WorldWideScience

Sample records for landslide hazard analysis

  1. Landslide hazards and systems analysis: A Central European perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Martin; Damm, Bodo; Kreuzer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Part of the problem with assessing landslide hazards is to understand the variable settings in which they occur. There is growing consensus that hazard assessments require integrated approaches that take account of the coupled human-environment system. Here we provide a synthesis of societal exposure and vulnerability to landslide hazards, review innovative approaches to hazard identification, and lay a focus on hazard assessment, while presenting the results of historical case studies and a landslide time series for Germany. The findings add to a growing body of literature that recognizes societal exposure and vulnerability as a complex system of hazard interactions that evolves over time as a function of social change and development. We therefore propose to expand hazard assessments by the framework and concepts of systems analysis (e.g., Liu et al., 2007) Results so far have been promising in ways that illustrate the importance of feedbacks, thresholds, surprises, and time lags in the evolution of landslide hazard and risk. In densely populated areas of Central Europe, landslides often occur in urbanized landscapes or on engineered slopes that had been transformed or created intentionally by human activity, sometimes even centuries ago. The example of Germany enables to correlate the causes and effects of recent landslides with the historical transition of urbanization to urban sprawl, ongoing demographic change, and some chronic problems of industrialized countries today, including ageing infrastructures or rising government debts. In large parts of rural Germany, the combination of ageing infrastructures, population loss, and increasing budget deficits starts to erode historical resilience gains, which brings especially small communities to a tipping point in their efforts to risk reduction. While struggling with budget deficits and demographic change, these communities are required to maintain ageing infrastructures that are particularly vulnerable to

  2. Analysis Landslide Hazard in Banjarmangu Sub District, Banjarnegara District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuswaji Dwi Priyono

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research is to find the most suitable soil conservation practice that may be applied to control landslide hazard. In order to achieve that objective, some research steps must be done, are: (1 to identify the land characteristics of the study area that is based on the understanding of some factors that caused and triggered the landslide hazard, i.e.: slope morphology, rocks/soils characteristics, climatic condition, and landuse; (2 to study the types of landslide that occurs in every landforms and determine the area having ideal landslide form; The proposed landslide in this research is the process of masswasting down-slope as a result of the gravitation action on materials being sliding. The landslide types is including creep, slide, slump, and rocks/soils fall. The methods that being applied in the research include field survey methods and the method for determining landslide hazard by using geographic information techniques. Field survey method was intended to characterize the location of every landslide that have been happened in the study area. The results of field survey were applied as materials for determinating the grade of landslide hazard. Scorring and weighting methods of factors that influence landslide was apllied to determine the grade of landslide hazard. Scor and weight were not same for every parameters used for evaluation. The result of field research shows that landslide happen in every landform unit The study area can be devided into 9 landform unit. The landform units are differentiated into the landslide hazard classes, the study area there were found 5 classes of landslide hazard, namely: (1 vary low hazard equal to 16,65% (1 landform unit; (2 low hazard equal to 7,63% (1 landform unit; (3 medium hazard equal to 37,58% (3 landform unit; (4 high hazard equal to 25,41% (2 landforms unit; and (5 highest hazard equal to 12,73% (2 landform unit. Evaluation of landslide hazard shows hat most of study area

  3. Landslide Hazard Zonation Mapping and Comparative Analysis of Hazard Zonation Maps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Sarkar; R. Anbalagan

    2008-01-01

    Landslide hazard zonation mapping at regional level of a large area provides a broad trend of landslide potential zones. A macro level landslide hazard zonation for a small area may provide a better insight into the landslide hazards. The main objective of the present work was to carry out macro landslide hazard zonation mapping on 1:50,000 scale in an area where regional level zonation mapping was conducted earlier. In the previous work the regional landslide hazard zonation maps of Srinagar-Rudraprayag area of Garhwal Himalaya in the state of Uttarakhand were prepared using subjective and objective approaches. In the present work the landslide hazard zonation mapping at macro level was carded out in a small area using a Landslide Hazard Evaluation Factor rating scheme. The hazard zonation map produced by using this technique classifies the area into relative hazard classes in which the high hazard zones well correspond with high frequency of landslides. The results of this map when compared with the regional zonation maps prepared earlier show that application of the present technique identified more details of the hazard zones, which are broadly shown in the earlier zonation maps.

  4. Landslide hazard zonation assessment using GIS analysis at Golmakan Watershed, northeast of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Reza MANSOURI DANESHVAR; Ali BAGHERZADEH

    2011-01-01

    Landslide hazard is one of the major environmental hazards in geomorphic studies in mountainous areas. For helping the planners in selection of suitable locations to implement development projects, a landslide hazard zonation map has been produced for the Golmakan Watershed as part of Binaloud northern hillsides (northeast of Iran). For this purpose, after preparation of a landslide inventory of the study area, some 15 major parameters were examined for integrated analysis of landslide hazard in the region. The analyses of parameters were done by geo-referencing and lateral model making, satellite imaging of the study area, and spatial analyses by using geographical information system (GIS). The produced factor maps were weighted with analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method and then classified. The study area was classified into four classes of relative landslide hazards:negligible, low, moderate, and high. The final produced map for landslide hazard zonation in Golmakan Watershed revealed that: 1 ) the parameters of land slope and geologic formation have strong correlation (R2 = 0.79 and 0.83,respectively) with the dependent variable landslide hazard (p < 0.05). 2) About 18.8% of the study area has low and negligible hazards to future landslides, while 81.2% of the land area of Golmakan Watershed falls into the high and moderate categories.

  5. Landslide and debris-flow hazard analysis and prediction using GIS in Minamata Hougawachi area, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunxiang; Esaki, Tetsuro; Xie, Mowen; Qiu, Cheng

    2006-10-01

    On July 20, 2003, following a short duration of heavy rainfall, a debris-flow disaster occurred in the Minamata Hougawachi area, Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan. This disaster was triggered by a landslide. In order to assess the landslide and debris-flow hazard potential of this mountainous region, the study of historic landslides is critical. The objective of the study is to couple 3D slope-stability analysis models and 2D numerical simulation of debris flow within a geographical information systems in order to identity the potential landslide-hazard area. Based on field observations, the failure mechanism of the past landslide is analyzed and the mechanical parameters for 3D slope-stability analysis are calculated from the historic landslide. Then, to locate potential new landslides, the studied area is divided into slope units. Based on 3D slope-stability analysis models and on Monte Carlo simulation, the spots of potential landslides are identified. Finally, we propose a depth-averaged 2D numerical model, in which the debris and water mixture is assumed to be a uniform continuous, incompressible, unsteady Newtonian fluid. The method accurately models the historic debris flow. According to the 2D numerical simulation, the results of the debris-flow model, including the potentially inundated areas, are analyzed, and potentially affected houses, river and road are mapped.

  6. Evaluation of the Potential of NASA Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis in Global Landslide Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yang; Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George J.

    2007-01-01

    Landslides are one of the most widespread natural hazards on Earth, responsible for thousands of deaths and billions of dollars in property damage every year. In the U.S. alone landslides occur in every state, causing an estimated $2 billion in damage and 25- 50 deaths each year. Annual average loss of life from landslide hazards in Japan is 170. The situation is much worse in developing countries and remote mountainous regions due to lack of financial resources and inadequate disaster management ability. Recently, a landslide buried an entire village on the Philippines Island of Leyte on Feb 17,2006, with at least 1800 reported deaths and only 3 houses left standing of the original 300. Intense storms with high-intensity , long-duration rainfall have great potential to trigger rapidly moving landslides, resulting in casualties and property damage across the world. In recent years, through the availability of remotely sensed datasets, it has become possible to conduct global-scale landslide hazard assessment. This paper evaluates the potential of the real-time NASA TRMM-based Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) system to advance our understanding of and predictive ability for rainfall-triggered landslides. Early results show that the landslide occurrences are closely associated with the spatial patterns and temporal distribution of rainfall characteristics. Particularly, the number of landslide occurrences and the relative importance of rainfall in triggering landslides rely on the influence of rainfall attributes [e.g. rainfall climatology, antecedent rainfall accumulation, and intensity-duration of rainstorms). TMPA precipitation data are available in both real-time and post-real-time versions, which are useful to assess the location and timing of rainfall-triggered landslide hazards by monitoring landslide-prone areas while receiving heavy rainfall. For the purpose of identifying rainfall-triggered landslides, an empirical global rainfall intensity

  7. Vulnerability analysis of Landslide hazard area: Case study of South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chaeyeon; Jun, Kyewon; Kim, Younghwan

    2017-04-01

    Recently such as Landslide and debris flow are occurring over the due to climate changes, frequent sedimentation disaster in mountains area. A scientific analysis of landslide risk areas along with the collection and analysis of a variety of spatial information would be critical for minimizing damage in the event of mountainous disasters such as landslide and debris flow. We carried out a case study of the selected areas at Inje, Gangwon province which suffered from serious landslides due to flash floods by Typhoon Ewiniar in 2006. Landslide and debris flow locations were identified in the study area from interpretation of airborne image and field surveys. We used GIS to construct a spatial information database integrating the data required for a comprehensive analysis of landslide risk areas including geography, hydrology, pedology, and forestry. Furthermore, this study evaluates slope stability of the affected areas using SINMAP(Stability Index Mapping), analyzes spatial data that have high correlation with selected landslide areas using Likelihood ratio. And by applying the Weight of evidence techniques weight values (W+ and W-) which were calculated for each element. We then analyzed the spatial data which were significantly correlated with the landslide occurrence and predicted the mountainous areas with elevated risks of landslide which are vulnerable to disasters, and the hazard map was generated using GIS. Acknowledgments This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning(No.NRF-2014R1A1A3050495).

  8. Debris flow and landslide hazard mapping and risk analysis in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xilin LIU; Chengjun YU; Peijun SHI; Weihua FANG

    2012-01-01

    This paper assesses the hazardousness,vulnerability and risk of debris flow and landslide in China and compiles maps with a scale of 1∶6000000,based on Geographical Information System (GIS) technology,hazard regionalization map,socioeconomic data from 2000.Integrated hazardousness of debris flow and landslide is equivalent to the sum of debris flow hazardousness and landslide hazardousness.Vulnerability is assessed by employing a simplified assessment model.Risk is calculated by the following formula:Risk =Hazardousness × Vulnerability.The analysis results of assessment of hazardousness,vulnerability and risk show that there are extremely high risk regions of 104 km2,high risk regions of 283008 km2,moderate risk regions of 3161815 km2,low risk regions of 3299604km2,and extremely low risk regions of 2681709 km2.Exploitation activities should be prohibited in extremely high risk and high risk regions and restricted in moderate risk regions.The present study on risk analysis of debris flow and landslide not only sheds new light on the future work in this direction but also provides a scientific basis for disaster prevention and mitigation policy making.

  9. Spatial hazard analysis and prediction on rainfall-induced landslide using GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The application of landslide hazard model cou-pled with GIS provides an effective means to spatial hazardanalysis and prediction on rainfall-induced landslides. Amodified SINMAP model is established based upon the sys-tematic investigation on previous GIS-based landslide analy-sis models. By integrating the landslide deterministic modelwith the hydrological distribution model based on DEM, thismodel deeply studied the effect of underground water dis-tribution due to rainfall on the slope stability and landslideoccurrence, including the effect of dynamic water pressureresulting from the down slope seepage process as well as thatof static water pressure. Its applicability has been testified onthe Xiaojiang watershed, the rainfall-induced landslideswidespread area in Southeast China. Detailed discussion wascarried out on the spatial distribution characteristics oflandslide hazard and its extending trend, as well as thequantitative relationship between landslide hazard with pre-cipitation, slope angle and specific catchment area in theXiaojiang watershed. And the precipitation threshold forlandslide occurrence was estimated. These analytical resultsare proved useful for geohazard control and engineeringdecision-making in the Xiaojiang watershed.

  10. Application of a Data Mining Model and It's Cross Application for Landslide Hazard Analysis: a Case Study in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Biswajeet; Lee, Saro; Shattri, Mansor

    This paper deals with landslide hazard analysis and cross-application using Geographic Information System (GIS) and remote sensing data for Cameron Highland, Penang Island and Selangor in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to cross-apply and verify a spatial probabilistic model for landslide hazard analysis. Landslide locations were identified in the study area from interpretation of aerial photographs and field surveys. Topographical/geological data and satellite images were collected and processed using GIS and image processing tools. There are ten landslide inducing parameters which are considered for the landslide hazard analysis. These parameters are topographic slope, aspect, curvature and distance from drainage, all derived from the topographic database; geology and distance from lineament, derived from the geologic database; landuse from Landsat satellite images; soil from the soil database; precipitation amount, derived from the rainfall database; and the vegetation index value from SPOT satellite images. These factors were analyzed using an artificial neural network model to generate the landslide hazard map. Each factor's weight was determined by the back-propagation training method. Then the landslide hazard indices were calculated using the trained back-propagation weights, and finally the landslide hazard map was generated using GIS tools. Landslide hazard maps were drawn for these three areas using artificial neural network model derived not only from the data for that area but also using the weight for each parameters, one of the statistical model, calculated from each of the other two areas (nine maps in all) as a cross-check of the validity of the method. For verification, the results of the analyses were compared, in each study area, with actual landslide locations. The verification results showed sufficient agreement between the presumptive hazard map and the existing data on landslide areas.

  11. Regional analysis assessment of landslide hazard and zoning map for transmission line route selection using GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharuddin, I. N. Z.; Omar, R. C.; Usman, F.; Mejan, M. A.; Abd Halim, M. K.; Zainol, M. A.; Zulkarnain, M. S.

    2013-06-01

    The stability of ground as foundation for infrastructure development is always associated with geology and geomorphology aspects. Failure to carefully analyze these aspects may induce ground instability such subsidence and landslide which eventually can cause catastrophe to the infrastructure i.e. instability of transmission tower. However, in some cases such as the study area this is unavoidable. A GIS system for analysis of route was favoured to perform optimal route predictions based selection by incorporating multiple influence factors into its analysis by incorporating the Landslide Hazard Map (LHM) that was produced on basis of slope map, aspect map, land use map and geological map with the help of ArcGIS using weighted overlay method. Based on LHM it is safe to conclude that the proposed route for Ulu Jelai- Neggiri-Lebir-LILO transmission line has very low risk in term of landslides.

  12. GIS-Based Spatial Analysis and Modeling for Landslide Hazard Assessment: A Case Study in Upper Minjiang River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Wenlan; ZHOU Qigang; ZHANG Baolei; ZHOU Wancun; LI Ainong; ZHANG Haizhen; XIAN Wei

    2006-01-01

    By analyzing the topographic features of past landslides since 1980s and the main land-cover types (including change information) in landslide-prone area, modeled spatial distribution of landslide hazard in upper Minjiang River Basin was studied based on spatial analysis of GIS in this paper. Results of GIS analysis showed that landslide occurrence in this region closely related to topographic feature. Most areas with high hazard probability were deep-sheared gorge. Most of them in investigation occurred assembly in areas with elevation lower than 3 000 m, due to fragile topographic conditions and intensive human disturbances. Land-cover type, including its change information, was likely an important environmental factor to trigger landslide. Destroy of vegetation driven by increase of population and its demands augmented the probability of landslide in steep slope.

  13. Risk analysis for roadways subjected to multiple landslide-related hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas, Jordi; Mavrouli, Olga

    2014-05-01

    Roadways through mountainous terrain often involve cuts and landslide areas whose stability is precarious and require protection and stabilization works. To optimize the allocation of resources, government and technical offices are increasingly interested in both the risk analysis and assessment. Risk analysis has to consider the hazard occurrence and the consequences. The consequences can be both direct and indirect. The former include the costs regarding the repair of the roadway, the damage of vehicles and the potential fatalities, while the latter refer to the costs related to the diversion of vehicles, the excess of distance travelled, the time differences, and tolls. The type of slope instabilities that may affect a roadway may vary and its effects as well. Most current approaches either consider a single hazardous phenomenon each time, or if applied at small (for example national) scale, they do not take into account local conditions at each section of the roadway. The objective of this work is the development of a simple and comprehensive methodology for the assessment of the risk due to multiple hazards along roadways, integrating different landslide types that include rockfalls, debris flows and considering as well the potential failure of retaining walls. To quantify risk, all hazards are expressed with a common term: their probability of occurrence. The methodology takes into consideration the specific local conditions along the roadway. For rockfalls and debris flow a variety of methods for assessing the probability of occurrence exists. To assess the annual probability of failure of retaining walls we use an indicator-based model that provides a hazard index. The model parameters consist in the design safety factor, and further anchorage design and construction parameters. The probability of failure is evaluated in function of the hazard index and next corrected (in terms of order of magnitude) according to in situ observations for increase of two

  14. Geomorphological analysis of sinkhole and landslide hazard in a karst area of the Venetian Prealps- Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiberi, Valentina

    2010-05-01

    In the pedemountain area of the Asiago Plateau (Venetian Prealps - NE Italy) sinkholes and landslides represent in many cases a complex response to karst processes. Field survey showed that both soil and bedrock are involved, mainly represented by colluvial-alluvial sediments and carbonate rocks. Preliminary observations also reveal the key role of piping and cave-collapse phenomena and the importance of human remedial measures. Within study area, these processes cause damage mainly to agricultural and pasture activities and expose peoples and farm animals to very high hazards. This work provides preliminary results of geomorphological analysis carried out to define sinkhole and landslide hazard and his connections with karst processes. During first phases of the research program, an inventory of interesting phenomena has been elaborated employing GIS technologies. The database has been constantly revised and enriched with new field measurements and thematic maps (i.e. geomorphological, geo-structural, hydrogeological, caves development maps). Specifically, field survey focused on the morphodynamic definition of instability elements allowing to recognize a wide range of morphotypes (mainly with regard to sinkholes) and polygenic morphologies (i.e. mixed sinkholes-landslides configurations). Geomorphological analysis also revealed specific evolutionary trends of instability processes; they could be useful employed to program more effective mitigation strategies.

  15. AschFlow - A dynamic landslide run-out model for medium scale hazard analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Byron Quan; Blahut, Jan; van Asch, Theo; van Westen, Cees; Kappes, Melanie

    2015-04-01

    Landslides and debris flow hazard assessments require a scale-dependent analysis in order to mitigate damage and other negative consequences at the respective scales of occurrence. Medium or large scale landslide run-out modelling for many possible landslide initiation areas has been a cumbersome task in the past. This arises from the difficulty to precisely define the location and volume of the released mass and from the inability of the run-out models to compute the displacement with a large amount of individual initiation areas (computational exhaustive). Most of the existing physically based run-out models have complications in handling such situations and therefore empirical methods have been used as a practical mean to predict landslides mobility at a medium scale (1:10,000 to 1:50,000). In this context, a simple medium scale numerical model for rapid mass movements in urban and mountainous areas was developed. The deterministic nature of the approach makes it possible to calculate the velocity, height and increase in mass by erosion, resulting in the estimation of various forms of impacts exerted by debris flows at the medium scale The established and implemented model ("AschFlow") is a 2-D one-phase continuum model that simulates, the entrainment, spreading and deposition process of a landslide or debris flow at a medium scale. The flow is thus treated as a single phase material, whose behavior is controlled by rheology (e.g. Voellmy or Bingham). The developed regional model "AschFlow" was applied and evaluated in well documented areas with known past debris flow events.

  16. Ground landslide hazard potency using geoelectrical resistivity analysis and VS30, case study at geophysical station, Lembang, Bandung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohadi, Supriyanto; Sakya, Andi Eka; Masturyono, Murjaya, Jaya; Sunardi, Bambang; Rasmid, Ngadmanto, Drajat; Susilanto, Pupung; Nugraha, Jimmi; Pakpahan, Suliyanti

    2017-07-01

    We have conducted geoelectric resistivity and shear wave velocity (Vs30) study to identify the landslide potential hazard, around Geophysics Station Lembang, Bandung (107,617° E and 6,825° S). The the geoelectric analysis using Dipole-Dipole resitivity configuration, while shear wave velocity analysis performed using the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Wave (MASW). The study results indicate that the assumed soil or clay depth from the electrical resistivity observation was in accordance with the confirmed soil or clay depth by the MASW investigation. Based on these conditions, indicate the high potential of landsliding in this area, landslide potential supported by high slope angle in this area.

  17. A new concept in seismic landslide hazard analysis for practical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chyi-Tyi

    2017-04-01

    A seismic landslide hazard model could be constructed using deterministic approach (Jibson et al., 2000) or statistical approach (Lee, 2014). Both approaches got landslide spatial probability under a certain return-period earthquake. In the statistical approach, our recent study found that there are common patterns among different landslide susceptibility models of the same region. The common susceptibility could reflect relative stability of slopes at a region; higher susceptibility indicates lower stability. Using the common susceptibility together with an earthquake event landslide inventory and a map of topographically corrected Arias intensity, we can build the relationship among probability of failure, Arias intensity and the susceptibility. This relationship can immediately be used to construct a seismic landslide hazard map for the region that the empirical relationship built. If the common susceptibility model is further normalized and the empirical relationship built with normalized susceptibility, then the empirical relationship may be practically applied to different region with similar tectonic environments and climate conditions. This could be feasible, when a region has no existing earthquake-induce landslide data to train the susceptibility model and to build the relationship. It is worth mentioning that a rain-induced landslide susceptibility model has common pattern similar to earthquake-induced landslide susceptibility in the same region, and is usable to build the relationship with an earthquake event landslide inventory and a map of Arias intensity. These will be introduced with examples in the meeting.

  18. Hazard analysis in active landslide areas in the State of Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Martina; Morales Barrera, Wendy V.; Rodriguez Elizarrarás, Sergio R.; Solleiro Rebolledo, Elizabeth; Sedov, Sergey; Terhorst, Birgit

    2016-04-01

    mass movements are analyzed in order to reconstruct complex interrelations of the causes and effects of landslide events. One of the major objectives of this research is to evaluate the potential hazard of active landslide areas. Detailed field analyzes were performed to investigate the situations and dynamics of the slope movements. Therefore, geomorphological mapping, sediment characterization as well as geophysical methods are applied. On the one hand, a detailed sediment characterization aims to identify the type of material (e.g. geotechnical attributes), on the other sediments can provide information on different activity phases, respectively movement processes in slide masses. Furthermore, the focus is placed on the determination of landslide relevant parameters and thresholds. Digital elevation models, which were generated before the onset of slope movements, are integrated in the geomorphological analysis. The poster presents the specific study sites in Veracruz and the situation of endangered slopes before and after the landslide events. It is planned to use this knowledge to model susceptibility maps for the region in the future. Moreover, field data will be used as basic information for further monitoring plans. Resulting susceptibility maps will be provided to the responsible authorities in order to support sustainable planning of settlements and infrastructure in hazardous regions.

  19. Regional landslide hazard assessment based on Distance Evaluation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiacun LI; Yan QIN; Jing LI

    2008-01-01

    There are many factors influencing landslide occurrence. The key for landslide control is to confirm the regional landslide hazard factors. The Cameron Highlands of Malaysia was selected as the study area. By bivariate statistical analysis method with GIS software the authors analyzed the relationships among landslides and environmental factors such as lithology, geomorphy, elevation, road and land use. Distance Evaluation Model was developed with Landslide Density(LD). And the assessment of landslide hazard of Cameron Highlands was performed. The result shows that the model has higher prediction precision.

  20. Shallow landslide hazard map of Seattle, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, Edwin L.; Michael, John A.; Laprade, William T.

    2008-01-01

    Landslides, particularly debris flows, have long been a significant cause of damage and destruction to people and property in the Puget Sound region. Following the years of 1996 and 1997, the Federal Emergency Management Agency designated Seattle as a “Project Impact” city with the goal of encouraging the city to become more disaster resistant to landslides and other natural hazards. A major recommendation of the Project Impact council was that the city and the U.S. Geological Survey collaborate to produce a landslide hazard map. An exceptional data set archived by the city containing more than 100 yr of landslide data from severe storm events allowed comparison of actual landslide locations with those predicted by slope-stability modeling. We used an infinite-slope analysis, which models slope segments as rigid friction blocks, to estimate the susceptibility of slopes to debris flows, which are water-laden slurries that can form from shallow failures of soil and weathered bedrock and can travel at high velocities down steep slopes. Data used for the analysis consisted of a digital slope map derived from recent light detection and ranging (LiDAR) imagery of Seattle, recent digital geologic mapping of the city, and shear-strength test data for the geologic units found in the surrounding area. The combination of these data layers within a geographic information system (GIS) platform allowed us to create a shallow landslide hazard map for Seattle.

  1. Shallow landslide hazard map of Seattle, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, Edwin L.; Michael, John A.; Laprade, William T.

    2008-01-01

    Landslides, particularly debris flows, have long been a significant cause of damage and destruction to people and property in the Puget Sound region. Following the years of 1996 and 1997, the Federal Emergency Management Agency designated Seattle as a “Project Impact” city with the goal of encouraging the city to become more disaster resistant to landslides and other natural hazards. A major recommendation of the Project Impact council was that the city and the U.S. Geological Survey collaborate to produce a landslide hazard map. An exceptional data set archived by the city containing more than 100 yr of landslide data from severe storm events allowed comparison of actual landslide locations with those predicted by slope-stability modeling. We used an infinite-slope analysis, which models slope segments as rigid friction blocks, to estimate the susceptibility of slopes to debris flows, which are water-laden slurries that can form from shallow failures of soil and weathered bedrock and can travel at high velocities down steep slopes. Data used for the analysis consisted of a digital slope map derived from recent light detection and ranging (LiDAR) imagery of Seattle, recent digital geologic mapping of the city, and shear-strength test data for the geologic units found in the surrounding area. The combination of these data layers within a geographic information system (GIS) platform allowed us to create a shallow landslide hazard map for Seattle.

  2. Geomechanics of Hazardous Landslides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    POISEL Rainer; BEDNARIK Martin; HOLZER Rudolf; LI(S)(C)(A)K Pavel

    2005-01-01

    A catalogue of possible landslide initial failure mechanisms, taking into account the geological setting and the geometry of the slope, the joint structure, the habitus of the rock blocks, as well as the mechanical behaviour of the rocks and of the rock mass (deformation and strength parameters), is presented. Its aim is to give geologists as well as engineers the opportunity to compare phenomena in the field and phenomena belonging to particular mechanisms and to find the mechanism occurring.The presented catalogue of initial landslide mechanisms only comprises the mechanisms having a clearly defined mechanical model that can be divided into empirical relations and into mechanical models,as well as an overview of run out models, which can be divided into empirical relations and into mechanical models.

  3. Assessing Landslide Hazard Using Artificial Neural Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrokhzad, Farzad; Choobbasti, Asskar Janalizadeh; Barari, Amin

    2011-01-01

    neural network has been developed for use in the stability evaluation of slopes under various geological conditions and engineering requirements. The Artificial neural network model of this research uses slope characteristics as input and leads to the output in form of the probability of failure...... and factor of safety. It can be stated that the trained neural networks are capable of predicting the stability of slopes and safety factor of landslide hazard in study area with an acceptable level of confidence. Landslide hazard analysis and mapping can provide useful information for catastrophic loss...

  4. Assessing Landslide Hazard Using Artificial Neural Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrokhzad, Farzad; Choobbasti, Asskar Janalizadeh; Barari, Amin

    2011-01-01

    neural network has been developed for use in the stability evaluation of slopes under various geological conditions and engineering requirements. The Artificial neural network model of this research uses slope characteristics as input and leads to the output in form of the probability of failure...... and factor of safety. It can be stated that the trained neural networks are capable of predicting the stability of slopes and safety factor of landslide hazard in study area with an acceptable level of confidence. Landslide hazard analysis and mapping can provide useful information for catastrophic loss...... failure" which is main concentration of the current research and "liquefaction failure". Shear failures along shear planes occur when the shear stress along the sliding surfaces exceed the effective shear strength. These slides have been referred to as landslide. An expert system based on artificial...

  5. Landslide hazard assessment in the Collazzone area, Umbria, Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Guzzetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the application of a recently proposed model to determine landslide hazard. The model predicts where landslides will occur, how frequently they will occur, and how large they will be in a given area. For the Collazzone area, in the central Italian Apennines, we prepared a multi-temporal inventory map through the interpretation of multiple sets of aerial photographs taken between 1941 and 1997 and field surveys conducted in the period between 1998 and 2004. We then partitioned the 79 square kilometres study area into 894 slope units, and obtained the probability of spatial occurrence of landslides by discriminant analysis of thematic variables, including morphology, lithology, structure and land use. For each slope unit, we computed the expected landslide recurrence by dividing the total number of landslide events inventoried in the terrain unit by the time span of the investigated period. Assuming landslide recurrence was constant, and adopting a Poisson probability model, we determined the exceedance probability of having one or more landslides in each slope unit, for different periods. We obtained the probability of landslide size, a proxy for landslide magnitude, by analysing the frequency-area statistics of landslides, obtained from the multi-temporal inventory map. Lastly, assuming independence, we determined landslide hazard for each slope unit as the joint probability of landslide size, of landslide temporal occurrence, and of landslide spatial occurrence.

  6. Landslide hazard assessment: recent trends and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardeshi, Sudhakar D; Autade, Sumant E; Pardeshi, Suchitra S

    2013-01-01

    Landslide hazard assessment is an important step towards landslide hazard and risk management. There are several methods of Landslide Hazard Zonation (LHZ) viz. heuristic, semi quantitative, quantitative, probabilistic and multi-criteria decision making process. However, no one method is accepted universally for effective assessment of landslide hazards. In recent years, several attempts have been made to apply different methods of LHZ and to compare results in order to find the best suited model. This paper presents the review of researches on landslide hazard mapping published in recent years. The advanced multivariate techniques are proved to be effective in spatial prediction of landslides with high degree of accuracy. Physical process based models also perform well in LHZ mapping even in the areas with poor database. Multi-criteria decision making approach also play significant role in determining relative importance of landslide causative factors in slope instability process. Remote Sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) are powerful tools to assess landslide hazards and are being used extensively in landslide researches since last decade. Aerial photographs and high resolution satellite data are useful in detection, mapping and monitoring landslide processes. GIS based LHZ models helps not only to map and monitor landslides but also to predict future slope failures. The advancements in Geo-spatial technologies have opened the doors for detailed and accurate assessment of landslide hazards.

  7. Maps showing seismic landslide hazards in Anchorage, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibson, Randall W.

    2014-01-01

    The devastating landslides that accompanied the great 1964 Alaska earthquake showed that seismically triggered landslides are one of the greatest geologic hazards in Anchorage. Maps quantifying seismic landslide hazards are therefore important for planning, zoning, and emergency-response preparation. The accompanying maps portray seismic landslide hazards for the following conditions: (1) deep, translational landslides, which occur only during great subduction-zone earthquakes that have return periods of =300-900 yr; (2) shallow landslides for a peak ground acceleration (PGA) of 0.69 g, which has a return period of 2,475 yr, or a 2 percent probability of exceedance in 50 yr; and (3) shallow landslides for a PGA of 0.43 g, which has a return period of 475 yr, or a 10 percent probability of exceedance in 50 yr. Deep, translational landslide hazards were delineated based on previous studies of such landslides, with some modifications based on field observations of locations of deep landslides. Shallow-landslide hazards were delineated using a Newmark-type displacement analysis for the two probabilistic ground motions modeled.

  8. Probabilistic landslide hazards and risk mapping on Penang Island, Malaysia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saro Lee; Biswajeet Pradhan

    2006-12-01

    This paper deals with landslide hazards and risk analysis of Penang Island, Malaysia using Geographic Information System (GIS) and remote sensing data. Landslide locations in the study area were identified from interpretations of aerial photographs and field surveys. Topographical/ geological data and satellite images were collected and processed using GIS and image processing tools. There are ten landslide inducing parameters which are considered for landslide hazard analysis. These parameters are topographic slope, aspect, curvature and distance from drainage, all derived from the topographic database; geology and distance from lineament, derived from the geologic database; landuse from Landsat satellite images; soil from the soil database; precipitation amount, derived from the rainfall database; and the vegetation index value from SPOT satellite images. Landslide susceptibility was analyzed using landslide-occurrence factors employing the probability–frequency ratio model. The results of the analysis were verified using the landslide location data and compared with the probabilistic model. The accuracy observed was 80.03%. The qualitative landslide hazard analysis was carried out using the frequency ratio model through the map overlay analysis in GIS environment. The accuracy of hazard map was 86.41%. Further, risk analysis was done by studying the landslide hazard map and damageable objects at risk. This information could be used to estimate the risk to population, property and existing infrastructure like transportation network.

  9. Landslide Hazards and Risks in Tanon, Sragen, Central Java Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwarno Suwarno

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research are 1 to study and classify the landslide hazard of the study area, and 2 to evaluate the landslide risk of the research area. Field survey and laboratory analysis were used in this research. Terrain characteristic and social economic data were collected by purposive sampling. The structure of terrain unit based on landform unit map, slope map, soil map, and landuse map. Terrain parameters were divided into five classes; that were no hazard, low hazard, medium hazard, high hazard, and highest hazard classes. The risk classes were divided into four classes, that were no risk, low risk, midium risk, and high risk. Based on the landform units, soil type and the land used, the study area can be divided into 27 terrain units. The terrain units are differentiated into the landslide hazard classes and their landslide risk. In the study area there were found 5 classes of landslide hazard, namely 1 no hazard (2 terrain units; 2 low hazard (4 terrain units; 3 medium hazard (8 terrain units; 4 high hazard (11 terrain units; and 5 highest hazard (2 terrain units. Most of the high hazard class are located on hilly terrain units. Distribution of landslide risk in the study area are as follow: 4 terrain units have no risk; 17 terrain units have low risk; 4 terrain units in medium risk; and 2 terrain units have high risk. High risk are mostly located on hilly area with closely populated area.

  10. Landslide hazard and risk assessment for Ambon city using landslide inventory and geographic information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souisa, Matheus; Hendrajaya, Lilik; Handayani, Gunawan

    2016-08-01

    Ambon Island is a volcanic islands arc and included in the territory of the archipelago of small islands are associated with subduction zones that have a degree of high vulnerability to natural disasters, such as erosion and landslides on the slopes of certain conditions. Landslides that occur various in the city of Ambon, usually occurs during the rainy season so that the impacts that occur not only occurs on site but also off site with amount of large sedimentation. This paper presents the application of digital image analysis techniques and tools Geographic Information Systems to describe the degree of landslide hazard and risk areas in locations Ambon City, Moluccas. The cause of the landslide is analyzed through various thematic layers attribute data for the study area. Landslide hazard zonation assessment is done by using historical data, while the landslide risk analysis is done by using the results of landslide hazard assessment and socioeconomic factors by using geospatial models. The risk assessment of landslides can be used to estimate the risk to the population, property and infrastructure. The study results in the form of a map of landslide hazard and the risk of landslides that act to support urban spatial planning based on disaster mitigation.

  11. Landslides Hazard Assessment Using Different Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coman Cristina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Romania represents one of Europe’s countries with high landslides occurrence frequency. Landslide hazard maps are designed by considering the interaction of several factors which, by their joint action may affect the equilibrium state of the natural slopes. The aim of this paper is landslides hazard assessment using the methodology provided by the Romanian national legislation and a very largely used statistical method. The final results of these two analyses are quantitative or semi-quantitative landslides hazard maps, created in geographic information system environment. The data base used for this purpose includes: geological and hydrogeological data, digital terrain model, hydrological data, land use, seismic action, anthropic action and an inventory of active landslides. The GIS landslides hazard models were built for the geographical area of the Iasi city, located in the north-east side of Romania.

  12. Hazard, Vulnerability and Capacity Mapping for Landslides Risk Analysis using Geographic Information System (GIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, D. A. P.; Innaqa, S.; Safrilah

    2017-06-01

    This research analyzed the levels of disaster risk in the Citeureup sub-District, Bogor Regency, West Java, based on its potential hazard, vulnerability and capacity, using map to represent the results, then Miles and Huberman analytical techniques was used to analyze the qualitative interviews. The analysis conducted in this study is based on the concept of disaster risk by Wisner. The result shows that the Citeureup sub-District has medium-low risk of landslides. Of the 14 villages, three villages have a moderate risk level, namely Hambalang, Tajur, and Tangkil, or 49.58% of the total land area. Eleven villages have a low level of risk, namely Pasir Mukti, Sanja, Tarikolot, Gunung Sari, Puspasari, East Karang Asem, Citeureup, Leuwinutug, Sukahati, West Karang Asem West and Puspanegara, or 48.68% of the total land area, for high-risk areas only around 1.74%, which is part of Hambalang village. The analysis using Geographic Information System (GIS) prove that areas with a high risk potential does not necessarily have a high level of risk. The capacity of the community plays an important role to minimize the risk of a region. Disaster risk reduction strategy is done by creating a safe condition, which intensified the movement of disaster risk reduction.

  13. Submarine landslides: processes, triggers and hazard prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, D G; Harbitz, C B; Wynn, R B; Pedersen, G; Løvholt, F

    2006-08-15

    Huge landslides, mobilizing hundreds to thousands of km(3) of sediment and rock are ubiquitous in submarine settings ranging from the steepest volcanic island slopes to the gentlest muddy slopes of submarine deltas. Here, we summarize current knowledge of such landslides and the problems of assessing their hazard potential. The major hazards related to submarine landslides include destruction of seabed infrastructure, collapse of coastal areas into the sea and landslide-generated tsunamis. Most submarine slopes are inherently stable. Elevated pore pressures (leading to decreased frictional resistance to sliding) and specific weak layers within stratified sequences appear to be the key factors influencing landslide occurrence. Elevated pore pressures can result from normal depositional processes or from transient processes such as earthquake shaking; historical evidence suggests that the majority of large submarine landslides are triggered by earthquakes. Because of their tsunamigenic potential, ocean-island flank collapses and rockslides in fjords have been identified as the most dangerous of all landslide related hazards. Published models of ocean-island landslides mainly examine 'worst-case scenarios' that have a low probability of occurrence. Areas prone to submarine landsliding are relatively easy to identify, but we are still some way from being able to forecast individual events with precision. Monitoring of critical areas where landslides might be imminent and modelling landslide consequences so that appropriate mitigation strategies can be developed would appear to be areas where advances on current practice are possible.

  14. Two models for evaluating landslide hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J.C.; Chung, C.-J.; Ohlmacher, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Two alternative procedures for estimating landslide hazards were evaluated using data on topographic digital elevation models (DEMs) and bedrock lithologies in an area adjacent to the Missouri River in Atchison County, Kansas, USA. The two procedures are based on the likelihood ratio model but utilize different assumptions. The empirical likelihood ratio model is based on non-parametric empirical univariate frequency distribution functions under an assumption of conditional independence while the multivariate logistic discriminant model assumes that likelihood ratios can be expressed in terms of logistic functions. The relative hazards of occurrence of landslides were estimated by an empirical likelihood ratio model and by multivariate logistic discriminant analysis. Predictor variables consisted of grids containing topographic elevations, slope angles, and slope aspects calculated from a 30-m DEM. An integer grid of coded bedrock lithologies taken from digitized geologic maps was also used as a predictor variable. Both statistical models yield relative estimates in the form of the proportion of total map area predicted to already contain or to be the site of future landslides. The stabilities of estimates were checked by cross-validation of results from random subsamples, using each of the two procedures. Cell-by-cell comparisons of hazard maps made by the two models show that the two sets of estimates are virtually identical. This suggests that the empirical likelihood ratio and the logistic discriminant analysis models are robust with respect to the conditional independent assumption and the logistic function assumption, respectively, and that either model can be used successfully to evaluate landslide hazards. ?? 2006.

  15. [Relations of landslide and debris flow hazards to environmental factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-ping; Xu, Jing; Bi, Bao-gui

    2009-03-01

    To clarify the relations of landslide and debris flow hazards to environmental factors is of significance to the prediction and evaluation of landslide and debris flow hazards. Base on the latitudinal and longitudinal information of 18431 landslide and debris flow hazards in China, and the 1 km x 1 km grid data of elevation, elevation difference, slope, slope aspect, vegetation type, and vegetation coverage, this paper analyzed the relations of landslide and debris flow hazards in this country to above-mentioned environmental factors by the analysis method of frequency ratio. The results showed that the landslide and debris flow hazards in China more occurred in lower elevation areas of the first and second transitional zones. When the elevation difference within a 1 km x 1 km grid cell was about 300 m and the slope was around 30 degree, there was the greatest possibility of the occurrence of landslide and debris hazards. Mountain forest land and slope cropland were the two land types the hazards most easily occurred. The occurrence frequency of the hazards was the highest when the vegetation coverage was about 80%-90%.

  16. Analysis on Two Typical Landslide Hazard Phenomena in The Wenchuan Earthquake by Field Investigations and Shaking Table Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changwei Yang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on our field investigations of landslide hazards in the Wenchuan earthquake, some findings can be reported: (1 the multi-aspect terrain facing empty isolated mountains and thin ridges reacted intensely to the earthquake and was seriously damaged; (2 the slope angles of most landslides was larger than 45°. Considering the above disaster phenomena, the reasons are analyzed based on shaking table tests of one-sided, two-sided and four-sided slopes. The analysis results show that: (1 the amplifications of the peak accelerations of four-sided slopes is stronger than that of the two-sided slopes, while that of the one-sided slope is the weakest, which can indirectly explain the phenomena that the damage is most serious; (2 the amplifications of the peak accelerations gradually increase as the slope angles increase, and there are two inflection points which are the point where the slope angle is 45° and where the slope angle is 50°, respectively, which can explain the seismic phenomenon whereby landslide hazards mainly occur on the slopes whose slope angle is bigger than 45°. The amplification along the slope strike direction is basically consistent, and the step is smooth.

  17. Analysis on Two Typical Landslide Hazard Phenomena in The Wenchuan Earthquake by Field Investigations and Shaking Table Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changwei; Zhang, Jianjing; Liu, Feicheng; Bi, Junwei; Jun, Zhang

    2015-08-06

    Based on our field investigations of landslide hazards in the Wenchuan earthquake, some findings can be reported: (1) the multi-aspect terrain facing empty isolated mountains and thin ridges reacted intensely to the earthquake and was seriously damaged; (2) the slope angles of most landslides was larger than 45°. Considering the above disaster phenomena, the reasons are analyzed based on shaking table tests of one-sided, two-sided and four-sided slopes. The analysis results show that: (1) the amplifications of the peak accelerations of four-sided slopes is stronger than that of the two-sided slopes, while that of the one-sided slope is the weakest, which can indirectly explain the phenomena that the damage is most serious; (2) the amplifications of the peak accelerations gradually increase as the slope angles increase, and there are two inflection points which are the point where the slope angle is 45° and where the slope angle is 50°, respectively, which can explain the seismic phenomenon whereby landslide hazards mainly occur on the slopes whose slope angle is bigger than 45°. The amplification along the slope strike direction is basically consistent, and the step is smooth.

  18. Probabilistic, Seismically-Induced Landslide Hazard Mapping of Western Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, M. J.; Sharifi Mood, M.; Gillins, D. T.; Mahalingam, R.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake-induced landslides can generate significant damage within urban communities by damaging structures, obstructing lifeline connection routes and utilities, generating various environmental impacts, and possibly resulting in loss of life. Reliable hazard and risk maps are important to assist agencies in efficiently allocating and managing limited resources to prepare for such events. This research presents a new methodology in order to communicate site-specific landslide hazard assessments in a large-scale, regional map. Implementation of the proposed methodology results in seismic-induced landslide hazard maps that depict the probabilities of exceeding landslide displacement thresholds (e.g. 0.1, 0.3, 1.0 and 10 meters). These maps integrate a variety of data sources including: recent landslide inventories, LIDAR and photogrammetric topographic data, geology map, mapped NEHRP site classifications based on available shear wave velocity data in each geologic unit, and USGS probabilistic seismic hazard curves. Soil strength estimates were obtained by evaluating slopes present along landslide scarps and deposits for major geologic units. Code was then developed to integrate these layers to perform a rigid, sliding block analysis to determine the amount and associated probabilities of displacement based on each bin of peak ground acceleration in the seismic hazard curve at each pixel. The methodology was applied to western Oregon, which contains weak, weathered, and often wet soils at steep slopes. Such conditions have a high landslide hazard even without seismic events. A series of landslide hazard maps highlighting the probabilities of exceeding the aforementioned thresholds were generated for the study area. These output maps were then utilized in a performance based design framework enabling them to be analyzed in conjunction with other hazards for fully probabilistic-based hazard evaluation and risk assessment. a) School of Civil and Construction

  19. Flow-type failures in fine-grained soils: an important aspect in landslide hazard analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. W. J. van Asch

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting the possibility of flow-type failures within a slow-moving landslide mass is rarely taken into account in quantitative hazard assessments. Therefore, this paper focuses on the potential transition of sliding blocks (slumps into flow-like processes due to the generation of excess pore water pressure in undrained conditions. The generation of excess pore water pressure may be the consequence of deformation of the landslide body during motion. Two model concepts are proposed and discussed. The first concept is the so called strain concept model where emphasis is laid on strain changes due to differential movement within the moving mass. This may create zones of compression and dilation and consequently excess pore water pressures. The second concept is the so called topographical concept model which focuses on changes in the stress field of the landslide caused by geometric changes in topography of the moving body. Both models were tested on two slumps which developed in secondary scarps of the Super-Sauze mudslide in the Barcelonnette Basin (South French Alps. The slump which developed in 1999 showed complete fluidization; all the material was removed from the source area and transformed into a mudflow. The second slump, dated from 2006, did not show fluidization; it has a relative short displacement and all the material remained in the source area. It appeared that the strain concept model predicted flow-type failure for both slumps, after relative short displacements, while the topographical concept model predicted only flow-type failure for the 1999 slump and not for the 2006 slump. The strain concept model seems too conservative in forecasting the fluidization potential of slumping blocks.

  20. Geospatial Approach on Landslide Hazard Zonation Mapping Using Multicriteria Decision Analysis: A Study on Coonoor and Ooty, Part of Kallar Watershed, The Nilgiris, Tamil Nadu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahamana, S. Abdul; Aruchamy, S.; Jegankumar, R.

    2014-12-01

    Landslides are one of the critical natural phenomena that frequently lead to serious problems in hilly area, resulting to loss of human life and property, as well as causing severe damage to natural resources. The local geology with high degree of slope coupled with high intensity of rainfall along with unplanned human activities of the study area causes many landslides in this region. The present study area is more attracted by tourist throughout the year, so this area must be considered for preventive measures. Geospatial based Multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) technique is increasingly used for landslide vulnerability and hazard zonation mapping. It enables the integration of different data layers with different levels of uncertainty. In this present study, it is used analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method to prepare landslide hazard zones of the Coonoor and Ooty, part of Kallar watershed, The Nilgiris, Tamil Nadu. The study was carried out using remote sensing data, field surveys and geographic information system (GIS) tools. The ten factors that influence landslide occurrence, such as elevation, slope aspect, slope angle, drainage density, lineament density, soil, precipitation, land use/land cover (LULC), distance from road and NDVI were considered. These factors layers were extracted from the various related spatial data's. These factors were evaluated, and then, the individual factor weight and class weight were assigned to each of the related factors. The Landslide Hazard Zone Index (LHZI) was calculated using Multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) the technique based on the assigned weight and the rating is given by the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) method. The final cumulative map of the study area was categorized into four hazard zones and classified as zone I to IV. There are 3.56% of the area comes under the hazard zone IV fallowed by 48.19% of the area comes under zone III, 43.63 % of the area in zone II and 4.61% of the area comes hazard

  1. Multi-Hazard Analysis for the Estimation of Ground Motion Induced by Landslides and Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Rubén; Koudogbo, Fifame; Ardizzone, Francesca; Mondini, Alessandro; Bignami, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensors allow obtaining all-day all-weather terrain complex reflectivity images which can be processed by means of Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) for the monitoring of displacement episodes with extremely high accuracy. In the work presented, different PSI strategies to measure ground surface displacements for multi-scale multi-hazard mapping are proposed in the context of landslides and tectonic applications. This work is developed in the framework of ESA General Studies Programme (GSP). The present project, called Multi Scale and Multi Hazard Mapping Space based Solutions (MEMpHIS), investigates new Earth Observation (EO) methods and new Information and Communications Technology (ICT) solutions to improve the understanding and management of disasters, with special focus on Disaster Risk Reduction rather than Rapid Mapping. In this paper, the results of the investigation on the key processing steps for measuring large-scale ground surface displacements (like the ones originated by plate tectonics or active faults) as well as local displacements at high resolution (like the ones related with active slopes) will be presented. The core of the proposed approaches is based on the Stable Point Network (SPN) algorithm, which is the advanced PSI processing chain developed by ALTAMIRA INFORMATION. Regarding tectonic applications, the accurate displacement estimation over large-scale areas characterized by low magnitude motion gradients (3-5 mm/year), such as the ones induced by inter-seismic or Earth tidal effects, still remains an open issue. In this context, a low-resolution approach based in the integration of differential phase increments of velocity and topographic error (obtained through the fitting of a linear model adjustment function to data) will be evaluated. Data from the default mode of Sentinel-1, the Interferometric Wide Swath Mode, will be considered for this application. Regarding landslides

  2. Directions of the US Geological Survey Landslide Hazards Reduction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) Landslide Hazards Reduction Program includes studies of landslide process and prediction, landslide susceptibility and risk mapping, landslide recurrence and slope evolution, and research application and technology transfer. Studies of landslide processes have been recently conducted in Virginia, Utah, California, Alaska, and Hawaii, Landslide susceptibility maps provide a very important tool for landslide hazard reduction. The effects of engineering-geologic characteristics of rocks, seismic activity, short and long-term climatic change on landslide recurrence are under study. Detailed measurement of movement and deformation has begun on some active landslides. -from Author

  3. Shallow-landslide hazard map of Seattle, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, Edwin L.; Michael, John A.; Laprade, William T.

    2006-01-01

    Landslides, particularly debris flows, have long been a significant cause of damage and destruction to people and property in the Puget Sound region. Following the years of 1996 and 1997, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) designated Seattle as a 'Project Impact' city with the goal of encouraging the city to become more disaster resistant to the effects of landslides and other natural hazards. A major recommendation of the Project Impact council was that the city and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collaborate to produce a landslide hazard map of the city. An exceptional data set archived by the city, containing more than 100 years of landslide data from severe storm events, allowed comparison of actual landslide locations with those predicted by slope-stability modeling. We used an infinite-slope analysis, which models slope segments as rigid friction blocks, to estimate the susceptibility of slopes to shallow landslides which often mobilize into debris flows, water-laden slurries that can form from shallow failures of soil and weathered bedrock, and can travel at high velocities down steep slopes. Data used for analysis consisted of a digital slope map derived from recent Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) imagery of Seattle, recent digital geologic mapping, and shear-strength test data for the geologic units in the surrounding area. The combination of these data layers within a Geographic Information System (GIS) platform allowed the preparation of a shallow landslide hazard map for the entire city of Seattle.

  4. Assessment of earthquake-induced landslides hazard in El Salvador after the 2001 earthquakes using macroseismic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Eliana; Violante, Crescenzo; Giunta, Giuseppe; Ángel Hernández, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Two strong earthquakes and a number of smaller aftershocks struck El Salvador in the year 2001. The January 13 2001 earthquake, Mw 7.7, occurred along the Cocos plate, 40 km off El Salvador southern coast. It resulted in about 1300 deaths and widespread damage, mainly due to massive landsliding. Two of the largest earthquake-induced landslides, Las Barioleras and Las Colinas (about 2x105 m3) produced major damage to buildings and infrastructures and 500 fatalities. A neighborhood in Santa Tecla, west of San Salvador, was destroyed. The February 13 2001 earthquake, Mw 6.5, occurred 40 km east-southeast of San Salvador. This earthquake caused over 300 fatalities and triggered several landslides over an area of 2,500 km2 mostly in poorly consolidated volcaniclastic deposits. The La Leona landslide (5-7x105 m3) caused 12 fatalities and extensive damage to the Panamerican Highway. Two very large landslides of 1.5 km3 and 12 km3 produced hazardous barrier lakes at Rio El Desague and Rio Jiboa, respectively. More than 16.000 landslides occurred throughout the country after both quakes; most of them occurred in pyroclastic deposits, with a volume less than 1x103m3. The present work aims to define the relationship between the above described earthquake intensity, size and areal distribution of induced landslides, as well as to refine the earthquake intensity in sparsely populated zones by using landslide effects. Landslides triggered by the 2001 seismic sequences provided useful indication for a realistic seismic hazard assessment, providing a basis for understanding, evaluating, and mapping the hazard and risk associated with earthquake-induced landslides.

  5. Overview Landslide Hazard Assessment of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Kunlong; Zhang Guirong; Zhu Liangfeng

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, China has suffered serious geological disasters, most of slope movements due to complex geology, geomorphology, unusual weather conditions, and large-scale land explorations during high speed economic development. According to geological hazard investigations organized by the Ministry of Land and Resources of China, there are 400 towns and more than 10 000 villages under the threatening of those landslide hazards. This paper presents the overview landslide hazard assessment in terms of GIS, which aims to evaluate the overview geohazard potentials, vulnerabilities of lives and land resources, and risks in conterminous China on the scale of 1∶6 000 000. This is the first overview landslide hazard potential map of China.

  6. Regional landslide hazard assessment in a deep uncertain future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Susana; Holcombe, Liz; Pianosi, Francesca; Wagener, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Landslides have many negative economic and societal impacts, including the potential for significant loss of life and damage to infrastructure. These risks are likely to be exacerbated in the future by a combination of climatic and socio-economic factors. Climate change, for example, is expected to increase the occurrence of rainfall-triggered landslides, because a warmer atmosphere tends to produce more high intensity rainfall events. Prediction of future changes in rainfall, however, is subject to high levels of uncertainty, making it challenging for decision-makers to identify the areas and populations that are most vulnerable to landslide hazards. In this study, we demonstrate how a physically-based model - the Combined Hydrology and Stability Model (CHASM) - can be used together with Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) to explore the underlying factors controlling the spatial distribution of landslide risks across a regional landscape, while also accounting for deep uncertainty around future rainfall conditions. We demonstrate how GSA can used to analyse CHASM which in turn represents the spatial variability of hillslope characteristics in the study region, while accounting for other uncertainties. Results are presented in the form of landslide hazard maps, utilising high-resolution digital elevation datasets for a case study in St Lucia in the Caribbean. Our findings about spatial landslide hazard drivers have important implications for data collection approaches and for long-term decision-making about land management practices.

  7. Regional Landslide Hazard Assessment Considering Potential Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, S.; Holcombe, E.; Pianosi, F.; Wagener, T.

    2016-12-01

    Landslides have many negative economic and societal impacts, including the potential for significant loss of life and damage to infrastructure. These risks are likely to be exacerbated in the future by a combination of climatic and socio-economic factors. Climate change, for example, is expected to increase the occurrence of rainfall-triggered landslides, because a warmer atmosphere tends to produce more high intensity rainfall events. Prediction of future changes in rainfall, however, is subject to high levels of uncertainty, making it challenging for decision-makers to identify the areas and populations that are most vulnerable to landslide hazards. In this study, we demonstrate how a physically-based model - the Combined Hydrology and Stability Model (CHASM) - can be used together with Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) to explore the underlying factors controlling the spatial distribution of landslide risks across a regional landscape, while also accounting for deep uncertainty around potential future rainfall triggers. We demonstrate how GSA can be used to analyse CHASM which in turn represents the spatial variability of hillslope characteristics in the study region, while accounting for other uncertainties. Results are presented in the form of landslide hazard maps, utilising high-resolution digital elevation datasets for a case study in St Lucia in the Caribbean. Our findings about spatial landslide hazard drivers have important implications for data collection approaches and for long-term decision-making about land management practices.

  8. Hazard assessment of rainfall-induced landsliding in mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara-Ayala, I.

    2004-07-01

    Rainfall-induced landsliding represents a major hazard in Mexico. About 200 municipalities in the states of Puebla, Veracruz and Hidalgo were affected by flooding and mass movement processes that resulted from a tropical depression from the Atlantic Ocean in October 1999. Hundreds of slope failures were triggered by intense precipitation, which in some localities reached 420 mm during a 24-h period. According to official information, 263 people died and 1 475 654 inhabitants were affected by flooding and landsliding. Rainfall event and cycle coefficient defined and the ratios between event and antecedent rainfalls, respectively, and the mean annual rainfall are summed to give a total coefficient. For landslide-triggering rainfalls in the Sierra Norte, values for the total coefficient of 0.8 and 0.4 for beginning and end of the wet season, respectively, appear to be important. In addition, a hazard assessment was carried out through the development of a landslide susceptibility indicator. This was elaborated by using aerial photographs, integrating field observations and the coupling of slope instability analysis within a digital elevation model framework. Field validation indicated that this approach provides a good representation of shallow translational failures; 81% of the observed landslides were satisfactorily predicted as potential unstable zones. Results suggested that this type of DEM-based hazard assessment can be extremely valuable not only after, but also before any landslide-related event, so that disaster preparedness and planning could be adequately structured.

  9. Landslide Hazards in the Seattle, Washington, Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Rex; Harp, Ed; Highland, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    The Seattle, Washington, area is known for its livability and its magnificent natural setting. The city and nearby communities are surrounded by an abundance of rivers and lakes and by the bays of Puget Sound. Two majestic mountain ranges, the Olympics and the Cascades, rim the region. These dramatic natural features are products of dynamic forces-landslides, earthquakes, tsunamis, glaciers, volcanoes, and floods. The same processes that formed this beautiful landscape pose hazards to the ever-growing population of the region. Landslides long have been a major cause of damage and destruction to people and property in the Seattle area.

  10. Remote sensing and GIS-based landslide hazard analysis and cross-validation using multivariate logistic regression model on three test areas in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Biswajeet

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the cross-validation of a multivariate logistic regression model using remote sensing data and GIS for landslide hazard analysis on the Penang, Cameron, and Selangor areas in Malaysia. Landslide locations in the study areas were identified by interpreting aerial photographs and satellite images, supported by field surveys. SPOT 5 and Landsat TM satellite imagery were used to map landcover and vegetation index, respectively. Maps of topography, soil type, lineaments and land cover were constructed from the spatial datasets. Ten factors which influence landslide occurrence, i.e., slope, aspect, curvature, distance from drainage, lithology, distance from lineaments, soil type, landcover, rainfall precipitation, and normalized difference vegetation index (ndvi), were extracted from the spatial database and the logistic regression coefficient of each factor was computed. Then the landslide hazard was analysed using the multivariate logistic regression coefficients derived not only from the data for the respective area but also using the logistic regression coefficients calculated from each of the other two areas (nine hazard maps in all) as a cross-validation of the model. For verification of the model, the results of the analyses were then compared with the field-verified landslide locations. Among the three cases of the application of logistic regression coefficient in the same study area, the case of Selangor based on the Selangor logistic regression coefficients showed the highest accuracy (94%), where as Penang based on the Penang coefficients showed the lowest accuracy (86%). Similarly, among the six cases from the cross application of logistic regression coefficient in other two areas, the case of Selangor based on logistic coefficient of Cameron showed highest (90%) prediction accuracy where as the case of Penang based on the Selangor logistic regression coefficients showed the lowest accuracy (79%). Qualitatively, the cross

  11. New techniques for landslide hazard assessments: opportunities, methodology, and uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, D. B.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Adler, R. F.; Hong, Y.

    2009-12-01

    An emerging global rainfall-triggered landslide hazard algorithm employs an empirical framework to identify potentially susceptible areas to rainfall-triggered landslides in near real-time. This methodology couples a satellite-derived estimate of cumulative rainfall with a static surface susceptibility map to highlight regions of anticipated landslide activity. While this algorithm represents an important first step in developing a larger-scale landslide prediction framework, there are many uncertainties and assumptions surrounding such a methodology that decreases the functionality and utility of this system. This research seeks to improve upon this initial concept by exploring the potential opportunities and methodological structure needed to advance larger-scale landslide hazard forecasting and make it more of an operational reality. Sensitivity analysis of the surface and rainfall parameters in the preliminary algorithm indicates that surface data resolution and the interdependency of variables must be more appropriately quantified at local and regional scales. Additionally, integrating available surface parameters must be approached in a more theoretical, physically-based manner to better represent the physical processes underlying slope instability and landslide initiation. Several rainfall infiltration and hydrological flow models have been developed to model slope instability at small spatial scales. This research investigates the potential of upscaling a more quantitative hydrological model to larger spatial scales, utilizing satellite and surface data inputs that are obtainable over different geographic regions. Due to the significant role that data and methodological uncertainties play in the effectiveness of landslide hazard assessment outputs, the methodology and data inputs are considered within an ensemble uncertainty framework in order to better resolve the contribution and limitations of model inputs and more effectively communicate the model skill.

  12. GIS-Based Mapping and Zonation of Landslide Hazards in Xiaojiang Valley of Southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Ze-zhong; He Yi-ping; Xie Hong; Cui Peng; Zhong Dun-lun; James S.Gardner

    2003-01-01

    Through the field survey, previous researches and interpretation of aerial photos, a landslide irformation database of Xiaojiang Valley, Yunnan Province was set up based on the remote sensing (RS) and geographic information system (GIS) technologies. In the paper, a quantitative model for the landslide hazard assessment and zoning was presented,in which the potential energy could be obtained on basis of thorough analysis of the potential sliding volume, distance and direction of the landslide body. Taking landslide potential energy as the index of the hazard severity zonation, the study area was divided into severe, heavy, medium and light hazard zones.

  13. GIS-Based Mapping and Zonation of Landslide Hazards in Xiaojiang Valley of Southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MaZe-zhong; HeYi-ping; XieHong; CuiPeng; ZhongDun-lun; JamesS.Gardner

    2003-01-01

    Through the field survey, previous researches and interpretation of aerial photos, a landslide information database of Xiaojiang Valley, Yurman Province was set up based on the remote sensing (RS) and geographic information system (GIS) technologies. In the paper, a quantitative model for the landslide hazard assessment and zoning was presented,in which the potential energy could be obtained on basis of thorough analysis of the potential sliding volume, distance and direction of the landslide body. Taking landslide potential energy as the index of the hazard severity zonation, the study area was divided into severe, heavy, medium and light hazard zones.

  14. Shallow Landslides Hazards in a Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellugi, D. G.; Perron, J. T.; O'Gorman, P. A.; Milledge, D.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall-triggered shallow landslides pose hazards to communities, infrastructure, and ecosystems. The magnitude and frequency of extreme precipitation are expected to change under climate warming, but their effects on landslide abundance, size, and spatial distribution are poorly understood. Fractional changes in extreme precipitation can be considerably greater than those in mean precipitation as storm intensity is not constrained by the atmospheric energy budget. Changes in orographic precipitation may also alter the spatial pattern of extreme precipitation. We assess relative changes in extreme precipitation for varying return periods and event durations predicted by regional climate models (RCM) in the USA over the periods 1971-2000 to 2041-2070. We delineate areas where orographic precipitation contributes to changes in extreme precipitation by analyzing topography and local winds associated with these extremes. To verify that RCMs reflect theoretical predictions, we quantify precipitation changes on the lee and windward slopes. We assess impacts of extreme precipitation change on landslide characteristics by applying a search algorithm that predicts landslide abundance, location, and size to a study site in the Oregon Coast Range (OCR) with a 10-year landslide observational record. We test a range of precipitation scenarios, forest management practices, and antecedent moisture conditions. To explore effects of orographic precipitation, we rescale observed precipitation for representative lee and windward locations and find that fractional changes in mean winter precipitation are ~3 times larger on leeward slopes. The fractional changes in intensity are much greater for extreme precipitation than mean precipitation, and they increase with return period. In the Pacific Northwest, leeward increases are ~10% for 2-year events and ~20% for 30-year events. At our study site, a 20% increase in precipitation or antecedent moisture corresponds to a 30-40% increase in

  15. GIS-supported geomorphological landslide hazard analysis in the Lainbach catchment, Upper Bavaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trau, J.; Ergenzinger, P.

    2003-04-01

    The Lainbach basin is located at the fringe of the Northern Limestone Alps. Predominant mass movements such as translational and rotational slides as well as debris flows are mainly linked to glacial deposits (Pleistocene valley fill) and Flysch series covering approximately 50% of the basin. The pre-Pleistocene relief is buried to a maximum thickness of 170 m of till, glacio-limnic and glacio-fluvial sediments. The spatial and temporal distributions of mass movements are coupled with different stages of fluvial incision. Recent fluvial processes are mainly bedrock controlled in the lower reaches. A special geomorphological map at a scale of 1:10.000 illustrates the relief evolution. In addition, the map focuses on past and recent process-forms related to mass movements. Thus areas of active and inactive mass movements can be easily distinguished. Zones of activity and the hazard potential can be deduced from the map. Hazard assessment is supported by GIS modelling, DEM analysis, multi-temporal time series analysis and aerial photo interpretation. Geophysical soundings are important for detailed site specific information such as shear planes and sediment thickness. A GIS model based on the parameters geology, topography (slope angle, curvature), thickness of loosely-consolidated material, vegetation and hydrology (proximity to receiving stream) was developed. Calculation of failure rates allow a specific value to be assigned to each parameter class indicating its role in the mass movement process. About 90% of the mapped mass movements were correctly classified by the model. Although the overall match seems to be quite good there are some localities where the modelled and the mapped results differ significantly. In the future, the mapped results should be considered together with further “expert knowledge” for an improvement of the GIS model.

  16. Analysis of rainfall-triggered landslide hazards through the dynamic integration of remotely sensed, modeled and in situ environmental factors in El Salvador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric Ross

    Landslides pose a persistent threat to El Salvador's population, economy and environment. Government officials share responsibility in managing this hazard by alerting populations when and where landslides may occur as well as developing and enforcing proper land use and zoning practices. This thesis addresses gaps in current knowledge between identifying precisely when and where slope failures may initiate and outlining the extent of the potential debris inundation areas. Improvements on hazard maps are achieved by considering a series of environmental variables to determine causal factors through spatial and temporal analysis techniques in Geographic Information Systems and remote sensing. The output is a more dynamic tool that links high resolution geomorphic and hydrological factors to daily precipitation. Directly incorporable into existing decision support systems, this allows for better disaster management and is transferable to other developing countries.

  17. Proposed method for hazard mapping of landslide propagation zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbulea, Manole-Stelian; Gogu, Radu; Manoli, Daniel-Marcel; Gaitanaru, Dragos Stefan; Priceputu, Adrian; Andronic, Adrian; Anghel, Alexandra; Liviu Bugea, Adrian; Ungureanu, Constantin; Niculescu, Alexandru

    2013-04-01

    Sustainable development of communities situated in areas with landslide potential requires a fully understanding of the mechanisms that govern the triggering of the phenomenon as well as the propagation of the sliding mass, with catastrophic consequences on the nearby inhabitants and environment. Modern analysis methods for areas affected by the movement of the soil bodies are presented in this work, as well as a new procedure to assess the landslide hazard. Classical soil mechanics offer sufficient numeric models to assess the landslide triggering zone, such as Limit Equilibrium Methods (Fellenius, Janbu, Morgenstern-Price, Bishop, Spencer etc.), blocks model or progressive mobilization models, Lagrange-based finite element method etc. The computation methods for assessing the propagation zones are quite recent and have high computational requirements, thus not being sufficiently used in practice to confirm their feasibility. The proposed procedure aims to assess not only the landslide hazard factor, but also the affected areas, by means of simple mathematical operations. The method can easily be employed in GIS software, without requiring engineering training. The result is obtained by computing the first and second derivative of the digital terrain model (slope and curvature maps). Using the curvature maps, it is shown that one can assess the areas most likely to be affected by the propagation of the sliding masses. The procedure is first applied on a simple theoretical model and then used on a representative section of a high exposure area in Romania. The method is described by comparison with Romanian legislation for risk and vulnerability assessment, which specifies that the landslide hazard is to be assessed, using an average hazard factor Km, obtained from various other factors. Following the employed example, it is observed that using the Km factor there is an inconsistent distribution of the polygonal surfaces corresponding to different landslide

  18. Landslide hazard and risk assessment using semi-automatically created landslide inventories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martha, T.R.; Westen, van C.J.; Kerle, N.; Jetten, V.G.; Kumar, K. V.

    2013-01-01

    Landslide inventories prepared manually from remote sensing data or through field surveys have shown to be useful for preparation of landslide susceptibility and hazard maps. Recent literatures show several studies have been carried out to prepare landslide inventories from satellite data by automat

  19. Landslide hazard and risk assessment using semi-automatically created landslide inventories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, J.A.; van Westen, C.J.; Kerle, N.; Jetten, V.G.; Kumar, K.V.

    2013-01-01

    Landslide inventories prepared manually from remote sensing data or through field surveys have shown to be useful for preparation of landslide susceptibility and hazard maps. Recent literatures show several studies have been carried out to prepare landslide inventories from satellite data by

  20. Landslide hazard assessment of the Black sea coastline (Caucasus, Russia) via drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazeev, Andrey; Postoev, German; Fedotova, Ksenia

    2017-04-01

    Landslide hazard assessment of slopes of Sochi was performed along the railway between the cities Tuapse and Adler (total length 103 km). The railway passes through the territory with active development of hazardous geological processes such as landslides, rock falls and debris-flows. By the beginning of 2016, 36 landslide sites were discovered along the railway (total length 34 km), 48 rock-fall sites (length 31 km), and 5 debris-flow sites (length 0.14 km). In recent years the intensification of deformations was observed. For instance, during previous 10 years (1996¬¬-2005) 28 sudden deformations occurred due to slope processes, which caused interruptions in traffic. And in the present decade (2006-2015), 72 deformations were recorded. High landslide activity and economic loss determined the necessity of complex investigations of engineering geological conditions of landslides development and causes of its intensification. The protection strategy development was needed to minimize negative consequences. Thus, the investigations of landslide situation along the railway "Tuapse - Adler" included the categorization of landslide sites by level of hazard, with risk assessment based on numerical criteria. Preliminary evaluation of landslide hazard for the railway was conducted via the analysis of archived engineering-geological documents. 13 of 36 landslide sites (total length 13 km) were selected, reflecting the variety and peculiarities of landslide displacements on slopes (both active and inactive sites). Visual field observations of landslide slopes using drone "DJI Phantom 4" were completed during the second stage of this investigation. High-resolution photographs of landslide cirques, cracks, scarp walls, vegetation features were obtained via drone, which would have been impossible to obtain from the ground in conditions of dense subtropical vegetation cover. Possible approaches to the landslide activity and hazard assessment were evaluated: slope stability

  1. A geomorphological approach to the estimation of landslide hazards and risks in Umbria, Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cardinali

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a geomorphological method to evaluate landslide hazard and risk. The method is based on the recognition of existing and past landslides, on the scrutiny of the local geological and morphological setting, and on the study of site-specific and historical information on past landslide events. For each study area a multi-temporal landslide inventory map has been prepared through the interpretation of various sets of stereoscopic aerial photographs taken over the period 1941–1999, field mapping carried out in the years 2000 and 2001, and the critical review of site-specific investigations completed to solve local instability problems. The multi-temporal landslide map portrays the distribution of the existing and past landslides and their observed changes over a period of about 60 years. Changes in the distribution and pattern of landslides allow one to infer the possible evolution of slopes, the most probable type of failures, and their expected frequency of occurrence and intensity. This information is used to evaluate landslide hazard, and to estimate the associated risk. The methodology is not straightforward and requires experienced geomorphologists, trained in the recognition and analysis of slope processes. Levels of landslide hazard and risk are expressed using an index that conveys, in a simple and compact format, information on the landslide frequency, the landslide intensity, and the likely damage caused by the expected failure. The methodology was tested in 79 towns, villages, and individual dwellings in the Umbria Region of central Italy.

  2. Landslide mobility and hazards: implications of the 2014 Oso disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.; George, David L.; Allstadt, Kate E.; Reid, Mark E.; Collins, Brian D.; Vallance, James W.; Schilling, Steve P.; Godt, Jonathan W.; Cannon, Charles; Magirl, Christopher S.; Baum, Rex L.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Schulz, William; Bower, J. Brent

    2015-01-01

    Landslides reflect landscape instability that evolves over meteorological and geological timescales, and they also pose threats to people, property, and the environment. The severity of these threats depends largely on landslide speed and travel distance, which are collectively described as landslide “mobility”. To investigate causes and effects of mobility, we focus on a disastrous landslide that occurred on 22 March 2014 near Oso, Washington, USA, following a long period of abnormally wet weather. The landslide's impacts were severe because its mobility exceeded that of prior historical landslides at the site, and also exceeded that of comparable landslides elsewhere. The ∼8×106 m3 landslide originated on a gently sloping (landslide began after about 50 s of preliminary slope movement, and observational evidence supports the hypothesis that the high mobility of the landslide resulted from liquefaction of water-saturated sediment at its base. Numerical simulation of the event using a newly developed model indicates that liquefaction and high mobility can be attributed to compression- and/or shear-induced sediment contraction that was strongly dependent on initial conditions. An alternative numerical simulation indicates that the landslide would have been far less mobile if its initial porosity and water content had been only slightly lower. Sensitive dependence of landslide mobility on initial conditions has broad implications for assessment of landslide hazards.

  3. Integrated multi-parameters Probabilistic Seismic Landslide Hazard Analysis (PSLHA): the case study of Ischia island, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccavale, Mauro; Matano, Fabio; Sacchi, Marco; Mazzola, Salvatore; Somma, Renato; Troise, Claudia; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The Ischia island is a large, complex, partly submerged, active volcanic field located about 20 km east to the Campi Flegrei, a major active volcano-tectonic area near Naples. The island is morphologically characterized in its central part by the resurgent block of Mt. Epomeo, controlled by NW-SE and NE-SW trending fault systems, by mountain stream basin with high relief energy and by a heterogeneous coastline with alternation of beach and tuff/lava cliffs in a continuous reshape due to the weather and sea erosion. The volcano-tectonic process is a main factor for slope stability, as it produces seismic activity and generated steep slopes in volcanic deposits (lava, tuff, pumice and ash layers) characterized by variable strength. In the Campi Flegrei and surrounding areas the possible occurrence of a moderate/large seismic event represents a serious threat for the inhabitants, for the infrastructures as well as for the environment. The most relevant seismic sources for Ischia are represented by the Campi Flegrei caldera and a 5 km long fault located below the island north coast. However those sources are difficult to constrain. The first one due to the on-shore and off-shore extension not yet completely defined. The second characterized only by few large historical events is difficult to parameterize in the framework of probabilistic hazard approach. The high population density, the presence of many infrastructures and the more relevant archaeological sites associated with the natural and artistic values, makes this area a strategic natural laboratory to develop new methodologies. Moreover Ischia represents the only sector, in the Campi Flegrei area, with documented historical landslides originated by earthquake, allowing for the possibility of testing the adequacy and stability of the method. In the framework of the Italian project MON.I.C.A (infrastructural coastlines monitoring) an innovative and dedicated probabilistic methodology has been applied to identify

  4. Quantify landslide exposure in areas with limited hazard information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicani, R.; Spilotro, G.; Van Westen, C. J.

    2012-04-01

    In Daunia region, located in the North-western part of Apulia (Southern Italy), landslides are the main source of damage to properties in the urban centers of the area, involving especially transportation system and the foundation stability of buildings. In the last 50 years, the growing demand for physical development of these unstable minor hillside and mountain centers has produced a very rapid expansion of built-up areas, often with poor planning of urban and territorial infrastructures, and invasion of the agricultural soil. Because of the expansion of the built-up towards not safe areas, human activities such as deforestation or excavation of slopes for road cuts and building sites, etc., have become important triggers for landslide occurrence. In the study area, the probability of occurrence of landslides is very difficult to predict, as well as the expected magnitude of events, due to the limited data availability on past landslide activity. Because the main limitations concern the availability of temporal data on landslides and triggering events (frequency), run-out distance and landslide magnitude, it was not possible to produce a reliable landslide hazard map and, consequently, a risk map. Given these limitations in data availability and details, a qualitative exposure map has been produced and combined with a landslide susceptibility map, both generated using a spatial multi-criteria evaluation (SMCE) procedure in a GIS system, for obtaining the qualitative landslide risk map. The qualitative analysis has been provided the spatial distribution of the exposure level in the study area; this information could be used in a preliminary stage of regional planning. In order to have a better definition of the risk level in the Daunia territory, the quantification of the economic losses at municipal level was carried out. For transforming these information on economic consequences into landslide risk quantification, it was necessary to assume the temporal

  5. A method for producing digital probabilistic seismic landslide hazard maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibson, R.W.; Harp, E.L.; Michael, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake is the first earthquake for which we have all of the data sets needed to conduct a rigorous regional analysis of seismic slope instability. These data sets include: (1) a comprehensive inventory of triggered landslides, (2) about 200 strong-motion records of the mainshock, (3) 1:24 000-scale geologic mapping of the region, (4) extensive data on engineering properties of geologic units, and (5) high-resolution digital elevation models of the topography. All of these data sets have been digitized and rasterized at 10 m grid spacing using ARC/INFO GIS software on a UNIX computer. Combining these data sets in a dynamic model based on Newmark's permanent-deformation (sliding-block) analysis yields estimates of coseismic landslide displacement in each grid cell from the Northridge earthquake. The modeled displacements are then compared with the digital inventory of landslides triggered by the Northridge earthquake to construct a probability curve relating predicted displacement to probability of failure. This probability function can be applied to predict and map the spatial variability in failure probability in any ground-shaking conditions of interest. We anticipate that this mapping procedure will be used to construct seismic landslide hazard maps that will assist in emergency preparedness planning and in making rational decisions regarding development and construction in areas susceptible to seismic slope failure. ?? 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Combining computational models for landslide hazard assessment of Guantánamo province, Cuba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos Abella, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the Cuban system for landslide disaster management, a methodology was developed for regional scale landslide hazard assessment, which is a combination of different models. The method was applied in Guantánamo province at 1:100 000 scale. The analysis started with an extensive aerial photo

  7. Combining computational models for landslide hazard assessment of Guantánamo province, Cuba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos Abella, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the Cuban system for landslide disaster management, a methodology was developed for regional scale landslide hazard assessment, which is a combination of different models. The method was applied in Guantánamo province at 1:100 000 scale. The analysis started with an extensive aerial

  8. Landslide hazards mapping using uncertain Naïve Bayesian classification method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛伊敏; 张茂省; 王根龙; 孙萍萍

    2015-01-01

    Landslide hazard mapping is a fundamental tool for disaster management activities in Loess terrains. Aiming at major issues with these landslide hazard assessment methods based on Naïve Bayesian classification technique, which is difficult in quantifying those uncertain triggering factors, the main purpose of this work is to evaluate the predictive power of landslide spatial models based on uncertain Naïve Bayesian classification method in Baota district of Yan’an city in Shaanxi province, China. Firstly, thematic maps representing various factors that are related to landslide activity were generated. Secondly, by using field data and GIS techniques, a landslide hazard map was performed. To improve the accuracy of the resulting landslide hazard map, the strategies were designed, which quantified the uncertain triggering factor to design landslide spatial models based on uncertain Naïve Bayesian classification method named NBU algorithm. The accuracies of the area under relative operating characteristics curves (AUC) in NBU and Naïve Bayesian algorithm are 87.29%and 82.47%respectively. Thus, NBU algorithm can be used efficiently for landslide hazard analysis and might be widely used for the prediction of various spatial events based on uncertain classification technique.

  9. Landslide hazard prediction in the North-Eastern Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disperati, L.; Guastaldi, E.; Rindinella, A.

    2003-04-01

    In order to assess the landslide hazard nearby the Pergola city (in the Northern-Eastern Apennines, Italy) a ground survey at a scale of 1:10,000 was performed for an extent of about 370 km^2 (Carmignani, 2001), and a GIS of landslides was built. Following statistical analysis allows to assess the correlation among landslide occurrences and causal factors related to the detachment zone (lithology, engineering geology, elevation, slope, aspect, bedding as related with slope face -RBS- and land use). Consequently, considering the morphological, lithological and anthropic characters of current slides, it was agreed to locate possible future landslides in those area actually stable but characterised by similar conditions. Because of that, a geostatistical analysis was performed. Comparing for every landslide the occurence of either single or combined causal factor, the analysis was carried out in grid format. The spatial analysis of the GIS data layers allowed building the unique condition regions (Chung et al., 1995) and creating statistical data on causal factors in relation of landslides. Afterwards, for every region the susceptibility to development of new occurrences (favourability mapping) was calculated by utilising the certainty factor (CF; Chung &Fabbri, 1993). For landslides where crown was identified, the main scarp was considered as occurrence; a buffer around the highest point of landslide was built for all the others (Disperati et al., 2002). Such procedure was applied both for slides (175 occurrences) and flows (464 occurrences). Furthermore, by the application of the procedure to causal factors and their combination, additional information regarding susceptibility to development of new occurrences was calculated. The selection of the most suitable factors combination can be done through the results accuracy assessment in relation of time and/or space (Chung, 1999), by utilising two different hazard information layers, respectively computed from a

  10. Assessing Degree of Susceptibility to Landslide Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, M. F.; Cordoba, G. A.; Delgado, H.; Stefanescu, R.

    2013-05-01

    The modeling of hazardous mass flows, both dry and water saturated, is currently an area of active research and several stable models have now emerged that have differing degrees of physical and mathematical fidelity. Models based on the early work of Savage and Hutter (1989) assume that very large dense granular flows could be modeled as incompressible continua governed by a Coulomb failure criterion. Based on this concept, Patra et al. (2005) developed a code for dry avalanches, which proposes a thin layer mathematical model similar to shallow-water equations. This concept was implemented in the widely-used TITAN2D program, which integrates the shock-capturing Godunov solution methodology for the equation system. We propose a method to assess the susceptibility of specific locations susceptible to landslides following heavy tephra fall using the TIATN2D code. Successful application requires that the range of several uncertainties must be framed in the selection of model input data: 1) initial conditions, like volume and location of origin of the landslide, 2) bed and internal friction parameters and 3) digital elevation model (DEM) uncertainties. Among the possible ways of coping with these uncertainties, we chose to use Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). This statistical technique reduces a computationally intractable problem to such an extent that is it possible to apply it, even with current personal computers. LHS requires that there is only one sample in each row and each column of the sampling matrix, where each row (multi-dimensional) corresponds to each uncertainty. LHS requires less than 10% of the sample runs needed by Monte Carlo approaches to achieve a stable solution. In our application LHS output provides model sampling for 4 input parameters: initial random volumes, UTM location (x and y), and bed friction. We developed a simple Octave script to link the output of LHS with TITAN2D. In this way, TITAN2D can run several times with successively different

  11. Landslide hazard mapping with selected dominant factors: A study case of Penang Island, Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, Lea Tien; Alkhasawneh, Mutasem Sh.; Ngah, Umi Kalthum [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Lateh, Habibah [School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11600 Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Landslide is one of the destructive natural geohazards in Malaysia. In addition to rainfall as triggering factos for landslide in Malaysia, topographical and geological factors play important role in the landslide susceptibility analysis. Conventional topographic factors such as elevation, slope angle, slope aspect, plan curvature and profile curvature have been considered as landslide causative factors in many research works. However, other topographic factors such as diagonal length, surface area, surface roughness and rugosity have not been considered, especially for the research work in landslide hazard analysis in Malaysia. This paper presents landslide hazard mapping using Frequency Ratio (FR) and the study area is Penang Island of Malaysia. Frequency ratio approach is a variant of probabilistic method that is based on the observed relationships between the distribution of landslides and each landslide-causative factor. Landslide hazard map of Penang Island is produced by considering twenty-two (22) landslide causative factors. Among these twenty-two (22) factors, fourteen (14) factors are topographic factors. They are elevation, slope gradient, slope aspect, plan curvature, profile curvature, general curvature, tangential curvature, longitudinal curvature, cross section curvature, total curvature, diagonal length, surface area, surface roughness and rugosity. These topographic factors are extracted from the digital elevation model of Penang Island. The other eight (8) non-topographic factors considered are land cover, vegetation cover, distance from road, distance from stream, distance from fault line, geology, soil texture and rainfall precipitation. After considering all twenty-two factors for landslide hazard mapping, the analysis is repeated with fourteen dominant factors which are selected from the twenty-two factors. Landslide hazard map was segregated into four categories of risks, i.e. Highly hazardous area, Hazardous area, Moderately hazardous area

  12. Regional landslide-hazard assessment for Seattle, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, R.L.; Coe, J.A.; Godt, J.W.; Harp, E.L.; Reid, M.E.; Savage, W.Z.; Schulz, W.H.; Brien, D.L.; Chleborad, A.F.; McKenna, J.P.; Michael, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Landslides are a widespread, frequent, and costly hazard in Seattle and the Puget Sound area of Washington State, USA. Shallow earth slides triggered by heavy rainfall are the most common type of landslide in the area; many transform into debris flows and cause significant property damage or disrupt transportation. Large rotational and translational slides, though less common, also cause serious property damage. The hundreds of landslides that occurred during the winters of 1995-96 and 1996-97 stimulated renewed interest by Puget Sound communities in identifying landslide-prone areas and taking actions to reduce future landslide losses. Informal partnerships between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the City of Seattle, and private consultants are focusing on the problem of identifying and mapping areas of landslide hazard as well as characterizing temporal aspects of the hazard. We have developed GIS-based methods to map the probability of landslide occurrence as well as empirical rainfall thresholds and physically based methods to forecast times of landslide occurrence. Our methods for mapping landslide hazard zones began with field studies and physically based models to assess relative slope stability, including the effects of material properties, seasonal groundwater levels, and rainfall infiltration. We have analyzed the correlation between historic landslide occurrence and relative slope stability to map the degree of landslide hazard. The City of Seattle is using results of the USGS studies in storm preparedness planning for emergency access and response, planning for development or redevelopment of hillsides, and municipal facility planning and prioritization. Methods we have developed could be applied elsewhere to suit local needs and available data.

  13. Hazard analysis of landslides triggered by Typhoon Chata'an on July 2, 2002, in Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, Edwin L.; Reid, Mark E.; Michael, John A.

    2004-01-01

    More than 250 landslides were triggered across the eastern volcanic islands of Chuuk State in the Federated States of Micronesia by torrential rainfall from tropical storm Chata?an on July 2, 2002. Landslides triggered during nearly 20 inches of rainfall in less than 24 hours caused 43 fatalities and the destruction or damage of 231 structures, including homes, schools, community centers, and medical dispensaries. Landslides also buried roads, crops, and water supplies. The landslides ranged in volume from a few cubic meters to more than 1 million cubic meters. Most of the failures began as slumps and transformed into debris flows, some of which traveled several hundred meters across coastal flatlands into populated areas. A landslide-inventory map produced after the storm shows that the island of Tonoas had the largest area affected by landslides, although the islands of Weno, Fefan, Etten, Uman, Siis, Udot, Eot, and Fanapanges also had significant landslides. Based on observations since the storm, we estimate the continuing hazard from landslides triggered by Chata?an to be relatively low. However, tropical storms and typhoons similar to Chata?an frequently develop in Micronesia and are likely to affect the islands of Chuuk in the future. To assess the landslide hazard from future tropical storms, we produced a hazard map that identifies landslide-source areas of high, moderate, and low hazard. This map can be used to identify relatively safe areas for relocating structures or establishing areas where people could gather for shelter in relative safety during future typhoons or tropical storms similar to Chata?an.

  14. Geospatial Data Integration for Assessing Landslide Hazard on Engineered Slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, P. E.; Mills, J. P.; Barr, S. L.; Birkinshaw, S. J.

    2012-07-01

    Road and rail networks are essential components of national infrastructures, underpinning the economy, and facilitating the mobility of goods and the human workforce. Earthwork slopes such as cuttings and embankments are primary components, and their reliability is of fundamental importance. However, instability and failure can occur, through processes such as landslides. Monitoring the condition of earthworks is a costly and continuous process for network operators, and currently, geospatial data is largely underutilised. The research presented here addresses this by combining airborne laser scanning and multispectral aerial imagery to develop a methodology for assessing landslide hazard. This is based on the extraction of key slope stability variables from the remotely sensed data. The methodology is implemented through numerical modelling, which is parameterised with the slope stability information, simulated climate conditions, and geotechnical properties. This allows determination of slope stability (expressed through the factor of safety) for a range of simulated scenarios. Regression analysis is then performed in order to develop a functional model relating slope stability to the input variables. The remotely sensed raster datasets are robustly re-sampled to two-dimensional cross-sections to facilitate meaningful interpretation of slope behaviour and mapping of landslide hazard. Results are stored in a geodatabase for spatial analysis within a GIS environment. For a test site located in England, UK, results have shown the utility of the approach in deriving practical hazard assessment information. Outcomes were compared to the network operator's hazard grading data, and show general agreement. The utility of the slope information was also assessed with respect to auto-population of slope geometry, and found to deliver significant improvements over the network operator's existing field-based approaches.

  15. Uncertainty on shallow landslide hazard assessment: from field data to hazard mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefolini, Emanuele; Tolo, Silvia; Patelli, Eduardo; Broggi, Matteo; Disperati, Leonardo; Le Tuan, Hai

    2015-04-01

    empirical relations with geotechnical index properties. Site specific information was regionalized at map scale by (hard and fuzzy) clustering analysis taking into account spatial variables such as: geology, geomorphology and hillslope morphometric variables (longitudinal and transverse curvature, flow accumulation and slope), the latter derived by a DEM with 10 m cell size. In order to map shallow landslide hazard, Monte Carlo simulation was performed for some common physically based models available in literature (eg. SINMAP, SHALSTAB, TRIGRS). Furthermore, a new approach based on the use of Bayesian Network was proposed and validated. Different models, such as Intervals, Convex Models and Fuzzy Sets, were adopted for the modelling of input parameters. Finally, an accuracy assessment was carried out on the resulting maps and the propagation of uncertainty of input parameters into the final shallow landslide hazard estimation was estimated. The outcomes of the analysis are compared and discussed in term of discrepancy among map pixel values and related estimated error. The novelty of the proposed method is on estimation of the confidence of the shallow landslides hazard mapping at regional level. This allows i) to discriminate regions where hazard assessment is robust from areas where more data are necessary to increase the confidence level and ii) to assess the reliability of the procedure used for hazard assessment.

  16. Landslide tsunami hazard in the Indonesian Sunda Arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brune

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Indonesian archipelago is known for the occurrence of catastrophic earthquake-generated tsunamis along the Sunda Arc. The tsunami hazard associated with submarine landslides however has not been fully addressed. In this paper, we compile the known tsunamigenic events where landslide involvement is certain and summarize the properties of published landslides that were identified with geophysical methods. We depict novel mass movements, found in newly available bathymetry, and determine their key parameters. Using numerical modeling, we compute possible tsunami scenarios. Furthermore, we propose a way of identifying landslide tsunamis using an array of few buoys with bottom pressure units.

  17. Application of remote sensed precipitation for landslide hazard assessment models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, D. B.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Adler, R. F.; Kumar, S.; Harrison, K.

    2010-12-01

    The increasing availability of remotely sensed land surface and precipitation information provides new opportunities to improve upon existing landslide hazard assessment methods. This research considers how satellite precipitation information can be applied in two types of landslide hazard assessment frameworks: a global, landslide forecasting framework and a deterministic slope-stability model. Examination of both landslide hazard frameworks points to the need for higher resolution spatial and temporal precipitation inputs to better identify small-scale precipitation forcings that contribute to significant landslide triggering. This research considers how satellite precipitation information may be downscaled to account for local orographic impacts and better resolve peak intensities. Precipitation downscaling is employed in both models to better approximate local rainfall distribution, antecedent conditions, and intensities. Future missions, such as the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will provide more frequent and extensive estimates of precipitation at the global scale and have the potential to significantly advance landslide hazard assessment tools. The first landslide forecasting tool, running in near real-time at http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov, considers potential landslide activity at the global scale and relies on Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation data and surface products to provide a near real-time picture of where landslides may be triggered. Results of the algorithm evaluation indicate that considering higher resolution susceptibility information is a key factor in better resolving potentially hazardous areas. However, success in resolving when landslide activity is probable is closely linked to appropriate characterization of the empirical rainfall intensity-duration thresholds. We test a variety of rainfall thresholds to evaluate algorithmic performance accuracy and determine the optimal set of conditions that

  18. Understanding Landslide Tsunami Hazard in Alaska Fjords for Tsunami Inundation Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleimani, E.; Hansen, R.

    2007-12-01

    Several communities of the southern coast of Alaska are located in glacial fjords, which are fed by major rivers and creeks draining nearby glaciers and depositing sediments into the bays at a high rate. Sediment accumulation on the steep underwater slopes contributes to the landslide tsunami hazard in these communities. During the Great Alaska Earthquake of 1964, the majority of tsunami-related deaths was due to local landslide tsunamis that occurred almost immediately after the initial shaking, and without any warning signs. In these coastal communities, tsunami potential from tectonic and submarine landslide sources must be evaluated for comprehensive mapping of areas that are at risk for inundation. We are creating tsunami inundation maps for Seward, Alaska, in the scope of the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. Seward is a community located at the head of Resurrection Bay, which was hit hard by both tectonic and landslide-generated tsunami waves during the 1964 earthquake. The purpose of the project is long- term prediction of potential landslide-generated tsunamis in Resurrection Bay, and public education on landslide-related tsunami hazard. In order to construct tsunami inundation maps for Seward, we use an approach that combines modeling of the historical tsunami events of 1964 in Resurrection Bay for model verification, and assessing the landslide tsunami hazard by simulating hypothetical landslide scenarios and performing sensitivity analysis. To reconstruct the sequence of waves observed at Seward on March 27, 1964, we model tsunami waves caused by superposition of the local landslide-generated tsunamis and the major tectonic tsunami. Next we create hypothetical landslide scenarios that are based on the underwater sediment accumulation areas derived from the bathymetry difference maps. Numerical simulations yield runup heights, extent of maximum inundation for chosen tsunami scenarios, depths of inundation on dry land, and maximum velocity

  19. Integrated multi-parameters Probabilistic Seismic Landslide Hazard Analysis (PSLHA): an innovative approach in the active volcano-tectonic area of Campi Flegrei (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccavale, M.; Matano, F.; Sacchi, M.; Somma, R.; Troise, C.; De Natale, G.

    2013-12-01

    The western coastal sector of Campania region (southern Italy) is characterised by the presence of the active volcano-tectonic area of Campi Flegrei. This area represents a very particular and interesting case-study for a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). The principal seismic source, related with the caldera, is not clearly constrained in the on-shore and off-shore areas. The well-known and monitored phenomenon of bradyseism affecting a large portion of case-study area is not modelled in the standard PSHA approach. From the environmental point of view the presence of very high exposed values in terms of population, buildings, infrastructures and palaces of high archaeological, natural and artistic value, makes this area a strategic natural laboratory to develop new methodologies. Moreover the geomorphological and geo-volcanological features lead to a heterogeneous coastline, made up by both beach and tuff cliffs, rapidly evolving for erosion and landslide (i.e. mainly rock fall and rock slide) phenomena that represent an additional hazard aspect. In the Campi Flegrei the possible occurrence of a moderate/large seismic event represents a serious threat for the inhabitants, for the infrastructures as well as for the environment. In the framework of Italian MON.I.C.A project (sinfrastructural coastlines monitoring) an innovative and dedicated probabilistic methodology has been applied to identify the areas with higher tendency of landslide occurrence due to the seismic effect. Resident population reported the occurrence of some small rock falls along tuff quarry slopes during the main shocks of the 1982-84 bradyseismic events. The PSHA methodology, introduced by Cornell (1968), combines the contributions to the hazard from all potential sources of earthquakes and the average activity rates associated to each seismogenic zone considered. The result of the PSHA is represented by the spatial distribution of a ground-motion (GM) parameter A, such as Peak

  20. Using Remotely Sensed Information for Near Real-Time Landslide Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia; Adler, Robert; Peters-Lidard, Christa

    2013-01-01

    The increasing availability of remotely sensed precipitation and surface products provides a unique opportunity to explore how landslide susceptibility and hazard assessment may be approached at larger spatial scales with higher resolution remote sensing products. A prototype global landslide hazard assessment framework has been developed to evaluate how landslide susceptibility and satellite-derived precipitation estimates can be used to identify potential landslide conditions in near-real time. Preliminary analysis of this algorithm suggests that forecasting errors are geographically variable due to the resolution and accuracy of the current susceptibility map and the application of satellite-based rainfall estimates. This research is currently working to improve the algorithm through considering higher spatial and temporal resolution landslide susceptibility information and testing different rainfall triggering thresholds, antecedent rainfall scenarios, and various surface products at regional and global scales.

  1. Fostering the uptake of satellite Earth Observation data for landslide hazard understanding: the CEOS Landslide Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Roessner, Sigrid

    2017-04-01

    Landslides occur around the world, on every continent, and play an important role in the evolution of landscapes. They also represent a serious hazard in many areas of the world. Despite their importance, it has been estimated that past landslide and landslide potential maps cover less than 1% of the slopes in these landmasses. Systematic information on the type, abundance, and distribution of existing landslides is lacking. Even in countries where landslide information is abundant (e.g. Italy), the vast majority of landslides caused by meteorological (intense or prolonged rainfall, rapid snowmelt) or geophysical (earthquake) triggers go undetected. This paucity of knowledge has consequences on the design of effective remedial and mitigation measures. Systematic use of Earth observation (EO) data and technologies can contribute effectively to detect, map, and monitor landslides, and landslide prone hillsides, in different physiographic and climatic regions. The CEOS (Committee on Earth Observation Satellites) Working Group on Disasters has recently launched a Landslide Pilot (period 2017-2019) with the aim to demonstrate the effective exploitation of satellite EO across the full cycle of landslide disaster risk management, including preparedness, response, and recovery at global, regional, and local scales, with a distinct multi-hazard focus on cascading impacts and risks. The Landslide Pilot is focusing efforts on three objectives: 1. Establish effective practices for merging different Earth Observation data (e.g. optical and radar) to better monitor and map landslide activity over time and space. 2. Demonstrate how landslide products, models, and services can support disaster risk management for multi-hazard and cascading landslide events. 3. Engage and partner with data brokers and end users to understand requirements and user expectations and get feedback through the activities described in objectives 1-2. The Landslide Pilot was endorsed in April 2016 and work

  2. Rainfall-triggered landslides, anthropogenic hazards, and mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Rainfall-triggered landslides are part of a natural process of hillslope erosion that can result in catastrophic loss of life and extensive property damage in mountainous, densely populated areas. As global population expansion on or near steep hillslopes continues, the human and economic costs associated with landslides will increase. Landslide hazard mitigation strategies generally involve hazard assessment mapping, warning systems, control structures, and regional landslide planning and policy development. To be sustainable, hazard mitigation requires that management of natural resources is closely connected to local economic and social interests. A successful strategy is dependent on a combination of multi-disciplinary scientific and engineering approaches, and the political will to take action at the local community to national scale.

  3. Earthquake induced landslide hazard field observatory in the Avcilar peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigarre, Pascal; Coccia, Stella; Theoleyre, Fiona; Ergintav, Semih; Özel, Oguz; Yalçinkaya, Esref; Lenti, Luca; Martino, Salvatore; Gamba, Paolo; Zucca, Francesco; Moro, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Earthquake-triggered landslides have an increasing disastrous impact in seismic regions due to the fast growing urbanization and infrastructures. Just considering disasters from the last fifteen years, among which the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake, the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, and the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, these events generated tens of thousands of coseismic landslides. Those resulted in amazing death toll and considerable damages, affecting the regional landscape including its hydrological main features. Despite a strong impetus in research during past decades, knowledge on those geohazards is still fragmentary, while databases of high quality observational data are lacking. These phenomena call for further collaborative researches aiming eventually to enhance preparedness and crisis management. The MARSITE project gathers research groups in a comprehensive monitoring activity developed in the Sea of Marmara Region, one of the most densely populated parts of Europe and rated at high seismic risk level since the 1999 Izmit and Duzce devastating earthquakes. Besides the seismic threat, landslides in Turkey and in this region constitute an important source of loss. The 6th Work Package of MARSITE project gathers 9 research groups to study earthquake-induced landslides focusing on two sub-regional areas of high interest among which the Cekmece-Avcilar peninsula, located westwards of Istanbul, as a highly urbanized concentrated landslide prone area, showing high susceptibility to both rainfalls while affected by very significant seismic site effects. A multidisciplinary research program based on pre-existing studies has been designed with objectives and tasks linked to constrain and tackle progressively some challenging issues related to data integration, modeling, monitoring and mapping technologies. Since the start of the project, progress has been marked on several important points as follows. The photogeological interpretation and analysis of ENVISAT-ERS DIn

  4. Geomorphometric analysis of shallow landslides in the Walgau valley (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lützenburg, Gregor; Schmaltz, Elmar; Glade, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Hydrologically triggered shallow landslides are a frequent natural hazard in the Eastern Alps and can cause severe damages to agriculturally used land, houses and infrastructure. Geomorphometric indices allow to estimate the spatial dynamics of shallow landslides based on recurrent landslide inventories. Previous studies found that the morphology of a landslip is closely related to its dominant genetic process. In this study, we focus on the calculation of established geomorphometric indices of the prevailing shallow landslides to assess the spatial landslide distribution in the Walgau valley in Vorarlberg (Austria). Therefore, we compiled a multi-temporal landslide inventory based on eight orthophoto series from 1950 to 2015 and two digital terrain models derived from airborne laser scanning (ALS) data of 2004 and 2011. The 123 mapped landslides and adjacent areas were further distinguished in distinct geomorphic features, such as parent slope, landslide scarp, concave (surface of rupture) and convex (mass material) segments. Lithological settings and anthropogenic impacts such as land use change were also considered in the analysis. A geomorphometric assessment of the mapped landslides, in combination with land cover information yields insights on the spatial dimension of the shallow landslides and the potential fluidity of the materials involved. The geomorphometric analyses revealed that 96 landslides were classified as fluid-flows, 17 landslides were classified as viscous-flows, 8 landslides were classified as slide-flows and 2 landslides were classified as planar slides. Our findings indicate that most of the shallow landslides display a flow-like movement with a rather low material plasticity. This leads to the assumption that the observed landslides in the investigated area might be of low kinetic energy despite their relatively long travel distances. Spatial disparities within the study area were not observable. We conclude that geomorphometric indices are

  5. GIS Applied to Landslide Hazard Mapping and Evaluation in North-East Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. A.; Degg, M.

    2009-04-01

    Slope instability is a significant environmental hazard in North-East Wales, responsible for important damage to roads and built-up areas. During the late 1980s and the 1990s, systematic landslide mapping and hazard modelling was completed for a number of landslide prone areas within Great Britain, but no such study has to date been carried out for North Wales. This research reports on the creation of a digital landslide inventory for North-East Wales and the use of a Geographical Information System (GIS) to create the first landslide susceptibility models for the area. The research has resulted in the most comprehensive landslide inventory of North-East Wales completed to date. This was accomplished through a combination of aerial photograph interpretation, field mapping and data collection from secondary sources (e.g. consultancy reports, newspapers), yielding a database that records 430 landslides for the area. This represents a 76% (186 landslides) increase on the number of landslides recorded for the area in the UK national landslides database. The landslides in North-East Wales are almost entirely situated inland, with less than 1% on the coast. Approximately 84% of the landslides occur within drift geology and 16% in solid geology. For the slides of known type, 46% are translational slides, 47% rotational slides, 3% flows, 3% falls and 1% complex failures. The type and distribution of landsliding in the area shows notable differences to that found in areas of similar bedrock geology elsewhere in the UK (e.g. Derbyshire and South Wales). Analysis shows that the main landslide controlling parameters in North-East Wales are: lithology, drift material, slope angle, proximity to known faults (structural weaknesses) and proximity to fluvial channels (undercutting). These factors were weighted statistically based on their estimated contribution to slope instability, and combined to create the landslide susceptibility models using a statistical (multiple logistic

  6. Landslide Hazard and Risk Assessment on the Northern Slope of Mt. Changbai, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhenghua; ZHANG Yanbin; Yoshiharu ISHIKAWA; Hiroyuki NAKAMURA

    2008-01-01

    Landslide hazard and risk assessment on the northern slope of Mt. Changbai,a well-known tourist attraction near the North Korean-Chinese border, are assessed. This study is divided into two parts, namely, landslide hazard zonation and risk assessment. The 1992 Anbalagan and Singh method of landslide hazard zonation (LHZ) was modified and used in this area. In this way, an Associative Analysis Method was used in representative areas to get a measure for controlling factors (slope gradient, relative relief, vegetation, geology, discontinuity development, weak layer thickness and ground water). For the membership degree of factor to slope failure, the middle range of limited values was used to calculate LHZ. Based on an estimation of the potential damage from slope failure,a reasonable risk assessment map was obtained using the relationship of potential damage and probable hazard to aid future planning and prediction and to avert loss of life.

  7. Validating national landslide susceptibility and hazard maps for Caribbean island countries: the case of Dominica and tropical storm Erika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Westen, Cees; Jetten, Victor; Alkema, Dinand

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to generate national-scale landslide susceptibility and hazard maps for four Caribbean islands, as part of the World Bank project CHARIM (Caribbean Handbook on Disaster Geoinformation Management, www.charim.net). This paper focuses on the results for the island country of Dominica, located in the Eastern part of the Caribbean, in-between Guadalupe and Martinique. The available data turned out to be insufficient to generate reliable results. We therefore generated a new database of disaster events for Dominica using all available data, making use of many different sources. We compiled landslide inventories for five recent rainfall events from the maintenance records of the Ministry of Public Works, and generated a completely new landslide inventory using multi-temporal visual image interpretation, and generated an extensive landslide database for Dominica. We analyzed the triggering conditions for landslides as far as was possible given the available data, and generated rainfall magnitude-frequency relations. We applied a method for landslide susceptibility assessment which combined bi-variate statistical analysis, that provided indications on the importance of the possible contributing factors, with an expert-based iterative weighing approach using Spatial Multi-Criteria Evaluation. The method is transparent, as the stakeholders (e.g. the engineers and planners from the four countries) and other consultants can consult the criteria trees and evaluate the standardization and weights, and make adjustments. The landslide susceptibility map was converted into a landslide hazard map using landslide density and frequencies for so called major, moderate and minor triggering events. The landslide hazard map was produced in May 2015. A major rainfall event occurred on Dominica following the passage of tropical storm Erika on 26 to 28 August 2015. An event-based landslide inventory for this event was produced by UNOSAT using very high resolution

  8. Landslide hazard assessment : LIFE+IMAGINE project methodology and Liguria region use case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spizzichino, Daniele; Campo, Valentina; Congi, Maria Pia; Cipolloni, Carlo; Delmonaco, Giuseppe; Guerrieri, Luca; Iadanza, Carla; Leoni, Gabriele; Trigila, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Scope of the work is to present a methodology developed for analysis of potential impacts in areas prone to landslide hazard in the framework of the EC project LIFE+IMAGINE. The project aims to implement a web services-based infrastructure addressed to environmental analysis, that integrates, in its own architecture, specifications and results from INSPIRE, SEIS and GMES. Existing web services has been customized to provide functionalities for supporting environmental integrated management. The implemented infrastructure has been applied to landslide risk scenarios, developed in selected pilot areas, aiming at: i) application of standard procedures to implement a landslide risk analysis; ii) definition of a procedure for assessment of potential environmental impacts, based on a set of indicators to estimate the different exposed elements with their specific vulnerability in the pilot area. The landslide pilot and related scenario are focused at providing a simplified Landslide Risk Assessment (LRA) through: 1) a landslide inventory derived from available historical and recent databases and maps; 2) landslide susceptibility and hazard maps; 3) assessment of exposure and vulnerability on selected typologies of elements at risk; 4) implementation of a landslide risk scenario for different sets of exposed elements 5) development of a use case; 6) definition of guidelines, best practices and production of thematic maps. The LRA has been implemented in Liguria region, Italy, in two different catchment areas located in the Cinque Terre National Park, characterized by a high landslide susceptibility and low resilience. The landslide risk impact analysis has been calibrated taking into account the socio-economic damage caused by landslides triggered by the October 2011 meteorological event. During this event, over 600 landslides were triggered in the selected pilot area. Most of landslides affected the diffuse system of anthropogenic terraces and caused the direct

  9. A multi-objective decision-making method for the treatment scheme of landslide hazard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanmin Xie; Yuanyou Xia

    2004-01-01

    The treatment engineering of landslide hazard is a complicated system engineering. The selecting treatment scheme is influenced by many factors such as technology, economics, environment, and risk. The decision-making of treatment schemes of landslide hazard is a problem of comprehensive judgment with multi-hierarchy and multi-objective. The traditional analysis hierarchy process needs identity test. The traditional analysis hierarchy process is improved by means of optimal transfer matrix here. An improved hierarchy decision-making model for the treatment of landslide hazard is set up. The judgment matrix obtained by the method can naturally meet the requirement of identity, so the identity test is not necessary. At last, the method is applied to the treatment decision-making of the dangerous rock mass at the Slate Mountain, and its application is discussed in detail.

  10. Combining heuristic and statistical techniques in landslide hazard assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, Jose; Schwendtner, Barbara; Quan, Byron; Nadim, Farrokh; Diaz, Manuel; Molina, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    As a contribution to the Global Assessment Report 2013 - GAR2013, coordinated by the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction - UNISDR, a drill-down exercise for landslide hazard assessment was carried out by entering the results of both heuristic and statistical techniques into a new but simple combination rule. The data available for this evaluation included landslide inventories, both historical and event-based. In addition to the application of a heuristic method used in the previous editions of GAR, the availability of inventories motivated the use of statistical methods. The heuristic technique is largely based on the Mora & Vahrson method, which estimates hazard as the product of susceptibility and triggering factors, where classes are weighted based on expert judgment and experience. Two statistical methods were also applied: the landslide index method, which estimates weights of the classes for the susceptibility and triggering factors based on the evidence provided by the density of landslides in each class of the factors; and the weights of evidence method, which extends the previous technique to include both positive and negative evidence of landslide occurrence in the estimation of weights for the classes. One key aspect during the hazard evaluation was the decision on the methodology to be chosen for the final assessment. Instead of opting for a single methodology, it was decided to combine the results of the three implemented techniques using a combination rule based on a normalization of the results of each method. The hazard evaluation was performed for both earthquake- and rainfall-induced landslides. The country chosen for the drill-down exercise was El Salvador. The results indicate that highest hazard levels are concentrated along the central volcanic chain and at the centre of the northern mountains.

  11. Landslide susceptibility analysis using an artificial neural network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Shattri; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Daud, Mohamed; Jamaludin, Normalina; Khuzaimah, Zailani

    2007-10-01

    This paper deals with landslide susceptibility analysis using an artificial neural network model for Cameron Highland, Malaysia. Landslide locations were identified in the study area from interpretation of aerial photographs and field surveys. Topographical/geological data and satellite images were collected and processed using GIS and image processing tools. There are ten landslide inducing parameters which are considered for the landslide hazards. These parameters are topographic slope, aspect, curvature and distance from drainage, all derived from the topographic database; geology and distance from lineament, derived from the geologic database; landuse from Landsat satellite images; soil from the soil database; precipitation amount, derived from the rainfall database; and the vegetation index value from SPOT satellite images. Landslide hazard was analyzed using landslide occurrence factors employing the logistic regression model. The results of the analysis were verified using the landslide location data and compared with logistic regression model. The accuracy of hazard map observed was 85.73%. The qualitative landslide susceptibility analysis was carried out using an artificial neural network model by doing map overlay analysis in GIS environment. This information could be used to estimate the risk to population, property and existing infrastructure like transportation network.

  12. Landslide hazard in Bukavu (DR Congo): a geomorphological assessment in a data-poor context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitte, Olivier; Mugaruka Bibentyo, Toussaint; Kulimushi Matabaro, Sylvain; Balegamire, Clarisse; Basimike, Joseph; Delvaux, Damien; Dille, Antoine; Ganza Bamulezi, Gloire; Jacobs, Liesbet; Michellier, Caroline; Monsieurs, Elise; Mugisho Birhenjira, Espoir; Nshokano, Jean-Robert; Nzolang, Charles; Kervyn, François

    2017-04-01

    zones where landslides may occur as well as the runout zones. Rock fall hazard concerns a very small portion of the urban territory. The other three hazards are much more widely spread. For these three scenarios, the hazard is the highest in areas that cover about 5 to 10% of the urban territory. The maps are presented in four classes. They present an information that can be easily used for further risk analysis and/or urban planning purposes.

  13. Hazard mapping related to structurally controlled landslides in Southern Leyte, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzon, Paul Kenneth; Montalbo, Kristina; Galang, Jam; Sabado, Jasmine May; Escape, Carmille Marie; Felix, Raquel; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    The 2006 Guinsaugon landslide in Saint Bernard, Southern Leyte, is one of the largest known landslides in the Philippines in recent history. It consists of a 15-20 million m3 rockslide-debris avalanche from an approximately 675 m high mountain weakened by continuous movement of the Philippine Fault. The catastrophic Guinsaugon landslide killed 1221 people and displaced 19 000 residents over its 4.5 km path. To investigate the present-day morphology of the scar and potential failure that may occur, analysis of a 5 m resolution InSAR-derived digital elevation model was conducted using Coltop3D and Matterocking software, leading to the generation of a landslide hazard map for the province of Southern Leyte in central Philippines. The dip and dip direction of discontinuity sets that contribute to gravitational failure in mountainous areas of the province were identified and measured using a lower Schmidt-Lambert color scheme. After measurement of the morpho-structural orientations, potential sites of failure were analyzed. Conefall was then utilized to compute the extent of rock mass runout. Results of the analysis show instability in the scarp area of the 2006 Guinsaugon landslide and in adjacent slopes because of the presence of steep discontinuities that range from 45 to 60°. Apart from the 2006 Guinsaugon landslide site, runout models simulated farther rock mass extent in its adjacent slopes, revealing a high potential for fatal landslides to happen in the municipality of Saint Bernard. Concerned agencies may use maps produced in the same manner as this study to identify possible sites where structurally controlled landslides can occur. In a country like the Philippines, where fractures and faults are common, this type of simulated hazard maps would be useful for disaster prevention and facilitate disaster risk reduction efforts for landslide-susceptible areas.

  14. Rapid field-based landslide hazard assessment in response to post-earthquake emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattini, Paolo; Gambini, Stefano; Cancelliere, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    On April 25, 2015 a Mw 7.8 earthquake occurred 80 km to the northwest of Kathmandu (Nepal). The largest aftershock, occurred on May 12, 2015, was the Mw 7.3 Nepal earthquake (SE of Zham, China), 80 km to the east of Kathmandu. . The earthquakes killed ~9000 people and severely damaged a 10,000 sqkm region in Nepal and neighboring countries. Several thousands of landslides have been triggered during the event, causing widespread damages to mountain villages and the evacuation of thousands of people. Rasuwa was one of the most damaged districts. This contribution describes landslide hazard analysis of the Saramthali, Yarsa and Bhorle VDCs (122 km2, Rasuwa district). Hazard is expressed in terms of qualitative classes (low, medium, high), through a simple matrix approach that combines frequency classes and magnitude classes. The hazard analysis is based primarily on the experience gained during a field survey conducted in September 2014. During the survey, local knowledge has been systematically exploited through interviews with local people that have experienced the earthquake and the coseismic landslides. People helped us to recognize fractures and active deformations, and allowed to reconstruct a correct chronicle of landslide events, in order to assign the landslide events to the first shock, the second shock, or the post-earthquake 2015 monsoon. The field experience was complemented with a standard analysis of the relationship between potential controlling factors and the distribution of landslides reported in Kargel et al (2016). This analysis allowed recognizing the most important controlling factor. This information was integrated with the field observations to verify the mapped units and to complete the mapping in area not accessible for field activity. Finally, the work was completed with the analysis and the use of a detailed landslide inventory produced by the University of Milano Bicocca that covers most of the area affected by coseismic landslides in

  15. Landslides Zonation Hazard: relation between geological structures and landslides occurrence in hilly tropical regions of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODRIGO I. CERRI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper presents a new approach of landslides zonation hazard studies, based on an integrated study of structural data along with geomorphological and external factors, in a hilly regions of Brazil, covered by a tropical humid rain-forest, called Serra do Mar. The Serra do Mar consists of a hilly region along the east coast of Brazil, with high slopes and many geological structures in a gneiss - migmatitic terrain. In contrast to traditional approaches, this method proposes that structural data (foliation, fractures and bedding planes and its relation with the slope geometry, is important to be consider in the landslide zonation hazard, along with declivity, relative relief, soil and rock properties, land use and vegetation cover and hydrogeological and climate factors. Results show that slopes with high hazard have the same dip direction of geological structures. Landslide zonation hazard using structural data contributes to a better understanding of how these structures, preserved in tropical residual soils, influence on slope stability and generates landslides.

  16. Landslides Zonation Hazard: relation between geological structures and landslides occurrence in hilly tropical regions of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, Rodrigo I; Reis, Fábio A G V; Gramani, Marcelo F; Giordano, Lucilia C; Zaine, José Eduardo

    2017-08-31

    This paper presents a new approach of landslides zonation hazard studies, based on an integrated study of structural data along with geomorphological and external factors, in a hilly regions of Brazil, covered by a tropical humid rain-forest, called Serra do Mar. The Serra do Mar consists of a hilly region along the east coast of Brazil, with high slopes and many geological structures in a gneiss - migmatitic terrain. In contrast to traditional approaches, this method proposes that structural data (foliation, fractures and bedding planes) and its relation with the slope geometry, is important to be consider in the landslide zonation hazard, along with declivity, relative relief, soil and rock properties, land use and vegetation cover and hydrogeological and climate factors. Results show that slopes with high hazard have the same dip direction of geological structures. Landslide zonation hazard using structural data contributes to a better understanding of how these structures, preserved in tropical residual soils, influence on slope stability and generates landslides.

  17. COMBINING NEURAL NETWORKS AND GEOSTATISTICS FOR LANDSLIDE HAZARD ASSESSMENT OF SAN SALVADOR METROPOLITAN AREA, EL SALVADOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ríos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This contribution describes the creation of a landslide hazard assessment model for San Salvador, a department in El Salvador. The analysis started with an aerial photointerpretation from Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources of El Salvador (MARN Spanish acronym, where 4792 landslides were identified and georeferenced along with 7 conditioning factors including: geomorphology, geology, rainfall intensity, peak ground acceleration, slope angle, distance to road, and distance to geological fault. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN were utilized to assess the susceptibility to landslides, achieving results where more than 80% of landslide were properly classified using in-sample and out of sample criteria. Logistic regression was used as base of comparison. Logistic regression obtained a lower performance. To complete the analysis we have performed interpolation of the points using the kriging method from geostatistical approach. Finally, the results show that is possible to derive a landslide hazard map, making use of a combination of ANNs and geostatistical techniques, thus the present study can help landslide mitigation in El Salvador.

  18. Assessing Landslide Characteristics and Developing a Landslide Potential Hazard Map in Rwanda and Uganda Using NASA Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, L.; Conner, P.; le Roux, J.; Finley, T.

    2015-12-01

    The International Emergency Disasters Database indicates that a total of 482 people have been killed and another 27,530 have been affected by landslides in Rwanda and Uganda, although the actual numbers are thought to be much higher. Data for individual countries are poorly tracked, but hotspots for devastating landslides occur throughout Rwanda and Uganda due to the local topography and soil type, intense rainfall events, and deforestation. In spite of this, there has been little research in this region that utilizes satellite imagery to estimate areas susceptible to landslides. This project utilized Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) data and Google Earth to identify landslides that occurred within the study area. These landslides were then added to SERVIR's Global Landslide Catalog (GLC). Next, Landsat 8 OLI, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM), and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Version 2 (SRTM V2) data were used to create a Landslide Susceptibility Map. This was combined with population data from the Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC) to create a Landslide Hazard map. A preliminary assessment of the relative performance of GPM and TRMM in identifying landslide conditions was also performed. The additions to the GLC, the Landslide Susceptibility Map, the Landslide Hazard Map, and the preliminary assessment of satellite rainfall performance will be used by SERVIR and the Regional Centre for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD) for disaster risk management, land use planning, and determining landslide conditions and moisture thresholds.

  19. Analysis of national and regional landslide inventories in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervás, J.; Van Den Eeckhaut, M.

    2012-04-01

    methods only occasionally included advanced technologies such as remote sensing. With regard to the inventory maps of most databases, the analysis illustrates the high variability of scales (between 1:10 000 and 1:1 M for national inventories, and from 1:10 000 to 1:25 000 for regional inventories), landslide classification systems and representation symbology. It also shows the difficulties to precisely locate landslides referred to in historical documents only. In addition, information on landslide magnitude, geometrical characteristics and age reported in national and regional databases greatly differs, even within the same database, as it strongly depends on the objectives of the database, the data collection methods used, the resources employed and the remaining landslide expression. In particular, landslide initiation and/or reactivation dates are generally estimated in less than 25% of records, thus making hazard and hence risk assessment difficult. In most databases, scarce information on landslide impact (damage and casualties) further hinders risk assessment at regional and national scales. Estimated landslide activity, which is very relevant to early warning and emergency management, is only included in half of the national databases and restricted to part of the landslides registered. Moreover, the availability of this information is not substantially higher in regional databases than in national ones. Most landslide databases further included information on geo-environmental characteristics at the landslide site, which is very important for modelling landslide zoning. Although a number of national and regional agencies provide free web-GIS visualisation services, the potential of existing landslide databases is often not fully exploited as, in many cases, access by the general public and external researchers is restricted. Additionally, the availability of information only in the national or local language is common to most national and regional databases

  20. Hazard Mapping of Structurally Controlled Landslide in Southern Leyte, Philippines Using High Resolution Digital Elevation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzon, Paul Kenneth; Rochelle Montalbo, Kristina; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    The 2006 Guinsaugon landslide in St. Bernard, Southern Leyte is the largest known mass movement of soil in the Philippines. It consisted of a 15 million m3 rockslide-debris avalanche from an approximately 700 m high escarpment produced by continuous movement of the Philippine fault at approximately 2.5 cm/year. The landslide was preceded by continuous heavy rainfall totaling 571.2 mm from February 8 to 12, 2006. The catastrophic landslide killed more than 1,000 people and displaced 19,000 residents over its 6,400 km path. To investigate the present-day morphology of the scar and potential failure that may occur, an analysis of a high-resolution digital elevation model (10 m resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar images in 2013) was conducted, leading to the generation of a structurally controlled landslide hazard map of the area. Discontinuity sets that could contribute to any failure mechanism were identified using Coltop 3D software which uses a unique lower Schmidt-Lambert color scheme for any given dip and dip direction. Thus, finding main morpho-structural orientations became easier. Matterocking, a software designed for structural analysis, was used to generate possible planes that could slide due to the identified discontinuity sets. Conefall was then utilized to compute the extent to which the rock mass will run out. The results showed potential instabilities in the scarp area of the 2006 Guinsaguon landslide and in adjacent slopes because of the presence of steep discontinuities that range from 45-60°. Apart from the 2006 Guinsaugon potential landslides, conefall simulation generated farther rock mass extent in adjacent slopes. In conclusion, there is a high probability of landslides in the municipality of St. Bernard Leyte, where the 2006 Guinsaugon Landslide occurred. Concerned agencies may use maps produced from this study for disaster preparedness and to facilitate long-term recovery planning for hazardous areas.

  1. Hazard Assessment Comparison of Tazhiping Landslide Before and After Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Dong; Qiao, Jianping; Wang, Meng

    2017-01-01

    Through investigation and analysis of geological conditions and mechanical parameters of the Taziping landslide, the finite volume method was adopted, and, the rheological model was adopted to simulate the landslide and avalanche entire mass movement process. The present paper adopted the GIS platform to simulate the mass movement process before and after treatment. This paper also provided the conditions and characteristic parameters of soil deposits (thickness, speed, and stresses) during t...

  2. Methodologies for the assessment of earthquake-triggered landslides hazard. A comparison of Logistic Regression and Artificial Neural Network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, M. J.; Malpica, J. A.; Benito, B.

    2009-04-01

    In recent years, interest in landslide hazard assessment studies has increased substantially. They are appropriate for evaluation and mitigation plan development in landslide-prone areas. There are several techniques available for landslide hazard research at a regional scale. Generally, they can be classified in two groups: qualitative and quantitative methods. Most of qualitative methods tend to be subjective, since they depend on expert opinions and represent hazard levels in descriptive terms. On the other hand, quantitative methods are objective and they are commonly used due to the correlation between the instability factors and the location of the landslides. Within this group, statistical approaches and new heuristic techniques based on artificial intelligence (artificial neural network (ANN), fuzzy logic, etc.) provide rigorous analysis to assess landslide hazard over large regions. However, they depend on qualitative and quantitative data, scale, types of movements and characteristic factors used. We analysed and compared an approach for assessing earthquake-triggered landslides hazard using logistic regression (LR) and artificial neural networks (ANN) with a back-propagation learning algorithm. One application has been developed in El Salvador, a country of Central America where the earthquake-triggered landslides are usual phenomena. In a first phase, we analysed the susceptibility and hazard associated to the seismic scenario of the 2001 January 13th earthquake. We calibrated the models using data from the landslide inventory for this scenario. These analyses require input variables representing physical parameters to contribute to the initiation of slope instability, for example, slope gradient, elevation, aspect, mean annual precipitation, lithology, land use, and terrain roughness, while the occurrence or non-occurrence of landslides is considered as dependent variable. The results of the landslide susceptibility analysis are checked using landslide

  3. Climate services for adapting landslide hazard prevention measures in the Vrancea Seismic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micu, Dana; Balteanu, Dan; Jurchescu, Marta; Sima, Mihaela; Micu, Mihai

    2014-05-01

    The Vrancea Seismic Region is covering an area of about 8 000 km2 in the Romanian Curvature Carpathians and Subcarpathians and it is considered one of Europe's most intensely multi-hazard-affected areas. Due to its geomorphic traits (heterogeneous morphostructural units of flysch mountains and molasse hills and depressions), the area is strongly impacted by extreme hydro-meteorological events which are potentially enhancing the numerous damages inflicted to a dense network of human settlements. An a priori knowledge of future climate change is a useful climate service for local authorities to develop regional adapting strategies and adequate prevention/preparedness frameworks. This paper aims at integrating the results of the high-resolution climate projections over the 21st century (within the FP7 ECLISE project) into the regional landslide hazard assessment. The requirements of users (Civil Protection, Land management, local authorities) for this area refer to reliable and high-resolution spatial data on landslide and flood hazard for short and medium-term risk management strategies. An insight into the future behavior of climate variability in the Vrancea Seismic Region, based on future climate projections of three regional models, under three RCPs (2.6, 4.5, 8.6), suggests a clear warming, both annually and seasonally and a rather limited annual precipitation decrease, but with a strong change of seasonality. A landslide inventory of 2485 cases (shallow and medium seated earth, debris and rock slides and earth and debris flows) was obtained based on large scale geomorphological mapping and aerial photos support (GeoEye, DigitalGlobe; provided by GoogleEarth and BingMaps). The landslides are uniformly distributed across the area, being considered representative for the entire morphostructural environment. Landslide susceptibility map was obtained using multivariate statistical analysis (logistic regression), while a relative landslide hazard index was computed

  4. Application of indicators derived by remote sensing for mapping of landslide hazard and vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidsvig, Unni; Vidar Vangelsten, Bjørn; Geiss, Christian; Klotz, Martin; Ekseth, Kristine; Taubenböck, Hannes

    2014-05-01

    The choice and the development of methods for risk assessment of landslides depends on several factors. Important factors are the type of landslide and the elements at risk, the choice of spatial and temporal scale, the purpose of the analysis and the needs of the end-users. In addition, data availability is a major constraint, which greatly affects the type of methods and models that can be developed. Remote sensing is a promising tool for an economical and up-to-date data collection, which also could be applied to monitor the dynamic development of risk. The spatial and temporal distribution of the risk for landslides can be assessed by monitoring hazard indicators (e.g. slope height and slope angle), exposure indicators (e.g. number of houses and the total population) and vulnerability indicators (e.g. population density, settlement structures or indicators related to structural vulnerability). Several of the indicators applicable for landslide risk and vulnerability can be obtained by remote sensing techniques. However, for better results, indicators from remote sensing should be combined with other type of data. In this work, a review on the application of indicators for landslide risk assessment in explicit models as well as an assessment of end user needs was conducted in order to determine the most relevant indicators for landslide hazard and vulnerability. Lists of recommended indicators, mainly derivable from remote sensing, have been developed. These indicators are supposed to be used in risk assessment, e.g. by combining hazard, vulnerability and exposure indicators to produce risk indices. Moreover schemes for ranking, weighting and aggregation of the indicators into hazard- and vulnerability indices are provided. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme [FP7-SPACE-2012-1] under Grant agreement No 312972 Framework to integrate Space-based and in-situ sENSing for dynamic v

  5. An establishment on the hazard mitigation system of large scale landslides for Zengwen reservoir watershed management in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuang-Jung; Lee, Ming-Hsi; Chen, Yie-Ruey; Huang, Meng-Hsuan; Yu, Chia-Ching

    2016-04-01

    Extremely heavy rainfall with accumulated rainfall amount more than 2900mm within continuous 3 day event occurred at southern Taiwan has been recognized as a serious natural hazard caused by Morakot typhoon in august, 2009. Very destructive large scale landslides and debris flows were induced by this heavy rainfall event. According to the satellite image processing and monitoring project was conducted by Soil & Water Conservation Bureau after Morakot typhoon. More than 10904 sites of landslide with total sliding area of 18113 ha were significantly found by this project. Also, the field investigation on all landslide areas were executed by this research on the basis of disaster type, scale and location related to the topographic condition, colluvium soil characteristics, bedrock formation and geological structure after Morakot hazard. The mechanism, characteristics and behavior of this large scale landslide combined with debris flow disasters are analyzed and Investigated to rule out the interaction of factors concerned above and identify the disaster extent of rainfall induced landslide during the period of this study. In order to reduce the disaster risk of large scale landslide and debris flow, the adaption strategy of hazard mitigation system should be set up as soon as possible and taken into consideration of slope land conservation, landslide control countermeasure planning, disaster database establishment, environment impact analysis and disaster risk assessment respectively. As a result, this 3-year research has been focused on the field investigation by using GPS/GIS/RS integration, mechanism and behavior study regarding to the rainfall induced landslide occurrence, disaster database and hazard mitigation system establishment. In fact, this project has become an important issue which was seriously concerned by the government and people live in Taiwan. Hopefully, all results come from this research can be used as a guidance for the disaster prevention and

  6. GIS COMPONENT BASED 3D LANDSLIDE HAZARD ASSESSMENT SYSTEM: 3DSLOPEGIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, based on a new Geographic Information System (GIS) grid-based three-dimensional (3D) deterministic model and taken the slope unit as the study object, the landslide hazard is mapped by the index of the 3D safety factor. Compared with the one-dimensional (1D) model of infinite slope, which is now widely used for deterministic model based landslide hazard assessment in GIS, the GIS grid-based 3D model is more acceptable and is more adaptable for three-dimensional landslide. Assuming the initial slip as the lower part of an ellipsoid, the 3D critical slip surface in the 3D slope stability analysis is obtained by means of a minimization of the 3D safety factor using the Monte Carlo random simulation. Using a hydraulic model tool for the watershed analysis in GIS, an automatic process has been developed for identifying the slope unit from digital elevation model (DEM) data. Compared with the grid-based landslide hazard mapping method, the slope unit possesses clear topographical meaning, so its results are more credible. All the calculations are implemented by a computational program, 3DSlopeGIS, in which a GIS component is used for fulfilling the GIS spatial analysis function, and all the data for the 3D slope safety factor calculation are in the form of GIS data (the vector and the grid layers). Because of all these merits of the GIS-based 3D landslide hazard mapping method, the complex algorithms and iteration procedures of the 3D problem can also be perfectly implemented.

  7. Landslide hazard assessment and mitigation measures in Philippine geothermal fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leynes, R.D.; Pioquinto, W.P.C.; Caranto, J.A. [PNOC Energy Development Corporation, Fort Bonifacio (Philippines)

    2005-04-01

    Simple, yet reliable, field criteria have been developed and are being used to qualitatively assess slope instability and slope failure potential in Philippine geothermal fields. Based on a hazard assessment classification of slopes along corridor facilities, sites for implementation of engineering measures are selected. Two case studies are presented. In Mindanao field, the ''very high-risk'' classification of an area resulted in the installation of pipe shelters, which subsequently shielded a section of a pipeline from landslides. Follow-up monitoring is also conducted using cheap, locally fabricated tools, such as surface extensometers. This is being done in Leyte field, where a landslide has threatened a transmission line tower. (author)

  8. Contribution of physical modelling to climate-driven landslide hazard mapping: an alpine test site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandromme, R.; Desramaut, N.; Baills, A.; Hohmann, A.; Grandjean, G.; Sedan, O.; Mallet, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a methodology for integrating climate change scenarios into quantitative hazard assessment and especially their precipitation component. The effects of climate change will be different depending on both the location of the site and the type of landslide considered. Indeed, mass movements can be triggered by different factors. This paper describes a methodology to address this issue and shows an application on an alpine test site. Mechanical approaches represent a solution for quantitative landslide susceptibility and hazard modeling. However, as the quantity and the quality of data are generally very heterogeneous at a regional scale, it is necessary to take into account the uncertainty in the analysis. In this perspective, a new hazard modeling method is developed and integrated in a program named ALICE. This program integrates mechanical stability analysis through a GIS software taking into account data uncertainty. This method proposes a quantitative classification of landslide hazard and offers a useful tool to gain time and efficiency in hazard mapping. However, an expertise approach is still necessary to finalize the maps. Indeed it is the only way to take into account some influent factors in slope stability such as heterogeneity of the geological formations or effects of anthropic interventions. To go further, the alpine test site (Barcelonnette area, France) is being used to integrate climate change scenarios into ALICE program, and especially their precipitation component with the help of a hydrological model (GARDENIA) and the regional climate model REMO (Jacob, 2001). From a DEM, land-cover map, geology, geotechnical data and so forth the program classifies hazard zones depending on geotechnics and different hydrological contexts varying in time. This communication, realized within the framework of Safeland project, is supported by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological

  9. Predictive susceptibility analysis of typhoon induced landslides in Central Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Keh-Jian; Lin, Zora

    2017-04-01

    Climate change caused by global warming affects Taiwan significantly for the past decade. The increasing frequency of extreme rainfall events, in which concentrated and intensive rainfalls generally cause geohazards including landslides and debris flows. The extraordinary, such as 2004 Mindulle and 2009 Morakot, hit Taiwan and induced serious flooding and landslides. This study employs rainfall frequency analysis together with the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) downscaling estimation to understand the temporal rainfall trends, distributions, and intensities in the adopted Wu River watershed in Central Taiwan. To assess the spatial hazard of the landslides, landslide susceptibility analysis was also applied. Different types of rainfall factors were tested in the susceptibility models for a better accuracy. In addition, the routes of typhoons were also considered in the predictive analysis. The results of predictive analysis can be applied for risk prevention and management in the study area.

  10. The Framework on Multi-Scale Landslide Hazard Evaluation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W. Y.; Liu, C.; Gao, J.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, Landslide has been one of the most frequent and seriously widespread natural hazards all over the world. How landslides can be monitored and predicted is an urgent research topic of the international landslide research community. Particularly, there is a lack of high quality and updated landslide risk maps and guidelines that can be employed to better mitigate and prevent landslide disasters in many emerging regions, including China. This paper considers national and regional scale, and introduces the framework on combining the empirical and physical models for landslide evaluation. Firstly, landslide susceptibility in national scale is mapped based on empirical model, and indicates the hot-spot areas. Secondly, the physically based model can indicate the process of slope instability in the hot-spot areas. The result proves that the framework is a systematic method on landslide hazard monitoring and early warning.

  11. Assessing landslide susceptibility, hazards and sediment yield in the Río El Estado watershed, Pico de Orizaba volcano, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legorreta Paulin, G.; Bursik, M. I.; Lugo Hubp, J.; Aceves Quesada, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    This work provides an overview of the on-going research project (Grant SEP-CONACYT # 167495) from the Institute of Geography at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) that seeks to conduct a multi-temporal landslide inventory, analyze the distribution of landslides, and characterize landforms that are prone to slope instability by using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The study area is the Río El Estado watershed that covers 5.2 km2 and lies on the southwestern flank of Pico de Orizaba volcano.The watershed was studied by using aerial photographs, fieldwork, and adaptation of the Landslide Hazard Zonation Protocol of the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, USA. 107 gravitational slope failures of six types were recognized: shallow landslides, debris-avalanches, deep-seated landslides, debris flows, earthflows, and rock falls. This analysis divided the watershed into 12 mass-wasting landforms on which gravitational processes occur: inner gorges, headwalls, active scarps of deep-seated landslides, meanders, plains, rockfalls, non-rule-identified inner gorges, non-rule-identified headwalls, non-rule-identified converging hillslopes and three types of hillslopes classified by their gradient: low, moderate, and high. For each landform the landslide area rate and the landslide frequency rate were calculated as well as the overall hazard rating. The slope-stability hazard rating has a range that goes from low to very high. The overall hazard rating for this watershed was very high. The shallow slide type landslide was selected and area and volume of individual landslides were retrieved from the watershed landslide inventory geo-database, to establish an empirical relationship between area and volume that takes the form of a power law. The relationship was used to estimate the total volume of landslides in the study area. The findings are important to understand the long-term evolution of the southwestern flank stream system of Pico de

  12. Contribution of topographically based landslide hazard modelling to the analysis of the spatial distribution and ecology of kauri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, L.F.G.; Verburg, P.H.; Schoorl, J.M.; Veldkamp, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the use of topographical attributes for the analysis of the spatial distribution and ecological cycle of kauri (Agathis australis), a canopy emergent conifer tree from northern New Zealand, is studied. Several primary and secondary topographical attributes are derived from a Digital

  13. Contribution of topographically based landslide hazard modelling to the analysis of the spatial distribution and ecology of kauri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, L.F.G.; Verburg, P.H.; Schoorl, J.M.; Veldkamp, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the use of topographical attributes for the analysis of the spatial distribution and ecological cycle of kauri (Agathis australis), a canopy emergent conifer tree from northern New Zealand, is studied. Several primary and secondary topographical attributes are derived from a Digital El

  14. Development of Smart Grid for Community and Cyber based Landslide Hazard Monitoring and Early Warning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnawati, D.; Wilopo, W.; Fathani, T. F.; Fukuoka, H.; Andayani, B.

    2012-12-01

    A Smart Grid is a cyber-based tool to facilitate a network of sensors for monitoring and communicating the landslide hazard and providing the early warning. The sensor is designed as an electronic sensor installed in the existing monitoring and early warning instruments, and also as the human sensors which comprise selected committed-people at the local community, such as the local surveyor, local observer, member of the local task force for disaster risk reduction, and any person at the local community who has been registered to dedicate their commitments for sending reports related to the landslide symptoms observed at their living environment. This tool is designed to be capable to receive up to thousands of reports/information at the same time through the electronic sensors, text message (mobile phone), the on-line participatory web as well as various social media such as Twitter and Face book. The information that should be recorded/ reported by the sensors is related to the parameters of landslide symptoms, for example the progress of cracks occurrence, ground subsidence or ground deformation. Within 10 minutes, this tool will be able to automatically elaborate and analyse the reported symptoms to predict the landslide hazard and risk levels. The predicted level of hazard/ risk can be sent back to the network of electronic and human sensors as the early warning information. The key parameters indicating the symptoms of landslide hazard were recorded/ monitored by the electrical and the human sensors. Those parameters were identified based on the investigation on geological and geotechnical conditions, supported with the laboratory analysis. The cause and triggering mechanism of landslide in the study area was also analysed in order to define the critical condition to launch the early warning. However, not only the technical but also social system were developed to raise community awareness and commitments to serve the mission as the human sensors, which will

  15. Reactivation hazard mapping for ancient landslides in West Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Dewitte

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Several examples in western Europe have shown that, at least for deep-seated rotational slides, reactivation of formerly slipped masses is a more frequent phenomenon than the occurrence of new landslides, therefore representing a higher hazard. We selected a study area comprised of 13 landslides located in the Flemish Ardennes (West Belgium and predicted the hazard related to scarp retreat. The scarp reactivations were identified from the comparison of DTMs produced for 1952 and 1996. Robust results were obtained with the Gamma operator of a fuzzy set approach and a combination of geomorphic, topographic and land use data. We built first a prediction model from the relations linking the 1952–1996 retreat events to the conditioning parameters of 1952. The prediction rate of the resulting susceptibility map is estimated by a cross-validation procedure. We then applied the statistics of this model to the data of 1996 in order to produce a susceptibility map responding to the present-day conditions. Finally, we estimated the conditional probabilities of occurrence of future reactivations for the period 1996–2036.

  16. Near real-time landslide hazard assessment using remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, D.; Stanley, T.; Cappelaere, P. G.; Simmons, J. M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing data offers the unique perspective to provide situational awareness of hydrometeorological hazards over large areas in a way that is impossible to achieve with in situ data. Recent work has shown that rainfall-triggered landslides, while typically local hazards that occupy small spatial areas, can be approximated over regional scales in near real-time. By leveraging data from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and other remote and in situ sources, we can represent the conditions for landslide triggering over broad regions. The landslide hazard assessment for situational awareness (LHASA) model integrates satellite precipitation data, a modeled and satellite-based soil moisture product and susceptibility information to improve the characterization of areas that may experience landslide activity at regional and global scales. The goal of LHASA is to better inform decision-making and disaster response agencies on landslide hazards at the regional and global scale. This system outputs straightforward landslide hazard assessment products available in near real-time that can be used to identify landslide-prone areas and the general timing of landslide initiation. This presentation summarizes the results of this modeling framework, discusses the utility of remote sensing products for landslide hazard characterization, and outlines the path forward for this modeling approach.

  17. Landslide Hazard Zonation and Risk Assessment of Ramganga Basin in Garhwal Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasini Pandey, Bindhy; Roy, Nikhil

    2016-04-01

    The Himalaya being unique in its physiographic, tectonic and climatic characteristics coupled with many natural and man-made factors is inherently prone to landslides. These landslides lead to mass loss of property and lives every year in Himalayas. Hence, Landslide Hazard Zonation is important to take quick and safe mitigation measures and make strategic planning for future development. The present study tries to explore the causes of landslides in Ramganga Basin in Garhwal Himalaya, which has an established history and inherent susceptibility to massive landslides has been chosen for landslide hazard zonation and risk assessment. The satellite imageries of LANDSAT, IRS P6, ASTER along with Survey of India (SOI) topographical sheets formed the basis for deriving baseline information on various parameters like slope, aspect, relative relief, drainage density, geology/lithology and land use/land cover. The weighted parametric method will be used to determine the degree of susceptibility to landslides. Finally, a risk map will be prepared from the landslide probability values, which will be classified into no risk, very low to moderate, high, and very high to severe landslide hazard risk zones. Keywords: Landslides, Hazard Zonation, Risk Assessment

  18. Geophysics of Volcanic Landslide Hazards: The Inside Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, C.; Deszcz-Pan, M.; Bedrosian, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    Flank collapses of volcanoes pose significant potential hazards, including triggering lahars, eruptions, and tsunamis. Significant controls on the stability of volcanoes are the distribution of hydrothermal alteration and the location of groundwater. Groundwater position, abundance, and flow rates within a volcano affect the transmission of fluid pressure and the transport of mass and heat. Interaction of groundwater with acid magmatic gases can lead to hydrothermal alteration that mechanically weakens rocks and makes them prone to failure and flank collapse. Therefore, detecting the presence and volume of hydrothermally altered rocks and shallow ground water is critical for evaluating landslide hazards. High-resolution helicopter magnetic and electromagnetic (HEM) data collected over the rugged, ice-covered Mount Adams, Mount Baker, Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens (Washington) and Mount Iliamna (Alaska) volcanoes, reveal the distribution of alteration, water and ice thickness essential to evaluating volcanic landslide hazards. These data, combined with geological mapping, other geophysical data and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of appreciable thicknesses (>500 m) of water-saturated hydrothermally altered rock west of the modern summit of Mount Rainier in the Sunset Amphitheater region and in the central core of Mount Adams north of the summit. Water-saturated alteration at Mount Baker is restricted to thinner (glaciers on Mount Iliamna. Removal of ice and snow during eruptions and landslide can result in lahars and floods. Ice thickness measurements critical for flood and mudflow hazards studies are very sparse on most volcanoes. The HEM data are used to estimate ice thickness over portions of Mount Baker and Mount Adams volcanoes. The best estimates for ice thickness are obtained over relatively low resistivity (<600 ohm-m) ground for the main ice cap on Mount Adams and over most of the summit of Mount Baker. The modeled distribution of

  19. Development of the method of landslide hazard assessment on areas of highways in terms of fuzzy information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Леонід Іванович Нефьодов

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Factors of landslide hazard on areas of highways have been analyzed. The main steps of fuzzy inference method are described. The method of landslide hazard assessment on areas of highways in terms of fuzzy information has been developed. The example of landslide hazard assessment on areas of highways in terms of fuzzy information in Matlab has been provided.

  20. Investigating applicability of Haeri-Samiee landslide hazard zonation model in Moalemkalayeh watershed, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshtirad, M.; Noormandipour, N.

    2009-04-01

    Identification of regions having potential for landslide occurrence is one of the basic measures in natural resources management which decreases damages causes by these phenomena. For this purpose different landslide hazard zonation models were proposed based on the environmental conditions and goals. In this research applicability of Haeri-samiee Landslide Hazard Zonations Model has been investigated in Moalemkalayeh watershed. For doing this, existing landslides identified and their inventory map was prepared as earthly evidence. Topographical map (1:50000) was divided into 514 cellular network as working unit. Landslide hazard zonation map provided based on H.S. model. We investigated the level of similarity potential hazard classes and figures of the two models with earthly evidence (landslide inventory map) in the SPSS and Minitab environments. Our results showed that there is a significant correlation at the 0.01 level between potential hazard classes and figures with the number of landslides, area of landslide, as well as the multiplication of the number and area of landslides in the H.S. model. Therefore H.S. model is the suitable model for Moalemkalayeh watershed.

  1. Risk analysis of landslide disaster in Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koesuma, S.; Saido, A. P.; Fukuda, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Ponorogo is one of regency in South-West of East Java Province, Indonesia, where located in subduction zone between Eurasia and Australia plate tectonics. It has a lot of mountain area which is disaster-prone area for landslide. We have collected landslide data in 305 villages in Ponorogo and make it to be Hazards Index. Then we also calculate Vulnerability Index, Economic Loss index, Environmental Damage Index and Capacity Index. The risk analysis map is composed of three components H (Hazards), V (Vulnerability, Economic Loss index, Environmental Damage Index) and C (Capacity Index). The method is based on regulations of National Disaster Management Authority (BNPB) number 02/2012 and number 03/2012. It has three classes of risk index, i.e. Low, Medium and High. Ponorogo city has a medium landslide risk index.

  2. Landslide Hazard Assessment and Mapping in the Guil Catchment (Queyras, Southern French Alps): From Landslide Inventory to Susceptibility Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulleau, Louise; Bétard, François; Carlier, Benoît; Lissak, Candide; Fort, Monique

    2016-04-01

    Landslides are common natural hazards in the Southern French Alps, where they may affect human lives and cause severe damages to infrastructures. As a part of the SAMCO research project dedicated to risk evaluation in mountain areas, this study focuses on the Guil river catchment (317 km2), Queyras, to assess landslide hazard poorly studied until now. In that area, landslides are mainly occasional, low amplitude phenomena, with limited direct impacts when compared to other hazards such as floods or snow avalanches. However, when interacting with floods during extreme rainfall events, landslides may have indirect consequences of greater importance because of strong hillslope-channel connectivity along the Guil River and its tributaries (i.e. positive feedbacks). This specific morphodynamic functioning reinforces the need to have a better understanding of landslide hazards and their spatial distribution at the catchment scale to prevent local population from disasters with multi-hazard origin. The aim of this study is to produce a landslide susceptibility mapping at 1:50 000 scale as a first step towards global estimation of landslide hazard and risk. The three main methodologies used for assessing landslide susceptibility are qualitative (i.e. expert opinion), deterministic (i.e. physics-based models) and statistical methods (i.e. probabilistic models). Due to the rapid development of geographical information systems (GIS) during the last two decades, statistical methods are today widely used because they offer a greater objectivity and reproducibility at large scales. Among them, multivariate analyses are considered as the most robust techniques, especially the logistic regression method commonly used in landslide susceptibility mapping. However, this method like others is strongly dependent on the accuracy of the input data to avoid significant errors in the final results. In particular, a complete and accurate landslide inventory is required before the modelling

  3. Modeling and Testing Landslide Hazard Using Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutasem Sh. Alkhasawneh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a decision tree model for specifying the importance of 21 factors causing the landslides in a wide area of Penang Island, Malaysia. These factors are vegetation cover, distance from the fault line, slope angle, cross curvature, slope aspect, distance from road, geology, diagonal length, longitude curvature, rugosity, plan curvature, elevation, rain perception, soil texture, surface area, distance from drainage, roughness, land cover, general curvature, tangent curvature, and profile curvature. Decision tree models are used for prediction, classification, and factors importance and are usually represented by an easy to interpret tree like structure. Four models were created using Chi-square Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID, Exhaustive CHAID, Classification and Regression Tree (CRT, and Quick-Unbiased-Efficient Statistical Tree (QUEST. Twenty-one factors were extracted using digital elevation models (DEMs and then used as input variables for the models. A data set of 137570 samples was selected for each variable in the analysis, where 68786 samples represent landslides and 68786 samples represent no landslides. 10-fold cross-validation was employed for testing the models. The highest accuracy was achieved using Exhaustive CHAID (82.0% compared to CHAID (81.9%, CRT (75.6%, and QUEST (74.0% model. Across the four models, five factors were identified as most important factors which are slope angle, distance from drainage, surface area, slope aspect, and cross curvature.

  4. Mapping of hazard from rainfall-triggered landslides in developing countries: Examples from Honduras and Micronesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, E.L.; Reid, M.E.; McKenna, J.P.; Michael, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Loss of life and property caused by landslides triggered by extreme rainfall events demonstrates the need for landslide-hazard assessment in developing countries where recovery from such events often exceeds the country's resources. Mapping landslide hazards in developing countries where the need for landslide-hazard mitigation is great but the resources are few is a challenging, but not intractable problem. The minimum requirements for constructing a physically based landslide-hazard map from a landslide-triggering storm, using the simple methods we discuss, are: (1) an accurate mapped landslide inventory, (2) a slope map derived from a digital elevation model (DEM) or topographic map, and (3) material strength properties of the slopes involved. Provided that the landslide distribution from a triggering event can be documented and mapped, it is often possible to glean enough topographic and geologic information from existing databases to produce a reliable map that depicts landslide hazards from an extreme event. Most areas of the world have enough topographic information to provide digital elevation models from which to construct slope maps. In the likely event that engineering properties of slope materials are not available, reasonable estimates can be made with detailed field examination by engineering geologists or geotechnical engineers. Resulting landslide hazard maps can be used as tools to guide relocation and redevelopment, or, more likely, temporary relocation efforts during severe storm events such as hurricanes/typhoons to minimize loss of life and property. We illustrate these methods in two case studies of lethal landslides in developing countries: Tegucigalpa, Honduras (during Hurricane Mitch in 1998) and the Chuuk Islands, Micronesia (during Typhoon Chata'an in 2002).

  5. Evolution trends in vulnerability of R/C buildings exposed to earthquake induced landslide hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulou, S.; Pitilakis, K.

    2012-04-01

    The assessment of landslide risk depends on the evaluation of landslide hazard and the vulnerability of exposed structures which both change with time. The real, dynamic vulnerability modeling of structures due to landslides may be significantly affected by aging considerations, anthropogenic actions, cumulative damage from past landslide events and retrofitting measures. The present work aims at the development of an efficient analytical methodology to assess the evolution of building vulnerability with time exposed to earthquake -induced landslide hazard. In particular, the aging of typical RC buildings is considered by including probabilistic models of corrosion deterioration of the RC elements within the vulnerability modeling framework. Two potential adverse corrosion scenarios are examined: chloride and carbonation induced corrosion of the steel reinforcement. An application of the proposed methodology to reference low-rise RC buildings exposed to the combined effect of seismically induced landslide differential displacements and reinforcement corrosion is provided. Both buildings with stiff and flexible foundation system standing near the crest of a potentially precarious soil slope are examined. Non linear static time history analyses of the buildings are performed using a fibre-based finite element code. In this analysis type, the applied loads (displacements) at the foundation level vary in the pseudo-time domain, according to a load pattern prescribed as the differential permanent landslide displacement (versus time) curves triggered by the earthquake. The distribution for the corrosion initiation time is assessed through Monte Carlo simulation using appropriate probabilistic models for the carbonation and the chloride induced corrosion. Then, the loss of area of steel over time due to corrosion of the RC elements is modeled as a reduction in longitudinal reinforcing bar cross-sectional area in the fibre section model. Time dependent structural limit

  6. Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, H. K.; Ichinose, G. A.; Somerville, P. G.; Polet, J.

    2006-12-01

    The recent tsunami disaster caused by the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake has focused our attention to the hazard posed by large earthquakes that occur under water, in particular subduction zone earthquakes, and the tsunamis that they generate. Even though these kinds of events are rare, the very large loss of life and material destruction caused by this earthquake warrant a significant effort towards the mitigation of the tsunami hazard. For ground motion hazard, Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) has become a standard practice in the evaluation and mitigation of seismic hazard to populations in particular with respect to structures, infrastructure and lifelines. Its ability to condense the complexities and variability of seismic activity into a manageable set of parameters greatly facilitates the design of effective seismic resistant buildings but also the planning of infrastructure projects. Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) achieves the same goal for hazards posed by tsunami. There are great advantages of implementing such a method to evaluate the total risk (seismic and tsunami) to coastal communities. The method that we have developed is based on the traditional PSHA and therefore completely consistent with standard seismic practice. Because of the strong dependence of tsunami wave heights on bathymetry, we use a full waveform tsunami waveform computation in lieu of attenuation relations that are common in PSHA. By pre-computing and storing the tsunami waveforms at points along the coast generated for sets of subfaults that comprise larger earthquake faults, we can efficiently synthesize tsunami waveforms for any slip distribution on those faults by summing the individual subfault tsunami waveforms (weighted by their slip). This efficiency make it feasible to use Green's function summation in lieu of attenuation relations to provide very accurate estimates of tsunami height for probabilistic calculations, where one typically computes

  7. Modelling landslide hazard, soil redistribution and sediment yield of landslides on the Ugandan footslopes of Mount Elgon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, L.; Knapen, A.; Kitutu, M.G.; Poesen, J.; Deckers, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the LAPSUS-LS landslide model, together with a digital terrain analysis of topographic attributes, is used as a spatially explicit tool to simulate recent shallow landslides in Manjiya County on the Ugandan slopes of Mount Elgon. Manjiya County is a densely populated mountainous area

  8. Application of remotely sensed data for landslide hazard assessment and forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach Kirschbaum, D.; Stanley, T.; Simmons, J. M. D.; Cappelaere, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past five years, rainfall-triggered landslides have caused over 16,000 fatalities in 65 countries and have resulted in higher annual property losses than any other natural disaster. Yet while hurricanes and earthquakes have global monitoring systems in place to alert disaster response agencies, governments and regional humanitarian groups of potential disasters and related impacts, no such real-time monitoring system exists for rainfall-triggered landslides. This work introduces a new regionally-based system to evaluate landslide hazards in near-real-time through the application of remotely sensed and in situ data. Build upon existing modeling efforts, the landslide hazard assessment and nowcasting system couples satellite precipitation data, a modeled and satellite-based soil moisture product and susceptibility information to improve the characterization of areas that may experience landslide activity. The goal of this system is to better inform decision-making and disaster response agencies on landslide hazards at the regional scale. This system outputs a straightforward, easily-interpreted set of landslide hazard assessment products available in near real-time for the Mesoamerica region that can be used to both identify landslide-prone areas and forecast the potential location and timing of landslide initiation in the future. This research presents the prototype regional model tested over Central America and the Caribbean region using satellite-based information including Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) near real-time rainfall, modeled soil moisture, topography, soils, road networks and distance to fault zones. These variables are integrated within a simple algorithm framework and model outputs provide a probabilistic representation of potential landslide activity over the region. This presentation summarizes the preliminary results of this modeling framework, discusses the utility of these products for landslide hazard characterization

  9. Landslides in Nicaragua - Mapping, Inventory, Hazard Assessment, Vulnerability Reduction, and Forecasting Attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dévoli, G.; Strauch, W.; Álvarez, A.; Muñoz, A.; Kjekstad, O.

    2009-04-01

    A successful landslide hazard and risk assessment requires awareness and good understanding of the potential landslide problems within the geographic area involved. However, this requirement is not always met in developing countries where population, scientific community, and the government may not be aware of the landslide threat. The landslide hazard assessment is often neglected or is based on sparse and not well documented technical information. In Nicaragua (Central America), the basic conditions for landslide hazard and risk assessment were first created after the catastrophic landslides triggered by Hurricane Mitch in October 1998. A single landslide took the life of thousands of people at Casita volcano forcing entire communities to be evacuated or relocated and, furthermore, thousands of smaller landslides caused loss of fertile soils and pasture lands, and made serious damages to the infrastructure. Since those events occurred, the public awareness has increased and the country relies now on new local and national governmental laws and policies, on a number of landslide investigations, and on educational and training programs. Dozens of geologists have been capacitated to investigate landslide prone areas, The Instituto Nicaragüense de Estudios Territoriales (INETER), governmental geo-scientific institution, has assumed the responsibility to help land-use planners and public officials to reduce geological hazard losses. They are committed to work cooperatively with national, international, and local agencies, universities and the private sector to provide scientific information and improve public safety through forecasting and warnings. However, in order to provide successful long-term landslide hazard assessment, the institutions must face challenges related to the scarcity and varied quality of available landslide information; collection and access to dispersed data and documents; organization of landslide information in a form that can be easy to

  10. UAV for landslide mapping and deformation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Beiqi; Liu, Chun

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) can be a flexible, cost-effective, and accurate method to monitor landslides with high resolution aerial images. Images acquired on 05 May 2013 and 13 December 2014 of the Xishan landslide, China, have been used to produce a high-resolution ortho-mosaic of the entire landslide and digital elevation model (DEM). The UAV capability for imaging detection and displacements on the landslide surface has been evaluated, and the subsequent image processing approaches for suitably georectifying the data have been assessed. Objects derived from the segmentation of a multispectral image were used as classifying units for landslide object-oriented analysis. Spectral information together with various morphometric characteristics was applied for recognizing landslides from false positives. Digital image correlation technique was evaluated to quantify and map terrain displacements. The magnitude and direction of the displacement vectors derived from correlating two temporal UAV images corresponded to a visual interpretation of landslide change. Therefore, the UAV can demonstrate its capability for producing valuable landslide mapping data and deformation information.

  11. Using geotypes for landslide hazard assessment and mapping: a coupled field and GIS-based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgot, S.; Parriaux, A.

    2009-04-01

    Switzerland is exceptionally subjected to landslides; indeed, about 10% of its area is considered as unstable. Making this observation, its Department of the Environment (BAFU) introduces in 1997 a method to realize landslide hazard maps. It is routinely used but, like most of the methods applied in Europe to map unstable areas, it is mainly based on the signs of previous or current phenomena (geomorphologic mapping, archive consultation, etc.) even though instabilities can appear where there is nothing to show that they existed earlier. Furthermore, the transcription from the geomorphologic map to the hazard map can vary according to the geologist or the geographer who realizes it: this method is affected by a certain lack of transparency. The aim of this project is to introduce the bedrock of a new method for landslide hazard mapping; based on instability predisposition assessment, it involves the designation of main factors for landslide susceptibility, their integration in a GIS to calculate a landslide predisposition index and the implementation of new methods to evaluate these factors; to be competitive, these processes have to be both cheap and quick. To identify the most important parameters to consider for assessing slope stability, we chose a large panel of topographic, geomechanic and hydraulic parameters and tested their importance by calculating safety factors on theoretical landslides using Geostudio 2007®; thus, we could determine that slope, cohesion, hydraulic conductivity and saturation play an important role in soil stability. After showing that cohesion and hydraulic conductivity of loose materials are strongly linked to their granulometry and plasticity index, we implemented two new field tests, one based on teledetection and one coupled sedimentometric and blue methylen test to evaluate these parameters. From these data, we could deduce approximated values of maximum cohesion and saturated hydraulic conductivity. The hydraulic conductivity of

  12. The landslide inventory as the basis of susceptibility and hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copons, Ramon; Linares, Rogelio; Cirés, Jordi; Tallada, Anna

    2010-05-01

    Landslide inventory involves the location, classification, volume, activity and others characteristics of the landslides in an area (Fell et al, 2008). Landslide inventory can includes also the location of lithologies prone to instability, structural conditions and silent witnesses (affected vegetation, damaged buildings, etc). This high quality information about landslides requires the use of images acquired from remote sensing and the field observation. Landslide inventory is the basis for susceptibility, hazard and risk assessment (Fell et al., 2008) because supplies information contrasted on the field. Unfortunately, landslide inventory has limitations so it usually is not totally complete or landslides boundaries mapped are influenced by the techniques used, resources and the ability of the field geologist. These usual errors included in the landslide inventory are difficult to estimate but are crucial to know since can create greater errors on results of susceptibility, hazard and risk assessed by further approaches including heuristic, empirical and deterministic ones. In many cases it is not possible to make an inventory including all the landslides occurred in the past because morphology of older landslides could be extremely eroded, or they are partially or totally covered by younger vents. Moreover, several external factors (like extreme forestation, urbanization or erosion) do not allow their identification or difficult their delimitation. Our work focuses on: (i) the establishment of a procedure for gathering data to complete a landslide inventory, and (ii) the determination of the error included in the landslide inventory whichever the field geologist. These issues are useful for administrations for: (i) undertaking landslide inventories across the country by several geologists, and (ii) managing hazard knowing limitations of the hazard zoning obtained from the landslide inventory. For accomplishing our purposes we have selected an area located about

  13. Discrete Element Analysis of Huangtupo Landslide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the deep geology and the geological structure of Huangtupo landslide, an ancient landslide in the reservoir of the Three Gorges, the geo-environmental model of the landslide is established to analyze quantitatively the sliding mechanism by using the discrete element method. It is concluded that interbedding structure of soft and hard formation consists of the main geological background,which induced the arching of the formation under gravity. Stability analysis of different loadings shows that the ground building weight on the middle slope may restrain the extension of shear sliding zone below, but may activate the foot area which will reduce the safety factor of the front.

  14. Development of models to inform a national Daily Landslide Hazard Assessment for Great Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Tom A.; Reeves, Helen J.; Dashwood, Claire; Pennington, Catherine; Freeborough, Katy; Mackay, Jonathan D.; Uhlemann, Sebastian S.; Chambers, Jonathan E.; Wilkinson, Paul B.

    2015-04-01

    The British Geological Survey (BGS) provides landside hazard information as part of its strategic role. This includes, among others, the issuing of a national Daily Landslide Hazard Assessment (DLHA) one of the hazards assessments issued by the Natural Hazard Partnership. A range of tools are currently under development to further develop reliability and enhance the granularity of these assessments. The BGS has three datasets that support and underpin this research; the National Landslide Database (NLD), the DiGMap mass movement layer and GeoSure. The NLD holds more than 16,500 records of landslides across Great Britain (GB) stored in an Oracle database that is accessible through an ESRI ® ArcGIS interface. DiGMap comprises a digital map layer with outlines of all landslides recorded by field geologists. GeoSure is a BGS product that assesses the potential for ground movement across GB in six layers, one of which is landslide potential. The GeoSure landslide potential layer incorporates information on conditioning factors, such as local geology, geotechnical parameters and topography. These are combined within a GIS to derive a map showing where a landslide may occur under favourable conditions (e.g. persistent wet conditions due to adverse weather). Different types of terrain will be affected by different modes of landsliding and a series of hierarchical landslide domains have been established capturing the spatial consistency of slope deformation response. Each landslide domain represents an area of similar physiographic and geological characteristics which has shaped the style of landsliding (recognising relic, active and potentially active processes). In turn, this enables development of regional thresholds that are relevant to characteristic landslides in these domains. The wet period from summer 2012 into early spring 2013 resulted in a surge of recorded landslides, particularly in SW England and S Wales. Approximations of regional effective precipitation

  15. Linking rainfall-induced landslides with debris flows runout patterns towards catchment scale hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Linfeng; Lehmann, Peter; McArdell, Brian; Or, Dani

    2017-03-01

    Debris flows and landslides induced by heavy rainfall represent an ubiquitous and destructive natural hazard in steep mountainous regions. For debris flows initiated by shallow landslides, the prediction of the resulting pathways and associated hazard is often hindered by uncertainty in determining initiation locations, volumes and mechanical state of the mobilized debris (and by model parameterization). We propose a framework for linking a simplified physically-based debris flow runout model with a novel Landslide Hydro-mechanical Triggering (LHT) model to obtain a coupled landslide-debris flow susceptibility and hazard assessment. We first compared the simplified debris flow model of Perla (1980) with a state-of-the art continuum-based model (RAMMS) and with an empirical model of Rickenmann (1999) at the catchment scale. The results indicate that predicted runout distances by the Perla model are in reasonable agreement with inventory measurements and with the other models. Predictions of localized shallow landslides by LHT model provides information on water content of released mass. To incorporate effects of water content and flow viscosity as provided by LHT on debris flow runout, we adapted the Perla model. The proposed integral link between landslide triggering susceptibility quantified by LHT and subsequent debris flow runout hazard calculation using the adapted Perla model provides a spatially and temporally resolved framework for real-time hazard assessment at the catchment scale or along critical infrastructure (roads, railroad lines).

  16. Landslides hazard mapping integrating remote sensing and geo-morphological data in the Sorrentina Peninsula coastal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    spinetti, claudia; bisson, marina; tolomei, cristiano; colini, laura; galvani, alessandro; moro, marco; saroli, michele; sepe, vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    The densely inhabited Campania region (Southern Italy) is affected by numerous and dangerous landslides. In particular, the coastal area of Sorrentina Peninsula is one of the zones most subjected to two types of landslides: volcanoclastic debris flows and rock fall. The first type occurs during intensive or persistent precipitations and on significant hillslopes where carbonatic bedrock is covered by pyroclastic deposits related to the Somma-Vesuvius and Phlegrean Fields explosive activity. The second type could be triggered by seismic events and occurs in areas where outcropping bedrock with steep slopes (e.g. the cliffs) is subjected to coastal erosion generating cliff instability. In order to improve the landslides hazard zonation in the Sorrentina Peninsula coastal area, we show a multidisciplinary approach to identify the areas more prone to generate such types of landslide. Our approach involves the analyses of ERS (temporal span between 1992-2000), Envisat (2003-2010), and COSMO-SkyMed (2013-2015) SAR data elaborated applying multi-temporal InSAR techniques to obtain the ground displacement maps and the relative displacement time series, integrated by means of GPS data. These maps were used to identify the instability areas and subsequently investigated by field survey, airborne photogeological interpretation and morphometric elaborations derived from airborne Lidar information. In addition, the land cover mapping was obtained using satellite high-medium resolution data. The analysis was performed in a GIS environment allowing to identify the main parameters that influence the slope instability and to obtain the landslide hazard map. finally, the comparison with the landslides historical database provides the different landslides susceptibility degrees classes.

  17. Examining the impact of landslide disturbances on hydrologic response dynamics using a paired hillslope approach: Implications for landslide hazard persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, B. B.; Smith, J. B.; Baum, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Landslides not only alter hillslope topography, but also change the hydrologic storage capacity and flow path connectivity within the subsurface. Influences of this disturbance on hydrology and resulting susceptibility to subsequent landsliding remain poorly understood. Since landslides often occur at the site of previous slope failures, we examined differences in hydrologic response between a vegetated hillslope (VH) and an active landslide hillslope (LH) using continuous monitoring of rainfall and subsurface pore pressures and saturation. These paired hillslopes are situated 0.5 km apart on steep coastal bluffs of heterogeneous glacial outwash deposits along the northeastern shore of Puget Sound, Washington. The average slopes of VH and LH are comparable (35 and 32°, respectively), the total relief of the bluffs is the same (42 m), and our field observations suggest that glacial deposits underlying both slopes are similar (mix of cobbles, gravel, sand, slits, and clays). The VH is mantled by a thin layer of sandy-silty colluvium and supports a dense forest. In early 2013 the LH also supported a dense forest, at which time a major slope failure substantially altered the topography, vegetation pattern, and regolith material. In 2015 we observed a clay-rich landslide deposit at the LH, with sparse vegetation. Findings from our 2015-2016 monitoring include: (1) lower cumulative rainfall at the VH, due to canopy interception, (2) earlier winter transition to wet, near-saturated conditions at the LH, (3) longer persistence of positive pore pressures at the LH between major storm events, and (4) episodic, complex failures at the LH, such as block falls from the headscarp, translational slides, and mudflows on lower portions of the deposit. These observed differences between the hillslopes support the hypothesis that disturbances introduced by landsliding may promote the hydrologic conditions contributing to slope instability and the persistence of landslide hazards.

  18. Land use change and landslide characteristics analysis for community-based disaster mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yuan; Huang, Wen-Lin

    2013-05-01

    On August 8, 2009, Typhoon Morakot brought heavy rain to Taiwan, causing numerous landslides and debris flows in the Taihe village area of Meishan Township, Chiayi County, in south-central Taiwan. In the Taihe land is primary used for agriculture and land use management may be a factor in the area's landslides. This study explores Typhoon Morakot-induced landslides and land use changes between 1999 and 2009 using GIS with the aid of field investigation. Spot 5 satellite images with a resolution of 2.5 m are used for landslide interpretation and manually digitalized in GIS. A statistical analysis for landslide frequency-area distribution was used to identify the landslide characteristics associated with different types of land use. There were 243 landslides with a total area of 2.75 km(2) in the study area. The area is located in intrinsically fragile combinations of sandstone and shale. Typhoon Morakot-induced landslides show a power-law distribution in the study area. Landslides were mainly located in steep slope areas containing natural forest and in areas planted with bamboo, tea, and betel nut. Land covered with natural forest shows the highest landslide ratio, followed by bamboo, betel nut, and tea. Landslides thus show a higher ratio in areas planted with shallow root vegetation such as bamboo, betel nut, and tea. Furthermore, the degree of basin development is proportional to the landslide ratio. The results show that a change in vegetation cover results in a modified landslide area and frequency and changed land use areas have higher landslide ratios than non-changed. Land use management and community-based disaster prevention are needed in mountainous areas of Taiwan for hazard mitigation.

  19. NASA Hazard Analysis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, George

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews The NASA Hazard Analysis process. The contents include: 1) Significant Incidents and Close Calls in Human Spaceflight; 2) Subsystem Safety Engineering Through the Project Life Cycle; 3) The Risk Informed Design Process; 4) Types of NASA Hazard Analysis; 5) Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA); 6) Hazard Analysis Process; 7) Identify Hazardous Conditions; 8) Consider All Interfaces; 9) Work a Preliminary Hazard List; 10) NASA Generic Hazards List; and 11) Final Thoughts

  20. A new approach to evaluating landslide hazard in the mountain glacial environment - mass and hypsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Madison L.; Evans, Stephen G.

    2016-04-01

    The magnitude and frequency of glacial hazards is central to the discussion of the effect of climate change in the mountain glacial environment and has persisted as a research question since the 1990s. We propose a new approach to evaluating mass flow (including landslides) hazard in the glacier environment conditioned by temporal and elevation changes in glacier-ice loss. Using digital topographic data sets and InSAR techniques we investigate the hypsometry of ice loss in a well-defined glacial environment in the southwest Coast Mountains of SW British Columbia (the Mount Meager Volcanic Complex - MMVC). The volume and elevation of major mass movements that have taken place in the MMVC since the 1930s is established and compared to the volume and hypsometry of glacial ice loss in the same time period. In the analysis, the volumes of ice loss and landslides are converted to units of mass. The elevation of a sequence of large-scale mass movements do not suggest a close correlation with the elevation or temporal sequence of greatest ice loss. Instead, the temporal relationship between the mass of ice loss and mass lost from slopes in landslides (including ice, rock, and debris) is suggestive of a steady state. The same approach is then applied to the Cordillera Blanca (Peruvian Andes) where we show that the greatest mass moved from the glacier system by glacier-related mass flows since the 1930s, corresponded generally to the period of greatest ice loss suggesting a decay-based response to recent glacier ice loss. As in the MMVC, the elevation of mass flow events is not correlated with the estimated hypsometry of glacial ice loss; in both regions the largest landslide in the period investigated occurred from a high mountain peak defining a topographic divide and where ice loss was minimal. It thus appears that mountain glacial environments exhibit different landslide responses to glacier ice loss that may be conditioned by the rate of ice loss and strongly influenced

  1. Multiple Landslide-Hazard Scenarios Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Richard J.; Graymer, Russell W.

    2008-01-01

    With the exception of Los Angeles, perhaps no urban area in the United States is more at risk from landsliding, triggered by either precipitation or earthquake, than the San Francisco Bay region of northern California. By January each year, seasonal winter storms usually bring moisture levels of San Francisco Bay region hillsides to the point of saturation, after which additional heavy rainfall may induce landslides of various types and levels of severity. In addition, movement at any time along one of several active faults in the area may generate an earthquake large enough to trigger landslides. The danger to life and property rises each year as local populations continue to expand and more hillsides are graded for development of residential housing and its supporting infrastructure. The chapters in the text consist of: *Introduction by Russell W. Graymer *Chapter 1 Rainfall Thresholds for Landslide Activity, San Francisco Bay Region, Northern California by Raymond C. Wilson *Chapter 2 Susceptibility to Deep-Seated Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Richard J. Pike and Steven Sobieszczyk *Chapter 3 Susceptibility to Shallow Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Kevin M. Schmidt and Steven Sobieszczyk *Chapter 4 Landslide Hazard Modeled for the Cities of Oakland, Piedmont, and Berkeley, Northern California, from a M=7.1 Scenario Earthquake on the Hayward Fault Zone by Scott B. Miles and David K. Keefer *Chapter 5 Synthesis of Landslide-Hazard Scenarios Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Richard J. Pike The plates consist of: *Plate 1 Susceptibility to Deep-Seated Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Richard J. Pike, Russell W. Graymer, Sebastian Roberts, Naomi B. Kalman, and Steven Sobieszczyk *Plate 2 Susceptibility to Shallow Landsliding Modeled for the Oakland-Berkeley Area, Northern California by Kevin M. Schmidt and Steven

  2. Field-based assessment of landslide hazards resulting from the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B. D.; Jibson, R.

    2015-12-01

    The M7.8 2015 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake sequence caused thousands of fatalities, destroyed entire villages, and displaced millions of residents. The earthquake sequence also triggered thousands of landslides in the steep Himalayan topography of Nepal and China; these landslides were responsible for hundreds of fatalities and blocked vital roads, trails, and rivers. With the support of USAID's Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance, the U.S. Geological Survey responded to this crisis by providing landslide-hazard expertise to Nepalese agencies and affected villages. Assessments of landslide hazards following earthquakes are essential to identify vulnerable populations and infrastructure, and inform government agencies working on rebuilding and mitigation efforts. However, assessing landslide hazards over an entire earthquake-affected region (in Nepal, estimated to be ~30,000 km2), and in exceedingly steep, inaccessible topography presents a number of logistical challenges. We focused the scope of our assessment by conducting helicopter- and ground-based landslide assessments in 12 priority areas in central Nepal identified a priori from satellite photo interpretation performed in conjunction with an international consortium of remote sensing experts. Our reconnaissance covered 3,200 km of helicopter flight path, extending over an approximate area of 8,000 km2. During our field work, we made 17 site-specific assessments and provided landslide hazard information to both villages and in-country agencies. Upon returning from the field, we compiled our observations and further identified and assessed 74 river-blocking landslide dams, 12% of which formed impoundments larger than 1,000 m2 in surface area. These assessments, along with more than 11 hours of helicopter-based video, and an overview of hazards expected during the 2015 summer monsoon have been publically released (http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/ofr20151142) for use by in-country and international agencies.

  3. Communicating landslide hazard and risk through global catalogs and a forecasting framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, D. B.; Adler, D.; Adler, R. F.

    2010-12-01

    Landslides are one of the most pervasive hazards in the world, resulting in more fatalities and economic damage than is generally recognized. Intense and prolonged rainfall is the most frequent trigger of mass movement events, which have caused over 11,500 fatalities within 70 countries since 2007. Within the United States alone, heavy thunderstorms, landfalling tropical cyclones, and orographically enhanced storm systems have triggered more than 400 destructive landslides over the past four years, which have resulted in significant economic damage from destroyed houses and blocked roads and 6 fatalities. Since 2007, we have systematically cataloged rainfall-triggered landslides (including mudslides, debris flows, etc.) from media reports, online disaster databases, and other credible sources. The catalog, which currently has over 2,400 entries, includes information on the date, location, impacts and rainfall trigger of the event. This database has been valuable for identifying patterns in landslide occurrence and reporting at the global level. Results from the database indicate that the Asian monsoon is the most significant driver of landslide reports, with a consistent peak in the number of reports and fatalities during the northern hemisphere summer in countries such as Nepal, India, China, Philippines, and Indonesia. Tropical cyclones in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean basins can also trigger widespread landsliding when they make landfall. The motivation for compiling this global database of events was driven by the development of a prototype satellite-based landslide hazard forecasting algorithm, which uses satellite-based estimates of rainfall and surface cover to assess potential landslide triggering conditions at the global scale in near real-time (http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications_dir/potential_landslide.html). Evaluation of the forecasting system using the global landslide catalog indicates that forecasting errors, including both under and

  4. The 3D Elevation Program—Landslide recognition, hazard assessment, and mitigation support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Vicki; Carswell, Jr., William J.

    2017-01-27

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Landslide Hazards Program conducts landslide hazard assessments, pursues landslide investigations and forecasts, provides technical assistance to respond to landslide emergencies, and engages in outreach. All of these activities benefit from the availability of high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) elevation information in the form of light detection and ranging (lidar) data and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IfSAR) data. Research on landslide processes addresses critical questions of where and when landslides are likely to occur as well as their size, speed, and effects. This understanding informs the development of methods and tools for hazard assessment and situational awareness used to guide efforts to avoid or mitigate landslide impacts. Such research is essential for the USGS to provide improved information on landslide potential associated with severe storms, earthquakes, volcanic activity, coastal wave erosion, and wildfire burn areas.Decisionmakers in government and the private sector increasingly depend on information the USGS provides before, during, and following disasters so that communities can live, work, travel, and build safely. The USGS 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) provides the programmatic infrastructure to generate and supply lidar-derived superior terrain data to address landslide applications and a wide range of other urgent needs nationwide. By providing data to users, 3DEP reduces users’ costs and risks and allows them to concentrate on their mission objectives. 3DEP includes (1) data acquisition partnerships that leverage funding, (2) contracts with experienced private mapping firms, (3) technical expertise, lidar data standards, and specifications, and (4) most important, public access to high-quality 3D elevation data.

  5. Assessing rainfall triggered landslide hazards through physically based models under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balin, D.; Metzger, R.; Fallot, J. M.; Reynard, E.

    2009-04-01

    Hazard and risk assessment require, besides good data, good simulation capabilities to allow prediction of events and their consequences. The present study introduces a landslide hazards assessment strategy based on the coupling of hydrological physically based models with slope stability models that should be able to cope with uncertainty of input data and model parameters. The hydrological model used is based on the Water balance Simulation Model, WASIM-ETH (Schulla et al., 1997), a fully distributed hydrological model that has been successfully used previously in the alpine regions to simulate runoff, snowmelt, glacier melt, and soil erosion and impact of climate change on these. The study region is the Vallon de Nant catchment (10km2) in the Swiss Alps. A sound sensitivity analysis will be conducted in order to choose the discretization threshold derived from a Laser DEM model, to which the hydrological model yields the best compromise between performance and time computation. The hydrological model will be further coupled with slope stability methods (that use the topographic index and the soil moisture such as derived from the hydrological model) to simulate the spatial distribution of the initiation areas of different geomorphic processes such as debris flows and rainfall triggered landslides. To calibrate the WASIM-ETH model, the Monte Carlo Markov Chain Bayesian approach is privileged (Balin, 2004, Schaefli et al., 2006). The model is used in a single and a multi-objective frame to simulate discharge and soil moisture with uncertainty at representative locations. This information is further used to assess the potential initial areas for rainfall triggered landslides and to study the impact of uncertain input data, model parameters and simulated responses (discharge and soil moisture) on the modelling of geomorphological processes.

  6. Extending natural hazard impacts: an assessment of landslide disruptions on a national road transportation network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postance, Benjamin; Hillier, John; Dijkstra, Tom; Dixon, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Disruptions to transportation networks by natural hazard events cause direct losses (e.g. by physical damage) and indirect socio-economic losses via travel delays and decreased transportation efficiency. The severity and spatial distribution of these losses varies according to user travel demands and which links, nodes or infrastructure assets are physically disrupted. Increasing transport network resilience, for example by targeted mitigation strategies, requires the identification of the critical network segments which if disrupted would incur undesirable or unacceptable socio-economic impacts. Here, these impacts are assessed on a national road transportation network by coupling hazard data with a transport network model. This process is illustrated using a case study of landslide hazards on the road network of Scotland. A set of possible landslide-prone road segments is generated using landslide susceptibility data. The results indicate that at least 152 road segments are susceptible to landslides, which could cause indirect economic losses exceeding £35 k for each day of closure. In addition, previous estimates for historic landslide events might be significant underestimates. For example, the estimated losses for the 2007 A83 ‘Rest and Be Thankful’ landslide are £80 k day-1, totalling £1.2 million over a 15 day closure, and are ˜60% greater than previous estimates. The spatial distribution of impact to road users is communicated in terms of ‘extended hazard impact footprints’. These footprints reveal previously unknown exposed communities and unanticipated spatial patterns of severe disruption. Beyond cost-benefit analyses for landslide mitigation efforts, the approach implemented is applicable to other natural hazards (e.g. flooding), combinations of hazards, or even other network disruption events.

  7. application of geospatial tools for landslide hazard assessment for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    immax

    landslide causal factors such as slope, precipitation, soil texture, vegetation cover and .... acquired from the Uganda Bureau of Statistics (UBOS), the land cover ... Meteorological Centre, while the Digital Elevation Model was acquired from the ...

  8. Mapping landslide processes in the North Tanganyika - Lake Kivu rift zones: towards a regional hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitte, Olivier; Monsieurs, Elise; Jacobs, Liesbet; Basimike, Joseph; Delvaux, Damien; Draida, Salah; Hamenyimana, Jean-Baptiste; Havenith, Hans-Balder; Kubwimana, Désiré; Maki Mateso, Jean-Claude; Michellier, Caroline; Nahimana, Louis; Ndayisenga, Aloys; Ngenzebuhoro, Pierre-Claver; Nkurunziza, Pascal; Nshokano, Jean-Robert; Sindayihebura, Bernard; Philippe, Trefois; Turimumahoro, Denis; Kervyn, François

    2015-04-01

    The mountainous environments of the North Tanganyika - Lake Kivu rift zones are part of the West branch of the East African Rift. In this area, natural triggering and environmental factors such as heavy rainfalls, earthquake occurrences and steep topographies favour the concentration of mass movement processes. In addition anthropogenic factors such as rapid land use changes and urban expansion increase the sensibility to slope instability. Until very recently few landslide data was available for the area. Now, through the initiation of several research projects and the setting-up of a methodology for data collection adapted to this data-poor environment, it becomes possible to draw a first regional picture of the landslide hazard. Landslides include a wide range of ground movements such as rock falls, deep failure of slopes and shallow debris flows. Landslides are possibly the most important geohazard in the region in terms of recurring impact on the populations, causing fatalities every year. Many landslides are observed each year in the whole region, and their occurrence is clearly linked to complex topographic, lithological and vegetation signatures coupled with heavy rainfall events, which is the main triggering factor. Here we present the current knowledge of the various slope processes present in these equatorial environments. A particular attention is given to urban areas such as Bukavu and Bujumbura where landslide threat is particularly acute. Results and research perspectives on landslide inventorying, monitoring, and susceptibility and hazard assessment are presented.

  9. A NOVEL SOFT COMPUTING MODEL ON LANDSLIDE HAZARD ZONE MAPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Quraishi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of landslide is very prominent in India as well as world over. In India North-East region and all the areas beneath the Himalayan range is prone to landslide. As state wise Uttrakhand, Himachal Pradesh and northern part of West Bengal are identified as a risk zone for landslide. In West Bengal, Darjeeling area is identified as our focus zone. There are several types of landslides depending upon various conditions. Most contributing factor of landslide is Earthquakes. Both field and the GIS data are very versatile and large in amount. Creating a proper data warehouse includes both Remote and field studies. Our proposed soft computing model merge the field and remote sensing data and create an optimized landslide susceptible map of the zone and also provide a broad risk assessment. It takes into account census and economic survey data as an input to calculate and predict the probable number of damaged houses, roads, other amenities including the effect on GDP. The model is highly customizable and tends to provide situation specific results. A fuzzy logic based approach has been considered to partially implement the model in terms of different parameter data sets to show the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  10. Application of a time probabilistic approach to seismic landslide hazard estimates in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, A. M.; Del Gaudio, V.; Capolongo, D.; Khamehchiyan, M.; Mahdavifar, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    the slope critical acceleration (Ac)x for which a prefixed probability exists that seismic shaking would result in a Dn value equal to a threshold x whose exceedence would cause landslide triggering. The obtained ac values represent the minimum slope resistance required to keep the probability of seismic-landslide triggering within the prefixed value. In particular we calculated the spatial distribution of (Ac)x for x thresholds of 10 and 2 cm in order to represent triggering conditions for coherent slides (e.g., slumps, block slides, slow earth flows) and disrupted slides (e.g., rock falls, rock slides, rock avalanches), respectively. Then we produced a probabilistic national map that shows the spatial distribution of (Ac)10 and (Ac)2, for a 10% probability of exceedence in 50 year, which is a significant level of hazard equal to that commonly used for building codes. The spatial distribution of the calculated (Ac)xvalues can be compared with the in situ actual ac values of specific slopes to estimate whether these slopes have a significant probability of failing under seismic action in the future. As example of possible application of this kind of time probabilistic map to hazard estimates, we compared the values obtained for the Manjil region with a GIS map providing spatial distribution of estimated ac values in the same region. The spatial distribution of slopes characterized by ac < (Ac)10 was then compared with the spatial distribution of the major landslides of coherent type triggered by the Manjil earthquake. This comparison provides indications on potential, problems and limits of the experimented approach for the study area. References Cornell, C.A., 1968: Engineering seismic risk analysis, Bull. Seism. Soc. Am., 58, 1583-1606. Del Gaudio V., Wasowski J., & Pierri P., 2003: An approach to time probabilistic evaluation of seismically-induced landslide hazard. Bull Seism. Soc. Am., 93, 557-569. Jibson, R.W., E.L. Harp and J.A. Michael, 1998: A method for

  11. Multi scale modelling of landslide hazard and risk assessment in data scarce area - a case study on Dhalai District, Tripura, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kapil; De, Sunil Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Successful landslide management plans and policy depends on in-depth knowledge about the hazard and associated risk. Thus, the present research is intended to present an integrated approach involving uses of geospatial technologies for landslide hazard and risk assessment at different scales (site specific to regional level). The landslide hazard map at regional scale (district level) is prepared by using weight-rating based method. To analyze landslide manifestation in the Dhalai district of Tripura different causative factor maps (lithology, road buffer, slope, relative relief, rainfall, fault buffer, landuse/landcover and drainage density) are derived. The analysis revealed that the geological structure and human interference have more influence than other considered factors on the landslide occurrences. The landslide susceptibility zonation map shows that about 1.64 and 16.68% of the total study area is falling under very high and high susceptibility zones respectively. The landslide risk assessment at district level is generated by integrating hazard scouring and resource damage potential scouring (fuzzy membership values) maps. The values of landslide risk matrix are varying within the range of 0.001 to 0.18 and the risk assessment map shows that only 0.45% (10.80 km2) of the district is under very high risk zone, whereas, about 50% pixels of existing road section are under very high to high level of landslide risk. The major part (94.06%) of the district is under very low to low risk zone. Landslide hazard and risk assessment at site specific level have been carried out through intensive field investigation in which it is found that the Ambassa landslide is located within 150 m buffer zone of fault line. Variation of geo-electrical resistivity (2.2Ωm to 31.4Ωm) indicates the complex geological character in this area. Based on the obtained geo-technical result which helps to identify the degree of risk to the existing resource, it is appropriate to

  12. An offline-online Web-GIS Android application for fast data acquisition of landslide hazard and risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olyazadeh, Roya; Sudmeier-Rieux, Karen; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Derron, Marc-Henri; Devkota, Sanjaya

    2017-04-01

    Regional landslide assessments and mapping have been effectively pursued by research institutions, national and local governments, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and different stakeholders for some time, and a wide range of methodologies and technologies have consequently been proposed. Land-use mapping and hazard event inventories are mostly created by remote-sensing data, subject to difficulties, such as accessibility and terrain, which need to be overcome. Likewise, landslide data acquisition for the field navigation can magnify the accuracy of databases and analysis. Open-source Web and mobile GIS tools can be used for improved ground-truthing of critical areas to improve the analysis of hazard patterns and triggering factors. This paper reviews the implementation and selected results of a secure mobile-map application called ROOMA (Rapid Offline-Online Mapping Application) for the rapid data collection of landslide hazard and risk. This prototype assists the quick creation of landslide inventory maps (LIMs) by collecting information on the type, feature, volume, date, and patterns of landslides using open-source Web-GIS technologies such as Leaflet maps, Cordova, GeoServer, PostgreSQL as the real DBMS (database management system), and PostGIS as its plug-in for spatial database management. This application comprises Leaflet maps coupled with satellite images as a base layer, drawing tools, geolocation (using GPS and the Internet), photo mapping, and event clustering. All the features and information are recorded into a GeoJSON text file in an offline version (Android) and subsequently uploaded to the online mode (using all browsers) with the availability of Internet. Finally, the events can be accessed and edited after approval by an administrator and then be visualized by the general public.

  13. Assessment, prevention and mitigation of landslide hazard in the Lesser Himalaya of Himachal Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patra Punyatoya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Landslides are destructive geological processes that have globally caused deaths and destruction to property worth billion dollars. Landslide occurrences are widespread and prolific in India covering more than 15 per cent of the total area. These are mostly concentrated in the Himalayan belt, parts of Meghalaya Plateau, Nilgiri Hills, Western and Eastern Ghats. The slope failure in the hilly terrain is due to geological processes and events. The frequency and magnitude of slope failure also increased due to anthropogenic activities such as road construction, deforestation and urban expansion. Keeping all these problems in mind research focuses on the Lesser Himalaya of Himachal Himalaya as it falls under very high risk zone in case of landslides and comprise of three objectives. They are: a to analyse the spatial pattern of landslides in the Lesser Himalaya, b to assess the causes of landslides vulnerability in the study region and c to suggests some preventive measures to mitigate landslides. In this work an attempt has been made to collect data on landslides incidences and damage from the secondary sources like Geological Survey of India, Building Material and Technology Promotion council from Ministry of Urban Affairs. The methodologies adopted for data analysis are simple tabulations, bar diagrams, statistical and mapping techniques to represent the Landslide vulnerability of the Lesser Himalaya. The analysis of the study reveals that there is increase in the number of landslides. The spatial pattern of landslide shows linear patterns, viz. along roads, rivers or lineaments/ faults. Besides, heavy rainfall, floods and earthquakes enhance the vulnerability condition. The landslides may be part and parcel of the Himalayan landscape, but they can be mitigated by some suitable measures. Few methods of landslide prevention in the study region have been suggested.

  14. Hydro-geomorphic connectivity and landslide features extraction to identifying potential threats and hazardous areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarolli, Paolo; Fuller, Ian C.; Basso, Federica; Cavalli, Marco; Sofia, Giulia

    2017-04-01

    Hydro-geomorphic connectivity has significantly emerged as a new concept to understand the transfer of surface water and sediment through landscapes. A further scientific challenge is determining how the concept can be used to enable sustainable land and water management. This research proposes an interesting approach to integrating remote sensing techniques, connectivity theory, and geomorphometry based on high-resolution digital terrain model (HR-DTMs) to automatically extract landslides crowns and gully erosion, to determine the different rate of connectivity among the main extracted features and the river network, and thus determine a possible categorization of hazardous areas. The study takes place in two mountainous regions in the Wellington Region (New Zealand). The methodology is a three step approach. Firstly, we performed an automatic detection of the likely landslides crowns through the use of thresholds obtained by the statistical analysis of the variability of landform curvature. After that, the research considered the Connectivity Index to analyse how a complex and rugged topography induces large variations in erosion and sediment delivery in the two catchments. Lastly, the two methods have been integrated to create a unique procedure able to classify the different rate of connectivity among the main features and the river network and thus identifying potential threats and hazardous areas. The methodology is fast, and it can produce a detailed and updated inventory map that could be a key tool for erosional and sediment delivery hazard mitigation. This fast and simple method can be a useful tool to manage emergencies giving priorities to more failure-prone zones. Furthermore, it could be considered to do a preliminary interpretations of geomorphological phenomena and more in general, it could be the base to develop inventory maps. References Cavalli M, Trevisani S, Comiti F, Marchi L. 2013. Geomorphometric assessment of spatial sediment connectivity

  15. GIS-based Analysis of Landslide and Debris Flow Hazard in Lanzhou%基于GIS的兰州滑坡与泥石流灾害危险性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁元; 刘勇; 杨正华; 徐瑱; 方苗

    2012-01-01

    Frequent geologic disasters cause huge impact on human society.Remote sensing,geographic information systems,global positioning systems and network technology play increasingly great role in disaster reduction.In Lanzhou,the regional lithology,tectonic faults,seismic activity,surface erosion and undulating terrain have contributed to crushing landslide and debris flow hazards.Summer torrential rains and human engineering activities induce disasters in every summer.Through establishing spatial database of regional landslide and debris flow disasters,using spatial analysis,the expertise model and Logistic model for predicting the probability of landslide and debris flow hazards are achieved in this study.The predicted landslide accuracy of Logistic model and the empirical model reach 85.3% and 74.2%,respectively.The predicted debris flow accuracy of Logistic model and the empirical model reach 80.5% and 90.5%,respectively.%频繁发生的灾害愈来愈对人类社会造成巨大影响,遥感、地理信息系统、全球定位系统和网络技术日益在减灾行动中发挥重要的作用.兰州区域地质岩性、构造断裂、地震活动带、地表侵蚀强烈和地形起伏破碎等因素造成了兰州滑坡与泥石流灾害的发育,夏季暴雨、人类工程活动等诱发下灾害频繁,风险加剧.针对兰州地区滑坡与泥石流等山地灾害对区域社会经济的影响,通过建立区域滑坡与泥石流灾害的空间数据库,在GIS技术辅助下实现了专家经验模型和Logistic模型对滑坡与泥石流灾害危险性的预测,其中滑坡Logistic模型准确性达到85.3%,专家经验模型准确性达到74.2%;泥石流Logistic危险性预模型准确性达到80.5%,专家经验模型准确性达到90.5%.随着研究的深入,综合遥感、地理信息系统、全球定位系统和网络技术的灾害研究与应用将在灾害防治中发挥重要的作用.

  16. Assessing population exposure for landslide risk analysis using dasymetric cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ricardo A. C.; Oliveira, Sérgio C.; Zêzere, José L.

    2016-12-01

    Assessing the number and locations of exposed people is a crucial step in landslide risk management and emergency planning. The available population statistical data frequently have insufficient detail for an accurate assessment of potentially exposed people to hazardous events, mainly when they occur at the local scale, such as with landslides. The present study aims to apply dasymetric cartography to improving population spatial resolution and to assess the potentially exposed population. An additional objective is to compare the results with those obtained with a more common approach that uses, as spatial units, basic census units, which are the best spatial data disaggregation and detailed information available for regional studies in Portugal. Considering the Portuguese census data and a layer of residential building footprint, which was used as ancillary information, the number of exposed inhabitants differs significantly according to the approach used. When the census unit approach is used, considering the three highest landslide susceptible classes, the number of exposed inhabitants is in general overestimated. Despite the associated uncertainties of a general cost-benefit analysis, the presented methodology seems to be a reliable approach for gaining a first approximation of a more detailed estimation of exposed people. The approach based on dasymetric cartography allows the spatial resolution of population over large areas to be increased and enables the use of detailed landslide susceptibility maps, which are valuable for improving the exposed population assessment.

  17. Use of High Resolution LiDAR imagery for landslide identification and hazard assessment, State Highway 6, Haast Pass, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Andrew; Zimmer, Valerie; Bell, David

    2015-04-01

    This study has assessed landslide hazards associated with steep and densely vegetated bedrock slopes adjacent to State Highway 6 through the Southern Alps of New Zealand. The Haast Pass serves as one of only three routes across the Southern Alps, and is a lifeline to the southern West Coast of the South Island with a 1,000km detour required through the nearest alternative pass. Over the last 50 years the highway has been subjected to numerous landslide events that have resulted in lengthy road closures, and the death of two tourists in September 2013. To date no study has been undertaken to identify and evaluate the landslide hazards for the entire Haast Pass, with previous work focusing on post-failure monitoring or investigation of individual landslides. This study identified the distribution and extent of regolith deposits on the schist slopes, and the location and sizes of dormant and active landslides potentially impacting the highway. Until the advent of LiDAR technology it had not been possible to achieve such an evaluation because dense vegetation and very steep topography prevented traditional methods of investigation (mapping; trenching; drilling; geophysics) from being used over a large part of the area. LiDAR technology has provided the tools with which to evaluate large areas of the slopes above the highway quickly and with great accuracy. A very high resolution LiDAR survey was undertaken with a flight line overlap of 70%, resulting in six points per square metre in the raw point cloud and a post-processing point spacing of half a metre. The point cloud was transformed into a digital terrain model, and the surface interpreted using texture and morphology to identify slope materials and landslides. Analysis of the LiDAR DTM revealed that the slopes above the highway consist of variable thicknesses of regolith sourced from landsliding events, as well as large areas of bare bedrock that have not been subjected to landslides and that pose minimal hazard

  18. Landslide displacement analysis based on fractal theory, in Wanzhou District, Three Gorges Reservoir, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Gui

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Slow moving landslide is a major disaster in the Three Gorges Reservoir area. It is difficult to compare the deformation among different parts of this kind of landslide through GPS measurements when the displacement of different monitoring points is similar in values. So far, studies have been seldom carried out to find out the information hidden behind those GPS monitoring data to solve this problem. Therefore, in this study, three landslides were chosen to perform landslide displacement analysis based on fractal theory. The major advantage of this study is that it has not only considered the values of the displacement of those GPS monitoring points, but also considered the moving traces of them. This allows to reveal more information from GPS measurements and to obtain a broader understanding of the deformation history on different parts of a unique landslide, especially for slow moving landslides. The results proved that using the fractal dimension as an indicator is reliable to estimate the deformation of each landslide and to represent landslide deformation on both spatial and temporal scales. The results of this study could make sense to those working on landslide hazard and risk assessment and land use planning.

  19. Preliminary assessment of landslide-induced wave hazards, Tidal Inlet, Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Gerald F.; Jakob, Matthias; Motyka, Roman J.; Zirnheld, Sandra L.; Craw, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    A large potential rock avalanche above the northern shore of Tidal Inlet, Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska, was investigated to determine hazards and risks of landslide-induced waves to cruise ships and other park visitors. Field and photographic examination revealed that the 5 to 10 million cubic meter landslide moved between AD 1892 and 1919 after the retreat of Little Ice Age glaciers from Tidal Inlet by AD 1890. The timing of landslide movement and the glacial history suggest that glacial debuttressing caused weakening of the slope and that the landslide could have been triggered by large earthquakes of 1899-1900 in Yakutat Bay. Evidence of recent movement includes fresh scarps, back-rotated blocks, and smaller secondary landslide movements. However, until there is evidence of current movement, the mass is classified as a dormant rock slump. An earthquake on the nearby active Fairweather fault system could reactivate the landslide and trigger a massive rock slump and debris avalanche into Tidal Inlet. Preliminary analyses show that waves induced by such a landslide could travel at speeds of 45 to 50 m/s and reach heights up to 76 m with wave runups of 200 m on the opposite shore of Tidal Inlet. Such waves would not only threaten vessels in Tidal Inlet, but would also travel into the western arm of Glacier Bay endangering large cruise ships and their passengers.

  20. Earthquake induced landslide hazard: a multidisciplinary field observatory in the Marmara SUPERSITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigarré, Pascal

    2014-05-01

    Earthquake-triggered landslides have an increasing disastrous impact in seismic regions due to the fast growing urbanization and infrastructures. Just considering disasters from the last fifteen years, among which the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake, the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, and the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, these events generated tens of thousands of coseismic landslides. Those resulted in amazing death toll and considerable damages, affecting the regional landscape including its hydrological main features. Despite a strong impetus in research during past decades, knowledge on those geohazards is still fragmentary, while databases of high quality observational data are lacking. These phenomena call for further collaborative researches aiming eventually to enhance preparedness and crisis management. As one of the three SUPERSITE concept FP7 projects dealing with long term high level monitoring of major natural hazards at the European level, the MARSITE project gathers research groups in a comprehensive monitoring activity developed in the Sea of Marmara Region, one of the most densely populated parts of Europe and rated at high seismic risk level since the 1999 Izmit and Duzce devastating earthquakes. Besides the seismic threat, landslides in Turkey and in this region constitute an important source of loss. The 1999 Earthquake caused extensive landslides while tsunami effects were observed during the post-event surveys in several places along the coasts of the Izmit bay. The 6th Work Package of MARSITE project gathers 9 research groups to study earthquake-induced landslides focusing on two sub-regional areas of high interest. First, the Cekmece-Avcilar peninsula, located westwards of Istanbul, is a highly urbanized concentrated landslide prone area, showing high susceptibility to both rainfalls while affected by very significant seismic site effects. Second, the off-shore entrance of the Izmit Gulf, close to the termination of the surface rupture of the 1999 earthquake

  1. Advances in Landslide Hazard Forecasting: Evaluation of Global and Regional Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia B.; Adler, Robert; Hone, Yang; Kumar, Sujay; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Lerner-Lam, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    A prototype global satellite-based landslide hazard algorithm has been developed to identify areas that exhibit a high potential for landslide activity by combining a calculation of landslide susceptibility with satellite-derived rainfall estimates. A recent evaluation of this algorithm framework found that while this tool represents an important first step in larger-scale landslide forecasting efforts, it requires several modifications before it can be fully realized as an operational tool. The evaluation finds that the landslide forecasting may be more feasible at a regional scale. This study draws upon a prior work's recommendations to develop a new approach for considering landslide susceptibility and forecasting at the regional scale. This case study uses a database of landslides triggered by Hurricane Mitch in 1998 over four countries in Central America: Guatemala, Honduras, EI Salvador and Nicaragua. A regional susceptibility map is calculated from satellite and surface datasets using a statistical methodology. The susceptibility map is tested with a regional rainfall intensity-duration triggering relationship and results are compared to global algorithm framework for the Hurricane Mitch event. The statistical results suggest that this regional investigation provides one plausible way to approach some of the data and resolution issues identified in the global assessment, providing more realistic landslide forecasts for this case study. Evaluation of landslide hazards for this extreme event helps to identify several potential improvements of the algorithm framework, but also highlights several remaining challenges for the algorithm assessment, transferability and performance accuracy. Evaluation challenges include representation errors from comparing susceptibility maps of different spatial resolutions, biases in event-based landslide inventory data, and limited nonlandslide event data for more comprehensive evaluation. Additional factors that may improve

  2. Advances in Landslide Hazard Forecasting: Evaluation of Global and Regional Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia B.; Adler, Robert; Hone, Yang; Kumar, Sujay; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Lerner-Lam, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    A prototype global satellite-based landslide hazard algorithm has been developed to identify areas that exhibit a high potential for landslide activity by combining a calculation of landslide susceptibility with satellite-derived rainfall estimates. A recent evaluation of this algorithm framework found that while this tool represents an important first step in larger-scale landslide forecasting efforts, it requires several modifications before it can be fully realized as an operational tool. The evaluation finds that the landslide forecasting may be more feasible at a regional scale. This study draws upon a prior work's recommendations to develop a new approach for considering landslide susceptibility and forecasting at the regional scale. This case study uses a database of landslides triggered by Hurricane Mitch in 1998 over four countries in Central America: Guatemala, Honduras, EI Salvador and Nicaragua. A regional susceptibility map is calculated from satellite and surface datasets using a statistical methodology. The susceptibility map is tested with a regional rainfall intensity-duration triggering relationship and results are compared to global algorithm framework for the Hurricane Mitch event. The statistical results suggest that this regional investigation provides one plausible way to approach some of the data and resolution issues identified in the global assessment, providing more realistic landslide forecasts for this case study. Evaluation of landslide hazards for this extreme event helps to identify several potential improvements of the algorithm framework, but also highlights several remaining challenges for the algorithm assessment, transferability and performance accuracy. Evaluation challenges include representation errors from comparing susceptibility maps of different spatial resolutions, biases in event-based landslide inventory data, and limited nonlandslide event data for more comprehensive evaluation. Additional factors that may improve

  3. GIS-based landslide hazard evaluation at the regional scale: some critical points in the permanent displacement approach for seismically-induced landslide maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessia, Giovanna; Parise, Mario

    2013-04-01

    the assumed depth of the sliding surface. Thus, it is of paramount relevance to correctly understand and describe the dynamic behavior of the lithologies affected by the earthquake. Accordingly, we put here in evidence some critical points in the application of the permanent displacement formulations by considering the case study of Santa Susana Mountains (California, USA) shaken by the Northridge earthquake in 1994. During this earthquake, a high number of registrations has been collected, whilst soon after a careful inventory of the mass movements triggered by the shaking has been produced, together with analysis of the related failure mechanisms. Hence, these data allow to perform a back analysis in order to verify the reliability of some numerical expressions, such as those proposed by Ambraseys and Menu (1988), Romeo (2000), and Jibson (2007), with respect to the possible dynamic behavior of the lithologies affected by landslides. In this sector of California, the following lithologies crop out, that were involved in shallow landslides: (1) Quaternay deposits; (2) Saugus Formation; (3) Towsley Formation; (4) Pico Formation; (5) Topanga Formation; (6) Modelo Formation; (7) Simi Conglomerate; (8) Santa Susana Formation; (9) Llajas and Chatsworth Formations. The surveys carried out after the Northridge earthquake (Harp and Jibson, 1995), and the analysis of landslide distribution (Parise and Jibson 2000) pointed out that the strongest formations with slopes higher than 50° mainly suffered toppling or fall failures: thus, our hazard maps based on permanent displacements did not take into account such range of slopes. Further, areas with slopes lower than 10° were not affected by relevant mass movements. Thus, a limited range of slopes (between 10° and 45°) was considered in the analyses, with depth of the sliding surface varying between 1 and 3 m, and using the resistance parameters of involved lithologies obtained from in situ and laboratory tests performed by

  4. Probabilistic Hazard of Tsunamis Generated by Submarine Landslides in the Cook Strait Canyon (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Emily M.; Mountjoy, Joshu J.; Power, William L.; Mueller, Christof

    2016-12-01

    Cook Strait Canyon is a submarine canyon that lies within ten kilometres of Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand. The canyon walls are covered with scars from previous landslides which could have caused local tsunamis. Palaeotsunami evidence also points to past tsunamis in the Wellington region. Furthermore, the canyon's location in Cook Strait means that there is inhabited land in the path of both forward- and backward-propagating waves. Tsunamis induced by these submarine landslides pose hazard to coastal communities and infrastructure but major events are very uncommon and the historical record is not extensive enough to quantify this hazard. The combination of infrequent but potentially very consequential events makes realistic assessment of the hazard challenging. However, information on both magnitude and frequency is very important for land use planning and civil defence purposes. We use a multidisciplinary approach bringing together geological information with modelling to construct a Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment of submarine landslide-generated tsunami. Although there are many simplifying assumptions used in this assessment, it suggests that the Cook Strait open coast is exposed to considerable hazard due to submarine landslide-generated tsunamis. We emphasise the uncertainties involved and present opportunities for future research.

  5. A water balance approach to enhance national (GB) Daily Landslide Hazard Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Tom; Reeves, Helen; Freeborough, Katy; Dashwood, Claire; Pennington, Catherine; Jordan, Hannah; Hobbs, Peter; Richardson, Jennifer; Banks, Vanessa; Cole, Steven; Wells, Steven; Moore, Robert

    2017-04-01

    The British Geological Survey (BGS) is a member of the Natural Hazards Partnership (NHP) and delivers a national (GB) daily landslide hazard assessment (DLHA). The DLHA is based largely on 'expert' driven evaluations of the likelihood of landslides in response to antecedent ground conditions, adverse weather and reported landslide events. It concentrates on shallow translational slides and debris flows - events that most frequently have societal consequences by disrupting transport infrastructure and affecting buildings. Considerable experience with the issuing of DLHAs has been gained since 2012. However, it remains very difficult to appropriately assess changing ground conditions throughout GB even when good quality precipitation forecasts are available. Soil moisture sensors are available, but the network is sparse and not yet capable of covering GB to the detail required to underpin the forecasts. Therefore, we developed an approach where temporal and spatial variations in soil moisture can be obtained from a water balance model, representing processes in the near-surface and configured on a relatively coarse grid of 1 km2. Model outputs are not intended to be relevant to the slope scale. The assumption is that the likelihood of landslides being triggered by rainfall is dependent upon the soil moisture conditions of the near-surface, in combination with how much rain is forecast to occur for the following day. These variables form the basis for establishing thresholds to guide the issuing of DLHA and early warnings. The main aim is to obtain an insight into regional patterns of change and threshold exceedance. The BGS water balance model is still in its infancy and it requires substantial work to fine-tune and validate it. To test the performance of the BGS model we focused on an analysis of Scottish landslides (2004-2015) comprising translational slides and debris flows where the BGS model is conditionally evaluated against the Grid-to-Grid (G2G) Model. G2G is

  6. Hydrologic impacts of landslide disturbances: Implications for remobilization and hazard persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Smith, Joel B.; Baum, Rex L.

    2017-01-01

    Landslides typically alter hillslope topography, but may also change the hydrologic connectivity and subsurface water-storage dynamics. In settings where mobile materials are not completely evacuated from steep slopes, influences of landslide disturbances on hillslope hydrology and susceptibility to subsequent failures remain poorly characterized. Since landslides often recur at the site of previous failures, we examine differences between a stable vegetated hillslope (VH) and a recent landslide (LS). These neighboring hillslopes exhibit similar topography and are situated on steep landslide-prone coastal bluffs of glacial deposits along the northeastern shore of Puget Sound, Washington. Our control hillslope, VH, is mantled by a heterogeneous colluvium, supporting a dense forest. In early 2013, our test hillslope, LS, also supported a forest before a landslide substantially altered the topography and disturbed the hillslope. In 2015, we observed a clay-rich landslide deposit at LS with sparse vegetation and limited root reinforcement, soil structures, and macropores. Our characterization of the sites also found matrix porosity and hydraulic conductivity are both lower at LS. Continuous monitoring during 2015-2016 revealed reduced effective precipitation at VH (due to canopy interception), an earlier seasonal transition to near-saturated conditions at LS, and longer persistence of positive pore pressures and slower drainage at LS (both seasonally and between major storm events). These differences, along with episodic, complex slope failures at LS support the hypothesis that, despite a reduced average slope, other disturbances introduced by landsliding may promote the hydrologic conditions leading to slope instability, thus contributing to the persistence of landslide hazards.

  7. Landslide!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Carl

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit that focuses on landslides and integrates earth science, physics, chemistry, and math. Includes activities to investigate porosity, permeability, cohesion, saturation, and gravity. (JRH)

  8. Landslide!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Carl

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit that focuses on landslides and integrates earth science, physics, chemistry, and math. Includes activities to investigate porosity, permeability, cohesion, saturation, and gravity. (JRH)

  9. Submarine landslide and tsunami hazards offshore southern Alaska: Seismic strengthening versus rapid sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Derek E.; Reece, Robert S.; Gulick, Sean P. S.; Lenz, Brandi L.

    2017-08-01

    The southern Alaskan offshore margin is prone to submarine landslides and tsunami hazards due to seismically active plate boundaries and extreme sedimentation rates from glacially enhanced mountain erosion. We examine the submarine landslide potential with new shear strength measurements acquired by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 341 on the continental slope and Surveyor Fan. These data reveal lower than expected sediment strength. Contrary to other active margins where seismic strengthening enhances slope stability, the high-sedimentation margin offshore southern Alaska behaves like a passive margin from a shear strength perspective. We interpret that seismic strengthening occurs but is offset by high sedimentation rates and overpressure. This conclusion is supported by shear strength outside of the fan that follow an active margin trend. More broadly, seismically active margins with wet-based glaciers are susceptible to submarine landslide hazards because of the combination of high sedimentation rates and earthquake shaking.

  10. Techniques, advances, problems and issues in numerical modelling of landslide hazard

    CERN Document Server

    Van Asch, Theo; Van Beek, Ludovicus; Amitrano, David

    2007-01-01

    Slope movements (e.g. landslides) are dynamic systems that are complex in time and space and closely linked to both inherited and current preparatory and triggering controls. It is not yet possible to assess in all cases conditions for failure, reactivation and rapid surges and successfully simulate their transient and multi-dimensional behaviour and development, although considerable progress has been made in isolating many of the key variables and elementary mechanisms and to include them in physically-based models for landslide hazard assessments. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to review the state-of-the-art in the understanding of landslide processes and to identify some pressing challenges for the development of our modelling capabilities in the forthcoming years for hazard assessment. This paper focuses on the special nature of slope movements and the difficulties related to simulating their complex time-dependent behaviour in mathematical, physically-based models. It analyses successively th...

  11. Predictive landslide susceptibility analysis along the mountain highway in central Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Keh-Jian; Lin, Zora

    2016-04-01

    Climate change caused by global warming affects Taiwan significantly for the past decade. The increasing frequency of extreme rainfall events, in which concentrated and intensive rainfalls generally cause geohazards including landslides and debris flows. The extraordinary Typhoon Morakot hit Southern Taiwan, on August 8, 2009, and induced serious flooding and landslides. Considering the existence of various types of large scale landslides (shallow and deep-seated) and the importance of protection targets (the landslide might affect a residential area, cut a road, isolate a village, etc.), this study aims to analyze the landslide susceptibility along the Nantou County Road # 89 of Taiwan, in the upstream of Wu River. This study employs rainfall frequency analysis together with the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) downscaling estimation to understand the temporal rainfall trends, distributions, and intensities in the Wu River watershed. Based on the data of Li-DAR and the information from boreholes, the temporal behavior and the complex mechanism of large scale landslides were analyzed. To assess the spatial hazard of the landslides, landslide susceptibility analysis was also implemented. The results of this study can be applied for risk prevention and management in the study area.

  12. A method for producing digital probabilistic seismic landslide hazard maps; an example from the Los Angeles, California, area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibson, Randall W.; Harp, Edwin L.; Michael, John A.

    1998-01-01

    The 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake is the first earthquake for which we have all of the data sets needed to conduct a rigorous regional analysis of seismic slope instability. These data sets include (1) a comprehensive inventory of triggered landslides, (2) about 200 strong-motion records of the mainshock, (3) 1:24,000-scale geologic mapping of the region, (4) extensive data on engineering properties of geologic units, and (5) high-resolution digital elevation models of the topography. All of these data sets have been digitized and rasterized at 10-m grid spacing in the ARC/INFO GIS platform. Combining these data sets in a dynamic model based on Newmark's permanent-deformation (sliding-block) analysis yields estimates of coseismic landslide displacement in each grid cell from the Northridge earthquake. The modeled displacements are then compared with the digital inventory of landslides triggered by the Northridge earthquake to construct a probability curve relating predicted displacement to probability of failure. This probability function can be applied to predict and map the spatial variability in failure probability in any ground-shaking conditions of interest. We anticipate that this mapping procedure will be used to construct seismic landslide hazard maps that will assist in emergency preparedness planning and in making rational decisions regarding development and construction in areas susceptible to seismic slope failure.

  13. DEM resolution effects on shallow landslide hazard and soil redistribution modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, L.F.G.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Schoorl, J.M.; Veldkamp, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the effects of digital elevation model (DEM) resolution on the results of a model that simulates spatially explicit relative shallow landslide hazard and soil redistribution patterns and quantities. We analyse distributions of slope, specific catchment area and relative haza

  14. Landslide hazard mapping by multivariate statistics: comparison of methods and case study in the Spanish Pyrenees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beguería, S.; Lorente, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper, written as a deliverable of the DAMOCLES project, is a review of the different existing methodologies to landslide hazard mapping by multivariate statistics. Within the DAMOCLES project, multivariate statistical models have been applied to different study regions in Italy and Spain. The

  15. GIS Based Spatial Data Analysis for Landslide Susceptibility Mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Sarkar; D.P.Kanungo; A.K.Patra; Pushpendra Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Landslide susceptibility map delineates the potential zones for landslides occurrence.The paper presents a statistical approach through spatial data analysis in GIS for landslide susceptibility mapping in parts of Sikkim Himalaya.Six important causative factors for landslide occurrences were selected and corresponding thematic data layers were prepared in GIS.Topographic maps,satellite image,field data and published maps constitute the input data for thematic layer preparation.Numerical weights for different categories of these factors were determined based on a statistical approach and the weighted thematic layers were integrated in GIS environment to generate the landslide susceptibility map of the area.The landslide susceptibility map classifies the area into five different landslide susceptible zones i.e.,very high,high,moderate,low and very low.This map was validated using the existing landslide distribution in the area.

  16. Hazard Analysis Database Report

    CERN Document Server

    Grams, W H

    2000-01-01

    The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U S . Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved Authorization Basis (AB) for the River Protection Project (RPP). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the Tank Farms FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The Hazard Analysis Database supports the preparation of Chapters 3 ,4 , and 5 of the Tank Farms FSAR and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Analysis Database: Data from t...

  17. Landslide Hazard Zonation Along NH-39 From Kangpokpi To Mao, Manipur, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TH. DEVALA DEVI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the prevailing high rainfall and complex nature of terrain, hilly areas of Manipur are vulnerable to instability and mass wasting which have been aggravated by rapid pace of anthropogenic activities and high seismicity. To categorize the land surface into areas and arrange them according to degree of actual or potential hazard from landslide or other mass movements on slopes, an effort is made to prepare landslide hazard zonation map along NH-39 from Kangpokpi to Mao, covering an area of 650km2. Based on the hazardousness to landslide the study area has been divided into four different zones. The major part of the study area about 380km2 (58% falls under the category of high risk zone, followed by moderate risk zone covering an area of 152km2, low risk zone (115 km2, and very high hazard zone (3 km2. Such zonation maps are useful for identifying and delineating unstable hazard prone areas so that suitable mitigative measures can be adopted to minimize the hazards. It also helps planners to choose the favorable sites for developmental schemes like road and building constructions.

  18. Integration of spatial and temporal data for the definition of different landslide hazard scenarios in the area north of Lisbon (Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Zêzere

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A general methodology for the probabilistic evaluation of landslide hazard is applied, taking in account both the landslide susceptibility and the instability triggering factors, mainly rainfall. The method is applied in the Fanhões-Trancão test site (north of Lisbon, Portugal where 100 shallow translational slides were mapped and integrated into a GIS database. For the landslide susceptibility assessment it is assumed that future landslides can be predicted by statistical relationships between past landslides and the spatial data set of the predisposing factors (slope angle, slope aspect, transversal slope profile, lithology, superficial deposits, geomorphology, and land use. Susceptibility is evaluated using algorithms based on statistical/probabilistic analysis (Bayesian model over unique-condition terrain units in a raster basis. The landslide susceptibility map is prepared by sorting all pixels according to the pixel susceptibility value in descending order. In order to validate the results of the susceptibility ana- lysis, the landslide data set is divided in two parts, using a temporal criterion. The first subset is used for obtaining a prediction image and the second subset is compared with the prediction results for validation. The obtained prediction-rate curve is used for the quantitative interpretation of the initial susceptibility map. Landslides in the study area are triggered by rainfall. The integration of triggering information in hazard assessment includes (i the definition of thresholds of rainfall (quantity-duration responsible for past landslide events; (ii the calculation of the relevant return periods; (iii the assumption that the same rainfall patterns (quantity/duration which produced slope instability in the past will produce the same effects in the future (i.e. same types of landslides and same total affected area. The landslide hazard is present as the probability of each pixel to be affected by a slope movement

  19. Predictive Analysis of Landslide Activity Using Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markuzon, N.; Regan, J.; Slesnick, C.

    2012-12-01

    Landslides are historically one of the most damaging geohazard phenomena in terms of death tolls and socio-economic losses. Therefore, understanding the underlying causes of landslides and how environmental phenomena affect their frequency and severity is of critical importance. Of specific importance for mitigating future damage is increasing our understanding of how climate change will affect landslide severity, occurrence rates, and damage. We are developing data driven models aimed at predicting landslide activity. The models learn multi-dimensional weather and geophysical patterns associated with historical landslides and estimate location-dependent probabilities for landslides under current or future weather and geophysical conditions. Our approach uses machine learning algorithms capable of determining non-linear associations between dependent variables and landslide occurrence without requiring detailed knowledge of geomorphology. Our primary goal in year one of the project is to evaluate the predictive capabilities of data mining models in application to landslide activity, and to analyze if the approach will discover previously unknown variables and/or relationships important to landslide occurrence, frequency or severity. The models include remote sensing and ground-based data, including weather, landcover, slope, elevation and drainage information as well as urbanization data. The historical landslide dataset we used to build our preliminary models was compiled from City of Seattle landslide files, United States Geological Survey reports, newspaper articles, and a verified subset of the Seattle Landslide Database that consists of all reported landslides within Seattle, WA, between 1948 and 1999. Most of the landslides analyzed to-date are shallow. Using statistical analysis and unsupervised clustering methods we have thus far identified subsets of weather conditions that lead to a significantly higher landslide probability, and have developed

  20. Landslide Mobility and Hazards: A Geophysical Overview of the Oso Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, R. M.; George, D. L.; Allstadt, K.; Godt, J.; Reid, M. E.; Vallance, J. W.; Schilling, S. P.; Cannon, C.; Magirl, C. S.; Collins, B. D.; Baum, R. L.; Coe, J. A.; Schulz, W. H.; Bower, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    much like that observed at Oso, and in a case with n = 0.36, it predicts much slower landsliding that ceases after only about 100 m of motion. This behavioral bifurcation has fundamental physical importance as well as large ramifications for assessment of landslide hazards.

  1. Communicating landslide risk by combining hazard and open infrastructure data in interactive visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tost, Jordi; Olen, Stephanie M.; Bookhagen, Bodo; Heidmann, Frank

    2017-04-01

    The DIGENTI project ("DIGitaler ENtscheiderTIsch für das Naturgefahrenmanagement auf Basis von Satellitendaten und Volunteered Geographic Information") has the goal of quantifying and communicating the threat of natural hazards in the Cesar and La Guajira departments of northeast Colombia. The end-goal of the project is to provide an interactive guide for policy and decision makers, and for disaster relief coordination. Over the last years, abundant research has been done in order to analyze risk and to provide relevant information that improves effectiveness in disaster management. The communication of natural hazards risk has traditionally been built upon the estimation of hazard maps. In the context of landslides, hazard maps are used to depict potential danger from landslides and visualize the possibility of future landsliding throughout a given area. Such hazard maps provide a static snapshot of the local estimated threat in a region. However, in mountainous regions, a sufficiently large landslide in remote mountainous areas may represent a potential threat to settlements located downstream of a landslide event. The research presented here proposes an approach to visualize and interactively explore landslide risk by combining static hazard maps, hydrologic networks, and OpenStreetMap data. We estimated the potential for hillslope instabilities scenarios in the region of interest by using the TanDEM-X World DEM to calculate a suite Factor of Safety (FOS) maps. The FOS estimates the ratio of total resisting and driving forces to hillslope mass movements. By combining the World DEM with other environmental data (e.g., the Harmonized World Soil Database), we were able to create a suite of high-resolution landslide potential maps for the region of interest. The suite of FOS maps are calculated based on user-selectable parameters (e.g, total mass sliding thickness) that are not well constrained by field observations. We additionally use the TanDEM-X World DEM to

  2. Urban and Rural Landslide Hazard and Exposure Mapping Using Landsat and Corona Satellite Imagery for Tehran and the Alborz Mountains, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fekete

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tehran, Karaj, Quazvin and nearby rural areas in the Alborz Mountains, Iran are prone to earthquake and landslide hazards. Risks for settlement areas, transport infrastructure and pastoralist areas exist due to a combination of natural as well as man-made factors. This study analyses data derived from satellite and airborne sensors, specifically, Landsat and declassified Corona data to identify landslide occurrence and urban sprawl. In a Geographic Information System, other data such as geology, topography, road network and river flows were integrated from various sources. A digital elevation model (DEM was computed based on contour lines that were extracted from topographic maps. The DEM allows for mapping topographic factors such as slope angle and aspect. Finally, change detection analysis has documented urban sprawl in massive dimensions since the 1970s. A multi-criteria landslide hazard and exposure zonation map was developed for a small rural area where several settlements and segments of roads were affected by landslides. The estimated risk areas were then overlaid with real landslide occurrences. The match of hypothetical and real event occurrence areas demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. The main contribution of this paper is to inform about recent landslide risks in Iran and how certain factors can be derived from spatial information.

  3. 利用光学遥感数据、GIS及人工神经网络模型分析区域滑坡灾害%UTILIZATION OF OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING DATA AND GIS TOOLS FOR REGIONAL LANDSLIDE HAZARD ANALYSIS USING AN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biswajeet Pradhan; Saro Lee

    2007-01-01

    用光学遥感数据和地理信息系统(GIS)分析了马来西亚Selangor地区的滑坡灾害.通过遥感图像解译和野外调查,在研究区内确定出滑坡发生区.通过GIS和图像处理,建立了一个集地形、地质和遥感图像等多种信息的空间数据库.滑坡发生的因素主要为:地形坡度、地形方位、地形曲率及与排水设备距离;岩性及与线性构造距离;TM图像解译得到的植被覆盖情况;Landsat图像解译得到的植被指数;降水量.通过建立人工神经网络模型对这些因素进行分析后得到滑坡灾害图:由反向传播训练方法确定每个因素的权重值,然后用该权重值计算出滑坡灾害指数,最后用GIS工具生成滑坡灾害图.用遥感解译和野外观测确定出的滑坡位置资料验证了滑坡灾害图,准确率为82.92%.结果表明推测的滑坡灾害图与滑坡实际发生区域足够吻合.%The aim of this study is to evaluate landslide hazard analysis at Selangor area, Malaysia using optical remote sensing data and a Geographic Information System (GIS). Landslide locations were identified in the study area from interpretation of aerial photographs and field surveys. Topographical, geological data and satellite images were collected, processed and constructed into a spatial database using GIS and image processing. There are about 10 landslide occurrence factors that were selected as: topographic slope, topographic aspect, topographic curvature and distance from drainage; lithology and distance from lineament; land cover from TM satellite images; the vegetation index value from Landsat satellite images; precipitation data. These factors were analyzed using an advanced artificial neural network model to generate the landslide hazard map. Each factor's weight was determined by the back-propagation training method. Then the landslide hazard indices were calculated using the trained back-propagation weights, and finally the landslide hazard map was

  4. Landslide risk analysis: a multi-disciplinary methodological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sterlacchini

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This study describes an analysis carried out within the European community project "ALARM" (Assessment of Landslide Risk and Mitigation in Mountain Areas, 2004 on landslide risk assessment in the municipality of Corvara in Badia, Italy. This mountainous area, located in the central Dolomites (Italian Alps, poses a significant landslide hazard to several man-made and natural objects. Three parameters for determining risk were analysed as an aid to preparedness and mitigation planning: event occurrence probability, elements at risk, and the vulnerability of these elements. Initially, a landslide hazard scenario was defined; this step was followed by the identification of the potential vulnerable elements, by the estimation of the expected physical effects, due to the occurrence of a damaging phenomenon, and by the analysis of social and economic features of the area. Finally, a potential risk scenario was defined, where the relationships between the event, its physical effects, and its economic consequences were investigated. People and public administrators with training and experience in local landsliding and slope processes were involved in each step of the analysis.

    A "cause-effect" correlation was applied, derived from the "dose-response" equation initially used in the biological sciences and then adapted by economists for the assessment of environmental risks. The relationship was analysed from a physical point of view and the cause (the natural event was correlated to the physical effects, i.e. the aesthetic, functional, and structural damage. An economic evaluation of direct and indirect damage was carried out considering the assets in the affected area (i.e., tourist flows, goods, transport and the effect on other social and economic activities. This study shows the importance of indirect damage, which is as significant as direct damage. The total amount of direct damage was estimated in 8 913 000 €; on the contrary, indirect

  5. An overview of a GIS method for mapping landslides and assessing landslide hazards at Río El Estado watershed, on the SW flank of Pico de Orizaba Volcano, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legorreta Paulin, G.; Bursik, M. I.; Contreras, T.; Polenz, M.; Ramírez Herrera, M.; Paredes Mejía, L.; Arana Salinas, L.

    2012-12-01

    This poster provides an overview of the on-going research project (Grant SEP-CONACYT no 167495) from the Institute of Geography at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) that seeks to conduct a multi-temporal landslide inventory, produce a landslide susceptibility map, and estimate sediment production by using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The Río El Estado watershed on the southwestern flank of Pico de Orizaba volcano, the highest mountain in Mexico, is selected as a study area. The catchment covers 5.2 km2 with elevations ranging from 2676.79 to 4248.2 m a.s.l. and hillslopes between 0° and 56°. The stream system of Río El Estado catchment erodes Tertiary and Quaternary lavas, pyroclastic flows, and fall deposits. The geologic and geomorphologic factors in combination with high seasonal precipitation, high degree of weathering, and steep slopes predispose the study area to landslides. The methodology encompasses three main stages of analysis to assess landslide hazards: Stage 1 builds a historic landslide inventory. In the study area, an inventory of more than 170 landslides is created from multi-temporal aerial-photo-interpretation and local field surveys to assess landslide distribution. All landslides were digitized into a geographic information system (GIS), and a spatial geo-database of landslides was constructed from standardized GIS datasets. Stage 2 Calculates the susceptibility for the watershed. During this stage, Multiple Logistic Regression and SINMAP) will be evaluated to select the one that provides scientific accuracy, technical accessibility, and applicability. Stage 3 Estimate the potential total material delivered to the main stream drainage channel by all landslides in the catchment. Detailed geometric measurements of individual landslides visited during the field work will be carried out to obtain the landslide area and volume. These measurements revealed an empirical relationship between area and volume that took the

  6. Evaluation of Tsunami Hazards in Kuwait from Possible Earthquake and Landslide Sources considering Effect of Natural Tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latcharote, P.

    2016-12-01

    Kuwait is one of the most important oil producers to the world and most of population and many vital facilities are located along the coasts. However, even with low or unknown tsunami risk, it is important to investigate tsunami hazards in this country to ensure safety of life and sustain the global economy. This study aimed to evaluate tsunami hazards along the coastal areas of Kuwait from both earthquake and landslide sources using numerical modeling. Tsunami generation and propagation was simulated using the two-layer model and the TUNAMI model. Four cases of earthquake scenarios are expected to generate tsunami along the Makran Subduction Zone (MSZ) based on historical events and worst cases possible to simulate tsunami propagation to the coastal areas of the Arabian Gulf. Case 1 (Mw 8.3) and Case 2 (Mw 8.3) are the replication of the 1945 Makran earthquake, whereas Case 3 (Mw 8.6) and Case 4 (Mw 9.0) are the worst-case scenarios. Tsunami numerical simulation was modelled with mesh size 30 arc-second using bathymetry and topography data from GEBCO. Preliminary results suggested that tsunamis generated by Case 1 and Case 2 will impose very small effects to Kuwait (coastal landslides were assumed occurred at the volume of 1.0-2.0 km3 at three possible locations from their topographic features. The preliminary results revealed that tsunami generated by coastal landslides could impose a significant tsunami impact to Kuwait having maximum tsunami amplitude at the Falika Island in front of Kuwait bay and Azzour power and desalination plant about 0.5 m- 1.1 m depending on landslide volume and energy dissipation. Future works will include more accuracy of tsunami numerical simulation with higher resolution of bathymetry and topography data in order to investigate tsunami inundation. Furthermore, detailed analysis on possible landslide sources will be performed by means of 3D-slope stability analysis in order to know the exact locations and landslide volumes taking into

  7. Comparison of Structurally Controlled Landslide Hazard Simulation to the Co-seismic Landslides Caused by the M 7.2 2013 Bohol Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galang, J. A. M. B.; Eco, R. C.; Lagmay, A. M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The M_w 7.2 October 15, 2013 Bohol earthquake is one of the more destructive earthquake to hit the Philippines in the 21st century. The epicenter was located in Sagbayan municipality, central Bohol and was generated by a previously unmapped reverse fault called the "Inabanga Fault". The earthquake resulted in 209 fatalities and over 57 million USD worth of damages. The earthquake generated co-seismic landslides most of which were related to fault structures. Unlike rainfall induced landslides, the trigger for co-seismic landslides happen without warning. Preparations for this type of landslides rely heavily on the identification of fracture-related slope instability. To mitigate the impacts of co-seismic landslide hazards, morpho-structural orientations of discontinuity sets were mapped using remote sensing techniques with the aid of a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) obtained in 2012. The DTM used is an IFSAR derived image with a 5-meter pixel resolution and approximately 0.5 meter vertical accuracy. Coltop 3D software was then used to identify similar structures including measurement of their dip and dip directions. The chosen discontinuity sets were then keyed into Matterocking software to identify potential rock slide zones due to planar or wedged discontinuities. After identifying the structurally-controlled unstable slopes, the rock mass propagation extent of the possible rock slides was simulated using Conefall. Separately, a manually derived landslide inventory has been performed using post-earthquake satellite images and LIDAR. The results were compared to the landslide inventory which identified at least 873 landslides. Out of the 873 landslides identified through the inventory, 786 or 90% intersect the simulated structural-controlled landslide hazard areas of Bohol. The results show the potential of this method to identify co-seismic landslide hazard areas for disaster mitigation. Along with computer methods to simulate shallow landslides, and debris flow

  8. Surficial Stability Analysis for Landslide Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Eun

    2017-04-01

    In Korea where rainfall of strong intensities is frequent, the depth of weathered residual soil is shallow in mountainous region. Therefore, full saturation of soil layer caused by the reaching of rainwater from the slope surface to impermeable bedrock is one of important causes of landslide. In this study, a shallow slope failure analysis method for slopes with shallow bedrock was developed to predict landslide based on one-dimensional Green-Ampt model. Constant intensities of rainfall were considered and shallow impermeable boundary condition was imposed on the Green-Ampt model to simulate the impermeable bedrock underlying the shallow weathered residual soil. The prediction results showed that the proposed method can be used to predict the landslide due to rainfall infiltration by efficiently considering the movement of the saturated region in the hillslope with shallow impermeable bedrock. Acknowledgements This research was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (2012M3A2A1050981).

  9. Application of the improved fuzzy analytic hierarchy process for landslide hazard assessment based on RS and GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baishou; Gao, Yujiu

    2015-12-01

    The landslide is a geological disaster that caused the second disruptions and losses next to the earthquake, and people around the world suffered a serious threat to their lives and property damage as a result of landslide disaster every year. So carrying on the study of the landslide hazard will create important theoretical meaning and practical value for proposing targeted prevention and treatment measures. Landslides occur more frequently in Guangxi where serious landslide disasters run riot because of its unique karst topography environment and abundant rainfall. The Wanxiu District of Wuzhou, Guangxi was selected as the study area, the landslide hazard zonation evaluation was studied on the basis of RS and GIS technology. The factors that influence landslide occurrence, such as elevation, slope inclination, slope aspect, curvature and distance to streams were derived from the DEM; land use was extracted from the Google Earth image; lithology was digitalized from the geologic map; rainfall information was from the literature. An improved analytic hierarchy process was presented to determine the index weight in this study. The method weakens the uncertainty in the process of comparing the importance of each factor, it need not to do the consistency check, which can also reduce the iteration times enormously, and improve operating speed. Combined with fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method, the landslide hazard mapping of the study area was made according to the maximum membership degree principle. The resulting map can be used to provide some reference values for risk management, land-use planning and urbanization.

  10. Study on landslide hazard zonation based on factor weighting-rating theory in Slanic Prahova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maftei, R.-M.; Vina, G.; Filipciuc, C.

    2012-04-01

    Studying the risks caused by landslides is important in the context of its forecast triggering. This study mainly integrates the background data that are related to historical and environmental factors and also current triggering factors. The theory on zoning hazard caused by landslides, Landslide Hazard Zonation, (LHZ) appeared in the 1960s. In this period the U.S. and many European countries began to use other triggers factors, besides the slope factor, in achieving hazard zoning. This theory has progressed due to the development of remote sensing and GIS technology, which were used to develop and analys methods and techniques consisting in combining data from different sources. The study of an area involves analysing the geographical position data, estimating the surface, the type of terrain, altitude, identifing the landslides in the area and some geological summary data. Data sources. The data used in this study are: · Landsat 7 satellite images; · 30 m spatial resolution, from which is derived the vegetation index; · topographic maps 1:25 000 from which we can obtain the numerical altitude model (DEM) (used to calculate the slope and relative altitude to land) · geological maps 1:50 000. Studied factors. The main factors used and studied in achieving land slides hazard zoning are: - the rate of displacement, the angle of slope, lithology - the index of vegetation or ground coverage of vegetation (NDVI) - river network, structural factor 1. The calculation of normalized vegetation index is made based on Landsat ETM satellite images. This vegetation factor can be both a principal and a secondary trigger factor in landslides. In areas devoid of vegetation, landslides are triggered more often compared with those in which coverage is greater. 2. Factors derived from the numerical model are the slope and elevation relative altitude. This operation was made using the topographic map 1:25 000 from were the level curvs contour was extracted by digitization, and

  11. Developing a methodology for the national-scale assessment of rainfall-induced landslide hazard in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurchescu, Marta; Micu, Dana; Sima, Mihaela; Bălteanu, Dan; Bojariu, Roxana; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Dragotă, Carmen; Micu, Mihai; Senzaconi, Francisc

    2017-04-01

    Landslides together with earthquakes and floods represent the main natural hazards in Romania, causing major impacts to human activities. The RO-RISK (Disaster Risk Evaluation at a National Level) project is a flagship project aimed to strengthen risk prevention and management in Romania, by evaluating - among the specific risks in the country - landslide hazard and risk at a national level. Landslide hazard is defined as "the probability of occurrence within a specified period of time and within a given area of a landslide of a given magnitude" (Varnes 1984; Guzzetti et al. 1999). Nevertheless, most landslide ʿhazardʾ maps only consist in susceptibility (i.e. spatial probability) zonations without considering temporal or magnitude information on the hazard. This study proposes a methodology for the assessment of landslide hazard at the national scale on a scenario basis, while also considering changes in hazard patterns and levels under climate change conditions. A national landslide database consisting of more than 3,000 records has been analyzed against a meteorological observation dataset in order to assess the relationship between precipitation and landslides. Various extreme climate indices were computed in order to account for the different rainfall patterns able to prepare/trigger landslides (e.g. extreme levels of seasonal rainfall, 3-days rainfall or number of consecutive rainy days with different return periods). In order to derive national rainfall thresholds, i.e. valid for diverse climatic environments across the country, values in the parameter maps were rendered comparable by means of normalization with the mean annual precipitation and the rainy-day-normal. A hazard assessment builds on a frequency-magnitude relationship. In the current hazard scenario approach, frequency was kept constant for each single map, while the magnitude of the expected geomorphic event was modeled in relation to the distributed magnitude of the triggering factor. Given

  12. Application of Landsat-8 and ALOS-2 data for structural and landslide hazard mapping in Kelantan, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiranvand Pour, Amin; Hashim, Mazlan

    2017-07-01

    Identification of high potential risk and susceptible zones for natural hazards of geological origin is one of the most important applications of advanced remote sensing technology. Yearly, several landslides occur during heavy monsoon rainfall in Kelantan River basin, Peninsular Malaysia. Flooding and subsequent landslide occurrences generated significant damage to livestock, agricultural produce, homes and businesses in the Kelantan River basin. In this study, remote sensing data from the recently launched Landsat-8 and Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) on board the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2) were used to map geologic structural and topographical features in the Kelantan River basin for identification of high potential risk and susceptible zones for landslides and flooding areas. The data were processed for a comprehensive analysis of major geological structures and detailed characterizations of lineaments, drainage patterns and lithology at both regional and district scales. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP) approach was used for landslide susceptibility mapping. Several factors such as slope, aspect, soil, lithology, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), land cover, distance to drainage, precipitation, distance to fault and distance to the road were extracted from remote sensing satellite data and fieldwork to apply the AHP approach. Directional convolution filters were applied to ALOS-2 data for identifying linear features in particular directions and edge enhancement in the spatial domain. Results indicate that lineament occurrence at regional scale was mainly linked to the N-S trending of the Bentong-Raub Suture Zone (BRSZ) in the west and Lebir Fault Zone in the east of the Kelantan state. The combination of different polarization channels produced image maps that contain important information related to water bodies, wetlands and lithological units. The N-S, NE-SW and NNE-SSW lineament trends and

  13. Software safety hazard analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Techniques for analyzing the safety and reliability of analog-based electronic protection systems that serve to mitigate hazards in process control systems have been developed over many years, and are reasonably well understood. An example is the protection system in a nuclear power plant. The extension of these techniques to systems which include digital computers is not well developed, and there is little consensus among software engineering experts and safety experts on how to analyze such systems. One possible technique is to extend hazard analysis to include digital computer-based systems. Software is frequently overlooked during system hazard analyses, but this is unacceptable when the software is in control of a potentially hazardous operation. In such cases, hazard analysis should be extended to fully cover the software. A method for performing software hazard analysis is proposed in this paper.

  14. Gender, age and circumstances analysis of flood and landslide fatalities in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvati, Paola; Petrucci, Olga; Rossi, Mauro; Bianchi, Cinzia; Pasqua, Aurora A; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2017-08-18

    Floods and landslides are frequent and destructive geo-hydrological hazards that cause harm to people every year. We analysed data on 1292 landslide and 771 flood fatalities that occurred in Italy in the 50-year period 1965-2014, to determine the dependence of the fatalities on gender and age and the circumstances of death by type of hazard. The multinomial probability mass function of the expected fatalities by gender and age, as reported by national census data, were estimated and compared with the observed landslide and flood fatalities. We identified the age categories over or under represented when the observed fatalities were respectively higher or lower than the modelled expected deaths. We found that in Italy males are more vulnerable to floods and landslides for most of the age categories. Apart from children, males are over-represented up to the age of 89 for floods and up to 79 for landslides, whereas females are under-represented up to the age of 59 for floods and landslides, and over-represented above 70 for floods and between 60 and 79 for landslides. To consider the demographic and socio-cultural changes over time, we performed a temporal analysis splitting the record into two non-overlapping subsets of 25year each. The analysis demonstrated that the over-representation of males compared to the females, both for landslide and flood is statistically significant and does not vary in time, indicating a different propensity towards the risk taking and a different degree of exposure between males and females. Analysis of the data allowed to identify the common circumstances of death. Landslides fatalities occurred frequently indoor, whereas the majority of the flood fatalities occurred outdoor, outlining the different dynamics of the hazards. Floods killed numerous people along roads and drivers or passengers travelling in vehicles. We expect that the results of this work will be helpful to design recommendations for self-protecting actions, and proactive

  15. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  16. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  17. The contribute of DInSAR techniques to landslide hazard evaluation in mountain and hilly regions: a case study from Agno Valley (North-Eastern Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Agostini, A.; Floris, M.; Pasquali, P.; Barbieri, M.; Cantone, A.; Riccardi, P.; Stevan, G.; Genevois, R.

    2012-04-01

    In the last twenty years, Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) techniques have been widely used to investigate geological processes, such as subsidence, earthquakes and landslides, through the evaluation of earth surface displacements caused by these processes. In the study of mass movements, contribution of interferometry can be limited due to the acquisition geometry of RADAR images and the rough morphology of mountain and hilly regions which represent typical landslide-prone areas. In this study, the advanced DInSAR techniques (i.e. Small Baseline Subset and Persistent Scatterers techniques), available in SARscape software, are used. These methods involve the use of multiple acquisitions stacks (large SAR temporal series) allowing improvements and refinements in landslide identification, characterization and hazard evaluation at the basin scale. Potential and limits of above mentioned techniques are outlined and discussed. The study area is the Agno Valley, located in the North-Eastern sector of Italian Alps and included in the Vicenza Province (Veneto Region, Italy). This area and the entire Vicenza Province were hit by an exceptional rainfall event on November 2010 that triggered more than 500 slope instabilities. The main aim of the work is to verify if spatial information available before the rainfall event, including ERS and ENVISAT RADAR data from 1992 to 2010, were able to predict the landslides occurred in the study area, in order to implement an effectiveness forecasting model. In the first step of the work a susceptibility analysis is carried out using landslide dataset from the IFFI project (Inventario Fenomeni Franosi in Italia, Landslide Italian Inventory) and related predisposing factors, which consist of morphometric (elevation, slope, aspect and curvature) and non-morphometric (land use, distance of roads and distance of river) factors available from the Veneto Region spatial database. Then, to test the prediction, the

  18. Reinvestigation and analysis a landslide dam event in 2012 using UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuo-Lung; Huang, Zji-Jie; Lin, Jun-Tin

    2015-04-01

    Geological condition of Taiwan is fracture with locating on Pacific Rim seismic area. Typhoons usually attack during summer and steep mountains are highly weathered, which induces landslide in mountain area. The situation happens more frequently recent years due to weather change effect. Most landslides are very far away from residence area. Field investigation is time consuming, high budget, limited data collected and dangerous. Investigation with satellite images has disadvantages such as less of the actual situation and poor resolution. Thus the possibility for slope investigation with UAV will be proposed and discussed in this research. Hazard investigation and monitoring is adopted UAV in recent years. UAV has advantages such as light weight, small volume, high mobility, safe, easy maintenance and low cost. Investigation can be executed in high risk area. Use the mature aero photogrammetry , combines aero photos with control point. Digital surface model (DSM) and Ortho photos can be produced with control points aligned. The resolution can be less than 5cm thus can be used as temporal creeping monitoring before landslide happens. A large landslide site at 75k of road No. 14 was investigated in this research. Landslide happened in June, 2012 with heavy rainfall and landslide dam was formed quickly after that. Analysis of this landslide failure and mechanism were discussed in this research using DEMs produced prior this event with aero photos and after this event with UAV. Residual slope stability analysis is thus carried out after strength parameters obtain from analysis described above. Thus advice for following potential landslide conditions can be provided.

  19. Analysis of shallow landslides and soil erosion induced by rainfall over large areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, Sabatino; Della Sala, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Due to heavy rainstorms, steep hillslopes may be affected by either shallow landslides or soil superficial erosion (Acharya et al., 2011), which originate different flow-like mass movements in adjacent or overlapping source areas (Cascini et al., 2013). Triggering analysis (Cascini et al., 2011) is a relevant issue for hazard assessment that is, in turn, the first step of risk analysis procedures (Fell et al., 2008). Nevertheless, the available approaches separately consider shallow landslides and soil erosion. Specifically, quantitative models for landslides triggering analysis allow simulating the physical processes leading to failure such as pore water pressure increase and soil shear mobilization and provide estimates of the amount of material potentially involved; however, success of quantitative methods must be carefully evaluated in complex geological setting as recently outlined (Sorbino et al., 2010) and further applications to real case histories are straightforward. On the other hand, a wide range of models exist for soil erosion analysis, which differ in terms of complexity, processes considered and data required for the model calibration and practical applications; in particular, quantitative models can estimate the source areas and the amount of eroded soil through empirical relationships or mathematical equations describing the main physical processes governing soil erosion (Merritt et al., 2003). In this work a spatially distributed analysis is proposed for testing the potentialities of two available models to respectively investigate the spatial occurrence of first-time shallow landslides and superficial soil erosion repeatedly occurring in a large test area of the Southern Italy. Both analyses take into account the seasonal variation of soil suction, rainfall characteristics and soil cover use (Cuomo and Della Sala, 2013). The achieved results show that the source areas of shallow landslides strongly depend on rainfall intensity and duration and

  20. LANDSLIDE HAZARD ZONATION AND APPLICATION OF GIS%滑坡灾害空间区划及GIS应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷坤龙; 朱良峰

    2001-01-01

    Landslide hazard zonation is one of the main considerations in the field of landslide research in the world. Random reflects one aspect of landslide generation, but regional regularities and repetition of individual landslide phenomenon dominate the distribution of landslides on a regional scale. It is of not only theoretical significance but also practical importance to study spatial hazard zonation in the propose of hazard reduction and land planning. This paper theoretically discusses the fundamentals of landslide hazard zonation, definition of terms used in risk assessment, and mapping network by GIS. Based on the platform of software MAPGIS and further development, Information Analysis System of Landslide Hazard (IASLH) has been developed to illustrate hazard zonation in Han River valley which was heavily threatened.%滑坡灾害空间区划研究是当前国内外滑坡领域的重要研究方向之一。虽然滑坡灾害的发生具有随机性的特点,但其发生的区域性和重复性特点则是区域滑坡分布与发生的总体规律。从减灾与土地规划的角度,开展滑坡灾害空间区划研究具有十分重要的理论和实际意义。文中重点探讨了滑坡灾害空间区划的理论体系、灾害风险评估的基本术语定义及GIS制图的基本原理,采用MAPGIS软件为平台及其二次开发的滑坡灾害信息分析系统,在中国滑坡重灾害的汉江流域开展了灾害危险性空间区划应用研究。

  1. An integrated approach to earthquake-induced landslide hazard zoning based on probabilistic seismic scenario for Phlegrean Islands (Ischia, Procida and Vivara), Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccavale, Mauro; Matano, Fabio; Sacchi, Marco

    2017-10-01

    In this study we present an integrated approach to assess earthquake-induced landslide hazard at the source area of the slope instability process. The method has been applied to the case study of Ischia, Procida and Vivara islands that represent an integral part of the Campi Flegrei, a densely populated, active volcanic area, located at the NW margin of the Naples Bay, Italy. The proposed method follows a stepwise procedure including: 1) Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA); 2) assessment of site and topographic effects; 3) input of the PSHA outputs into a classic sliding rigid-block analysis for slope instability (Newmark's approach); 4) construction of landslide frequency - magnitude curves for the estimate of the slope failure probability as a function of defined Newmark's threshold values under different probabilistic seismic scenarios; 5) construction of earthquake-induced landslide hazard maps at the source area, based on the integration of the probabilistic approach and the geological, morphological and geotechnical database available for the study area. The Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) is aimed at the definition of the seismic input with different annual exceedance frequency. PSHA results, expressed in terms of Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) at the bedrock, are calculated for 14 return periods (T) ranging from 10 to 2000 yr. PGA values have been corrected for the site effect associated with geological and morphologic conditions for each selected return period. Secondly, the corrected PGA values have been used as an input for the classic sliding rigid-block Newmark's approach, implemented in a Geographic Information System (GIS) to assess the relative potential for slope failure (landslide susceptibility) both in static (Factor of Safety, FS) and dynamic (Critical acceleration, ac) conditions. The combination of T-dependent, site-corrected PGA with the critical acceleration allowed for the calculation of the expected Newmark

  2. A complex geo-scientific strategy for landslide hazard mitigation ─ from airborne mapping to ground monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jaritz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available After a large landslide event in Sibratsgfäll/Austria several exploration methods were evaluated on their applicability to investigate and monitor landslide areas. The resulting optimised strategy consists of the combined application of airborne electromagnetics, ground geoelectrical measurements and geoelectrical monitoring combined with hydrological and geological mapping and geotechnical modelling. Interdisciplinary communication and discussion was the primary key to assess this complicated hazard situation.

  3. Variations in population vulnerability to tectonic and landslide-related tsunami hazards in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Nathan J.; Peters, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Effective tsunami risk reduction requires an understanding of how at-risk populations are specifically vulnerable to tsunami threats. Vulnerability assessments primarily have been based on single hazard zones, even though a coastal community may be threatened by multiple tsunami sources that vary locally in terms of inundation extents and wave arrival times. We use the Alaskan coastal communities of Cordova, Kodiak, Seward, Valdez, and Whittier (USA), as a case study to explore population vulnerability to multiple tsunami threats. We use anisotropic pedestrian evacuation models to assess variations in population exposure as a function of travel time out of hazard zones associated with tectonic and landslide-related tsunamis (based on scenarios similar to the 1964 M w9.2 Good Friday earthquake and tsunami disaster). Results demonstrate that there are thousands of residents, employees, and business customers in tsunami hazard zones associated with tectonically generated waves, but that at-risk individuals will likely have sufficient time to evacuate to high ground before waves are estimated to arrive 30–60 min after generation. Tsunami hazard zones associated with submarine landslides initiated by a subduction zone earthquake are smaller and contain fewer people, but many at-risk individuals may not have enough time to evacuate as waves are estimated to arrive in 1–2 min and evacuations may need to occur during earthquake ground shaking. For all hazard zones, employees and customers at businesses far outnumber residents at their homes and evacuation travel times are highest on docks and along waterfronts. Results suggest that population vulnerability studies related to tsunami hazards should recognize non-residential populations and differences in wave arrival times if emergency managers are to develop realistic preparedness and outreach efforts.

  4. Analysis of the causes of large-scale loess landslides in Baoji, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J. S.; Wu, L. Z.; Wu, S. R.; Li, B.; Wang, T.; Xin, P.

    2016-07-01

    Landslide hazards are common in western China. Understanding the mechanism of landslides in loess-covered regions is particularly important for landslide risk assessment. A detailed landslide survey including large-scale slide drilling and geophysical exploration was carried out at the edge of the Loess Plateau on the north side of the Wei River in China. We reconstructed the geomorphological evolution model of the Wei River and analyzed slope structures and lithology. Engineering geologic conditions and active fault properties in the landslide regions were investigated. The results showed that paleogeomorphology of the north slope of the river gradually lowered from south to north. Ancient landforms showed a gradual transition to the south Sanmen Lake Basin from the piedmont alluvial plain during the Pliocene to early Pleistocene. The lake basin in the southern part of the study area gradually retreated, and the Wei River formed in the early Pleistocene. The main river flow shifted northward because of neotectonic movement and periodic climate changes until the Holocene, and then gradually moved southward to produce the current landforms. The active Wei River fault at the edge of the Loess Plateau acted as a route of water infiltration, weakening the structural planes. Erosion and rise of the groundwater table caused old (occurrence during the Late Pleistocene) and ancient (occurrence before the Late Pleistocene) landslides to form on the edge of the plateau along active fractures and interfaces of Pliocene sand, gravel and clay. These were multiple deep-seated rotational slides and/or multiple perched translational landslides. Slope stability analysis indicated that the complex landslides that occurred in the loess areas in recent years were closely related to the distribution of water and Pliocene clay.

  5. Landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02160 Landslide This large landslide is located within Ganges Chasma. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -7.6N, Longitude 315.8E. 17 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02160 Landslide This large landslide is located within Ganges Chasma. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -7.6N, Longitude 315.8E. 17 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. GIS application on spatial landslide analysis using statistical based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Biswajeet; Lee, Saro; Buchroithner, Manfred F.

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents the assessment results of spatially based probabilistic three models using Geoinformation Techniques (GIT) for landslide susceptibility analysis at Penang Island in Malaysia. Landslide locations within the study areas were identified by interpreting aerial photographs, satellite images and supported with field surveys. Maps of the topography, soil type, lineaments and land cover were constructed from the spatial data sets. There are ten landslide related factors were extracted from the spatial database and the frequency ratio, fuzzy logic, and bivariate logistic regression coefficients of each factor was computed. Finally, landslide susceptibility maps were drawn for study area using frequency ratios, fuzzy logic and bivariate logistic regression models. For verification, the results of the analyses were compared with actual landslide locations in study area. The verification results show that bivariate logistic regression model provides slightly higher prediction accuracy than the frequency ratio and fuzzy logic models.

  8. Digital elevation models in the marine domain: investigating the offshore tsunami hazard from submarine landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappin, David R.

    2015-04-01

    the resolution necessary to identify the hazard from landslides, particularly along convergent margins where this hazard is the greatest. Multibeam mapping of the deep seabed requires low frequency sound sources that, because of their corresponding low resolution, cannot produce the detail required to identify the finest scale features. In addition, outside of most countries, there are not the repeat surveys that allow seabed changes to be identified. Perhaps only japan has this data. In the near future as research budgets shrink and ship time becomes ever expensive new strategies will have to be used to make best use of the vessels available. Remote AUV technology is almost certainly the answer, and should be increasingly utilised to map the seabed while the mother ship is better used to carry out other duties, such as sampling or seismic data acquisition. This will have the advantage in the deep ocean of acquiring higher resolution data from high frequency multibeams. This talk presents on a number of projects that show the evolution of the use of MBES in mapping submarine landslides since the PNG tsunami. Data from PNG is presented, together with data from Japan, Hawaii and the NE Atlantic. New multibeam acquisition methodologies are also discussed.

  9. Validation of landslide hazard assessment by means of GPS monitoring technique – a case study in the Dolomites (Eastern Alps, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tagliavini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years a research project aimed at the assessment of the landslide hazard and susceptibility in the high Cordevole river basin (Eastern Dolomites, Italy have been carried out. The hazard map was made adopting the Swiss Confederation semi-deterministic approach that takes into account parameters such as velocity, geometry and frequency of landslides. Usually these parameters are collected by means of geological and morphological surveys, historical archive researches, aerophotogrammetric analysis etc. In this framework however the dynamics of an instable slope can be difficult to determine. This work aims at illustrating some progress in landslide hazard assessment using a modified version of the Swiss Confederation semi-deterministic approach in which the values of some parameters have been refined in order to accomplish more reliable results in hazard assessment. A validation of the accuracy of these new values, using GPS and inclinometric measurements, has been carried out on a test site located inside the high Cordevole river basin.

  10. A Case Study of Geologic Hazards Affecting School Buildings: Evaluating Seismic Structural Vulnerability and Landslide Hazards at Schools in Aizawl, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, M. M.; Guo, J.

    2016-12-01

    India's National School Safety Program (NSSP) aims to assess all government schools in earthquake prone regions of the country. To supplement the Mizoram State Government's recent survey of 141 government schools, we screened an additional 16 private and 4 government schools for structural vulnerabilities due to earthquakes, as well as landslide hazards, in Mizoram's capital of Aizawl. We developed a geomorphologically derived landslide susceptibility matrix, which was cross-checked with Aizawl Municipal Corporation's landslide hazard map (provided by Lettis Consultants International), to determine the geologic hazards at each school. Our research indicates that only 7% of the 22 assessed school buildings are located within low landslide hazard zones; 64% of the school buildings, with approximately 9,500 students, are located within very high or high landslide hazard zones. Rapid Visual Screening (RVS) was used to determine the structural earthquake vulnerability of each school building. RVS is an initial vulnerability assessment procedure used to inventory and rank buildings that may be hazardous during an earthquake. Our study indicates that all of the 22 assessed school buildings have a damageability rating of Grade 3 or higher on the 5-grade EMS scale, suggesting a significant vulnerability and potential for damage in buildings, ranging from widespread cracking of columns and beam column joints to collapse. Additionally, 86% of the schools we visited had reinforced concrete buildings constructed before Aizawl's building regulations were passed in 2007, which can be assumed to lack appropriate seismic reinforcement. Using our findings, we will give recommendations to the Government of Mizoram to prevent unnecessary loss of life by minimizing each school's landslide risk and ensuring schools are earthquake-resistant.

  11. Landslides and engineering geology of the Seattle, Washington, area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Rex L.; Godt, Jonathan W.; Highland, Lynn M.

    2008-01-01

    This volume brings together case studies and summary papers describing the application of state-of-the-art engineering geologic methods to landslide hazard analysis for the Seattle, Washington, area. An introductory chapter provides a thorough description of the Quaternary and bedrock geology of Seattle. Nine additional chapters review the history of landslide mapping in Seattle, present case studies of individual landslides, describe the results of spatial assessments of landslide hazard, discuss hydrologic controls on landsliding, and outline an early warning system for rainfall-induced landslides.

  12. Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The slumping of materials in the walls of this impact crater illustrate the continued erosion of the martian surface. Small fans of debris as well as larger landslides are observed throughout the THEMIS image.Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 40.9, Longitude 120.5 East (239.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  13. Chemical process hazards analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  14. GIS-Based Terrain Analysis of Balakot Region after Occurred Landslide Disaster in October 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Salam Soomro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The landslide susceptibility models require the appropriate and reliable terrain analytical based study of the landslides prone areas using SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission data, based on certain GIS (Geographical Information Systems and remote sensing techniques. This research paper focuses on the analysis of the terrain conditions of Balakot region. The analytical operations have been used in the different phases: (i Extracting the study area from the large data; (ii preparing it into grid format; (iii developing contour lines with certain contour intervals (iv Re-classification of it into required classes and (v preparation of digital terrain model with its different required various supplementary models for analyzing the terrain conditions of the study area located in Mansehra district, north part of Pakistan where the great earthquake induced landslide disaster occurred in October 2005. This analytical study has notified the different sensitive issues concerning to the critical slope angles, variation in the elevation and the surface of study area. The various distinctions in the terrain phenomenon validate the occurred and probable landslides because the topography of such study area can predict the various probable landslide hazards, vulnerability and risk threats in the region again. This analytical study can be useful for the decisive authorities by becoming pro-active to rebuild the region to mitigate the expected losses from the natural disaster.

  15. What Were the Reasons for the Rapid Landslide Occurrence in “Piaseczno” Open Pit? – Analysis of the Landslide Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakóbczyk Joanna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Landslides are major natural hazards occurring in opencast mining. The problem of slope stability failure in the existing open pit mines as well as in those which are at a stage of technical closure is current issue in Poland and all over the world. This problem requires conducting in-depth and meaningful analysis which will identify the causes of processes characterized by a very rapid course and large extent.

  16. Optical and Radar Satellite Remote Sensing for Large Area Analysis of Landslide Activity in Southern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessner, S.; Behling, R.; Teshebaeva, K. O.; Motagh, M.; Wetzel, H. U.

    2014-12-01

    contribute to the early recognition of landslide activation prior to the onset of larger slope failure and thus support early warning. Overall, combined analysis of optical and radar data enables systematic spatio-temporal derivatioin of ongoing and backdated landslide activity for subsequent GIS-based landslide hazard assessment.

  17. Quantitative risk analysis for landslides ‒ Examples from Bíldudalur, NW-Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bell

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Although various methods to carry out quantitative landslide risk analyses are available, applications are still rare and mostly dependent on the occurrence of disasters. In Iceland, two catastrophic snow avalanches killed 34 people in 1995. As a consequence the Ministry of the Environment issued a new regulation on hazard zoning due to snow avalanches and landslides in 2000, which aims to prevent people living or working within the areas most at risk until 2010. The regulation requires to carry out landslide and snow avalanche risk analyses, however, a method to calculate landslide risk adopted to Icelandic conditions is still missing. Therefore, the ultimate goal of this study is to develop such a method for landslides, focussing on debris flows and rock falls and to test it in Bíldudalur, NW-Iceland. Risk analysis, beside risk evaluation and risk management, is part of the holistic concept of risk assessment. Within this study, risk analysis is considered only, focussing on the risks to life. To calculate landslide risk, the spatial and temporal probability of occurrence of potential damaging events, as well as the distribution of the elements at risk in space and time, considering also changing vulnerabilities, must be determined. Within this study, a new raster-based approach is developed. Thus, all existent vector data are transferred into raster data using a resolution of 1m x 1m. The specific attribute data are attributed to the grid cells, resulting in specific raster data layers for each input parameter. The calculation of the landslide risk follows a function of the input parameters hazard, damage potential of the elements at risk, vulnerability, probability of the spatial impact, probability of the temporal impact and probability of the seasonal occurrence. Finally, results are upscaled to a resolution of 20m x 20m and are presented as individual risk to life and object risk to life for each process. Within the quantitative

  18. Assessment of physical vulnerability of buildings and analysis of landslide risk at the municipal scale - application to the Loures municipality, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard-Gonçalves, C.; Zêzere, J. L.; Pereira, S.; Garcia, R. A. C.

    2015-09-01

    This study offers a semi-quantitative assessment of the physical vulnerability of buildings to landslides in the Loures municipality, as well as an analysis of the landslide risk computed as the product of the vulnerability by the economic value of the buildings and by the landslide hazard. The physical vulnerability assessment, which was based on a questionnaire sent to a pool of Portuguese and European researchers, and the assessment of the subjectivity of their answers are innovative contributions of this work. The generalization of the vulnerability to the smallest statistical subsection was validated by changing the map unit and applying the vulnerability to all the buildings of a test site (approximately 800 buildings), which were inventoried during fieldwork. The economic value of the buildings of the Loures municipality was calculated using an adaptation of the Portuguese Tax Services formula. The hazard was assessed by combining the susceptibility of the slopes, the spatio-temporal probability and the frequency-magnitude relationship of the landslide. Finally, the risk was mapped for different landslide magnitudes and different spatio-temporal probabilities. The highest landslide risk was found for the landslide with a depth of 3 m in the landslide body, and a height of 1m in the landslide foot.

  19. Debris Flow Vulnerability Assessment in Urban Area Associated with Landslide Hazard Map : Application to Busan, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okjeong, Lee; Yoonkyung, Park; Mookwang, Sung; Sangdan, Kim

    2016-04-01

    In this presentation, an urban debris flow disaster vulnerability assessment methodology is suggested with major focus on urban social and economic aspect. The proposed methodology is developed based on the landslide hazard maps that Korean Forest Service has utilized to identify landslide source areas. Frist, debris flows are propagated to urban areas from such source areas by Flow-R model, and then urban vulnerability is evaluated by two categories; physical and socio-economic aspect. The physical vulnerability is associated to buildings that can be broken down by a landslide event directly. This study considers two popular building structure types, reinforced concrete frame and non-reinforced concretes frame, to evaluate the physically-based vulnerability. The socio-economic vulnerability is measured as a function of the resistant levels of the exposed people, the intensity and magnitude of indirect or intangible losses, and preparedness level of the local government. An indicator-based model is established to evaluate the life and indirect loss under urban debris flow disasters as well as the resilience ability against disasters. To illuminate the validity of the suggested methodology, physical and socio-economic vulnerability levels are investigated for Daejeon, Korea using the proposed approach. The results reveal that the higher population density areas under a weaker fiscal condition that are located at the downstream of mountainous areas are more vulnerable than the areas in opposite conditions. Key words: Debris flow disasters, Physical vulnerability, Socio-economic Vulnerability, Urban Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant(13SCIPS04) from Smart Civil Infrastructure Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport(MOLIT) of Korea government and Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement(KAIA).

  20. Approaches for delineating landslide hazard areas using receiver operating characteristic in an advanced calibrating precision soil erosion model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Ghazvinei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is undesirable natural event that causes land degradation and desertification. Identify the erosion-prone areas is a major component of preventive measures. Recent landslide damages at different regions lead us to develop a model of the erosion susceptibility map using empirical method (RUSLE. A landslide-location map was established by interpreting satellite image. Field observation data was used to validate the intensity of soil erosion. Further, a correlation analysis was conducted to investigate the "Receiver Operating Characteristic" and frequency ratio. Results showed a satisfactory correlation between the prepared RUSLE-based soil erosion map and actual landslide distribution. The proposed model can effectively predict the landslide events in soil-erosion area. Such a reliable predictive model is an effective management facility for the regional landslide forecasting system.

  1. Towards a National Hazard Map of Landslides: Juan de Grijalva, Chiapas, and Mitlatongo, Oaxaca, two catastrophic landslides on southeastern of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-M, L.; Castañeda, A.; Ramirez, A.; González, A. E.

    2013-05-01

    One of the most catastrophic events, with economical losses and deaths, in Mexico and Latin America, is the landslide event. The Juan de Grijalva landslide, which blocked one of the largest rivers in the Chiapas state of Mexico, on November 4, 2007, is considered one of the greatest that have occurred in the world in the last 100 years (Dominguez, 2008) and it could be the one with the largest economic impact in the history of Mexico. This landslide occurred four days after a period of very heavy rains that caused, in the peak of the emergency, flooding in almost 62% of the area of the state of Tabasco (CENAPRED, 2009) and is also one of the most serious disasters that were faced by the Mexican government in the past 10 years. The Juan de Grijalva landslide mobilized the entire government apparatus and required an investment of just over 0.1 billions of US Dollars (CENAPRED, 2009) for the rehabilitation of the river runway and additional works in order to prevent further damages if another landslide occurs in the vicinity. A similar case of interest for Mexican researchers and specialists in earth sciences is the big landslide occurred in the communities of Santa Cruz Mitlatongo, municipality of Magdalena Jaltepec, and Santiago Mitlatongo, municipality of Nochixtlan, both in the state of Oaxaca (Dominguez, 2011). This landslide has dimensions of just over 2,500 m long and 900 m wide, and it remains active from September 2011. Since then, the landslide has moved just over 230 m in length and has destroyed about 850 houses. Given the geological and geotechnical characteristics of these landslides and the economic and social impact caused, the National Center for Disaster Prevention (CENAPRED) has initiated a research project in order to learn the main factors (constraints and triggers) that influenced both landslides. In relation with the National Hazard Landslide Map, developed by CENAPRED, these events are an important task of the National Inventory of Landslides

  2. Analysis of landslide mitigation effects using Ground Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Aleksandar; Govedarica, Miro; Vrtunski, Milan; Petrovacki, Dusan

    2013-04-01

    Area of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) technology applications becomes wider nowadays. It includes utility mapping as important part of civil engineering applications, geological structure and soil analyses, applications in agriculture, etc. Characteristics of the technology make it suitable for structure analysis of shallow landslides, whose number and impact on environment is dominant in the region. Especially when shallow landslide endangers some man-made structures such as buildings, roads or bridges, analysis of GPR data can yield very useful results. The results of GPR data analysis of the shallow landslide are represented here. It is situated on the mountain Fruska Gora in Serbia. Despite its dimensions (50x20m) this landslide was interesting for analysis for two reasons: - The landslide occurred at the part of the single road between the cement factory and the marl mine. The cement factory "Lafarge" in Beocin (Fruska Gora) is the largest cement manufacturer in the country. One of major priorities of the factory management is to keep the function of this road. The road is heavily exploited and over the years it led to landslide movements and damaging of the road itself. - The landslide dates back to earlier period and the mitigation measures were performed twice. Laying the foundation of the retaining wall was not performed during the first mitigation measures. The second mitigation measures were performed in 2010 and included detailed geotechnical analysis of the location with the appropriate foundation laying. Since the GPR technology can produce high resolution images of subsurface it provides clear insight into the current state of surveyed location. That kind of analysis is necessary to maintain permanent functionality of the road and to check the status of mitigation measures. Furthermore, the location characteristics do not allow easy access so the possibilities of other analysis technologies application are limited. In order to assess the effects of

  3. Landslide monitoring using multitemporal terrestrial laser scanning for ground displacement analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Barbarella

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the analysis of the temporal evolution of landslides and of related hydrogeological hazards, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS seems to be a very suitable technique for morphological description and displacement analysis. In this note we present some procedures designed to solve specific issues related to monitoring. A particular attention has been devoted to data georeferencing, both during survey campaigns and while performing statistical data analysis. The proper interpolation algorithm for digital elevation model generation has been chosen taking into account the features of the landslide morphology and of the acquired datasets. For a detailed analysis of the different dynamics of the hillslope, we identified some areas with homogeneous behaviour applying in a geographic information system (GIS environment a sort of rough segmentation to the grid obtained by differentiating two surfaces. This approach has allowed a clear identification of ground deformations, obtaining detailed quantitative information on surficial displacements. These procedures have been applied to a case study on a large landslide of about 10 hectares, located in Italy, which recently has severely damaged the national railway line. Landslide displacements have been monitored with TLS surveying for three years, from February 2010 to June 2012. Here we report the comparison results between the first and the last survey.

  4. Hunza Landslide and Monsoon Flooding in Pakistan Call for International Attention to Transboundary Natural Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J. S.; Fink, W.; Furfaro, R.; Leonard, G. J.; Patterson, M.; Glims, Gaphaz

    2010-12-01

    Two major disasters in Pakistan and innumerable lesser disasters throughout the Himalaya-Karakoram region in 2010 highlight geologic events and extreme weather (perhaps climate change) in affecting the well being of whole nations and commerce and relations between nations. Two chief events in Pakistan include the Jan. 4 rockslide into the Hunza River and the subsequent formation of a natural dam lake (Lake Gojal); and the monsoon precipitation-fed flooding across the Indus Basin. The first event severed Pakistan’s major land link with China. The second event devastated Pakistan’s national land-based transportation infrastructure and agriculture and displaced millions of people. In a country plagued by monsoon-driven floods, the lack of catastrophic breakout of Lake Gojal is welcome. Satellite-based monitoring shows the spillway to be eroding more rapidly (but not alarmingly) under August’s monsoon peak flow. Similar events have occurred before in the region and will occur again. These mega-events in Pakistan should be an alert for all of South Asia, as climate change increases or shifts the hazard environment, encroaching development and urbanization increases the vulnerabilities, and as improved capacity for trans-national commerce breaks down the Himalayan barrier and both promotes new opportunities and possible conflicts. 2010's natural mega-calamities in Pakistan and widespread landsliding and flooding elsewhere in South Asia underscores the subcontinent’s need for a thorough field-, remote sensing-, and modeling-based assessment of the disaster potential related to landslides, glacier surges, extreme monsoon precipitation events, natural glacier and landslide dam lake outbursts, and unseasonal snow melting. The Himalayan-Karakoram region is remarkable for its heterogeneous responses to climate change. For instance, some areas are undergoing rapid glacier recession and stagnation; others are undergoing glacier growth. We take the instance of the

  5. Compounding Hazards Facing Nepalese Villages due to Glacial Lake Thulagi, Extreme Monsoons, and Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Gregory; Kargel, Jeffrey; Regmi, Dhananjay

    2014-05-01

    Thulagi Tsho is listed by ICIMOD as among the most hazardous glacial lakes in Nepal. The listing is warranted by the physiography and downstream vulnerabilities. Tal Village—along a major trekking route—and a hydroelectric dam and reservoir are notably at risk due to the potential for a glacier lake outburst flood (GLOF), an extreme summer monsoon, extreme spring snowmelt, landslides, and rockfalls. Tal is downstream from Thulagi Lake just a couple meters above river level, and ordinary monsoons already cause an approach toward flood conditions, according to residents. A high flood stage due to an extreme monsoon or unusually rapid springtime melting of a thick winter snowpack could be catastrophic. Two significant mass movements occurred recently in Tal, one having buried some structures in the village in June 2012. In a favorable note, satellite image analysis shows that Thulagi Lake has slowed its elongation in the last couple years. Furthermore, any tsunami or other flood surge would have to traverse and erode a wide end moraine in order to generate a GLOF. On the other hand, remote sensing and field observations show that wasting of Thulagi Glacier has debuttressed the northern lateral moraine, which is slipping toward the growing lake and the thinning/retreating glacier. The landslip itself is not necessarily a bad thing: it is causing a loss of gravitational potential energy of the lateral moraine, and if that process continues gradually, it will result in diminished instability. However, the debuttressing and moraine slip signifies that the moraines are unstable. Will a rapid mass movement dump into the lake? Triggers could include seismicity, extreme rainfall, or a small landslip. The risk of a serious GLOF exceeds that of Imja Lake due to Thulagi Lake's large hydrographic head and the shape of its downstream end, which could funnel and amplify a potential tsunami generated by a large mass movement into the lake. A moraine collapse into the lake would

  6. Kinematic analysis for the implementation of landslide mitigation measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmonaco, Giuseppe; Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele

    2010-05-01

    The present work is finalised at the implementation of a landslide risk mitigation master plan of the ancient citadel of Machu Picchu. After the warning launched in March 2001, by the scientific community on potential collapse of the citadel from a near-disastrous landslide event different studies have been promoted to reconstruct landslide activity and suggest landslide risk mitigation measures for the protection and conservation of Machu Picchu cultural heritage. A site-scale analysis has been implemented following the application and integration of geomechanical classifications, ambient noise measurements and structural and kinematical analysis. The geology of the area is characterized by granitoid bodies that had been emplaced in the axial zones of the main rift system that are now exposed at the highest altitudes, together with country rocks (Precambrian and Lower Paleozoic metamorphics) originally constituting the rift ‘roots'. The bedrock of the Inca citadel of Machu Picchu is mainly composed by granite and subordinately granodiorite. This is mainly located in the lower part of the slopes. Superficially, the granite is jointed in blocks with variable dimensions, promoted by local structural setting. Single blocks vary from 10-1 to about 200 m3. Soil cover, widely outcropping in the area, is mainly composed by individual blocks and subordinately by coarse materials originated by chemical and physical weathering of minerals. Regional tectonic uplift and structural setting rule the general morphological features of the area and as a consequence, landslide type and evolution. Rock falls, rock slides, debris flows and debris slides are the main landslide typologies affecting the citadel slopes. In the last mission in May 2009, elastic and deformation rock parameters have been collected using a passive seismic innovative technique based on natural microtremor measurements and geostructural scan lines elaboration. A landslide zoning of the citadel has been

  7. Assessment of tsunami hazard to the U.S. East Coast using relationships between submarine landslides and earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, U.S.; Lee, H.J.; Geist, E.L.; Twichell, D.

    2009-01-01

    Submarine landslides along the continental slope of the U.S. Atlantic margin are potential sources for tsunamis along the U.S. East coast. The magnitude of potential tsunamis depends on the volume and location of the landslides, and tsunami frequency depends on their recurrence interval. However, the size and recurrence interval of submarine landslides along the U.S. Atlantic margin is poorly known. Well-studied landslide-generated tsunamis in other parts of the world have been shown to be associated with earthquakes. Because the size distribution and recurrence interval of earthquakes is generally better known than those for submarine landslides, we propose here to estimate the size and recurrence interval of submarine landslides from the size and recurrence interval of earthquakes in the near vicinity of the said landslides. To do so, we calculate maximum expected landslide size for a given earthquake magnitude, use recurrence interval of earthquakes to estimate recurrence interval of landslide, and assume a threshold landslide size that can generate a destructive tsunami. The maximum expected landslide size for a given earthquake magnitude is calculated in 3 ways: by slope stability analysis for catastrophic slope failure on the Atlantic continental margin, by using land-based compilation of maximum observed distance from earthquake to liquefaction, and by using land-based compilation of maximum observed area of earthquake-induced landslides. We find that the calculated distances and failure areas from the slope stability analysis is similar or slightly smaller than the maximum triggering distances and failure areas in subaerial observations. The results from all three methods compare well with the slope failure observations of the Mw = 7.2, 1929 Grand Banks earthquake, the only historical tsunamigenic earthquake along the North American Atlantic margin. The results further suggest that a Mw = 7.5 earthquake (the largest expected earthquake in the eastern U

  8. Subaqueous landslides at the distal basin of Lago Nahuel Huapi (Argentina): Towards a tsunami hazard evaluation in Northern Patagonian lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigt, Débora; Villarosa, Gustavo; Gómez, Eduardo A.; Manzoni, Carolina

    2016-09-01

    The May 22nd, 1960 Valdivia earthquake, Chile (Mw 9.5) triggered a series of subaqueous mass-wasting processes (debris flows and slides) in Lago Nahuel Huapi (Argentina), generating a tsunami-like wave that hit the coasts of San Carlos de Bariloche. Aiming to provide a first preliminary insight into tsunami hazards for the lakeshore communities, in this paper we identify and characterize the subaqueous landslides at the populated distal basin of the lake. Swath bathymetric and seismic profiling surveys were carried out and high-resolution digital elevation models were derived from these data to perform a landslide inventory map. A series of morphometrical parameters (including the landslide area, the volume of displaced materials and the run-out distance, among others) were estimated upon selected events. The results indicated that landslide activity at the distal basin of Lago Nahuel Huapi has been concentrated in the vicinity of Bariloche (massive landslide triggered by the 1960 earthquake) and within steep delta fronts where the slope failures typically initiate at shallow waters (9-11 m depth). The sliding mass frequently travels basinward along a great distance (≥ 1000 m). At the delta fronts, the volume of material removed by landslides can reach ~ 40 × 104 m3, leaving scar areas of up to 13 m thick. The periodic occurrence of rotational-translational mass movements initiating at the upper edge of the delta fronts, with vertical displacements of the mobilized materials reaching ~ 200 m, probably represents a potential tsunami hazard for the nearby populated coasts.

  9. APPLICATION OF PALSAR-2 REMOTE SENSING DATA FOR LANDSLIDE HAZARD MAPPING IN KELANTAN RIVER BASIN, PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Beiranvand Pour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Yearly, several landslides ensued during heavy monsoons rainfall in Kelantan river basin, peninsular Malaysia, which are obviously connected to geological structures and topographical features of the region. In this study, the recently launched Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2 onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2, remote sensing data were used to map geological structural and topographical features in the Kelantan river basin for identification of high potential risk and susceptible zones for landslides. Adaptive Local Sigma filter was selected and applied to accomplish speckle reduction and preserving both edges and features in PALSAR-2 fine mode observation images. Different polarization images were integrated to enhance geological structures. Additionally, directional filters were applied to the PALSAR-2 Local Sigma resultant image for edge enhancement and detailed identification of linear features. Several faults, drainage patterns and lithological contact layers were identified at regional scale. In order to assess the results, fieldwork and GPS survey were conducted in the landslide affected zones in the Kelantan river basin. Results demonstrate the most of the landslides were associated with N-S, NNW-SSE and NE-SW trending faults, angulated drainage pattern and metamorphic and Quaternary units. Consequently, structural and topographical geology maps were produced for Kelantan river basin using PALSAR-2 data, which could be broadly applicable for landslide hazard mapping.

  10. Application of PALSAR-2 Remote Sensing Data for Landslide Hazard Mapping in Kelantan River Basin, Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiranvand Pour, Amin; Hashim, Mazlan

    2016-06-01

    Yearly, several landslides ensued during heavy monsoons rainfall in Kelantan river basin, peninsular Malaysia, which are obviously connected to geological structures and topographical features of the region. In this study, the recently launched Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2), remote sensing data were used to map geological structural and topographical features in the Kelantan river basin for identification of high potential risk and susceptible zones for landslides. Adaptive Local Sigma filter was selected and applied to accomplish speckle reduction and preserving both edges and features in PALSAR-2 fine mode observation images. Different polarization images were integrated to enhance geological structures. Additionally, directional filters were applied to the PALSAR-2 Local Sigma resultant image for edge enhancement and detailed identification of linear features. Several faults, drainage patterns and lithological contact layers were identified at regional scale. In order to assess the results, fieldwork and GPS survey were conducted in the landslide affected zones in the Kelantan river basin. Results demonstrate the most of the landslides were associated with N-S, NNW-SSE and NE-SW trending faults, angulated drainage pattern and metamorphic and Quaternary units. Consequently, structural and topographical geology maps were produced for Kelantan river basin using PALSAR-2 data, which could be broadly applicable for landslide hazard mapping.

  11. A Multidisciplinary Approach for Monitoring Flood and Landslide Hazards: Application to The Quebrada de Ramón Watershed in Central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Vargas, M. T.; Oberli, C.; Castro, L. M.; Ledezma, C., Sr.; Gironas, J. A.; Escauriaza, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Floods and landslides produced by heavy rainfall in the Andes have acquired new relevance due to recent large-scale events, which have had devastating consequences. The complexity of the geomorphology and the climate that characterizes this region promote the occurrence of flash floods with high sediment concentrations. In addition, cities are expanding in the Andean foothills, occupying the floodplains, and increasing the exposure of the population and infrastructure to floods and landslides. Performing a hazard assessment of extreme events in these regions is a very complex task, due to the great uncertainty associated to the factors controlling the dynamics of floods and landslides, and the lack of historical records of hydrometeorological variables. The analysis is further complicated by anthropic activities that can amplify the effects of these events, and by the influence of climate change and the ENSO phenomenon. To provide a better understanding of these events in Andean regions, we integrate knowledge from different disciplines to study various aspects associated to floods and landslides in the Quebrada de Ramón, an Andean watershed located in central Chile. We combine two methodologies to collect the information in the field: 1) We use traditional methods, including sediment samples, weather stations, and topographic data from aerial photography and LIDAR; and 2) We also implement innovative methods based on a wireless network of sensors for monitoring hydrometeorological variables in real-time. We employ this information to develop and couple weather forecast, hydrological and hydrodynamic models, which are used to predict the propagation of floods in the river channel and the urban area, as well as the occurrence of landslides on specific sections of the watershed. This work is expected to provide more reliable information to citizens, city planners, emergency managers and other decision makers to enhance the preparedness, response, and resilience of

  12. An uncertainty and sensitivity analysis approach for GIS-based multicriteria landslide susceptibility mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizizadeh, Bakhtiar; Blaschke, Thomas

    2014-03-04

    GIS-based multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) methods are increasingly being used in landslide susceptibility mapping. However, the uncertainties that are associated with MCDA techniques may significantly impact the results. This may sometimes lead to inaccurate outcomes and undesirable consequences. This article introduces a new GIS-based MCDA approach. We illustrate the consequences of applying different MCDA methods within a decision-making process through uncertainty analysis. Three GIS-MCDA methods in conjunction with Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) and Dempster-Shafer theory are analyzed for landslide susceptibility mapping (LSM) in the Urmia lake basin in Iran, which is highly susceptible to landslide hazards. The methodology comprises three stages. First, the LSM criteria are ranked and a sensitivity analysis is implemented to simulate error propagation based on the MCS. The resulting weights are expressed through probability density functions. Accordingly, within the second stage, three MCDA methods, namely analytical hierarchy process (AHP), weighted linear combination (WLC) and ordered weighted average (OWA), are used to produce the landslide susceptibility maps. In the third stage, accuracy assessments are carried out and the uncertainties of the different results are measured. We compare the accuracies of the three MCDA methods based on (1) the Dempster-Shafer theory and (2) a validation of the results using an inventory of known landslides and their respective coverage based on object-based image analysis of IRS-ID satellite images. The results of this study reveal that through the integration of GIS and MCDA models, it is possible to identify strategies for choosing an appropriate method for LSM. Furthermore, our findings indicate that the integration of MCDA and MCS can significantly improve the accuracy of the results. In LSM, the AHP method performed best, while the OWA reveals better performance in the reliability assessment. The WLC operation

  13. Web Application for Coastal Area Planning through Analysis of Landslide and Soil Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizzoni, Giulio; Debiasi, Alberto; Eccher, Matteo; De Amicis, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    Global warming and rapid climatic changes are producing dramatic effects on coastal area of Mediterranean countries. Italian coastal areas are one of the most urbanized zones of the south western Europe and the extensive use of soil is causing a consistent impact on the hydrogeological context. Moreover, soil consumption combined with extreme meteorological events, facilitates the occurrence of hazardous landslide events. Environmental policy makers and data managers in territorial planning need to face such emergency situation with appropriate tools. We present an application service with the aim of advising user through environmental analysis of Landslide and Soil Consumption impact. This service wants also to improve the sharing of environmental harmonized datasets/metadata across different organizations and the creation of a collaborative environment where the stakeholders and environmental experts can share their data and work cooperatively. We developed a set of processing services providing functionalities to assess impact of landslide on territory and impact of land take and soil sealing. Among others, the service is able to evaluate environmental impacts of landslide events on Cultural Heritage sites. We have also designed a 3D WebGL client customized to execute the processing services and visualize their outputs. It provides high usability in terms of navigation and data visualization. In this way the service provides not only a Spatial Data Infrastructure to access and visualize data but a complete Decision Support Systems for a more effective environmental planning of coastal area.

  14. Predictive analysis of landslide susceptibility in the Kao-Ping watershed, Taiwan under climate change conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Shou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the most critical issues, climatic abnormalities caused by global warming also affect Taiwan significantly for the past decade. The increasing frequency of extreme rainfall events, in which concentrated and intensive rainfalls generally cause geohazards including landslides and debris flows. The extraordinary Typhoon Morakot hit Southern Taiwan on 8 August 2009 and induced serious flooding and landslides. In this study, the Kao-Ping River watershed was adopted as the study area, and the typical events 2007 Krosa Typhoon and 2009 Morakot Typhoon were adopted to train the susceptibility model. This study employs rainfall frequency analysis together with the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM downscaling estimation to understand the temporal rainfall trends, distributions, and intensities in the Kao-Ping River watershed. The rainfall estimates were introduced in the landslide susceptibility model to produce the predictive landslide susceptibility for various rainfall scenarios, including abnormal climate conditions. These results can be used for hazard remediation, mitigation, and prevention plans for the Kao-Ping River watershed.

  15. Landslide triggering-thickness susceptibility, a simple proxy for landslide hazard? A test in the Mili catchment (North-Eastern Sicily, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Luigi; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Amato, Gabriele; Bonasera, Mauro; Mai, Martin

    2016-04-01

    in order to produce an example for a landslide triggering-thickness susceptibility which differently from more common approaches, may performs as a better proxy for more complex landslide hazard assessments.

  16. Connectivity of earthquake-triggered landslides with the fluvial network: Implications for landslide sediment transport after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gen; West, A. Joshua; Densmore, Alexander L.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Jin, Zhangdong; Zhang, Fei; Wang, Jin; Hilton, Robert G.

    2016-04-01

    Evaluating the influence of earthquakes on erosion, landscape evolution, and sediment-related hazards requires understanding fluvial transport of material liberated in earthquake-triggered landslides. The location of landslides relative to river channels is expected to play an important role in postearthquake sediment dynamics. In this study, we assess the position of landslides triggered by the Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake, aiming to understand the relationship between landslides and the fluvial network of the steep Longmen Shan mountain range. Combining a landslide inventory map and geomorphic analysis, we quantify landslide-channel connectivity in terms of the number of landslides, landslide area, and landslide volume estimated from scaling relationships. We observe a strong spatial variability in landslide-channel connectivity, with volumetric connectivity (ξ) ranging from ~20% to ~90% for different catchments. This variability is linked to topographic effects that set local channel densities, seismic effects (including seismogenic faulting) that regulate landslide size, and substrate effects that may influence both channelization and landslide size. Altogether, we estimate that the volume of landslides connected to channels comprises 43 + 9/-7% of the total coseismic landslide volume. Following the Wenchuan earthquake, fine-grained (90% of the total landslide volume) may be more significantly affected by landslide locations.

  17. Use of groundwater flow model in the analysis of a creeping landslide in western Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.K.Shrestha; R.Yatabe; N.P.Bhandary

    2006-01-01

    @@ To predict the movement of an existing creeping landslide, monitoring and analysis of hydrological parameters are crucial. This paper analyses the hydrological parameters of an existing creeping landslide site in western Japan.

  18. Combined statistical analysis of landslide release and propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergili, Martin; Rohmaneo, Mohammad; Chu, Hone-Jay

    2016-04-01

    quantify this relationship by a set of empirical curves. (6) Finally, we multiply the zonal release probability with the impact probability in order to estimate the combined impact probability for each pixel. We demonstrate the model with a 167 km² study area in Taiwan, using an inventory of landslides triggered by the typhoon Morakot. Analyzing the model results leads us to a set of key conclusions: (i) The average composite impact probability over the entire study area corresponds well to the density of observed landside pixels. Therefore we conclude that the method is valid in general, even though the concept of the zonal release probability bears some conceptual issues that have to be kept in mind. (ii) The parameters used as predictors cannot fully explain the observed distribution of landslides. The size of the release zone influences the composite impact probability to a larger degree than the pixel-based release probability. (iii) The prediction rate increases considerably when excluding the largest, deep-seated, landslides from the analysis. We conclude that such landslides are mainly related to geological features hardly reflected in the predictor layers used.

  19. ACTUAL LANDSLIDES AS MOST OBJECTIVE STANDARD FOR VALIDA-TION OF LANDSLIDE HAZARD ASSESSMENT RESULT%实际滑坡是滑坡危险性评价结果合理性检验最好的标准

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许冲

    2013-01-01

    王涛等“基于简化Newmark位移模型的区域地震滑坡危险性快速评估---以汶川MS 8.0级地震为例”一文的地震滑坡危险性快速评价结果与2008年汶川地震触发实际滑坡空间分布的相关性较低。本文试图通过对该文中基础数据、分析处理过程、研究结果的分析与讨论,找出这种相关性较低的原因。结果表明值得针对王涛等文章中的Arias烈度分布数据的准确性、工程地质岩组的划分情况、汶川地震滑坡危险性评价结果的客观性共三个方面开展更深入的分析与研究。本文对探索与发掘更客观的地震滑坡危险性评价模型起到了积极的作用。%A relatively low correlation appeared between the result from the published paper of Wang Tao et al. named“Case study on rapid assessment of regional seismic landslide hazard based on simplified Newmark displace-ment model:Wenchuan MS 8.0 earthquake”and spatial distribution pattern of actual landslides triggered by the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake.The main purpose of this comment or discussion is to analyze the reasons of the low correlation by analyzing and discussing of basic data,data analysis process,and results from that paper from Wang Tao and his research teams.The results suggest that Wang Tao and his teams carry out a more in-depth study in three aspects,include accuracy of the Arias intensity data,engineering geology lithology formation groupings,and validation of the Wenchuan earthquake-triggered landslides hazard assessment.This comment plays a positive role on exploring more scientific landslide hazard assessment models.

  20. Analysis of changes in post-seismic landslide distribution and its effect on building reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. T. Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Six years after the devastating Ms 8.0 Wenchuan Earthquake, new landslides, debris flows, and flash floods still occur frequently in the earthquake-stricken regions. This shows the geological hazards that occur after a major earthquake in a mountainous environment can be a long-term threat. However, post-earthquake reconstruction and relocation of local residents often neglect this evolving threat, and its interaction with existing and rebuilt houses has not been well studied. Here we show that the evolving mountain environment, including the changed geographic distribution of new landslides and the continuously uplifting riverbed, creates emerging risks for existing and rebuilt houses. We use spatial analysis of landslide debris and the location of houses from high-resolution images and field survey in the study area, and find that new landslides and the houses rebuilt after the Wenchuan Earthquake have a similar trend of moving to lower elevations, gentler slopes, and closer to rivers. This study confirms that the persistent downward movement of landslide debris has rapidly filled up riverbeds over the past 6 yr. The elevated riverbeds make the study area extremely susceptible to flash floods, creating further risks to newly rebuilt houses that are closer to the river. We highlight the often neglected dynamic process that involves changes in the natural environment and man-made constructions, and their interaction. This dynamic process requires long-term monitoring and adaptive management of mountainous regions after major earthquakes that can fully consider the sophisticated evolving risks caused by the changing environment, exposure and vulnerability in the region.

  1. Mapping of landslides under dense vegetation cover using object - oriented analysis and LiDAR derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Eeckhout, Miet; Kerle, Norman; Hervas, Javier; Supper, Robert; Margottini, C.; Canuti, P.; Sassa, K.

    2013-01-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and its wide range of derivative products have become a powerful tool in landslide research, particularly for landslide identification and landslide inventory mapping. In contrast to the many studies that use expert-based analysis of LiDAR derivatives to identify

  2. Mapping of landslides under dense vegetation cover using object - oriented analysis and LiDAR derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Eeckhout, Miet; Kerle, N.; Hervas, Javier; Supper, Robert; Margottini, C.; Canuti, P.; Sassa, K.

    2013-01-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and its wide range of derivative products have become a powerful tool in landslide research, particularly for landslide identification and landslide inventory mapping. In contrast to the many studies that use expert-based analysis of LiDAR derivatives to identify

  3. A simplified early-warning system for imminent landslide prediction based on failure index fragility curves developed through numerical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Ozturk

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Early-warning systems (EWSs are crucial to reduce the risk of landslide, especially where the structural measures are not fully capable of preventing the devastating impact of such an event. Furthermore, designing and successfully implementing a complete landslide EWS is a highly complex task. The main technical challenges are linked to the definition of heterogeneous material properties (geotechnical and geomechanical parameters as well as a variety of the triggering factors. In addition, real-time data processing creates a significant complexity, since data collection and numerical models for risk assessment are time consuming tasks. Therefore, uncertainties in the physical properties of a landslide together with the data management represent the two crucial deficiencies in an efficient landslide EWS. Within this study the application is explored of the concept of fragility curves to landslides; fragility curves are widely used to simulate systems response to natural hazards, i.e. floods or earthquakes. The application of fragility curves to landslide risk assessment is believed to simplify emergency risk assessment; even though it cannot substitute detailed analysis during peace-time. A simplified risk assessment technique can remove some of the unclear features and decrease data processing time. The method is based on synthetic samples which are used to define the approximate failure thresholds for landslides, taking into account the materials and the piezometric levels. The results are presented in charts. The method presented in this paper, which is called failure index fragility curve (FIFC, allows assessment of the actual real-time risk in a case study that is based on the most appropriate FIFC. The application of an FIFC to a real case is presented as an example. This method to assess the landslide risk is another step towards a more integrated dynamic approach to a potential landslide prevention system. Even if it does not define

  4. Digital photogrammetric analysis and electrical resistivity tomography for investigating a landslide located in Basilicata region (southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bari, C.; Lapenna, V.; Perrone, A.; Puglisi, C.; Sdao, F.

    2009-04-01

    The combined application of the most modern methodologies and techniques in the field of the remote sensing, of the geomorphology and of the applied geophysics is fundamental to define correct and practicable strategies for the hazard evaluation and for the damages estimate produced by a mass movements. The purpose is to consolidate and/or mitigate the landslide affected areas. The aim of this job has been to reconstruct the volumetric history and the geomorphologic evolution of the main landslide parts of a complex roto-translational slide that, because of the hard weather, in March of 2006 occurred in an area located in the Picerno (PZ) territory. The landslide is 600 m length and 230 m wide with a range of altimetry varying between 1072 m s.l.m. in the main crown and 978 m s.l.m. in the toe of the landslide. For studying this landslide, a multitemporal analysis on aerial photo of the years 1997, 2004 and 2007, in an apparent scale of 1:18000, has been applied by using the digital photogrammetric technique via the software SOCETSET version 5.4.1. For each year, the morphological characterization of the landslide body through digital photo interpretation at a maximum scale of 1:5000 has been performed, with the aim to identify the different geomorphological features (scarps, terraces, trench) and their development, and mainly the morphological units (displaced material) characterizing the investigated landslide. Then DEMs have been produced choosing a 5 x 5 m pixel by means of a grid adaptive inside the same polygon containing the whole landslide area. DEMs allowed us to generate correspondent orthophotos related to the three years too. By using the difference of DEMs in a GIS environment it has been possible to recognize areas affected by uplift (accumulation zone) or lowering (depleted zone), then to estimate for every geomorphological unit the altimetry variation during the time considered. Moreover, the volume of the material involved in the movement can be

  5. Monitoring and forecasting local landslide hazard in the area of Longyearbyen, Svalbard - early progress and experiences from the Autumn 2016 events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Thea; Krøgli, Ingeborg; Boje, Søren; Colleuille, Hervé

    2017-04-01

    Since 2013 the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) has operated a landslide early warning system (LEWS) for mainland Norway. The Svalbard islands, situated 800 km north of the Norwegian mainland, and 1200 km from the North Pole, are not part of the conventional early warning service. However, following the fatal snow avalanche event 19 Dec. 2015 in the settlement of Longyearbyen (78° north latitude), local authorities and the NVE have initiated monitoring of the hydro-meteorological conditions for the area of Longyearbyen, as an extraordinary precaution. Two operational forecasting teams from the NVE; the snow avalanche and the landslide hazard forecasters, perform hazard assessment related to snow avalanches, slush flows, debris flows, shallow slides and local flooding. This abstract will focus on recent experiences made by the landslide hazard team during the autumn 2016 landslide events, caused by a record setting wet and warm summer and autumn of 2016. The general concept of the Norwegian LEWS is based on frequency intervals of extreme hydro-meteorological conditions. This general concept has been transposed to the Longyearbyen area. Although the climate is considerably colder and drier than mainland Norway, experiences so far are positive and seem useful to the local authorities. Initially, the landslide hazard evaluation was intended to consider only slush flow hazard during the snow covered season. However, due to the extraordinary warm and wet summer and autumn 2016, the landslide hazard forecasters unexpectedly had to issue warnings for the local authorities due to increased risk of shallow landslides and debris flows. This was done in close cooperation with the Norwegian Meteorological Institute, who provided weather forecasts from the recently developed weather prediction model, AROME-Arctic. Two examples, from 14-15 Oct and 8-9 Nov 2016, will be given to demonstrate how the landslide hazard assessment for the Longyearbyen area is

  6. Indirect economic impact of landslide hazards by disruption to national road transportation networks; Scotland, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postance, Benjamin; Hillier, John; Dijkstra, Tom; Dixon, Neil

    2016-04-01

    The failure of engineered or natural slopes which support or are adjacent to transportation systems often inflicts costly direct physical damage and indirect system disruption. The consequences and severity of indirect impacts vary according to which links, nodes or network facilities are physically disrupted. Moreover, it is often the case that multiple slope failure disruptions are triggered simultaneously following prolonged or intense precipitation events due to a degree of local homogeneity of slope characteristics and materials. This study investigates the application of national commuter statistics and network agent simulation to evaluate indirect impacts of landslide events disrupting the Scottish trunk road transportation network (UK). Previous studies often employ shortest pathway analysis whereas agent simulation has received relatively little attention. British Geological Survey GeoSure landslide susceptibility data is used to select 35 susceptible trunk road segments by means of neighbouring total area at risk. For each of the candidate 35 segments the network and zonal variation in travel time is calculated for a single day of disruption, economic impact is approximated using established governmental and industry transport planning and appraisal values. The results highlight that a number of trunk road segments incur indirect economic losses in the order of tens of thousands of pounds for each day of closure. Calculated losses at the A83 Rest and Be Thankful are 50% greater than previous estimates at £75 thousand per day of closure. Also highlighted are events in which economic impact is relatively minor, yet concentrating on particular communities that can become substantially isolated as a consequence of a single event. The findings of this study are of interest and support wider investigations exploring cost considerations for decision makers and mitigation strategies, in addition to identifying network topological and demand indicators conducive

  7. Landslide susceptibility assessment based on different rainfall-triggered landslide events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Sergio C.; Zêzere, José L.; Garcia, Ricardo A. C.

    2015-04-01

    The availability of several complete landslide event inventory maps associated to different rainfall conditions is uncommon for a single region. Nevertheless, it could contribute to a better recognition of the total extent and magnitude of landslides under specific triggering conditions. The motivation of the present work is related with three problems that should be solved: (i) How representative of the landslide activity and distribution in a study area can be a landslide event? (ii) How reliable can be a landslide event-based susceptibility map? (iii) How adequate can be a landslide event-based map to independent validate a landslide susceptibility map? To answer the previous questions two independent rainfall-triggered landslide event inventories, available for the Grande da Pipa river basin, north of Lisbon, Portugal, are used to assess landslide susceptibility at the regional scale. The 1983 landslide event was triggered by a single day of intense precipitation and originates 220 landslides that affected 0.15% (161413 m2) of the study area. The 2010 landslide event was associated with a long lasting rainfall period up to 90 days and generated 254 landslides that affected 0.46 % (511820 m2) of the study area. The two landslide-event inventories are compared according the following topics: (i) the landslide typology; (ii) the landslide morphometric characteristics; (iii) the analysis of the landslide predisposing factors; (iv) the assessment of magnitude-frequency relationships; (v) the predictive capability of landslide event-based susceptibility models. For the last topic, the Information Value method is used to establish the statistical relationships between the dependent landslide inventory map and the data-set of independent predisposing factors. Two landslide event-based susceptibility maps are produced using independently the landslide inventories of 1983 and 2010. The independent validation is obtained by crossing each landside susceptibility map with

  8. Analysis of the relationship between landslides size distribution and earthquake source area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valagussa, Andrea; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Frattini, Paolo; Xu, Chong

    2014-05-01

    The spatial distribution of earthquake induced landslides around the seismogenetic source has been analysed to better understand the triggering of landslides in seismic areas and to forecast the maximum distance at which an earthquake, with a certain magnitude, can induce landslides (e.g Keefer, 1984). However, when applying such approaches to old earthquakes (e.g 1929 Buller and 1968 Iningahua earthquakes New Zealand; Parker, 2013; 1976 Friuli earthquake, Italy) one should be concerned about the undersampling of smaller landslides which can be cancelled by erosion and landscape evolution. For this reason, it is important to characterize carefully the relationship between landslide area and number with distance from the source, but also the size distribution of landslides as a function of distance from the source. In this paper, we analyse the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake landslide inventory (Xu et al, 2013). The earthquake triggered more than 197,000 landslides of different type, including rock avalanches, rockfalls, translational and rotational slides, lateral spreads and derbies flows. First, we calculated the landslide intensity (number of landslides per unit area) and spatial density (landslide area per unit area) as a function of distance from the source area of the earthquake. Then, we developed magnitude frequency curves (MFC) for different distances from the source area. Comparing these curves, we can describe the relation between the distance and the frequency density of landslide in seismic area. Keefer D K (1984) Landslides caused by earthquakes. Geological Society of America Bulletin, 95(4), 406-421. Parker R N, (2013) Hillslope memory and spatial and temporal distributions of earthquake-induced landslides, Durham theses, Durham University. Xu, C., Xu, X., Yao, X., & Dai, F. (2013). Three (nearly) complete inventories of landslides triggered by the May 12, 2008 Wenchuan Mw 7.9 earthquake of China and their spatial distribution statistical analysis

  9. Enhancing national Daily Landslide Hazard Assessments through inter-agency collaboration; lessons learned from storm Desmond (UK)/Synne (Norway), Dec 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boje, Søren; Devoli, Graziella; Sund, Monica; Freeborough, Katy; Dijkstra, Tom; Reeves, Helen; Banks, Vanessa

    2016-04-01

    The Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) and the British Geological Survey (BGS) compile daily landslide hazard assessments (DLHA) in their respective countries. NVE DLHA has been operational since 2013 and provides national daily assessments based on quantitative thresholds related to daily hydro-meteorological forecasts coupled with qualitative expert analysis of these forecasts. The BGS DLHA has been operational since 2012 and this is predominantly based on expert evaluation of antecedent hydro-meteorological conditions and triggering rainfall across Great Britain (GB). In both cases, the hydro-meteorological evaluation is coupled with observations derived from proprietary datasets on landslide events and landslide potential in order to specify, and limit, the spatial extent of the potentially impacted area. However, the DLHA are strongly driven by hydro-meteorological forecasts. In December 2015, a large extra-tropical cyclone developed over the Atlantic and delivered record-breaking precipitation over parts of the UK and Norway. The meteorological services started naming these events to enhance public uptake and awareness and the storms were named as Desmond (the 4th large storm in 2015/16 in the UK) and Synne (the 5th storm in 2015 in Norway). Desmond arrived in earnest on the 5th of December and brought intense precipitation and strong winds over a 48-hour period. In Cumbria (NW-England) record precipitation was measured (341.4 mm in 24-hour at Honister Pass which is more than twice the monthly average), with 48-hour accumulations exceeding 400 mm. Synne arrived shortly after in Norway and was also characterised by excessive rainfall of 140 mm in 24-hour, 236 mm in 48-hour and 299 mm in 72-hour at Maudal, SW-Norway. Both organisations managed to issue appropriate advance warnings, operating individually. In Norway, warnings were issued some 2 days in advance with a yellow level communicated on Friday 4th and an orange warning the 5th and 6

  10. 潜在地震滑坡危险区区划方法%Hazards zonation for potential earthquake-induced landslide area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓利; 冉洪流; 王明明

    2012-01-01

    Earthquake-induced landslide is different from landslide triggered by rainstorms. Compared with landslides caused by rain, landslides induced by earthquake have more wide and dense space distribution and bigger scale, and can cause tremendous loss both to properties and lives. Earthquake-induced landslides usually cannot be prevented by current mitigation measures, thus, it becomes more and more important to develop a useful skill of assessing the hazard of landslides triggered by earthquake for land planning. This paper presents a method for zonation of potential earthquake-induced landslide area based on seismic hazard analysis. The approach takes account of uncertainty about earthquake location, intensity and recurrence, as well as space distribution of seismic peak ground acceleration. The study selects the damaged region in 2008. 5. 12 Wenchuan Earthquake as target area, and divided potential seismic source zone on the studying of geology, tectonics and seismic activity in this region. On the basis of potential seismic source zone division, this paper calculates the seismic peak ground acceleration according to different probability of exceedance of 10Mi, 5% and 2% in 50a using seismic hazard analysis method proposed by Cornell in 1968, and then assesses earthquake-induced landslide hazard of study region with comprehensive indexes model. In this model, the hazard is classified into 4 grades as high, secondary high, secondary low and low, and five indexes are used including seismic peak ground acceleration, slope angle, rock type, and distance to faults and rivers. The result of hazards zonation for potential earthquake-induced landslide in the study area shows that landslide areas in Wenchuan earthquake such as Wenchuan county, Beichuan county. Maoxian county et al, are located at areas of high or secondary high grades. In Leiguzhen area of Beichuan county, where high resolution DEM data is available, the zonation result shows good correlation with reality

  11. Catastrophic debris flows transformed from landslides in volcanic terrains : mobility, hazard assessment and mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kevin M.; Macias, Jose Luis; Naranjo, Jose Antonio; Rodriguez, Sergio; McGeehin, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Communities in lowlands near volcanoes are vulnerable to significant volcanic flow hazards in addition to those associated directly with eruptions. The largest such risk is from debris flows beginning as volcanic landslides, with the potential to travel over 100 kilometers. Stratovolcanic edifices commonly are hydrothermal aquifers composed of unstable, altered rock forming steep slopes at high altitudes, and the terrain surrounding them is commonly mantled by readily mobilized, weathered airfall and ashflow deposits. We propose that volcano hazard assessments integrate the potential for unanticipated debris flows with, at active volcanoes, the greater but more predictable potential of magmatically triggered flows. This proposal reinforces the already powerful arguments for minimizing populations in potential flow pathways below both active and selected inactive volcanoes. It also addresses the potential for volcano flank collapse to occur with instability early in a magmatic episode, as well as the 'false-alarm problem'-the difficulty in evacuating the potential paths of these large mobile flows. Debris flows that transform from volcanic landslides, characterized by cohesive (muddy) deposits, create risk comparable to that of their syneruptive counterparts of snow and ice-melt origin, which yield noncohesive (granular) deposits, because: (1) Volcano collapses and the failures of airfall- and ashflow-mantled slopes commonly yield highly mobile debris flows as well as debris avalanches with limited runout potential. Runout potential of debris flows may increase several fold as their volumes enlarge beyond volcanoes through bulking (entrainment) of sediment. Through this mechanism, the runouts of even relatively small collapses at Cascade Range volcanoes, in the range of 0.1 to 0.2 cubic kilometers, can extend to populated lowlands. (2) Collapse is caused by a variety of triggers: tectonic and volcanic earthquakes, gravitational failure, hydrovolcanism, and

  12. Landslide hazard and land management in high-density urban areas of Campania region, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Di Martire

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Results deriving from a research focused on the interplay between landslides and urban development are presented here, with reference to two densely populated settings located in the Campania region, Italy: the city of Naples and the island of Ischia. Both areas suffer adverse consequences from various types of landslides since at least 2000 yr. Our study evidences that, despite the long history of slope instabilities, the urban evolution, often illegal, disregarded the high landslide propensity of the hillsides; thus, unsafe lands have been occupied, even in recent years, when proper and strict rules have been enacted to downgrade the landslide risk. It is finally argued that future guidelines should not be entirely based upon physical countermeasures against mass movements. On the contrary, national and local authorities should enforce the territorial control, obliging citizens to respect the existing regulations and emphasizing the role of alternative, non-structural solutions.

  13. Landslide hazard and land management in high-density urban areas of Campania region, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martire, D.; De Rosa, M.; Pesce, V.; Santangelo, M. A.; Calcaterra, D.

    2012-04-01

    Results deriving from a research focused on the interplay between landslides and urban development are presented here, with reference to two densely populated settings located in the Campania region, Italy: the city of Naples and the island of Ischia. Both areas suffer adverse consequences from various types of landslides since at least 2000 yr. Our study evidences that, despite the long history of slope instabilities, the urban evolution, often illegal, disregarded the high landslide propensity of the hillsides; thus, unsafe lands have been occupied, even in recent years, when proper and strict rules have been enacted to downgrade the landslide risk. It is finally argued that future guidelines should not be entirely based upon physical countermeasures against mass movements. On the contrary, national and local authorities should enforce the territorial control, obliging citizens to respect the existing regulations and emphasizing the role of alternative, non-structural solutions.

  14. Landslide tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Steven N.

    2001-06-01

    In the creation of "surprise tsunami," submarine landslides head the suspect list. Moreover, improving technologies for seafloor mapping continue to sway perceptions on the number and size of surprises that may lie in wait offshore. At best, an entirely new distribution and magnitude of tsunami hazards has yet to be fully appreciated. At worst, landslides may pose serious tsunami hazards to coastlines worldwide, including those regarded as immune. To raise the proper degree of awareness, without needless alarm, the potential and frequency of landslide tsunami have to be assessed quantitatively. This assessment requires gaining a solid understanding of tsunami generation by landslides and undertaking a census of the locations and extent of historical and potential submarine slides. This paper begins the process by offering models of landslide tsunami production, propagation, and shoaling and by exercising the theory on several real and hypothetical landslides offshore Hawaii, Norway, and the United States eastern seaboard. I finish by broaching a line of attack for the hazard assessment by building on previous work that computed probabilistic tsunami hazard from asteroid impacts.

  15. Geotechnical stability analysis, fragility of structures and velocity of movement to assess landslides vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Cuanalo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Landslides are geohazards that can be potential risks to life and property; these phenomena usually cause disasters when they occur in densely populated communities as those that inhabit mountainous and steep regions. Hazard and vulnerability are parameters determined by probability mathematical analysis with values between 0 and 1. When there are no records or enough information regards historical events on the phenomenon in study, that have occurred in a specific area (as in several mountainous regions of Mexico inhabited by ethnic groups, it has the disadvantage of not being able to perform a statistical analysis to properly evaluate the hazard nor the vulnerability. To solve the problem, this paper presents a proposal for evaluating the physical and functional vulnerability of the elements at risk, from two fundamental aspects: (a the exposure level (EL, and (b the expected damage degree (EDD. First of these factors is determined by the severity index (SI and the safety factor from geotechnical stability analysis (SFgeo; the second one from the construction type (degree of fragility of structures and the velocity that may have the landslide. For evaluating the parameters aforementioned, included tables, graphs and equations proposed by the authors.

  16. MGR External Events Hazards Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Booth

    1999-11-06

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to apply an external events Hazards Analysis (HA) to the License Application Design Selection Enhanced Design Alternative 11 [(LADS EDA II design (Reference 8.32))]. The output of the HA is called a Hazards List (HL). This analysis supersedes the external hazards portion of Rev. 00 of the PHA (Reference 8.1). The PHA for internal events will also be updated to the LADS EDA II design but under a separate analysis. Like the PHA methodology, the HA methodology provides a systematic method to identify potential hazards during the 100-year Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) operating period updated to reflect the EDA II design. The resulting events on the HL are candidates that may have potential radiological consequences as determined during Design Basis Events (DBEs) analyses. Therefore, the HL that results from this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply during the performance of DBE analyses.

  17. Assessing population exposure for landslide risk analysis using dasymetric cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ricardo A. C.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Zezere, Jose L.

    2015-04-01

    Exposed Population is a major topic that needs to be taken into account in a full landslide risk analysis. Usually, risk analysis is based on an accounting of inhabitants number or inhabitants density, applied over statistical or administrative terrain units, such as NUTS or parishes. However, this kind of approach may skew the obtained results underestimating the importance of population, mainly in territorial units with predominance of rural occupation. Furthermore, the landslide susceptibility scores calculated for each terrain unit are frequently more detailed and accurate than the location of the exposed population inside each territorial unit based on Census data. These drawbacks are not the ideal setting when landslide risk analysis is performed for urban management and emergency planning. Dasymetric cartography, which uses a parameter or set of parameters to restrict the spatial distribution of a particular phenomenon, is a methodology that may help to enhance the resolution of Census data and therefore to give a more realistic representation of the population distribution. Therefore, this work aims to map and to compare the population distribution based on a traditional approach (population per administrative terrain units) and based on dasymetric cartography (population by building). The study is developed in the Region North of Lisbon using 2011 population data and following three main steps: i) the landslide susceptibility assessment based on statistical models independently validated; ii) the evaluation of population distribution (absolute and density) for different administrative territorial units (Parishes and BGRI - the basic statistical unit in the Portuguese Census); and iii) the dasymetric population's cartography based on building areal weighting. Preliminary results show that in sparsely populated administrative units, population density differs more than two times depending on the application of the traditional approach or the dasymetric

  18. Integrating landslide and liquefaction hazard and loss estimates with existing USGS real-time earthquake information products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyas, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    he U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has made significant progress toward the rapid estimation of shaking and shakingrelated losses through their Did You Feel It? (DYFI), ShakeMap, ShakeCast, and PAGER products. However, quantitative estimates of the extent and severity of secondary hazards (e.g., landsliding, liquefaction) are not currently included in scenarios and real-time post-earthquake products despite their significant contributions to hazard and losses for many events worldwide. We are currently running parallel global statistical models for landslides and liquefaction developed with our collaborators in testing mode, but much work remains in order to operationalize these systems. We are expanding our efforts in this area by not only improving the existing statistical models, but also by (1) exploring more sophisticated, physics-based models where feasible; (2) incorporating uncertainties; and (3) identifying and undertaking research and product development to provide useful landslide and liquefaction estimates and their uncertainties. Although our existing models use standard predictor variables that are accessible globally or regionally, including peak ground motions, topographic slope, and distance to water bodies, we continue to explore readily available proxies for rock and soil strength as well as other susceptibility terms. This work is based on the foundation of an expanding, openly available, case-history database we are compiling along with historical ShakeMaps for each event. The expected outcome of our efforts is a robust set of real-time secondary hazards products that meet the needs of a wide variety of earthquake information users. We describe the available datasets and models, developments currently underway, and anticipated products. 

  19. ANALYSIS ON THE DEEP SEATED LANDSLIDE OCCURRED IN SHAOLIN VILLEGE, KAOHSIUNG COUNTY, TAIWAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Daizo; Fujita, Masaharu; Miyamoto, Kuniaki; Imaizumi, Fumitoshi; Fujimoto, Masamitsu; Kokuryo, Hiroshi; Izumiyama, Hiroaki

    In August 2009, the Typhoon Morakot hit Taiwan and caused an extraordinary amount of rainfall. Due to the heavy rainfall, a large number of floods and sediment-related disasters occurred all over the island. In Shaolin Village, Kaohsiung County, a huge landslide occurred around 6 am August 9, destroyed the village completely and killed more than 500 people. After the landslide, authors visited the landslide site and investigated the landslide scour to collect information on factors affecting landslide occurrence such as exposed bedrock and soil layer conditions. GIS analysis using DEM data were also conducted to determine the sliding domain. According to the site investigation and GIS analysis, rainwater infiltration analysis and slope stability analysis were conducted. Results of the analysis suggested that the landslide domain, about 1,200 m long, 500 m wide and 80 m deep was collapsed by multi phased manner.

  20. Integration of landslide susceptibility products in the environmental plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Federica; Reichenbach, Paola; Rossi, Mauro; Cardinali, Mauro; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2015-04-01

    Landslides are one of the most destructive natural hazard that causes damages to urban area worldwide. The knowledge of where a landslide could occur is essential for the strategic management of the territory and for a good urban planning . In this contest landslide susceptibility zoning (LSZ) is crucial to provide information on the degree to which an area can be affected by future slope movements. Despite landslide susceptibility maps have been prepared extensively during the last decades, there are few examples of application is in the environmental plans (EP). In this work we present a proposal for the integration of the landslide inventory map with the following landslide susceptibility products: (i) landslide susceptibility zonation , (ii) the associated error map and (iii) the susceptibility uncertainty map. Moreover we proposed to incorporate detailed morphological studies for the evaluation of landslide risk associated to local parceling plan. The integration of all this information is crucial for the management of landslide risk in urban expansions forecasts. Municipality, province and regional administration are often not able to support the costs of landslide risk evaluation for extensive areas but should concentrate their financial resources to specific hazardous and unsafe situations defined by the result of the integration of landslide susceptibility products. Zonation and detail morphological analysis should be performed taking into account the existing laws and regulations, and could become a starting point to discuss new regulations for the landslide risk management.

  1. GIS技术支持下的滑坡涌浪灾害分析研究%LANDSLIDE IMPULSIVE WAVE HAZARD STUDY SUPPORTED BY GIS TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄波林; 殷跃平; 王世昌; 刘广宁; 陈小婷

    2013-01-01

    引入水波动力学模型,结合GIS技术,开发形成滑坡涌浪灾害快速评价系统软件(FAST),该软件由前处理模块、涌浪计算模块和后处理模块组成,能够按滑坡失稳类型处理涌浪计算,能够更直观地展示水质点、剖面线、水面和水体的高程变化情况,具有易入手、易操作、高效率和可视化等特点。以三峡库区巫峡茅草坡滑坡为例,应用FAST预测该滑坡失稳后的涌浪效应,验证FAST的可行性和实用性。模拟结果表明茅草坡滑坡失稳会造成最大的涌浪高度为25 m,最大涌浪爬高为12.5 m,滑坡发生444.5 s后以2.5 m的最大爬坡浪到达巫山县城。该技术方法为快速合理确定水库崩滑体涌浪灾害预警范围及风险管理评价等工作提供一套新的分析手段和可视化平台。%Impulsive wave generated by landslide is a complex and dynamic process,wave propagation overly extended the dangerous range of landslide. Landslide impulsive wave simulation adopted wave dynamic model is hot in relative field in foreign,which can efficiently simulate long wave propagation problems. In this paper,the authors introduce wave dynamic model and form fast assessing system for tsunamis generated by geo-hazard(FAST) supported by GIS technology. FAST is made up of pre-processing module,simulation module,and post processing module,which can calculate impulsive wave according to the type of landslide failure,and can intuitively display water elevation change condition of point,line,surface and volume. It has characteristics of manageability,high efficiency and visibility. The paper takes Maocaopo landslide in Wu Gorge of Three Gorges Reservoir for example,and forecast impulsive wave generated by this landslide,verifying the feasibility and utility of FAST. The simulation result shows that the maximum wave amplitude is 25 m,the maximum run-up height is 12.5 m,and after landslide failure 444.5 s,a 2.5 m run-up wave will

  2. Large landslides in the Pyrenees: preliminary tasks carried out for a harmonized cross-border risk analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, José; Grandjean, Gilles; Copons, Ramon; Vaunat, Jean; Buxó, Pere; Colas, Bastien; Darrozes, José; Gasc, Muriel; Guinau, Marta; Gutiérrez, Francisco; García, Juan Carlos; Virely, Didier; Crosetto, Michele; Mas, Raül

    2017-04-01

    Large landslides are recognised as one of the main erosional agents in mountain ranges, having a significant influence on landscape evolution. However, few efforts have been carried out to assess their geomorphological impact from a regional perspective. Regional-scale investigations are also necessary for the reliable evaluation of the associated risks (i.e. for land-use planning). Large landslides are common in the Pyrenees but: 1) their geographic distribution on a regional scale is not well known; 2) their geological and geomorphological controlling factors have been only studied preliminarily; and 3) their state of activity and stability conditions are unknown for most of the cases. Regional analyses of large landslides, as those carried out by Crosta et al. (2013) in the Alps, are rare worldwide. Jarman et al. (2014) conducted a very preliminary analysis in a sector of the Pyrenees. The construction of a cartographic inventory constitutes the basics for such type of studies, which are typically hindered by the lack of cross-border landslide data bases and methodologies. The aim of this contribution is to present the preliminary works carried out for constructing a harmonized inventory of large landslides in the Pyrenees, involving for the first time both sides of the cordillera and the main groups working in landslide risk in France, Spain and Andorra. Methods used for landslide hazard and risk analysis have been compiled and compared, showing a significant divergence, even as regards the terminology. A preliminary cross-border inventory sheet on risk of large landslides has been prepared. It includes specific fields for the assessment of landslide activity (by using complimentary methods such as morpho-stratigraphy, morphometric analysis and remote techniques) and indirect potential costs (that typically overcome direct ones), which usually are neglected in the existing data bases. Crosta, G.B., Frattini, P. and Agliardi, F., 2013. Deep seated gravitational

  3. Rainfall-induced landslide stability analysis in response to transient pore pressure--A case study of natural terrain landslide in Hong Kong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Hengxing; ZHOU Chenghu; C.F.Lee; WANG Sijing; WU Faquan

    2003-01-01

    Transient pore pressure in response to short intense rainfall process plays an important role in shallow landslide occurrence. Using GIS technology, we carry out the rainfall-induced landslide stability analysis in response to transient pore pressure by means of transient and unsaturated rainfall infiltration modeling. A case study is performed on the shallow landslide stability analysis in Hong Kong. Detailed analysis and discussion reached some useful conclusions on the tempo-spatial behavior and characteristics of slope stability response and pore pressure response to typical rainfall process. Comparison analysis is performed on some important issues including landslide stability response in different types of slopes with different hydraulic properties, antecedent rainfall and landslide stability, and the nature of pore pressure response time. These studies might give us an important insight into landslide tringgering mechanism and the hydrological process in response to rainfall, and provide systematic information and evidences for effective risk assessment and warning system establishment.

  4. Performance of Models for Flash Flood Warning and Hazard Assessment: The 2015 Kali Gandaki Landslide Dam Breach in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D. Bricker

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The 2015 magnitude 7.8 Gorkha earthquake and its aftershocks weakened mountain slopes in Nepal. Co- and postseismic landsliding and the formation of landslide-dammed lakes along steeply dissected valleys were widespread, among them a landslide that dammed the Kali Gandaki River. Overtopping of the landslide dam resulted in a flash flood downstream, though casualties were prevented because of timely evacuation of low-lying areas. We hindcast the flood using the BREACH physically based dam-break model for upstream hydrograph generation, and compared the resulting maximum flow rate with those resulting from various empirical formulas and a simplified hydrograph based on published observations. Subsequent modeling of downstream flood propagation was compromised by a coarse-resolution digital elevation model with several artifacts. Thus, we used a digital-elevation-model preprocessing technique that combined carving and smoothing to derive topographic data. We then applied the 1-dimensional HEC-RAS model for downstream flood routing, and compared it to the 2-dimensional Delft-FLOW model. Simulations were validated using rectified frames of a video recorded by a resident during the flood in the village of Beni, allowing estimation of maximum flow depth and speed. Results show that hydrological smoothing is necessary when using coarse topographic data (such as SRTM or ASTER, as using raw topography underestimates flow depth and speed and overestimates flood wave arrival lag time. Results also show that the 2-dimensional model produces more accurate results than the 1-dimensional model but the 1-dimensional model generates a more conservative result and can be run in a much shorter time. Therefore, a 2-dimensional model is recommended for hazard assessment and planning, whereas a 1-dimensional model would facilitate real-time warning declaration.

  5. Probabilistic analysis of tsunami hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, E.L.; Parsons, T.

    2006-01-01

    Determining the likelihood of a disaster is a key component of any comprehensive hazard assessment. This is particularly true for tsunamis, even though most tsunami hazard assessments have in the past relied on scenario or deterministic type models. We discuss probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis (PTHA) from the standpoint of integrating computational methods with empirical analysis of past tsunami runup. PTHA is derived from probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), with the main difference being that PTHA must account for far-field sources. The computational methods rely on numerical tsunami propagation models rather than empirical attenuation relationships as in PSHA in determining ground motions. Because a number of source parameters affect local tsunami runup height, PTHA can become complex and computationally intensive. Empirical analysis can function in one of two ways, depending on the length and completeness of the tsunami catalog. For site-specific studies where there is sufficient tsunami runup data available, hazard curves can primarily be derived from empirical analysis, with computational methods used to highlight deficiencies in the tsunami catalog. For region-wide analyses and sites where there are little to no tsunami data, a computationally based method such as Monte Carlo simulation is the primary method to establish tsunami hazards. Two case studies that describe how computational and empirical methods can be integrated are presented for Acapulco, Mexico (site-specific) and the U.S. Pacific Northwest coastline (region-wide analysis).

  6. Landslide Mapping and Modeling Using Remote Sensing, GIS and Statistical Analysis of District Muzaffarabad, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Nimrah; Mushtaq, Saman

    2016-07-01

    Occurrence factors of Landslide hazard can be natural such as high slopes, geological conditions and lineaments, faults, rain, and river cutting. Man-made factors such as road cuttings, deforestation or development can also contribute to the landsliding. The focus of this study was to model those landslides susceptible prone to hazard areas which in turn can help for the development, urbanization and for setting up rules or regulations to save nature and environment of the area. The focal of the current research work was the Earthquake of October, 2005 also known as Kashmir Earthquake, the epicenter location of the earthquake 34°29'35″N 73°37'44″E at height of ~2000 from mean sea level and ~20 Km North-East from Muzaffarabad city, Azad Jammu & Kashmir, at the scale of 1:50000 Geological map of 43-F/11, tehsil Nauseri area. The techniques used in this research is based on theorem of Bayes's bivariat statistic (weight of evidence) which predicts the events geographically and on input layers and the relationship of event. A relationship between event of landslide and factors was studied and analyzed using this method. Subsequently a prediction of the occurrence of the spatial location of the landslide event was established successfully. The relationship of distribution of landslide and factors layers was calculated using the statistical methods which enabled to predict the landslides zones in different areas. The methodology applied proved that the success rate was 80% landslide occurred in 18% area and prediction rate was 70% of landslides occurred in 70% of area. The use satellite remote sensing data, and GIS with the integration of statistical method are definitely an effective tool for predicting the future landslide prone areas.

  7. Integrating Expert Knowledge with Statistical Analysis for Landslide Susceptibility Assessment at Regional Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Chalkias

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an integration landslide susceptibility model by combining expert-based and bivariate statistical analysis (Landslide Susceptibility Index—LSI approaches is presented. Factors related with the occurrence of landslides—such as elevation, slope angle, slope aspect, lithology, land cover, Mean Annual Precipitation (MAP and Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA—were analyzed within a GIS environment. This integrated model produced a landslide susceptibility map which categorized the study area according to the probability level of landslide occurrence. The accuracy of the final map was evaluated by Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC analysis depending on an independent (validation dataset of landslide events. The prediction ability was found to be 76% revealing that the integration of statistical analysis with human expertise can provide an acceptable landslide susceptibility assessment at regional scale.

  8. Application of a process-based shallow landslide hazard model over a broad area in Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Eleonora; Speranza, Gabriella; Ferretti, Maurizio; Godt, Jonathan W.; Baum, Rex L.; Marincioni, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Process-based models are widely used for rainfall-induced shallow landslide forecasting. Previous studies have successfully applied the U.S. Geological Survey’s Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-Based Regional Slope-Stability (TRIGRS) model (Baum et al. 2002) to compute infiltration-driven changes in the hillslopes’ factor of safety on small scales (i.e., tens of square kilometers). Soil data input for such models are difficult to obtain across larger regions. This work describes a novel methodology for the application of TRIGRS over broad areas with relatively uniform hydrogeological properties. The study area is a 550-km2 region in Central Italy covered by post-orogenic Quaternary sediments. Due to the lack of field data, we assigned mechanical and hydrological property values through a statistical analysis based on literature review of soils matching the local lithologies. We calibrated the model using rainfall data from 25 historical rainfall events that triggered landslides. We compared the variation of pressure head and factor of safety with the landslide occurrence to identify the best fitting input conditions. Using calibrated inputs and a soil depth model, we ran TRIGRS for the study area. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, comparing the model’s output with a shallow landslide inventory, shows that TRIGRS effectively simulated the instability conditions in the post-orogenic complex during historical rainfall scenarios. The implication of this work is that rainfall-induced landslides over large regions may be predicted by a deterministic model, even where data on geotechnical and hydraulic properties as well as temporal changes in topography or subsurface conditions are not available.

  9. DEBRIS FLOW AND LANDSLIDE HAZARDS UNDER CERTAIN TYPES OF ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Kononova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Conditions of formation and development of landslides and debris flows in the Black Sea coast of the Caucasus and on Sakhalin Island were considered. They are formed under the influence of heavy rainfall under the influence of the Mediterranean cyclones outlet in the Black Sea coast of the Caucasus and of the Pacific cyclones outlet on Sakhalin Island in the same macro-circulation processes. Activity of landslides and debris flows in these regions has been shown to be connected with certain types of atmospheric circulation during the XX—the beginning of the XXI century. Based on these results, possible increase in the activity of landslides and debris flows, in the Black Sea coast of the Caucasus and Sakhalin Island, is suggested.

  10. Regional analysis of distribution of pre and post 2015 Nepal Earthquake landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valagussa, Andrea; Frattini, Paolo; Crosta, Giovanni; Valbuzzi, Elena

    2016-04-01

    A magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck Nepal on April 25, 2015. Three landslide inventories have been prepared in four districts: Dhading (1885 km2), Sindhupalchok (2488 km2), Rasuwa (1522 km2) and Nuwakot (1194 km2), that are located north of Kathmandu. These inventories extend 14 to 138 km SE from the epicenter of the main shock (April 25, 2015), 4.5 to 143 km NW from the epicenter of the main aftershock (May 12, 2015), and 34 to 136 km from the Main Frontal Thrust. The first inventory is a coseismic and post-seismic landslide inventory based on multi-temporal images (Google Earth, Google Crisis maps, Bing maps), and helicopter-based video. The second one is a pre-event shallow landslide inventory. In these two inventories the most abundant landslide types are: debris flows, shallow translational slides, and rockfalls. The third is a deep seated landslide inventory, in which the most represented landslide types are rock avalanches, slumps, rockslides and deep-seated gravitational slope deformations (DSGSD). All the landslides have been mapped as individual polygons. For the analysis we focus our attention on four districts: First we studied how the landslide frequency density changes as a function of topographic parameters (i.e. slope gradient, slope aspect, and elevation). The analyses have been based on the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (ASTER GDEM). For coseismic and post-seismic landslides we observed that the mean slope gradient at which the landslide occurs is higher with respect to the two other inventories (50° and 30/40° respectively). The slope aspect of coseismic and post-seismic landslides is also different, with a larger frequency of landslides towards SW, whereas in pre-event landslides the most common slope aspect is SE. This could be related to the direction of the seismic wave. At least the coseismic and post-seismic landslides occur, in mean, at an elevation lower than the pre-event landslides. We also analyzed the relationship between the

  11. Application of multi-temporal landform analysis in landslide susceptibility assessment for mountainous highway - a case study in southeastern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-Xuan, Jian; Wei-Kai, Huang; Po-Shen, Lin

    2016-04-01

    This study divided a coastal mountainous highway into small sections with slope unit, plot the multi-temporal landslide inventories, and analyze the relationships between the revegetation areas of the existing landslide and newly activated landslide to calculate landslide status Index (LSI). The RI represents the multi-temporal status of landslide status in each slope unit; three statuses and their representing colors were defined in this study. Red representing slope unit with continuously landslides, yellow for those with previous landslide but stable and revegetating, green are those without landslides. The regression lines became one of the parameters in establishing landslide status map. The study area, 407K to 439K of Provincial Highway No. 9, located in southeastern Taiwan and is the most important transport corridor connecting southern Taiwan and the east coast. In 2009 this mountainous highway was hit by Typhoon Morakot and several landslides, debris slides were triggered in the study area. The debris blocked the traffic and residential communities alone the highway became isolated. To this date some section of the highway still suffer from landslide hazard and transportation had to be temporarily interrupted during some occasions. The landslide status map of this transport corridor was established combining the result of field investigation, remote sensing interpretation, and the regression lines of LSI. The preliminary result shows that out of the 258 slope units, 13 (5%) showing continuous landslides, 44 (17%) became stable and revegetating. The result of this study could provide better information for mountainous highway safety management.

  12. Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coordes, D.; Ruggieri, M.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility`s construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment.

  13. GIS and statistical analysis for landslide susceptibility mapping in the Daunia area, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mancini

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on landslide susceptibility mapping in the Daunia area (Apulian Apennines, Italy and achieves this by using a multivariate statistical method and data processing in a Geographical Information System (GIS. The Logistic Regression (hereafter LR method was chosen to produce a susceptibility map over an area of 130 000 ha where small settlements are historically threatened by landslide phenomena. By means of LR analysis, the tendency to landslide occurrences was, therefore, assessed by relating a landslide inventory (dependent variable to a series of causal factors (independent variables which were managed in the GIS, while the statistical analyses were performed by means of the SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. The LR analysis produced a reliable susceptibility map of the investigated area and the probability level of landslide occurrence was ranked in four classes. The overall performance achieved by the LR analysis was assessed by local comparison between the expected susceptibility and an independent dataset extrapolated from the landslide inventory. Of the samples classified as susceptible to landslide occurrences, 85% correspond to areas where landslide phenomena have actually occurred. In addition, the consideration of the regression coefficients provided by the analysis demonstrated that a major role is played by the "land cover" and "lithology" causal factors in determining the occurrence and distribution of landslide phenomena in the Apulian Apennines.

  14. Hazardous Materials Hazard Analysis, Portland, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    ACCIDENTS IN OREGON, 1976-1979 INJURY RATE FATALITY RATE (per 100 million nilles ) (per 100 million miles) Injuries Fatalities 100 - 94. 8 80 75 - - 6...commercial vehicle Involved. Driver fault--icy road conditions caused truck to jack -knIfe and skid. Resulted in hazardous material spill and relase and...Wheel gem tanks retrieved her body. Huerta Mayor Jack Pirog said Mobil Chemi- Corp. i Mendota. She distributed the revived after emergency treatment at

  15. Integration of conventional GIS-based techniques and remote sensing analysis to landslide risk assessment at basin scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agili, F.; Bartolomei, A.; Casagli, N.; Catani, F.; Ermini, L.; Farina, P.; Kukavicic, M.; Mirannalti, M.; Moretti, S.; Righini, G.

    2003-04-01

    This note concerns the preliminary results gathered in a research project aimed at landslide risk assessment in the Arno River basin (9000 km^2). The project, sponsored by the Basin Authority of the Arno River, started in the year 2002 and it will finish in the 2004. The objective of such a project consists of the updating of the landslide risk cartography related to the PAI document (Piano Assetto Idrogeologico) with reference to the Italian Law 267/1998. Different types of products will be generated: the updating of the existing inventory maps and the definition and application of a methodology for landslide hazard and risk mapping. Conventional methods, such as aerial-photo interpretation and field surveys are coupled with the use of different remote sensing methods, and all the data are integrated within a GIS environment. The analysis of remote sensing data regards both optical and radar images. In particular for the analysis of optical data, panchromatic and multispectral Landsat images are used in order to update the Corine standard land cover maps. In addition high resolution images (Ikonos and Quickbird), acquired in stereoscopic configuration, are analysed for integrating the aerial-photo intepretation. Differential SAR interferometry, implemented by using ERS and JERS data, is used in order to detect new mass movements, not yet observed and to evaluate the state of activity of known phenomena. Such data represent the base needed to produce the final landslide risk cartography.

  16. Landslides: Geomorphology and Sea Cliff Hazard Potential, Santa Barbara - Isla Vista, California J.F. Klath and E.A. Keller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klath, J. F.; Keller, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal areas are often characterized by high population densities in an ever changing, dynamic environment. The world's coasts are often dominated by steeply sloping sea cliffs, the morphology of which reflects rock type, wave erosion, and surface erosion, as well as human activities such changing vegetation, urban runoff, and construction of coastal defenses. The Santa Barbara and Goleta area, with over 17 km of sea cliffs and beaches, extends from Santa Barbara Point west to the hamlet of Isla Vista. A deeper understanding of the local geology and the physical processes generating slope failure and, thus, landward cliff retreat is important for general public safety, as well as future development and planning. Our research objective includes assessment of landslide hazard potential through investigation of previous landslides and how these events relate to various physical variables and characteristics within the surrounding bedrock. How does landslide frequency, volume, and type relate to varying local bedrock and structure? Two geologic formations dominate the sea cliffs of the Santa Barbara area: Monterey shale (upper, middle, and lower) and Monterey Sisquoc shale. Geology varies from hard cemented shale and diatomaceous, low specific gravity shale to compaction shale. Variations in landslide characteristics are linked closely to the geology of a specific site that affects how easily rock units are weathered and eroded by wave erosion, naturally occurring oil and water seeps, burnt shale events, and landslide type and frequency on steeply dipped bedding planes/daylighting beds. Naturally occurring features linked to human processes often weaken bedrock and, thus, increase the likelihood of landslides. We categorize landslide frequency, type, and triggers; location of beach access, drainage pipes, and water; and oil and tar seeps in order to develop suggestions to minimize landslide potential. Lastly, using previously published erosion cliff retreat rates and

  17. Exploiting COSMO-Skymed Data and Multi-Temporal Interferometry for Early Detection of Landslide Hazard: A Case of Slope Failure and Train Derailment Near Marina Di Andora, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasowski, J.; Chiaradia, M.; Bovenga, F.; Nutricato, R.; Nitti, D. O.; Milillo, G.; Guerriero, L.

    2014-12-01

    The improving temporal and spatial resolutions of new generation space-borne X-Band SAR sensors such as COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) constellation, and therefore their better monitoring capabilities, will guarantee increasing and more efficient use of multi-temporal interferometry (MTI) in landslide investigations. Thanks to their finer spatial resolution with respect to C-band data, X-band InSAR applications are very promising also for monitoring smaller landslides and single engineering structures sited on potentially unstable slopes. This work is focused on the detection of precursory signals of an impending slope failure from MTI time series of ground deformations obtained by exploiting 3 m resolution CSK data. We show the case of retrospectively captured pre-failure strains related to the landslide which occurred on January 2014 close to the town of Marina di Andora. The landslide caused the derailment of a train and the interruption of the railway line connecting north-western Italy to France. A dataset of 56 images acquired in STRIPMAP HIMAGE mode by CSK constellation from October 2008 to May 2014 was processed through SPINUA algorithm to derive the ground surface deformation map and the time series of displacement rates for each coherent radar target. We show that a cluster of moving targets coincides with the structures (buildings and terraces) affected by the 2014 landslide. The analysis of the MTI time series further shows that the targets had been moving since 2009, and thus could have provided a forewarning signal about ongoing slope or engineering structure instability. Although temporal landslide prediction remains difficult even via in situ monitoring, the presented case study indicates that MTI relying on high resolution radars such as CSK can provide very useful information for slope hazard mapping and possibly for early warning. Acknowledgments DIF provided contribution to data analysis within the framework of CAR-SLIDE project funded by MIUR (PON01_00536).

  18. FIRE HAZARDS ANALYSIS - BUSTED BUTTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Longwell; J. Keifer; S. Goodin

    2001-01-22

    The purpose of this fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas at the Busted Butte Test Facility and to ascertain whether the DOE fire safety objectives are met. The objective, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Section 4.2, is to establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees. (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  19. Using high resolution satellite multi-temporal interferometry for landslide hazard detection in tropical environments: the case of Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasowski, Janusz; Nutricato, Raffaele; Nitti, Davide Oscar; Bovenga, Fabio; Chiaradia, Maria Teresa; Piard, Boby Emmanuel; Mondesir, Philemon

    2015-04-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) multi-temporal interferometry (MTI) is one of the most promising satellite-based remote sensing techniques for fostering new opportunities in landslide hazard detection and assessment. MTI is attractive because it can provide very precise quantitative information on slow slope displacements of the ground surface over huge areas with limited vegetation cover. Although MTI is a mature technique, we are only beginning to realize the benefits of the high-resolution imagery that is currently acquired by the new generation radar satellites (e.g., COSMO-SkyMed, TerraSAR-X). In this work we demonstrate the potential of high resolution X-band MTI for wide-area detection of slope instability hazards even in tropical environments that are typically very harsh (eg. coherence loss) for differential interferometry applications. This is done by presenting an example from the island of Haiti, a tropical region characterized by dense and rapidly growing vegetation, as well as by significant climatic variability (two rainy seasons) with intense precipitation events. Despite the unfavorable setting, MTI processing of nearly 100 COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) mages (2011-2013) resulted in the identification of numerous radar targets even in some rural (inhabited) areas thanks to the high resolution (3 m) of CSK radar imagery, the adoption of a patch wise processing SPINUA approach and the presence of many man-made structures dispersed in heavily vegetated terrain. In particular, the density of the targets resulted suitable for the detection of some deep-seated and shallower landslides, as well as localized, very slow slope deformations. The interpretation and widespread exploitation of high resolution MTI data was facilitated by Google EarthTM tools with the associated high resolution optical imagery. Furthermore, our reconnaissance in situ checks confirmed that MTI results provided useful information on landslides and marginally stable slopes that can represent a

  20. Landslide inventory development in a data sparse region: spatial and temporal characteristics of landslides in Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Robbins

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In Papua New Guinea (PNG earthquakes and rainfall events form the dominant trigger mechanisms capable of generating many landslides. Large volume and high density landsliding can result in significant socio-economic impacts, which are felt particularly strongly in the largely subsistence-orientated communities which reside in the most susceptible areas of the country. As PNG has undergone rapid development and increased external investment from mining and other companies, population and settled areas have increased, hence the potential for damage from landslides has also increased. Information on the spatial and temporal distribution of landslides, at a regional-scale, is critical for developing landslide hazard maps and for planning, sustainable development and decision making. This study describes the methods used to produce the first, country-wide landslide inventory for PNG and analyses of landslide events which occurred between 1970 and 2013. The findings illustrate that there is a strong climatic control on landslide-triggering events and that the majority (~ 61 % of landslides in the PNG landslide inventory are initiated by rainfall related triggers. There is also large year to year variability in the annual occurrence of landslide events and this is related to the phase of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO and mesoscale rainfall variability. Landslide-triggering events occur during the north-westerly monsoon season during all phases of ENSO, but less landslide-triggering events are observed during drier season months (May to October during El Niño phases, than either La Niña or ENSO neutral periods. This analysis has identified landslide hazard hotspots and relationships between landslide occurrence and rainfall climatology and this information can prove to be very valuable in the assessment of trends and future behaviour, which can be useful for policy makers and planners.

  1. Landslide inventory development in a data sparse region: spatial and temporal characteristics of landslides in Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, J. C.; Petterson, M. G.

    2015-08-01

    In Papua New Guinea (PNG) earthquakes and rainfall events form the dominant trigger mechanisms capable of generating many landslides. Large volume and high density landsliding can result in significant socio-economic impacts, which are felt particularly strongly in the largely subsistence-orientated communities which reside in the most susceptible areas of the country. As PNG has undergone rapid development and increased external investment from mining and other companies, population and settled areas have increased, hence the potential for damage from landslides has also increased. Information on the spatial and temporal distribution of landslides, at a regional-scale, is critical for developing landslide hazard maps and for planning, sustainable development and decision making. This study describes the methods used to produce the first, country-wide landslide inventory for PNG and analyses of landslide events which occurred between 1970 and 2013. The findings illustrate that there is a strong climatic control on landslide-triggering events and that the majority (~ 61 %) of landslides in the PNG landslide inventory are initiated by rainfall related triggers. There is also large year to year variability in the annual occurrence of landslide events and this is related to the phase of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and mesoscale rainfall variability. Landslide-triggering events occur during the north-westerly monsoon season during all phases of ENSO, but less landslide-triggering events are observed during drier season months (May to October) during El Niño phases, than either La Niña or ENSO neutral periods. This analysis has identified landslide hazard hotspots and relationships between landslide occurrence and rainfall climatology and this information can prove to be very valuable in the assessment of trends and future behaviour, which can be useful for policy makers and planners.

  2. Response of the Laprak Landslide to the 2015 Nepal Earthquake and Implications for the Utility of Simple Infinite Slope Models in Regional Landslide Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneberg, W. C.; Gurung, N.

    2016-12-01

    The village of Laprak, located in the Gorkha District of western Nepal, was built on a large colluvium landslide about 10 km from the epicenter of the 25 April 2015 M 7.8 Nepal earthquake. Recent episodic movement began during a wet period in 1999 and continued in at least 2002, 2006, and 2007, destroying 24 homes, removing 23 hectares of land from agricultural production, and claiming 1 life. Reconnaissance mapping, soil sampling and testing, and slope stability analyses undertaken before the 2015 earthquake suggested that the hillside should be stable under dry conditions, unstable to marginally stable under static wet conditions, and wholly unstable under wet seismic conditions. Most of the buildings in Laprak, which were predominantly of dry fitted stone masonry, were destroyed by Intensity IX shaking during the 2015 earthquake. Interpretation of remotely sensed imagery and published photographs shows new landslide features; hence, some downslope movement occurred but the landslide did not mobilize into a long run-out flow. Monte Carlo simulations based upon a pseudostatic infinite slope model and constrained by reasonable distributions of soil shear strength, pore pressure, and slope angle from earlier work and seismic coefficients based upon the observed Intensity IX shaking (and inferred PGA) yield high probabilities of failure for steep portions of the slope above and below the village but moderate probabilities of failure for the more gentle portion of the slope upon which most of the village was constructed. In retrospect, the seismic coefficient selected for the pre-earthquake analysis proved to be remarkably prescient. Similar results were obtained using a first-order, second-moment (FOSM) approach that is convenient for GIS based regional analyses. Predictions of permanent displacement made using a variety of published empirical formulae based upon sliding block analyses range from about 10 cm to about 200 cm, also broadly consistent with the observed

  3. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Treatment Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2015-08-31

    A preliminary hazard assessment was completed during February 2015 to evaluate the conceptual design of the modular hydrothermal liquefaction treatment system. The hazard assessment was performed in 2 stages. An initial assessment utilizing Hazard Identification and Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) techniques identified areas with significant or unique hazards (process safety-related hazards) that fall outside of the normal operating envelope of PNNL and warranted additional analysis. The subsequent assessment was based on a qualitative What-If analysis. This analysis was augmented, as necessary, by additional quantitative analysis for scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy with the potential for affecting the public.

  4. ADVICE: A New Approach for Near-Real-Time Monitoring of Surface Displacements in Landslide Hazard Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Lollino

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a new method for near-real-time monitoring of surface displacements due to landslide phenomena, namely ADVanced dIsplaCement monitoring system for Early warning (ADVICE. The procedure includes: (i data acquisition and transfer protocols; (ii data collection, filtering, and validation; (iii data analysis and restitution through a set of dedicated software; (iv recognition of displacement/velocity threshold, early warning messages via SMS and/or emails; (v automatic publication of the results on a dedicated webpage. We show how the system evolved and the results obtained by applying ADVICE over three years into a real early warning scenario relevant to a large earthflow located in southern Italy. ADVICE has speed-up and facilitated the understanding of the landslide phenomenon, the communication of the monitoring results to the partners, and consequently the decision-making process in a critical scenario. Our work might have potential applications not only for landslide monitoring but also in other contexts, as monitoring of other geohazards and of complex infrastructures, as open-pit mines, buildings, dams, etc.

  5. ADVICE: a new approach for near-real-time monitoring of surface displacements in landslide hazard scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allasia, Paolo; Manconi, Andrea; Giordan, Daniele; Baldo, Marco; Lollino, Giorgio

    2013-06-27

    We present a new method for near-real-time monitoring of surface displacements due to landslide phenomena, namely ADVanced dIsplaCement monitoring system for Early warning (ADVICE). The procedure includes: (i) data acquisition and transfer protocols; (ii) data collection, filtering, and validation; (iii) data analysis and restitution through a set of dedicated software; (iv) recognition of displacement/velocity threshold, early warning messages via SMS and/or emails; (v) automatic publication of the results on a dedicated webpage. We show how the system evolved and the results obtained by applying ADVICE over three years into a real early warning scenario relevant to a large earthflow located in southern Italy. ADVICE has speed-up and facilitated the understanding of the landslide phenomenon, the communication of the monitoring results to the partners, and consequently the decision-making process in a critical scenario. Our work might have potential applications not only for landslide monitoring but also in other contexts, as monitoring of other geohazards and of complex infrastructures, as open-pit mines, buildings, dams, etc.

  6. Landslide databases for applied landslide impact research: the example of the landslide database for the Federal Republic of Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, Bodo; Klose, Martin

    2014-05-01

    This contribution presents an initiative to develop a national landslide database for the Federal Republic of Germany. It highlights structure and contents of the landslide database and outlines its major data sources and the strategy of information retrieval. Furthermore, the contribution exemplifies the database potentials in applied landslide impact research, including statistics of landslide damage, repair, and mitigation. The landslide database offers due to systematic regional data compilation a differentiated data pool of more than 5,000 data sets and over 13,000 single data files. It dates back to 1137 AD and covers landslide sites throughout Germany. In seven main data blocks, the landslide database stores besides information on landslide types, dimensions, and processes, additional data on soil and bedrock properties, geomorphometry, and climatic or other major triggering events. A peculiarity of this landslide database is its storage of data sets on land use effects, damage impacts, hazard mitigation, and landslide costs. Compilation of landslide data is based on a two-tier strategy of data collection. The first step of information retrieval includes systematic web content mining and exploration of online archives of emergency agencies, fire and police departments, and news organizations. Using web and RSS feeds and soon also a focused web crawler, this enables effective nationwide data collection for recent landslides. On the basis of this information, in-depth data mining is performed to deepen and diversify the data pool in key landslide areas. This enables to gather detailed landslide information from, amongst others, agency records, geotechnical reports, climate statistics, maps, and satellite imagery. Landslide data is extracted from these information sources using a mix of methods, including statistical techniques, imagery analysis, and qualitative text interpretation. The landslide database is currently migrated to a spatial database system

  7. Dynamics of the Bingham Canyon Mine landslides from seismic signal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibert, Clément; Ekström, Göran; Stark, Colin P.

    2014-07-01

    Joint interpretation of long- and short-period seismic signals generated by landslides sheds light on the dynamics of slope failure, providing constraints on landslide initiation and termination and on the main phases of acceleration and deceleration. We carry out a combined analysis of the seismic signals generated by two massive landslides that struck the Bingham Canyon Mine pit on 10 April 2013. Inversion of the long-period waveforms yields time series for the bulk landslide forces and momenta, from which we deduce runout trajectories consistent with the deposit morphology. Comparing these time series with the short-period seismic data, we are able to infer when and where major changes take place in landslide momentum along the runout path. This combined analysis points to a progressive fracturing of the masses during acceleration indicates that deceleration starts the moment they reach the pit floor and suggests that the bulk movement is stopped by a topographic barrier.

  8. Landslide inventory maps: New tools for an old problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzetti, Fausto; Mondini, Alessandro Cesare; Cardinali, Mauro; Fiorucci, Federica; Santangelo, Michele; Chang, Kang-Tsung

    2012-04-01

    Landslides are present in all continents, and play an important role in the evolution of landscapes. They also represent a serious hazard in many areas of the world. Despite their importance, we estimate that landslide maps cover less than 1% of the slopes in the landmasses, and systematic information on the type, abundance, and distribution of landslides is lacking. Preparing landslide maps is important to document the extent of landslide phenomena in a region, to investigate the distribution, types, pattern, recurrence and statistics of slope failures, to determine landslide susceptibility, hazard, vulnerability and risk, and to study the evolution of landscapes dominated by mass-wasting processes. Conventional methods for the production of landslide maps rely chiefly on the visual interpretation of stereoscopic aerial photography, aided by field surveys. These methods are time consuming and resource intensive. New and emerging techniques based on satellite, airborne, and terrestrial remote sensing technologies, promise to facilitate the production of landslide maps, reducing the time and resources required for their compilation and systematic update. In this work, we first outline the principles for landslide mapping, and we review the conventional methods for the preparation of landslide maps, including geomorphological, event, seasonal, and multi-temporal inventories. Next, we examine recent and new technologies for landslide mapping, considering (i) the exploitation of very-high resolution digital elevation models to analyze surface morphology, (ii) the visual interpretation and semi-automatic analysis of different types of satellite images, including panchromatic, multispectral, and synthetic aperture radar images, and (iii) tools that facilitate landslide field mapping. Next, we discuss the advantages and the limitations of the new remote sensing data and technology for the production of geomorphological, event, seasonal, and multi-temporal inventory maps

  9. The Integrated Hazard Analysis Integrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. Terry; Massie, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Hazard analysis addresses hazards that arise in the design, development, manufacturing, construction, facilities, transportation, operations and disposal activities associated with hardware, software, maintenance, operations and environments. An integrated hazard is an event or condition that is caused by or controlled by multiple systems, elements, or subsystems. Integrated hazard analysis (IHA) is especially daunting and ambitious for large, complex systems such as NASA s Constellation program which incorporates program, systems and element components that impact others (International Space Station, public, International Partners, etc.). An appropriate IHA should identify all hazards, causes, controls and verifications used to mitigate the risk of catastrophic loss of crew, vehicle and/or mission. Unfortunately, in the current age of increased technology dependence, there is the tendency to sometimes overlook the necessary and sufficient qualifications of the integrator, that is, the person/team that identifies the parts, analyzes the architectural structure, aligns the analysis with the program plan and then communicates/coordinates with large and small components, each contributing necessary hardware, software and/or information to prevent catastrophic loss. As viewed from both Challenger and Columbia accidents, lack of appropriate communication, management errors and lack of resources dedicated to safety were cited as major contributors to these fatalities. From the accident reports, it would appear that the organizational impact of managers, integrators and safety personnel contributes more significantly to mission success and mission failure than purely technological components. If this is so, then organizations who sincerely desire mission success must put as much effort in selecting managers and integrators as they do when designing the hardware, writing the software code and analyzing competitive proposals. This paper will discuss the necessary and

  10. GIS and ANN model for landslide susceptibility mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Landslide hazard is as the probability of occurrence of apotentially damaging landslide phenomenon within specified period of time and within a given area. The susceptibility map provides the relative spatial probability of landslides occurrence. A study is presented of the application of GIS and artificial neural network model to landslide susceptibility mapping, with particular reference to landslides on natural terrain in this paper. The method has been applied to Lantau Island, the largest outlying island within the territory of Hong Kong. A three-level neural network model was constructed and trained by the back-propagate algorithm in the geographical database of the study area. The data in the database includes digital elevation modal and its derivatives, landslides distribution and their attributes, superficial geological maps, vegetation cover, the raingauges distribution and their 14 years 5-minute observation. Based on field inspection and analysis of correlation between terrain variables and landslides frequency, lithology, vegetation cover, slope radient, slope aspect, slope curvature, elevation, the characteristic value, the rainstorms corresponding to the landslide, and distance to drainage line are considered to be related to landslide usceptibility in this study. The artificial neural network is then coupled with the ArcView3.2 GIS software to produce the landslide susceptibility map, which classifies the susceptibility into three levels: low, moderate, and high. The results from this study indicate that GIS coupled with artificial nural network model is a flexible and powerful approach to identify the spatial probability of hazards.

  11. Evaluating fuzzy operators of an object-based image analysis for detecting landslides and their changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizizadeh, Bakhtiar; Blaschke, Thomas; Tiede, Dirk; Moghaddam, Mohammad Hossein Rezaei

    2017-09-01

    This article presents a method of object-based image analysis (OBIA) for landslide delineation and landslide-related change detection from multi-temporal satellite images. It uses both spatial and spectral information on landslides, through spectral analysis, shape analysis, textural measurements using a gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), and fuzzy logic membership functionality. Following an initial segmentation step, particular combinations of various information layers were investigated to generate objects. This was achieved by applying multi-resolution segmentation to IRS-1D, SPOT-5, and ALOS satellite imagery in sequential steps of feature selection and object classification, and using slope and flow direction derivatives from a digital elevation model together with topographically-oriented gray level co-occurrence matrices. Fuzzy membership values were calculated for 11 different membership functions using 20 landslide objects from a landslide training data. Six fuzzy operators were used for the final classification and the accuracies of the resulting landslide maps were compared. A Fuzzy Synthetic Evaluation (FSE) approach was adapted for validation of the results and for an accuracy assessment using the landslide inventory database. The FSE approach revealed that the AND operator performed best with an accuracy of 93.87% for 2005 and 94.74% for 2011, closely followed by the MEAN Arithmetic operator, while the OR and AND (*) operators yielded relatively low accuracies. An object-based change detection was then applied to monitor landslide-related changes that occurred in northern Iran between 2005 and 2011. Knowledge rules to detect possible landslide-related changes were developed by evaluating all possible landslide-related objects for both time steps.

  12. Coupling effect analysis between landslides, river channel changes and sediment budgets - extreme climate events in Laishe River, southern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuo-Jen; Huang, Mei-Jen; Tseng, Chih-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Taiwan, due to the high seismicity and high annual rainfall, numerous landslides triggered every year and severe impacts affect the island. Concerning to the catastrophic landslides, the key information of landslide, including range of landslide, volume estimation and the subsequent evolution are important when analyzing the triggering mechanism, hazard assessment and mitigation. Thus, the morphological analysis gives a general overview for the landslides and been considered as one of the most fundamental information. Typhoon Morakot brought extreme and long-time rainfall for Taiwan in August 2009, and caused severe disasters. In this study we integrate several technologies, especially by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and multi-spectral camera, to decipher the consequence and the potential hazard, and the social impact. In recent years, the remote sensing technology improves rapidly, providing a wide range of image, essential and precise information. This study integrates several methods, including, 1) Remote-sensing images gathered by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and by aerial photos taken in different periods; 2) field in-situ geologic investigation; 3) Differential GPS, RTK GPS geomatic measurements. The methods allow to constructing the DTMs before and after landslide, as well as the subsequent periods by using aerial photos and UAV derived images. The data sets permits to analysis the morphological changes. In the past, the study of sediment budgets usually relies on field investigation, but due to inconvenient transportation, topographical barriers, or located in remote areas, etc. the survey is hardly to be completed sometimes. In recent years, the rapid development of remote sensing technology improves image resolution and quality significantly. Remote sensing technology can provide a wide range of image data, and provide essential and precious information. The purpose of this study is to investigate the phenomenon of river migration and to evaluate the

  13. Landslide Spatial Distribution Analysis Using GIS. Case Study Secașelor Plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Rosian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Landslides represent an extremely frequent geomorphological phenomenon in the Secașelor Plateau. The regional unit is located in the South-Eastern part of the Transylvanian Basin (large basin within the Carpathian Mountains. In this paper, we analyzed the distribution of the landslides through spatial statistics techniques and GIS. In order to analyze the distribution of the landslides we took into consideration 5 criteria: geology, height, slope, exposition and the territorial administrative units. This type of study is necessary to find out the way in which the actual landslides are distributed and on the other hand, the research will collect information on the susceptible fields which are favored by these geomorphological processes. After the visual analysis of the area using the 1:5000 aerial photography and topographic maps, 835 landslides were identified and vectorized. At the level of administrative-territorial units, these cover mostly agricultural areas. Given the lithological conditions (the presence of friable rocks of marl, clay and poorly cemented sands and the land use (mostly agricultural it can be said that in the future new landslides will ocure in similar conditions of slope, exposition and geological characteristic etc. The identification of areas that are susceptible to landslides is beneficial for the future territorial planning actions and also to avoid building on areas which are prone to landslides.

  14. Analysis of hydrological triggered clayey landslides by small scale Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spickermann, A.; Malet, J.P.; Asch, Th.W.J. van; Schanz, T.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrological processes, such as slope saturation by water, are a primary cause of landslides. This effect can occur in the form of e.g. intense rainfall, snowmelt or changes in ground-water levels. Hydrological processes can trigger a landslide and control subsequent movement. In order to forecast p

  15. Comparative Distributions of Hazard Modeling Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Abdul Wajid

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the comparison among the distributions used in hazard analysis. Simulation technique has been used to study the behavior of hazard distribution modules. The fundamentals of Hazard issues are discussed using failure criteria. We present the flexibility of the hazard modeling distribution that approaches to different distributions.

  16. Cluster analysis of Landslide Vulnerable region on an urban Area in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yonghee; Lee, Sangeun; Kim, Myoungsoo; Baek, Jongrak

    2016-04-01

    Mountain areas occupy about 65% of the territory in South Korea. Due to the rapid population growth and urbanization, many cities suffer from the limitation in space, and hence the commercial buildings, educational facilities, and housing settlement areas continue to stretch until the bottom of the mountain. In result, residents become more and more vulnerable to landslides and debris flow. This led to the central government to perceiving the need for strengthening regulations relevant to urban planning. In order to consider risks due to landslides and debris flow in the stage of urban planning, present authors suggested the strategies, including: first, selecting priority areas necessary to manage landslide-related disasters strictly; second, establishing the integrated management system useful to offer technical assistances to persons in charge of urban planning in the areas; third, promoting disaster awareness programs with those persons along with the central government. As the first attempt, this study mainly discusses the GIS-application procedures in which authors selected the priority areas, which are summarized: 1. Collect the landslide historical data for the period 1999 - 2012 when the disasters particularly threatened the whole country. 2. Define the areas with the one-kilometer radius around the landslide occurrence places. 3. Exclude the areas where population is less than 100 persons per 1 km2. 4. Exclude the areas where mountains with Grade I or II of landslide risk (announced by the Korea Forest Service) go below a certain portion of the area. 5. Carry out the cluster analysis with the remaining areas 6. Classify the types at the standpoint of landslide disaster risk management. Through the procedures, this study obtained a total of 86 priority areas, which were also classified into 24 areas - Type A (high population exposure and mid landslide occurrence likelihood) -, 25 areas - Type B (mid population exposure and high landslide occurrence

  17. Application of Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis to Floods and Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert; Hong, Yang; Huffman, George

    2007-01-01

    Satellite data acquired and processed in real time now have the potential to provide the spacetime information on rainfall needed to monitor flood and landslide events around the world. This can be achieved by integrating the satellite-derived forcing data with hydrological models and landslide algorithms. Progress in using the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) as input to flood and landslide forecasts is outlined, with a focus on understanding limitations of the rainfall data and impacts of those limitations on flood/landslide analyses. Case studies of both successes and failures will be shown, as well as comparison with ground comparison data sets both in terms of rainfall and in terms of flood/landslide events. In addition to potential uses in real-time, the nearly ten years of TMPA data allow retrospective running of the models to examine variations in extreme events. The flood determination algorithm consists of four major components: 1) multi-satellite precipitation estimation; 2) characterization of land surface including digital elevation from NASA SRTM (Shuttle Radar Terrain Mission), topography-derived hydrologic parameters such as flow direction, flow accumulation, basin, and river network etc.; 3) a hydrological model to infiltrate rainfall and route overland runoff; and 4) an implementation interface to relay the input data to the models and display the flood inundation results to potential users and decision-makers. In terms of landslides, the satellite rainfall information is combined with a global landslide susceptibility map, derived from a combination of global surface characteristics (digital elevation topography, slope, soil types, soil texture, and land cover classification etc.) using a weighted linear combination approach. In those areas identified as "susceptible" (based on the surface characteristics), landslides are forecast where and when a rainfall intensity/duration threshold is exceeded. Results are described

  18. Slope stability analysis of landslide in Wayang Windu Geothermal Field, Pangalengan, West Java Province, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuhendar, A. H.; Wusqa, U.; Kartiko, R. D.; Raya, N. R.; Misbahudin

    2016-05-01

    Large-scale landslide occurred in Margamukti village, Pangalengan, Bandung Regency, West Java Province, Indonesia. The landslide damaged geothermal gas pipeline along 300 m in Wayang Windu Geothermal Field. Based on field observation, landslide occured in rotational sliding movement. Laboratory analysis were conducted to obtain the characteristics of the soil. Based on the condition of the landslide in this area, the Factor of Safety can be simulated by the soil mechanics approach. Factor of safety analysis based on soil cohesion and internal friction angle was conducted using manual sensitivity analysis for back analysis. The analysis resulted soil cohesion in critical condition (FS<1) is 6.01 kPa. This value is smaller than cohesion of undisturbed slope soil sample. Water from rainfall is the most important instability factors in research area. Because it decreases cohesion in soils and increases weight and pore water pressure in granular media.

  19. Landslide and tsunami hazard at Yate volcano, Chile as an example of edifice destruction on strike-slip fault zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Sebastian F. L.; Pyle, David M.; Naranjo, José A.; Mather, Tamsin A.

    2009-07-01

    The edifice of Yate volcano, a dissected stratocone in the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone, has experienced multiple summit collapses throughout postglacial time restricted to sectors NE and SW of the summit. The largest such historic event occurred on 19th February 1965 when ˜6.1-10 × 106 m3 of rock and ice detached from 2,000-m elevation to the SW of the summit and transformed into a debris flow. In the upper part of the flow path, velocities are estimated to have reached 40 m s-1. After travelling 7,500 m and descending 1,490 m, the flow entered an intermontane lake, Lago Cabrera. A wavemaker of estimated volume 9 ± 3 × 106 m3 generated a tsunami with an estimated amplitude of 25 m and a run-up of ˜60 m at the west end of the lake where a settlement disappeared with the loss of 27 lives. The landslide followed 15 days of unusually heavy summer rain, which may have caused failure by increasing pore water pressure in rock mechanically weathered through glacial action. The preferential collapse directions at Yate result from the volcano’s construction on the dextral strike-slip Liquiñe-Ofqui fault zone. Movement on the fault during the lifetime of the volcano is thought to have generated internal instabilities in the observed failure orientations, at ˜10° to the fault zone in the Riedel shear direction. This mechanically weakened rock may have led to preferentially orientated glacial valleys, generating a feedback mechanism with collapse followed by rapid glacial erosion, accelerating the rate of incision into the edifice through repeated landslides. Debris flows with magnitudes similar to the 1965 event are likely to recur at Yate, with repeat times of the order of 102 years. With a warming climate, increased glacial meltwater due to snowline retreat and increasing rain, at the expense of snow, may accelerate rates of edifice collapse, with implications for landslide hazard and risk at glaciated volcanoes, in particular those in strike-slip tectonic

  20. Discrete rough set analysis of two different soil-behavior-induced landslides in National Shei-Pa Park, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hsun Chang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The governing factors that influence landslide occurrences are complicated by the different soil conditions at various sites. To resolve the problem, this study focused on spatial information technology to collect data and information on geology. GIS, remote sensing and digital elevation model (DEM were used in combination to extract the attribute values of the surface material in the vast study area of Shei-Pa National Park, Taiwan. The factors influencing landslides were collected and quantification values computed. The major soil component of loam and gravel in the Shei-Pa area resulted in different landslide problems. The major factors were successfully extracted from the influencing factors. Finally, the discrete rough set (DRS classifier was used as a tool to find the threshold of each attribute contributing to landslide occurrence, based upon the knowledge database. This rule-based knowledge database provides an effective and urgent system to manage landslides. NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, VI (Vegetation Index, elevation, and distance from the road are the four major influencing factors for landslide occurrence. The landslide hazard potential diagrams (landslide susceptibility maps were drawn and a rational accuracy rate of landslide was calculated. This study thus offers a systematic solution to the investigation of landslide disasters.

  1. Discrete rough set analysis of two different soil-behavior-induced landslides in National Shei-Pa Park, Taiwan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shih-Hsun Chang; Shiuan Wan

    2015-01-01

    The governing factors that influence landslide occurrences are complicated by the different soil condi-tions at various sites. To resolve the problem, this study focused on spatial information technology to collect data and information on geology. GIS, remote sensing and digital elevation model (DEM) were used in combination to extract the attribute values of the surface material in the vast study area of Shei-Pa National Park, Taiwan. The factors influencing landslides were collected and quantification values computed. The major soil component of loam and gravel in the Shei-Pa area resulted in different landslide problems. The major factors were successfully extracted from the influencing factors. Finally, the discrete rough set (DRS) classifier was used as a tool to find the threshold of each attribute contributing to landslide occurrence, based upon the knowledge database. This rule-based knowledge database provides an effective and urgent system to manage landslides. NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), VI (Vegetation Index), elevation, and distance from the road are the four major influencing factors for landslide occurrence. The landslide hazard potential diagrams (landslide sus-ceptibility maps) were drawn and a rational accuracy rate of landslide was calculated. This study thus offers a systematic solution to the investigation of landslide disasters.

  2. 14 CFR 437.29 - Hazard analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazard analysis. 437.29 Section 437.29 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Documentation § 437.29 Hazard analysis. (a) An applicant must perform a hazard analysis that complies with §...

  3. Dynamic sensitivity analysis of long running landslide models through basis set expansion and meta-modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the temporal evolution of landslides is typically supported by numerical modelling. Dynamic sensitivity analysis aims at assessing the influence of the landslide properties on the time-dependent predictions (e.g., time series of landslide displacements). Yet two major difficulties arise: 1. Global sensitivity analysis require running the landslide model a high number of times (> 1000), which may become impracticable when the landslide model has a high computation time cost (> several hours); 2. Landslide model outputs are not scalar, but function of time, i.e. they are n-dimensional vectors with n usually ranging from 100 to 1000. In this article, I explore the use of a basis set expansion, such as principal component analysis, to reduce the output dimensionality to a few components, each of them being interpreted as a dominant mode of variation in the overall structure of the temporal evolution. The computationally intensive calculation of the Sobol' indices for each of these components are then achieved through meta-modelling, i.e. by replacing the landslide model by a "costless-to-evaluate" approximation (e.g., a projection pursuit regression model). The methodology combining "basis set expansion - meta-model - Sobol' indices" is then applied to the La Frasse landslide to investigate the dynamic sensitivity analysis of the surface horizontal displacements to the slip surface properties during the pore pressure changes. I show how to extract information on the sensitivity of each main modes of temporal behaviour using a limited number (a few tens) of long running simulations. In particular, I identify the parameters, which trigger the occurrence of a turning point marking a shift between a regime of low values of landslide displacements and one of high values.

  4. INTERNAL HAZARDS ANALYSIS FOR LICENSE APPLICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.J. Garrett

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this internal hazards analysis is to identify and document the internal hazards and potential initiating events associated with preclosure operations of the repository at Yucca Mountain. Internal hazards are those hazards presented by the operation of the facility and by its associated processes that can potentially lead to a radioactive release or cause a radiological hazard. In contrast to external hazards, internal hazards do not involve natural phenomena and external man-made hazards. This internal hazards analysis was performed in support of the preclosure safety analysis and the License Application for the Yucca Mountain Project. The methodology for this analysis provides a systematic means to identify internal hazards and potential initiating events that may result in a radiological hazard or radiological release during the repository preclosure period. These hazards are documented in tables of potential internal hazards and potential initiating events (Section 6.6) for input to the repository event sequence categorization process. The results of this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply to the performance of event sequence analyses for the repository preclosure period. The evolving design of the repository will be re-evaluated periodically to ensure that internal hazards that have not been previously evaluated are identified.

  5. Spatial prediction of landslide for Badong County in the Three Gorges reservoir district

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiming TANG; Yiping WU

    2006-01-01

    By using the landslide risk evaluating model and the advantages of GIS technology in image processing and space analysis, the relative landslide hazard and risk evaluating system of the new county site of Badong is built up. The system is mainly consisted of four subsystems: Information management subsystem, hazard assessment subsystem, vulnerability evaluation subsystem and risk prediction subsystem. In the system, landslide hazard assessment, vulnerability evaluation, risk predictions are carried out automatically based on irregular units. At last the landslide hazard and risk map of the study area is compiled. During the whole procedure, Matter-Element Model, Artificial Neural Network, and Information Model are used as assessment models. This system provides an effective way for the landslide hazard information management and risk prediction of each district in the Reservoir of Three Gorge Project. The result of the assessment can be a gist and ensure for the land planning and the emigration project in Badong.

  6. Discriminant Analysis of a Spatially Extensive Landsliding Inventory for the Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjogren, D.; Martin, Y. E.; Jagielko, L.

    2010-12-01

    Gimbarzevsky (1988) collected an exceptional landsliding inventory for the Haida Gwaii, British Columbia (formerly called the Queen Charlotte Islands). This data base includes more than 8 000 landsliding vectors, with an areal coverage of about 10 000 km2. Unfortunately, this landsliding inventory was never published in the referred literature, despite its regional significance. The data collection occurred prior to widespread use of GIS technologies in landsliding analysis, thus restricting the types of analyses that were undertaken at the time relative to what is possible today. Gimbarzevsky identified the landsliding events from 1:50 000 aerial photographs, and then transferred the landslide vectors to NTS map sheets. In this study, we digitized the landslide vectors from these original map sheets and connected each vector to a digital elevation model. Lengths of landslide vectors were then compared to results of Rood (1984), whose landsliding inventory for the Haida Gwaii relied on larger-scale aerial photographs (~ 1:13 000). A comparison of the two data bases shows that Rood’s inventory contains a more complete record of smaller landslides, whereas Gimbarzevsky’s inventory provides a much better statistical representation of less frequently occurring, medium to large landslide events. We then apply discriminant analysis to the Gimbarzevsky data base to assess which of a set of ten predictor variables, selected on the basis of mechanical theory, best predict failed vs. unfailed locations in the landscape (referred to as the grouping variable in discriminant analysis). Certain predictor variables may be cross-correlated, and any one particular variable may be related to several aspects of mechanical theory (for example, a particular variable may affect various components of shear stress and/or shear strength); it is important to recognize that the significance of particular groupings may reflect this information. Eight of the original variables were found

  7. SPATIAL RESOLUTION EFFECTS OF DIGITAL TERRAIN MODELS ON LANDSLIDE SUSCEPTIBILITY ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Chang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study are to identify the maximum number of correlated factors for landslide susceptibility mapping and to evaluate landslide susceptibility at Sihjhong river catchment in the southern Taiwan, integrating two techniques, namely certainty factor (CF and artificial neural network (ANN. The landslide inventory data of the Central Geological Survey (CGS, MOEA in 2004-2014 and two digital elevation model (DEM datasets including a 5-meter LiDAR DEM and a 30-meter Aster DEM were prepared. We collected thirteen possible landslide-conditioning factors. Considering the multi-collinearity and factor redundancy, we applied the CF approach to optimize these thirteen conditioning factors. We hypothesize that if the CF values of the thematic factor layers are positive, it implies that these conditioning factors have a positive relationship with the landslide occurrence. Therefore, based on this assumption and positive CF values, seven conditioning factors including slope angle, slope aspect, elevation, terrain roughness index (TRI, terrain position index (TPI, total curvature, and lithology have been selected for further analysis. The results showed that the optimized-factors model provides a better accuracy for predicting landslide susceptibility in the study area. In conclusion, the optimized-factors model is suggested for selecting relative factors of landslide occurrence.

  8. Real-Time Application of Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis for Floods and Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert; Hong, Yang; Huffman, George

    2007-01-01

    Satellite data acquired and processed in real time now have the potential to provide the spacetime information on rainfall needed to monitor flood and landslide events around the world. This can be achieved by integrating the satellite-derived forcing data with hydrological models and landslide algorithms. Progress in using the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) as input to flood and landslide forecasts is outlined, with a focus on understanding limitations of the rainfall data and impacts of those limitations on flood/landslide analyses. Case studies of both successes and failures will be shown, as well as comparison with ground comparison data sets-- both in terms of rainfall and in terms of flood/landslide events. In addition to potential uses in real-time, the nearly ten years of TMPA data allow retrospective running of the models to examine variations in extreme events. The flood determination algorithm consists of four major components: 1) multi-satellite precipitation estimation; 2) characterization of land surface including digital elevation from NASA SRTM (Shuttle Radar Terrain Mission), topography-derived hydrologic parameters such as flow direction, flow accumulation, basin, and river network etc.; 3) a hydrological model to infiltrate rainfall and route overland runoff; and 4) an implementation interface to relay the input data to the models and display the flood inundation results to potential users and decision-makers, In terms of landslides, the satellite rainfall information is combined with a global landslide susceptibility map, derived from a combination of global surface characteristics (digital elevation topography, slope, soil types, soil texture, and land cover classification etc.) using a weighted linear combination approach. In those areas identified as "susceptible" (based on the surface characteristics), landslides are forecast where and when a rainfall intensity/duration threshold is exceeded. Results are described

  9. Quick Analysis Method for Estimating Debris Flow Prone Area Caused by Overflow from Landslide dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T.; Uchida, T.; Yamakoshi, T.; Yoshino, K.; Kisa, H.; Ishizuka, T.; Kaji, A.

    2012-04-01

    When earthquake or torrential rainfall cause deep catastrophic landslides, landslide dams can be formed in mountainous region. If water overflows from the landslide dams, large scale debris flow can occurs and possibly causes serious disasters in the downward region. Debris flow caused by the overflow from landslide dam is possible to affect the larger area than normal debris flow and flash flood. It is important for both a decision maker and resident in the area to recognize the disaster prone area as early as possible. For that reason, it is important to establish a quick analysis method for estimating debris flow prone area caused by overflow from landslide dams under the emergency situation. This situation requires the method to have both accuracy and speed for release. Nonetheless these two factors have trade-off relationship. We recently developed the quick analysis method to estimate debris flow disaster prone area caused by overflow from landslide dams. The method including the ways of efficient survey and numerical simulation programs called QUAD-L (QUick Analysis system for Debris flow caused by Landslide dam overflow). Our quick analysis system was actually applied to show the area for evacuation against debris flow caused by overflow from landslide dam formed by the 2011 Typhoon Talas which hit mainly the central region of Japan on September 2-4th, 2011. In addition to background of this application, since May 1st, 2011, Erosion and Sediment Control (SABO) Department of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, Japan (MLIT) launched a new scheme using above-mentioned quick analysis method.

  10. Morphometric Analysis of Recent Landslides in Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, N. F.; Araújo, J.; Silva, L. M.; Dourado, F.

    2012-12-01

    Landslides are the main processes controlling landscape evolution in many areas of southeastern Brazil. In January 2011, a catastrophic event took place in the Serra do Mar in Rio de Janeiro state, triggered by intense summer rainstorms and killing more than one thousand people. Although shallow translational landslides were the most frequent type, rotational landslides, rock falls and debris flows also took place. In some areas, debris flows were more than 7 km long dissecting the steep soil mantled hillslopes and the bare rocky surfaces developed over gneiss and granite bedrock. The main focus of this study is to investigate the topographic features that controlled the spatial distribution of landslides during the 2011 event. To address this question, some morphometric indexes were derived from a 5-m grid DEM of the D'Antas creek basin, located in the city of Nova Friburgo. The results obtained were compared with the landslide scar map from this event and suggest that there is a strong topographic control on the spatial distribution of landslides in this area.

  11. Canister storage building hazard analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    POWERS, T.B.

    1999-05-11

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the CSB final safety analysis report (FSAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with the DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', and meets the intent of HNF-PRO-704, ''Hazard and Accident Analysis Process''. This hazard analysis implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports''.

  12. Slope Stability Analysis for Shallow Landslides using TRIGRS: A Case Study for Sta. Cruz, Zambales, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, J. P. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Philippines, being located in the circum-Pacific, bounded by multiple subduction zones, open seas and ocean, is one of the most hazard-prone countries in the world (Benson, 1997). This widespread recurrence of natural hazards in the country requires much attention for disaster management (Aurelio, 2006). On the average, 21 typhoons enter the Philippine area of responsibility annually with 6-9 making a landfall. Several rainfall-induced landslide events are reported annually particularly during and after the inundation of major typhoons which imposes hazards to communities and causes destruction of properties due to the moving mass and possible flash floods it may induce. Shallow landslides are the most commonly observed failure involving soil-mantled slopes and are considered major geohazards, often causing property damage and other economic loss. Hence numerous studies on landslide susceptibility including numerical models based on infinite slope equation are used in order to identify slopes prone to occurrences of shallow landslides. The study aims to determine the relationships between the slope and elevation to the factor of safety for laterite-mantled topography by incorporating precipitation values in the determination of landslide susceptibility. Using a DEM, flow direction map and slope map of the Sta Cruz (Zambales, Philippines), the FORTRAN based program TRIGRS, was used to generate the values for the factors of safety in the study area. Overlays with a generated slope map and elevation map were used to determine relationships of the mentioned factors and the factors of safety. A slope in a topography mantled with lateritic soil will fail at a slope angle higher than 20 degrees. Generally, the factor of safety decreases as the slope angle increases; this increases the probability and risk of slope failure. Elevation has no bearing on the computation for the factor of safety. The factor of safety is heavily dependent on the slope angle. The value of

  13. Landslides geotechnical analysis. Qualitative assessment by valuation factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuanalo Oscar, Sc D.; Oliva Aldo, Sc D.; Polanco Gabriel, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    In general, a landslide can cause a disaster when it is combined a number of factors such as an extreme event related to a geological phenomenon, vulnerable elements exposed in a specific geographic area, and the probability of loss and damage evaluated in terms of lives and economic assets, in a certain period of time. This paper presents the qualitative evaluation of slope stability through of Valuation Factors, obtained from the characterization of the determinants and triggers factors that influence the instability; for the first the morphology and topography, geology, soil mechanics, hydrogeology and vegetation to the second, the rain, earthquakes, erosion and scour, human activity, and ultimately dependent factors of the stability analysis, and its influence ranges which greatly facilitate the selection of construction processes best suited to improve the behavior of a slope or hillside. The Valuation Factors are a set of parameters for assessing the influence of conditioning and triggering factors that influence the stability of slopes and hillsides. The characteristics of each factor must be properly categorized to involve its effect on behavior; a way to do this is by assigning a weighted value range indicating its effect on the stability of a slope. It is proposed to use Valuation Factors with weighted values between 0 and 1 (arbitrarily selected but common sense and logic), the first corresponds to no or minimal effect on stability (no effect or very little influence) and the second, the greatest impact on it (has a significant influence). The meddle effects are evaluated with intermediate values.

  14. Evaluating the impact of climate change on landslide occurrence, hazard, and risk: from global to regional scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariano, Stefano Luigi; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2017-04-01

    According to the fifth report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, "warming of the climate system is unequivocal". The influence of climate changes on slope stability and landslides is also undisputable. Nevertheless, the quantitative evaluation of the impact of global warming, and the related changes in climate, on landslides remains a complex question to be solved. The evidence that climate and landslides act at only partially overlapping spatial and temporal scales complicates the evaluation. Different research fields, including e.g., climatology, physics, hydrology, geology, hydrogeology, geotechnics, soil science, environmental science, and social science, must be considered. Climatic, environmental, demographic, and economic changes are strictly correlated, with complex feedbacks, to landslide occurrence and variation. Thus, a holistic, multidisciplinary approach is necessary. We reviewed the literature on landslide-climate studies, and found a bias in their geographical distribution, with several studies centered in Europe and North America, and large parts of the world not investigated. We examined advantages and drawbacks of the approaches adopted to evaluate the effects of climate variations on landslides, including prospective modelling and retrospective methods that use landslide and climate records, and paleo-environmental information. We found that the results of landslide-climate studies depend more on the emission scenarios, the global circulation models, the regional climate models, and the methods to downscale the climate variables, than on the description of the variables controlling slope processes. Using ensembles of projections based on a range of emissions scenarios would reduce (or at least quantify) the uncertainties in the obtained results. We performed a preliminary global assessment of the future landslide impact, presenting a global distribution of the projected impact of climate change on landslide activity and abundance

  15. Use of Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) in the analysis of historical landslide occurred in 1885 in the Rječina River Valley, Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugonjić Jovančević, Sanja; Peranić, Josip; Ružić, Igor; Arbanas, Željko; Kalajžić, Duje; Benac, Čedomir

    2016-04-01

    . Images were processed using the online Autodesk service "ReCap". Ground control points (GCP) collected with Total Station are identified on photorealistic point cloud and used for geo-referencing. Cloud Compare software was used for the point cloud processing. This study compared georeferenced landslide point cloud delivered from images with data acquired from laser scanning. RAPS and SfM application produced high accuracy landslide 3D point cloud, characterized by safe and quick data acquisition. Based on the adopted rock mass strength parameters, obtained from the back analysis, a stability analysis of the present slope situation was performed, and the present stability of the landslide body is determined. The unfavourable conditions and possible triggering factors such as saturation of the slope, caused by heavy rain and earthquake, were included in the analyses what enabled estimation of future landslide hazard and risk.

  16. Application of a hybrid model of neural networks and genetic algorithms to evaluate landslide susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. B.; Li, J. W.; Zhou, B.; Yuan, Z. Q.; Chen, Y. P.

    2013-03-01

    In the last few decades, the development of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) technology has provided a method for the evaluation of landslide susceptibility and hazard. Slope units were found to be appropriate for the fundamental morphological elements in landslide susceptibility evaluation. Following the DEM construction in a loess area susceptible to landslides, the direct-reverse DEM technology was employed to generate 216 slope units in the studied area. After a detailed investigation, the landslide inventory was mapped in which 39 landslides, including paleo-landslides, old landslides and recent landslides, were present. Of the 216 slope units, 123 involved landslides. To analyze the mechanism of these landslides, six environmental factors were selected to evaluate landslide occurrence: slope angle, aspect, the height and shape of the slope, distance to river and human activities. These factors were extracted in terms of the slope unit within the ArcGIS software. The spatial analysis demonstrates that most of the landslides are located on convex slopes at an elevation of 100-150 m with slope angles from 135°-225° and 40°-60°. Landslide occurrence was then checked according to these environmental factors using an artificial neural network with back propagation, optimized by genetic algorithms. A dataset of 120 slope units was chosen for training the neural network model, i.e., 80 units with landslide presence and 40 units without landslide presence. The parameters of genetic algorithms and neural networks were then set: population size of 100, crossover probability of 0.65, mutation probability of 0.01, momentum factor of 0.60, learning rate of 0.7, max learning number of 10 000, and target error of 0.000001. After training on the datasets, the susceptibility of landslides was mapped for the land-use plan and hazard mitigation. Comparing the susceptibility map with landslide inventory, it was noted that the prediction accuracy of landslide occurrence

  17. Landslide susceptibility assessment considering landslide typology. A case study in the area north of Lisbon (Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Zêzere

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to confirm the importance of discriminate different types of slope movements for a better landslide susceptibility evaluation. The study was applied to the sample area of Calhandriz (11.3 km2 in the area North of Lisbon. Sixty shallow translational slides, 23 deeper translational movements and 19 rotational movements were selected for statistical analysis. Landslide susceptibility assessment was achieved using a data-driven approach: the Information Value Method (Yin and Yan, 1988. The method was applied both to the total set of considered landslides and to each type of slope movement, and the obtained success rates for the highest susceptibility classes are higher in the latter case. The different types of landslides are not equally conditioned by the considered instability factors. Information scores are higher for lithology, concordance between slope aspect and dip of the strata, and slope angle, respectively, for rotational movements, translational movements and shallow translational slides. The information value of the variables "presence of artificial cut (roads" and "presence of fluvial channel" is systematically high for the three types of slope movement, pointing out the importance of both anthropogenic influence and bank erosion on slope instability in the study area. Different types of landslides have neither the same magnitude nor equal damaging potential. Furthermore, technical strategies to mitigate landsliding also depend on landslide typology. These are additional reasons to discriminate between different types of slope movements when assessing landslide susceptibility and hazard.

  18. 3D viscous time dependent analysis of a slow moving landslide by finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bru, Guadalupe; Fernández-Merodo, Josè Antonio; García-Davalillo, Juan Carlos; Herrera, Gerardo

    2017-04-01

    A methodology to study the cinematic behavior in time and 3D effects of slow moving landslides is presented by its application to the Portalet landslide, located in the Spanish Central Pyrenees. The area is characterize by the presence of several complex landslides triggered by glacial retreat and developed in weathered Devonian and Carboniferous slate materials. In summer 2004, the toe of two paleolanslides was excavated in order to construct a parking area, which reactivated the preexistent rupture surfaces and generated a new and smaller roto-translational landslide of about 5·105m3. Works were paralyzed and the road A-136 connecting Spain and France was temporary closed. In 2006 stabilizing solutions were performed, although surface and deep monitoring data reveal that the landslide is currently active. In this work the cinematic behavior of the Portalet parking landslide has been reproduced since the excavation in 2004 until 2016 by an advanced 3D finite element model (FEM) analysis. A detailed 3D litho-stratigraphic geometry has been defined using the information available from previous works(1-3): real topography, geological profiles, ground water level and material properties. The first step has been a stability analysis using the shear stress reduction (SSR) technique to calibrate the value of the friction angle of the soil layer where the rupture surface develops. In this step the sensibility of the mesh size has been studied, as is a critical parameter. Secondly, stability analysis results have been verified by simulating the parking excavation with a static analysis using Mohr-Coulomb elastoplastic failure criteria. In the last step the behavior of the landslide has been recreated using a hydromechanic coupled formulation for displacements and interstitial water pressure (u-pw), a simple elevation ground water model calculated from daily rainfall and a Perzyna viscous constitutive model of the solid skeleton which represent the creep detected by

  19. Brief Communication: Landslides triggered by the Ms =7.0 Lushan earthquake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. L. Chen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Earthquake-triggered landslide has drawn much attention in the world because of severe hazards it causes. The Ms =7.0 Lushan earthquake which occurred on 20 April 2013, China, in the Longmen Shan mountain region triggered more than 1000 landslides and really blocked many roads and exacerbated the overall transportation problems in the mountainous region. Preliminary landslides inventory is complied based on the high-resolution remote sensing images. Based on it, landslides spatial distribution characteristics and correlations between the occurrence of landslides with geologic and geomorphologic conditions are analyzed. Statistic analysis is conducted by using landslide point density (LPD, which is defined as the number of landslides per square kilometer. It is found that LPD have strong positive correlations with slope gradients, and the landslides are likely to occur in younger strata systems like Quaternary and Tertiary sediments. Spatially, the triggered landslides are controlled by the causative faults in their distribution and mainly concentrate around the epicenter. All the landslides are located within the area with seismic intensity ≥ VII and in scale with the seismic intensity. LPD decreases with increasing distance from the epicenter, and sometimes landslides are found densely presented along the roads in the mountainous. It is found that the empirical distance–magnitude relation are more suitable for estimating the landslides concentrated area during the Lushan earthquake.

  20. Assessment of Hazardousness of Collapses, Landslides and Debris Flows in Guangdong%广东省崩塌、滑坡及泥石流灾害危险性评价与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余承君; 刘希林

    2012-01-01

    广东省地质灾害较为常见,崩塌、滑坡、泥石流是其中比较严重的3种类型.基于现有的泥石流危险度评价原理和方法,建立了可用于广东省崩塌、滑坡、泥石流灾害危险性的评价模型.以全省88个县级评价单元为基础,根据崩塌、滑坡、泥石流灾害危险度评价结果,将广东省共分为3个危险等级区,其中高度危险区8个县,占总数的9.1%;中度危险区60个县,占总数的68.2%;低度危险区20个县,占总数的22.7%,据此制成广东省崩塌、滑坡、泥石流灾害危险等级图.高度危险区主要位于粤北山区,危险度数值介于0.6~0.72之间;中度危险区连片分布,是全省崩塌、滑坡、泥石流灾害的主体部分,危险度数值介于0.4~0.6之间;低度危险区集中分布在平原区及低平台地区,危险度数值介于0.31~0.4之间.采用1994- 2009年广东省防灾减灾年鉴和广东省地质灾害防治规划(2001 -2015年)中的统计数据,验证了本文的研究成果与实际情况具有较高的一致性.%Collapses, landslides and debris flows are the main three Geological hazards in Guangdong. On the basis of the existing methodology for debris flow hazard assessment, this paper establishes a system of indexes for assessment of collapse, landslide and debris flow hazards in Guangdong, including assessing index choosing, assessing model establishment and modification, and assessing result analysis. According to the hazardousness assessing results of 88 units at county level, the province can be divided into three classes of hazardous areas. The high hazardous area has 8 counties and districts, accounting for 9.1% of the total, the moderate hazardous areas include 60 counties and districts, accounting for 68.2%, and the low hazardous area has 20 counties and districts, accounting for 22.7%. Accordingly a hazardousness class map of collapse, landslide and debris flow hazards in Guangdong is presented. The areas with

  1. Geomorphological features and monitoring of a large and complex landslide near Avigliano urban area (South Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sdao

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of geological and geomorphological surveys and the first results of a still in progress GPS monitoring campaign, taken on a large and ancient landslide located near Avigliano town (Basilicata region, South Italy. The landslide occurs on structurally complex clayey-marly terrains and it is classifiable as a multiple and complex roto-translational-earthflow landslide. In the last years this landslide has been affected by frequent reactivations that have been the cause of grave damages to the urban structures in the area. During January 2004, in order to monitor the present kinematics of the landslide body, a GPS network was installed. Until today several GPS surveys have been carried out. The results of GPS data analysis show centimetres level motions going on the landslide. The final goal of the research will be to define a hazard evaluation and an evolution model of the landslide, using the integrated information coming from GPS and geomorphological surveys.

  2. Predicting Subsurface Soil Layering and Landslide Risk with Artificial Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrokhzad, Farzad; Barari, Amin; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2011-01-01

    This paper is concerned principally with the application of ANN model in geotechnical engineering. In particular the application for subsurface soil layering and landslide analysis is discussed in more detail. Three ANN models are trained using the required geotechnical data obtained from...... networks are capable of predicting variations in the soil profile and assessing the landslide hazard with an acceptable level of confidence....

  3. A study on the application of database into engineering geology : Landslide analysis case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Kyun; Park, Hyeong-Dong [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-04-30

    Application of database is required to prevent the damage caused by landslide which is resulted from various factors. Thus it is highly important to select relevant factors as a field for database. After literature review on the previous studies, it was found that the stratigraphic information and slake durability have been rarely used as fields for landslide database in Korea. In this paper the influence of stratigraphy on slope instability was studied. Field survey at Cheju Island confirmed that there were some unstable slopes caused by the movement of lower weak rock. Slake durability test was used to indicate whether slopes of certain rock types were potentially unstable. Five tests were conducted using the rock samples from several slopes from Cheju Island and Kyongju area. The results showed that some rock types were highly susceptible to weathering caused by heavy rainfall. Thus, stratigraphic information and the slake durability of rock materials should be considered as fields for landslide database in Korea. Such database can be used to construct landslide hazard map. (author). 27 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  4. 14 CFR 437.55 - Hazard analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazard analysis. 437.55 Section 437.55 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Safety Requirements § 437.55 Hazard analysis. (a) A permittee...

  5. Plan curvature and landslide probability in regions dominated by earth flows and earth slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlmacher, G.C.

    2007-01-01

    Damaging landslides in the Appalachian Plateau and scattered regions within the Midcontinent of North America highlight the need for landslide-hazard mapping and a better understanding of the geomorphic development of landslide terrains. The Plateau and Midcontinent have the necessary ingredients for landslides including sufficient relief, steep slope gradients, Pennsylvanian and Permian cyclothems that weather into fine-grained soils containing considerable clay, and adequate precipitation. One commonly used parameter in landslide-hazard analysis that is in need of further investigation is plan curvature. Plan curvature is the curvature of the hillside in a horizontal plane or the curvature of the contours on a topographic map. Hillsides can be subdivided into regions of concave outward plan curvature called hollows, convex outward plan curvature called noses, and straight contours called planar regions. Statistical analysis of plan-curvature and landslide datasets indicate that hillsides with planar plan curvature have the highest probability for landslides in regions dominated by earth flows and earth slides in clayey soils (CH and CL). The probability of landslides decreases as the hillsides become more concave or convex. Hollows have a slightly higher probability for landslides than noses. In hollows landslide material converges into the narrow region at the base of the slope. The convergence combined with the cohesive nature of fine-grained soils creates a buttressing effect that slows soil movement and increases the stability of the hillside within the hollow. Statistical approaches that attempt to determine landslide hazard need to account for the complex relationship between plan curvature, type of landslide, and landslide susceptibility. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sediment Transportation Induced by Deep-Seated Landslides in a Debris Flow Basin in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meei Ling; Chen, Te Wei; Chen, Yong Sheng; Sin Jhuang, Han

    2016-04-01

    Typhoon Morakot brought huge amount of rainfall to the southern Taiwan in 2009 and caused severe landslides and debris flow hazard. After Typhoon Morakot, it was found that the volume of sediment transported by the debris flow and its effects on the affected area were much more significant compared to previous case history, which may due to the huge amount of rainfall causing significant deep-seated landslides in the basin. In this study, the effects and tendency of the sediment transportation in a river basin following deep-seated landslides caused by typhoon Morakot were evaluated. We used LiDAR, DEM, and aerial photo to identify characteristics of deep-seated landslides in a debris flow river basin, KSDF079 in Liuoguey District, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. Eight deep-seated landslides were identified in the basin. To estimate the potential landslide volume associated with the deep-seated landslides, the stability analysis was conducted to locate the critical sliding surface, and the potential landside volume was estimated based on the estimation equation proposed by the International Geotechnical Societies' UNESCO Working Party on World Landslide Inventory (WP/WLI, 1990). The total potential landslide volume of the eight deep-seated landslides in KSDF079 basin was about 28,906,856 m3. Topographic analysis was performed by using DEM before and LiDAR derived DEM after typhoon Morakot to calculate the landslide volume transported. The result of erosion volume and deposition volume lead to a run out volume of 5,832,433 m3. The results appeared to consist well with the field condition and aerial photo. Comparing the potential landslide volume and run out volume of eight deep-seated landslides, it was found that the remaining potential landslide volume was about 80%. Field investigation and topographic analysis of the KSDF079 debris flow revealed that a significant amount of sediment deposition remained in the river channel ranging from the middle to the downstream

  7. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krahn, D.E.

    1998-02-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  8. Canister storage building hazard analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krahn, D.E.; Garvin, L.J.

    1997-07-01

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the final CSB safety analysis report (SAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Report, and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  9. Distributed modelling of shallow landslides triggered by intense rainfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. Crosta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hazard assessment of shallow landslides represents an important aspect of land management in mountainous areas. Among all the methods proposed in the literature, physically based methods are the only ones that explicitly includes the dynamic factors that control landslide triggering (rainfall pattern, land-use. For this reason, they allow forecasting both the temporal and the spatial distribution of shallow landslides. Physically based methods for shallow landslides are based on the coupling of the infinite slope stability analysis with hydrological models. Three different grid-based distributed hydrological models are presented in this paper: a steady state model, a transient "piston-flow" wetting front model, and a transient diffusive model. A comparative test of these models was performed to simulate landslide occurred during a rainfall event (27–28 June 1997 that triggered hundreds of shallow landslides within Lecco province (central Southern Alps, Italy. In order to test the potential for a completely distributed model for rainfall-triggered landslides, radar detected rainfall intensity has been used. A new procedure for quantitative evaluation of distributed model performance is presented and used in this paper. The diffusive model results in the best model for the simulation of shallow landslide triggering after a rainfall event like the one that we have analysed. Finally, radar data available for the June 1997 event permitted greatly improving the simulation. In particular, radar data allowed to explain the non-uniform distribution of landslides within the study area.

  10. Performance analysis of landslide early warning systems at regional scale: the EDuMaP method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piciullo, Luca; Calvello, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Landslide early warning systems (LEWSs) reduce landslide risk by disseminating timely and meaningful warnings when the level of risk is judged intolerably high. Two categories of LEWSs, can be defined on the basis of their scale of analysis: "local" systems and "regional" systems. LEWSs at regional scale (ReLEWSs) are used to assess the probability of occurrence of landslides over appropriately-defined homogeneous warning zones of relevant extension, typically through the prediction and monitoring of meteorological variables, in order to give generalized warnings to the public. Despite many studies on ReLEWSs, no standard requirements exist for assessing their performance. Empirical evaluations are often carried out by simply analysing the time frames during which significant high-consequence landslides occurred in the test area. Alternatively, the performance evaluation is based on 2x2 contingency tables computed for the joint frequency distribution of landslides and alerts, both considered as dichotomous variables. In all these cases, model performance is assessed neglecting some important aspects which are peculiar to ReLEWSs, among which: the possible occurrence of multiple landslides in the warning zone; the duration of the warnings in relation to the time of occurrence of the landslides; the level of the warning issued in relation to the landslide spatial density in the warning zone; the relative importance system managers attribute to different types of errors. An original approach, called EDuMaP method, is proposed to assess the performance of landslide early warning models operating at regional scale. The method is composed by three main phases: Events analysis, Duration Matrix, Performance analysis. The events analysis phase focuses on the definition of landslide (LEs) and warning events (WEs), which are derived from available landslides and warnings databases according to their spatial and temporal characteristics by means of ten input parameters. The

  11. Application of Satellite remote sensing for detailed landslide inventories using Frequency ratio model and GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himan Shahabi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents landslide susceptibility analysis in central Zab basin in the southwest mountainsides of West-Azerbaijan province in Iran using remotely sensed data and Geographic Information System. Landslide database was generated using satellite imagery and aerial photographs accompanied by field investigations using Differential Global Positioning System to generate a landslide inventory map. Digital elevation model (DEM was first constructed using GIS software. Nine landslide inducing factors were used for landslide vulnerability analysis: slope, slope aspect, distance to road, distance to drainage network, distance to fault, land use, Precipitation, Elevation, and geological factors. This study demonstrates the synergistic use of medium resolution, multitemporal Satellite pour lObservation de la Terre (SPOT, for prepare of landslide-inventory map and Landsat ETM+ for prepare of Land use. The post-classification comparison method using the Maximum Likelihood classifier with SPOT images was able to detect approximately 70% of landslides. Frequency ratio of each factor was computed using the above thematic factors with past landslide locations. It employs the landslide events as dependant variable and data layers as independent variable, and makes use of the correlation between these two factors in landslide zonation. Given the employed model and the variables, signification tests were implemented on each independent variable, and the degree of fitness of zonation map was estimated Landslide susceptibility map was produced using raster analysis. The landslide susceptibility map was classified into four classes: low, moderate, high and very high. The model is validated using the Relative landslide density index (R-index method. The final, landslide low hazard susceptibility map was drawn using frequency ratio. As a result, showed that the identified landslides were located in the class (51.37%, moderate (29.35%, high (11.10% and very high

  12. Predicting global landslide spatiotemporal distribution: Integrating landslide susceptibility zoning techniques and real-time satellite rainfall estimates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Landslides triggered by rainfall can possibly be foreseen in real time by jointly using rainfall intensity-duration thresholds and information related to land surface susceptibility. However, no system exists at either a national or a global scale to monitor or detect rainfall conditions that may trigger landslides due to the lack of sufficient ground-based observing network in many parts of the world. Recent advances in satellite remote sensing technology and increasing availability of high-resolution geospatial products around the globe have provided an unprecedented opportunity for such a study. In this paper, a framework for developing a preliminary real-time prediction system to identify where rainfall-triggered landslides will occur is proposed by combining two necessary components: surface landslide susceptibility and a real-time space-based rainfall analysis system (http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.govV First, a global landslide susceptibility map is derived from a combination of semi-static global surface characteristics (digital elevation topography, slope, soil types, soil texture, land cover classification, etc.) using a GIS weighted linear combination approach. Second, an adjusted empirical relationship between rainfall intensity-duration and landslide occurrence is used to assess landslide hazards at areas with high susceptibility. A major outcome of this work is the availability for the first time of a global assessment of landslide hazards, which is only possible because of the utilization of global satellite remote sensing products. This preliminary system can be updated continuously using the new satellite remote sensing products. This proposed system, if pursued through wide interdisciplinary efforts as recommended herein, bears the promise to grow many local landslide hazard analyses into a global decision-making support system for landslide disaster preparedness and mitigation activities across the world.

  13. Derivation of landslide-triggering thresholds by Monte Carlo simulation and ROC analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, David Johnny; Cancelliere, Antonino

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall thresholds of landslide-triggering are useful in early warning systems to be implemented in prone areas. Direct statistical analysis of historical records of rainfall and landslide data presents different shortcomings typically due to incompleteness of landslide historical archives, imprecise knowledge of the triggering instants, unavailability of a rain gauge located near the landslides, etc. In this work, a Monte Carlo approach to derive and evaluate landslide triggering thresholds is presented. Such an approach contributes to overcome some of the above mentioned shortcomings of direct empirical analysis of observed data. The proposed Monte Carlo framework consists in the combination of a rainfall stochastic model with hydrological and slope-stability model. Specifically, 1000-years long hourly synthetic rainfall and related slope stability factor of safety data are generated by coupling the Neyman-Scott rectangular pulses model with the TRIGRS unsaturated model (Baum et al., 2008) and a linear-reservoir water table recession model. Triggering and non-triggering rainfall events are then distinguished and analyzed to derive stochastic-input physically based thresholds that optimize the trade-off between correct and wrong predictions. For this purpose, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) indices are used. An application of the method to the highly landslide-prone area of the Peloritani mountains in north-eastern Sicily (Italy) is carried out. A threshold for the area is derived and successfully validated by comparison with thresholds proposed by other researchers. Moreover, the uncertainty in threshold derivation due to variability of rainfall intensity within events and to antecedent rainfall is investigated. Results indicate that variability of intensity during rainfall events influences significantly rainfall intensity and duration associated with landslide triggering. A representation of rainfall as constant-intensity hyetographs globally leads to

  14. Landslide-exposed areas modeling using the multivariate analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Landslide occurrence is governed by numerous spatial and temporal factors that can be divided into the causes and the triggers. Human interaction with the environment coincides mainly with the triggers, which are also of natural origin. For a better understanding of the causing factors, which mainly influence the spatial distribution, several methods based on GIS technology are used. Results, derived from these methods, define areas that are more exposed to triggering factors, consequencially...

  15. SLOWMOVE - A numerical model for the propagation of slow-moving landslides: a 1D approach and its application to the analysis of the Valoria landslide (Apennines, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daehne, A.; van Asch, Th. W. J.; Corsini, A.; Spickerman, A.; Bégueria-Portuguès, S.

    2010-05-01

    dormant landslide parts as an effect of undrained loading and changed pressure conditions caused by active movements approaching from upslope. A representative landslide cross-section of the Valoria landslide, stretching from the main track zone down to the toe zone, was analyzed in SLOWMOVE. A large set of surface displacement data obtained since March 2008 through continuous total-station monitoring allowed for evaluation and calibration of the numerical implementations in terms of velocity. Multi-temporal Lidar surveys allowed for calibration of the model in terms of event-induced morphological changes along the selected cross section. Model parameters were defined, on such basis, via a trial and error approach starting from laboratory and literature data. The model was able to reproduce realistic velocities and morphological changes. The specific function of coupling between interacting portion of the mass movement, allowed for simulation of landslide toe reactivation, that was observed during major acceleration events as a result of the domino effect caused by active flows in the main flow track. Further development is needed in order to integrate in the model transient pore pressure conditions. Nevertheless, results are promising, as they point to a possible application of the model in quantitative hazard and risk assessment.

  16. Analysis Community’s Coping Strategies and Local Risk Governance Framework in Relation to Landslide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heru Setiawan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of people perception and analysis of the coping strategy to landslides are the two elements that are es-sential to determine the level of preparedness of communities to landslides. To know the preparedness of government and other stakeholders in facing landslide, the analysis risk governance framework was required. A survey using questionnaires with random sampling was applied to assess the level of people perception and people coping strategy related to landslide. Analysis of risk governance frame work was done at the district and sub-district level. ἀe study found that people perception related with landslide dominated by high and moderate level. Age and education are two factors that inḀuence the people’s perception to landslide. Local people applied four types coping strategy, which are: economic, structural, social and cultural coping strategy. Totally, 51.6% respondents have high level, 33.3% have moderate level and only 15.1% respondents that have low level of coping strategy. ἀe factors that inḀuence the level of coping strategy are education, income and building type.  Analysis of risk governance framework is limited to the three components including stakeholder involvement, risk management and risk communication. Based on the data analysis, the level of stakeholder involvement at the district scope was categorized on the moderate till high and the level of stakeholder involvement at sub-district level was categorized on the high level. Generally, the risk management of Karanganyar was categorized on the moderate level and high level and the risk management in Tawangmangu was categorized on the moderate level. ἀere are some elements must be improved on the risk governance framework, those are data management, the pattern of relationships among stakeholders, increased participation of NGOs, constructed and updated landslide risk map, enhancement of microᴀnance role in helping the com-munity when disaster strikes

  17. VERIFICATION AND RISK ASSESSMENT FOR LANDSLIDES IN THE SHIMEN RESERVOIR WATERSHED OF TAIWAN USING SPATIAL ANALYSIS AND DATA MINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Lai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatial information technologies and data can be used effectively to investigate and monitor natural disasters contiguously and to support policy- and decision-making for hazard prevention, mitigation and reconstruction. However, in addition to the vastly growing data volume, various spatial data usually come from different sources and with different formats and characteristics. Therefore, it is necessary to find useful and valuable information that may not be obvious in the original data sets from numerous collections. This paper presents the preliminary results of a research in the validation and risk assessment of landslide events induced by heavy torrential rains in the Shimen reservoir watershed of Taiwan using spatial analysis and data mining algorithms. In this study, eleven factors were considered, including elevation (Digital Elevation Model, DEM, slope, aspect, curvature, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, fault, geology, soil, land use, river and road. The experimental results indicate that overall accuracy and kappa coefficient in verification can reach 98.1% and 0.8829, respectively. However, the DT model after training is too over-fitting to carry prediction. To address this issue, a mechanism was developed to filter uncertain data by standard deviation of data distribution. Experimental results demonstrated that after filtering the uncertain data, the kappa coefficient in prediction substantially increased 29.5%.The results indicate that spatial analysis and data mining algorithm combining the mechanism developed in this study can produce more reliable results for verification and forecast of landslides in the study site.

  18. A first landslide inventory in the Rwenzori Mountains, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Liesbet; Dewitte, Olivier; Poesen, Jean; Sekajugo, John; Maes, Jan; Mertens, Kewan; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2015-04-01

    be the first of this kind for the Rwenzori region and will serve as a basis for future geomorphological analysis and susceptibility and hazard mapping.

  19. Submarine Landslides: What we Know and Where we are Going!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscardelli, L. G.; Mountjoy, J. J.; Micallef, A.; Strasser, M.; Vanneste, M.; Chaytor, J. D.; Mosher, D.; Krastel, S.; Lo Iacono, C.; Yamada, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Submarine landslides and other gravity-induced movements can disrupt very large areas of continental margins resulting in long-term seafloor morphologic change and multi-scale mass transport deposits (MTDs). Potential consequences of submarine landslides include damage to seabed infrastructure, offshore facilities, as well as generation or enhancement of tsunamis. MTDs are common on the modern seafloor and within the stratigraphic record. Slides, slumps and debris flows can be constituents of MTDs and can co-occur in the same event or depositional unit. Recent research indicates that relationships exist between MTD geological setting, causal mechanisms, and geometries. Quantitative data analysis suggests that MTD morphometric parameters can be used to link these three parameters. Despite many advances in this field, it still remains unclear how to definitively identify pre-conditioning factors and triggers of submarine landslides in modern slopes, and how submarine landslides evolve after initiation. In addition, new questions regarding the interaction between submarine landslides and active marine processes, such as bottom currents and fluid flow, have emerged.One of the mandates of the S4SLIDE (IGCP-640) project, a joint endeavor of UNESCO and IGCP that represents the broad field of submarine landslide research, is to facilitate interactions at an international level among scientists, industry and government representatives to advance our knowledge on a number of outstanding science questions: (i) What is the nature of the interaction between current-controlled sedimentation and submarine landslides? (ii) What role do transient turbulent-laminar flows play in the formation of submarine landslides? (iii) Do climatic variations control the occurrence of submarine landslides? (iv) What is the economic significance of submarine landslides? (v) Do we understand the hazards that submarine landslides pose to the environment and to humans? This presentation will cover

  20. Landslide Kinematical Analysis through Inverse Numerical Modelling and Differential SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, R.; Tizzani, P.; Lollino, P.; Calò, F.; Ardizzone, F.; Lanari, R.; Guzzetti, F.; Manunta, M.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology to perform inverse numerical modelling of slow landslides that combines the potentialities of both numerical approaches and well-known remote-sensing satellite techniques. In particular, through an optimization procedure based on a genetic algorithm, we minimize, with respect to a proper penalty function, the difference between the modelled displacement field and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR) deformation time series. The proposed methodology allows us to automatically search for the physical parameters that characterize the landslide behaviour. To validate the presented approach, we focus our analysis on the slow Ivancich landslide (Assisi, central Italy). The kinematical evolution of the unstable slope is investigated via long-term DInSAR analysis, by exploiting about 20 years of ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT satellite acquisitions. The landslide is driven by the presence of a shear band, whose behaviour is simulated through a two-dimensional time-dependent finite element model, in two different physical scenarios, i.e. Newtonian viscous flow and a deviatoric creep model. Comparison between the model results and DInSAR measurements reveals that the deviatoric creep model is more suitable to describe the kinematical evolution of the landslide. This finding is also confirmed by comparing the model results with the available independent inclinometer measurements. Our analysis emphasizes that integration of different data, within inverse numerical models, allows deep investigation of the kinematical behaviour of slow active landslides and discrimination of the driving forces that govern their deformation processes.

  1. Landslides and fortified settlements as valuable geoheritage sites in the Moldavian Plateau, North-Eastern Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculita, Mihai; Bucci, Francesco; Santangelo, Michele; Ciprian Margarint, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    Landslides are widespread natural phenomena that shape the earth surface. As such, they are part of the environment where people live, playing an important role as natural hazard, but also making a place peculiar for its specific morphology. Nowadays, like in the past, people living in hilly to mountainous areas have always had to face landslides. In the Eastern Carpathians lowlands, landslides have carved a landscape with inaccessible escarpments tens of meters high, providing old populations with panoramic and naturally defensive places to build their settlements. This interaction produced an association of landslide morphologies and archaeological remains that is unique in Romaina. In this study, we present the case of chalcolitic and thraco-getic (6.5 ka BP to 500 BP) fortified settlements, for which landslides provided a favorable place for their construction on one hand, and acted as a natural hazard on the other hand. In the Moldavian Plateau, North-Eastern Romania, more than 50 sites were identified on structural plateaus bounded by wide scarps of Pleistocene landslides, on cuesta ridges bounded by scarps of Holocene landslides, or situated on hillslopes, on erosional remnants of landslide bodies. For nine out of the 50 sites, we produced accurate geomorphological landslide inventories, mapping more than 500 landslides starting from high resolution LiDAR DEM derived images. Such inventories provide information on landslide type and relative ages (very old, old, recent landslides) based on the morphological appearance of each slope failure. Analysis of the relations between the sites hosting the fortified settlements, their archaeological remains and very old landslides distribution, provides evidences that landslide scarps and their deposits were used by these populations as defensive sites. In particular, the scarps were used as natural walls, allowing to save material and manpower required to erect walls on the gentle and open parts of the sites. Besides

  2. Statistical analysis of factors affecting landslide distribution in the new Madrid seismic zone, Tennessee and Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibson, R.W.; Keefer, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    More than 220 large landslides along the bluffs bordering the Mississippi alluvial plain between Cairo, Ill., and Memphis, Tenn., are analyzed by discriminant analysis and multiple linear regression to determine the relative effects of slope height and steepness, stratigraphic variation, slope aspect, and proximity to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 New Madrid, Mo., earthquakes on the distribution of these landslides. Three types of landslides are analyzed: (1) old, coherent slumps and block slides, which have eroded and revegetated features and no active analogs in the area; (2) old earth flows, which are also eroded and revegetated; and (3) young rotational slumps, which are present only along near-river bluffs, and which are the only young, active landslides in the area. Discriminant analysis shows that only one characteristic differs significantly between bluffs with and without young rotational slumps: failed bluffs tend to have sand and clay at their base, which may render them more susceptible to fluvial erosion. Bluffs having old coherent slides are significantly higher, steeper, and closer to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 earthquakes than bluffs without these slides. Bluffs having old earth flows are likewise higher and closer to the earthquake hypocenters. Multiple regression analysis indicates that the distribution of young rotational slumps is affected most strongly by slope steepness: about one-third of the variation in the distribution is explained by variations in slope steepness. The distribution of old coherent slides and earth flows is affected most strongly by slope height, but the proximity to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 earthquakes also significantly affects the distribution. The results of the statistical analyses indicate that the only recently active landsliding in the area is along actively eroding river banks, where rotational slumps formed as bluffs are undercut by the river. The analyses further indicate that the old coherent slides

  3. Landslide risk models for decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonachea, Jaime; Remondo, Juan; de Terán, José Ramón Díaz; González-Díez, Alberto; Cendrero, Antonio

    2009-11-01

    This contribution presents a quantitative procedure for landslide risk analysis and zoning considering hazard, exposure (or value of elements at risk), and vulnerability. The method provides the means to obtain landslide risk models (expressing expected damage due to landslides on material elements and economic activities in monetary terms, according to different scenarios and periods) useful to identify areas where mitigation efforts will be most cost effective. It allows identifying priority areas for the implementation of actions to reduce vulnerability (elements) or hazard (processes). The procedure proposed can also be used as a preventive tool, through its application to strategic environmental impact analysis (SEIA) of land-use plans. The underlying hypothesis is that reliable predictions about hazard and risk can be made using models based on a detailed analysis of past landslide occurrences in connection with conditioning factors and data on past damage. The results show that the approach proposed and the hypothesis formulated are essentially correct, providing estimates of the order of magnitude of expected losses for a given time period. Uncertainties, strengths, and shortcomings of the procedure and results obtained are discussed and potential lines of research to improve the models are indicated. Finally, comments and suggestions are provided to generalize this type of analysis.

  4. Generating an optimal DTM from airborne laser scanning data for landslide mapping in a tropical forest environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Razak, Khamarrul Azahari; Santangelo, Michele; Westen, van Cees J.; Straatsma, Menno W.; Jong, de Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Landslide inventory maps are fundamental for assessing landslide susceptibility, hazard, and risk. In tropical mountainous environments, mapping landslides is difficult as rapid and dense vegetation growth obscures landslides soon after their occurrence. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data have been

  5. Object-oriented analysis of multi-temporal panchromatic images for creation of historical landslide inventories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martha, T.R.; Kerle, N.; Westen, van C.J.; Jetten, V.G.; Kumar, K.V.

    2012-01-01

    Object-oriented analysis (OOA) has been demonstrated to produce more accurate results than pixel-based image processing. Studies carried out by previous researchers have shown how landslide inventories can be prepared from multispectral satellite images using OOA. However, panchromatic images are fr

  6. Analysis of a landslide multi-date inventory in a complex mountain landscape: the Ubaye valley case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Schlögel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a methodology (1 to prepare a multi-date landslide inventory for a mountainous area affected by several landslide types with different degrees of activity, and (2 to estimate the temporal occurrence and the intensity of the landslides through the analysis of morphological indicators. The inventory, covering the period 1956–2010, is constructed for the middle section of the Ubaye valley (South French Alps based on the analysis of multi-source documents (geomorphological maps, historical reports of landslide events, field surveys, series of orthophotographs and SAR satellite images. The uncertainties in the interpretation of the documents and the landslide morphological features are taken into account in relation to the scale of the source documents. Several morphological indicators are calculated to describe quantitatively the evolution of the landslides (length, area, relative elevation, runout distance. Frequency-area density functions are calculated to estimate the changes in the landslide distributions. A Poisson model is used to estimate the probability of reactivation of the observed landslides. The proposed multi-date inventory and the associated statistics give additional information to the event catalogue managed by local authorities.

  7. A shallow landslide analysis method consisting of contour line based method and slope stability model with critical slip surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, D.

    2015-12-01

    To mitigate sediment related disaster triggered by rainfall event, it is necessary to predict a landslide occurrence and subsequent debris flow behavior. Many landslide analysis method have been developed and proposed by numerous researchers for several decades. Among them, distributed slope stability models simulating temporal and spatial instability of local slopes are more essential for early warning or evacuation in area of lower part of hill-slopes. In the present study, a distributed, physically based landslide analysis method consisting of contour line-based method that subdivide a watershed area into stream tubes, and a slope stability analysis in which critical slip surface is searched to identify location and shape of the most instable slip surface in each stream tube, is developed. A target watershed area is divided into stream tubes using GIS technique, grand water flow for each stream tubes during a rainfall event is analyzed by a kinematic wave model, and slope stability for each stream tube is calculated by a simplified Janbu method searching for a critical slip surface using a dynamic programming method. Comparing to previous methods that assume infinite slope for slope stability analysis, the proposed method has advantage simulating landslides more accurately in spatially and temporally, and estimating amount of collapsed slope mass, that can be delivered to a debris flow simulation model as a input data. We applied this method to a small watershed in the Izu Oshima, Tokyo, Japan, where shallow and wide landslides triggered by heavy rainfall and subsequent debris flows attacked Oshima Town, in 2013. Figure shows the temporal and spatial change of simulated grand water level and landslides distribution. The simulated landslides are correspond to the uppermost part of actual landslide area, and the timing of the occurrence of landslides agree well with the actual landslides.

  8. The impact of expert knowledge on natural hazard susceptibility assessment using spatial multi-criteria analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Caroline; Kalantari, Zahra; Mörtberg, Ulla; Olofsson, Bo; Lyon, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Road and railway networks are one of the key factors to a country's economic growth. Inadequate infrastructural networks could be detrimental to a society if the transport between locations are hindered or delayed. Logistical hindrances can often be avoided whereas natural hindrances are more difficult to control. One natural hindrance that can have a severe adverse effect on both infrastructure and society is flooding. Intense and heavy rainfall events can trigger other natural hazards such as landslides and debris flow. Disruptions caused by landslides are similar to that of floods and increase the maintenance cost considerably. The effect on society by natural disasters is likely to increase due to a changed climate with increasing precipitation. Therefore, there is a need for risk prevention and mitigation of natural hazards. Determining susceptible areas and incorporating them in the decision process may reduce the infrastructural harm. Spatial multi-criteria analysis (SMCA) is a part of decision analysis, which provides a set of procedures for analysing complex decision problems through a Geographic Information System (GIS). The objective and aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of expert judgements for inundation, landslide and debris flow susceptibility assessments through a SMCA approach using hydrological, geological and land use factors. The sensitivity of the SMCA model was tested in relation to each perspective and impact on the resulting susceptibility. A least cost path function was used to compare new alternative road lines with the existing ones. This comparison was undertaken to identify the resulting differences in the susceptibility assessments using expert judgements as well as historic incidences of flooding and landslides in order to discuss the usefulness of the model in road planning.

  9. Supplemental Hazard Analysis and Risk Assessment - Hydrotreater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Peter P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wagner, Katie A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    A supplemental hazard analysis was conducted and quantitative risk assessment performed in response to an independent review comment received by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from the U.S. Department of Energy Pacific Northwest Field Office (PNSO) against the Hydrotreater/Distillation Column Hazard Analysis Report issued in April 2013. The supplemental analysis used the hazardous conditions documented by the previous April 2013 report as a basis. The conditions were screened and grouped for the purpose of identifying whether additional prudent, practical hazard controls could be identified, using a quantitative risk evaluation to assess the adequacy of the controls and establish a lower level of concern for the likelihood of potential serious accidents. Calculations were performed to support conclusions where necessary.

  10. Risk Mapping and Spatial Pattern of Debris Flow and Landslide Hazards in China%中国泥石流滑坡灾害风险制图与空间格局研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘希林; 余承君; 尚志海

    2011-01-01

    The paper studied the hazardousness, vulnerability and risk of debris flow and landslide in China and compiled maps with a scale of 1:6000000, based on Geographical Information Systems ( GIS ) technology, hazard zonation map, socioeconomic data from 2000. Integrated hazardousness of debris flow and landslide was the sum of debris flow hazardousness and landslide hazardousness. Vulnerability was employed a simplified assessing model, which was related to three aspects of GDP,land-use and population. Risk was expressed by the product of hazardousness and vulnerability. Analysis for the results of hazardousness,vulnerability and risk shows that China has extremely high risk territory with 104km2 occupied by debris flow and landslide hazards, and high risk territory with 283008km2, moderate risk territory with 3161815km2, low risk territory with 3299604km2, extremely low risk territory with 2681709km2,which respectively account for 0. 001% ,3% ,33. 55% ,35% , and 28. 45% of total territorial areas. The risk pattern of debris flow and landslide hazards had been studied, including the spatial patterns analyses of risk classes for 30 provinces and provincial capital cites. The studies suggest that the governments and land-use makers should carry out more strict politics for land uses. In the extremely high risk territory and in high risk regions, human activities and developments should be prohibited, and in the moderate risk areas, socioeconomic developments should be restricted so as to avoid the debris flow and landslide hazards.%基于GIS技术和危险性区划图、2000年的社会经济数据相关资料,研究了中国泥石流滑坡灾害危险度、易损度和风险度的量化与分析,分别编制了比例尺为1∶6000000的相应地图.泥石流滑坡灾害的危险度是泥石流危险度和滑坡危险度的叠加;易损度采用简化后的评估模型,模型输入指标包括国内生产总值、土地利用现状及人口分布3方面;风险度在

  11. Critical Rainfall Conditions Triggering Shallow Landslides or Debris Flows in Torrents - Analysis of Debris Flow events 2012, 2013 and 2014 in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Markus; Mehlhorn, Susanne; Janu, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Generally, debris flows are caused by both small-scale intensive precipitation and long lasting rainfalls with lower intensity but high pre-wetting or both combined. The triggering mechanism of the debris flow events in Austria 2012, 2013 and 2014 were mass movements (rapid shallow landslides) on steep slopes in the upper catchments. Those masses slide with very high velocity into the torrent beds provoking hyperconcentrated flows or debris flows. In areas of the geologically unstable Greywacke zone, the torrents were cleared up onto the bedrock and the debris was deposited in the storage areas of existing debris flow breakers or in torrents without technical protection measures the debris caused catastrophic damage to residential buildings and other infrastructural facilities on the alluvial fan. Following the events, comprehensive documentation work was undertaken comprising precipitation analysis (rainfall data, weather radar data), identification and quantification of the landslide masses, cross profiles along the channel and of deposition in the storage areas or on the fan. The documentation and analysis of torrential events is an essential part of an integrated risk management. It supports the understanding of the occurred processes to mitigate future hazards. Unfortunately, the small-scale heavy rain events are not detected by the precipitation stations. Therefore, weather radar data (INCA-Data) analysis was used to determine the - usually very local - intensities which caused those catastrophic landslides and debris flows. Analysis results showed an agreement with the range of the previously known precipitation thresholds for debris flow triggering in the Alps.

  12. Semi-quantitative assessment of the physical vulnerability of buildings for the landslide risk analysis. A case study in the Loures municipality, Lisbon district, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard-Gonçalves, Clémence; Zêzere, José Luis; Pereira, Susana; Garcia, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    The physical vulnerability of the buildings of Loures (a Portuguese municipality) to landslides was assessed, and the landslide risk was computed as the product of the landslide hazard by the vulnerability and the market economic value of the buildings. First, the hazard was assessed by combining the spatio-temporal probability and the frequency-magnitude relationship of the landslides, which was established by plotting the probability of a landslide area. The susceptibility of deep-seated and shallow landslides was assessed by a bi-variate statistical method and was mapped. The annual and multiannual spatio-temporal probabilities were estimated, providing a landslide hazard model. Then, an assessment of buildings vulnerability to landslides, based on an inquiry of a pool of landslide European experts, was developed and applied to the study area. The inquiry was based on nine magnitude scenarios and four structural building types. A sub-pool of the landslide experts who know the study area was extracted from the pool, and the variability of the answers coming from the pool and the sub-pool was assessed with standard deviation. Moreover, the average vulnerability of the basic geographic entities was compared by changing the map unit and applying the vulnerability to all the buildings of a test site (included in the study area), the inventory of which was listed on the field. Next, the market economic value of the buildings was calculated using an adaptation of the Portuguese Tax Services approach. Finally, the annual and multiannual landslide risk was computed for the nine landslide magnitude scenarios and different spatio-temporal probabilities by multiplying the potential loss (Vulnerability × Economic Value) by the hazard probability. As a rule, the vulnerability values given by the sub-pool of experts who know the study area are higher than those given by the European experts, namely for the high magnitude landslides. The obtained vulnerabilities vary from 0

  13. 反距离加权法在区域滑坡危险性评价中的应用%Application of Inverse Distance Weighted Method to Regional Landslide Hazards Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱吉祥; 张礼中; 周小元; 梁国玲; 王乾; 蔡子昭

    2012-01-01

    区域滑坡危险性评价是进行区域滑坡风险性研究的基础。提出了一种基于反距离加权的"黑箱"式评价方法,该方法将滑坡作为一个系统进行分析,各影响因素作为滑坡系统中的子系统。根据相似相近的原理,假设已有滑坡点对周围区域的滑坡危险性存在局部性影响,利用反距离加权法对所有滑坡点进行分析评价,以获取研究区的滑坡危险性评价结果。同时对该方法运用于区域滑坡危险性评价的理论基础、适用范围进行分析,并以四川省苍溪县为例,验证了运用该方法进行区域滑坡危险性评价的可行性。%Regional landslide hazards assessment is the basis of the research on regional landslide hazard risk.A "black box" method is proposed based on inverse distance weighted interpolation(IDW) theory considering landslide as a system and the factors as subsystems.This approach hypothesizes that existing landslides have local influences on the landslide risk to their surrounding areas according to the principle that the more closed the distance of the things is,the more similar the characters of them are;it obtains the result of regional landslide hazard assessment by analyzing all the landslides with the IDW theory;and simultaneously,it analyzes the basis of theory why the IDW theory can be applied in regional landslide hazards assessment and the scope of its application.Finally,the feasibility of IDW Interpolation theory in regional landslide hazards assessment is verified by taking Cangxi County of Sichuan Province for an example.

  14. Deep seated gravitational slope deformations and large landslides: implications on landslide hazard of urban areas and coastal erosion phenomena of Mount Poro headland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerricchio, A.; Simeone, V.

    2012-04-01

    Deep seated gravitational slope deformations (DSGSD) characterize the north west and south side of Mount Poro headland, mid Calabria, south Italy, as reported by Guerrichio (2000). This work investigates the DSGSD of Mount Poro headland, in particular the gravitational collapses, occurring between the coast and the western flank of the headland up to an elevation of about 500-600 m AMSL. These collapses seem to be inconsistent with the local lithotypes, made by the substratum of granitic complex of Polia-Copanello. In particular, Ietto and Calcaterra (1988) identified DSGSDs in the area of Zaccanopoli. They assumed these phenomena on the edge between post-uplift gravitative tectonics and deep seated gravitational deformations that were referred to morphologies sub-parallel to the banks of two important local rivers. The local geology comprises severely fractured and sometimes cataclastic granitic rocks. These show deep sub-vertical fracture, bow-shaped and oriented along the direction NNE-SSW in the upstream areas, at an elevation between 500 and 600 m AMSL. For those areas on the right side of the headland, fractures are oriented along NE-SW, N-S and NW-SE, while on the left side of the headland fractures are oriented W-E and NW-SE. In the upstream areas, there are frequent depressed and stretched stripes of land, which are crossed by fractures, which affect granitic masses for a difference of elevation ranging between few tens of meters and one hundred meters. Similar differences of elevation can also be observed either inside the DSGSDs, and the large landslides, like that located immediately upstream Dropia town, where for instance a one hundred meters concave scarp shows. Inside the DSGSDs and inside the topping Pleistocenic deposits, there are frequent twofold terraces, which can be hardly dated. In fact, no fossils are present, and then it is possible to assume their age just on a geomorphologic base. The entire area involved by the DSGSD is few tens of

  15. Landslides hazard susceptibility evaluation based on weighting model%基于权重模型的滑坡灾害敏感性评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解传银

    2011-01-01

    在GIS环境下,基于主客观综合权重模型编制贵州省滑坡灾害敏感性区划图。选择历史滑坡分布、坡向、至水系距离、地形地貌、高程、岩性、至构造线距离和年平均降雨量作为引发滑坡的致灾因子,应用TFNW(梯形模糊数加权)方法计算二级指标的主观权重。根据历史滑坡的密度,以信息熵权理论计算一级指标的客观权重。最后,应用WLC(权重线性组合)方法,基于GIS平台编制贵州省滑坡灾害敏感性区划图。根据敏感性指标分布,将贵州省划分为4个区域:低危险区、中等危险区、高危险区和极高危险区。结合历史滑坡分布图对分区结果进行统计分析,结果表明滑坡敏感性预测区划图和实际的滑坡发育情况基本吻合,说明TFNW和信息熵理论是有效的滑坡致灾因子赋权方法。%The purpose of this study is to present a weighting method, integrating of subjective weights with objective weights, for landslide susceptibility mapping based on GIS. Firstly, landslide inventory, aspect, proximity to drainage line, topography, elevation, lithology, proximity to structural line and annual precipitation, were taken as independent causal factors. Secondly, trapezoidal fuzzy number weighting (TFNW) approach was used to assess the effect of each subclass of each causal factor. Thirdly, entropy-based weighting method was used to calculate objective weights of causal factors according to the landslide density for each parameter class. Finally, the landslide susceptibility map of Guizhou Province in China, as an example, was created using weighted linear combination (WLC) model based on geographical information system (GIS). According to the susceptibility index, the study area was classified into four categories of landslide susceptibility: low, moderate, high and very high. The results of the analysis were verified using the landslide inventory map. The validation results show

  16. Case Histories of Landslide Impact: A Database-driven Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Martin; Damm, Bodo

    2015-04-01

    Fundamental understanding of landslide risk requires in-depth knowledge of how landslides have impacted society in the past (e.g., Corominas et al., 2014). A key to obtain insights into the evolution of landslide risk at single facilities of critical infrastructures are case histories of landslide impact. The purpose of such historical analyses is to inform about the site-specific interactions between landslides and land-use activity. Case histories support correlating landslide events and associated damages with multiple control variables of landslide risk, including (i) previous construction works, (ii) hazard awareness, (iii) the type of structure or its material properties, and (iv) measures of post-disaster mitigation. It is a key advantage of case histories to provide an overview of the changes in the exposure and vulnerability of infrastructures over time. Their application helps to learn more about changing patterns in risk culture and the effectiveness of repair or prevention measures (e.g., Klose et al., 2014). Case histories of landslide impact are developed on the basis of information extracted from landslide databases. The use of path diagrams and illustrated flowcharts as data modeling techniques is aimed at structuring, condensing, and visualizing complex historical data sets on landslide activity and land-use. Much of the scientific potential of case histories simply depends on the quality of available database information. Landslide databases relying on a bottom-up approach characterized by targeted local data specification are optimally suited for historical impact analyses. Combined with systematic retrieval, extraction, and integration of data from multiple sources, landslide databases constitute a valuable tool for developing case histories that enable to open a whole new window on the study of landslide impacts (e.g., Damm and Klose, 2014). The present contribution introduces such a case history for a well-known landslide site at a heavily

  17. Determination of Important Topographic Factors for Landslide Mapping Analysis Using MLP Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutasem Sh. Alkhasawneh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Landslide is one of the natural disasters that occur in Malaysia. Topographic factors such as elevation, slope angle, slope aspect, general curvature, plan curvature, and profile curvature are considered as the main causes of landslides. In order to determine the dominant topographic factors in landslide mapping analysis, a study was conducted and presented in this paper. There are three main stages involved in this study. The first stage is the extraction of extra topographic factors. Previous landslide studies had identified mainly six topographic factors. Seven new additional factors have been proposed in this study. They are longitude curvature, tangential curvature, cross section curvature, surface area, diagonal line length, surface roughness, and rugosity. The second stage is the specification of the weight of each factor using two methods. The methods are multilayer perceptron (MLP network classification accuracy and Zhou's algorithm. At the third stage, the factors with higher weights were used to improve the MLP performance. Out of the thirteen factors, eight factors were considered as important factors, which are surface area, longitude curvature, diagonal length, slope angle, elevation, slope aspect, rugosity, and profile curvature. The classification accuracy of multilayer perceptron neural network has increased by 3% after the elimination of five less important factors.

  18. Determination of important topographic factors for landslide mapping analysis using MLP network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhasawneh, Mutasem Sh; Ngah, Umi Kalthum; Tay, Lea Tien; Mat Isa, Nor Ashidi; Al-batah, Mohammad Subhi

    2013-01-01

    Landslide is one of the natural disasters that occur in Malaysia. Topographic factors such as elevation, slope angle, slope aspect, general curvature, plan curvature, and profile curvature are considered as the main causes of landslides. In order to determine the dominant topographic factors in landslide mapping analysis, a study was conducted and presented in this paper. There are three main stages involved in this study. The first stage is the extraction of extra topographic factors. Previous landslide studies had identified mainly six topographic factors. Seven new additional factors have been proposed in this study. They are longitude curvature, tangential curvature, cross section curvature, surface area, diagonal line length, surface roughness, and rugosity. The second stage is the specification of the weight of each factor using two methods. The methods are multilayer perceptron (MLP) network classification accuracy and Zhou's algorithm. At the third stage, the factors with higher weights were used to improve the MLP performance. Out of the thirteen factors, eight factors were considered as important factors, which are surface area, longitude curvature, diagonal length, slope angle, elevation, slope aspect, rugosity, and profile curvature. The classification accuracy of multilayer perceptron neural network has increased by 3% after the elimination of five less important factors.

  19. Effect of forest clear-cutting on landslide occurrences: Analysis of rainfall thresholds at Mt. Ichifusa, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hitoshi; Murakami, Wataru; Daimaru, Hiromu; Oguchi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Vegetation cover is an important factor for rainfall-induced landslides. We analyzed the effect of forest clear-cutting on the initiation of landslides using empirical rainfall intensity-duration (I-D) thresholds at Mt. Ichifusa, Japan, which is characterized by granitic rocks. Extensive clear-cutting was conducted for the forest industry during the late 1960s in the northern part of Mt. Ichifusa. This single episode of clear-cutting caused frequent shallow landslides triggered by rainfall. We interpreted orthorectified aerial photographs from 1969, 1976, 1980, 1985, 1990, 1995, 1999, and 2005 using GIS and mapped landslides based on these photographs. We then analyzed all rainfall events of the warm seasons (Apr.-Oct.) of 1952-2011 (60 years) based on hourly rain gauge data. We used basic rainfall parameters such as mean rainfall intensity (I, mm/h) and duration (D, h) and estimated the return periods of these rainfall conditions. We investigated rainfall I-D thresholds for landslide occurrences in each period represented by the aerial photographs and assessed the relationships between landslide occurrences and topographic characteristics from 10-m DEMs. The results show that several landslides occurred after clear-cutting before 1976 but that they have occurred most frequently during the periods 1976-1980, 1980-1985, and 1990-1995. Numerous landslides occurred in these years at steeper and gentler slopes in the clear-cut area, but few landslides occurred in the non-clear-cut area. Rainfall analysis demonstrates that rainfall I-D thresholds after clear-cutting declined to half of those of the non-clear-cut area. The return periods of these rainfall I-D thresholds also declined to 1 year for short durations of < 12 h and to < 3 years for 72 h in the clear-cut area. Our findings underscore the substantial hysteresis effects between clear-cutting and landslide occurrences at Mt. Ichifusa.

  20. Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Kubicek

    2001-09-07

    The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment. (3) Vital US. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  1. Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard C. Logan

    2002-03-28

    The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment; Vital U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  2. Multi-Dimensional Shallow Landslide Stability Analysis Suitable for Application at the Watershed Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milledge, D.; Bellugi, D.; McKean, J. A.; Dietrich, W.

    2012-12-01

    The infinite slope model is the basis for almost all watershed scale slope stability models. However, it assumes that a potential landslide is infinitely long and wide. As a result, it cannot represent resistance at the margins of a potential landslide (e.g. from lateral roots), and is unable to predict the size of a potential landslide. Existing three-dimensional models generally require computationally expensive numerical solutions and have previously been applied only at the hillslope scale. Here we derive an alternative analytical treatment that accounts for lateral resistance by representing the forces acting on each margin of an unstable block. We apply 'at rest' earth pressure on the lateral sides, and 'active' and 'passive' pressure using a log-spiral method on the upslope and downslope margins. We represent root reinforcement on each margin assuming that root cohesion is an exponential function of soil depth. We benchmark this treatment against other more complete approaches (Finite Element (FE) and closed form solutions) and find that our model: 1) converges on the infinite slope predictions as length / depth and width / depth ratios become large; 2) agrees with the predictions from state-of-the-art FE models to within +/- 30% error, for the specific cases in which these can be applied. We then test our model's ability to predict failure of an actual (mapped) landslide where the relevant parameters are relatively well constrained. We find that our model predicts failure at the observed location with a nearly identical shape and predicts that larger or smaller shapes conformal to the observed shape are indeed more stable. Finally, we perform a sensitivity analysis using our model to show that lateral reinforcement sets a minimum landslide size, while the additional strength at the downslope boundary means that the optimum shape for a given size is longer in a downslope direction. However, reinforcement effects cannot fully explain the size or shape

  3. Landslide mapping with multi-scale object-based image analysis – a case study in the Baichi watershed, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lahousse

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We developed a multi-scale OBIA (object-based image analysis landslide detection technique to map shallow landslides in the Baichi watershed, Taiwan, after the 2004 Typhoon Aere event. Our semi-automated detection method selected multiple scales through landslide size statistics analysis for successive classification rounds. The detection performance achieved a modified success rate (MSR of 86.5% with the training dataset and 86% with the validation dataset. This performance level was due to the multi-scale aspect of our methodology, as the MSR for single scale classification was substantially lower, even after spectral difference segmentation, with a maximum of 74%. Our multi-scale technique was capable of detecting landslides of varying sizes, including very small landslides, up to 95 m2. The method presented certain limitations: the thresholds we established for classification were specific to the study area, to the landslide type in the study area, and to the spectral characteristics of the satellite image. Because updating site-specific and image-specific classification thresholds is easy with OBIA software, our multi-scale technique is expected to be useful for mapping shallow landslides at watershed level.

  4. COUPLING ANALYSIS OF CONTROL FACTORS BETWEEN EARTHQUAKEINDUCED LANDSLIDES AND SUBSEQUENT RAINFALL-INDUCED LANDSLIDES IN EPICENTER AREA OF WENCHUAN EARTHQUAKE%汶川地震强震区地震诱发滑坡与后期降雨诱发滑坡控制因子耦合分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐信; 唐川; 陈州丰; 邵长生

    2012-01-01

    the landslide area increased by68. 7%. Meanwhile, on the basis of remote sensing data interpretation, the paper further analyse the induced landslides , carries out the trends, hazard and risk evaluation, which provides a scientific prediction basis. The findings in this paper can be useful to the Wenchuan Earthquake restoration and reconstruction in disaster mitigation and preparedness and provide the decision-makers to carry out earthquake-induced landslides and rainfall-induced landslides scale contrast and control factor coupling analysis and the earthquake and rainfall coupling disasters chain mode.

  5. Use of Satellite Remote Sensing Data in the Mapping of Global Landslide Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yang; Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George J.

    2007-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing data has significant potential use in analysis of natural hazards such as landslides. Relying on the recent advances in satellite remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) techniques, this paper aims to map landslide susceptibility over most of the globe using a GIs-based weighted linear combination method. First , six relevant landslide-controlling factors are derived from geospatial remote sensing data and coded into a GIS system. Next, continuous susceptibility values from low to high are assigned to each of the six factors. Second, a continuous scale of a global landslide susceptibility index is derived using GIS weighted linear combination based on each factor's relative significance to the process of landslide occurrence (e.g., slope is the most important factor, soil types and soil texture are also primary-level parameters, while elevation, land cover types, and drainage density are secondary in importance). Finally, the continuous index map is further classified into six susceptibility categories. Results show the hot spots of landslide-prone regions include the Pacific Rim, the Himalayas and South Asia, Rocky Mountains, Appalachian Mountains, Alps, and parts of the Middle East and Africa. India, China, Nepal, Japan, the USA, and Peru are shown to have landslide-prone areas. This first-cut global landslide susceptibility map forms a starting point to provide a global view of landslide risks and may be used in conjunction with satellite-based precipitation information to potentially detect areas with significant landslide potential due to heavy rainfall. 1

  6. What Are Volcano Hazards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sheet 002-97 Revised March 2008 What Are Volcano Hazards? Volcanoes give rise to numerous geologic and ... as far as 15 miles from the volcano. Volcano Landslides A landslide or debris avalanche is a ...

  7. Landslide susceptibility map: from research to application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Federica; Reichenbach, Paola; Ardizzone, Francesca; Rossi, Mauro; Felicioni, Giulia; Antonini, Guendalina

    2014-05-01

    Susceptibility map is an important and essential tool in environmental planning, to evaluate landslide hazard and risk and for a correct and responsible management of the territory. Landslide susceptibility is the likelihood of a landslide occurring in an area on the basis of local terrain conditions. Can be expressed as the probability that any given region will be affected by landslides, i.e. an estimate of "where" landslides are likely to occur. In this work we present two examples of landslide susceptibility map prepared for the Umbria Region and for the Perugia Municipality. These two maps were realized following official request from the Regional and Municipal government to the Research Institute for the Hydrogeological Protection (CNR-IRPI). The susceptibility map prepared for the Umbria Region represents the development of previous agreements focused to prepare: i) a landslide inventory map that was included in the Urban Territorial Planning (PUT) and ii) a series of maps for the Regional Plan for Multi-risk Prevention. The activities carried out for the Umbria Region were focused to define and apply methods and techniques for landslide susceptibility zonation. Susceptibility maps were prepared exploiting a multivariate statistical model (linear discriminant analysis) for the five Civil Protection Alert Zones defined in the regional territory. The five resulting maps were tested and validated using the spatial distribution of recent landslide events that occurred in the region. The susceptibility map for the Perugia Municipality was prepared to be integrated as one of the cartographic product in the Municipal development plan (PRG - Piano Regolatore Generale) as required by the existing legislation. At strategic level, one of the main objectives of the PRG, is to establish a framework of knowledge and legal aspects for the management of geo-hydrological risk. At national level most of the susceptibility maps prepared for the PRG, were and still are obtained

  8. The Tagus River delta (off Lisbon, Portugal) as a repository of landslides. Implications on trigger mechanisms, tsunami hazard and neotectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrinha, Pedro; Duarte, Henrique; Noiva, João; Ribeiro, Carlos; Brito, Pedro; Baptista, Maria Ana; Miranda, Miguel; Omira, Rachid; Magalhães, Vitor; Roque, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    The seismic stratigraphy of the Tagus estuary ebb-tidal delta of Lisbon (Portugal) is investigated with the purpose of searching for evidences of possible sedimentary or erosive features associated with landslides or mass wasting deposits (MTD) events. A special attention was given to events that could have been triggered by large earthquakes that are known to have struck the West of Portugal and Spain in historical and pre-historical times. These earthquakes destroyed Lisbon at least twice in the last 500 years, being the 1755 Lisbon earthquake of estimated magnitude >8.5. To investigate these geological features the seismic reflection dataset used in this work consists of Chirp (Lisboa98 dataset), Sparker single channel (PACEMAKER 2011 dataset) and multichannel seismic (MCS) data (TAGUSDELTA 2013 dataset). Cross-lines of MCS data were acquired crossing the core sampling sites done in previous works. Calibration of the seismic lines width the core data led to infer that the Tagus ebb delta started its formation around 17ky BP and it consists of two main stratigraphic units, the younger of which initiated its formation at approximately 13ky BP. The lower deltaic unit contains several MTDs and/or landslides that could not be mapped with the present dataset. In the upper unit we report the existence of a landslide with 10km of length, 4.5km of width and 20m of maximum thickness that accounted for the collapse of half of the Tagus river delta front. The internal structure of the landslide varies laterally. The main different aspects are, as follows, i) the landslide can be dismembered along slope due to stretching parallel associated to differential movement along slope, ii) it can show internal discontinuities that represent mechanical detachments that separate imbricate wedges and iii) distal deposited bodies completely detached from the main landslide body. The age of the landslide is discussed; an estimated age of >8ky BP is proposed by stratigraphic correlation

  9. A landslide on a mudslide? Natural hazards and the right to life under the European Convention of Human Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauta, Kristian Cedervall; Rytter, Jens Elo

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the protection of individuals’ lives against natural hazards under the European Convention on Human Rights. In 2008, the European Court of Human Rights decided to include natural hazards in a well-established doctrine developed to protect individuals from life......-threatening industrial hazards, while allowing States an especially broad margin of appreciation with regard to natural hazards. Drawing on contemporary disaster theory, the article examines whether and to what extent the Court's distinction between natural and industrial hazards can be maintained. The article proposes...

  10. Recent advances in modeling landslides and debris flows

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Landslides and debris flows belong to the most dangerous natural hazards in many parts of the world. Despite intensive research, these events continue to result in human suffering, property losses, and environmental degradation every year. Better understanding of the mechanisms and processes of landslides and debris flows will help make reliable predictions, develop mitigation strategies and reduce vulnerability of infrastructure. This book presents contributions to the workshop on Recent Developments in the Analysis, Monitoring and Forecast of Landslides and Debris Flow, in Vienna, Austria, September 9, 2013. The contributions cover a broad spectrum of topics from material behavior, physical modelling over numerical simulation to applications and case studies. The workshop is a joint event of three research projects funded by the European Commission within the 7th Framework Program: MUMOLADE (Multiscale modelling of landslides and debris flows, www.mumolade.com), REVENUES (Numerical Analysis of Slopes with V...

  11. Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard C. Logan

    2001-07-30

    This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

  12. Co-seismic landslide topographic analysis based on multi-temporal DEM-A case study of the Wenchuan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhikun; Zhang, Zhuqi; Dai, Fuchu; Yin, Jinhui; Zhang, Huiping

    2013-01-01

    Hillslope instability has been thought to be one of the most important factors for landslide susceptibility. In this study, we apply geomorphic analysis using multi-temporal DEM data and shake intensity analysis to evaluate the topographic characteristics of the landslide areas. There are many geomorphologic analysis methods such as roughness, slope aspect, which are also as useful as slope analysis. The analyses indicate that most of the co-seismic landslides occurred in regions with roughness, hillslope and slope aspect of >1.2, >30, and between 90 and 270, respectively. However, the intersection regions from the above three methods are more accurate than that derived by applying single topographic analysis method. The ground motion data indicates that the co-seismic landslides mainly occurred on the hanging wall side of Longmen Shan Thrust Belt within the up-down and horizontal peak ground acceleration (PGA) contour of 150 PGA and 200 gal, respectively. The comparisons of pre- and post-earthquake DEM data indicate that the medium roughness and slope increased, the roughest and steepest regions decreased after the Wenchuan earthquake. However, slope aspects did not even change. Our results indicate that co-seismic landslides mainly occurred at specific regions of high roughness, southward and steep sloping areas under strong ground motion. Co-seismic landslides significantly modified the local topography, especially the hillslope and roughness. The roughest relief and steepest slope are significantly smoothed; however, the medium relief and slope become rougher and steeper, respectively.

  13. 40 CFR 68.67 - Process hazard analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process hazard analysis. 68.67 Section...) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Program 3 Prevention Program § 68.67 Process hazard analysis. (a) The owner or operator shall perform an initial process hazard analysis (hazard evaluation)...

  14. Analysis of factors inducing different type of landslide in apparently similar environmental contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busnardo, Enrico; Secco, Michele; Salbego, Giorgio; Toaldo, Miriam; Lampo, Chiara; Artioli, Gilberto; Floris, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Landslides frequently hit the hilly region of the Vicenza province (North-Eastern Italian Alps) exposing human activities to damage. The region includes Lessini Mountains and Marostica hills. These two areas are separated by a portion of the upper Vicenza plain. They have the same lithological framework, with the predominance of Tertiary volcanic rocks (Basalts and Tuffs) and most of landslides are earth slides and earth flows which affect the altered volcanic bedrock. At first glance, only considering these two type of movements, it seems that the predisposing conditions, as well as triggering factors (i.e. rainfall) are the same. The aim of this work is to find the factors that determine earth slides rather than earth flows. In other words, we checked if there are any anomalies due to particular lithological and morphological constraints attributable to a type of movement. The research was performed both at large and small scale. At large scale, we decide to perform spatial analysis of four numerical and seven categorical factors. Numerical factors are elevation, provided by the Veneto Region, slope gradient, slope aspect and surface curvature, derived from elevation. Categorical data are: soils map and land-use map, both provided by the Veneto Region; lithological map provided by the Vicenza province; IFFI (Inventory of Landslide Phenomena in Italy) project data. We also consider factors such as roads, rivers network and civil buildings. Spatial analysis was performed using a simple probabilistic method that compares spatial distribution of landslides with numerical and categorical factors. At small-scale, we performed mineralogical and geotechnical analyses of samples collected from an earth slide and an earth flow. In order to define the mineralogical phases we use x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) of whole sample and of thin portion. Geotechnical indexes were obtained by Atterber Limits and sieve analyses. We also determined the rheological and swelling

  15. A comparative analysis of hazard models for predicting debris flows in Madison County, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Meghan M.; Wieczorek, Gerald F.; Morgan, Benjamin A.

    2001-01-01

    During the rainstorm of June 27, 1995, roughly 330-750 mm of rain fell within a sixteen-hour period, initiating floods and over 600 debris flows in a small area (130 km2) of Madison County, Virginia. Field studies showed that the majority (70%) of these debris flows initiated with a thickness of 0.5 to 3.0 m in colluvium on slopes from 17 o to 41 o (Wieczorek et al., 2000). This paper evaluated and compared the approaches of SINMAP, LISA, and Iverson's (2000) transient response model for slope stability analysis by applying each model to the landslide data from Madison County. Of these three stability models, only Iverson's transient response model evaluated stability conditions as a function of time and depth. Iverson?s model would be the preferred method of the three models to evaluate landslide hazards on a regional scale in areas prone to rain-induced landslides as it considers both the transient and spatial response of pore pressure in its calculation of slope stability. The stability calculation used in SINMAP and LISA is similar and utilizes probability distribution functions for certain parameters. Unlike SINMAP that only considers soil cohesion, internal friction angle and rainfall-rate distributions, LISA allows the use of distributed data for all parameters, so it is the preferred model to evaluate slope stability over SINMAP. Results from all three models suggested similar soil and hydrologic properties for triggering the landslides that occurred during the 1995 storm in Madison County, Virginia. The colluvium probably had cohesion of less than 2KPa. The root-soil system is above the failure plane and consequently root strength and tree surcharge had negligible effect on slope stability. The result that the final location of the water table was near the ground surface is supported by the water budget analysis of the rainstorm conducted by Smith et al. (1996).

  16. On the characteristics of landslide tsunamis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvholt, F; Pedersen, G; Harbitz, C B; Glimsdal, S; Kim, J

    2015-10-28

    This review presents modelling techniques and processes that govern landslide tsunami generation, with emphasis on tsunamis induced by fully submerged landslides. The analysis focuses on a set of representative examples in simplified geometries demonstrating the main kinematic landslide parameters influencing initial tsunami amplitudes and wavelengths. Scaling relations from laboratory experiments for subaerial landslide tsunamis are also briefly reviewed. It is found that the landslide acceleration determines the initial tsunami elevation for translational landslides, while the landslide velocity is more important for impulsive events such as rapid slumps and subaerial landslides. Retrogressive effects stretch the tsunami, and in certain cases produce enlarged amplitudes due to positive interference. In an example involving a deformable landslide, it is found that the landslide deformation has only a weak influence on tsunamigenesis. However, more research is needed to determine how landslide flow processes that involve strong deformation and long run-out determine tsunami generation. © 2015 The Authors.

  17. Probabilistic earthquake hazard analysis for Cairo, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Korrat, Ibrahim; El-Hadidy, Mahmoud; Gaber, Hanan

    2016-04-01

    Cairo is the capital of Egypt and the largest city in the Arab world and Africa, and the sixteenth largest metropolitan area in the world. It was founded in the tenth century (969 ad) and is 1046 years old. It has long been a center of the region's political and cultural life. Therefore, the earthquake risk assessment for Cairo has a great importance. The present work aims to analysis the earthquake hazard of Cairo as a key input's element for the risk assessment. The regional seismotectonics setting shows that Cairo could be affected by both far- and near-field seismic sources. The seismic hazard of Cairo has been estimated using the probabilistic seismic hazard approach. The logic tree frame work was used during the calculations. Epistemic uncertainties were considered into account by using alternative seismotectonics models and alternative ground motion prediction equations. Seismic hazard values have been estimated within a grid of 0.1° × 0.1 ° spacing for all of Cairo's districts at different spectral periods and four return periods (224, 615, 1230, and 4745 years). Moreover, the uniform hazard spectra have been calculated at the same return periods. The pattern of the contour maps show that the highest values of the peak ground acceleration is concentrated in the eastern zone's districts (e.g., El Nozha) and the lowest values at the northern and western zone's districts (e.g., El Sharabiya and El Khalifa).

  18. Automatic Extraction and Size Distribution of Landslides in Kurdistan Region, NE Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsalan A. Othman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to assess the localization and size distribution of landslides using automatic remote sensing techniques in (semi- arid, non-vegetated, mountainous environments. The study area is located in the Kurdistan region (NE Iraq, within the Zagros orogenic belt, which is characterized by the High Folded Zone (HFZ, the Imbricated Zone and the Zagros Suture Zone (ZSZ. The available reference inventory includes 3,190 landslides mapped from sixty QuickBird scenes using manual delineation. The landslide types involve rock falls, translational slides and slumps, which occurred in different lithological units. Two hundred and ninety of these landslides lie within the ZSZ, representing a cumulated surface of 32 km2. The HFZ implicates 2,900 landslides with an overall coverage of about 26 km2. We first analyzed cumulative landslide number-size distributions using the inventory map. We then proposed a very simple and robust algorithm for automatic landslide extraction using specific band ratios selected upon the spectral signatures of bare surfaces as well as posteriori slope and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI thresholds. The index is based on the contrast between landslides and their background, whereas the landslides have high reflections in the green and red bands. We applied the slope threshold map to remove low slope areas, which have high reflectance in red and green bands. The algorithm was able to detect ~96% of the recent landslides known from the reference inventory on a test site. The cumulative landslide number-size distribution of automatically extracted landslide is very similar to the one based on visual mapping. The automatic extraction is therefore adapted for the quantitative analysis of landslides and thus can contribute to the assessment of hazards in similar regions.

  19. Localized landslide risk assessment with multi pass L band DInSAR analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, HyeWon; Rack Kim, Jung; Lin, Shih-Yuan; Choi, YunSoo

    2014-05-01

    In terms of data availability and error correction, landslide forecasting by Differential Interferometric SAR (DInSAR) analysis is not easy task. Especially, the landslides by the anthropogenic construction activities frequently occurred in the localized cutting side of mountainous area. In such circumstances, it is difficult to attain sufficient enough accuracy because of the external factors inducing the error component in electromagnetic wave propagation. For instance, the local climate characteristics such as orographic effect and the proximity to water source can produce the significant anomalies in the water vapor distribution and consequently result in the error components of InSAR phase angle measurements. Moreover the high altitude parts of target area cause the stratified tropospheric delay error in DInSAR measurement. The other obstacle in DInSAR observation over the potential landside site is the vegetation canopy which causes the decorrelation of InSAR phase. Thus rather than C band sensor such as ENVISAT, ERS and RADARSAT, DInSAR analysis with L band ALOS PLASAR is more recommendable. Together with the introduction of L band DInSAR analysis, the improved DInSAR technique to cope all above obstacles is necessary. Thus we employed two approaches i.e. StaMPS/MTI (Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers/Multi-Temporal InSAR, Hopper et al., 2007) which was newly developed for extracting the reliable deformation values through time series analysis and two pass DInSAR with the error term compensation based on the external weather information in this study. Since the water vapor observation from spaceborne radiometer is not feasible by the temporal gap in this case, the quantities from weather Research Forecasting (WRF) with 1 km spatial resolution was used to address the atmospheric phase error in two pass DInSAR analysis. Also it was observed that base DEM offset with time dependent perpendicular baselines of InSAR time series produce a significant error

  20. Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

  1. A Cascading Storm-Flood-Landslide Guidance System: Development and Application in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ziyue; Tang, Guoqiang; Long, Di; Ma, Meihong; Hong, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Flash floods and landslides, triggered by storms, often interact and cause cascading effects on human lives and property. Satellite remote sensing data has significant potential use in analysis of these natural hazards. As one of the regions continuously affected by severe flash floods and landslides, Yunnan Province, located in Southwest China, has a complex mountainous hydrometeorology and suffers from frequent heavy rainfalls from May through to late September. Taking Yunnan as a test-bed, this study proposed a Cascading Storm-Flood-Landslide Guidance System to progressively analysis and evaluate the risk of the multi-hazards based on multisource satellite remote sensing data. First, three standardized rainfall amounts (average daily amount in flood seasons, maximum 1h and maximum 6h amount) from the products of Topical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) were used as rainfall indicators to derive the StorM Hazard Index (SMHI). In this process, an integrated approach of the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and the Information-Entropy theory was adopted to determine the weight of each indicator. Then, land cover and vegetation cover data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) products, soil type from the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) soil map, and slope from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data were add as semi-static geo-topographical indicators to derive the Flash Flood Hazard Index (FFHI). Furthermore, three more relevant landslide-controlling indicators, including elevation, slope angle and soil text were involved to derive the LandSlide Hazard Index (LSHI). Further inclusion of GDP, population and prevention measures as vulnerability indicators enabled to consecutively predict the risk of storm to flash flood and landslide, respectively. Consequently, the spatial patterns of the hazard indices show that the southeast of Yunnan has more possibility to encounter with storms

  2. A comparative analysis of simulated and observed landslide locations triggered by Hurricane Camille in Nelson County, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, M.M.; Wieczorek, G.F.; Morgan, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    In 1969, Nelson County, Virginia received up to 71 cm of rain within 12 h starting at 7 p.m. on August 19. The total rainfall from the storm exceeded the 1000-year return period in the region. Several thousands of landslides were induced by rainfall associated with Hurricane Camille causing fatalities and destroying infrastructure. We apply a distributed transient response model for regional slope stability analysis to shallow landslides. Initiation points of over 3000 debris flows and effects of flooding from this storm are applied to the model. Geotechnical data used in the calculations are published data from samples of colluvium. Results from these calculations are compared with field observations such as landslide trigger location and timing of debris flows to assess how well the model predicts the spatial and temporal distribution. of landslide initiation locations. The model predicts many of the initiation locations in areas where debris flows are observed. Copyright ?? 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Analysis of rainfall-induced shallow landslides in Jamne and Jaszcze stream valleys (Polish Carpathians – preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zydroń Tymoteusz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of rainfall-induced shallow landslides in Jamne and Jaszcze stream valleys (Polish Carpathians - preliminary results. Preliminary shallow landslide susceptibility mapping of the Jamne and Jaszcze stream valleys, located in the Polish Flysch Carpathians, is presented in the paper. For the purpose of mapping, there were used SINMAP and Iverson’s models integrating infiltration and slope stability calculations. The calibration of the used models parameters, obtained from limited field and laboratory tests, was performed using data from 8-9 July 1997, when as a consequence of a very intense rainfall, 94 shallow landslides were observed on meadows and arable lands. A comparison of the slope stability calculation results and the localisation of the noticed shallow landslides showed satisfactory agreement between localisation of the observed and computed unstable areas. However, it was concluded that better simulation results were obtained using Iverson’s model.

  4. Remote sensing of rainfall for debris-flow hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, G.F.; Coe, J.A.; Godt, J.W.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing of rainfall provide more detailed temporal and spatial data on rainfall distribution. Four case studies of abundant debris flows over relatively small areas triggered during intense rainstorms are examined noting the potential for using remotely sensed rainfall data for landslide hazard analysis. Three examples with rainfall estimates from National Weather Service Doppler radar and one example with rainfall estimates from infrared imagery from a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite are compared with ground-based measurements of rainfall and with landslide distribution. The advantages and limitations of using remote sensing of rainfall for landslide hazard analysis are discussed. ?? 2003 Millpress,.

  5. Technical Note: Use of remote sensing for landslide studies in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tofani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of FP7, an EU-funded SafeLand project, a questionnaire was prepared to collect information about the use of remote sensing for landslide study and to evaluate its actual application in landslide detection, mapping and monitoring. The questionnaire was designed using a Google form and was disseminated among end-users and researchers involved in landslide studies in Europe. In total, 49 answers from 17 different European countries were collected. The outcomes showed that landslide detection and mapping is mainly performed with aerial photos, often associated with optical and radar imagery. Concerning landslide monitoring, satellite radars prevail over the other types of data. Remote sensing is mainly used for detection/mapping and monitoring of slides, flows and lateral spreads with a preferably large scale of analysis (1:5000–1:25 000. All the compilers integrate remote sensing data with other thematic data, mainly geological maps, landslide inventory maps and DTMs and derived maps. According to the research and working experience of the compilers, remote sensing is generally considered to have a medium effectiveness/reliability for landslide studies.

    The results of the questionnaire can contribute to an overall sketch of the use of remote sensing in current landslide studies and show that remote sensing can be considered a powerful and well-established instrument for landslide mapping, monitoring and hazard analysis.

  6. Identification of Forested Landslides Using LiDar Data, Object-based Image Analysis, and Machine Learning Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianju Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For identification of forested landslides, most studies focus on knowledge-based and pixel-based analysis (PBA of LiDar data, while few studies have examined (semi- automated methods and object-based image analysis (OBIA. Moreover, most of them are focused on soil-covered areas with gentle hillslopes. In bedrock-covered mountains with steep and rugged terrain, it is so difficult to identify landslides that there is currently no research on whether combining semi-automated methods and OBIA with only LiDar derivatives could be more effective. In this study, a semi-automatic object-based landslide identification approach was developed and implemented in a forested area, the Three Gorges of China. Comparisons of OBIA and PBA, two different machine learning algorithms and their respective sensitivity to feature selection (FS, were first investigated. Based on the classification result, the landslide inventory was finally obtained according to (1 inclusion of holes encircled by the landslide body; (2 removal of isolated segments, and (3 delineation of closed envelope curves for landslide objects by manual digitizing operation. The proposed method achieved the following: (1 the filter features of surface roughness were first applied for calculating object features, and proved useful; (2 FS improved classification accuracy and reduced features; (3 the random forest algorithm achieved higher accuracy and was less sensitive to FS than a support vector machine; (4 compared to PBA, OBIA was more sensitive to FS, remarkably reduced computing time, and depicted more contiguous terrain segments; (5 based on the classification result with an overall accuracy of 89.11% ± 0.03%, the obtained inventory map was consistent with the referenced landslide inventory map, with a position mismatch value of 9%. The outlined approach would be helpful for forested landslide identification in steep and rugged terrain.

  7. Automatic Case-Based Reasoning Approach for Landslide Detection: Integration of Object-Oriented Image Analysis and a Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Dou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an automatic method for detecting landslides by using an integrated approach comprising object-oriented image analysis (OOIA, a genetic algorithm (GA, and a case-based reasoning (CBR technique. It consists of three main phases: (1 image processing and multi-image segmentation; (2 feature optimization; and (3 detecting landslides. The proposed approach was employed in a fast-growing urban region, the Pearl River Delta in South China. The results of detection were validated with the help of field surveys. The experimental results indicated that the proposed OOIA-GA-CBR (0.87 demonstrates higher classification performance than the stand-alone OOIA (0.75 method for detecting landslides. The area under curve (AUC value was also higher than that of the simple OOIA, indicating the high efficiency of the proposed landslide detection approach. The case library created using the integrated model can be reused for time-independent analysis, thus rendering our approach superior in comparison to other traditional methods, such as the maximum likelihood classifier. The results of this study thus facilitate fast generation of accurate landslide inventory maps, which will eventually extend our understanding of the evolution of landscapes shaped by landslide processes.

  8. Risk analysis model for landslide mass of high slope in dam area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to identify the threat of reservoir bank landslide to dam safety and reduce the risk of dam failure,impact factors of the landslide are analyzed.The concept of landslide risk degree is put forward to measure the threat of landslide to dam safety.The monotony of the landslide risk assessment function which changes with different affecting factors is analyzed qualitatively.Based on gene automatic programming,a data mining model of the landslide risk assessment function is constructed combined with impact factors of reservoir bank landslide on dam safety.And the assessment function of landslide risk has been excavated and established according to practical project information,which provides a valuable reference for analyzing the impact of landslide on dam risk.

  9. 证据权法在区域滑坡危险性评价中的应用--以贵州省为例%LANDSLIDES HAZARDS ASSESSMENT WITH WEIGHTS OF EVIDENCE---A CASE STUDY IN GUIZHOU,CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范强; 巨能攀; 向喜琼; 黄健

    2014-01-01

    Landslides are the most common geohazards in mountainous terrains and can cause extraordinary landscape changes and destruction of people’s lives and properties.So assessing landslide hazards is significant and can provide valuable information to planners,developers and engineers.This paper examines some landslides at a hilly area of western China,Guizhou province.The purpose is to generate a landslide susceptibility map using the weights of evidence.It is based on the GIS technology and combined with landslides inventory and environmental factors.The causal factors include lithology,tectonic,elevation,slope,aspect,relief,distance from road and distance from stream.The weight of each causal class is calculated in a GIS software ArcGIS 10.Then the landslide hazard index of each unit is produced and divided into four classes:very high hazard,high hazard,medium hazard and low hazard.Finally,a success rate curve is built to detect the capability rate of the method.The study area under the curve is 0.7 1 .A hazard zonation map is produced and the predictive power of the map is tested on the basis of landslides inventory.The evaluation results are in line with the landslides distribution.The weights of evidence are effective to assess the landslides hazard in regional scale.%以GIS为技术平台,采用证据权法对研究区进行了滑坡地质灾害危险性分析。综合分析历史滑坡数据及其环境因素和触发因素,数据源主要有地形图、DEM、地质图,选取地层岩性、构造、高程、坡度、坡向、地形起伏度、道路、水系作为危险性评价因子。首先应用ArcGIS软件对数据源进行处理,提取各个评价因子图层,并对每个图层进行分级、缓冲区分析等处理,建立若干证据层。然后将历史灾害点与评价因子进行空间关联分析,计算每个评价因子等级的权重,最后计算出评价单元的危险性指数,并将危险性分为极高危险区、高危险

  10. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Mohindra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A stochastic-event probabilistic seismic hazard model, which can be used further for estimates of seismic loss and seismic risk analysis, has been developed for the territory of Yemen. An updated composite earthquake catalogue has been compiled using the databases from two basic sources and several research publications. The spatial distribution of earthquakes from the catalogue was used to define and characterize the regional earthquake source zones for Yemen. To capture all possible scenarios in the seismic hazard model, a stochastic event set has been created consisting of 15,986 events generated from 1,583 fault segments in the delineated seismic source zones. Distribution of horizontal peak ground acceleration (PGA was calculated for all stochastic events considering epistemic uncertainty in ground-motion modeling using three suitable ground motion-prediction relationships, which were applied with equal weight. The probabilistic seismic hazard maps were created showing PGA and MSK seismic intensity at 10% and 50% probability of exceedance in 50 years, considering local soil site conditions. The resulting PGA for 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years (return period 475 years ranges from 0.2 g to 0.3 g in western Yemen and generally is less than 0.05 g across central and eastern Yemen. The largest contributors to Yemen’s seismic hazard are the events from the West Arabian Shield seismic zone.

  11. ALOS/PALSAR InSAR Time-Series Analysis for Detecting Very Slow-Moving Landslides in Southern Kyrgyzstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanayim Teshebaeva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on evaluating the potential of ALOS/PALSAR time-series data to analyze the activation of deep-seated landslides in the foothill zone of the high mountain Alai range in the southern Tien Shan (Kyrgyzstan. Most previous field-based landslide investigations have revealed that many landslides have indicators for ongoing slow movements in the form of migrating and newly developing cracks. L-band ALOS/PALSAR data for the period between 2007 and 2010 are available for the 484 km2 area in this study. We analyzed these data using the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS time-series technique to assess the surface deformation related to the activation of landslides. We observed up to ±17 mm/year of LOS velocity deformation rates, which were projected along the local steepest slope and resulted in velocity rates of up to −63 mm/year. The obtained rates indicate very slow movement of the deep-seated landslides during the observation time. We also compared these movements with precipitation and earthquake records. The results suggest that the deformation peaks correlate with rainfall in the 3 preceding months and with an earthquake event. Overall, the results of this study indicated the great potential of L-band InSAR time series analysis for efficient spatiotemporal identification and monitoring of slope activations in this region of high landslide activity in Southern Kyrgyzstan.

  12. Potential landslide activity affecting the archaeological site of Orongo (Easter Island-Chile): preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margottini, C.; Delmonaco, G.; Spizzichino, D.; Pandolfi, O.; Crisostomo, R.; Nohe, S.

    2009-04-01

    Easter Island forms part of the Easter Line, a continuous latitudinal chain of volcanic seamounts and islands in the Pacific Sea. The island's roughly triangular shape is determined by the merging of lava flows produced by its three main volcanoes (Rano Kau, Terevaka, Poike) which form its main mass. The Rano Kau volcano, sited in the SW vertex of the island, is made up of numerous basaltic lava flows and has been reduced in size by faulting and marine erosion. Its crater (1.4 km wide) is a small caldera that collapsed after a late, large explosive phase, as attested by the presence of breccia deposits around the eastern rim of the crater. The archaeological stone village of Orongo is located above the inner wall of the crater at an altitude of ca. 300m a.s.l. Prominent historical remains are the numerous petroglyphs that represent the ancient ceremonial of the birdman cult (tangata manu). Rano Kau is mainly composed of sequences of basaltic and intermediate lavas and pyroclastics. Most of the of the original caldera area, especially in the southern flank, has been disrupted by marine erosion. This has caused a dramatic change of the original morphology, resulting in a sub-vertical cliff and steep slopes, especially in the middle-low portions. In the upper part of the slopes weathered soils and regolith are outcropping. Topographical and geomorphological analysis of the area conducted by a direct field surveys in January and July 2008 have provided clear evidences of slope instability along the southern external flank of the caldera. Different landslide areas have been detected. The most active area is located at east of the village in correspondence of the crest zone of Rano Kau where a debris slide/fall has recently occurred. The analysis of photos taken in Nov. 2007 in the same area evidences that the landslide crown area was originated at an elevation of ca. 200m a.s.l. along a probable contact between basaltic layers on the top and weathered lava. Other minor

  13. Shallow landslide susceptibility assessment in a data-poor region of Guatemala (Comitancillo municipality

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    Federico Preti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although landslides are frequent natural phenomena in mountainous regions, the lack of data in emerging countries is a significant issue in the assessment of shallow landslide susceptibility. A key factor in risk-mitigation strategies is the evaluation of deterministic physical models for hazard assessment in these data-poor regions. Given the lack of physical information, input parameters to these data-intensive deterministic models have to be estimated, which has a negative impact on the reliability of the assessment. To address this problem, we examined shallow landslide hazard in Comitancillo municipality, Guatemala. Shallow landslides are here defined as small (less than two or three metre-deep rotational or translational slides or earth flows. We based our hazard simulation on the stability index mapping model. The model’s input parameters were estimated from a statistical analysis of factors affecting landslides in the municipality obtained from a geodatabase. The outputs from the model were analysed and compared to an inventory of small-scale landslides. The results of the comparison show the effectiveness of the method developed to estimate input parameters for a deterministic model, in regions where physical data related to the assessment of shallow landslide susceptibility is lacking.

  14. Landslide Deformation Analysis by Coupling Deformation Time Series from SAR Data with Hydrological Factors through Data Assimilation

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    Yanan Jiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Time-series SAR/InSAR techniques have proven to be effective tools for measuring landslide movements over large regions. Prior studies of these techniques, however, have focused primarily on technical innovation and applications, leaving coupling analysis of slope displacements and trigging factors as an unexplored area of research. Linking potential landslide inducing factors such as hydrology to SAR/InSAR derived displacements is of crucial importance for understanding landslide deformation mechanisms and could support the development of early-warning systems for disaster mitigation and management. In this study, a sequential data assimilation method named the Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF, is adopted to explore the response mechanisms of the Shuping landslide movement in relation to hydrological factors. Previous research on the Shuping landslide area shows that the reservoir water level and rainfall are the two main triggering factors in slope failures. To extract the time-series deformations for the Shuping landslide area, Pixel Offset Tracking (POT technique with corner reflectors was adopted to process the TerraSAR-X StripMap (SM and High-resolution Spotlight (HS images. Considering that these triggering factors are the primary causes of displacement fluctuations in periodic displacement, time-series decomposition was carried out to extract the periodic displacement from the POT measurements. The correlations between the periodic displacement and the inducing factors were qualitatively estimated through a grey relational analysis. Based on this analysis, the EnKF method was adopted to explore the response relationships between the displacements and triggering factors. Preliminary results demonstrate the effectiveness of EnKF in studying deformation response mechanisms and understanding landslide development processes.

  15. Fire hazard analysis for fusion energy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvares, N.J.; Hasegawa, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    The 2XIIB mirror fusion facility at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) was used to evaluate the fire safety of state-of-the-art fusion energy experiments. The primary objective of this evaluation was to ensure the parallel development of fire safety and fusion energy technology. Through fault-tree analysis, we obtained a detailed engineering description of the 2XIIB fire protection system. This information helped us establish an optimum level of fire protection for experimental fusion energy facilities as well as evaluate the level of protection provided by various systems. Concurrently, we analyzed the fire hazard inherent to the facility using techniques that relate the probability of ignition to the flame spread and heat-release potential of construction materials, electrical and thermal insulations, and dielectric fluids. A comparison of the results of both analyses revealed that the existing fire protection system should be modified to accommodate the range of fire hazards inherent to the 2XIIB facility.

  16. Estimation of rainfall thresholds for the initiation of landslides in the Ialomita Subcarpathians, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitu, Z.; Micu, D.; Sandric, I.; Mihai, B.

    2012-04-01

    Landslides are a common feature in the landscape of the Romanian hills and plateaus, affecting around 7% of the national territory (Pusch, 2004). It is general knowledge that landslides represent the combined result of a series of predisposing factors (lithology, faults, slope, land-use, land cover, etc.) with long term impact on slope stability and triggering factors (rainfall, snow melt, earthquakes) that temporarily modify the local hydrogeological conditions (Corominas, 2008). Rainfall represents the most common triggering factor of landslides in the Ialomita Subcarpathians, therefore the determination of rainfall thresholds for landslides initiation would be very useful for landslide hazard assessment and implementation of warning systems. This paper aims to determine regional rainfall thresholds in the Subcarpathian area between the Prahova and Ialomita Valleys, where the most frequent phenomena are: deep seated rotational slides, earth flows and complex movements (rotational slides combined with mudflow or translational slides). The methodology used in studies addressing the regional scale is based on empirical or statistical analysis of rainfall, due to the spatial and temporal variation of landslide factors. Given the lack of hourly measurements of rainfall variables for long periods in Romania we were constrained to determine the corresponding rainfall thresholds based on cumulated precipitation during the landslide events. The rainfall variables were chosen based on the typology of landslides: daily rainfall in the case of shallow landslides usually triggered by short and intense rainfall, normalized total precipitation (antecedent and event rainfall) for deep-seated landslides. After establishing what thresholds correspond to the different types of landslides, we continued by analyzing the spatial and temporal variability of the pluvial regime aiming to understand the over time occurrence of landslides in the Subcarpathian area between the Prahova and

  17. The contribution of satellite SAR-derived displacement measurements in landslide risk management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspini, Federico; Bardi, Federica; Bianchini, Silvia; Ciampalini, Andrea; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Farina, Paolo; Ferrigno, Federica; Solari, Lorenzo; Casagli, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    Landslides are common phenomena that occur worldwide and are a main cause of loss of life and damage to property. The hazards associated with landslides are a challenging concern in many countries, including Italy. With 13% of the territory prone to landslides, Italy is one of the European countries with the highest landslide hazard, and on a worldwide scale, it is second only to Japan among the technologically advanced countries. Over the last 15 years, an increasing number of applications have aimed to demonstrate the applicability of images captured by space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors in slope instability investigations. InSAR (SAR Interferometry) is currently one of the most exploited techniques for the assessment of ground displacements, and it is becoming a consolidated tool for Civil Protection institutions in addressing landslide risk. We present a subset of the results obtained in Italy within the framework of SAR-based programmes and applications intended to test the potential application of C- and X-band satellite interferometry during different Civil Protection activities (namely, prevention, prevision, emergency response and post-emergency phases) performed to manage landslide risk. In all phases, different benefits can be derived from the use of SAR-based measurements, which were demonstrated to be effective in the field of landslide analysis. Analysis of satellite-SAR data is demonstrated to play a major role in the investigation of landslide-related events at different stages, including detection, mapping, monitoring, characterization and prediction. Interferometric approaches are widely consolidated for analysis of slow-moving slope deformations in a variety of environments, and exploitation of the amplitude data in SAR images is a somewhat natural complement for rapid-moving landslides. In addition, we discuss the limitations that still exist and must be overcome in the coming years to manage the transition of satellite SAR

  18. Formation of the 2015 Shenzhen landslide observed by SAR shape from shading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.

    2016-12-01

    The time-series topography change of a landfill before its failure is rarely surveyed in detail. However, this kind of information is important for both engineering supervision and landslide early warning. Here, we take the 2015 Shenzhen landslide for example, and present a method to retrieve the time-series digital elevation models of the landfill by using radar shape from shading. The results suggest a total filling volume of 4,074,300 m3 in recent one and half year before the landslide, and 2,817,400 m3 of them slide down in the landslide. The landfilling rate in most areas exceed the vigilance value of 2 m/month. Using topography captured on December 12, 2015, the slope safety analysis gives a factor of safety (FOS) of 0.906, suggesting this slope has already been hazardous before the landslide. We conclude SAR shape from shading has potential to contribute to the landfill failure monitoring.

  19. 9 CFR 417.2 - Hazard Analysis and HACCP Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazard Analysis and HACCP Plan. 417.2... REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE FEDERAL MEAT INSPECTION ACT AND THE POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT HAZARD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT (HACCP) SYSTEMS § 417.2 Hazard Analysis and HACCP Plan. (a)...

  20. Assessment of landslide hazards resulting from the February 13, 2001, El Salvador earthquake; a report to the government of El Salvador and the U. S. Agency for International Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Rex L.; Crone, Anthony J.; Escobar, Demetreo; Harp, Edwin L.; Major, Jon J.; Martinez, Mauricio; Pullinger, Carlos; Smith, Mark E.

    2001-01-01

    On February 13, 2001, a magnitude 6.5 earthquake occurred about 40 km eastsoutheast of the capital city of San Salvador in central El Salvador and triggered thousands of landslides in the area east of Lago de Ilopango. The landslides are concentrated in a 2,500-km2 area and are particularly abundant in areas underlain by thick deposits of poorly consolidated, late Pleistocene and Holocene Tierra Blanca rhyolitic tephras that were erupted from Ilopango caldera. Drainages in the tephra deposits are deeply incised, and steep valley walls failed during the strong shaking. Many drainages are clogged with landslide debris that locally buries the adjacent valley floor. The fine grain-size of the tephra facilitates its easy mobilization by rainfall runoff. The potential for remobilizing the landslide debris as debris flows and in floods is significant as this sediment is transported through the drainage systems during the upcoming rainy season. In addition to thousands of shallow failures, two very large landslides occurred that blocked the Rio El Desague and the Rio Jiboa. The Rio El Desague landslide has an estimated volume of 1.5 million m3, and the Rio Jiboa landslide has an estimated volume of 12 million m3. Field studies indicate that catastrophic draining of the Rio El Desague landslide-dammed lake would pose a minimal flooding hazard, whereas catastrophic draining of the Rio Jiboa lake would pose a serious hazard and warrants immediate action. Construction of a spillway across part of the dam could moderate the impact of catastrophic lake draining and the associated flood. Two major slope failures on the northern side of Volcan San Vicente occurred in the upper reaches of Quebrada Del Muerto and the Quebrada El Blanco. The landslide debris in the Quebrada Del Muerto consists dominantly of blocks of well-lithified andesite, whereas the debris in the Quebrada El Blanco consists of poorly consolidated pyroclastic sediment. The large blocks of lithified rock in

  1. Forest clearing and regional landsliding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, D.R.; Schmidt, K.M.; Greenberg, H.M.; Dietrich, W.E.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of forest clearing on landsliding is central to longstanding concern over the effects of timber harvesting on slope stability. Here we document a strong topographic control on shallow landsliding by combining unique ground-based landslide surveys in an intensively monitored study area with digital terrain modeling using high-resolution laser altimetry and a coarser resolution regional study of 3224 landslides. As predicted by our digital terrain-based model, landslides occur disproportionately in steep, convergent topography. In terrain predicted to be at low risk of slope failure, a random model performs equally well to our mechanism-based model. Our monitoring shows that storms with 24 hr rainfall recurrence intervals of less than 4 yr triggered landslides in the decade after forest clearing and that conventional monitoring programs can substantially underestimate the effects of forest clearing. Our regional analysis further substantiates that forest clearing dramatically accelerates shallow landsliding in steep terrain typical of the Pacific Northwest.

  2. Population vulnerability and disaster risk reduction: A situation analysis among the landslide affected communities in Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Damodaran Santha

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Landslides affect at least 15% of the land area of India, exceeding 0.49 million km2. Taking the case of landslide affected communities in the state of Kerala in India, this paper demonstrates that the focus has seldom been placed on assessing and reducing vulnerability. From the perspective of political economy, this paper argues that vulnerability reduction has to be the main priority of any disaster risk reduction programme. This paper also demonstrates that the interactions between ecological and social systems are usually complex and non-linear in nature. In contrast, interventions to tackle landslide risks have followed a linear course, assuming that one hazard event acts independently of another. The key findings of the study show that lack of access to political power, decision making, and resources, insecure livelihoods,environmental degradation, and ine#ectiveness of the state approach to disaster risk reduction are some of the major factors that lead to increasing vulnerability. Qualitative in nature, the primary data were collected through in-depth interviews with people from different groups such as farmers affected by the landslides and secondary floods, men and women living in the temporary shelter, government representatives involved in relief activities, health authorities, and elected representatives.

  3. Analysis of landslide development using aerial photographs and DEMs comparison, along part of the Chacoura River valley, Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy, S.; Locat, J.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Demers, D.; Loye, A.

    2009-04-01

    The large plains of Eastern Canada sensitive clays are cut by numerous rivers, in a way that their slopes have been and are still affected by landslides. They play an important role in the modelling of the landscape of these regions. Hence, the role of erosion as a trigger of landslides is important. On the Chacoura River, north of Louiseville (Quebec), several large landslides scars, more or less recent, are visible. A first inventory of areas of erosion, slides and landslides clay was carried out by Locat et al. (1984) on some series of aerial photographs covering a period from 1948 to 1979. This study is based on a detailed analysis of aerial photographs, dating from 1948 to 1997 and an airborne LiDAR digital elevation model (DEM-LiDAR), dating from 2007, in a GIS environment, using two different approaches: (1) a map of the phenomena was drawn by identifying various elements such as land movements, limits of the slope, position of the river, the area covered by forest and agricultural drainage structures, e.g., and (2) the comparison of DEMs was performed to estimate slipped and eroded volumes, the rate of erosion on a section of the river (about 6 km) and the spatial distribution of movements. The results show that the location of landslides is directly linked to the presence of some characteristic topographical features, such as (1) the shape of the meandering river, (2) the flow of agricultural drainage, or (3) the erosion at the toe of the slope. Finally, the study of landslides over a period of 60 years shows that the major landslide scars in this area could be in fact the sum of several events of lesser importance. For example, a large landslide (around 13'000 m2) occurred in 1976 at the same place where a first landslide of 1500 m2 in 1964. Locat, J., Demers, D., Lebuis, J. and Rissmann, P. (1984), Prédiction des Glissements de Terrain; Application aux Argiles Sensibles, Rivière Chacoura, Québec, Canada, the IV International Symposium on Landslides

  4. Landslides analysis using geological, geotechnical and geophysical data from experimental measurements in Prahova County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Stoica

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The landslide that is the subject of this paper occurred inPrahova County. The present work was carried out to study the spatialinfluence of geological and morphological factors upon landslideoccurrence on a local scale by using geotechnical and geophysical methods in order to determine local trigger parameters. The input data for the slopestability analysis were collected from topographic investigations, geological mapping. In addition, soil geotechnical parameters were collated from a series of in situ tests. A geophysical survey was applied by using vertical electrical soundings in order to detect the existence and continuity of a potential sliding surface.

  5. Multi-method characterisation of an active landslide: Case study in the Pays d'Auge plateau (Normandy, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fressard, M.; Maquaire, O.; Thiery, Y.; Davidson, R.; Lissak, C.

    2016-10-01

    Shallow landslides are among the most frequent natural hazards in the Pays d'Auge plateau (Normandy, France) but no study has yet focused on the functioning of these phenomena at a detailed scale. This study aims to identify the structure and mechanical properties of a representative case study in the region. The main objective is to understand landslide dynamics and behaviour in order to assess triggering conditions and quantify triggering thresholds. The results will help complement the regional landslide hazard mapping based on landslide statistical susceptibility mapping and quantification of triggering thresholds. The landslide morphology and internal structure were identified using a multi-method approach. A morphodynamic map was produced in the field using cartographic GPS to depict the surface morphology and map the estimated landslide activity. These field measurements were completed by an analysis of all available aerial-photo images from the French National Geographic Institute (IGN) to identify the occurrence dates and possible landslide reactivations. The landslide structure was defined using multiple electrical tomography profiles, boreholes, augerings and penetration tests. Despite the overall low electrical resistivity of the landslide materials (i.e. ± < 80 Ω·m), the electrical profiles showed good agreement with the interpreted structure based on direct observations (augerings and penetration tests). The landslide slip surface, internal morphology and palaeotopography were identified. A finite slope model was used to calculate the landslide safety factor based on the internal structure and geotechnical data. The evolution of this safety factor according to the rainfall and the groundwater levels shows that the landslides are more likely to occur after long episodes of high cumulative precipitations with an important role being played by the preliminary conditions and the rise of the surficial groundwater table level.

  6. Using Qualitative Hazard Analysis to Guide Quantitative Safety Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortle, J. F.; Allocco, M.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative methods can be beneficial in many types of safety investigations. However, there are many difficulties in using quantitative m ethods. Far example, there may be little relevant data available. This paper proposes a framework for using quantitative hazard analysis to prioritize hazard scenarios most suitable for quantitative mziysis. The framework first categorizes hazard scenarios by severity and likelihood. We then propose another metric "modeling difficulty" that desc ribes the complexity in modeling a given hazard scenario quantitatively. The combined metrics of severity, likelihood, and modeling difficu lty help to prioritize hazard scenarios for which quantitative analys is should be applied. We have applied this methodology to proposed concepts of operations for reduced wake separation for airplane operatio ns at closely spaced parallel runways.

  7. Analysis on the Critical Rainfall Value For Predicting Large Scale Landslides Caused by Heavy Rainfall In Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuang-Jung; Chiang, Jie-Lun; Lee, Ming-Hsi; Chen, Yie-Ruey

    2017-04-01

    Analysis on the Critical Rainfall Value For Predicting Large Scale Landslides Caused by Heavy Rainfall In Taiwan. Kuang-Jung Tsai 1, Jie-Lun Chiang 2,Ming-Hsi Lee 2, Yie-Ruey Chen 1, 1Department of Land Management and Development, Chang Jung Christian Universityt, Tainan, Taiwan. 2Department of Soil and Water Conservation, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung, Taiwan. ABSTRACT The accumulated rainfall amount was recorded more than 2,900mm that were brought by Morakot typhoon in August, 2009 within continuous 3 days. Very serious landslides, and sediment related disasters were induced by this heavy rainfall event. The satellite image analysis project conducted by Soil and Water Conservation Bureau after Morakot event indicated that more than 10,904 sites of landslide with total sliding area of 18,113ha were found by this project. At the same time, all severe sediment related disaster areas are also characterized based on their disaster type, scale, topography, major bedrock formations and geologic structures during the period of extremely heavy rainfall events occurred at the southern Taiwan. Characteristics and mechanism of large scale landslide are collected on the basis of the field investigation technology integrated with GPS/GIS/RS technique. In order to decrease the risk of large scale landslides on slope land, the strategy of slope land conservation, and critical rainfall database should be set up and executed as soon as possible. Meanwhile, study on the establishment of critical rainfall value used for predicting large scale landslides induced by heavy rainfall become an important issue which was seriously concerned by the government and all people live in Taiwan. The mechanism of large scale landslide, rainfall frequency analysis ,sediment budge estimation and river hydraulic analysis under the condition of extremely climate change during the past 10 years would be seriously concerned and recognized as a required issue by this

  8. Assessment of Rainfall-induced Landslide Potential and Spatial Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yie-Ruey; Tsai, Kuang-Jung; Chen, Jing-Wen; Chiang, Jie-Lun; Hsieh, Shun-Chieh; Chue, Yung-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    Recently, due to the global climate change, most of the time the rainfall in Taiwan is of short duration but with high intensity. Due to Taiwan's steep terrain, rainfall-induced landslides often occur and lead to human causalities and properties loss. Taiwan's government has invested huge reconstruction funds to the affected areas. However, after rehabilitation they still face the risk of secondary sediment disasters. Therefore, this study assesses rainfall-induced (secondary) landslide potential and spatial distribution in watershed of Southern Taiwan under extreme climate change. The study areas in this research are Baolai and Jianshan villages in the watershed of the Laonongxi River Basin in the Southern Taiwan. This study focused on the 3 years after Typhoon Morakot (2009 to 2011). During this period, the study area experienced six heavy rainfall events including five typhoons and one heavy rainfall. The genetic adaptive neural network, texture analysis and GIS were implemented in the analysis techniques for the interpretation of satellite images and to obtain surface information and hazard log data and to analyze land use change. A multivariate hazards evaluation method was applied to quantitatively analyze the weights of various natural environmental and slope development hazard factors. Furthermore, this study established a slope landslide potential assessment model and depicted a slope landslide potential diagram by using the GIS platform. The interaction between (secondary) landslide mechanism, scale, and location was analyzed using association analysis of landslide historical data and regional environmental characteristics. The results of image classification before and after six heavy rainfall events show that the values of coefficient of agreement are at medium-high level. By multivariate hazards evaluation method, geology and the effective accumulative rainfall (EAR) are the most important factors. Slope, distance from fault, aspect, land disturbance

  9. Comparison of various remote sensing classification methods for landslide detection using ArcGIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escape, Carmille Marie; Kristia Alemania, Maneka; Luzon, Paul Kenneth; Felix, Raquel; Salvosa, Sheena; Aquino, Dakila; Narod Eco, Rodrigo; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive landslide inventory is vital in landslide hazard analysis. It provides statistical and spatial distributions at a given time which can be used as parameter for susceptibility and classification modelling. It is usually derived from historical data, field surveys, and manual interpretation of aerial and satellite images. However, historical data is not always available and complete, intensive field surveys are impractical for large-scale studies, and manual analysis of aerial and spectral images can be tedious and time-consuming. With the advancement of spectral remote sensing systems, different automated procedures for image classification have been developed. To test the effectiveness of various automated image classification methods, we compared several procedures utilizing spectral images taken after the Mw 7.2 Bohol (Philippines) earthquake on October 15, 2013 instead of a comprehensive landslide inventory. These procedures included: 1.) an unsupervised ISODATA clustering classification, 2.) a supervised maximum likelihood classification using raw spectral bands, 3.) another supervised classification using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), and 4.) a manual reclassification of NDVI values using specific ranges. We used the fourth method to highlight the difference between using its unbiased mathematical data with supervised classification training sites that has an added human factor. We then compared each image classification with the manual inventory done to determine its accuracy. The unsupervised classification had the lowest accuracy and reliability in distinguishing the landslides. The supervised classification using raw spectral bands, though it showed clear regions of landslides, only distinguished 75% of the landslides manually inventoried. Both methods that involved NDVI were more useful for landslide identification but had different advantages. The supervised classification with NDVI was more useful in pinpointing

  10. Landslide stability analysis on basis of LIDAR data extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui; Fernandez-Steeger, Tomas M.; Dong, Mei; Azzam, Rafig

    2010-05-01

    Currently, existing contradictory between remediation and acquisition from natural resource induces a series of divergences. With regard to open pit mining, legal regulation requires human to fill back the open pit area with water or recreate new landscape by other materials; on the other hand, human can not help excavating the mining area due to the shortage of power resource. However, to engineering geologists, one coincident problem which takes place not only in filling but also in mining operation should be paid more attention to, i.e. the slope stability analysis within these areas. There are a number of construction activities during remediation or mining process which can directly or indirectly cause slope failure. Lives can be endangered since local failure either while or after remediation; for mining process, slope failure in a bench, which carries a main haul road or is adjacent to human activity area, would be significant catastrophe to the whole mining program. The stability of an individual bench or slope is controlled by several factors, which are geological condition, morphology, climate, excavation techniques and transportation approach. The task which takes the longest time is to collect the morphological data. Consequently, it is one of the most dangerous tasks due to the time consuming in mining field. LIDAR scanning for morphological data collecting can help to skip this obstacle since advantages of LIDAR techniques as follows: • Dynamic range available on the market: from 3 m to beyond 1 km, • Ruggedly designed for demanding field applications, • Compact, easily hand-carried and deployed by a single operator. In 2009, scanning campaigns for 2 open pit quarry have been carried out. The aim for these LIDAR detections is to construct a detailed 3D quarry model and analyze the bench stability to support the filling planning. The 3D quarry surface was built up by using PolyWorks 10.1 on basis of LIDAR data. LIDAR data refining takes an

  11. 基于层次分析法的库岸高速滑坡危险度评价%AHP-based hazard degree assessment of high-speed landslide of reservoir bank

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄锦林; 赵吉国; 张婷; 李嘉琳

    2011-01-01

    The jubgement of highspeed landslide is an important content in the landslide control work;however, it brings certain difficulties of highspeed landslide prediction due to the unavailability of normative approaches of slid- ing speed calculation at present. AHP (analytic hierarchy process) is a multi -objective decision analysis method through the combination of qualitative and quantitative analysis. This paper aims at various influencing factors of highspeed landslide taken plance on reservoir bank, uses AHP to analyze and evaluate the highspeed landslide haz- ard degree of the Egongdai ancient landslide, and provides a new thinking on the reservoir bank highspeed landslide prediction.%高速滑坡的判定是滑坡治理工作中的一项重要内容,但由于目前尚没有统一规范的滑速计算方法,因而给高速滑坡的预测带来了一定的困难。层次分析法是一种定性与定量相结合的多目标决策分析方法,针对库岸高速滑坡发生的各影响因子,采用层次分析法对鹅公带古滑坡体的高速滑坡体危险度进行了分析评价,为库岸高速滑坡的预测提供了一条新思路。

  12. A Predictive Study of the Hazardousness of Landslides in Loess Hilly Region Based on Rainfall Response: A Case Study of Linyou County, Baoji City%基于降雨响应的黄土丘陵区滑坡危险性预测研究——以宝鸡市麟游县为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛鹏; 吴树仁; 石菊松; 王涛; LIU Zhen

    2012-01-01

    the principle of the infinite slope model and parameter selection by analyzing formation mechanism of landslides in loess-hilly areas induced by rainfall with Lingnan landslide as an example, completed quantitative studies of hazards of landslide disasters under four different rainfall conditions, i.e., no rainfall, 25 mm, 50 mm and 75 mm respectively using GIS spatial modeling and analysis and analyzed their errors. The results show that: (1) landslide disasters in loess hilly areas are related to topography, mechanical properties of rock bodies and earth. Headward erosion of rainfall and surface water is macro background of developing landslide disasters. (2) Rainfalls in loess hilly areas such as Linyou County are prone to inducing shallow strata loess landslide, represented by loess mudflow and shallow landslides. (3) For the same amount of rainfall, different units in slope areas have different response mechanisms, and high risk zones, middle risk zones and low risk zones are generated in areas with significant differences. Under the four different rainfall conditions of no rainfall, 25 mm, 50 mm and 75 mm, watershed area in the middle, Tiantang Town in the north, and Zhangba Township are high risk zones which are prone to generating rainfall landslide disasters. (4) In high risk zones with rainfall induced disasters, the situation threatens safety of residents of nearby villages and small towns, and hence monitoring, warning and corresponding preventive measures should be taken. In middle risk zones, mass monitoring, preventing and warning measures should be taken in flood seasons. In low risk zones, people should be vigilant in preventing unexpected incidents in flood seasons. (5) The infinite model is fit for calculating shallow slides induced by rainfall, reflecting response to rainfall induced landslide disasters soundly. The derived hazard distribution meets actual conditions. The errors of calculating hazards are related to resolution of geographic base

  13. Short Term Patterns of Landslides Causing Death in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, S. A.; Petley, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    Among natural hazards, landslides represent a significant source of loss of life in mountainous terrains. Many regions of Latin America and the Caribbean are prone to landslide activity, due to strong topographic relief, high tectonic uplift rates, seismicity and/or climate. Further, vulnerable populations are often concentrated in deep valleys or mountain foothills susceptible to catastrophic landslides, with vulnerability further increased by dense urbanization and precarious settlements in some large cities. While historic extremely catastrophic events such as the 1999 Vargas flows in Venezuela or the 1970 Huascaran rock avalanche in Peru are commonly cited to characterize landslide hazards in this region, less known is the landslide activity in pe