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Sample records for lambda-cyhalothrin covering wall

  1. The use of wide-mesh gauze impregnated with lambda-cyhalothrin covering wall openings in huts as a vector control method in Suriname

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    Jaco Voorham

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available An alternative vector control method, using lambda-cyhalothrin impregnated wide-mesh gauze covering openings in the walls of the houses was developed in an area in the Eastern part of the interior of Suriname. Experimental hut observations showed that Anopheles darlingi greatly reduced their biting activity (99-100% during the first 5 months after impregnation. A model assay showed high mortality both of mosquitoes repelled by the gauze as well as of those that succeeded in getting through it. A field application test in 270 huts showed good acceptance by the population and good durability of the applied gauze. After introducing the method in the entire working area, replacing DDT residual housespraying, the malaria prevalence, of 25-37% before application dropped and stabilized at between 5 and 10% within one year. The operational costs were less than those of the previously used DDT housespraying program, due to a 50% reduction in the cost of materials used. The method using widemesh gauze impregnated with lambdacyhalothrin strongly affects the behavior of An. darlingi. It is important to examine the effect of the method on malaria transmission further, since data indirectly obtained suggest substantial positive results.

  2. The use of wide-mesh gauze impregnated with lambda-cyhalothrin covering wall openings in huts as a vector control method in Suriname Uso de tela de malha larga impregnada com lamba-cyhalotrina como método de controle vetorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaco Voorham

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available An alternative vector control method, using lambda-cyhalothrin impregnated wide-mesh gauze covering openings in the walls of the houses was developed in an area in the Eastern part of the interior of Suriname. Experimental hut observations showed that Anopheles darlingi greatly reduced their biting activity (99-100% during the first 5 months after impregnation. A model assay showed high mortality both of mosquitoes repelled by the gauze as well as of those that succeeded in getting through it. A field application test in 270 huts showed good acceptance by the population and good durability of the applied gauze. After introducing the method in the entire working area, replacing DDT residual housespraying, the malaria prevalence, of 25-37% before application dropped and stabilized at between 5 and 10% within one year. The operational costs were less than those of the previously used DDT housespraying program, due to a 50% reduction in the cost of materials used. The method using widemesh gauze impregnated with lambdacyhalothrin strongly affects the behavior of An. darlingi. It is important to examine the effect of the method on malaria transmission further, since data indirectly obtained suggest substantial positive results.Foi desenvolvido, na parte oriental do interior do Suriname um método alternativo de controle antivetorial, usando uma tela de malha larga impregnada com lambda-cyhalotrina, cobrindo as aberturas das paredes das casas. Observações com casas experimentais mostraram uma redução de picadas muita alta (99% de Anopheles darlingi durante os primeiros 5 meses após a impregnação. Um ensaio mostrou alta mortalidade dos mosquitos, repelidos ao tentar passar pelo tule, além daqueles que conseguiram passar. A aplicação no campo revelou resultados promissores deste método de controle antivetorial, boa aprovação da população e baixos custos operacionais em relação à borrifação residual com DDT.

  3. Persistence behaviour of thiamethoxam and lambda cyhalothrin in transplanted paddy.

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    Barik, Suhrid Ranjan; Ganguly, Pritam; Kunda, Samir Kumar; Kole, Ramen Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Anjan

    2010-10-01

    A field study was conducted in Pre-Kharif season 2007 on paddy to determine the persistence of thiamethoxam (12.6%) and lambda cyhalothrin (9.4%) [in a 'Readymix' formulation Alika 247 ZC], following the application of 33 g. a.i. ha⁻¹ (T₁) and 66 g. a.i. ha⁻¹ (T₂). Spraying of insecticide was done during milking stage of the crop (63 days after transplantation). Thiamethoxam and lambda cyhalothrin residues were estimated by HPLC and GLC respectively. The half-life values were 5.2-5.8 and 4.8 days for thiamethoxam and lambda cyhalothrin respectively. No residue was detected in the harvested paddy, straw, grain, and soil samples.

  4. Stable carbon isotope fractionation during the biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xiaoli [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Environmental Engineering, Quzhou University, Quzhou 324000 (China); Xu, Zemin [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhang, Xichang [Laboratory for Teaching in Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Fangxing, E-mail: fxyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Effect-Directed Analysis, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research — UFZ, Leipzig 04318 (Germany)

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the microbial degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in soil was investigated using compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The results revealed that lambda-cyhalothrin was biodegraded in soil under laboratory conditions. The half-lives of lambda-cyhalothrin were determined to be 49 and 161 days in non-sterile and sterile soils spiked with 2 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin and 84 and 154 days in non-sterile and sterile soils spiked with 10 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin, respectively. The biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin resulted in carbon isotope fractionation, which shifted from − 29.0‰ to − 26.5‰ in soil spiked with 2 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin, and to − 27.5‰ with 10 mg/kg lambda-cyhalothrin. A relationship was established between the stable carbon isotope fraction and the residual concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin by the Rayleigh equation in which the carbon isotope enrichment factor ε of the microbial degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in the soil was calculated as − 2.53‰. This study provides an approach to quantitatively evaluate the biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin in soil in field studies. - Highlights: • Abiotic and biotic degradation of lambda-cyhalothrin were observed in soil. • Biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin was evaluated by CSIA. • Biodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin leads to carbon isotope fractionation. • An enrichment factor ε of lambda-cyhalothrin was determined as − 2.53‰.

  5. Lambda-Cyhalothrin Nanosuspension Prepared by the Melt Emulsification-High Pressure Homogenization Method

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenzhong Pan; Bo Cui; Zhanghua Zeng; Lei Feng; Guoqiang Liu; Haixin Cui; Hongyu Pan

    2015-01-01

    The nanosuspension of 5% lambda-cyhalothrin with 0.2% surfactants was prepared by the melt emulsification-high pressure homogenization method. The surfactants composition, content, and homogenization process were optimized. The anionic surfactant (1-dodecanesulfonic acid sodium salt) and polymeric surfactant (maleic rosin-polyoxypropylene-polyoxyethylene ether sulfonate) screened from 12 types of commercially common-used surfactants were used to prepare lambda-cyhalothrin nanosuspension with ...

  6. Dual resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin and dicrotophos in Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Paulo R R; Michaud, J P; Rodrigues, Agna R S; Torres, Jorge B

    2016-09-01

    Insecticide resistance is usually associated with pests, but may also evolve in natural enemies. In this study, adult beetles of three distinct North American populations of Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, and the progeny of reciprocal crosses between the resistant and most susceptible population, were treated topically with varying concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin and dicrotophos. In addition, the LD50s of both insecticides were applied in combination to resistant individuals. The developmental and reproductive performance of each population was assessed in the absence of insecticide exposure to compare baseline fitness. California and Kansas populations were susceptible to both materials, whereas Georgia (GA) beetles exhibited a resistance ratio (RR50) of 158 to lambda-cyhalothrin and 530 to dicrotophos. Inheritance of lambda-cyhalothrin resistance was X-linked, whereas inheritance of dicrotophos resistance was autosomal. Mortality of resistant beetles treated with a mixture of LD50s of both materials was twice that of those treated with lambda-cyhalothrin alone, but not significantly different from those receiving dicrotophos alone. Life history parameters were largely similar among populations, except that Georgia beetles had higher egg fertility relative to susceptible populations. We conclude that the high levels of resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin and dicrotophos in Georgia beetles reflect heavy loads of these insecticides in local environments, most likely the large acreage under intensive cotton cultivation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fate of the insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin in ditch enclosures differing in vegetation density.

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    Leistra, Minze; Zweers, Anton J; Warinton, Jacqui S; Crum, Steven J H; Hand, Laurence H; Beltman, Wim H J; Maund, Stephen J

    2004-01-01

    Use of the insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin in agriculture may result in the contamination of water bodies, for example by spray drift. Therefore, the possible exposure of aquatic organisms to this insecticide needs to be evaluated. The exposure of the organisms may be reduced by the strong sorption of the insecticide to organic materials and its susceptibility to hydrolysis at the high pH values in the natural range. In experiments done in May and August, formulated lambda-cyhalothrin was mixed with the water body of enclosures in experimental ditches containing a bottom layer and macrophytes (at different densities) or phytoplankton. Concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin in the water body and in the sediment layer, and contents in the plant compartment, were measured by gas-liquid chromatography at various times up to 1 week after application. Various water quality parameters were also measured. Concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin decreased rapidly in the water column: 1 day after application, 24-40% of the dose remained in the water, and by 3 days it had declined to 1.8-6.5%. At the highest plant density, lambda-cyhalothrin residue in the plant compartment reached a maximum of 50% of the dose after 1 day; at intermediate and low plant densities, this maximum was only 3-11% of the dose (after 1-2 days). The percentage of the insecticide in the ditch sediment was 12% or less of the dose and tended to be lower at higher plant densities. Alkaline hydrolysis in the water near the surface of macrophytes and phytoplankton is considered to be the main dissipation process for lambda-cyhalothrin.

  8. Hydroponic Uptake of Atrazine and Lambda-cyhalothrin in Aquatic Macrophytes

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    Bouldin, J. L.; Farris, J. L.; Moore, M. T.; Smith, S.; Cooper, C. M.

    2005-05-01

    Phytoremediation encompasses an array of plant-associated processes known to mitigate contaminants from soil, sediment, and water. Modification of pesticides associated with agricultural runoff includes processes directly associated with aquatic macrophytes in addition to soil geochemical modifications and associated rhizospheric degradation. Remediation attributes of two vegetative species common to agricultural drainages in the Mississippi Delta, USA, were assessed using atrazine and lambda-cyhalothrin. Concentrations used in 8-d hydroponic exposures were calculated using recommended field applications and a 5% runoff model from a 0.65-cm rainfall event on a 2.02-ha field. While greater atrazine uptake was measured in Juncus effusus, greater lambda-cyhalothrin uptake occurred in Ludwigia peploides. Maximum pesticide uptake was reached within 48 h for each exposure and subsequent translocation of pesticides to upper plant biomass occurred in macrophytes exposed to atrazine. Sequestration of 98.2% of lambda-cyhalothrin in roots of L. peploides was measured after 8 d. Translocation of lambda-cyhalothrin in J. effusus resulted in 25.4% of pesticide uptake partitioned to upper plant biomass. These individual macrophyte remediation studies measured species- and pesticide-specific uptake rates, indicating that the seasonality of pesticide applications and macrophyte emergence might interact strongly to enhance mitigation capabilities in edge-of-field conveyance structures.

  9. Ecological effects of Spring and late Summer applications of Lambda-Cyhalothrin on freshwater microcosms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, van R.P.A.; Brock, T.C.M.; Brink, van den P.J.; Gylstra, R.; Maund, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin (treated at 10, 25, 50, 100, 250 ng active ingredient a.i./L) on a drainage ditch ecosystem in spring and late summer. Microcosms (water volume approximately 430 L) were established using enclosures in a

  10. Fate of the insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin in ditch enclosures differing in vegetation density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leistra, M.; Zweers, A.J.; Warinton, J.S.; Crum, S.J.H.; Hand, L.H.; Beltman, W.H.J.; Maund, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    Use of the insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin in agriculture may result in the contamination of water bodies, for example by spray drift. Therefore, the possible exposure of aquatic organisms to this insecticide needs to be evaluated. The exposure of the organisms may be reduced by the strong sorption

  11. Behavioral Differentiation Induced by Insecticide Lambda-Cyhalothrin in Mosquito Fish, Gambusia affinis

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    Utku GÜNER

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Test toxic material, one of most used pesticide, the Lambda cyhalothrin (LCY (TEKVANDO 5EC belongs to a group of chemicals called synthetic pyrethroids and pesticides and potential toxic pollutant contaminating aquatic ecosystems, was investigated in the present study for behavioral toxicology. Mosquito fish, Gambusia affinis (Baird & Girard, 1853 were selected for responses of Lambda cyhalothrin by Using to video-based movement analysis system. Selected 3 different doses 0.1, 0.5 and 0.75 ppm were used analyzed behavioral changes according to control group. The following behaviors were measured: total distance, travelled and average speed for treatment and control groups, maximum and average speed and time moving away from the dose applied point. This suggests that LCY contamination has the potential to significantly affect (p<0.05 the behavior of Mosquito fish, G. affinis.

  12. Micronuclei induction in Rana catesbeiana tadpoles by the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin

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    Campana Marcela Alejandra

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid lambda-cyhalothrin genotoxicity was evaluated using the micronucleus test in Rana catesbeiana tadpoles. The effects of concentration and exposure time on the micronuclei frequency were studied in blood smears obtained from tadpoles exposed to four concentrations (0.02, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg/L of the compound for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h and 8, 15, 20 and 30 days. As a positive control, tadpoles were exposed to cyclophosphamide (5 mg/L. The micronucleated cell frequency was expressed per 1,000 cells. R. catesbeiana tadpoles exposed to increasing concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin showed an increase in the micronuclei frequency in peripheral blood. Tadpoles exposed to cyclophosphamide (CP also showed a significant increase in micronucleated erythrocytes which peaked after 15 days. These results suggest that R. catesbeiana tadpoles may provide a useful model for monitoring water pollution.

  13. Efficacy of alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin applications to prevent Aedes breeding in tires.

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    Pettit, William J; Whelan, Peter I; McDonnell, Joseph; Jacups, Susan P

    2010-12-01

    The efficacy of alpha-cypermethrin (Cyperthor) and lambda-cyhalothrin (Demand) to prevent mosquito larval colonization of water-containing receptacles was investigated using 2 differing applications in disused car tires in Darwin, Australia. Insecticide treatments were applied uniformly to the inside surfaces of 2 categories of tires: 1) dry tires that were partially filled with water 24 h after spraying and 2) wet tires partially filled with water prior to spraying. All mosquito larvae, pupae, and dead adults were collected from the treatment and control tires weekly over the 24-wk study period and were later identified to species in the laboratory. Control tires were colonized by Aedes notoscriptus in wk 2 and by Culex quinquefasciatus in wk 4. Aedes notoscriptus failed to colonize any alpha-cypermethrin-treated tires until wk 22 and did not colonize any lambda-cyhalothrin-treated tires during the 24-wk trial. Culex quinquefasciatus colonized alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin-treated tires from wk 11 and wk 15, respectively. These results indicate both insecticides using either application method can prevent colonization of Ae. notoscriptus for at least 20 wk and demonstrate great potential for the prevention of breeding in receptacles for other receptacle-breeding Aedes species, such as the dengue vectors, Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus.

  14. Dissipation kinetics of alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin residues in aboveground part of white mustard (Sinapis alba L.).

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    Słowik-Borowiec, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Dissipation of simultaneously applied insecticides alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin was studied in a minor crop, aboveground part of white mustard (Sinapis alba L.). A validated gas chromatographic method (GC-ECD/NPD) was used to determine insecticide residues. Analytical performances were very satisfactory, with expanded uncertainties not higher than 14% (coverage factor k = 2, confidence level 95%). Dissipation of alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin in white mustard followed first-order kinetics (R(2) between 0.953 and 0.995), with half-lives of 3.1-4.6 and 2.9-3.7 days respectively. Based on the results of this two-year study and the relevant residue regulation, alpha-cypermethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin treatments can be considered safe for crop protection, feeding animals and the environment.

  15. Lambda-Cyhalothrin Nanosuspension Prepared by the Melt Emulsification-High Pressure Homogenization Method

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    Zhenzhong Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanosuspension of 5% lambda-cyhalothrin with 0.2% surfactants was prepared by the melt emulsification-high pressure homogenization method. The surfactants composition, content, and homogenization process were optimized. The anionic surfactant (1-dodecanesulfonic acid sodium salt and polymeric surfactant (maleic rosin-polyoxypropylene-polyoxyethylene ether sulfonate screened from 12 types of commercially common-used surfactants were used to prepare lambda-cyhalothrin nanosuspension with high dispersity and stability. The mean particle size and polydispersity index of the nanosuspension were 16.01 ± 0.11 nm and 0.266 ± 0.002, respectively. The high zeta potential value of −41.7 ± 1.3 mV and stable crystalline state of the nanoparticles indicated the excellent physical and chemical stability. The method could be widely used for preparing nanosuspension of various pesticides with melting points below boiling point of water. This formulation may avoid the use of organic solvents and reduce surfactants and is perspective for improving bioavailability and reducing residual pollution of pesticide in agricultural products and environment.

  16. Performance of Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) resistant to lambda-cyhalothrin after extended recovery from knockdown.

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    Santos, D S; Rodrigues, A R S; Torres, J B; Lira, R

    2016-12-01

    A population of the predatory lady beetle Eriopis connexa (Germar) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was recorded as resistant to lambda-cyhalothrin. Adults exposed to this insecticide have recovered from knockdown after 72 h. Thus, the performance of resistant (R) and susceptible (S) populations of E. connexa not exposed to insecticide (R0 and S0) and R adults recovering from knockdown 24, 48, and 72 h after exposure (R24, R48, and R72) was studied. In addition, the fertility life table parameters were calculated for one generation considering the progenies from R0, S0, and R24 populations. The recovery rate from knockdown was 69.4% for R-adults, and greater recovery rate was observed within 48 h following lambda-cyhalothrin exposure. The S-females produced about 50% more eggs and lived longer, when compared with R-females irrespective of the recovery periods after knockdown. The R-females produced similar number of eggs and exhibited similar longevity across all treatments (R0, R24, R48, and R72). Progenies produced by R- and S-populations did not exhibit consistent differences in development and survival. The fertility life table parameters showed higher intrinsic rate of population growth (rm) and lower mean generation time (T) for R0- and R24-females, when compared with those for S0-females. Thus, the time interval needed to recover from knockdown is not related to the adaptive cost of resistance in E. connexa.

  17. EFFECT OF LAMBDA-CYHALOTHRIN IN THE RELEASE OF OOTHECA, SPERM VIABILITY AND MOTILITY IN BLATELLA GERMANICA (L. (DICTYOPTERA: BLATELLIDAE

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    Pino, J.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Cockroaches are one of the most important worldwide household pests. The objective of the current research was to assess exposure of lambda-cyhalothrin on release of ootheca, and sperm viability and motility of Blatella germanica (Linnaeus. No premature release of female oothecas were evident, but mortality in males (LT = 1h 6 min was higher than in females (LT = 1h 54 50 50 min. Lambda-cyhalothrin produced effects on inhibition of sperm viability (EC = 1130 mg·L-1 50 and sperm motility (EC = 660, 6 mg·L-1 of B. germanica.

  18. Enzymes mediating resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin in Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

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    Rodrigues, Agna R S; Siqueira, Herbert A A; Torres, Jorge B

    2014-03-01

    Resistance to widely used insecticide, lambda-cyhalothrin, was recently reported in the predatory lady beetle Eriopis connexa (Germar) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). However, to understand whether metabolic mechanisms underlie such resistance, synergism bioassays and in vitro studies were carried out by using inhibitors and model substrates for enzymatic assays, respectively. The LD50s estimated for susceptible and resistant populations ηg of lambda-cyhalothrin/insect, and thus, a 22-fold difference in resistance ratio. Synergism ratios for the susceptible population with piperonyl butoxide (PBO), diethyl maleate (DEM), triphenyl phosphate (TPP), and S,S,S-tributylphosphorotrithioate (DEF) were respectively 33.8-, 0.24-, 0.35-, and 4.25-fold, while for the resistant population, they were 1463.0-, 0.79-, 0.85-, and 282.6-fold, respectively. The synergized resistance ratios were 0.50-, 2.00-, 6.75-, and 8.77-fold with PBO, DEF, DEM, and TPP, respectively, while resistance was virtually suppressed with DEF. The esterase exhibited 4.16-, 4.03-, and 5.38-fold greater activity towards formation of α-naphthol, β-naphthol, and 4-nitrophenol in the resistant population of E. connexa than in the susceptible population. The activity of esterase depended on concentrations of DEF applied, either using α-naphthol or β-naphthol, which completely inhibited the activity at 636 ηM. The PBO inhibited the β-naphthol formation in approximately 50%, suggesting it as inhibitor of esterases. The activities of glutathione-S-transferase were similar and corresponded to 0.36-0.47 ηmol(-1) min(-1)μg of protein, for S and R populations, respectively. Similarly, the activities of cytochrome P450-dependent microsomal monooxygenases were 0.04 and 0.05 ηmol(-1) min(-1)μg of protein. The native gel indicated that the formation of β-naphthol was completely inhibited by methyl-paraoxon, but only partially inhibited by eserine, TPP, and PBO. Although other studies with DEF and PBO have

  19. Influence of selected water quality characteristics on the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin and gamma-cyhalothrin to Hyalella azteca

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    This study was conducted to assess the influence of suspended solids, dissolved organic carbon, and phytoplankton (as chlorophyll a) water quality characteristics on lambda-cyhalothrin and gamma-cyhalothrin aqueous toxicity to Hyalella azteca using natural water from 12 ponds and lakes in Mississipp...

  20. Evaluation of Stability and Biological Activity of Solid Nanodispersion of Lambda-Cyhalothrin.

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    Bo Cui

    Full Text Available Pesticides are essential agrochemicals used to protect plants from diseases, pests and weeds. However, the formulation defects of conventional pesticides cause food toxicity and ecological environmental problems. In this study, a novel, efficient and environmentally friendly formulation of lambda-cyhalothrin, a solid nanodispersion, was successfully developed based on melt-emulsification and high-speed shearing methods. The solid nanodispersion presented excellent advantages over conventional pesticide formulations in such formulation functions as dispersibility, stability and bioavailability. The formulation is free of organic solvents, and the use of surfactant is reduced. Therefore, the application of the solid nanodispersion in crop production will improve efficacy and reduce the occurrence of both pesticide residues in food and environmental pollution from pesticides.

  1. Reasoned opinion on the modification of the existing MRLs for lambda-cyhalothrin in azarole and persimmon

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    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with Article 6 of Regulation (EC No 396/2005, Spain, herewith referred to as the evaluating Member State Spain, received an application from Syngenta Agro S.A. to raise the existing MRL for lambda-cyhalothrin in persimmon from the LOQ (0.02 mg/kg to 0.1 mg/kg in support of a new intended SEU use. Belgium (hereafter the EMS Belgium compiled an application to raise the existing MRL for lambda-cyhalothrin in azarole from the LOQ to 0.2 mg/kg based on a new intended NEU use on kiwi berries (Actinidia arguta. The EMS Spain and the EMS Belgium drafted evaluation reports according to Article 8 of Regulation (EC No 396/2005, which were submitted to the European Commission and forwarded to EFSA. According to EFSA, the submitted supervised residue trials are sufficient to derive a MRL proposal of 0.09 mg/kg for persimmon. The MRL proposal of 0.2 mg/kg for azarole (including kiwi berries is derived as an extrapolation from the available residue data on black currant. According to the EMS Belgium, the intended spray concentration of lambda-cyhalothrin on kiwi berries is identical to that in the black currant residue trials and thus these trials were considered appropriate to estimate residue levels in azarole (including kiwi berries. Based on the risk assessment results, EFSA concludes that the intended use of lambda-cyhalothrin on the crops under consideration will not result in a consumer exposure exceeding the toxicological reference values and therefore is unlikely to pose a public health concern.

  2. Vitamin E modulates reproductive toxicity of pyrethroid lambda-cyhalothrin in male rabbits.

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    Yousef, Mokhtar I

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the current study was to analyze the reproductive toxicity caused by lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) in male rabbits, and to evaluate the possible protective effect of vitamin E (Vit. E) as antioxidant. Animals were orally administered their respective doses of LCT every other day and given drinking water supplemented with vitamin E for 16 weeks. Results showed that semen quality was deteriorated following treatment with LCT. Also, testosterone levels, body weight (BW), feed intake (FI), and relative testes (RTW) and epididymis (REW) weights were significantly decreased. Concentrations of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) were significantly increased in seminal plasma of rabbits treated with LCT compared with control. While, activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST), transaminases and acid phosphatase (AcP) were significantly decreased. Vitamin E alone significantly increased testosterone levels, BW, FI, RTW, REW, semen characteristics and seminal plasma enzymes, and decreased the levels of TBARS. Also, the present study showed that vitamin E might be effective against LCT-induced reproductive toxicity. It was suggested that LCT exerted a significant adverse effect on reproductive performance of male rabbits. Furthermore, vitamin E antagonized the toxic effects of LCT and improved semen quality of male rabbit. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of insecticides malathion and lambda-cyhalothrin residues in zucchini by gas chromatography

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    Hayam M. Lofty

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive gas chromatographic method has been developed for the determination of malathion and lambda-cyhalothrin (λ-cyhalothrin insecticide residues in zucchini. The developed method consists of extraction with acetone, purification and partitioning with methylene chloride, column chromatographic clean-up, and finally capillary gas chromatographic determination of the insecticides. The recoveries of method were greater than 90% and limit of determination was 0.001 ppm for both insecticides. The method was applied to determine residues and the rate of disappearance of malathion and λ-cyhalothrin from fruits of zucchini (open field treatment, 50 cc of Malason/Cormandel 57% EC (emulsifiable concentrate for 100 L of water, 20 cc of LAMBDA SUPER FOG 5% liquid for 100 L of water. The insecticide incorporated into the plants decreased rapidly with a half-life time around 0.77 day (18.5h for malathion and 4 days for λ-cyhalothrin. It is not recommended to use zucchini before 12 h of malathion application. For λ-cyhalothrin, the preharvest interval is 5 days. Four market samples were chosen from different regions from A.R.E. and all of them showed no residues of malathion or λ-cyhalothrin.

  4. Influence of Copper on Transport and Dissipation of Lambda-Cyhalothrin and Cypermethrin in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun; L(U) Xiao-Meng; XIE Ji-Min; LI Ping-Ping; HAN Jian-Gang; SUN Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Repeated applications of bordeaux mixture (a blend of copper sulfate and calcium hydroxide) and pyrethroid insecticides (Pys)have led to elevated copper (Cu) and Pys concentrations in vineyard surface soils.To understand the potential influence of Cu on the fate of Pys in the soil environment,we selected two Pys,cypermethrin (CPM) and lambda-cyhalothrin (λ-CHT),and two typical Chinese vineyard soils,Haplic Acrisol and Luvic Phaeozem,as experimental samples.The dissipation experiment was conducted at room temperature in the dark,and the transport of both Pys through the soils was investigated using soil thin-layer chromatography.The results showed that the transport of Pys in both soils increased as the Cu2+ concentration increased from 0 to 100 mg L-1,and Pys were more transportable in Haplic Acrisol (HA) than in Luvic Phaeozem (LP) under the same experimental conditions.For CPM,only 100 mg L-1 of Cu2+ significantly (P < 0.05) increased Pys transport through both soils relative to water.Lambda-CHT was significantly (P < 0.05) transported through HA by all the Cu2+ concentrations compared to water,and all but the 1 mg L-1 of Cu2+ significantly (P < 0.05) increased the transport of λ-CHT through LP relative to water.However,the dissipation rates of CPM and λ-CHT decreased with the addition of Cu to soils.Our findings suggest that the risk of groundwater contamination by Pys increases in the soils with elevated Cu concentrations.

  5. Prenatal exposure to lambda-cyhalothrin alters brain dopaminergic signaling in developing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuriya, Yogesh K; Srivastava, Pranay; Shukla, Rajendra K; Gupta, Richa; Singh, Dhirendra; Parmar, Devendra; Pant, Aditya B; Khanna, Vinay K

    2017-07-01

    The present study is focused to decipher the molecular mechanisms associated with dopaminergic alterations in corpus striatum of developing rats exposed prenatally to lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT), a new generation type II synthetic pyrethroid. There was no significant change in the mRNA and protein expression of DA-D1 receptors at any of the doses of LCT (0.5, 1 and 3mg/kg body weight) in corpus striatum of developing rats exposed prenatally to LCT on PD22 and PD45. Prenatal exposure to LCT (1 and 3mg/kg body weight) resulted to decrease the levels of mRNA and protein of DA-D2 receptors in corpus stratum of developing rats on PD22 as compared to controls. Decrease in the binding of 3H-Spiperone in corpus striatum, known to label DA-D2 receptors was also distinct in developing rats on PD22. These rats also exhibited decrease in the expression of proteins - TH, DAT and VMAT2 involved in pre-dopaminergic signaling. Further, decrease in the expression of DARPP-32 and pCREB associated with increased expression of PP1α was evident in developing rats on PD22 as compared to controls. Interestingly, a trend of recovery in the expression of these proteins was observed in developing rats exposed to LCT at moderate dose (1.0mg/kg body weight) while alteration in the expression of these proteins continued to persist in those exposed at high dose (3.0mg/kg body weight) on PD45 as compared to respective controls. No significant change in the expression of any of these proteins was observed in corpus striatum of developing rats prenatally exposed to LCT at low dose (0.5mg/kg body weight) on PD22 and PD45 as compared to respective controls. The results provide interesting evidence that alterations in dopaminergic signaling on LCT exposure are due to selective changes in DA-D2 receptors in corpus striatum of developing rats. Further, these changes could be attributed to impairment in spontaneous motor activity on LCT exposure in developing rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  6. Biochemical and histopathological changes in the kidney and adrenal gland of rats following repeated exposure to lambda-cyhalothrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassina Khaldoun Oularbi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT is a type II pyrethroid insecticide widely used in pest management. This study was undertaken to evaluate the toxic effects of LCT on the kidneys and adrenal glands of rats after subacute exposure. Twenty-eight 6-week-old male albino Rattus norvegicus rats were randomly assigned to four groups. Group 1 was the control group, which received distilled water. The experimental groups 2, 3 and 4 received 20.4, 30.6 and 61.2 mg/kg body weight, respectively, of LCT, administered orally over 28 days. The effects of the insecticide on various biochemical parameters were evaluated at 14 and 28 days. Histopathological studies were carried out in the kidneys and adrenal glands at the end of the experiment. Lambda-cyhalothrin, as a pyrethroid insecticide, induced significant increases (P≤0.05 in plasma urea, creatinine, uric acid and glucose concentrations, and alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities after 14 and 28 days. In the rat plasma samples after 28 days, residual concentrations of LCT 1R, cis,

  7. Field evaluation of lambda-cyhalothrin (ICON 10 CS indoor residual spraying against Anopheles culicifacies in India

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    K. Raghavendra, S.K. Ghosh, Alex Eapen, S.N. Tiwari, T.S. Satyanarayan, John Ravindran, U. Sreehari & A.P. Dash

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Field trials of lambda-cyhalothrin 10 CS (ICON 10 CS in indoor residual spraying(IRS with 25 mg a.i./m2 against Anopheles culicifacies was undertaken vs malathion IRS (25% WP–2 g a.i./m2 in Tumkur district, Karnataka; vs deltamethrin IRS (2.5% WP–20 mg a.i./m2 in Dharmapuri district; andvs lambda-cyhalothrin (10 WP–25 mg a.i./m2 in Ramanathapuram district, Tamil Nadu, India.Methods: Spray operations in the experimental villages were done by the National Institute of Malaria Research(NIMR and in the control villages by the respective State Health Department staff. Persistence of efficacy ofinsecticide sprayed in villages was assessed by contact bioassays against vector mosquitoes. Entomologicalindicators such as per structure density, parity rates of vector mosquitoes and sporozoite rates were measuredin all the three study areas using standard procedures. Mass blood surveys and active fever case detectionswere carried out in experimental and control villages to study the impact of IRS on malaria transmission.Results: Persistence of effectiveness of ICON 10 CS was observed up to 2–3 months in all the three studyareas. ICON 10 CS was found effective at par with or better than the insecticides used in the national programmein reducing the mosquito densities and in interrupting malaria transmission in the study villages. Vectordensity, parity rates and malaria cases considerably reduced in the ICON 10 CS-sprayed villages.Conclusion: Field trials at three sites have established that ICON 10 CS formulation was relatively moreeffective than malathion 25% WP, deltamethrin 2.5% WP and lambda-cyhalothrin 10% WP in some evaluationparameters like indoor resting mosquitoes, parity rates in vector mosquitoes and persistence of effectiveness.It can be used for IRS for malaria vector control with two rounds of spray at an interval of 3 months forcurtailing the malaria transmission and an additional round is recommended in

  8. Comparison of laboratory single species and field population-level effects of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin on freshwater invertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroer, A.F.W.; Belgers, J.D.M.; Brock, T.C.M.; Matser, A.M.; Maund, S.J.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2004-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin to freshwater invertebrates has been investigated using data from short-term laboratory toxicity tests and in situ bioassays and population-level effects in field microcosms. In laboratory tests, patterns of toxicity were consistent with

  9. Resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin in Spanish field populations of Ceratitis capitata and metabolic resistance mediated by P450 in a resistant strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arouri, Rabeh; Le Goff, Gaelle; Hemden, Hiethem; Navarro-Llopis, Vicente; M'saad, Mariem; Castañera, Pedro; Feyereisen, René; Hernández-Crespo, Pedro; Ortego, Félix

    2015-09-01

    The withdrawal of malathion in the European Union in 2009 resulted in a large increase in lambda-cyhalothrin applications for the control of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata, in Spanish citrus crops. Spanish field populations of C. capitata have developed resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin (6-14-fold), achieving LC50 values (129-287 ppm) higher than the recommended concentration for field treatments (125 ppm). These results contrast with the high susceptibility to lambda-cyhalothrin found in three Tunisian field populations. We have studied the mechanism of resistance in the laboratory-selected resistant strain W-1Kλ (205-fold resistance). Bioassays with synergists showed that resistance was almost completely suppressed by the P450 inhibitor PBO. The study of the expression of 53 P450 genes belonging to the CYP4, CYP6, CYP9 and CYP12 families in C. capitata revealed that CYP6A51 was overexpressed (13-18-fold) in the resistant strain. The W-1Kλ strain also showed high levels of cross-resistance to etofenprox (240-fold) and deltamethrin (150-fold). Field-evolved resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin has been found in C. capitata. Metabolic resistance mediated by P450 appears to be the main resistance mechanism in the resistant strain W-1Kλ. The levels of cross-resistance found may compromise the effectiveness of other pyrethroids for the control of this species. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Spinach or amaranth contains highest residue of metalaxyl, fluazifop-P-butyl, chlorpyrifos, and lambda-cyhalothrin on six leaf vegetables upon open field application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Sufang; Zhang, Fengzu; Deng, Kailin; Yu, Chuanshan; Liu, Shaowen; Zhao, Pengyue; Pan, Canping

    2013-03-06

    To select representative leaf vegetables which may contain the highest residue, field experiments of metalaxyl, fluazifop-P-butyl, chlorpyrifos, and lambda-cyhalothrin on six crops including pakchoi, rape, crown daisy, amaranth, spinach, and lettuce were designed and conducted. In this study, a high-performance liquid chromatograph and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer with multiple reaction monitoring was used to simultaneously determine metalaxyl and fluazifop-P-butyl residue in various samples, and a gas chromatograph with electron capture detector was used to detect chlorpyrifos and lambda-cyhalothrin. The limits of quantification (LOQ) of metalaxyl, fluazifop-P-butyl, chlorpyrifos, and lambda-cyhalothrin were in the range of 0.001-0.01 mg kg(-1) for all samples, and the average recoveries of all pesticides ranged from 67.6 to 119.1% at spiked levels of 0.01-0.1 mg kg(-1). In supervised field trials, the half-lives of metalaxyl, fluazifop-P-butyl, chlorpyrifos, and lambda-cyhalothrin were in the range of 1.11-3.79 days, 1.11-2.27 days, 1.13-5.17 days, and 1.77-6.24 days. It was also found that all pesticide residues in spinach and/or amaranth were higher than others after application. It is recommended that spinach or amaranth can be selected as a representative crop of leaf vegetables in studying systemic fungicide, insecticides, and herbicides with similarity as metalaxyl, fluazifop-P-butyl, chlorpyrifos, and lambda-cyhalothrin.

  11. Lambda-Cyhalothrin Resistance in the Lady Beetle Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Confers Tolerance to Other Pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J B; Rodrigues, A R S; Barros, E M; Santos, D S

    2015-02-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely recommended to control insect defoliators but lack efficacy against most aphid species. Thus, conserving aphid predators such as the lady beetle Eriopis connexa (Germar) is important to pest management in crop ecosystems that require pyrethroid sprays. In a greenhouse, early fourth-instar larvae and 5-day-old adults from susceptible (S) and resistant (R) E. connexa populations were caged on lambda-cyhalothrin-treated cotton plants, after which survival and egg production (for those caged at adult stage) were assessed. In the laboratory, similar groups were subjected to dried residues and topical treatment with one of eight pyrethroids (alpha-cypermethrin, bifenthrin, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, fenpropathrin, permethrin, zeta-cypermethrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin), the organophosphate methidathion, or water and wetting agent. After caging on treated cotton terminals, 66% of the R-population larvae survived to adulthood, compared with 2% of those from the S-population. At 12 d after caging at adult stage under the same conditions, 64% of the females from the R-population survived and laid eggs, compared with 100% mortality and no oviposition for the S-females. In trials involving dried insecticide residues, gain in survival based on the survival difference (percentage for R-population minus percentage for S-population) across all tested pyrethroids varied from 3 to 63% for larvae and from 3 to 70% for adults. In trials involving topical sprays of the tested pyrethroids, survival differences ranged from 36 to 96% for larvae and from 21 to 82% for adults. Fenpropathrin and bifenthrin were the least and most toxic, respectively. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. NMR-based metabolomics approach to study the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin to goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minghui [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Department of Natural Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tong Jia Xiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wang, Junsong, E-mail: wang.junsong@gmail.com [Center for Molecular Metabolism, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, 200 Xiao Ling Wei Street, Nanjing 210094 (China); Lu, Zhaoguang; Wei, Dandan; Yang, Minghua [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Department of Natural Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tong Jia Xiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Kong, Lingyi, E-mail: cpu_lykong@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Department of Natural Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tong Jia Xiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: •A goldfish model was established to investigate the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) exposure on multiple organs. •NMR based metabolomics approach were firstly used to provide a global view of the toxicity of LCT. •LCT induced neurotransmitters and osmoregulatory imbalances, oxidative stress, energy and amino acid metabolic disorders. •Glutamate–glutamine–GABA axis as a potential target for LCT toxicity was first found. -- Abstract: In this study, a {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabolomics approach was applied to investigate the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) in goldfish (Carassius auratus). LCT showed tissue-specific damage to gill, heart, liver and kidney tissues of goldfish. NMR profiling combined with statistical methods such as orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) and two-dimensional statistical total correlation spectroscopy (2D-STOCSY) was developed to discern metabolite changes occurring after one week LCT exposure in brain, heart and kidney tissues of goldfish. LCT exposure influenced levels of many metabolites (e.g., leucine, isoleucine and valine in brain and kidney; lactate in brain, heart and kidney; alanine in brain and kidney; choline in brain, heart and kidney; taurine in brain, heart and kidney; N-acetylaspartate in brain; myo-inositol in brain; phosphocreatine in brain and heart; 2-oxoglutarate in brain; cis-aconitate in brain, and etc.), and broke the balance of neurotransmitters and osmoregulators, evoked oxidative stress, disturbed metabolisms of energy and amino acids. The implication of glutamate–glutamine–gamma-aminobutyric axis in LCT induced toxicity was demonstrated for the first time. Our findings demonstrated the applicability and potential of metabolomics approach for the elucidation of toxicological effects of pesticides and the underlying mechanisms, and the discovery of biomarkers for pesticide pollution in aquatic environment.

  13. Effect of long term exposure of low doses of lambda- cyhalothrin on the level of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes of the pregnant rats and their offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Tukhtaev

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lambda- cyhalothrin (LCT is a pyrethroid insecticide class, which is widely used for pest control in agriculture, public health, home and garden. In the present study we investigated the effect of long term exposure of low doses of the LCT on the state of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection of pregnant rats and their offspring. It was revealed, that prolonged exposure of lambda-cyhalothrin leads to the development of oxidative stress in both of pregnant females and their offspring. The highest level of lipid peroxidation detected on 14-21 days of pregnancy, which was accompanied by a reduction in activity of antioxidant enzymes. In the offspring highest level of oxidative stress observed on 7-14 days of lactation. The degree of oxidative stress in offspring decreases as the cessation of receipt of a pesticide or its toxic metabolites in breast milk.

  14. The effects of the insecticide lambda-Cyhalothrin on the earthworm Eisenia fetida under experimental conditions of tropical and temperate regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcos [Embrapa Amazonia Ocidental, Rod. AM-10, Km 28, 69.011-970 Manaus, AM (Brazil); Scheffczyk, Adam [ECT Oekotoxikologie, Boettgerstr. 2-14, D-65439 Floersheim (Germany); Garcia, Terezinha [Embrapa Amazonia Ocidental, Rod. AM-10, Km 28, 69.011-970 Manaus, AM (Brazil); Roembke, Joerg, E-mail: j-roembke@ect.d [ECT Oekotoxikologie, Boettgerstr. 2-14, D-65439 Floersheim (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Plant Protection Products can affect soil organisms and thus might have negative impacts on soil functions. Little research has been performed on their impact on tropical soils. Therefore, the effects of the insecticide lambda-Cyhalothrin on earthworms were evaluated in acute and chronic laboratory tests modified for tropical conditions, i.e. at selected temperatures (20 and 28 {sup o}C) and with two strains (temperate and tropical) of the compost worm Eisenia fetida. The insecticide was spiked in two natural soils, in OECD artificial soil and a newly developed tropical artificial soil. The effects of lambda-Cyhalothrin did rarely vary in the same soil at tropical (LC50: 68.5-229 mg a.i./kg dry weight (DW); EC50: 54.2-60.2 mg a.i./kg DW) and temperate (LC50: 99.8-140 mg a.i./kg DW; EC50: 37.4-44.5 mg a.i./kg DW) temperatures. In tests with tropical soils and high temperature, effect values differed by up to a factor of ten. - Research highlights: In one soil, effects of lambda-Cyhalothrin did not vary much at two temperatures. In tropical soils at high temperature, effects differed by up to a factor of ten. In the tropics, effects of pesticides can be higher or lower as in temperate regions. - The effects of the insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin on earthworms did not differ considerably when performed in the same soil under different temperatures, but LC/EC{sub 50} values varied by a factor of ten between OECD and tropical artificial soil.

  15. Protective role of caffeic acid on lambda cyhalothrin-induced changes in sperm characteristics and testicular oxidative damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Fatma Ben; Fetoui, Hamadi; Zribi, Nassira; Fakhfakh, Feiza; Keskes, Leila

    2012-08-01

    The synthetic pyrethroids are expected to cause deleterious effects on most of the organs and especially on the male reproductive system. The current study was performed to assess the adverse effect of lambda cyhalothrin (LC) on reproductive organs and fertility in male rats and to evaluate the protective role of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in alleviating the detrimental effect of LC on male fertility. A total of 48 male rats were divided into 4 groups (12 rats each): control group received distilled water ad libitum and 1 ml of vehicle solution given intraperitoneally (i.p.); CAPE-treated group received a single i.p. dose of CAPE (10 μmol kg⁻¹ day⁻¹); LC-treated group received 668 ppm of LC through drinking water; and CAPE + LC-treated group received an i.p. injection of CAPE (10 μmol kg⁻¹ day⁻¹) 12 h before the LC administration. The experiment was conducted for 10 consecutive weeks. LC caused a significant increase in testicular malondialdehyde, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione-S-transferase activities, and sperm abnormalities and a significant reduction in testicular glutathione concentration, sperm count, sperm motility, and a live sperm percentage. Conversely, treatment with CAPE improved the reduction in the sperm characteristics, LC-induced oxidative damage of testes and the testicular histopathological alterations. Results indicate that LC exerts significant harmful effects on the male reproductive system and that CAPE reduced the deleterious effects of LC on male fertility.

  16. Identification and functional characterization of esterases in Euschistus heros (Hemiptera, Pentatomidae) and their relationship with thiamethoxam and lambda-cyhalothrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegeto, L A; Ronqui, L; Lapenta, A S; Albuquerque, F A

    2015-09-22

    The brown stink bug Euschistus heros is the most abundant species of the soybean-sucking bugs, and causes large economic losses. Applying different chemical groups of organosynthetic insecticides for its control increases the potential for resistance. Esterases are a group of enzymes that play a variety of roles in insects, and some of them are related to the metabolism of xenobiotics. The aim of this study was to analyze the esterase isoenzyme system of this species and investigate its response to Engeo™ Pleno (thiamethoxam and lambda-cyhalothrin), which is the most widely used pesticide in soybean crops. Two strains were analyzed: the EB strain, which had been free of insecticides for several generations; and the MA strain, which was collected in a location exposed to agrochemicals. By analyzing the polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis profile, seven different esterases in adults and nymphs of both strains were found. Eight gene loci were responsible for the synthesis of these enzymes. The differences in esterases between the two strains and enzyme changes in insects exposed to Engeo™ Pleno suggest that EST-2 and EST-4 are related to the metabolism of the agrochemical used and are mechanisms of resistance.

  17. Comparison of the acute toxicity for gamma-cyhalothrin and lambda-cyhalothrin to zebra fish and shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Cai, D J; Shan, Z J; Chen, W L; Poletika, Nick; Gao, X W

    2007-03-01

    Gamma-cyhalothrin 15CS (GCH) contains only the active stereoisomer of the two isomers found in lambda-cyhalothrin 25EW (LCH). GCH (0.5 x rate) provides equivalent overall insect control as LCH (1 x rate). Both formulations showed high acute toxicity to zebra fish (Brachydanio rerio H.B.) and shrimp (Macrobrachium nippoensis de Haan). The 96-h LC(50(zebra fish,GCH)) is 1.93 microg a.i/L and LC(50(zebra fish,LCH)) is 1.94 microg a.i/L. LC(50(shrimp,GCH)) is 0.28 microg a.i./L and LC(50(shrimp,LCH)) 0.04 microg a.i./L. This indicates that the toxicity to shrimp is likely stereochemistry-dependent. The fates of GCH and LCH are similar in laboratory simulated rice paddy water and their concentrations decrease rapidly, with no GCH or LCH detected after 3 or 4 days. Both are toxic to shrimp in a simulated paddy irrigation reservoir even though treated return water is diluted 5 times. No shrimp fatality is shown in the GCH-treated paddy water after a 4-day holding period, and longer than 5 days is necessary to reach a zero fatality rate for LCH. This is compatible with the 7-day water holding period considered reasonable in agricultural practice.

  18. Efectos subletales de la lambda-cialotrina sobre Eisenia fetida (Annelida, Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae Sublethal effects of lambda-cyhalothrin on Eisenia fetida (Annelida, Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Ricardo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available El uso intensivo de agroquímicos provoca efectos dañinos sobre la fauna no blanco. Dentro de la misma, los oligoquetos contribuyen a mantener la estructura y fertilidad del suelo. La lambda-cialotrina es uno de los insecticidas piretroides más utilizados en la Argentina, pero son escasos los datos existentes acerca de su toxicidad sobre oligoquetos. Los objetivos de este trabajo fueron evaluar mediante bioensayos de toxicidad crónica los efectos de lambda-cialotrina (producto comercial al 5% en Eisenia fetida sobre los parámetros de comportamiento, sobrevivencia, biomasa, reproducción y bioacumulación, así como la persistencia en suelo OECD de dicho tóxico. Los resultados muestran un comportamiento de huída intenso a partir de la concentración más baja, con un EC50 de 1,36 mg kg-1 (95% C.L. 0,24 - 2,80. No se observaron efectos en sobrevivencia y alimentación. La reproducción fue afectada significativamente (F= 11,94, PThe intensive use of agrochemicals has deleterious effects on non-target organisms. Among these organisms, earthworms are important because of their role in keeping the soil structure and fertility. Lambda-cyhalothrin is one of the most widely used pyrethroid insecticide in Argentina, but there are not enough studies of the effects of this pesticide on earthworms. The goals of this work were to perform chronic toxicity bioassays to determine the effects of commercial lambda-cyhalothrin (at 5% on Eisenia fetida. The parameters of behaviour, survival, biomass, reproduction, bioaccumulation and the degradation time of lambda-cyhalotrin in an OECD standard soil were also estimated. Results showed a hard avoidance behaviour in the lowest lambda-cyhalothrin concentration with an EC50 of 1.36 mg kg-1 (95% C.L 0.24-2.80. Eisenia fetida chronic test survival and feeding were not affected by lambda-cyhalothrin but negative effects on reproduction were significant (P<0.05. Cocoon production and fertility were reduced and

  19. Mixed-function oxidases and esterases associated with cross-r esistance between DDT and lambda-cyhalothrin in Anopheles darlingi Root 1926 populations from Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idalyd Fonseca-González

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to establish the insecticide susceptibility status for Anopheles darlingi in Colombia, and as part of the National Network on Insecticide Resistance Surveillance, five populations of insects from three Colombian states were evaluated. Standardised WHO and CDC bottle bioassays, in addition to microplate biochemical assays, were conducted. Populations with mortality rates below 80% in the bioassays were considered resistant. All field populations were susceptible to deltamethrin, permethrin, malathion and fenitrothion. Resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin and DDT was detected in the Amé-Beté population using both bioassay methods with mortality rates of 65-75%. Enzyme levels related to insecticide resistance, including mixed function oxidases (MFO, non-specific esterases (NSE, glutathione S-transferases and modified acetylcholinesterase were evaluated in all populations and compared with a susceptible natural strain. Only mosquitoes from Amé-Beté presented significantly increased levels of both MFO and NSE, consistent with the low mortalities found in this population. The continued use of lambda-cyhalothrin for An. darlingi control in this locality has resulted in a natural resistance to this insecticide. In addition, DDT resistance is still present in this population, although this insecticide has not been used in Colombia since 1992. Increased metabolism through MFO and NSE may be involved in cross-resistance between lambda-cyhalothrin and DDT, although kdr-type nerve insensitivity cannot be discarded as a possible hypothesis. Additional research, including development of a kdr specific assay for An. darlingi should be conducted in future studies. Our data demonstrates the urgent need to develop local insecticide resistance management and surveillance programs throughout Colombia.

  20. Reasoned opinion on the review of the existing maximum residue levels (MRLs for lambda-cyhalothrin according to Article 12 of Regulation (EC No 396/2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to Article 12 of Regulation (EC No 396/2005, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA has reviewed the Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs currently established at European level for the pesticide active substance lambda-cyhalothrin. In order to assess the occurrence of lambda-cyhalothrin residues in plants, processed commodities, rotational crops and livestock, EFSA considered the conclusions derived in the framework of Directive 91/414/EEC, the MRLs established by the Codex Alimentarius Commission as well as the import tolerances and European authorisations reported by Member States (incl. the supporting residues data. Based on the assessment of the available data, MRL proposals were derived and a consumer risk assessment was carried out. Some information required by the regulatory framework was found to be missing and a possible acute risk to consumers was identified. Hence, the consumer risk assessment is considered indicative only, some MRL proposals derived by EFSA still require further consideration by risk managers and measures for reduction of the consumer exposure should also be considered.

  1. Minor crops for export: a case study of boscalid, pyraclostrobin, lufenuron and lambda-cyhalothrin residue levels on green beans and spring onions in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafi, Ahmad; Garau, Vincenzo L; Caboni, Pierluigi; Sarais, Giorgia; Cabras, Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Dissipation rates of boscalid [2-chloro-N-(4' -chlorobiphenyl-2-yl)nicotinamide], pyraclostrobin [methyl 2-[1-(4-chlorophenyl) pyrazol-3-yloxymethyl]-N-methoxycarbanilate], lufenuron [(RS)-1-[2,5-dichloro-4-(1,1,2,3,3,3-hexafluoropropoxy)phenyl]-3-(2,6-difluorobenzoyl)urea] and lambda-cyhalothrin [(R)-cyano(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl (1S,3S)-rel-3-[(1Z)-2-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoro-1-propenyl]-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate] in green beans and spring onions under Egyptian field conditions were studied. Field trials were carried out in 2008 in a Blue Nile farm, located at 70 kilometer (km) from Cairo (Egypt). The pesticides were sprayed at the recommended rate and samples were collected at pre-determined intervals. After treatment (T(0)) the pesticide residues in green beans were 7 times lower than in spring onions. This is due to a different structure of vegetable plant in the two crops. In spring onions, half-life (t(1/2)) of pyraclostrobin and lufenuron was 3.1 days and 9.8 days respectively. At day 14th (T(14)) after treatment boscalid residues were below the Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) (0.34 versus 0.5 mg/kg), pyraclostrobin and lambda -cyhalothrin residues were not detectable (ND), while lufenuron residues were above the MRL (0.06 versus 0.02 mg/kg). In green beans, at T(0), levels of boscalid, lufenuron and lambda -cyhalothrin were below the MRL (0.28 versus 2 mg/kg; ND versus 0.02 mg/kg; 0.06 versus 0.2 mg/kg, respectively) while, after 7 days treatment (T(7)) pyraclostrobin residues were above the MRL (0.03 versus 0.02 mg/kg). However, after 14 days the residue level could go below the MRL (0.02 mg/kg), as observed in spring onions.

  2. Geometric morphometrics of nine field isolates of Aedes aegypti with different resistance levels to lambda-cyhalothrin and relative fitness of one artificially selected for resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-O, Nicolás; Fonseca-González, Idalyd; Chaverra-Rodríguez, Duverney

    2014-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, a mosquito closely associated with humans, is the principal vector of dengue virus which currently infects about 400 million people worldwide. Because there is no way to prevent infection, public health policies focus on vector control; but insecticide-resistance threatens them. However, most insecticide-resistant mosquito populations exhibit fitness costs in absence of insecticides, although these costs vary. Research on components of fitness that vary with insecticide-resistance can help to develop policies for effective integrated management and control. We investigated the relationships in wing size, wing shape, and natural resistance levels to lambda-cyhalothrin of nine field isolates. Also we chose one of these isolates to select in lab for resistance to the insecticide. The main life-traits parameters were assessed to investigate the possible fitness cost and its association with wing size and shape. We found that wing shape, more than wing size, was strongly correlated with resistance levels to lambda-cyhalothrin in field isolates, but founder effects of culture in the laboratory seem to change wing shape (and also wing size) more easily than artificial selection for resistance to that insecticide. Moreover, significant fitness costs were observed in response to insecticide-resistance as proved by the diminished fecundity and survival of females in the selected line and the reversion to susceptibility in 20 generations of the non-selected line. As a practical consequence, we think, mosquito control programs could benefit from this knowledge in implementing efficient strategies to prevent the evolution of resistance. In particular, the knowledge of reversion to susceptibility is important because it can help in planning better strategies of insecticide use to keep useful the few insecticide-molecules currently available.

  3. Geometric morphometrics of nine field isolates of Aedes aegypti with different resistance levels to lambda-cyhalothrin and relative fitness of one artificially selected for resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Jaramillo-O

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti, a mosquito closely associated with humans, is the principal vector of dengue virus which currently infects about 400 million people worldwide. Because there is no way to prevent infection, public health policies focus on vector control; but insecticide-resistance threatens them. However, most insecticide-resistant mosquito populations exhibit fitness costs in absence of insecticides, although these costs vary. Research on components of fitness that vary with insecticide-resistance can help to develop policies for effective integrated management and control. We investigated the relationships in wing size, wing shape, and natural resistance levels to lambda-cyhalothrin of nine field isolates. Also we chose one of these isolates to select in lab for resistance to the insecticide. The main life-traits parameters were assessed to investigate the possible fitness cost and its association with wing size and shape. We found that wing shape, more than wing size, was strongly correlated with resistance levels to lambda-cyhalothrin in field isolates, but founder effects of culture in the laboratory seem to change wing shape (and also wing size more easily than artificial selection for resistance to that insecticide. Moreover, significant fitness costs were observed in response to insecticide-resistance as proved by the diminished fecundity and survival of females in the selected line and the reversion to susceptibility in 20 generations of the non-selected line. As a practical consequence, we think, mosquito control programs could benefit from this knowledge in implementing efficient strategies to prevent the evolution of resistance. In particular, the knowledge of reversion to susceptibility is important because it can help in planning better strategies of insecticide use to keep useful the few insecticide-molecules currently available.

  4. In-house method validation and occurrence of alpha-, beta-endosulfan, endosulfan sulphate, lambda-cyhalothrin, procymidone and trifluralin residues in strawberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Augusto Soares

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A method for determination of organohalogen pesticides in strawberry by gas chromatography with electron capture detection was validated and applied in a monitoring program. Linearity, matrix effects, and day effect were evaluated for the analytes alpha-endosulfan, beta-endosulfan, endosulfan sulphate, lambda-cyhalothrin, procymidone, and trifluralin. The linear range varied according to the chromatographic response of the analyte. Significant matrix effects were observed. The mean recoveries ranged from 74.6 to 115.4%, with repeatability standard deviations between 1.6 and 21.0% and intermediate precision between 5.9 and 21.0%. Detection, quantification and decision limit, and detection capacity ranged from 0.003 to 0.007 mg/kg, 0.005 to 0.013 mg/kg; 0.003 to 3.128 mg/kg; and 0.005 to 3.266 mg/kg, respectively. The method was fit for the purpose of monitoring organohalogen residues in strawberries. Residues of these pesticides were detected in 124 of the 186 samples analyzed between 2009 and 2011 in the state of Minas Gerais. Nine of them did not comply with the current legislation requirements; among them, seven (3.8% had residues of unauthorized pesticide for the culture of strawberry, one (0.5% had residues above the maximum residue limit, and another one (0.5% exhibited both non-conformities.

  5. Molecular Cloning and Expression of CYP9A61: A Chlorpyrifos-Ethyl and Lambda-Cyhalothrin-Inducible Cytochrome P450 cDNA from Cydia pomonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqing Yang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs or P450s play paramount roles in detoxification of insecticides in a number of insect pests. However, little is known about the roles of P450s and their responses to insecticide exposure in the codling moth Cydia pomonella (L., an economically important fruit pest. Here we report the characterization and expression analysis of the first P450 gene, designated as CYP9A61, from this pest. The full-length cDNA sequence of CYP9A61 is 2071 bp long and its open reading frame (ORF encodes 538 amino acids. Sequence analysis shows that CYP9A61 shares 51%–60% identity with other known CYP9s and contains the highly conserved substrate recognition site SRS1, SRS4 and SRS5. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that CYP9A61 were 67-fold higher in the fifth instar larvae than in the first instar, and more abundant in the silk gland and fat body than other tissues. Exposure of the 3rd instar larvae to 12.5 mg L−1 of chlorpyrifos-ethyl for 60 h and 0.19 mg L−1 of lambda-cyhalothrin for 36 h resulted in 2.20- and 3.47-fold induction of CYP9A61, respectively. Exposure of the 3rd instar larvae to these two insecticides also significantly enhanced the total P450 activity. The results suggested that CYP9A61 is an insecticide-detoxifying P450.

  6. Tissue distribution, metabolism and hepatic tissue injury in Chinese lizards (Eremias argus) after a single oral administration of lambda-cyhalothrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jing; Li, Jitong; Wang, Huili; Wang, Yinghuan; Guo, Baoyuan; Yin, Jing; Hao, Weiyu; Li, Wei; Li, Jianzhong; Xu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) is a widely used pyrethroid with neurotoxicity. However, little is known about the toxicokinetics of LCT in reptiles. In this study, the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of LCT in Chinese lizards (Eremias Argus) were determined following a single dose (10 mg kg(-1)) treatment. In the liver, brain, gonads and skin, LCT levels peaked within several hours and then decreased rapidly. However, the concentration of LCT gradually increased in the fat tissue. More than 90% of the LCT dose was excreted in the faeces. One LCT metabolite, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (PBA), was detected in lizard plasma and tissues. PBA preferentially accumulates in the brain and plasma. The half-life of PBA in the brain was 3.2 days, which was 35.4-fold greater than that of LCT. In the plasma, the concentration of PBA was significantly higher than that of LCT. The bioaccumulation of LCT in tissues was enantioselective, and the enantiomeric fractions (EF) ranged from 0.72 to 0.26. The preferential accumulation of enantiomers changed according to exposure time, but the reasons behind this phenomenon were not clear. For pathological analysis, vacuolation of the cytoplasm and large areas of necrosis were observed in the liver sections after 168 h of dosing. The liver tissues exhibited both decreases in the hepatosomatic index and histopathological lesions during the exposure period. In this study, the effect concentration of LCT in lizards was 200-fold lower than its LD50 value used in risk assessments for birds. These results may provide additional information for the risk assessment of LCT for reptiles and indicate that birds may not be an ideal surrogate for reptile toxicity evaluation.

  7. Control efficiency of lambda-cyhalothrin and thiamethoxam against the red imported fire ant (Hymenoptera:Formicidae)%高效氯氟氰菊酯和噻虫嗪对红火蚁的室内毒力

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭德龙; 陆永跃; 李鑫; 曾玲; 许益镌

    2014-01-01

    Lambda-cyhalothrin and thiamethoxam are common agricultural insecticides .[Method]Virulence of 0.25 g · L-1 lambda-cyhalothrin aqueous capsule suspension and 0.01%thiamethoxam gel bait against Solenopsis invicta were tested in la-boratory.[Result]The lambda-cyhalothrin microcapsule suspension showed active contact toxicities on S.invicta with a short expo-sure time, high mortality rate, and effective transduction rate .Thiamethoxam gel bait was successfully transferred between workers and larval ants by feeding worker ants .Under these conditions , up to 93.5%of the colony could be killed in laboratory conditions .[Conclusion and significance]The results indicated that both insecticides could be used as effective agent for fire ant control .%【背景】高效氯氟氰菊酯和噻虫嗪是农业上常用的杀虫剂。【方法】在室内测定了0.25 g· L-1高效氯氟氰菊酯微囊悬浮剂和0.01%噻虫嗪胶饵对红火蚁的毒力。【结果】高效氯氟氰菊酯微囊悬浮剂对红火蚁有良好的触杀作用,触杀时间短,致死量大,具备毒力传导作用;噻虫嗪胶饵能通过虫体间交哺传导毒力,室内防治整巢红火蚁效果可达93.50%以上。【结论与意义】这2种药剂都具有有效防治红火蚁的潜力。

  8. 25%噻虫胺·高效氯氟氰菊酯微囊悬浮剂防治温室白粉虱的田间药效试验%Control Effects of 25%Clothianidin Lambda-cyhalothrin Microcapsules SC on Trialeurodes vaporariorum in Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶晡; 苑士涛; 范凡; 魏国树

    2014-01-01

    为了明确25%噻虫胺·高效氯氟氰菊酯微囊悬浮剂对温室白粉虱的防治效果,2013年以常用药剂25%噻虫嗪水分散粒剂和5%高效氯氟氰菊酯微乳剂为药剂对照,在夏春秋甘蓝上测定了25%噻虫胺·高效氯氟氰菊酯微囊悬浮剂2500倍液、2000倍液和1500倍液对温室白粉虱的田间防治效果。结果表明:在试验剂量条件下,25%噻虫胺·高效氯氟氰菊酯微囊悬浮剂对温室白粉虱具有较好的防治效果,且持效期长,对温室白粉虱的天敌种类和数量以及甘蓝生长等均无不良影响。其中,施用1500倍液防效最好,试验期内的防效始终>药剂对照,施药后第7 d防效为86.97%;施用2000倍液防效次之,除施药后第1 d外,其他时段的防效均>药剂对照且与施用1500倍液防效差异不显著。生产上推荐25%噻虫胺·高效氯氟氰菊酯微囊悬浮剂施用浓度为2000~1500倍液,折合有效成分用量为93.75~112.5 g/hm2。%In order to define the control effects of 25% clothianidin lambda-cyhalothrin microcapsules SC on Trialeurodes vaporariorum, the 25% clothianidin lambda-cyhalothrin microcapsules SC was diluted 2 500, 2 000 and 1 500 times in liquid, and the control effects of which on Trialeurodes vaporariorum were tested with the 25%actara WG and 5% lambda-cyhalothrin ME insecticides as control in 2013.The results showed that 25%clothianidin lambda-cyhalothrin microcapsules SC revealed good control effects , and in the dose of 25%clothianidin lambda-cyhalothrin microcapsules SC, the cabbage was safe and there were no adverse effects on natural enemy species and quantity.25% clothianidin lambda-cyhalothrin microcapsules SC 1 500-2 000 times liquid treatments showed good control effects on Trialeurodes vaporariorum, and they were all higher than the effects of control treatments.The control effect of 25% clothianidin lambda-cyhalothrin microcapsules SC diluted 1 500 times was

  9. 基于叶绿素评价高效氯氟氰菊酯对三种农作物生态安全性%The Safety Assessment of Lambda-cyhalothrin for The Three Crops According to Chlorophyll Contents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晴晴; 丁艳梅; 徐笑; 王涛; 张悦; 杜宝贞; 曲爱军

    2013-01-01

    对大田栽培作物玉米、棉花、红薯和花生,用喷雾器喷施不同浓度杀虫剂高效氯氟氰菊酯,24h后测定4种作物叶绿素和类胡萝卜素的含量.结果表明,3 000倍高效氯氟氰菊酯对红薯和玉米是安全的,而高效氯氟氰菊酯对棉花则完全是有利的.%In the field, the leaves of maize, cotton and sweet potato were spayed the different concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin. The contents of chlorophyll and carotenoid were tested at the 24th hour. The result showed that lambda-cyhalothrin which concentration was 3 000 times for the sweet potato and maize was safe. It was not harmful of lambda-cyhalothrin between 1 000 to 3 000 times to the cotton.

  10. Outer Rail for Wall Plate Covering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The outer rail retains two lateral screw webs of an intermediate rail to construct a base for wall plate covering. Two retention devices are disposed oppositely on respective inner sides of each retention web for retaining a respective screw web of the intermediate rail. Each retention device...

  11. Outer Rail for Wall Plate Covering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The outer rail retains two lateral screw webs of an intermediate rail to construct a base for wall plate covering. Two retention devices are disposed oppositely on respective inner sides of each retention web for retaining a respective screw web of the intermediate rail. Each retention device...

  12. Toxicidade comparativa de lambda- cyalothrin à lagarta-da-soja, Anticarsia gemmatalis Hueb., 1818 (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae e ao percevejo verde, Nezara viridula (L., 1758 (Hemiptera, Pentatomidae Comparative toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin to the velvetbean caterpillar, Anticarsia gemmatalis Hueb., 1818 (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae and to the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (L., 1758 (Hemiptera, Pentatomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.C. de Baptista

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar, através dos valores de dose letal (DL50, a toxicidade comparativa do inseticida piretróide lambda-cyalothrin à lagarta-da-soja, Anticarsia gemmatalis e à ninfas do percevejo verde, Nezara viridula, tomando-se como padrão de comparação o inseticida organofosforadomonocrotofós. Os experimentos foram realizados em condições de laboratório por técnica de aplicação tópica, sendo usadas lagartas e ninfas, ambas de 3° instar. As avaliações das mortalidades foram feitas 3, 6, 24, 48 e 72 horas após o tratamento. O parâmetro DL50 foi determinado por análises de probit através de software apropriado. Lambda-cyalothrin agiu mais rapidamente do que monocrotofós contra as lagartas, sendo cerca de 140 a 190 vezes mais tóxico para elas e de 20 a 40 vezes mais ativo contra as ninfas. O inseticida piretróide foi ainda de 5 a 9 vezes mais tóxico à lagarta-da-soja do que ao percevejo verde.The objective of this study was to evaluate the comparative toxicity of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin to the velvetbean caterpillar, Anticarsia gemmatalis and to the nymphs of the southern green stink bug, Nezara virídula. The lethal dose (LD50 values were compared with the ones of the organophosphoms insecticide monocrotophos. The experiments were performed under laboratory conditions by topical application technique to 3rd instars of both caterpillars and nymphs. Mortality evaluations were made at 3, 6, 24, 48 and 72 hours after treatment. The LD50 parameters were determined by probit analyses through appropriate software. Lambda-cyhalothrin acted more rapidly than monocrotophos against the caterpillars, being approximately 140-190 times more toxic than the latter. Lambda-cyhalothrin was 20-40 times more active against the nymphs than monocrotophos. The pyrethroid insecticide was about 5-9 times more toxic to the velvetbean caterpillar than to the southern green stink bug.

  13. High resolution PIV of flow over biofilm covered walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartenberger, Joel; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Microbial, 'slime' biofilms detrimentally affect the performance of engineered systems used every day from heat exchangers to large ocean-going vessels. The presence of a slime layer on a pipe wall or external boundary often leads to a significant increase in drag and may alter the nature of the turbulence in the adjacent flow. Despite these consequences, relatively few efforts have been undertaken to understand the underlying physical processes which couple biofilm characteristics with increased drag and other alterations to the flow. Experiments performed in a 1:14 scale replica of the US Navy's Large Cavitation Channel (LCC) at the University of Michigan investigate the effect of biofilm composition, coverage and thickness on the development of an external turbulent boundary layer (TBL) through the use of conventional and micro PIV. A range of fields of view (FOVs) were used to capture both the inner and outer regions of the boundary layer. The fine resolution of micro PIV gives an in-depth look at the near-wall region of the flow and may provide evidence linking specific biofilm features with flow characteristics while the less resolved, larger FOVs capture flow behavior to the freestream. Measurement techniques used to characterize the biofilm will be presented along with a description of the mean flow and turbulent fluctuations in the TBL.

  14. Variations of insecticide residual bio-efficacy on different types of walls: results from a community-based trial in south Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etang Josiane

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determination of residual activity of insecticides is essential information for the selection of appropriate indoor spraying operation. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the residual effect of three candidate insecticide formulations on different indoor surfaces in order to guide future interventions, in the context of Cameroon and other African countries. Methods The study was conducted in the Ntougou neighbourhood in Yaoundé (capital city of Cameroon. Bendiocarb WP, lambda-cyhalothrin CS and deltamethrin WG were sprayed on the indoor wall surfaces of local cement, wood and mud houses. Their effects on the knockdown and mortality of the Kisumu susceptible strain of Anopheles gambiae s.s were assessed each month from March to September 2009, using the WHO plastic cones test. Knockdown and mortality rates were compared between different surfaces using Chi-square test. A Kaplan-Meir model was used to estimate the time of treatment failure. Results With bendiocarb WP, the knockdown rates were frequently above 98% during 13 weeks after spraying, except on mud walls where it significantly decreased at the 13th week (P th (83% and the 20th (88% weeks respectively (P 98%; while it varied between 60 and 100% on wood or mud surfaces. The survival estimates of bendiocarb WP treatments remaining effective in killing An. gambiae s.s. (mortality rate ≥ 80% was > 13 weeks on cement and wood surfaces and 13 weeks on mud surfaces. Those of lambda-cyhalothrin CS were > 26 weeks on wood surfaces, and 20 weeks on concrete and mud surfaces. By contrast, those of deltamethrin WG were 26 weeks on concrete, 20 weeks on mud surfaces and 15 weeks on wood surfaces. Conclusion Current data suggest variable durations of spray cycles for each product, according to the type of wall surfaces, highlighting the importance of testing candidate products in local context before using them in large scale.

  15. Chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with Marlex mesh for metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suganuma Nobuyasu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The distant metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinomas are often untreatable. In particular, bone metastasis is significantly related to poor prognosis since radioactive iodine therapy is generally less effective. Therefore, surgical resection is considered one of the treatments for patients with bone metastases. We report chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with polypropylene mesh (Marlex mesh for metastatic rib bones as a result of follicular thyroid carcinoma. Case presentation A 51-year-old man was referred to our institution with a painful chest wall tumor. He presented with a 15 × 10 cm bony swelling on the left chest wall and multiple small lung nodules from follicular thyroid carcinoma. Completion total thyroidectomy, chest wall resection and reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with Marlex mesh were performed. There were no critical complications associated with surgical treatments and tumor pain disappeared during the postoperative period. Then, he received radioactive iodine therapy and the uptake of radioactive iodine was well observed in bilateral lung fields. Conclusion Reconstruction using titanium micromesh covered with Marlex mesh is possible for repairing the wide chest wall resection required for thyroid carcinoma metastasis. This technique would help to enhance treatment efficacy in the combination therapy of radioactive iodine and surgery in patients with large thyroid carcinoma metastasis in the chest wall.

  16. 78 FR 71609 - Methiocarb, Lambda-Cyhalothrin, Permethrin and Prodiamine; Notice of Receipt of Requests To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... including environmental, human health, and agricultural advocates; the chemical industry; pesticide users.... Farnam Companies, Inc. voluntarily requested the cancellation of dog use from the Permethrin Farnam Purge... label (EPA Reg. No. 88541-1); Permethrin use on dogs from the label of Farnam Purge Pesticide (EPA...

  17. Domain walls collision in Fe-rich and Co-rich glass covered microwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of the investigation of domain walls propagation in Fe-rich and Co-rich microwires performed using Sixtus-Tonks and magneto-optical Kerr effect techniques. It was found that under certain experimental conditions we are able to create the regime of the motion of two domain walls moving to opposite directions which terminates by the collision of the domain walls. Also the domain walls collision was visualized using magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope when the surface giant Barkhausen jump induced by circular magnetic field has been observed.

  18. Partially uncovered Cheatham platinum-covered stent to treat complex aortic coarctation associated with aortic wall aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Gianfranco; Piazza, Luciane

    2015-04-01

    Percutaneous treatment of aortic coarctation is a widely used option. Covered stents have increased the profile of efficacy and safety of this procedure. Here we report on a 32-year-old woman with significant aortic recoarctation associated with aortic wall aneurysm and close proximity of both lesions to the origin of both the subclavian arteries. It was decided to manually and partially uncover the proximal part of the stent to have a hybrid stent that could act as a bare stent at the level of the origin of the subclavian arteries and as a covered stent at the level of the aneurysm.

  19. Advancing the quantification of humid tropical forest cover loss with multi-resolution optical remote sensing data: Sampling & wall-to-wall mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broich, Mark

    Humid tropical forest cover loss is threatening the sustainability of ecosystem goods and services as vast forest areas are rapidly cleared for industrial scale agriculture and tree plantations. Despite the importance of humid tropical forest in the provision of ecosystem services and economic development opportunities, the spatial and temporal distribution of forest cover loss across large areas is not well quantified. Here I improve the quantification of humid tropical forest cover loss using two remote sensing-based methods: sampling and wall-to-wall mapping. In all of the presented studies, the integration of coarse spatial, high temporal resolution data with moderate spatial, low temporal resolution data enable advances in quantifying forest cover loss in the humid tropics. Imagery from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are used as the source of coarse spatial resolution, high temporal resolution data and imagery from the Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) sensor are used as the source of moderate spatial, low temporal resolution data. In a first study, I compare the precision of different sampling designs for the Brazilian Amazon using the annual deforestation maps derived by the Brazilian Space Agency for reference. I show that sampling designs can provide reliable deforestation estimates; furthermore, sampling designs guided by MODIS data can provide more efficient estimates than the systematic design used for the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization Forest Resource Assessment 2010. Sampling approaches, such as the one demonstrated, are viable in regions where data limitations, such as cloud contamination, limit exhaustive mapping methods. Cloud-contaminated regions experiencing high rates of change include Insular Southeast Asia, specifically Indonesia and Malaysia. Due to persistent cloud cover, forest cover loss in Indonesia has only been mapped at a 5-10 year interval using photo interpretation of single

  20. Optimization of the heat output of wall convectors with using an unconventional slumped glass cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulhavy Petr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with study of a new shape of the glass cover of heat convectors. Design of the heat convectors is characterized by the low water volume, highly variable geometry, adjustable heat output and the pressure losses that arise when the fluid flow through the exchanger. Based on a new concept of a slumped glass cover of the exchanger have been created some numerical models and also carried out experiments in order to find and optimize an appropriate shape. The glass materials are very specific mainly due to their specific shaping abilities and technological capabilities of manufacturing. The aim is to determine an appropriate shape and a curvature of the glass body and also the position and size of the exchanger. It has been found a significant dependence of the heat exchanger position on to the total heat output of an entire device. Simultaneously has been proved also the dependence of a shape of the cover plate, to the total heat output, that is more considerably for natural than for the forced convection.

  1. The influence of covering a germanium nanowire with a single wall carbon nanotube on mechanical properties: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, M.; Davoodi, J.

    2017-07-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are potential candidates for applications in quantum information processing, Josephson junctions, and field-effect transistors. Therefore, this study focused on the effects of covering a germanium nanowire (GeNW) with a single wall carbon nanotube (CNT) on the stress-strain diagram, failure points, and Young's modulus using molecular dynamics simulations. To describe the interactions between atoms in the system, we used Tersoff potential. Also, a Nose-Hoover thermostat was employed to control temperature of the system. The stress-strain curves of GeNW and GeNW inside CNT (CNT-GeNW) were obtained at various temperatures, radii, and strain velocities. It was found that coverage of GeNW with CNT led to 2-6 fold improved Young's modulus. It was also determined that a significant part of the Young's modulus in CNT-GeNW is due to the presence of CNT. Moreover, we defined the behavior of Young's modulus of GeNW as well as CNT-GeNW in the [100], [110], and [111] crystallography direction and found that Young's modulus decreased with increasing temperature. In addition, by increasing strain velocity, Young's modulus decreased for GeNW but increased for CNT-GeNW. Finally, we observed that when a GeNW is covered by a CNT, its failure point increased as compared with GeNW.

  2. Suppression of Amblyomma americanum (Ixodida: Ixodidae) for Short-Term Field Operations Utilizing Cypermethrin and Lambda-Cyhalothrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    two grids (42 by 42 m) were established that contained a mix of open grasses and dense brush . Each grid was evenly divided into 49 plots,witheachplot...the label rate of one tablet in 1.9 liters of water, delivering 15 mg a.i./m2. Hand pump compression sprayers were used to apply the acaricides...developments in invertebrate repellents. ACS Symposium Series, American Chemical Society, Wash - ington, DC. Table 1. Host-seeking A. americanum abundance

  3. 40 CFR 180.438 - Lambda-cyhalothrin and an isomer gamma-cyhalothrin; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., hulls 5.0 Rice, straw 1.8 Rice, wild, grain 1.0 Rye, bran 0.2 Rye, grain 0.05 Rye, forage 2.0 Rye, straw... Sunflower, seed, hulls 0.50 Sunflower, refined oil 0.30 Sunflower, seed 0.2 Tomato 0.1 Tomato, dry pomace 6.0 Tomato, wet pomace 6.0 Vegetable, cucurbit, group 9 0.05 Vegetable, fruiting, group 8...

  4. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  5. MAD-MEX: Automatic Wall-to-Wall Land Cover Monitoring for the Mexican REDD-MRV Program Using All Landsat Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Gebhardt

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Estimating forest area at a national scale within the United Nations program of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD is primarily based on land cover information using remote sensing technologies. Timely delivery for a country of a size like Mexico can only be achieved in a standardized and cost-effective manner by automatic image classification. This paper describes the operational land cover monitoring system for Mexico. It utilizes national-scale cartographic reference data, all available Landsat satellite imagery, and field inventory data for validation. Seven annual national land cover maps between 1993 and 2008 were produced. The classification scheme defined 9 and 12 classes at two hierarchical levels. Overall accuracies achieved were up to 76%. Tropical and temperate forest was classified with accuracy up to 78% and 82%, respectively. Although specifically designed for the needs of Mexico, the general process is suitable for other participating countries in the REDD+ program to comply with guidelines on standardization and transparency of methods and to assure comparability. However, reporting of change is ill-advised based on the annual land cover products and a combination of annual land cover and change detection algorithms is suggested.

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotubes coated fibers for solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of pesticides in Tea samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fang; Lu, Wanping; Chen, Jinghua; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Lan

    2010-08-15

    Using a single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as stationary phase of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers, a simple, low cost and environmentally friendly method for extraction of 13 pesticides in Tea samples has been developed following gas chromatography-mass spectrometric determination. Potential factors affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized, including extraction and desorption time, extraction temperature, stirring rate, solution pH and ionic strength. Under optimized conditions, the linearity of the developed method was in the range of 0.125-25 ng/mL with correlation coefficients greater than 0.9928 and the limits of detections (LODs) were 0.027-0.23 ng/mL (S/N=3). Meanwhile, the relative standard deviations (RSDs) for five successive measurements with single fiber, fiber-to-fiber, day-to-day were 2.3-13.0, 8.2-14.6 and 4.1-12.5%, respectively, indicating good reproducibility of the proposed method. The fiber had high extraction efficiency for studied pesticides in comparison with commercial poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and polyacrylate (PA) fibers and could be used for more than 70 times without decrease of efficiency. The developed method was successfully applied for the analysis of real samples including green Tea, oolong Tea, white Tea, and flower Tea, and the recoveries of the pesticides spiked in these samples ranged from 75.1 to 118.4%. Chlorfenapyr and lambda-cyhalothrin were found in the Tea samples bought randomly from local market. The results demonstrated that the developed SWCNTs-SPME method was a simple, efficient pretreatment and enrichment procedure for pesticides in complex matrices. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of the substrate on the results of the fire tests of thin layers of floor, wall, and ceiling coverings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keski-Rahkonen, O. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). Fire Technology Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    In the fire tests of many building materials a thin sheet of the sample is mounted on a thicker substrate. The thermal properties of the substrate could have a considerable effect on the heating of a thin slab. This changes the ignition time, burning rate and other measured quantities, and could influence the conclusions from the fire test. Results from a simple linearized heat conduction model are reviewed and used to delineate regions in terms of Fourier and Biot numbers where that effect should be considered while designing fire tests for thin samples. The effective heat transfer coefficient is determined by an asymptotic approach device here. Experimental evidence supports this linearized theory for steel plates on wooden substrates. CEN/TC127/WG1 has proposed standard substrates for the fire tests of surface products. These substrates should represent and cover well common usage. These theoretical and experimental results are used to make a new proposal for standard substrates for CEN/TC127/WG1.

  8. Effect of the substrate on the results of the fire tests of thin layers of floor, wall, and ceiling coverings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keski-Rahkonen, O. [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). Fire Technology Lab.

    1992-12-31

    In the fire tests of many building materials a thin sheet of the sample is mounted on a thicker substrate. The thermal properties of the substrate could have a considerable effect on the heating of a thin slab. This changes the ignition time, burning rate and other measured quantities, and could influence the conclusions from the fire test. Results from a simple linearized heat conduction model are reviewed and used to delineate regions in terms of Fourier and Biot numbers where that effect should be considered while designing fire tests for thin samples. The effective heat transfer coefficient is determined by an asymptotic approach device here. Experimental evidence supports this linearized theory for steel plates on wooden substrates. CEN/TC127/WG1 has proposed standard substrates for the fire tests of surface products. These substrates should represent and cover well common usage. These theoretical and experimental results are used to make a new proposal for standard substrates for CEN/TC127/WG1.

  9. The Influence of Internal Wall and Floor Covering Materials and Ventilation Type on Indoor Radon and Thoron Levels in Hospitals of Kermanshah, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirsaheb, Meghdad; Najafi, Farid; Haghparast, Abbas; Hemati, Lida; Sharafi, Kiomars; Kurd, Nematullah

    2016-01-01

    Background Building materials and the ventilation rate of a building are two main factors influencing indoor radon and thoron levels (two radioactive gases which have the most important role in human natural radiation exposure within dwellings). Objectives This analytical descriptive study was intended to determine the relationship between indoor radon and thoron concentrations and the building materials used in interior surfaces, as well as between those concentrations and the type of ventilation system (natural or artificial). Materials and Methods 102 measurements of radon and thoron levels were taken from different parts of three hospital buildings in the city of Kermanshah in the west of Iran, using an RTM-1688-2 radon meter. Information on the type of building material and ventilation system in the measurement location was collected and then analyzed using Stata 8 software and multivariate linear regression. Results In terms of radon and thoron emissions, travertine and plaster were found to be the most appropriate and inappropriate covering for walls, respectively. Furthermore, granite and travertine were discovered to be inappropriate materials for flooring, while plastic floor covering was found suitable. Natural ventilation performed better for radon, while artificial ventilation worked better for thoron. Conclusions Internal building materials and ventilation type affect indoor radon and thoron concentrations. Therefore, the use of proper materials and adequate ventilation can reduce the potential human exposure to radon and thoron. This is of utmost importance, particularly in buildings with a high density of residents, including hospitals.

  10. An in vivo pilot study of a microporous thin film nitinol-covered stent to assess the effect of porosity and pore geometry on device interaction with the vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Youngjae; Kealey, Colin P; Levi, Daniel S; Rigberg, David A; Chen, Yanfei; Tillman, Bryan W; Mohanchandra, K P; Shayan, Mahdis; Carman, Gregory P

    2017-03-01

    Sputter-deposited thin film nitinol constructs with various micropatterns were fabricated to evaluate their effect on the vessel wall in vivo when used as a covering for commercially available stents. Thin film nitinol constructs were used to cover stents and deployed in non-diseased swine arteries. Swine were sacrificed after approximately four weeks and the thin film nitinol-covered stents were removed for histopathologic evaluation. Histopathology revealed differences in neointimal thickness that correlated with the thin film nitinol micropattern. Devices covered with thin film nitinol with a lateral × vertical length = 20 × 40 µm diamond pattern had minimal neointimal growth with well-organized cell architecture and little evidence of ongoing inflammation. Devices covered with thin film nitinol with smaller fenestrations exhibited a relatively thick neointimal layer with inflammation and larger fenestrations showed migration of inflammatory and smooth muscle cells through the micro fenestrations. This "proof-of-concept" study suggests that there may be an ideal thin film nitinol porosity and pore geometry to encourage endothelialization and incorporation of the device into the vessel wall. Future work will be needed to determine the optimal pore size and geometry to minimize neointimal proliferation and in-stent stenosis.

  11. [Efficacy of indoor treatment with cypermethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and chlorpyrifos for the regulation of Aedes aegypti in the City of Havana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montada Dorta, Domingo; Leyva Silva, Maureen; Castex Rodriguez, Mayda; Silva Leyva, Yenly

    2010-01-01

    in dengue outbreaks or epidemics, the chemical pesticides play a fundamental role to control disease-borne adult mosquitoes and to support the Vector Control program in Cuba. to find out the effectiveness and the efficiency of insecticidal formulations in use for the control of Aedes aegypti mosquito in three strains from the City of Havana. bioassays followed the methodology recommended by the World Health Organization. Efficacy and efficiency were compared in the studied insecticides between the cold spraying and the thermal spraying. A standardization test was applied to verify the nature of each variable; one three-factor ANOVA to see any differences among the mortality means and the Kruskal-Wallis test to find out difference among the mortality values for each type of treatment with respect to the preparation of one liter of mixture (efficiency), for a significance level of p < 0,05. when comparing the mortality figures reached with both types of treatment, it was evinced that there was a highly significant difference between them, the most favourable results corresponded to thermal spraying, which proved the efficacy of this treatment and its efficiency (effectiveness/cost). there exists a highly significant difference between the formulations, which favors Galgothrin 25 EC.

  12. Covering the Bases with Young Adult Literature: Implementing John H. Ritter's "Choosing Up Sides" and "Over the Wall" as Touchstone Texts in a Middle School Language Arts Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Patricia K.

    2000-01-01

    Supports ideas for implementing John H. Ritter's "Choosing Up Sides" and "Over the Wall" as touchstone texts in a middle school language arts program. Discusses these two novels and the use and power of metaphors. Reveals literary connections made by young adolescent readers and writers strengthening overall comprehension, synthesis and analysis…

  13. Comment on Gebhardt et al. MAD-MEX: Automatic Wall-to-Wall Land Cover Monitoring for the Mexican REDD-MRV Program Using All Landsat Data. Remote Sens. 2014, 6, 3923–3943

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Mas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gebhardt et al. (2014 presented the Monitoring Activity Data for the Mexican REDD+ program (MAD-MEX, an automatic nation-wide land cover monitoring system for the Mexican REDD+ MRV. Though MAD-MEX represents a valuable first effort toward establishing a national reference emissions level for the implementation of REDD+ in Mexico, in this paper, we argue that this land cover system has important limitations that may prevent it from becoming operational for REDD+ MRV. Specifically, we show that (1 the accuracy assessment of MAD-MEX land cover maps is optimistically biased; (2 the ability of MAD-MEX to monitor land cover change, including deforestation and forest degradation; is poor and (3 the use of an entirely automatic classification approach, such as that followed by MAD-MEX, is highly problematic in the case of a large and heterogeneous country like Mexico. We discuss these limitations and call into question the ability of a land cover monitoring system, such as MAD-MEX, both to elaborate a national reference emissions level and to monitor future forest cover change, as part of a REDD+ MRV system. We provide some insights with the aim of improving the development of nation-wide land cover monitoring systems in Mexico and elsewhere.

  14. Research on Fire Safety Design of Thermal Insulation Materials Covering on Exterior Wall of Building%建筑外墙外保温材料防火安全的选型设计探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏朝晖

    2011-01-01

    近年来,我国因建筑外墙外保温材料防火安全问题而导致特大火灾事故频发,尤其是上海胶州路教师公寓火灾、沈阳皇朝万鑫大厦火灾和北京央视大楼火灾,造成重大人员伤亡和财产损失,使得建筑外墙外保温材料防火安全成为人们关注的焦点.该文针对目前建筑外墙外保温材料选型设计中不注重防火安全的实际问题,分析了各种建筑外墙外保温材料防火性能,探讨其不同的使用局限性和优缺点,为建筑外墙外保温材料的选型设计提供参考.%In recent years the thermal insulation materials covering on the exterior wall for building fire safety problems caused the serious fire accidents, especially in the teacher apartment fire at Jiaozhou Road in Shanghai, the Dynasty wan Xin building fire in Shenyang and the CCTV building fire in Beijing, which caused the heavy casualties and the property losses, Therefore, the fire safety of the thermal insulation materials covering on the exterior wall has been a focus of attention.For solving the problem of the current moterials selection not paying attention to fire safety design, This paper analyzes the various fire performances of thermal insulation material covering on exterior wall, and their advantages and disadvantages, as a reference of selecting the thermal insulation material in the fire safety design.

  15. Development of a ceramic material to cover walls to be applied in diagnostic radiological protection; Desenvolvimento de um material ceramico para utilizacao em protecao radiologica diagnostica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frimaio, Audrew

    2006-07-01

    This study aims to formulate a ceramic composition for wall coating seeking to contribute to the optimization of diagnosis rooms' shielding. The work was based on experimental measures of X-radiation attenuation (80 and 100 kV) using ceramic coating materials containing different ceramic bases (red, white, gres, stoneware porcelain tiles, etc). Among the appraised ceramic bases, the white gres presented better attenuation properties and it was considered the most suitable material for the targets of this work. Different formulations of white gres were studied and altered in order to obtain better attenuation properties. Simulations of ceramic compositions using gres coating were made maintaining the percentages of 12-20% clay; 6-18% kaolin; 12-25% phyllite; 8-14% quartz; 1018% feldspar; 32-40% pegmatite and 6-8% talc in the composition of the necessary raw-material. The quantitative and qualitative chemical compositions of these materials were also evaluated and the most common representative elements are SiO{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Formulations containing Pb and Ba oxides were studied, considering that CaO can be replaced by PbO or BaO. The attenuation properties for X-radiation were investigated by computer simulations considering the incident and transmitted X-ray spectra for the different studied compositions and they were compared to the properties of the reference materials Pb, Ba and BaSO{sub 4} (barite). The results obtained with the simulations indicated the formulated composition of gres ceramic base that presented better attenuation properties considering the X-ray energies used in diagnosis (80, 100 and 150 kV). Ceramic plates based on the formulated compositions that presented lower percentage differences related to Pb were experimentally produced and physically tested as wall coating and protecting barrier. Properties as flexion resistance module, density, load rupture, water absorption and X

  16. 49 CFR 193.2167 - Covered systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Covered systems. 193.2167 Section 193.2167...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Design Impoundment Design and Capacity § 193.2167 Covered systems. A covered impounding system is prohibited except for concrete wall designed tanks where the concrete wall is an outer...

  17. Land Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Land Cover database depicts 10 general land cover classes for the State of Kansas. The database was compiled from a digital classification of Landsat Thematic...

  18. Reação histopatológica da parede da aorta abdominal ao stent não recoberto Histopathological reaction of the abdominal aorta wall to non-covered stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubio Bombonato

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a reação histopatológica da parede aorta abdominal, em suínos, no nível das artérias renais, na presença de stent metálico não recoberto. MÉTODO: Foi estudada histopatologicamente a aorta abdominal de 10 suínos, com peso médio de 86,6 quilos e idade média de 6 meses, submetidos a implante de stent metálico posicionado na aorta, no nível das artérias renais, após 100 dias do implante. Os stents foram liberados por auto-expansão com laparotomia. Os cortes histológicos foram realizados nos seguintes locais: 1 transição entre a aorta normal e aorta contendo stent; 2 aorta contendo o stent; 3 porção contendo os óstios das artérias renais, 4 linfonodos periaórticos e, 5 parênquima renal. As lâminas foram coradas pela técnica da hematoxilina e eosina. RESULTADOS: Os achados macroscópicos revelaram: linfonodomegalia periaórtica; espessamento da parede aórtica; artérias lombares e renais pérvias; estrutura anatômica renal normal. Análises microscópicas, próximas aos stents, evidenciaram espessamento da parede vascular, secundário à fibrose intimal e camada média comprometida com fibrose intersticial. Medidas micrométricas da parede aórtica com o stent, comparada à aorta sem o stent, apresentaram aumento da espessura da parede (75,9% por hiperplasia da camada íntima secundária à proliferação de fibroblastos; depósitos de colágeno com infiltrado inflamatório e granulomas do tipo corpo estranho. CONCLUSÃO: O stent de aço inoxidável descoberto, implantado na aorta de suínos, produziu importante reação inflamatória, com fibrose nas camadas média e íntima, evidenciada pelas análises histopatológicas e a sua presença não comprometeu o estado pérvio da aorta e dos ramos lombares e renais.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the histopathological reaction of the abdominal aorta wall in pigs' renal arteries to the presence of non-covered stainless steel stents. METHODS: The abdominal aorta of

  19. Benthic Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic cover (habitat) maps are derived from aerial imagery, underwater photos, acoustic surveys, and data gathered from sediment samples. Shallow to moderate-depth...

  20. Green walls in Vancouver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    With the renewed interest in design for microclimate control and energy conservation, many cities are implementing clean air initiatives and sustainable planning policies to mitigate the effects of urban climate and the urban heat island effect. Green roofs, sky courts and green walls must be thoughtfully designed to withstand severe conditions such as moisture stress, extremes in temperature, tropical storms and strong desiccating winds. This paper focused on the installation of green wall systems. There are 2 general types of green walls systems, namely facade greening and living walls. Green facades are trellis systems where climbing plants can grow vertically without attaching to the surface of the building. Living walls are part of a building envelope system where plants are actually planted and grown in a wall system. A modular G-SKY Green Wall Panel was installed at the Aquaquest Learning Centre at the Vancouver Aquarium in Stanley Park in September 2006. This green wall panel, which was originally developed in Japan, incorporates many innovative features in the building envelope. It provides an exterior wall covered with 8 species of plants native to the Coastal Temperate Rain Forest. The living wall is irrigated by rainwater collected from the roof, stored in an underground cistern and fed through a drip irrigation system. From a habitat perspective, the building imitates an escarpment. Installation, support systems, irrigation, replacement of modules and maintenance are included in the complete wall system. Living walls reduce the surface temperature of buildings by as much as 10 degrees C when covered with vegetation and a growing medium. The project team is anticipating LEED gold certification under the United States-Canada Green Building Council. It was concluded that this technology of vegetated building envelopes is applicable for acoustical control at airports, biofiltration of indoor air, greywater treatment, and urban agriculture and vertical

  1. 低温和室温下除虫脲和高效氯氟氰菊酯的太赫兹谱分析%Terahertz Research of Diflubenzuron and Lambda-cyhalothrin in Low and Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付秀华; 郝国徽; 杜勇; 刘建军; 洪治

    2013-01-01

    利用太赫兹时域光谱技术(THz-TDS)对两种常用的卫生杀虫剂除虫脲和高效氯氟氰菊酯在室温(298K)和低温(90K)下进行了光谱测量与分析.实验观察到两种物质存在各自明显的特征吸收峰,可将其作为太赫兹波段的指纹谱用于物质分子识别.低温与室温的太赫兹谱相比无论特征峰频率或特征峰强度都有明显的差别,蓝移和红移现象同时存在,并且低温下的特征吸收强度显著增强.为进一步理解太赫兹光谱振动吸收特性,利用CRYSTAL09软件完成了晶体的密度泛函理论模拟,其模拟结果预测出了两种物质的所有吸收峰.

  2. 氯虫苯甲酰胺和高效氯氟氰菊酯在豇豆和土壤中的残留行为%Residual behavior of chlorantraniliprole and lambda-cyhalothrin in cowpea and soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张希跃; 吴迪; 潘洪吉; 罗雪婷; 矫健; 李秋梅; 王艳梅

    2016-01-01

    The residue and dissipation dynamic of chlorantraniliprole andlambda-cyhalothrin in cowpea and soil were investigated. A dispersive solid phase extraction method was established for the pretreatment, while LC-MS/MS and GC-ECD chromatography were employed for the analysis. The result has shown that the recovery rate ranges from 80% to 105% and the variation coefficient ranges from 0.70% to 9.5%, when chlorantraniliprole andlambda-cyhalothrin are added to the cowpea and soil at the concentration ranging from 0.005 to 1 mg/kg (four concentrations). The half-lives of chlorantraniliprole andlambda-cyhalothrin in cowpea at Beijing and Hainan are 4-6 days; The half-lives of chlorantraniliprole andlambda-cyhalothrin in soil in the above mentioned two regions are 10-24 days. The residues in stems of cowpea were lower than 0.2 mg/kg at the harvest time. We recommend Good Agricultural Practices of chlorantraniliprole andlambda-cyhalothrin 14% aqueous capsule suspension (CS) used in cowpea are as follows: maximum using dose is 45 g a. i/hm2, spray at growth phase and no more than 3 times, applying pesticide interval is 7 days, and preharveat interval is 5 days.%建立了采用分散固相萃取法进行样品前处理,分别用液相色谱-质谱联用和气相色谱检测14%氯虫苯甲酰胺·高效氯氟氰菊酯微囊悬浮剂中2种有效成分在豇豆和土壤中的残留量及消解动态的方法。结果表明:豇豆和土壤中分别添加0.005~1 mg/kg 4个水平的氯虫苯甲酰胺和高效氯氟氰菊酯,其平均回收率为80%~105%,相对标准偏差为0.70%~9.5%。北京和海南2地氯虫苯甲酰胺和高效氯氟氰菊酯在豇豆中的半衰期为4~6 d,土壤中的为10~24 d。成熟时采收,豇豆中氯虫苯甲酰胺和高效氯氟氰菊酯的残留量均低于0.2 mg/kg。推荐14%氯虫苯甲酰胺∙高效氯氟氰菊酯微囊悬浮剂在豇豆上的使用剂量为有效成分45 g/hm2,使用方式为喷雾,施药次数不超过3次,施药间隔期为7 d,安全间隔期为5 d。

  3. Sganzerla Cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor da Rosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7917.2014v19n1p158 Neste artigo, realizo uma leitura do cinema de Rogério Sganzerla, desde o clássico O bandido da luz vermelha até os documentários filmados na década de oitenta, a partir de duas noções centrais: cover e over. Para isso, parto de uma controvérsia com o ensaio de Ismail Xavier, Alegorias do subdesenvolvimento, em que o crítico realiza uma leitura do cinema brasileiro da década de sessenta através do conceito de alegoria; depois releio uma série de textos críticos do próprio Sganzerla, publicados em Edifício Sganzerla, procurando repensar as ideias de “herói vazio” ou “cinema impuro” e sugerindo assim uma nova relação do seu cinema com o tempo e a representação; então busco articular tais ideias com certos procedimentos de vanguarda, como a falsificação, a cópia, o clichê e a colagem; e finalmente procuro mostrar que, no cinema de Sganzerla, a partir principalmente de suas reflexões sobre Orson Welles, a voz é usada de maneira a deformar a interpretação naturalista.

  4. Cover Picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuning; Ruben; Lehn; Renz; Garcia; Ksenofontov; Gütlich; Wegelius; Rissanen

    2000-07-17

    The cover picture shows how both, fine arts and science, avail themselves of a system of intertwined symbolic and iconic languages. They make use of a common set of abstracted signs to report on their results. Thus, already in 1925, Wassily Kandinsky painted a masterpiece (bottom), which now, 75 years later, might be regarded as a blueprint for a scientific project. In his painting, Kandinsky pictured a grid-shaped sign that resembles in effect an actual molecular switch. Apparently following an enigmatic protocol, the groups of Lehn and Gütlich (see p. 2504 ff. for more details) constructed a grid-type inorganic architecture that operates as a three-level magnetic switch (center) triggered by three external perturbations (p, T, hnu). The switching principle is based on the spin-crossover phenomenon of Fe(II) ions and can be monitored by Mössbauer spectroscopy (left) and magnetic measurements (rear). Maybe not by chance, the English translation of the title of the painting "signs" is a homonym of "science", since both presented works are a product of the insatiable curiosity of man and his untiring desire to recognize his existence.

  5. Wonderful Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  6. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how wall...

  7. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  8. Land Cover - Minnesota Land Cover Classification System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Land cover data set based on the Minnesota Land Cover Classification System (MLCCS) coding scheme. This data was produced using a combination of aerial photograph...

  9. The Cell Walls of Green Algae: A Journey through Evolution and Diversity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Domozych, David S; Ciancia, Marina; Fangel, Jonatan U; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Ulvskov, Peter; Willats, William G T

    2012-01-01

    .... The extracellular coverings of green algae including cell walls are also diverse. A recent surge of research in green algal cell walls fueled by new emerging technologies has revealed new and critical insight concerning these coverings...

  10. Wall Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  11. Rethinking China's new great wall

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ma, Zhijun; Melville, David S; Liu, Jianguo; Chen, Ying; Yang, Hongyan; Ren, Wenwei; Zhang, Zhengwang; Piersma, Theunis; Li, Bo

    2014-01-01

    ... enclosed by thousands of kilometers of seawalls, whose length exceeds that of China’s famous ancient “Great Wall” (see photos and map). This new “Great Wall,” covering 60% of the total length of coast-line along mainland China...

  12. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  13. What Medicare Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Part A covers Medicare Part A hospital insurance covers inpatient hospital care, skilled nursing facility, hospice, lab tests, surgery, ... Medicare Covers Drug Coverage (Part D) Supplements & Other Insurance Claims & ... doctors, providers, hospitals & plans Where can I get covered medical items? ...

  14. Mechanism of bubble detachment from vibrating walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongjun; Park, Jun Kwon, E-mail: junkeun@postech.ac.kr; Kang, Kwan Hyoung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, In Seok [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), San 31, Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    We discovered a previously unobserved mechanism by which air bubbles detach from vibrating walls in glasses containing water. Chaotic oscillation and subsequent water jets appeared when a wall vibrated at greater than a critical level. Wave forms were developed at water-air interface of the bubble by the wall vibration, and water jets were formed when sufficiently grown wave-curvatures were collapsing. Droplets were pinched off from the tip of jets and fell to the surface of the glass. When the solid-air interface at the bubble-wall attachment point was completely covered with water, the bubble detached from the wall. The water jets were mainly generated by subharmonic waves and were generated most vigorously when the wall vibrated at the volume resonant frequency of the bubble. Bubbles of specific size can be removed by adjusting the frequency of the wall's vibration.

  15. [Structure of the interalveolar wall].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senelar, R

    1975-01-01

    The wall, which unites as well as separates two contiguous pulmonary alveoli is composed of: - a conjuntival partition, the veritable skeleton of the wall, which is occupied, to the largest extent, by capillary blood vessels. Between the capillaries, conjunctival cells are dispursed: fibrocytes, fibroblasts and histiocytes, of which some can be mobilised, transformed into macrophages, and penetrate into the alveolar lumen; - modified epithelial cells, whose very thin, vast expansions cover the conjunctival partition; - a liquid film, 0.2 mu in thickness, which separates the epithelial cells, or pneumocytes from the alveolar air. Numerous physiological implications result from this organisation.

  16. The Berlin Wall: A Simulation for the Social Studies Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, William B., III

    2010-01-01

    November 9, 2009, marked the twentieth anniversary of the opening of the Berlin Wall. The Wall, a symbol of the Cold War, separated the German people for 28 years (1961-1989), keeping those on the East side isolated. Although the construction and dismantling of the Berlin Wall is a significant part of history, the topic is little covered in the…

  17. The Berlin Wall: A Simulation for the Social Studies Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, William B., III

    2010-01-01

    November 9, 2009, marked the twentieth anniversary of the opening of the Berlin Wall. The Wall, a symbol of the Cold War, separated the German people for 28 years (1961-1989), keeping those on the East side isolated. Although the construction and dismantling of the Berlin Wall is a significant part of history, the topic is little covered in the…

  18. Branched polynomial covering maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1999-01-01

    A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch...

  19. Branched polynomial covering maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2002-01-01

    A Weierstrass polynomial with multiple roots in certain points leads to a branched covering map. With this as the guiding example, we formally define and study the notion of a branched polynomial covering map. We shall prove that many finite covering maps are polynomial outside a discrete branch...

  20. Landfill Top Covers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    the landfill section has been filled or several years later depending on the settlement patterns. Significant differential settlements may disturb the functioning of the top cover. The specific design of the cover system depends on the type of waste landfilled (municipal, hazardous, or inert waste...... such as lowpermeability clay soils and geomembranes are required. The avoidance of water input to organic waste may impede the microbial stabilization processes including gas generation. Therefore watertight top covers may be in conflict with the purposes of reactor landfills (see Chapter 10.6). At some sites covers...... sometimes are made to include components for recirculation of landfill leachate (see Section 10.9.2 for more details). The top cover is an important factor in the water management of landfills. Details about water infiltration through top covers and its influence on the hydrology of the landfill is covered...

  1. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  2. Landfill Top Covers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    is landscaped in order to fit into the surrounding area/environment or meet specific plans for the final use of the landfill. To fulfill the above listed requirements landfill covers are often multicomponent systems which are placed directly on top of the waste. The top cover may be placed immediately after...... the landfill section has been filled or several years later depending on the settlement patterns. Significant differential settlements may disturb the functioning of the top cover. The specific design of the cover system depends on the type of waste landfilled (municipal, hazardous, or inert waste...... however, top covers may be the only environmental protection measure. In some landfill regulations (for instance the Subtitle D landfills receiving municipal solid waste in the USA) it is required to minimize infiltration into the waste layers. Therefore top covers containing liner components...

  3. Percent Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Forests provide economic and ecological value. High percentages of forest cover (FORPCT) generally indicate healthier ecosystems and cleaner surface water. More...

  4. Saturated Domino Coverings

    CERN Document Server

    Buchanan, Andrew; Ryba, Alex

    2011-01-01

    A domino covering of a board is saturated if no domino is redundant. We introduce the concept of a fragment tiling and show that a minimal fragment tiling always corresponds to a maximal saturated domino covering. The size of a minimal fragment tiling is the domination number of the board. We define a class of regular boards and show that for these boards the domination number gives the size of a minimal X-pentomino covering. Natural sequences that count maximal saturated domino coverings of square and rectangular boards are obtained. These include the new sequences A193764, A193765, A193766, A193767, and A193768 of OEIS.

  5. Percent Forest Cover (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Forests provide economic and ecological value. High percentages of forest cover (FORPCTFuture) generally indicate healthier ecosystems and cleaner surface water....

  6. Wall to Wall Optimal Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Doering, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The calculus of variations is employed to find steady divergence-free velocity fields that maximize transport of a tracer between two parallel walls held at fixed concentration for one of two constraints on flow strength: a fixed value of the kinetic energy or a fixed value of the enstrophy. The optimizing flows consist of an array of (convection) cells of a particular aspect ratio Gamma. We solve the nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations analytically for weak flows and numerically (and via matched asymptotic analysis in the fixed energy case) for strong flows. We report the results in terms of the Nusselt number Nu, a dimensionless measure of the tracer transport, as a function of the Peclet number Pe, a dimensionless measure of the energy or enstrophy of the flow. For both constraints the maximum transport Nu_{MAX}(Pe) is realized in cells of decreasing aspect ratio Gamma_{opt}(Pe) as Pe increases. For the fixed energy problem, Nu_{MAX} \\sim Pe and Gamma_{opt} \\sim Pe^{-1/2}, while for the fixed enstrophy scen...

  7. Land Cover Characterization Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a long heritage of leadership and innovation in land use and land cover mapping. The USGS Anderson system defined the principles for land use and land cover mapping that have been the model both nationally and internationally for more than 20 years. The Land Cover Characterization Program (LCCP) is founded on the premise that the Nation's needs for land cover and land use data are diverse and increasingly sophisticated. The range of projects, programs, and organizations that use land cover data to meet their planning, management, development, and assessment objectives has expanded significantly. The reasons for this are numerous, and include the improved capabilities provided by geographic information systems, better and more data-intensive analytic models, and increasing requirements for improved information for decision making. The overall goals of the LCCP are to:

  8. Land Cover Trends Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, William

    2006-01-01

    The Land Cover Trends Project is designed to document the types, rates, causes, and consequences of land cover change from 1973 to 2000 within each of the 84 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Level III ecoregions that span the conterminous United States. The project's objectives are to: * Develop a comprehensive methodology using probability sampling and change analysis techniques and Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS), Thematic Mapper (TM), and Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM) data for estimating regional land cover change. * Characterize the spatial and temporal characteristics of conterminous U.S. land cover change for five periods from 1973 to 2000 (nominally 1973, 1980, 1986, 1992, and 2000). * Document the regional driving forces and consequences of change. * Prepare a national synthesis of land cover change.

  9. Flat covers of modules

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jinzhong

    1996-01-01

    Since the injective envelope and projective cover were defined by Eckmann and Bas in the 1960s, they have had great influence on the development of homological algebra, ring theory and module theory. In the 1980s, Enochs introduced the flat cover and conjectured that every module has such a cover over any ring. This book provides the uniform methods and systematic treatment to study general envelopes and covers with the emphasis on the existence of flat cover. It shows that Enochs' conjecture is true for a large variety of interesting rings, and then presents the applications of the results. Readers with reasonable knowledge in rings and modules will not have difficulty in reading this book. It is suitable as a reference book and textbook for researchers and graduate students who have an interest in this field.

  10. Ventilated solar walls. Nature Center Vestamager; Ventilerede solvaegge. Naturcenter Vestamager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, T.P.

    1999-05-01

    The aim of the project is to demonstrate ventilated solar walls in practice, including how the walls may be fitted in architecturally and structurally in an actual building. The solar walls are mechanically ventilated with recirculation of indoor air. Each of the two solar walls has the dimension 1.77 x 1.77 m - total 3.13 m{sup 2}. The transparent area makes up 2.71 m{sup 2} pr. solar wall. The covering layer consists of 4 mm hardened glass with low emission covering. A black absorber of anodised aluminium is mounted between covering layer and back covering of galvanised steel. The air flow takes place in a 20 mm slit between back covering and absorber. Covering layer, absorber and back covering is mounted in powder finished aluminium frames integrated in the facade. The use of the building implies that there is only rarely a need for heat supply during the evening, which is the reason why the solar walls are not constructed to store solar heat. The glass area in the building is so small, that the solar walls only to a small extent compete with solar radiation through the doors and windows. (EHS)

  11. Covering folded shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswin Aichholzer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Can folding a piece of paper flat make it larger? We explore whether a shape S must be scaled to cover a flat-folded copy of itself. We consider both single folds and arbitrary folds (continuous piecewise isometries \\(S\\to\\mathbb{R}^2\\. The underlying problem is motivated by computational origami, and is related to other covering and fixturing problems, such as Lebesgue's universal cover problem and force closure grasps. In addition to considering special shapes (squares, equilateral triangles, polygons and disks, we give upper and lower bounds on scale factors for single folds of convex objects and arbitrary folds of simply connected objects.

  12. Percent Wetland Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Wetlands act as filters, removing or diminishing the amount of pollutants that enter surface water. Higher values for percent of wetland cover (WETLNDSPCT) may be...

  13. Percent of Impervious Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — High amounts of impervious cover (parking lots, rooftops, roads, etc.) can increase water runoff, which may directly enter surface water. Runoff from roads often...

  14. Percent Wetland Cover (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Wetlands act as filters, removing or diminishing the amount of pollutants that enter surface water. Higher values for percent of wetland cover (WETLNDSPCT) may be...

  15. GAP Land Cover - Image

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This raster dataset is a simple image of the original detailed (1-acre minimum), hierarchically organized vegetation cover map produced by computer classification of...

  16. GAP Land Cover - Vector

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This vector dataset is a detailed (1-acre minimum), hierarchically organized vegetation cover map produced by computer classification of combined two-season pairs of...

  17. Projected 2020 Land Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Projected 2020 land cover was developed to provide one scenario of development in the year 2020. It was used to generate several metrics to compare to 1992 metrics...

  18. Design criteria for structural design of silage silo walls

    OpenAIRE

    von Wachenfelt, Hans; Nilsson, Christer; Östergaard, Göran; Olofsson, Anders; Karlsson, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Existing Swedish design guidelines (JBR) cover silo wall heights up to about 3 m. These guidelines presumably overestimate the forces and pressures exerted by silage juice when silo walls are more than 3 m high, which could result in over-sizing, material waste and increased capital costs. This study determined silage physical properties in terms of horizontal wall pressure and evaluated silage juice levels in silos with a wall height of 3 m or more.Wall pressure was measured by transducers m...

  19. 77 FR 66834 - Pesticide Emergency Exemptions; Agency Decisions and State and Federal Agency Crisis Declarations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... them. Potentially affected entities may include: Crop production (NAICS code 111). Animal production... use of lambda-cyhalothrin on asparagus to control European asparagus aphid (Brachycolus asparagi...

  20. Climate under cover

    CERN Document Server

    Takakura, Tadashi

    2002-01-01

    1.1. INTRODUCTION Plastic covering, either framed or floating, is now used worldwide to protect crops from unfavorable growing conditions, such as severe weather and insects and birds. Protected cultivation in the broad sense, including mulching, has been widely spread by the innovation of plastic films. Paper, straw, and glass were the main materials used before the era of plastics. Utilization of plastics in agriculture started in the developed countries and is now spreading to the developing countries. Early utilization of plastic was in cold regions, and plastic was mainly used for protection from the cold. Now plastic is used also for protection from wind, insects and diseases. The use of covering techniques started with a simple system such as mulching, then row covers and small tunnels were developed, and finally plastic houses. Floating mulch was an exception to this sequence: it was introduced rather recently, although it is a simple structure. New development of functional and inexpensive films trig...

  1. Reusable pipe flange covers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, James Elliott (Simpsonville, SC); Perez, Julieta (Houston, TX)

    2001-01-01

    A molded, flexible pipe flange cover for temporarily covering a pipe flange and a pipe opening includes a substantially round center portion having a peripheral skirt portion depending from the center portion, the center portion adapted to engage a front side of the pipe flange and to seal the pipe opening. The peripheral skirt portion is formed to include a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs, wherein free ends of the flexible tabs are formed with respective through passages adapted to receive a drawstring for pulling the tabs together on a back side of the pipe flange.

  2. Comparative study of Trombe wall, water wall and trans wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodha, M.S.; Bansal, N.K.; Singh, S.; Ram, S.; Annamalai, M.; Iyer, M.V.; Nirmala, K.A.; Venkatesh, P.; Prasad, C.R.; Subramani, C.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal performances of three systems viz. Trombe wall: (1) without; and (2) with vents (forced air circulation), water wall and Transwall have been studied analytically interms of heat flux entering the living space (Maintained at 20/sup 0/C) corresponding to the meteriological data on January 19, 1981 at New Delhi (India), a typical cold winter day. Subsequent parametric studies using the simulation indicated that the Transwall system is the more efficient system for the passive heating of buildings.

  3. Fire behaviour of tabique walls

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo, Alexandre; Fonseca, E.M.M.; Ferreira, Débora; P. A. G. Piloto; Pinto,Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The tabique is one of the main Portuguese traditional building techniques, which is based on raw materials as earth and wood. In general, a tabique wall is formed by a simple timber structure covered by an earth-based material. Earth has an important role in this system because it protects the internal timber structure along with its finishing function. The Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro is the northeast region of Portugal and it is very rich in terms of tabique construction heritage. Nowadays, ...

  4. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jian-Ying; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting ...

  5. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jiong; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting ...

  6. Covering All Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The day a school opens its doors for the first time, the flooring will be new and untarnished. When the flooring is in such pristine condition, many flooring materials--carpeting, vinyl, terrazzo, wood or some other surface--will look good. But school and university planners who decide what kind of material covers the floors of their facilities…

  7. CORINE Land Cover 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stjernholm, Michael

    "CORINE land cover" er en fælleseuropæisk kortlægning af arealanvendelse/arealdække. Arealanvendelse/arealdække er i Danmark kortlagt efter CORINE metode og klasseopdeling med satellitbilleder fra 3 forskellige tidsperioder, fra begyndelsen af 1990'erne (CLC90), fra år 2000 (CLC2000) og fra år 2006...

  8. CORINE Land Cover 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stjernholm, Michael

    "CORINE land cover" er en fælleseuropæisk kortlægning af arealanvendelse/arealdække. Arealanvendelse/arealdække er i Danmark kortlagt efter CORINE metode og klasseopdeling med satellitbilleder fra 3 forskellige tidsperioder, fra begyndelsen af 1990'erne (CLC90), fra år 2000 (CLC2000) og fra år 2006...

  9. On domain-wall/QFT dualities in various dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behrndt, Klaus; Bergshoeff, Eric; Halbersma, Rein; Schaar, Jan Pieter van der

    1999-01-01

    We investigate domain-wall/quantum field-theory correspondences in various dimensions. Our general analysis covers not only the well studied cases in 10 and 11 dimensions, but also enables us to discuss new cases like a type I/heterotic 6-brane in 10 dimensions and domain-wall dualities in lower

  10. Pathology of the thoracic wall: congenital and acquired

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Pena, Pilar; Barber, Ignasi [Hospital Materno-Infantil, Pediatric Radiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    This review aims to cover the main congenital and acquired lesions that arise in the thoracic wall of infants and children. Imaging often plays an essential role in the evaluation of symptomatic and asymptomatic thoracic wall abnormalities. The use of appropriate imaging modalities for each condition will be addressed, as well as the range of benign and malignant conditions that can occur. (orig.)

  11. Abdominal Wall Hernia: new perspectives for clinical research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.H. Eker (Hasan)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Abdominal wall surgery is a broad term, covering different treatment strategies for all different types of abdominal wall hernias. For example, an inguinal hernia is a totally different entity than an incisional hernia and requires a different treatment strategy. Nevert

  12. Efficacy of Insecticide and Bioinsecticide Ground Sprays to Control Metisa plana Walker (Lepidoptera: Psychidae) in Oil Palm Plantations, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Hasber; Rawi, Che Salmah Md; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Al-Shami, Salman Abdo

    2015-12-01

    The effectiveness of the synthetic insecticides trichlorfon, lambda-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin emulsion concentrated (EC) and cypermethrin emulsion water based (EW) and a bio-insecticide, Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Btk), was evaluated at 3, 7, 14 and 30 days after treatment (DAT) for the control of Metisa plana larvae in an oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) plantation in Malaysia. Although all synthetic insecticides effectively reduced the larval population of M. plana, trichlorfon, lambda-cyhalothrin and cypermethrin EC were the fastest-acting. The larval population dropped below the economic threshold level (ETL) 30 days after a single application of the synthetic insecticides. Application of Btk, however, gave poor results, with the larval population remaining above the ETL post treatment. In terms of operational productivity, ground spraying using power spray equipment was time-consuming and resulted in poor coverage. Power spraying may not be appropriate for controlling M. plana infestations in large fields. Using a power sprayer, one man could cover 2-3 ha per day. Hence, power spraying is recommended during outbreaks of infestation in areas smaller than 50 ha.

  13. Domain Walls on Singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2009-01-01

    We describe domain walls that live on $A_2$ and $A_3$ singularities. The walls are BPS if the singularity is resolved and non--BPS if it is deformed and fibered. We show that these domain walls may interpolate between vacua that support monopoles and/or vortices.

  14. The Lamportian cell wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. (Michigan State Univ. Plant Research Lab., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  15. Halogenation of microcapsule walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. R.; Schaab, C. K.; Scott, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for halogenation of confining walls of both gelatin and gelatin-phenolic resin capsules is similar to that used for microencapsulation. Ten percent halogen content renders capsule wall nonburning; any higher content enhances flame-retardant properties of selected internal phase material. Halogenation decreases permeability of wall material to encapsulated materials.

  16. Singular coverings of toposes

    CERN Document Server

    Bunge, Marta

    2006-01-01

    The self-contained theory of certain singular coverings of toposes called complete spreads, that is presented in this volume, is a field of interest to topologists working in knot theory, as well as to various categorists. It extends the complete spreads in topology due to R. H. Fox (1957) but, unlike the classical theory, it emphasizes an unexpected connection with topos distributions in the sense of F. W. Lawvere (1983). The constructions, though often motivated by classical theories, are sometimes quite different from them. Special classes of distributions and of complete spreads, inspired respectively by functional analysis and topology, are studied. Among the former are the probability distributions; the branched coverings are singled out amongst the latter. This volume may also be used as a textbook for an advanced one-year graduate course introducing topos theory with an emphasis on geometric applications. Throughout the authors emphasize open problems. Several routine proofs are left as exercises, but...

  17. On directed coverings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fajstrup, Lisbeth

    In [1], we study coverings in the setting of directed topology. Unfortunately, there is a condition missing in the definition of a directed covering. Some of the results in [1] require this extra condition and in fact it was claimed to follow from the original definition. It is the purpose...... of this note to give the right definition and point out how this affects the statements in that paper. Moreover, we give an example of a dicovering in the sense of [1], which does not satisfy the extra condition. Fortunately, with the extra condition, the subsequent results are now correct. [1] L. Fajstrup......, Dicovering spaces, Homology Homotopy Appl. 5 (2003), no. 2, 1-17....

  18. Thoracic wall reconstruction after tumor resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran eHarati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical treatment of malignant thoracic wall tumors represents a formidable challenge. In particular, locally advanced tumors that have already infiltrated critical anatomic structures are associated with a high surgical morbidity and can result in full thickness defects of the thoracic wall. Plastic surgery can reduce this surgical morbidity by reconstructing the thoracic wall through various tissue transfer techniques. Sufficient soft tissue reconstruction of the thoracic wall improves life quality and mitigates functional impairment after extensive resection. The aim of this article is to illustrate the various plastic surgery treatment options in the multimodal therapy of patients with malignant thoracic wall tumors.Material und methods: This article is based on a review of the current literature and the evaluation of a patient database.Results: Several plastic surgical treatment options can be implemented in the curative and palliative therapy of patients with malignant solid tumors of the chest wall. Large soft tissue defects after tumor resection can be covered by local, pedicled or free flaps. In cases of large full-thickness defects, flaps can be combined with polypropylene mesh to improve chest wall stability and to maintain pulmonary function. The success of modern medicine has resulted in an increasing number of patients with prolonged survival suffering from locally advanced tumors that can be painful, malodorous or prone to bleeding. Resection of these tumors followed by thoracic wall reconstruction with viable tissue can substantially enhance the life quality of these patients. Discussion: In curative treatment regimens, chest wall reconstruction enables complete resection of locally advanced tumors and subsequent adjuvant radiotherapy. In palliative disease treatment, stadium plastic surgical techniques of thoracic wall reconstruction provide palliation of tumor-associated morbidity and can therefore improve

  19. Covering R-trees

    CERN Document Server

    Berestovskii, V N

    2007-01-01

    We show that every inner metric space X is the metric quotient of a complete R-tree via a free isometric action, which we call the covering R-tree of X. The quotient mapping is a weak submetry (hence, open) and light. In the case of compact 1-dimensional geodesic space X, the free isometric action is via a subgroup of the fundamental group of X. In particular, the Sierpin'ski gasket and carpet, and the Menger sponge all have the same covering R-tree, which is complete and has at each point valency equal to the continuum. This latter R-tree is of particular interest because it is "universal" in at least two senses: First, every R-tree of valency at most the continuum can be isometrically embedded in it. Second, every Peano continuum is the image of it via an open light mapping. We provide a sketch of our previous construction of the uniform universal cover in the special case of inner metric spaces, the properties of which are used in the proof.

  20. 76 FR 57953 - Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and Tube From Turkey; Notice of Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... duty order on light-walled rectangular pipe and tube from Turkey. See Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and... antidumping duty order covering light- walled rectangular pipe and tube from Turkey. See Preliminary Results... involved in the transaction. See Notice of Antidumping Duty Order: Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and...

  1. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the skin on ...

  2. Covered Clause Elimination

    CERN Document Server

    Heule, Marijn; Biere, Armin

    2010-01-01

    Generalizing the novel clause elimination procedures developed in [M. Heule, M. J\\"arvisalo, and A. Biere. Clause elimination procedures for CNF formulas. In Proc. LPAR-17, volume 6397 of LNCS, pages 357-371. Springer, 2010.], we introduce explicit (CCE), hidden (HCCE), and asymmetric (ACCE) variants of a procedure that eliminates covered clauses from CNF formulas. We show that these procedures are more effective in reducing CNF formulas than the respective variants of blocked clause elimination, and may hence be interesting as new preprocessing/simplification techniques for SAT solving.

  3. Influence of Cover Type on Silage Quality in Bunker Silos

    Science.gov (United States)

    The quality of silage under reduced oxygen-permeability plastic film systems vs. standard white polyethylene film and tires was evaluated. In six trials (four in whole-plant corn, two in alfalfa), the Silostop two-step covering system (oxygen-barrier film on the side walls and top, woven plastic tar...

  4. Assessment of the thematic accuracy of land cover maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høhle, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Several land cover maps are generated from aerial imagery and assessed by different approaches. The test site is an urban area in Europe for which six classes (‘building’, ‘hedge and bush’, ‘grass’, ‘road and parking lot’, ‘tree’, ‘wall and car port’) had to be derived. Two classification methods...

  5. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  6. Solar heating wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, J.L.

    1983-08-16

    A solar heating wall is disclosed including a water pipe circulation system having a plurality of separate tubes, each formed as a loop, connected between a water supply and a return. The separate tubes are arranged in a single vertical plane at the approximate center of the wall. The wall is formed within a frame which is packed with a material suited for use as a thERMAL RESERVOIR, SUCH AS concrete. The frame provides extra support by having a series of horizontally disposed cross supports on one surface of the wall and a series of vertically disposed cross supports on the opposite surface A pressure relief valve may be provided between the water supply to the separate tubes and the water supply to the building or structure containing the solar wall, so that the solar wall can be adapted for use with a city water system.

  7. Cell Wall Proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Boudart, Georges; Minic, Zoran; Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter, we will focus on the contribution of proteomics to the identification and determination of the structure and function of CWPs as well as discussing new perspectives in this area. The great variety of proteins found in the plant cell wall is described. Some families, such as glycoside hydrolases, proteases, lectins, and inhibitors of cell wall modifying enzymes, are discussed in detail. Examples of the use of proteomic techniques to elucidate the structure of various cell wall...

  8. Staggered domain wall fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Hoelbling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We construct domain wall fermions with a staggered kernel and investigate their spectral and chiral properties numerically in the Schwinger model. In some relevant cases we see an improvement of chirality by more than an order of magnitude as compared to usual domain wall fermions. Moreover, we present first results for four-dimensional quantum chromodynamics, where we also observe significant reductions of chiral symmetry violations for staggered domain wall fermions.

  9. Covering walks in graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Fujie, Futaba

    2014-01-01

    Covering Walks  in Graphs is aimed at researchers and graduate students in the graph theory community and provides a comprehensive treatment on measures of two well studied graphical properties, namely Hamiltonicity and traversability in graphs. This text looks into the famous Kӧnigsberg Bridge Problem, the Chinese Postman Problem, the Icosian Game and the Traveling Salesman Problem as well as well-known mathematicians who were involved in these problems. The concepts of different spanning walks with examples and present classical results on Hamiltonian numbers and upper Hamiltonian numbers of graphs are described; in some cases, the authors provide proofs of these results to illustrate the beauty and complexity of this area of research. Two new concepts of traceable numbers of graphs and traceable numbers of vertices of a graph which were inspired by and closely related to Hamiltonian numbers are introduced. Results are illustrated on these two concepts and the relationship between traceable concepts and...

  10. Land Use and Land Cover - Montana Land Cover Framework 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This statewide land cover theme is a baseline digital map of Montana's natural and human land cover. The baseline map is adapted from the Northwest ReGAP project...

  11. Performance of a selective-surface trombe wall in a small commercial building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkoff, R.; Sokol, F.

    1981-03-01

    The design and construction of a 100% passive solar building utilizing a clerestory and a trombe wall are described. The use of three selectively absorptive and emissive coverings on the trombe wall outer surface are investigated. One of the coverings and its laminating adhesive are tested for degradation after a year of exposure under normal operating conditions. Ambient temperature, room air temperature, trombe wall interior and exterior surface temperatures, and solar radiation are measured.

  12. Infolding of covered stents used for aortic coarctation: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Andrea W; Lee, Kyong-Jin; Benson, Lee N

    2014-01-01

    Covered stents have been used for the treatment of aortic coarctation to protect the arterial wall during dilation. Early results have shown them to be safe and effective. We report two cases of infolding of the proximal edge of a covered aortic coarctation stent. Management required implantation of a second stent. Poor stent apposition to the vessel wall and/or recoil may allow conditions for these events to occur.

  13. Allegheny County Land Cover Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Land Cover dataset demarcates 14 land cover types by area; such as Residential, Commercial, Industrial, Forest, Agriculture, etc. If viewing this description on...

  14. Allegheny County Land Cover Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Land Cover dataset demarcates 14 land cover types by area; such as Residential, Commercial, Industrial, Forest, Agriculture, etc. If viewing this description...

  15. Allegheny County Land Cover Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Land Cover dataset demarcates 14 land cover types by area; such as Residential, Commercial, Industrial, Forest, Agriculture, etc. If viewing this description on...

  16. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, A.C.W.(L.)

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful, a

  17. Domain wall filters

    CERN Document Server

    Bär, O; Neuberger, H; Witzel, O; Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  18. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  19. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, A.C.W.(L.)

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful,

  20. Space Constrained Dynamic Covering

    CERN Document Server

    Antonellis, Ioannis; Dughmi, Shaddin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we identify a fundamental algorithmic problem that we term space-constrained dynamic covering (SCDC), arising in many modern-day web applications, including ad-serving and online recommendation systems in eBay and Netflix. Roughly speaking, SCDC applies two restrictions to the well-studied Max-Coverage problem: Given an integer k, X={1,2,...,n} and I={S_1, ..., S_m}, S_i a subset of X, find a subset J of I, such that |J| <= k and the union of S in J is as large as possible. The two restrictions applied by SCDC are: (1) Dynamic: At query-time, we are given a query Q, a subset of X, and our goal is to find J such that the intersection of Q with the union of S in J is as large as possible; (2) Space-constrained: We don't have enough space to store (and process) the entire input; specifically, we have o(mn), sometimes even as little as O((m+n)polylog(mn)) space. The goal of SCDC is to maintain a small data structure so as to answer most dynamic queries with high accuracy. We present algorithms a...

  1. Hard and soft walls

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, Kimball A

    2011-01-01

    In a continuing effort to understand divergences which occur when quantum fields are confined by bounding surfaces, we investigate local energy densities (and the local energy-momentum tensor) in the vicinity of a wall. In this paper, attention is largely confined to a scalar field. If the wall is an infinite Dirichlet plane, well known volume and surface divergences are found, which are regulated by a temporal point-splitting parameter. If the wall is represented by a linear potential in one coordinate $z$, the divergences are softened. The case of a general wall, described by a potential of the form $z^\\alpha$ for $z>0$ is considered. If $\\alpha>2$, there are no surface divergences, which in any case vanish if the conformal stress tensor is employed. Divergences within the wall are also considered.

  2. Cover crops and N credits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover crops often provide many short- and long-term benefits to cropping systems. Legume cover crops can significantly reduce the N fertilizer requirement of non-legume cash crops that follow. The objectives of this presentation were to: I) educate stakeholders about the potential benefits of cover ...

  3. Control effect of the mixture of alpha-cypermethrin with pirimiphos-methyl and lambda-cyhalothrin against houseflies%顺式氯氰菊酯和甲嘧·高氯氟混配防治家蝇的效果研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李彦; 韩华; 史慧勤; 黄清臻; 贾瑞忠; 石华

    2016-01-01

    目的 将100 g/L顺式氯氰菊酯悬浮剂和8.5%甲嘧·高氯氟卫生杀虫泡腾片按不同比例混配后研究对家蝇的防治效果,为提高单剂对家蝇杀灭效果提供实验依据.方法 采用药纸接触法测定比较顺式氯氰菊酯与甲嘧·高氯氟及其不同比例混配剂对家蝇的毒力;采用共毒系数法确定混配剂的联合作用;采用药纸接触法测定家蝇抗性倍数;按照农药登记卫生杀虫剂室内药效试验方法,测定比较混配剂不同比例对家蝇的表面触杀和空间喷雾杀灭效果.结果 混配剂对家蝇的击倒效果较单剂有明显提高.混配剂中顺式氯氰菊酯和甲嘧·高氯氟浓度比为1∶10和1∶15时,共毒系数分别为317.92和297.70.混配剂对抗性家蝇进行表面触杀时宜使用的有效成分浓度为顺式氯氰菊酯0.33 g/L、甲嘧·高氯氟5.0 g/L,空间喷雾时宜使用的有效成分浓度为顺式氯氰菊酯1.0 g/L、甲嘧·高氯氟15.0g/L.结论 顺式氯氰菊酯和甲嘧·高氯氟不同比例混配剂对家蝇有明显增效作用.混配剂对抗性家蝇有良好的击倒和致死作用,能够提高防治效果.

  4. Field test of 22% Lambda -cyhalothrin & Thiamethoxam CS on controlling Heliothis assulta and Myzus persicae%22%高效氯氟氰菊酯·噻虫嗪微囊悬浮剂防治烟草烟青虫和蚜虫田间药效试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶开泉

    2013-01-01

    田间小区试验结果表明,22%高效氯氟氰菊酯·噻虫嗪微囊悬浮剂666.7m2用8.42~ 11.23 g的处理,对烟草烟青虫的防效为88.74%~94.59%,对烟草蚜虫的防效为89.54%~94.55%,能较好控制两种害虫的危害.

  5. On L-injective Covers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周德旭

    2004-01-01

    We use the class of L-injective modules to define L-injective covers, and provide the characterizations of L-injective covers by the properties of kernels of homomorphisms. We prove that the right L-noetherian right L-hereditary ring is just such that every right R-module has an L-injective cover which is monic. We also use kernels of homomorphisms to investigate L-simple L-injective covers and give some constructions ofL-simple L-iniective covers.

  6. Plant and algal cell walls: diversity and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popper, Zoë A; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Domozych, David S

    2014-10-01

    Although plants and many algae (e.g. the Phaeophyceae, brown, and Rhodophyceae, red) are only very distantly related they are united in their possession of carbohydrate-rich cell walls, which are of integral importance being involved in many physiological processes. Furthermore,wall components have applications within food, fuel, pharmaceuticals, fibres (e.g. for textiles and paper) and building materials and have long been an active topic of research. As shown in the 27 papers in this Special Issue, as the major deposit of photosynthetically fixed carbon, and therefore energy investment, cell walls are of undisputed importance to the organisms that possess them, the photosynthetic eukaryotes ( plants and algae). The complexities of cell wall components along with their interactions with the biotic and abiotic environment are becoming increasingly revealed. The importance of plant and algal cell walls and their individual components to the function and survival of the organism, and for a number of industrial applications, are illustrated by the breadth of topics covered in this issue, which includes papers concentrating on various plants and algae, developmental stages, organs, cell wall components, and techniques. Although we acknowledge that there are many alternative ways in which the papers could be categorized (and many would fit within several topics), we have organized them as follows: (1) cell wall biosynthesis and remodelling, (2) cell wall diversity, and (3) application of new technologies to cell walls. Finally, we will consider future directions within plant cell wall research. Expansion of the industrial uses of cell walls and potentially novel uses of cell wall components are both avenues likely to direct future research activities. Fundamentally, it is the continued progression from characterization (structure, metabolism, properties and localization) of individual cell wall components through to defining their roles in almost every aspect of plant

  7. "I Climbed the Great Wall"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    I finally climbed the Great Wall, A dream of my childhood; my heart is filled with pleasure at the indescribable beauty of the Wall. China’s ancient civilization is best documented by the grandeur of the Wall.

  8. Advanced walling systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The question addressed by this chapter is: How should advanced walling systems be planned, designed, built, refurbished, and end their useful lives, to classify as smart, sustainable, green or eco-building environments?...

  9. Distribution Regularity of Muzzle Shock-Wave Inside Protective Cover

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jun; LIU Jingbo; DU Yixin

    2006-01-01

    The injury of gunners caused by muzzle shock-wave has always been a great problem when firing inside the protective cover.The distribution regularity and personnel injury from the muzzle blast-wave were investigated by both test and numerical simulation.Through the inside firing test,the changes of overpressure and noise have been measured at different measuring points in the thin-wall cover structure with different open widths and shallow covering thickness.The distribution regularity of muzzle shock-wave with different firing port widths is calculated by ANSYS/LSDYNA software.The overpressure distribution curves of muzzle shock-wave inside the structure can be obtained by comparing the test results with the numerical results.Then,the influence of open width and shallow covering thickness is proposed to give a reference to the protective design under the condition of the inside firing with the same cannon caliber.

  10. Conducting Wall Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Hofer, Richard R.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Dotson, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A unique configuration of the magnetic field near the wall of Hall thrusters, called Magnetic Shielding, has recently demonstrated the ability to significantly reduce the erosion of the boron nitride (BN) walls and extend the life of Hall thrusters by orders of magnitude. The ability of magnetic shielding to minimize interactions between the plasma and the discharge chamber walls has for the first time enabled the replacement of insulating walls with conducting materials without loss in thruster performance. The boron nitride rings in the 6 kW H6 Hall thruster were replaced with graphite that self-biased to near the anode potential. The thruster efficiency remained over 60% (within two percent of the baseline BN configuration) with a small decrease in thrust and increase in Isp typical of magnetically shielded Hall thrusters. The graphite wall temperatures decreased significantly compared to both shielded and unshielded BN configurations, leading to the potential for higher power operation. Eliminating ceramic walls makes it simpler and less expensive to fabricate a thruster to survive launch loads, and the graphite discharge chamber radiates more efficiently which increases the power capability of the thruster compared to conventional Hall thruster designs.

  11. Combinatorial aspects of covering arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Colbourn

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Covering arrays generalize orthogonal arrays by requiring that t -tuples be covered, but not requiring that the appearance of t -tuples be balanced.Their uses in screening experiments has found application in software testing, hardware testing, and a variety of fields in which interactions among factors are to be identified. Here a combinatorial view of covering arrays is adopted, encompassing basic bounds, direct constructions, recursive constructions, algorithmic methods, and applications.

  12. Solar walls in simulation programs; Solvaegge i simuleringsprogrammer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittchen, K.B.

    1996-12-31

    Using the Danish Building Research`s (SBI) computer programme tsbi3 as an example, this report describes ways of implementing routines for calculating solar walls in programmes for simulating the thermal behaviour of buildings. Because of the extreme temperature conditions in a solar wall, some thermal processes used in normal building simulations can not be used. These processes are described in detail in this report. It is proved possible to describe solar walls with the same level of detail as the rest of the building model in tsbi3 and, on the basis of this description, to build and implement models with acceptable accuracy. As a result of this work, a C version of the tsbi3 programme with models for simulating solar walls has been made. With this version it is possible to simulate five different types of solar wall. The five types are denoted: mass-wall, Trombe walls, internally ventilated solar walls, double Trombe walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. It is now possible to simulate solar walls and their influence on the temperatures in buildings using one programme. Major changes are the introduction of a 3. order polynomial curve-fitting routine for an accurate description of solar transmission and temperature dependency of the thermal resistance of the transparent cover and the use of air-speed dependent surface resistances at all internal surfaces of the solar wall. All major processes are reused from the original version of tsbi3, i.e. conduction through the massive construction of the solar wall, shadows from local and external obstacles and airing the enclosure in front of the absorber and the solar shading devices. (ARW)

  13. Quantifying environmental limiting factors on tree cover using geospatial data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Greenberg

    Full Text Available Environmental limiting factors (ELFs are the thresholds that determine the maximum or minimum biological response for a given suite of environmental conditions. We asked the following questions: 1 Can we detect ELFs on percent tree cover across the eastern slopes of the Lake Tahoe Basin, NV? 2 How are the ELFs distributed spatially? 3 To what extent are unmeasured environmental factors limiting tree cover? ELFs are difficult to quantify as they require significant sample sizes. We addressed this by using geospatial data over a relatively large spatial extent, where the wall-to-wall sampling ensures the inclusion of rare data points which define the minimum or maximum response to environmental factors. We tested mean temperature, minimum temperature, potential evapotranspiration (PET and PET minus precipitation (PET-P as potential limiting factors on percent tree cover. We found that the study area showed system-wide limitations on tree cover, and each of the factors showed evidence of being limiting on tree cover. However, only 1.2% of the total area appeared to be limited by the four (4 environmental factors, suggesting other unmeasured factors are limiting much of the tree cover in the study area. Where sites were near their theoretical maximum, non-forest sites (tree cover < 25% were primarily limited by cold mean temperatures, open-canopy forest sites (tree cover between 25% and 60% were primarily limited by evaporative demand, and closed-canopy forests were not limited by any particular environmental factor. The detection of ELFs is necessary in order to fully understand the width of limitations that species experience within their geographic range.

  14. Modeling Effects on Forces in Shear Wall-Frame Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adang Surahman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Shear walls are added to a structural system to reduce lateral deformations in moment resisting frames and are designed to carry a major portion of lateral load induced by an earthquake. A small percentage error in the shear wall calculation will have a significant effect on the frame forces. The results show that even a slight difference in structural assumption, or modeling, results in significant differences. Some of these differences are beyond the values that are covered by safety factors for errors in modeling. The differences are more obvious in the upper stories. It is not recommended to overestimate shear wall stiffness, nor underestimate frame stiffness.

  15. Dualities in Covering Rough Operations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William Zhu

    2006-01-01

    Rough set theory is a technique of granular computing. In this paper, we study a type of generalized rough sets based on covering. There are several literatures[ 1,40-43 ] exploring covering-based rough sets. Our focus of this paper is on the dualities in rough operations.

  16. High plains cover crop research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some recent statements have been made about the benefits of growing cover crops in mixtures as compared with single-species plantings of cover crops. Those stated benefits have included greatly reduced water use, enhanced soil microbiological activity, increased biomass productivity, and enhanced wa...

  17. Midwest Cover Crops Field Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Producers who want to prevent soil erosion, improve nutrient cycling, sustain their soils, and protect/maintain the environment have been returning to a very old practice: planting cover crops. Cover crops are effective tools for reducing soil erosion and increasing nutrient recycling on farmlands, ...

  18. Automatic design of magazine covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanian, Ali; Liu, Jerry; Tretter, Daniel R.; Lin, Qian; Damera-Venkata, Niranjan; O'Brien-Strain, Eamonn; Lee, Seungyon; Fan, Jian; Allebach, Jan P.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a system for automatic design of magazine covers that quantifies a number of concepts from art and aesthetics. Our solution to automatic design of this type of media has been shaped by input from professional designers, magazine art directors and editorial boards, and journalists. Consequently, a number of principles in design and rules in designing magazine covers are delineated. Several techniques are derived and employed in order to quantify and implement these principles and rules in the format of a software framework. At this stage, our framework divides the task of design into three main modules: layout of magazine cover elements, choice of color for masthead and cover lines, and typography of cover lines. Feedback from professional designers on our designs suggests that our results are congruent with their intuition.

  19. Where are the Walls?

    CERN Document Server

    Olive, Keith A; Peterson, Adam J

    2012-01-01

    The reported spatial variation in the fine-structure constant at high redshift, if physical, could be due to the presence of dilatonic domains, and one or more domain walls inside our horizon. An absorption spectrum of an object in a different domain from our own would be characterized by a different value of alpha. We show that while a single wall solution is statically comparable to a dipole fit, and is a big improvement over a weighted mean (despite adding 3 parameters), a two-wall solution is a far better fit (despite adding 3 parameters over the single wall solution). We derive a simple model accounting for the two-domain wall solution. The goodness of these fits is however dependent on the extra random error which was argued to account for the large scatter in most of the data. When this error is omitted, all the above solutions are poor fits to the data. When included, the solutions that exhibit a spatial dependence agree with the data much more significantly than the Standard Model; however, the Stand...

  20. 75 FR 61127 - Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and Tube from Turkey; Notice of Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... duty order on Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and Tube from Turkey. See Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and... antidumping duty order covering light- walled rectangular pipe and tube from Turkey. See Preliminary Results...-specific rate for an intermediary involved in the transaction. See Notice of Antidumping Duty Order:...

  1. 75 FR 57456 - Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and Tube from the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... duty order on light-walled rectangular pipe and tube from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''), covering the period January 20, 2008, through July 31, 2009. See Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and Tube... International Trade Administration Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and Tube from the People's Republic of...

  2. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  3. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya [Department of Physics, Tohoku University,Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Takahashi, Fuminobu [Department of Physics, Tohoku University,Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kavli IPMU, TODIAS, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  4. Congenital Abdominal Wall Defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risby, Kirsten; Jakobsen, Marianne Skytte; Qvist, Niels

    2016-01-01

    complications were seen in five (15%) children: four had detachment of the mesh and one patient developed abdominal compartment syndrome. Mesh related clinical infection was observed in five children. In hospital mortality occurred in four cases (2 gastroschisis and 2 omphalocele) and was not procedure......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical utility of GORE® DUALMESH (GDM) in the staged closure of large congenital abdominal wall defects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data of patients with congenital abdominal wall defects managed with GDM was analyzed for outcome regarding complete fascial closure; mesh...

  5. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding....... It was found that the specific damages made to the vapour barrier as part of the test did not have any provable effect on the moisture content. In general elements with an intact vapour barrier did not show a critical moisture content at the wind barrier after four years of exposure....

  6. EDGE COVERING COLORING AND FRACTIONAL EDGE COVERING COLORING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAOLianying; LIUGuizhen

    2002-01-01

    Let G be a graph with edge set E(G).S E(G)is called an edge cover of G if every vertex of G is an end vertex of some edges in S.The edge covering chromatic number of a graph G,denoted by Xc(G),is the maximum size of a partition of E(G) into edge covers of G.It is known that for any graph G with minimum degree δ,δ-1≤Xc(G)≤δ.The fractional edge covering chromatic number of a graph G,denoted by Xcf(G),is the fractional matiching number of the edge covering hypergraph H of G whose vertices are the edges of G and whose hypereges the edge covers of G.In this paper,we study the relation between Xc(G) and δfor any graph G,and give a new simple proof of the inequalities δ-1≤Xc(G)≤δ by the technique of graph coloring.For any graph G,we give an exact formula o Xcf(G),that is,Xcf(G)=min{δ,λ(G)},where λ(G)=minCS/S/2 and the minimum is taken over all noempty subsets S of V(G) and C[S] is the set of edges that have at least one end in S.δ

  7. EDGE COVERING COLORING AND FRACTIONAL EDGE COVERING COLORING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Lianying; LIU Guizhen

    2002-01-01

    Let G be a graph with edge set E(G). S _C E(G) is called an edge cover of G if every vertex of G is an end vertex of some edges in S. The edge covering chromatic number of a graph G, denoted by X'c(G) , is the maximum size of a partition of E(G) into edge covers of G. It is known that for any graph G with minimum degree δ, δ - 1 ≤ X'c(G) ≤ δ.The fractional edge covering chromatic number of a graph G, denoted by X'cf(G), is the fractional matching number of the edge covering hypergraph H of G whose vertices are the edges of G and whose hyperedges the edge covers of G. In this paper, we study the relation between X'c(G) and δ for any graph G, and give a new simple proof of the inequalities δ - 1 ≤ X'c(G) ≤ δ by the technique of graph coloring. For any graph G, we give an exact formula of X'cf(G), that is, X'cf(G)=min{δ,λ(G)}, where λ(G)=min |C[S]|/[|S|/2]and the minimum is taken over all noempty subsets S of V(G) and C[S] is the set of edges that have at least one end in S.

  8. Determining Covers in Combinational Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubomir Cvetkovic

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a procedure for determining 0- or 1-cover of an arbitrary line in a combinational circuit. When determining a cover we do not need Boolean expression for the line; only the circuit structure is used. Within the proposed procedure we use the tools of the cube theory, in particular, some operations defined on cubes. The procedure can be applied for determining 0- and 1- covers of output lines in programmable logic devices. Basically, this procedure is a method for the analysis of a combinational circuit.

  9. COVER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of hepatic B virus(HBV)infection is the result of complex interactions between replicating HBV and the innate/adaptive immune system.As an important lectin complement pathway activator,human ficolin-2 is secreted from liver cells and contributes to the clearance of viral infections and lysis of enveloped virions,which has been implicated as an anti-infection innate immune molecule.In this issue,a research group lead by Drs.XiaoLian Zhang and Fengling Luo,investigated the serum and liver tissue ficolin-2

  10. COVER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    <正>This issue of Virologica Sinica is to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the discovery of "filterable lytic factor" or "bacteriophage"(1915-2015).During the past 100 years,both basic knowledge and applications of bacteriophages have been substantially explored and developed.In recent years,bacteriophage research is booming and holding the hope

  11. Cover

    OpenAIRE

    Frontiers of Biogeography, Editorial Office

    2017-01-01

    Frontiers of Biogeography new logo. This logo feeds on the theme created for the new IBS corporate image, and represents four overlapping hypervolumes in the form of a butterfly’s wings, flying over four niche response curves in the form of hills, mountains and the sea (see Dawson et al. in this issue for details).

  12. Cover

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Soybean growth habit is an important agronomic trait,and related genes have been cloned recently,while the variation of the major gene and how this gene was selected during the soybean breeding in China remain unknown.In the diverse soybean germplasm,it is hard to distinguish the determinate from the semi‐determinate phenotype.The development of functional Indel and CAPS markers from the Gm Tfl1 gene of the Dt1 locus makes it possible to evaluate genotype of the germplasm.The different allele

  13. COVER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus(HBV)infection remains a major global health problem because current therapies rarely eliminate the replicative template of HBV,which is the covalently closed circular DNA(ccc DNA).As an accurate and efficient genome editing tool,clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeat(CRISPR)-associated(Cas)9 system represents a very promising potential

  14. GAP Land Cover - Tiled Raster

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This raster dataset is a detailed (1-acre minimum), hierarchically organized vegetation cover map produced by computer classification of combined two-season pairs of...

  15. Forest Cover Types - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer portrays general forest cover types for the United States. Data were derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) composite images...

  16. Land-cover change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuexia; Giri, Chandra; Vogelmann, James

    2012-01-01

    Land cover is the biophysical material on the surface of the earth. Land-cover types include grass, shrubs, trees, barren, water, and man-made features. Land cover changes continuously.  The rate of change can be either dramatic and abrupt, such as the changes caused by logging, hurricanes and fire, or subtle and gradual, such as regeneration of forests and damage caused by insects (Verbesselt et al., 2001).  Previous studies have shown that land cover has changed dramatically during the past sevearal centuries and that these changes have severely affected our ecosystems (Foody, 2010; Lambin et al., 2001). Lambin and Strahlers (1994b) summarized five types of cause for land-cover changes: (1) long-term natural changes in climate conditions, (2) geomorphological and ecological processes, (3) human-induced alterations of vegetation cover and landscapes, (4) interannual climate variability, and (5) human-induced greenhouse effect.  Tools and techniques are needed to detect, describe, and predict these changes to facilitate sustainable management of natural resources.

  17. Good covers are algorithmically unrecognizable

    CERN Document Server

    Tancer, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A good cover in R^d is a collection of open contractible sets in R^d such that the intersection of any subcollection is either contractible or empty. Motivated by an analogy with convex sets, intersection patterns of good covers were studied intensively. Our main result is that intersection patterns of good covers are algorithmically unrecognizable. More precisely, the intersection pattern of a good cover can be stored in a simplicial complex called nerve which records which subfamilies of the good cover intersect. A simplicial complex is topologically d-representable if it is isomorphic to the nerve of a good cover in R^d. We prove that it is algorithmically undecidable whether a given simplicial complex is topologically d-representable for any fixed d \\geq 5. As an auxiliary result we prove that if a simplicial complex is PL embeddable into R^d, then it is topologically d-representable. We also supply this result with showing that if a "sufficiently fine" subdivision of a k-dimensional complex is d-represen...

  18. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Lois [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Mantha, Pallavi [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  19. Assessment of Paraguay's forest cover change using Landsat observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengquan; Kim, Sunghee; Song, Kuan; Townshend, John R. G.; Davis, Paul; Altstatt, Alice; Rodas, Oscar; Yanosky, Alberto; Clay, Rob; Tucker, Compton J.; Musinsky, John

    2009-05-01

    Comprehensive assessments of Paraguay's forest cover (FC) change from the 1970s to the 2000s using Landsat observations were conducted, including a wall-to-wall mapping of changes across the whole country between the 1990s and 2000s, and an assessment of forest area in the Atlantic Forest ecoregion in the 1970s using a systematic sampling approach. The derived wall-to-wall FC change map was evaluated using available high resolution satellite images and aerial photos. The overall accuracy values were 92% or higher in the areas covered by those high resolution data sets. The results revealed that the Atlantic Forest ecoregion experienced the most forest loss, with the 73.4% forest cover in the 1970s decreasing precipitously down to 40.7% by the 1990s and further down to 24.9% by the 2000s. The rapid loss of Atlantic forests was driven by complex social economic forces, including widespread land disputes arising from long time inequalities and profits from exporting agricultural products. Forest changes in the Humid Chaco and the Chaco ecoregions were relatively moderate. However, extensive forests were converted to non-forest land use near a major population center. The results also revealed that so far the established protected areas were effective in protecting forest within their border. However, most of the forests surrounding the protected areas were lost by the 2000s. Loss of Atlantic forest is a major threat to the rich biodiversity found in this region. The alarming deforestation rates over the last three decades and the low percentage of Atlantic forest left by the 2000s call for immediate actions to halt the trends of forest loss.

  20. The HADES RPC inner TOF wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belver, D. [LABCAF-Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Blanco, A. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Cabanelas, P. [LABCAF-Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Carolino, N. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Castro, E. [LABCAF-Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Diaz, J. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universidad de Valencia), Valencia 46071 (Spain); Fonte, P. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal)], E-mail: fonte@lipc.fis.uc.pt; Garzon, J.A. [LABCAF-Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Gonzalez-Diaz, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI), 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Gil, A. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universidad de Valencia), Valencia 46071 (Spain); Koenig, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI), 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lopes, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Oliveira, O.; Pereira, A.; Silva, C. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Sousa, C.C. [Escola Superior de Tecnologia e Gestao de Leiria, 2411-901 Leiria (Portugal); Zapata, M. [LABCAF-Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2009-05-01

    The upgraded HADES inner TOF Wall will cover a total area of 8 m{sup 2} with 1116 variable-geometry 4-gap, symmetric, timing RPCs, readout by 2232 time and charge channels. Each RPC is individually shielded for robust multi-hit performance and optimum use of the readout channels (crosstalk minimization). The double layer configuration provides a useful degree of redundancy for very accurate timing of a large fraction of all particles crossing the detector. In this paper we describe the concept of the detector, its inner structure and the multi-hit performance.

  1. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  2. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  3. Influence of Wall Material on VUV Emission from Hydrogen Plasma in H- Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacal, M.; Glass-Maujean, M.; Ivanov, A. A., Jr; Nishiura, M.; Sasao, M.; Wada, M.

    2002-11-01

    The study of VUV emission from a hydrogen plasma produced in a filament discharge in a magnetic multicusp device showed that the use of tantalum and tungsten filaments leads to significant differences in the spectra. The effect of the filament material is interpreted in terms of the fresh film of this material, deposited on the wall. The synthetic spectrum convoluted with our apparatus function for the conditions of this experiment (gas temperature 500 K, electron energy 100 eV) agrees roughly well with the spectrum obtained with tungsten covered walls, but not with the spectrum obtained with tantalum covered walls. We show that in the case of tungsten covered walls the E-V singlet excitation is indeed a two-step Franck-Condon transition, going through either B or C state from an initial H2 molecule with v"=0, added to a Franck-Condon transition to highly excited states cascading to the B or C states. The excitation process to high v" states in the case of tantalum covered walls is a three step process, in which the first step is the formation by recombinative desorption on the wall of a vibrationally excited molecule with v"=1 or 2, which serves as the initial molecule in the subsequent E-V excitation through the B state. The results indicate a larger recombination coefficient of atoms on the tantalum covered wall.

  4. Integrating shotcrete walls into the natural landscape by application of 'Green Walls'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medl, Alexandra; Kikuta, Silvia

    2017-04-01

    Steep slopes resulting from major road infrastructure constructions are increasingly perceived as disagreeable disturbance in the landscape. Thus, a tool to consider landscape aspects and integrate these slopes into the natural environment is required. The challenge is to establish a sustainable vegetation layer despite of adverse circumstances such as inclinations of almost 90⁰, exposed position of slopes near streets and lack of soil and water supply. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of an innovative greening technology for vertical structures (shotcrete wall) in terms of vegetation development on varying plant substrates and geotextiles. The field experiment in Steinach am Brenner, Tyrol, Austria, included testing three plant substrates on basis of nearby rocky excavation material ('Innsbrucker Quarzphyllit', 'Bündnerschiefer' and 'Zentralgneis') combined with compost. Additionally, five geotextiles (geogrid (3x4 mm), geogrid (9x10 mm), coir net, coir mat, geo mat) were applied for evaluation. All test combinations were evaluated regarding vegetation cover and biomass production from 2015 to 2016. Analyses of chemical properties were conducted for all plant substrates. Results showed highest vegetation cover ratio on 'Bündnerschiefer' and 'Innsbrucker Quarzphyllit', which can be explained by the favorable mineral composition (nutrient storage capacity) and chemical properties of compost (lower values of electrical conductivity and C/N ratio). In conclusion, the use of 'Green Walls' filled with 'Bündnerschiefer' or 'Innsbrucker Quarzphyllit' plant substrate in combination with netlike geotextiles proved best, since geo grid and coir net turned out as most successful one year after installation. 'Green Walls' are promising in terms of establishing an optimal vegetation cover on vertical structures and are well suited for integrating shotcrete walls into the landscape. The use of local excavation material for greening purposes can be

  5. Biocompatibility of a new device of self-expandable covered and non-covered tracheal stent: comparative study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olavo Ribeiro Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the compatibility of a new model of self-expandable tracheal stent in rats. METHODS: A new device of polyurethane covered and non - covered stent was placed in the trachea of Wistar rats. Animals were distributed in two groups: the polyurethane covered and non-covered group. Macroscopic parameters included position within the tracheal lumen, adherence to the mucosa, degree of dilatation, permeability and internal diameter. Microscopic findings evaluated were: incorporation, inflammatory activity, granulation tissue and epithelial revetment injuries. The observation follow-up was six weeks. All parameters were quantified based on determined score values. Incorporation of the stents was evaluated based on the observation if the stent was fixed into the trachea or if it could be removed. Degree of dilatation was performed by external diameter measurements. Granulation tissue was evaluated by measurements of height of the tissue growing into the tracheal lumen. RESULTS: 100% of non-covered stents had total attachment to mucosa and 100% of polyurethane covered type had adherence only. Regarding dilatation, granulation tissue, inflammatory activity and internal diameter measurements, there were no significant differences between the groups. Pathological tracheal wall injuries were present in both groups. CONCLUSION: Both models of stent demonstrated biocompatibility with the trachea. Rats are suitable for an experimental model of tracheal stent study.

  6. Occupy Wall Street

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael J.; Bang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the political form of Occupy Wall Street on Twitter. Drawing on evidence contained within the profiles of over 50,000 Twitter users, political identities of participants are characterized using natural language processing. The results find evidence of a traditional oppositio......This article analyzes the political form of Occupy Wall Street on Twitter. Drawing on evidence contained within the profiles of over 50,000 Twitter users, political identities of participants are characterized using natural language processing. The results find evidence of a traditional...... oppositional social movement alongside a legitimizing countermovement, but also a new notion of political community as an ensemble of discursive practices that are endogenous to the constitution of political regimes from the “inside out.” These new political identities are bound by thin ties of political...

  7. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...... were removed in some of the elements to simulate damaged vapour barriers. The condition of the wind barriers of elements with intact vapour barriers was inspected from the inside after four years of exposure. This paper presents results with emphasis on the moisture conditions behind the wind barrier....... It was found that the specific damages made to the vapour barrier as part of the test did not have any provable effect on the moisture content. In general elements with an intact vapour barrier did not show a critical moisture content at the wind barrier after four years of exposure....

  8. Space, composition, vertical wall ...

    OpenAIRE

    Despot, Katerina; Sandeva, Vaska

    2016-01-01

    The space in which it is an integral segment of our life is nourished with many functional and decorative elements. One aspect for consideration of vertical walls or The vertical gardens and their aesthetic impact in space called function. Vertical gardens bordering the decoration to totally functional garden in areas where there is little oxygen and space, ideal for residential buildings and public spaces where missing greenery, special place occupies in interior design where their expres...

  9. Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    KAUST Repository

    Leigh, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  10. Wall Street som kreationistisk forkynder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekman, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong......Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong...

  11. Covering Numbers for Convex Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Guntuboyina, Adityanand

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the covering numbers of the space of convex and uniformly bounded functions in multi-dimension. We find optimal upper and lower bounds for the $\\epsilon$-covering number of $\\C([a, b]^d, B)$, in the $L_p$-metric, $1 \\le p 0$, and $\\C([a,b]^d, B)$ denotes the set of all convex functions on $[a, b]^d$ that are uniformly bounded by $B$. We summarize previously known results on covering numbers for convex functions and also provide alternate proofs of some known results. Our results have direct implications in the study of rates of convergence of empirical minimization procedures as well as optimal convergence rates in the numerous convexity constrained function estimation problems.

  12. The National Land Cover Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Collin H.; Fry, Joyce A.; Barnes, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) serves as the definitive Landsat-based, 30-meter resolution, land cover database for the Nation. NLCD provides spatial reference and descriptive data for characteristics of the land surface such as thematic class (for example, urban, agriculture, and forest), percent impervious surface, and percent tree canopy cover. NLCD supports a wide variety of Federal, State, local, and nongovernmental applications that seek to assess ecosystem status and health, understand the spatial patterns of biodiversity, predict effects of climate change, and develop land management policy. NLCD products are created by the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium, a partnership of Federal agencies led by the U.S. Geological Survey. All NLCD data products are available for download at no charge to the public from the MRLC Web site: http://www.mrlc.gov.

  13. Mekong Land Cover Dasboard: Regional Land Cover Mointoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saah, D. S.; Towashiraporn, P.; Aekakkararungroj, A.; Phongsapan, K.; Triepke, J.; Maus, P.; Tenneson, K.; Cutter, P. G.; Ganz, D.; Anderson, E.

    2016-12-01

    SERVIR-Mekong, a USAID-NASA partnership, helps decision makers in the Lower Mekong Region utilize GIS and Remote Sensing information to inform climate related activities. In 2015, SERVIR-Mekong conducted a geospatial needs assessment for the Lower Mekong countries which included individual country consultations. The team found that many countries were dependent on land cover and land use maps for land resource planning, quantifying ecosystem services, including resilience to climate change, biodiversity conservation, and other critical social issues. Many of the Lower Mekong countries have developed national scale land cover maps derived in part from remote sensing products and geospatial technologies. However, updates are infrequent and classification systems do not always meet the needs of key user groups. In addition, data products stop at political boundaries and are often not accessible making the data unusable across country boundaries and with resource management partners. Many of these countries rely on global land cover products to fill the gaps of their national efforts, compromising consistency between data and policies. These gaps in national efforts can be filled by a flexible regional land cover monitoring system that is co-developed by regional partners with the specific intention of meeting national transboundary needs, for example including consistent forest definitions in transboundary watersheds. Based on these facts, key regional stakeholders identified a need for a land cover monitoring system that will produce frequent, high quality land cover maps using a consistent regional classification scheme that is compatible with national country needs. SERVIR-Mekong is currently developing a solution that leverages recent developments in remote sensing science and technology, such as Google Earth Engine (GEE), and working together with production partners to develop a system that will use a common set of input data sources to generate high

  14. Light shining through walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Javier [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Shining light through walls? At first glance this sounds crazy. However, very feeble gravitational and electroweak effects allow for this exotic possibility. Unfortunately, with present and near future technologies the opportunity to observe light shining through walls via these effects is completely out of question. Nevertheless there are quite a number of experimental collaborations around the globe involved in this quest. Why are they doing it? Are there additional ways of sending photons through opaque matter? Indeed, various extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of new particles called WISPs - extremely weakly interacting slim particles. Photons can convert into these hypothetical particles, which have no problems to penetrate very dense materials, and these can reconvert into photons after their passage - as if light was effectively traversing walls. We review this exciting field of research, describing the most important WISPs, the present and future experiments, the indirect hints from astrophysics and cosmology pointing to the existence of WISPs, and finally outlining the consequences that the discovery of WISPs would have. (orig.)

  15. Root Growth and Water distribution in living walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars

    walls; the vertical orientation of the growing medium, plants are growing vertically above or below each other in a limited rooting volume; there is an increased exposure to weather and the plants can react differently to water conditions and competition from other plants. Plant growth is the core......Living walls is a way of bringing plants and green areas into cities, and offer both positive environmental and aesthetical effects. A prerequisite for optimal performance of a living wall is that the plant cover is properly established why the individual plant should have optimal conditions...... for root growth. This thesis investigates the correlations between the growing media and root and shoots growth, and studies root growth patterns of different plant species and effects of planting position and root interactions of plants growing in living walls. There are a number of challenges with living...

  16. Prosthetics and Techniques in Repair of Animal's Abdominal Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrouf, Gamal; Zaghloul, Adel; Abou-Alsaud, Mohamed; Barbour, Elie; Abouelnasr, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    The management of abdominal wall repair continues to present a challenging problem, especially in the repair of major defects. Many abdominal wall defects can be repaired by primary closure; however, if the defect is large and there is a tension on the closure of the wound, the use of prosthetic materials becomes indispensable. Many studies have been performed with various materials and implant techniques, without the comparison of their degrees of success, based on sound meta-analysis and/or inclusive epidemiologic studies. This review covered the effectiveness of recent advances in prosthetic materials and implant procedures used in repair of abdominal wall, based on biomechanical properties and economic aspects of reconstructed large abdominal wall defects and hernias in animals. The presented results in this review helped to reach treatment algorithms that could maximize outcomes and minimize morbidity.

  17. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  18. Kummer covers and braid monodromy

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Enrique Artal; Ortigas-Galindo, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    In this work we describe a method to reconstruct the braid monodromy of the preimage of a curve by a Kummer cover. This method is interesting, since it combines two techniques, namely, the reconstruction of a highly non-generic braid monodromy with a systematic method to go from a non-generic to a generic braid monodromy. This "generification" method is independent from Kummer covers and can be applied in more general circumstances since non generic braid monodromies appear more naturally and are oftentimes much easier to compute. Explicit examples are computed using these techniques.

  19. Cell Wall Biology: Perspectives from Cell Wall Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kieran J.D.Lee; Susan E.Marcus; J.Paul Knox

    2011-01-01

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are important biomaterials that underpin plant growth,are major repositories for photosynthetically accumulated carbon,and,in addition,impact greatly on the human use of plants. Land plant cell walls contain in the region of a dozen major polysaccharide structures that are mostly encompassed by cellulose,hemicelluloses,and pectic polysaccharides. During the evolution of land plants,polysaccharide diversification appears to have largely involved structural elaboration and diversification within these polysaccharide groups. Cell wall chemistry is well advanced and a current phase of cell wall science is aimed at placing the complex polysaccharide chemistry in cellular contexts and developing a detailed understanding of cell wall biology. Imaging cell wall glycomes is a challenging area but recent developments in the establishment of cell wall molecular probe panels and their use in high throughput procedures are leading to rapid advances in the molecular understanding of the spatial heterogeneity of individual cell walls and also cell wall differences at taxonomic levels. The challenge now is to integrate this knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity with an understanding of the molecular and physiological mechanisms that underpin cell wall properties and functions.

  20. Canal Wall Reconstruction Mastoidectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the advantages of canal wall reconstruction (CWR) mastoidectomy, a single-stage technique for cholesteatoma removal and posterior external canal wall reconstruction, over the open and closed procedures in terms of cholesteatoma recurrence. Methods: Between June 2002 and December 2005, 38 patients (40 ears) with cholesteatoma were admited to Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital and received surgical treatments. Of these patients, 25 were male with ages ranging between 11 and 60 years (mean = 31.6 years) and 13 were female with ages ranging between 20 and 65 years (mean = 38.8 years). Canal wall reconstruction (CWR)mastoidectomy was performed in 31 ears and canal wall down (CWD) mastoidectomy in 9 ears. Concha cartilage was used for ear canal wall reconstruction in 22 of the 31 CWR procedures and cortical mastoid bone was used in the remaining 9 cases. Results At 0.5 to 4 years follow up, all but one patients remained free of signs of cholesteatoma recurrence, i.e., no retraction pocket or cholesteatoma matrix. One patient, a smoker, needed revision surgery due to cholesteatoma recurrence 1.5 year after the initial operation. The recurrence rate was therefore 3.2% (1/31). Cholesteatoma recurrence was monitored using postoperative CT scans whenever possible. In the case that needed a revision procedure, a retraction pocket was identified by otoendoscopy in the pars flacida area that eventually evolved into a cholesteatoma. A pocket extending to the epitympanum filled with cholesteatoma matrix was confirmed during the revision operation, A decision to perform a modified mastoidectomy was made as the patient refused to quit smoking. The mean air-bone gap in pure tone threshold was 45 dB before surgery and 25 dB after (p < 0.05). There was no difference between using concha cartilage and cortical mastoid bone for the reconstruction regarding air-bone gap improvement, CT findings and otoendoscopic results. Conclusion CWR mastoidectomy can be used for

  1. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models.

  2. Gambia Land Use Land Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This series of three-period land use land cover (LULC) datasets (1975, 2000, and 2013) aids in monitoring change in West Africa’s land resources (exception is...

  3. Emerging Infectious Diseases Cover Art

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-26

    Byron Breedlove, managing editor of the EID Journal, discusses his approach to cover art.  Created: 7/26/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/26/2017.

  4. Covering Numbers for Semicontinuous Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-29

    di Matematica pura ed applicata, CLX:303–320, 1991. [3] H. Attouch and R. J-B Wets. A convergence theory for saddle functions. Transactions of the...P. L. Bartlett, J. Shawe-Taylor, and R. C. Williamson. Covering numbers for support vector machines. IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, 48(1

  5. Strengthening of Shear Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg

    -plane loaded walls and disks is however not included in any guidelines, and only a small fraction of scientists have initiated research within this topic. Furthermore, studies of the principal behavior and response of a strengthened disk has not yet been investigated satisfactorily, and this is the principal...... be altered to fit the surrounding boundary conditions. The effective cohesive law will then become a function of the investigated structural geometry. A simplified approach for the latter topic was used to predict the load capacity of concrete beams in shear. Results obtained were acceptable, but the model...

  6. Axions from wall decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S; Hagmann, C; Sikivie, P

    2001-01-08

    The authors discuss the decay of axion walls bounded by strings and present numerical simulations of the decay process. In these simulations, the decay happens immediately, in a time scale of order the light travel time, and the average energy of the radiated axions is {approx_equal} 7m{sub a} for v{sub a}/m{sub a} {approx_equal} 500. is found to increase approximately linearly with ln(v{sub a}/m{sub a}). Extrapolation of this behavior yields {approx_equal} 60 m{sub a} in axion models of interest.

  7. Abdominal wall endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyaya, P; Karak, A K; Sinha, A K; Kumar, B; Karki, S; Agarwal, C S

    2010-01-01

    Endometriosis of abdominal wall scar following operation on uterus and tubes is extremely rare. The late onset of symptoms after surgery is the usual cause of misdiagnosis. Scar endometriosis is a rare disease which is difficult to diagnose and should always be considered as a differential diagnosis of painful abdominal masses in women. The diagnosis is made only after excision and histopathology of the lesion. Preoperative differentials include hernia, lipoma, suture granuloma or abscess. Hence an awareness of the entity avoids delay in diagnosis, helps clinicians to a more tailored treatment and also avoids unnecessary referrals. We report a case of abdominal endometriosis. The definitive diagnosis of which was established by histopathological studies.

  8. A Revised CFB Wall-to-suspension Heat Transfer Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Ya-xin

    2005-01-01

    Based on the Cluster Renewal Model of the particle motion in a CFB riser, a revised heat transfer model is developed, which introduces the latest research results of the hydrodynamics of the suspension flow in CFB. This model divides the heat transfer into two parts, which are due to the transient heat conduction by the covered clusters and the convection between the uncovered wall and the dispersed phase. Radiation at high temperature is regarded as being additive. The fraction of the covered wall by clusters is revised by a new formula, which is a function of the operating condition and the particle properties. The radiation between the dispersed phase and the uncovered wall includes not only the direct radiation to the uncovered wall, but also the radiation to the clusters and then reflected to the uncovered wall. Calculation was carried out for the CFB heat transfer model. The results were compared with the published typical experimental data of other researchers and showed a good agreement between them.

  9. Sky cover from MFRSR observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kassianov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their modeled clear-sky counterparts are the main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumuli. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from a ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR. The MFRSR data are collected at the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumuli. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

  10. Prym varieties of spectral covers

    CERN Document Server

    Hausel, Tamás

    2010-01-01

    Given a possibly reducible and non-reduced spectral cover X over a smooth projective complex curve C we determine the group of connected components of the Prym variety Prym(X/C). We also describe the sublocus of characteristics a for which the Prym variety Prym(X_a/C) is connected. These results extend special cases of work of Ng\\^o who considered integral spectral curves.

  11. Slotted Antenna with Anisotropic Covering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-06

    08-2015 Publication Slotted Antenna with Anisotropic Covering David A. Tonn et al Naval Under Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell St...NUWC 300055 Distribution A An antenna includes a tubular, conductive radiator having a longitudinal slot formed therein from a first end of the...conductive radiator to a second end of the conductive radiator. An antenna feed can be joined to the conductive radiator adjacent to and across the slot

  12. Extreme fatigue and malaise--a syndrome caused by badly cleaned wall-to-wall carpets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nexø, E; Skov, P G; Gravesen, S

    1983-01-01

    Complaints connected with the indoor climate are often vague and a cause-effect relationship is difficult to demonstrate. The present paper describes two patients suffering from symptoms in the form of extreme fatigue and malaise. The patients connected their problems to the poorly cleaned working place. We found the working place to be covered with badly cleaned wall-to-wall carpet. Examination of 12 employees showed five to have symptoms related to the working place. Four of the five had precipitating antibodies against extracts of dust collected from the carpets and two of the five had a positive prick test to the same extract. After removal of the carpets all symptoms disappeared. We conclude that vague symptoms related to the indoor climate may be induced by accumulation of organic dust.

  13. Measure Guideline: Deep Energy Enclosure Retrofit for Double-Stud Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, H. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Pettit, B. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-06-22

    This Measure Guideline describes a deep energy enclosure retrofit solution that provides insulation to the interior of the wall assembly with the use of a double-stud wall. The guide describes two approaches to retrofitting the existing walls—one that involves replacing the existing cladding and the other that leaves the cladding in place. This guideline also covers the design principles related to the use of various insulation types and provides strategies and procedures for implementing the double-stud wall retrofit. It also includes an evaluation of important moisture-related and indoor air quality measures that need to be implemented to achieve a durable high-performance wall.

  14. Abdominal wall blocks in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børglum, Jens; Gögenür, Ismail; Bendtsen, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Abdominal wall blocks in adults have evolved much during the last decade; that is, particularly with the introduction of ultrasound-guided (USG) blocks. This review highlights recent advances of block techniques within this field and proposes directions for future research.......  Recent findings Ultrasound guidance is now considered the golden standard for abdominal wall blocks in adults, even though some landmark-based blocks are still being investigated. The efficiency of USG transversus abdominis plane blocks in relation to many surgical procedures involving the abdominal wall...... been introduced with success. Future research should also investigate the effect of specific abdominal wall blocks on neuroendocrine and inflammatory stress response after surgery.  Summary USG abdominal wall blocks in adults are commonplace techniques today. Most abdominal wall blocks are assigned...

  15. Structure of axionic domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M. C.; Sikivie, P.

    1985-09-01

    The structure of axionic domain walls is investigated using the low-energy effective theory of axions and pions. We derive the spatial dependence of the phases of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field and the QCD quark-antiquark condensates inside an axionic domain wall. Thence an accurate estimate of the wall surface energy density is obtained. The equations of motion for axions, photons, leptons, and baryons in the neighborhood of axionic domain walls are written down and estimates are given for the wall reflection and transmission coefficients of these particles. Finally, we discuss the energy dissipation by axionic domain walls oscillating in the early universe due to the reflection of particles in the primordial soup.

  16. Structure of axionic domain walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, M.C.; Sikivie, P.

    1985-09-15

    The structure of axionic domain walls is investigated using the low-energy effective theory of axions and pions. We derive the spatial dependence of the phases of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field and the QCD quark-antiquark condensates inside an axionic domain wall. Thence an accurate estimate of the wall surface energy density is obtained. The equations of motion for axions, photons, leptons, and baryons in the neighborhood of axionic domain walls are written down and estimates are given for the wall reflection and transmission coefficients of these particles. Finally, we discuss the energy dissipation by axionic domain walls oscillating in the early universe due to the reflection of particles in the primordial soup.

  17. Asymptotic Dynamics of Monopole Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Cross, R

    2015-01-01

    We determine the asymptotic dynamics of the U(N) doubly periodic BPS monopole in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory, called a monopole wall, by exploring its Higgs curve using the Newton polytope and amoeba. In particular, we show that the monopole wall splits into subwalls when any of its moduli become large. The long-distance gauge and Higgs field interactions of these subwalls are abelian, allowing us to derive an asymptotic metric for the monopole wall moduli space.

  18. Dynamical domain wall and localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Toyozato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the previous works (Toyozato et al., 2013 [24]; Higuchi and Nojiri, 2014 [25], we investigate the localization of the fields on the dynamical domain wall, where the four-dimensional FRW universe is realized on the domain wall in the five-dimensional space–time. Especially we show that the chiral spinor can localize on the domain wall, which has not been succeeded in the past works as the seminal work in George et al. (2009 [23].

  19. Geomorphology and dynamics of supraglacial debris covers in the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deline, P.; Gardent, M.; Kirkbride, M. P.; Le Roy, M.; Martin, B.

    2012-04-01

    In the alpine regions of France and NW Italy, many glaciers of a variety of sizes are at least partly debris-covered, but these have received less scientific research than clean glaciers. During the present period of glacier shrinkage - the area of glacier cover in France has reduced by 26% over the last 40 years -, growing debris cover needs to be understood as an influence on continuing retreat, with consequences for natural hazards, water resources and tourism. We present the results of a combined ongoing study of an inventory of debris-covered glaciers in France with site-specific studies of c. 12 glaciers of contrasting types, in order to understand spatial and temporal changes in supraglacial debris cover. Our specific aims are: 1. To understand the geomorphology of debris-covers and their formation, investigating the types of debris cover in relation to formative processes including extraglacial supply and development during transport. 2. To document the changing extents of supraglacial debris covers, using historical documents and aerial photographs. 3. To interpret areal changes in terms of glaciological and topographical controls on different glacier and debris cover types (catchment morphology, glacier structure, mass balance history, and rock wall collapse magnitude and frequency). 4. To understand the effect of debris cover on glacier dynamics and geomorphological evolution, related to insulation-related modifications to AAR, long profiles, and length changes on both short and long timescales. This includes investigation of the characteristics of debris-covered glacier depositional systems resulting from their modified dynamics.

  20. EXACT ALGORITHM FOR BIN COVERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a new arc flow model for the one-dimensional bin covering problem and an algorithm to solve the problem exactly through a branch-and-bound procedure and the technique of column generation. The subproblems occuring in the procedure of branch-and-bound have the same structure and therefore can be solved by the same algorithm. In order to solve effectively the subproblems which are generally large scale, a column generation algorithm is employed. Many rules found in this paper can improve the performance of the methods.

  1. Green's conjecture for general covers

    CERN Document Server

    Aprodu, Marian

    2011-01-01

    We establish Green's syzygy conjecture for classes of covers of curves of higher Clifford dimension. These curves have an infinite number of minimal pencils, in particular they do not verify a well-known Brill-Noether theoretic sufficient condition that implies Green's conjecture. Secondly, we study syzygies of curves with a fixed point free involution and prove that sections of Nikulin surfaces of minimal Picard number 9, verify the classical Green Conjecture but fail the Prym-Green Conjecture on syzygies of Prym-canonical curves. This provides an explicit locus in the moduli space R_g where Green's Conjecture is known to hold.

  2. Distributed snow and rock temperature modelling in steep rock walls using Alpine3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberkorn, Anna; Wever, Nander; Hoelzle, Martin; Phillips, Marcia; Kenner, Robert; Bavay, Mathias; Lehning, Michael

    2017-02-01

    In this study we modelled the influence of the spatially and temporally heterogeneous snow cover on the surface energy balance and thus on rock temperatures in two rugged, steep rock walls on the Gemsstock ridge in the central Swiss Alps. The heterogeneous snow depth distribution in the rock walls was introduced to the distributed, process-based energy balance model Alpine3D with a precipitation scaling method based on snow depth data measured by terrestrial laser scanning. The influence of the snow cover on rock temperatures was investigated by comparing a snow-covered model scenario (precipitation input provided by precipitation scaling) with a snow-free (zero precipitation input) one. Model uncertainties are discussed and evaluated at both the point and spatial scales against 22 near-surface rock temperature measurements and high-resolution snow depth data from winter terrestrial laser scans.In the rough rock walls, the heterogeneously distributed snow cover was moderately well reproduced by Alpine3D with mean absolute errors ranging between 0.31 and 0.81 m. However, snow cover duration was reproduced well and, consequently, near-surface rock temperatures were modelled convincingly. Uncertainties in rock temperature modelling were found to be around 1.6 °C. Errors in snow cover modelling and hence in rock temperature simulations are explained by inadequate snow settlement due to linear precipitation scaling, missing lateral heat fluxes in the rock, and by errors caused by interpolation of shortwave radiation, wind and air temperature into the rock walls.Mean annual near-surface rock temperature increases were both measured and modelled in the steep rock walls as a consequence of a thick, long-lasting snow cover. Rock temperatures were 1.3-2.5 °C higher in the shaded and sunny rock walls, while comparing snow-covered to snow-free simulations. This helps to assess the potential error made in ground temperature modelling when neglecting snow in steep bedrock.

  3. Ultrastructure of the Epidermal Cell Wall and Cuticle of Tomato Fruit (Solanum lycopersicum L.) during Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segado, Patricia; Domínguez, Eva; Heredia, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The epidermis plays a pivotal role in plant development and interaction with the environment. However, it is still poorly understood, especially its outer epidermal wall: a singular wall covered by a cuticle. Changes in the cuticle and cell wall structures are important to fully understand their functions. In this work, an ultrastructure and immunocytochemical approach was taken to identify changes in the cuticle and the main components of the epidermal cell wall during tomato fruit development. A thin and uniform procuticle was already present before fruit set. During cell division, the inner side of the procuticle showed a globular structure with vesicle-like particles in the cell wall close to the cuticle. Transition between cell division and elongation was accompanied by a dramatic increase in cuticle thickness, which represented more than half of the outer epidermal wall, and the lamellate arrangement of the non-cutinized cell wall. Changes in this non-cutinized outer wall during development showed specific features not shared with other cell walls. The coordinated nature of the changes observed in the cuticle and the epidermal cell wall indicate a deep interaction between these two supramolecular structures. Hence, the cuticle should be interpreted within the context of the outer epidermal wall. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Conditions for the sliding-bouncing transition for the interaction of a bubble with an inclined wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, C.; Legendre, D.; Zenit, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this study we analyze the interaction of a single rising bubble with an inclined wall. We conduct experiments considering different liquids and bubble sizes, to cover a wide range of Reynolds and Weber numbers, with wall angles from nearly horizontal to nearly vertical. For all cases, the bubble initially collides with the wall; after the initial interaction, in accord with previous studies, the bubble either steadily slides on the wall or ascends, colliding repeatedly with it. Considering a force balance for the bubble motion on the wall, we propose a set of conditions for the transition from sliding to bouncing that is validated with the present and previous data.

  5. A new patch antenna with metamaterial cover

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jun; YAN Chun-sheng; LIN Qing-chun

    2006-01-01

    A metamaterial was introduced into the cover of a patch antenna and its band structure was analyzed. The metamaterial cover with correct selection of the working frequency increases by 9.14 dB the patch antenna's directivity. The mechanism of metamaterial cover is completely different from that of a photonic bandgap cover. The mechanism of the metamaterial cover,the number of the cover's layers, and the distance between the layers, were analyzed in detail. The results showed that the metamaterial cover, which works like a lens, could effectively improve the patch antenna's directivity. The physical reasons for the improvement are also given.

  6. Commutator coverings of Siegel threefolds

    CERN Document Server

    Gritsenko, V

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the existence and non-existence of modular forms of low weight with a character with respect to the paramodular group $\\Gamma_t$ and discuss the resulting geometric consequences. Using an advanced version of Maa\\ss\\ lifting one can construct many examples of such modular forms and in particular examples of weight 3 cusp forms. Consequently we find many abelian coverings of low degree of the moduli space ${\\Cal A}_t$ of (1,t)-polarized abelian surfaces which are not unirational. We also determine the commutator subgroups of the paramodular group $\\Gamma_t$ and its degree 2 extension $\\Gamma^+_t$. This has applications for the Picard group of the moduli stack ${\\underline{\\Cal A}}_t$. Finally we prove non-existence theorems for low weight modular forms. As one of our main results we obtain the theorem that the maximal abelian cover ${\\Cal A}_t^{com}$ of ${\\Cal A}_t$ has geometric genus 0 if and only if t=1, 2, 4 or 5. We also prove that ${\\Cal A}_t^{com}$ has geometric genus 1 for t=3 and 7.

  7. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and su

  8. Domain Walls in SU(5)

    CERN Document Server

    Poghosian, L E; Pogosian, Levon; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2000-01-01

    We consider the Grand Unified SU(5) model with a small or vanishing cubic term in the adjoint scalar field in the potential. This gives the model an approximate or exact Z$_2$ symmetry whose breaking leads to domain walls. The simplest domain wall has the structure of a kink across which the Higgs field changes sign ($\\Phi \\to -\\Phi$) and inside which the full SU(5) is restored. The kink is shown to be perturbatively unstable for all parameters. We then construct a domain wall solution that is lighter than the kink and show it to be perturbatively stable for a range of parameters. The symmetry in the core of this domain wall is smaller than that outside. The interactions of the domain wall with magnetic monopole is discussed and it is shown that magnetic monopoles with certain internal space orientations relative to the wall pass through the domain wall. Magnetic monopoles in other relative internal space orientations are likely to be swept away on collision with the domain walls, suggesting a scenario where ...

  9. Solar Walls in tsbi3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building. This...

  10. Control of Wall Mounting Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Christoffer; Pedersen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for designing controllers for trajectory tracking with actuator constraints. In particular, we consider a joystick-controlled wall mounting robot called WallMo. In contrast to previous works, a model-free approach is taken to the control problem, where the path...

  11. The "Brick Wall" Graphic Organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteson, Shirley M.

    2016-01-01

    A brick wall provides a fitting description of what happens when teachers try to teach a concept for which students are unprepared. When students are unsuccessful academically, their foundational knowledge may be missing, incomplete, or incorrect. As a result, students "hit a brick wall," and their academic progress stops because they do…

  12. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and

  13. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  14. A review of gravitational waves from cosmic domain walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikawa, Ken' ichi

    2017-03-15

    In this contribution, we discuss the cosmological scenario where unstable domain walls are formed in the early universe and their late-time annihilation produces a significant amount of gravitational waves. After describing cosmological constraints on long-lived domain walls, we estimate the typical amplitude and frequency of gravitational waves observed today. We also review possible extensions of the standard model of particle physics that predict the formation of unstable domain walls and can be probed by observation of relic gravitational waves. It is shown that recent results of pulser timing arrays and direct detection experiments partially exclude the relevant parameter space, and that a much wider parameter space can be covered by the next generation of gravitational wave observatories.

  15. Domain wall description of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Brito, F A; Silva, J C M

    2012-01-01

    In the present work we shall address the issue of electrical conductivity in superconductors in the perspective of superconducting domain wall solutions in the realm of field theory. We take our set up made out of a dynamical complex scalar field coupled to gauge field to be responsible for superconductivity and an extra scalar real field that plays the role of superconducting domain walls. The temperature of the system is interpreted as the parameter to move type I to type II domain walls. Alternatively, this means that the domain wall surface is suffering an acceleration as one goes from one type to another. On the other hand, changing from type I to type II state means a formation of a condensate what is in perfect sense of lowering the temperature around the superconductor. One can think of this scenario as an analog of holographic scenarios where this set up is replaced by a black hole near the domain wall.

  16. A Novel Thin Film Nitinol Covered Neurovascular Stent Significantly Decreases Intra-Aneurysmal Flow In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Youngjae; Hur, Soojung; Shayan, Mahdis; Kealey, Colin; Levi, Daniel; Mohanchandra, Kp; di Carlo, Dino; Carman, Gregory

    2013-11-01

    A novel thin film nitinol (TFN) stent has been developed to promote aneurysm quiescence by diminishing flow across the aneurysm's neck. Laboratory aneurysm models were used to assess the flow changes produced by stents covered with different patterns of TFN. Flow diversion stents were constructed by covering Wingspan stents (Boston Scientific, DxL:4x20mm) with TFNs (i.e., 77 and 82 percent porosity). The flow changes that occur after deployment of two different porous TFN covered stent in intracranial aneurysm models were evaluated in vitro. The 82 percent porous TFN covered stent reduced the intra-aneurysmal mean flow velocity by 86.42 percent, while a 77 percent porous TFN covered stent reduced to intra-aneurysmal mean flow velocity to 93.44 percent compared to a nonstented model. Local wall shear rates were also significantly reduced in wide-neck aneurysm model (i.e., 97.52 - 98.92 percent) with TFN stent placement. The results showed that TFN covered stents significantly reduced intra-aneurysmal flow velocity magnitudes and local wall shear rates. This suggests that TFN covered stents with both 77 and 82 percent porosity have great potential to promote thrombosis in both wide-necked and fusiform aneurysm sacs.

  17. Channel Wall Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. DIII-D in-vessel port cover and shutter assembly for the phase contrast interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The entire outer wall of the DIII-D vacuum vessel interion is covered with a regular array of graphite tiles. Certain of the diagnostic ports through the outer vessel wall contain equipment which is shielded from the plasma by installing port covers designed to withstand energy deposition. If the diagnostic contained in the port must communicate with the vessel volume, a shutter assembly is usually provided. In the ports at 285 degrees, R+1 and R-1, interferometer mirrors have been installed to provide a means for transmitting a large diameter CO-2 laser beam through the edge of the plasma. To protect the mirrors and other hardware contained in these ports, a special protective plate and shutter arrangement has been designed. This report describes the details of design, fabrication, and installation of these protective covers and shutters.

  19. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  20. Interaction of cover and target with xenon gas in the IFE-reaction chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuteev, Boris V. [State Technical Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2001-11-01

    Interaction of a direct drive target and a cover, which is shielding the target against gas particle and heat flows in the reaction chamber of the Inertial Confinement Reactor, is considered. The cover is produced from solid gas -deuterium, neon of xenon. It is shown that at the SOMBRERO parameters the xenon cover with 5.6-mm size significantly reduces the heat flows onto the 4-mm target. The gas drag produces the deceleration of the target much larger than that for the cover due to large mass difference between them. The distance between the target and the cover is about 15 mm at the explosion point, which is sufficient for normal irradiation of the target by laser beams. Protection of the target against the wall radiation is necessary during the flight. Along with creation of reflecting layers over the target surface ablating layers from solid hydrogen or neon seem to be a solution. (author)

  1. The covering number of $M_{24}$

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Epstein

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A  finite cover $\\mathcal{C}$ of a group $G$ is a finite collection of proper subgroups of $G$ such that $G$ is equal to the union of all of the members of $\\mathcal{C}$. Such a cover is called {\\em minimal} if it has the smallest cardinality among all finite covers of $G$. The  covering number of $G$, denoted by $\\sigma(G$, is the number of subgroups in a minimal cover of $G$. In this paper the covering number of the Mathieu group $M_{24}$ is shown to be 3336.

  2. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffano, Paolo; Roccia, Fabio; Gallesio, Cesare; Karagozoglu, K Hakki; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and such fractures. This study is based on 2 databases that have continuously recorded data of patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures between 2001 and 2010. On the whole, 447 patients (334 males, 113 females) with pure blow-out orbital wall fractures were included. The most frequently involved orbital site was the floor (359 fractures), followed by medial wall (41 fractures) and lateral wall (5 fractures). At presentation, 227 patients (50.7%) had evidence of diplopia. In particular, in most patients, a diplopia in all directions was referred (78 patients). Statistically significant associations were found between diplopia on eye elevation and orbital floor fractures (P diplopia and medial wall fractures (P diplopia on eye elevation and horizontal diplopia at presentation could be useful clinical indicators orbital floor and medial wall fractures, respectively.

  3. Green towers and green walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture and Planning, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    North American cities face many major environmental and health issues such as urban heat island effect, the intensity of storms, microclimate around buildings, imperviousness of sites, poor air quality and increases in respiratory disease. Several new technologies are starting to address global impacts and community level issues as well as the personal health and comfort of building occupants. These include green towers, living walls, vegetated rooftops and ecological site developments. This paper examined these forms of eco-development and presented their benefits. It discussed green walls in Japan; green towers in Malaysia, Singapore and Great Britain; green facades of climbing plants; active living walls in Canada; and passive living walls in France and Canada. It also discussed thermal walls; thematic walls; vertical gardens and structured wildlife habitat. Last, it presented testing, monitoring, research and conclusions. The Centre for the Advancement of Green Roof Technology is setting up a program to test thermal performance, to assess plant survival and to monitor green walls at the British Columbia Institute of Technology in Vancouver, Canada as much of the research out of Japan is only available in Japanese script. It was concluded that green architecture can provide shade, food, rainwater, shelter for wildlife and mimic natural systems. 15 refs.

  4. The value of snow cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokratov, S. A.

    2009-04-01

    only and not even the main outcome from snow cover use. The value of snow cover for agriculture, water resources, industry and transportation is so naturally inside the activities that is not often quantified. However, any considerations of adaptation strategies for climate change with changing snow conditions need such quantification.

  5. OTVE combustor wall condition monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szemenyei, Brian; Nelson, Robert S.; Barkhoudarian, S.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonics, eddy current, and electromagnetic acoustic transduction (EMAT) technologies were evaluated to determine their capability of measuring wall thickness/wear of individual cooling channels in test specimens simulating conditions in the throat region of an OTVE combustion chamber liner. Quantitative results are presented for the eddy current technology, which was shown to measure up to the optimum 20-mil wall thickness with near single channel resolution. Additional results demonstrate the capability of the conventional ultrasonics and EMAT technologies to detect a thinning or cracked wall. Recommendations for additional eddy current and EMAT development tests are presented.

  6. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias.

  7. National Land Cover Database: 1986-1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — NLCD 92 (National Land Cover Dataset 1992) is a 21-category land cover classification scheme that has been applied consistently over the conterminous U.S. It is...

  8. 1990 Kansas Land Cover Patterns Update

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — In 2008, an update of the 1990 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) database was undertaken. The 1990 KLCP database depicts 10 general land cover classes for the State...

  9. VT National Land Cover Dataset - 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The NLCD2001 layer available from VCGI is a subset of the the National Land Cover Database 2001 land cover layer for mapping zone 65 was produced...

  10. National Land Cover Database: 1986-1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — NLCD 92 (National Land Cover Dataset 1992) is a 21-category land cover classification scheme that has been applied consistently over the conterminous U.S. It is...

  11. A Citizen's Guide to Evapotranspiration Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guide explains Evapotranspiration Covers which are Evapotranspiration (ET) covers are a type of cap placed over contaminated material, such as soil, landfill waste, or mining tailings, to prevent water from reaching it.

  12. Watershed impervious cover relative to stream location

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Estimates of watershed (12-digit huc) impervious cover and impervious cover near streams and water body shorelines for three dates (2001, 2006, 2011) using NLCD...

  13. 2402-IJBCS-Article-Zoumenou Berny's

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    1Laboratory of Food Analysis, Department of Food Science, University of Liège, Belgium. ... The results show that lambda-cyhalothrin causes undesirable effects in ..... Bioconcentration factor (BCF) (fish) ..... Aquatic toxicity due to residential.

  14. Effects of selected defoliants in combination with insecticides on sweetpotato whitefly (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and its parasitoids in cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of two defoliants, Def (S, S, Stributylphosphorotrithioate) and Dropp (thidiazuron) alone and in combination with two commonly used insecticides, a pyrethroid, Karate (lambda-cyhalothrin) and an organophosphate, Guthion (azinphosmethyl) on sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci Gennadius Bioty...

  15. Thermodestruction of components of anticorrosion polymer cover

    OpenAIRE

    Тихомирова, Татьяна Сергеевна

    2012-01-01

    This article concerns the processes of thermodestruction of multilayer polymer cover, which is widely used to protect the external surface of steel pipelines. The main purpose of the work is to prove the possibility of combination of various polymer components in one cover preserving the thermostability of the cover. The behavior of the separate modified components of the cover at high temperatures was analyzed using the differential-thermal analysis and the derivative thermogravimetry...

  16. [Snow cover pollution monitoring in Ufa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daukaev, R A; Suleĭmanov, R A

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of examining the snow cover polluted with heavy metals in the large industrial town of Ufa. The level of man-caused burden on the snow cover of the conventional parts of the town was estimated and compared upon exposure to a wide range of snow cover pollutants. The priority snow cover pollutants were identified among the test heavy metals.

  17. A new alternative in vertical barrier wall construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawl, G.F. [Horizontal Technologies Inc., Matlacha, FL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A new proprietary vertical barrier wall system has been developed to revolutionize the construction process by eliminating many of the concerns of conventional installation method`s with respect to performance, installation constraints and costs. Vertical barrier walls have been used in the environmental and construction industries for a variety of purposes, usually for cut-off or containment. The typical scenario involves a groundwater contamination problem, in which a vertical barrier wall is utilized to contain or confine the spread of contaminants below the ground surface. Conventional construction techniques have been adequate in many applications, but often fall short of their intended purposes due to physical constraints. In many instances, the economics of these conventional methods have limited the utilization of physical barrier walls. Polywall, the trade name for this new barrier wall technology, was subsequently developed to meet these needs and offer a number of distinct advantages in a variety of scenarios by maximizing confinement and minimizing installation costs. Polywall is constructed from chemically resistant high density polyethylene (HDPE) plastic. It has proven in a half-dozen projects to date to be the most cost-effective and technically sound approach to many containment situations. This paper will cover the development of the technology and will provide a brief synopsis of several installations.

  18. Retrofitted green roofs and walls and improvements in thermal comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa, Renato Castiglia; Wilkinson, Sara

    2017-06-01

    Increased urbanization has led to a worsening in the quality of life for many people living in large cities in respect of the urban heat island effect and increases of indoor temperatures in housing and other buildings. A solution may be to retrofit existing environments to their former conditions, with a combination of green infrastructures applied to existing walls and rooftops. Retrofitted green roofs may attenuate housing temperature. However, with tall buildings, facade areas are much larger compared to rooftop areas, the role of green walls in mitigating extreme temperatures is more pronounced. Thus, the combination of green roofs and green walls is expected to promote a better thermal performance in the building envelope. For this purpose, a modular vegetated system is adopted for covering both walls and rooftops. Rather than temperature itself, the heat index, which comprises the combined effect of temperature and relative humidity is used in the evaluation of thermal comfort in small scale experiments performed in Sydney - Australia, where identical timber framed structures prototypes (vegetated and non-vegetated) are compared. The results have shown a different understanding of thermal comfort improvement regarding heat index rather than temperature itself. The combination of green roof and walls has a valid role to play in heat index attenuation.

  19. The Layer Cake Walls of Valles Marineris

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This image of the northern wall of Coprates Chasma, in Valles Marineris, was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 1227 UTC (8:27 a.m. EDT) on June 16, 2007, near 13.99 degrees south latitude, 303.09 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across. The region covered is just over 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point. Valles Marineris is a large canyon system straddling Mars' equator, with a total size approximating the Mediterranean Sea emptied of water. It is subdivided into several interconnected 'chasmata' each hundreds of kilometers wide and, in some cases, thousands of kilometers long. The walls of several of the chasmata, including Coprates Chasma, expose a section of Mars' upper crust about 5 kilometers (3 miles) in depth. Exposures like these show the layers of rock that record the formation of Mars' crust over geologic time, much as the walls of the Grand Canyon on Earth show part of our planet's history. The upper panel of this montage shows the location of the CRISM image on a mosaic from the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), taken in longer infrared wavelengths than measured by CRISM. The CRISM image samples the base of Coprates Chasma's wall, including a conspicuous horizontal band that continues along the wall for tens of kilometers to the east and west, and a topographic shelf just above that. The middle two panels show the CRISM image in visible and infrared light. In the middle left panel, the red, green, and blue image planes show brightness at 0.59, 0.53, and 0.48 microns, similar to what the human eye would see. Color variations are subdued by the presence of dust on all exposed surfaces. In the middle right panel, the red, green, and blue image planes show brightness at 2.53, 1.51, and 1.08 microns. These three infrared wavelengths are the 'usual' set

  20. Estimating mean plant cover from different types of cover data: a coherent statistical framework

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damgaard, C

    2014-01-01

    Plant cover is measured by different methods and it is important to be able to estimate mean cover and to compare estimates of plant cover across different sampling methods in a coherent statistical framework...

  1. Managing cover crops: an economic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common reasons given by producers as to why they do not adopt cover crops are related to economics: time, labor, and cost required for planting and managing cover crops. While many of the agronomic benefits of cover crops directly relate to economics, there are costs associated with adopting the pra...

  2. Reducibility of Covers of AFT shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bates, Teresa; Eilers, Søren; Pask, David

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we show that the reducibility structure of several covers of sofic shifts is a flow invariant. In addition, we prove that for an irreducible subshift of almost finite type the left Krieger cover and the past set cover are reducible. We provide an example which shows that there are n...

  3. National land-cover pattern data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt H. Riitters; James D. Wickham; James E. Vogelmann; K. Bruce Jones

    2000-01-01

    Land cover and its spatial patterns are key ingredients in ecological studies that consider large regions and the impacts of human activities. Because humanity is a principal driver of land-cover change over large regions (Turner et al. 1990), land-cover data provide direct measures of human activity, and both direct and indirect measures of ecological conditions...

  4. Juyongguan on the Great Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Juyongguan Pass on the Great Wall,one ofthe most important strategic passes of the oldcapital Beijing,is now repaired and a goodplace for tourists to see ancient Chinesemilitary and cultural facilities,as well asbeautiful local scenery.

  5. Statistical characteristics of simulated walls

    CERN Document Server

    Demianski, M; Müller, V; Turchaninov, V I

    2000-01-01

    The large scale matter distribution in three different simulations of CDM models is investigated and compared with corresponding results of the Zel'dovich theory of nonlinear gravitational instability. We show that the basic characteristics of wall-like structure elements are well described by this theory, and that they can be expressed by the cosmological parameters and a few spectral moments of the perturbation spectrum. Therefore the characteristics of such elements provide reasonable estimates of these parameters. We show that the compressed matter is relaxed and gravitationally confined, what manifests itself in the existence of walls as (quasi)stationary structure elements with life time restricted by their disruption into high density clouds. The matter distribution is investigated both in the real and redshift spaces. In both cases almost the same particles form the walls, and we estimate differences in corresponding wall characteristics. The same methods are applied to several mock catalogues of 'gal...

  6. Nano magnetic vortex wall guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A concept of nano magnetic vortex wall guide is introduced. Two architectures are proposed. The first one is properly designed superlattices while the other one is bilayer nanostrips. The concept is verified by micromagnetic simulations. Both guides can prevent the vortex core in a magnetic vortex wall from colliding with sample surface so that the information stored in the vortex core can be preserved during its transportation from one location to another one through the guides.

  7. Actinomycosis - Left Post Chest Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kafil Akhtar, M. Naim, S. Shamshad Ahmad, Nazoora Khan, Uroos Abedi, A.H. Khan*

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A forty year old female of weak body built presented with recurring small hard lumps in let posteriorchest wall for 3 years and discharging ulcers for 3 months duration. Clinically, the provisional diagnosiswas malignancy with secondary infection. FNAC showed features suggestive of dysplasia buthistopathology confirmed the diagnosis as actinomycosis. The present case is reported due to rare incidenceof actinomycosis at post chest wall with muscle involvement.

  8. CHEST WALL HAMARTOMA : Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Gülden DİNİZ; Ortaç, Ragıp; Aktaş, Safiye; TEMİR, Günyüz; HOŞGÖR, Münevver; Karaca, İrfan

    2005-01-01

    A case of four-month – old girl diagnosed as chest wall hamartoma is presented. This entity is an extremely rare but characteristic lesion of the ribs usually presenting in the neonate or infant with a mass or respiratory symptoms. Complete sponraneous regression of the lesion has been reported. Recently conservative management of asymptomatic childiren was recommended. Although rare, this condition ought to be kept in mind while dealing with infantile chest wall masses to avoid an errone...

  9. CHEST WALL HAMARTOMA : Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Gülden DİNİZ; Ortaç, Ragıp; Aktaş, Safiye; HOŞGÖR, Günyüz TEMİR2Münevver; Karaca, İrfan

    2005-01-01

    A case of four-month – old girl diagnosed as chest wall hamartoma is presented. This entity is an extremely rare but characteristic lesion of the ribs usually presenting in the neonate or infant with a mass or respiratory symptoms. Complete sponraneous regression of the lesion has been reported. Recently conservative management of asymptomatic childiren was recommended. Although rare, this condition ought to be kept in mind while dealing with infantile chest wall masses to avoid...

  10. A New Eddy-Based Model for Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-11

    results show it to work effectively as a correction scheme for spatial resolution effects in hot - wire anemometry measurements in wall-turbulence. 15...results show it to work effectively as a correction scheme for spatial resolution effects in hot - wire anemometry measurements in wall-turbulence. The...Carry out hot - wire anemometry experiments covering a large Reynolds number range. This involves the use of the High Reynolds Number Boundary Layer

  11. Load-carrying capacity of lightly reinforced, prefabricated walls of lightweight aggregate concrete with open structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents and evaluates the results of a coordinated testing of prefabricated, lightly reinforced walls of lightweight aggregate concrete with open structure. The coordinated testing covers all wall productions in Denmark and will therefore provide a representative assessment of the qual...... of the quality actually produced. Existing and new formulas for the capacity are evaluated by comparison to the test results and a new model with a good correlation with the test results is presented....

  12. Permeable conformal walls and holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachas, Constantin; de Boer, Jan; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Ooguri, Hirosi

    2002-06-01

    We study conformal field theories in two dimensions separated by domain walls, which preserve at least one Virasoro algebra. We develop tools to study such domain walls, extending and clarifying the concept of `folding' discussed in the condensed-matter literature. We analyze the conditions for unbroken supersymmetry, and discuss the holographic duals in AdS3 when they exist. One of the interesting observables is the Casimir energy between a wall and an anti-wall. When these separate free scalar field theories with different target-space radii, the Casimir energy is given by the dilogarithm function of the reflection probability. The walls with holographic duals in AdS3 separate two sigma models, whose target spaces are moduli spaces of Yang-Mills instantons on T4 or K3. In the supergravity limit, the Casimir energy is computable as classical energy of a brane that connects the walls through AdS3. We compare this result with expectations from the sigma-model point of view.

  13. Permeable conformal walls and holography

    CERN Document Server

    Bachas, C P; Dijkgraaf, R; Ooguri, H

    2002-01-01

    We study conformal field theories in two dimensions separated by domain walls, which preserve at least one Virasoro algebra. We develop tools to study such domain walls, extending and clarifying the concept of `folding' discussed in the condensed-matter literature. We analyze the conditions for unbroken supersymmetry, and discuss the holographic duals in AdS3 when they exist. One of the interesting observables is the Casimir energy between a wall and an anti-wall. When these separate free scalar field theories with different target-space radii, the Casimir energy is given by the dilogarithm function of the reflection probability. The walls with holographic duals in AdS3 separate two sigma models, whose target spaces are moduli spaces of Yang-Mills instantons on T4 or K3. In the supergravity limit, the Casimir energy is computable as classical energy of a brane that connects the walls through AdS3. We compare this result with expectations from the sigma-model point of view.

  14. Wall force produced during disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, H.; Paccagnella, R.; Breslau, J.

    2009-11-01

    The study of disruptions is of great importance for ITER. Previous work on disruptions [1] is extended to compute toroidally asymmetric wall force in ITER, using the M3D code. The disruptions are produced by n = 1 resistive wall modes or external kink modes. A thin wall resistive boundary model is used to calculate the wall forces. The symmetric wall force, produced by a VDE, and the asymmetric wall force, produced by n = 1 modes, are comparable in magnitude. It is found that the asymmetric and axisymmetric forces scale with the growth rate of the instability multiplied by the square of the current divided by magnetic field. A similar scaling was reported for VDEs in JET [2]. Numerically, the study of disruptions is very challenging. In the M3D extended MHD code, dealiasing was applied in the toroidal direction. Advection terms were treated with a numerical upwind method. These techniques provided sufficient numerical stability to simulate entire disruption events. [4pt] [1] R. Paccagnella, H. R. Strauss, and J. Breslau, Nucl. Fusion (2009) 49 035003. [2] V. Riccardo, T. C. Hender, P. J. Lomas, et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion (2004)

  15. Effect of selected insecticides on the natural enemies Coleomegilla maculata and Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), Geocoris punctipes (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae), and Bracon mellitor, Cardiochiles nigriceps, and Cotesia marginiventris (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, P G; Mulrooney, J E

    2000-12-01

    We evaluated the toxicity of three insecticides (lambda cyhalothrin, spinosad, and S-1812) to the natural enemies Bracon mellitor Say, Cardiochiles nigriceps Viereck, Coleomegilla maculata De Geer, Cotesia marginiventris (Cresson), Geocoris punctipes (Say), and Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, in topical, residual, and field assays. Lambda cyhalothrin exhibited the greatest toxicity to the natural enemies. In topical toxicity tests, lambda cyhalothrin adversely affected each natural enemy species studied. Residues of lambda cyhalothrin on cotton leaves were toxic to B. mellitor, C. nigriceps, C. maculata, and C. punctipes. Interestingly, residues of this insecticide were not very toxic to C. marginiventris and H. convergens. Geocoris punctipes and C. maculata numbers in the field generally were significantly lower for lambda cyhalothrin treatments than for the other four treatments, substantiating the previous tests. Although cotton aphids began to increase over all treatments around the middle of the test period, the number of cotton aphids in the lambda cyhalothrin plots was significantly higher than the number in any of the other treatments. As cotton aphids increased in lambda cyhalothrin field plots, the predator H. convergens also increased in number, indicating that lambda cyhalothrin did not adversely affect it in accordance with the residual tests. Spinosad exhibited marginal to excellent selectivity, but was highly toxic to each parasitoid species and G. punctipes in topical toxicity tests and to B. mellitor in residual tests. Spinosad generally did not affect the number of G. punctipes, H. convergens, and C. maculata in the field except for one day after the second application for G. punctipes. S-1812 exhibited good to excellent selectivity to the natural enemies. Some reduction of G. punctipes occurred for only a short period after the first and second application of this insecticide in the field. H. convergens and C. maculata were affected

  16. Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Pesticides Used in Western United States Orchards on Hippodamia convergens

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of two fungicides (copper+mancozeb and sulfur) and five reduced-risk insecticides (chlorantraniliprole, cyantraniliprole, lambda-cyhalothrin, novaluron, and spinetoram) on Hippodamia convergens (Guerin-Meneville) (Col.: Coccinellidae), an important natural enemy in western United States orchards. Acute toxicity of pesticides was tested via three different exposure routes: oral, residual, and topical. Lambda-cyhalothrin caused significant mortality to adults and larva...

  17. Changes of snow cover in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwed, Małgorzata; Pińskwar, Iwona; Kundzewicz, Zbigniew W.; Graczyk, Dariusz; Mezghani, Abdelkader

    2017-02-01

    The present paper examines variability of characteristics of snow cover (snow cover depth, number of days with snow cover and dates of beginning and end of snow cover) in Poland. The study makes use of a set of 43 long time series of observation records from the stations in Poland, from 1952 to 2013. To describe temporal changes in snow cover characteristics, the intervals of 1952-1990 and of 1991-2013 are compared and trends in analysed data are sought (e.g., using the Mann-Kendall test). Observed behaviour of time series of snow-related variables is complex and not easy to interpret, for instance because of the location of the research area in the zone of transitional moderate climate, where strong variability of climate events is one of the main attributes. A statistical link between the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index and the snow cover depth, as well as the number of snow cover days is found.

  18. Apparatus for nuclear logging employing sub wall mounted detectors and modular connector assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, C.A.; Daigle, G.A.; Rountree, S.; Talmadge, G.; Grunbeck, J.; Wassell, M.

    1993-06-01

    A nuclear logging apparatus for logging a borehole formation is described comprising: a drill collar sub having a sub wall and having opposed ends; a radioactive source in said sub; at least one detector assembly in said sub, said detector assembly being spaced from said radioactive source and said detector assembly being positioned to detect radiation resulting from emissions emitted by said source; at least one chamber in said sub wall; at least one chamber cover, said chamber cover including attachment means for forming fluid tight and removable attachment to said at least one chamber; and said detector assembly being positioned in said at least one chamber.

  19. Effects of the flexibility of the arterial wall on the wall shear stresses and wall tension in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Fernandez, Miguel; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2005-11-01

    As an abdominal aortic aneurysm develops, large changes occur in the composition and structure of the arterial wall, which result in its stiffening. So far, most studies, whether experimental or numerical, have been conducted assuming the walls to be rigid. A numerical simulation of the fluid structure interactions is performed in different models of aneurysms in order to analyze the effects that the wall compliance might have on the flow topology. Both symmetric and non-symmetric models of aneurysms are considered, all idealistic in shape. The wall mechanical properties are varied in order to simulate the progressive stiffening of the walls. The spatial and temporal distributions of wall tension are calculated for the different values of the wall elasticity and compared to the results for the rigid walls. In the case of rigid walls, the calculation of the wall shear stresses and pressure compare very well with experimental results.

  20. Physiological functions of plant cell coverings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki

    2002-08-01

    The cell coverings of plants have two important functions in plant life. Plant cell coverings are deeply involved in the regulation of the life cycle of plants: each stage of the life cycle, such as germination, vegetative growth, reproductive growth, and senescence, is strongly influenced by the nature of the cell coverings. Also, the apoplast, which consists of the cell coverings, is the field where plant cells first encounter the outer environment, and so becomes the major site of plant responses to the environment. In the regulation of each stage of the life cycle and the response to each environmental signal, some specific constituents of the cell coverings, such as xyloglucans in dicotyledons and 1,3,1,4-beta-glucans in Gramineae, act as the key component. The physiological functions of plant cell coverings are sustained by the metabolic turnover of these components. The components of the cell coverings are supplied from the symplast, but then they are modified or degraded in the apoplast. Thus, the metabolism of the cell coverings is regulated through the cross-talk between the symplast and the apoplast. The understanding of physiological functions of plant cell coverings will be greatly advanced by the use of genomic approaches. At the same time, we need to introduce nanobiological techniques for clarifying the minute changes in the cell coverings that occur in a small part within each cell.

  1. The cell walls of green algae: a journey through evolution and diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eDomozych

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The green algae represent a large group of morphologically diverse photosynthetic eukaryotes that occupy virtually every photic habitat on the planet. The extracellular coverings of green algae including cell walls are also diverse. A recent surge of research in green algal cell walls fueled by new emerging technologies has revealed new and critical insight concerning these coverings. For example, the late divergent taxa of the Charophycean Green Algae possess cell walls containing assemblages of polymers with notable similarity to the cellulose, pectins, hemicelluloses, arabinogalactan proteins, extensin and lignin present in embryophyte walls. Ulvophycean seaweeds have cell wall components whose most abundant fibrillar constituents may change from cellulose to β-mannans to β-xylans and during different life cycle phases. Likewise, these algae produce complex sulfated polysaccharides, arabinogalactan proteins and extensin. Chlorophycean green algae produce a wide array of walls ranging from cellulose-pectin complexes to ones made of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. Larger and more detailed surveys of the green algal taxa including incorporation of emerging genomic and transcriptomic data are required in order to more fully resolve evolutionary trends within the green algae and in relationship with higher plants as well as potential applications of wall components in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  2. The Cell Walls of Green Algae: A Journey through Evolution and Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domozych, David S; Ciancia, Marina; Fangel, Jonatan U; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Ulvskov, Peter; Willats, William G T

    2012-01-01

    The green algae represent a large group of morphologically diverse photosynthetic eukaryotes that occupy virtually every photic habitat on the planet. The extracellular coverings of green algae including cell walls are also diverse. A recent surge of research in green algal cell walls fueled by new emerging technologies has revealed new and critical insight concerning these coverings. For example, the late divergent taxa of the Charophycean green algae possess cell walls containing assemblages of polymers with notable similarity to the cellulose, pectins, hemicelluloses, arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), extensin, and lignin present in embryophyte walls. Ulvophycean seaweeds have cell wall components whose most abundant fibrillar constituents may change from cellulose to β-mannans to β-xylans and during different life cycle phases. Likewise, these algae produce complex sulfated polysaccharides, AGPs, and extensin. Chlorophycean green algae produce a wide array of walls ranging from cellulose-pectin complexes to ones made of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. Larger and more detailed surveys of the green algal taxa including incorporation of emerging genomic and transcriptomic data are required in order to more fully resolve evolutionary trends within the green algae and in relationship with higher plants as well as potential applications of wall components in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  3. Isolation of the Cell Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes a method allowing the purification of the cell wall for studying both polysaccharides and proteins. The plant primary cell wall is mainly composed of polysaccharides (90-95 % in mass) and of proteins (5-10 %). At the end of growth, specialized cells may synthesize a lignified secondary wall composed of polysaccharides (about 65 %) and lignin (about 35 %). Due to its composition, the cell wall is the cellular compartment having the highest density and this property is used for its purification. It plays critical roles during plant development and in response to environmental constraints. It is largely used in the food and textile industries as well as for the production of bioenergy. All these characteristics and uses explain why its study as a true cell compartment is of high interest. The proposed method of purification can be used for large amount of material but can also be downscaled to 500 mg of fresh material. Tools for checking the quality of the cell wall preparation, such as protein analysis and microscopy observation, are also provided.

  4. Generation and Assessment of Urban Land Cover Maps Using High-Resolution Multispectral Aerial Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höhle, Joachim; Höhle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    to a tree structured classifier, which automatically derives land cover maps in 2D or 3D. We investigate the thematic accuracy of the produced land cover map by a class-wise stratified design and provide a method for deriving necessary sample sizes. Corresponding survey adjusted accuracy measures...... and their associated confidence intervals are used to adequately reflect uncertainty in the assessment based on the chosen sample size. Proof of concept for the method is given for an urban area in Switzerland. Here, the produced land cover map with six classes (building, wall and carport, road and parking lot, hedge...... tree learning based on recursive partitioning is investigated. We conclude that the open source software “R” provides all the tools needed for performing statistical prudent classification and accuracy evaluations of urban land cover maps....

  5. Lightweight composite fighting cover prototype development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Frame, B.J.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Akerman, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Army Field Assistance Science and Technology Program requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the use of lightweight composite materials in construction of overhead covers for reinforced infantry fighting positions. In recent years, ORNL researchers have designed and tested several concepts for lightweight ballistic protection structures, and they have developed numerous prototype composite structures for military and civilian applications. In the current program, composite panel designs and materials are tested and optimized to meet anticipated static and dynamic load conditions for the overhead cover structure. Ten prototype composite covers were built at ORNL for use in Army field tests. Each composite cover has a nominal surface area of 12 ft[sup 2] and a nominal weight of 8 lb. Four of the prototypes are made with folding sections to improve their handling characteristics. The composite covers exhibit equivalent performance in Army field tests to covers made with conventional materials that weigh four times as much.

  6. Abdominal wall hernia and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K K; Henriksen, N A; Jorgensen, L N

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: There is no consensus as to the treatment strategy for abdominal wall hernias in fertile women. This study was undertaken to review the current literature on treatment of abdominal wall hernias in fertile women before or during pregnancy. METHODS: A literature search was undertaken in Pub......Med and Embase in combination with a cross-reference search of eligible papers. RESULTS: We included 31 papers of which 23 were case reports. In fertile women undergoing sutured or mesh repair, pain was described in a few patients during the last trimester of a subsequent pregnancy. Emergency surgery...... of incarcerated hernias in pregnant women, as well as combined hernia repair and cesarean section appears as safe procedures. No major complications were reported following hernia repair before or during pregnancy. The combined procedure of elective cesarean section and abdominal wall hernia repair was reported...

  7. Integrating geographical data and phenological characteristics derived from MODIS data for improving land cover mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Hongyan; ZHANG Shuwen; BU Kun; YANG Jiuchun; CHANG Liping

    2011-01-01

    The study developed a feasible method for large-area land cover mapping with combination of geographical data and phenological characteristics,taking Northeast China (NEC) as the study area.First,with the monthly average of precipitation and temperature datasets,the spatial clustering method was used to divide the NEC into four ecoclimate regions.For each ecoclimate region,geographical variables (annual mean precipitation and temperature,elevation,slope and aspect) were combined with phenological variables derived from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data (enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and land surface water index (LSWI)),which were taken as input variables of land cover classification.Decision Tree (DT) classifiers were then performed to produce land cover maps for each region.Finally,four resultant land cover maps were mosaicked for the entire NEC (NEC_MODIS),and the land use and land cover data of NEC (NEC_LULC) interpreted from Landsat-TM images was used to evaluate the NEC_MODIS and MODIS land cover product (MODIS_IGBP) in terms of areal and spatial agreement.The results showed that the phenological information derived from EVl and LSWl time series well discriminated land cover classes in NEC,and the overall accuracy was significantly improved by 5.29% with addition of geographical variables.Compared with NEC_LULC for seven aggregation classes,the area errors of NEC_MODIS were much smaller and more stable than that of MODIS_IGBP for most of classes,and the wall-to-wall spatial comparisons at pixel level indicated that NEC_MODIS agreed with NEC_LULC for 71.26% of the NEC,whereas only 62.16% for MODIS_IGBP.The good performance of NEC_MODIS demonstrates that the methodology developed in the study has great potential for timely and detailed land cover mapping in temperate and boreal regions.

  8. Catalysts of plant cell wall loosening

    OpenAIRE

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The growing cell wall in plants has conflicting requirements to be strong enough to withstand the high tensile forces generated by cell turgor pressure while selectively yielding to those forces to induce wall stress relaxation, leading to water uptake and polymer movements underlying cell wall expansion. In this article, I review emerging concepts of plant primary cell wall structure, the nature of wall extensibility and the action of expansins, family-9 and -12 endoglucanases, family-16 xyl...

  9. Diffusion-damped domain wall dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, R; Infante, G [Inst. Phys., Fac. Sci., UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 04154 Kosice (Slovakia); Badini-Confalonieri, G A; Vazquez, M, E-mail: rvarga@upjs.s [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-01-01

    In the given work, the influence of diffusional damping on the domain wall dynamics of heat treated FeSiBP microwires is presented. Two regions of the domain wall dynamics have been found. At low applied fields diffusion damping prevails, keeping the domain wall velocity and mobility low. At higher fields, the diffusional effects are overcomed and domain wall velocity increases steeply and so does the domain wall mobility.

  10. Clique Cover Width and Clique Sum

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrokhi, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    For a clique cover $C$ in the undirected graph $G$, the clique cover graph of $C$ is the graph obtained by contracting the vertices of each clique in $C$ into a single vertex. The clique cover width of G, denoted by $CCW(G)$, is the minimum value of the bandwidth of all clique cover graphs of $G$. When $G$ is the clique sum of $G_1$ and $G_2$, we prove that $CCW(G) \\le 3/2(CCW(G_1) + CCW(G_2))$.

  11. The DEMO wall load challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenninger, R.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R.; Arbeiter, F.; Aubert, J.; Bachmann, C.; Barbato, L.; Barrett, T.; Beckers, M.; Biel, W.; Boccaccini, L.; Carralero, D.; Coster, D.; Eich, T.; Fasoli, A.; Federici, G.; Firdaouss, M.; Graves, J.; Horacek, J.; Kovari, M.; Lanthaler, S.; Loschiavo, V.; Lowry, C.; Lux, H.; Maddaluno, G.; Maviglia, F.; Mitteau, R.; Neu, R.; Pfefferle, D.; Schmid, K.; Siccinio, M.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Snicker, A.; Subba, F.; Varje, J.; Zohm, H.

    2017-04-01

    For several reasons the challenge to keep the loads to the first wall within engineering limits is substantially higher in DEMO compared to ITER. Therefore the pre-conceptual design development for DEMO that is currently ongoing in Europe needs to be based on load estimates that are derived employing the most recent plasma edge physics knowledge. An initial assessment of the static wall heat load limit in DEMO infers that the steady state peak heat flux limit on the majority of the DEMO first wall should not be assumed to be higher than 1.0 MW m-2. This compares to an average wall heat load of 0.29 MW m-2 for the design {\\tt {EU}}{\\tt {~}}{\\tt {DEMO1}}{\\tt {~2015}} assuming a perfect homogeneous distribution. The main part of this publication concentrates on the development of first DEMO estimates for charged particle, radiation, fast particle (all static) and disruption heat loads. Employing an initial engineering wall design with clear optimization potential in combination with parameters for the flat-top phase (x-point configuration), loads up to 7 MW m-2 (penalty factor for tolerances etc not applied) have been calculated. Assuming a fraction of power radiated from the x-point region between 1/5 and 1/3, peaks of the total power flux density due to radiation of 0.6-0.8 MW m-2 are found in the outer baffle region. This first review of wall loads, and the associated limits in DEMO clearly underlines a significant challenge that necessitates substantial engineering efforts as well as a considerable consolidation of the associated physics basis.

  12. Composition and architecture of the cell walls of grasses and the mechanisms of synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides. Final report for period September 1, 1988 - April 30, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2001-10-18

    This program was devoted toward complete understanding of the polysaccharide structure and architecture of the primary cell walls grasses and cereals, and the biosynthesis of the mixed-linkage beta-glucane, a cellulose interacting polymer that is synthesized uniquely by grass species and close relatives. With these studies as focal point, the support from DOE was instrumental in the development of new analytical means that enabled us to characterize carbohydrate structure, to reveal new features of cell wall dynamics during cell growth, and to apply these techniques in other model organisms. The support by DOE in these basic studies was acknowledged on numerous occasions in review articles covering current knowledge of cell wall structure, architecture, dynamics, biosynthesis, and in all genes related to cell wall biogenesis.

  13. Wall conditioning of JET with the ITER-Like Wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douai, D.; Brezinsek, S.; Esser, H. G.; Joffrin, E.; Keenan, T.; Knipe, S.; Kogut, D.; Lomas, P. J.; Marsen, S.; Nunes, I.; Philipps, V.; Pitts, R.A.; Shimada, M.; P. de Vries,

    2013-01-01

    The initial conditioning cycle of \\{JET\\} İLW\\} is analysed and compared with restart and operation in 2008 with a carbon dominated wall. Comparable water and oxygen decay times are observed during bake-out in both cases. Despite a 2 × 10−3 mbar l/s leak rate duri

  14. Domain wall description of superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, F.A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Freire, M.L.F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, 58109-753 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Mota-Silva, J.C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraíba (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-970 João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil)

    2014-01-20

    In the present work we shall address the issue of electrical conductivity in superconductors in the perspective of superconducting domain wall solutions in the realm of field theory. We take our set up made out of a dynamical complex scalar field coupled to gauge field to be responsible for superconductivity and an extra scalar real field that plays the role of superconducting domain walls. The temperature of the system is interpreted through the fact that the soliton following accelerating orbits is a Rindler observer experiencing a thermal bath.

  15. Wall and Bed Shear Force in Rectangular Open Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Tavakkol, Sasan

    2016-01-01

    A method is introduced to determine the percentage of the total shear force acting on the walls and bed in rectangular open channels. The proposed method takes both the velocity gradients and secondary currents into account. In the current method the channel cross section is divided into subsections using the bisectors along which there are no secondary flow effects, and isovels orthogonal trajectories along which there is no shear stress. Based on these subsections and assuming the equilibrium between the shear force and gravitational force, the share of the bed and wall from the mean shear force of the flow are calculated. Calculated wall and bed shear forces are in very good agreement with experimental data with an average relative error less than 5%. It is also shown that neglecting the effect of secondary currents and only assuming zero-shear division lines does not yield to acceptable results. The method also provides a possible range for wall and bed shear forces which nicely covers the experimental da...

  16. Multicellularity in green algae: Upsizing in a walled complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Domozych

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern green algae constitute a large and diverse taxonomic assemblage that encompasses many multicellular phenotypes including colonial, filamentous and parenchymatous forms. In all multicellular green algae, each cell is surrounded by an extracellular matrix, most often in the form of a cell wall. Volvocalean taxa like Volvox have an elaborate, gel-like, hydroxyproline rich glycoprotein covering that contains the cells of the colony. In ulvophytes, uronic acid-rich and sulfated polysaccharides are the likely adhesion agents that maintain the multicellular habit. Charophytes also produce polysaccharide-rich cell walls and in late divergent taxa, pectin plays a critical role in cell-adhesion in the multicellular complex. Cell walls are products of coordinated interaction of membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal dynamics and the cell’s signal transduction machinery responding both to precise internal clocks and external environmental cues. Most often, these activities must be synchronized with the secretion, deposition and remodeling of the polymers of the extracellular matrix. Rapid advances in molecular genetics, cell biology and cell wall biochemistry of green algae will soon provide new insights into the evolution and subcellular processes leading to multicellularity.

  17. Multicellularity in green algae: upsizing in a walled complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domozych, David S; Domozych, Catherine E

    2014-01-01

    Modern green algae constitute a large and diverse taxonomic assemblage that encompasses many multicellular phenotypes including colonial, filamentous, and parenchymatous forms. In all multicellular green algae, each cell is surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM), most often in the form of a cell wall. Volvocalean taxa like Volvox have an elaborate, gel-like, hydroxyproline rich glycoprotein covering that contains the cells of the colony. In "ulvophytes," uronic acid-rich and sulfated polysaccharides are the likely adhesion agents that maintain the multicellular habit. Charophytes also produce polysaccharide-rich cell walls and in late divergent taxa, pectin plays a critical role in cell adhesion in the multicellular complex. Cell walls are products of coordinated interaction of membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal dynamics and the cell's signal transduction machinery responding both to precise internal clocks and external environmental cues. Most often, these activities must be synchronized with the secretion, deposition and remodeling of the polymers of the ECM. Rapid advances in molecular genetics, cell biology and cell wall biochemistry of green algae will soon provide new insights into the evolution and subcellular processes leading to multicellularity.

  18. [Reconstruction of the anterior chest wall by a sandwich-type combination of a synthetic support and a muscle flap from the latissimus dorsi. Apropos of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfrey, E; Grolleau, J L; Glock, Y; Chavoin, J P; Costagliola, M

    1996-04-01

    Reconstruction of the chest wall after balistic or other trauma requires good and muscle cover and creation of a new, stable and airtight wall. The authors present a case of balistic trauma of the right anterolateral chest wall which was urgently debrided and subsequently reconstructed by sandwich combination of a latissimus dorsi muscle flap and synthetic material composed of a sheet of PTFE and creation of two methylmethylacrylate ribs. The advantage of this technique is that it avoids the use of autologous tissue from an already weakened chest wall and confers a new chest stability in several sites corresponding to the wall defect with easily available and easy-to-use materials.

  19. GENERATION OF 2D LAND COVER MAPS FOR URBAN AREAS USING DECISION TREE CLASSIFICATION

    OpenAIRE

    J. Höhle

    2014-01-01

    A 2D land cover map can automatically and efficiently be generated from high-resolution multispectral aerial images. First, a digital surface model is produced and each cell of the elevation model is then supplemented with attributes. A decision tree classification is applied to extract map objects like buildings, roads, grassland, trees, hedges, and walls from such an "intelligent" point cloud. The decision tree is derived from training areas which borders are digitized on top of a ...

  20. Use of Cover Crops in Hardwood Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randy Rentz

    2005-01-01

    Cover crops are as essential a practice in hardwood production as in pine production or any other nursery operation. Without proper cover crop rotation in a nursery plan, we open ourselves up to an array of problems: more diseases, wrong pH, more weeds, reduced fertility, and less downward percolation of soil moisture due, in part, to compaction....

  1. AsMA journal covers, a history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Pamela C

    2014-01-01

    The cover of our journal has changed quite often over the years. As we look forward to changing the name and design of the journal, it seems appropriate to reflect on the previous journal titles and covers. A brief history follows.

  2. Winter cover crops influence Amaranthus palmeri establishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter cover crops were evaluated for their effect on Palmer amaranth (PA) suppression in cotton production. Cover crops examined included rye and four winter legumes: narrow-leaf lupine, crimson clover, Austrian winter pea, and cahaba vetch. Each legume was evaluated alone and in a mixture with rye...

  3. Managing cover crops on strawberry furrow bottoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bare furrows in strawberry fields with plastic mulch covered beds can lead to lots of soil erosion and runoff during winter rainy periods. This article describes how growers can plant and manage cover crops in these furrows to minimize runoff and soil erosion. This is based on on-going research at...

  4. Well-covered graphs and factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randerath, Bert; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    2006-01-01

    A maximum independent set of vertices in a graph is a set of pairwise nonadjacent vertices of largest cardinality α. Plummer defined a graph to be well-covered, if every independent set is contained in a maximum independent set of G. Every well-covered graph G without isolated vertices has a perf...

  5. 29 CFR 1904.31 - Covered employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Covered employees. 1904.31 Section 1904.31 Labor... Requirements § 1904.31 Covered employees. (a) Basic requirement. You must record on the OSHA 300 Log the recordable injuries and illnesses of all employees on your payroll, whether they are labor, executive,...

  6. 14 CFR 120.215 - Covered employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Covered employees. 120.215 Section 120.215... Alcohol Testing Program Requirements § 120.215 Covered employees. (a) Each employee, including any... accordance with this subpart. This includes full-time, part-time, temporary, and intermittent...

  7. "Lolita": Genealogy of a Cover Girl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Shari L.

    2015-01-01

    At the publication of Vladimir Nabokov's controversial novel "Lolita" (1958), the author insisted that a girl never appear on the cover. This discourse analysis of 185 "Lolita" book covers, most of which feature a girl, considers the genealogy of "Lolita" in relation to representation, myth, and tacit knowledge…

  8. "Lolita": Genealogy of a Cover Girl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Shari L.

    2015-01-01

    At the publication of Vladimir Nabokov's controversial novel "Lolita" (1958), the author insisted that a girl never appear on the cover. This discourse analysis of 185 "Lolita" book covers, most of which feature a girl, considers the genealogy of "Lolita" in relation to representation, myth, and tacit knowledge…

  9. Gullies and Layers in Crater Wall in Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This dramatic view of gullies emergent from layered outcrops occurs on the wall of a crater within the much larger impact basin, Newton. Newton Crater and its surrounding terrain exhibit many examples of gullies on the walls of craters and troughs. The gullies exhibit meandering channels with fan-shaped aprons of debris located downslope. The gullies are considered to have been formed by erosion--both from a fluid (such as water) running downslope, and by slumping and landsliding processes driven by the force of gravity. This picture was obtained by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) in March 2001; it is illuminated from the upper left and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  10. New Bricks in the Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG JIAOJIAO

    2007-01-01

    @@ Whenever a newcomer enters the classroom, he points at the wall. "Look at that!" says Li Shunye, indicating a picture of something that looks a bit like a pink furry fox, only with an oversized tail. "It's a squirrel," says the 9-year-old. "I made it."

  11. Designing a Sound Reducing Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erk, Kendra; Lumkes, John; Shambach, Jill; Braile, Larry; Brickler, Anne; Matthys, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acoustical engineers use their knowledge of sound to design quiet environments (e.g., classrooms and libraries) as well as to design environments that are supposed to be loud (e.g., concert halls and football stadiums). They also design sound barriers, such as the walls along busy roadways that decrease the traffic noise heard by people in…

  12. Solar Walls for concrete renovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Lotte; Vejen, Niels Kristian; Olsen, Lars

    1996-01-01

    This repport gives a short presentation of three full-scale testing solar walls, the construction including the architectural design, materials and components, transportation and storage of solar enegy, the effect on the construction behind, statics and practical experience.The results...

  13. Overlap/Domain-wall reweighting

    CERN Document Server

    Fukaya, H; Cossu, G; Hashimoto, S; Kaneko, T; Noaki, J

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the eigenvalues of nearly chiral lattice Dirac operators constructed with five-dimensional implementations. Allowing small violation of the Ginsparg-Wilson relation, the HMC simulation is made much faster while the eigenvalues are not significantly affected. We discuss the possibility of reweighting the gauge configurations generated with domain-wall fermions to those of exactly chiral lattice fermions.

  14. Wary Eyes Monitoring Wall Street

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    School business officials kept a close watch on the financial markets this week--and on district investment portfolios and teacher-retirement funds--as stock prices gyrated and once-sound institutions got government bailouts or crumbled into bankruptcy. While financial observers said it was too soon to predict how Wall Street's upheaval might…

  15. Solar Walls for concrete renovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Lotte; Vejen, Niels Kristian; Olsen, Lars

    1996-01-01

    This repport gives a short presentation of three full-scale testing solar walls, the construction including the architectural design, materials and components, transportation and storage of solar enegy, the effect on the construction behind, statics and practical experience.The results of the mea...

  16. Fandom and the fourth wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Kathryn Ballinger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available I use the Teen Wolf fandom as an example to examine the ways social media has created a more complicated, nuanced relationship with fans. The collapse of the fourth wall between fans and The Powers That Be can have both positive and negative impacts, depending on the willingness of participants to maintain mutual respect and engage in meaningful dialogue.

  17. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, T.A. [Duffy, (T.A.) Tijeras, NM (United States); Goldman, A. [Goldman, (A.), Sandia, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  18. Wary Eyes Monitoring Wall Street

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    School business officials kept a close watch on the financial markets this week--and on district investment portfolios and teacher-retirement funds--as stock prices gyrated and once-sound institutions got government bailouts or crumbled into bankruptcy. While financial observers said it was too soon to predict how Wall Street's upheaval might…

  19. Designing a Sound Reducing Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erk, Kendra; Lumkes, John; Shambach, Jill; Braile, Larry; Brickler, Anne; Matthys, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acoustical engineers use their knowledge of sound to design quiet environments (e.g., classrooms and libraries) as well as to design environments that are supposed to be loud (e.g., concert halls and football stadiums). They also design sound barriers, such as the walls along busy roadways that decrease the traffic noise heard by people in…

  20. Statistical characteristics of simulated walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiański, M.; Doroshkevich, A. G.; Müller, V.; Turchaninov, V.

    2000-11-01

    The large-scale matter distribution in three different simulations of CDM models is investigated and compared with corresponding results of the Zel'dovich theory of non-linear gravitational instability. We show that the basic characteristics of wall-like structure elements are well described by this theory, and that they can be expressed by the cosmological parameters and a few spectral moments of the perturbation spectrum. Therefore the characteristics of such elements provide reasonable estimates of these parameters. We show that the compressed matter is relaxed and gravitationally confined and manifests itself in the existence of walls as (quasi-)stationary structure elements with a lifetime restricted by their disruption into high-density clouds. The matter distribution is investigated in both real and redshift spaces. In both cases almost the same particles form the walls, and we estimate differences in corresponding wall characteristics. The same methods are applied to several mock catalogues of `galaxies', which allows us to characterize a large-scale bias between the spatial distribution of dark matter and of simulated `galaxies'.

  1. Partial domain wall partition functions

    CERN Document Server

    Foda, O

    2012-01-01

    We consider six-vertex model configurations on a rectangular lattice with n (N) horizontal (vertical) lines, and "partial domain wall boundary conditions" defined as 1. all 2n arrows on the left and right boundaries point inwards, 2. n_u (n_l) arrows on the upper (lower) boundary, such that n_u + n_l = N - n, also point inwards, 3. all remaining n+N arrows on the upper and lower boundaries point outwards, and 4. all spin configurations on the upper and lower boundaries are summed over. To generate (n-by-N) "partial domain wall configurations", one can start from A. (N-by-N) configurations with domain wall boundary conditions and delete n_u (n_l) upper (lower) horizontal lines, or B. (2n-by-N) configurations that represent the scalar product of an n-magnon Bethe eigenstate and an n-magnon generic state on an N-site spin-1/2 chain, and delete the n lines that represent the Bethe eigenstate. The corresponding "partial domain wall partition function" is computed in construction {A} ({B}) as an N-by-N (n-by-n) det...

  2. The Influence of Wall Binders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    This report is an analysis of the thermal bridge effects that occur in wall binders in masonry buildings. The effects are analyzed using a numerical calculation programme.The results are compared to the values given in the danish standard, DS418....

  3. Chuck Close: "Off the Wall."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Describes the planning and design process of "Off the Wall," a student-developed CD-ROM multimedia project about the life and work of artist Chuck Close-the product of a studio-based course in Learning Experiments Design at the University of Georgia. The design includes an element of gaming; text is kept sparse; navigational elements are rendered…

  4. Thin Wall Austempered Ductile Iron (TWADI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Górny

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the analysis of thin walled castings made of ductile iron is considered. It is shown that thin wall austempered ductile iron can be obtained by means of short-term heat treatment of thin wall castings without addition of alloying elements. Metallographic examinations of 2 mm thin walled castings along with casting with thicker wall thickness (20x28 mm after different austempring conditions are presented. It has been proved that short-term heat treatment amounted 20 minutes of austenitizing at 880 oC followed by holding at 400 oC for 5 minutes causes ausferrite matrix in 2 mm wall thickness castings, while casting with thicker wall thickness remain untransformed and martensite is still present in a matrix. Finally there are shown that thin wall ductile iron is an excellent base material for austempering heat treatments. As a result high mechanical properties received in thin wall plates made of austempered ductile iron.

  5. Liquidity in Government versus Covered Bond Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens; Gyntelberg, Jacob; Sangill, Thomas

    We present findings on the secondary market liquidity of government and covered bonds in Denmark before, during and after the 2008 financial crisis. The analysis focuses on wholesale trading in the two markets and is based on a complete transaction level dataset covering November 2007 until end...... 2011. Overall, our findings suggest that Danish benchmark covered bonds by and large are as liquid as Danish government bonds - including in periods of market stress. Before the financial crisis of 2008, government bonds were slightly more liquid than covered bonds. During the crisis, trading continued...... in both markets but the government bond market experienced a brief but pronounced decline in market liquidity while liquidity in the covered bond market was more robust - partly reflective of a number of events as well as policy measures introduced in the autumn of 2008. After the crisis, liquidity...

  6. Liquidity in Government versus Covered Bond Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens; Gyntelberg, Jacob; Sangill, Thomas

    in both markets but the government bond market experienced a brief but pronounced decline in market liquidity while liquidity in the covered bond market was more robust - partly reflective of a number of events as well as policy measures introduced in the autumn of 2008. After the crisis, liquidity......We present findings on the secondary market liquidity of government and covered bonds in Denmark before, during and after the 2008 financial crisis. The analysis focuses on wholesale trading in the two markets and is based on a complete transaction level dataset covering November 2007 until end...... 2011. Overall, our findings suggest that Danish benchmark covered bonds by and large are as liquid as Danish government bonds - including in periods of market stress. Before the financial crisis of 2008, government bonds were slightly more liquid than covered bonds. During the crisis, trading continued...

  7. Un/covering: Making Disability Identity Legible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Dawn Evans

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines one aspect of disability identity among people with non-apparent or "invisible" disabilities: the decision to emphasize, remind others about, or openly acknowledge impairment in social settings. I call this process "un/covering," and situate this concept in the sociological and Disability Studies literature on disability stigma, passing, and covering. Drawing on interviews with people who have acquired a non-apparent impairment through chronic illness or injury, I argue that decisions to un/cover (after a disability disclosure has already been made play a pivotal role for this group in developing a strong, positive disability identity and making that identity legible to others. Decisions to pass, cover, or un/cover are ongoing decisions that stitch together the fabric of each person's daily life experiences, thus serving as primary mechanisms for identity negotiation and management.

  8. PPOOLEX experiments on wall condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, J.; Puustinen, M. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2009-08-15

    This report summarizes the results of the wall condensation experiments carried out in December 2008 and January 2009 with the scaled down PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Steam was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through a DN200 blowdown pipe to the condensation pool. Altogether five experiments, each consisting of several blows, were carried out. The main purpose of the experiment series was to study wall condensation phenomenon inside the dry well compartment while steam is discharged through it into the condensation pool and to produce comparison data for CFD calculations at VTT. The PPOOLEX test facility is a closed stainless steel vessel divided into two compartments, dry well and wet well. For the wall condensation experiments the test facility was equipped with a system for collecting and measuring the amount of condensate from four different wall segments of the dry well compartment. A thermo graphic camera was used in a couple of experiments for filming the outside surface of the dry well wall. The effect of the initial temperature level of the dry well structures and of the steam flow rate for the accumulation of condensate was studied. The initial temperature level of the dry well structures varied from 23 to 99 deg. C. The steam flow rate varied from 90 to 690 g/s and the temperature of incoming steam from 115 to 160 deg. C. During the initial phase of steam discharge the accumulation of condensate was strongly controlled by the temperature level of the dry well structures; the lower the initial temperature level was the more condensate was accumulated. As the dry well structural temperatures increased the condensation process slowed down. Most of the condensate usually accumulated during the first 200 seconds of the discharge. However, the condensation process never completely stopped because a small temperature difference remained between the dry well atmosphere and inner wall

  9. Stomatal cell wall composition: distinctive structural patterns associated with different phylogenetic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtein, Ilana; Shelef, Yaniv; Marom, Ziv; Zelinger, Einat; Schwartz, Amnon; Popper, Zoë A; Bar-On, Benny; Harpaz-Saad, Smadar

    2017-04-01

    Stomatal morphology and function have remained largely conserved throughout ∼400 million years of plant evolution. However, plant cell wall composition has evolved and changed. Here stomatal cell wall composition was investigated in different vascular plant groups in attempt to understand their possible effect on stomatal function. A renewed look at stomatal cell walls was attempted utilizing digitalized polar microscopy, confocal microscopy, histology and a numerical finite-elements simulation. The six species of vascular plants chosen for this study cover a broad structural, ecophysiological and evolutionary spectrum: ferns ( Asplenium nidus and Platycerium bifurcatum ) and angiosperms ( Arabidopsis thaliana and Commelina erecta ) with kidney-shaped stomata, and grasses (angiosperms, family Poaceae) with dumbbell-shaped stomata ( Sorghum bicolor and Triticum aestivum ). Three distinct patterns of cellulose crystallinity in stomatal cell walls were observed: Type I (kidney-shaped stomata, ferns), Type II (kidney-shaped stomata, angiosperms) and Type III (dumbbell-shaped stomata, grasses). The different stomatal cell wall attributes investigated (cellulose crystallinity, pectins, lignin, phenolics) exhibited taxon-specific patterns, with reciprocal substitution of structural elements in the end-walls of kidney-shaped stomata. According to a numerical bio-mechanical model, the end walls of kidney-shaped stomata develop the highest stresses during opening. The data presented demonstrate for the first time the existence of distinct spatial patterns of varying cellulose crystallinity in guard cell walls. It is also highly intriguing that in angiosperms crystalline cellulose appears to have replaced lignin that occurs in the stomatal end-walls of ferns serving a similar wall strengthening function. Such taxon-specific spatial patterns of cell wall components could imply different biomechanical functions, which in turn could be a consequence of differences in

  10. Through-the-wall radar imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Moeness G

    2011-01-01

    Wall Attenuation and Dispersion, A. Hussein Muqaibel, M.A. Alsunaidi, Nuruddeen M. Iya, and A. Safaai-JaziAntenna Elements, Arrays, and Systems for Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging, A. Hoorfar and A. FathyBeamforming for Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging, G. Alli and D. DiFilippoImage and Localization of Behind-the-Wall Targets Using Collocated and Distributed Apertures, Y.D. Zhang and A. HuntConventional and Emerging Waveforms for Detection and Imaging of Targets behind Walls, F. Ahmad and R.M. NarayananInverse Scattering Approaches in Through-the-Wall Imaging, K. Sarabandi, M. Thiel, M. Dehmollai

  11. Pulmonary vein and atrial wall pathology in human total anomalous pulmonary venous connection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, Yvonne L.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; den Hartog, Wietske C. E.; Bartelings, Margot M.; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; Ebels, Tjark; DeRuiter, Marco C.; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Normally, the inside of the left atrial (LA) body and pulmonary veins (PVs) is lined by vessel wall tissue covered by myocardium. In total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC), no connection of the PVs with the LA body exists. These veins have an increased incidence of PV

  12. EASE-Grid Land Cover Classifications Derived from Boston University MODIS/Terra Land Cover Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — These data provide land cover classifications derived from the Boston University MOD12Q1 V004 MODIS/Terra 1 km Land Cover Product (Friedl et al. 2002). The data are...

  13. Himalayan glacier retreat delayed by debris cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherler, D.; Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    Variable retreat rates and paucity of mass-balance data complicate a coherent picture of the current state and future fate of Himalayan glaciers. We report frontal changes and remotely-sensed surface velocities from >250 glaciers in the greater Himalayan realm (Hindu Kush, Karakoram, Himalaya, West Kunlun Shan) between 2000 and 2008 that provide evidence for widespread meltdown, which is obscured by debris cover. While debris-free glaciers in Tibet and other low-relief areas have been mainly retreating, debris-covered glaciers in high-relief areas, such as the central Himalaya, were mostly stagnating and in-situ down wasting but not retreating. Only Karakoram glaciers show no signs of stagnation or appreciable retreat, despite high debris cover, suggesting no recent mass loss. Our study shows that regional differences in topographic relief account for substantial differences in debris cover and thus retreat behaviour that need to be considered when comparing glacier retreat rates. The combination of melt rates lowered by debris cover and healthier glaciers in the strongly glaciated Karakoram slows down current glacier wastage in High Asia. Predictions of future water availability and global sea level have so far neglected the effect of debris cover on glacier melt rates and thus likely overestimate the speed of glacier meltdown in the Himalaya and other steep mountain ranges where debris covered glaciers are common.

  14. Assessing uncertainties in land cover projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Peter; Prestele, Reinhard; Verburg, Peter H; Arneth, Almut; Baranzelli, Claudia; Batista E Silva, Filipe; Brown, Calum; Butler, Adam; Calvin, Katherine; Dendoncker, Nicolas; Doelman, Jonathan C; Dunford, Robert; Engström, Kerstin; Eitelberg, David; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Harrison, Paula A; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Holzhauer, Sascha; Humpenöder, Florian; Jacobs-Crisioni, Chris; Jain, Atul K; Krisztin, Tamás; Kyle, Page; Lavalle, Carlo; Lenton, Tim; Liu, Jiayi; Meiyappan, Prasanth; Popp, Alexander; Powell, Tom; Sands, Ronald D; Schaldach, Rüdiger; Stehfest, Elke; Steinbuks, Jevgenijs; Tabeau, Andrzej; van Meijl, Hans; Wise, Marshall A; Rounsevell, Mark D A

    2017-02-01

    Understanding uncertainties in land cover projections is critical to investigating land-based climate mitigation policies, assessing the potential of climate adaptation strategies and quantifying the impacts of land cover change on the climate system. Here, we identify and quantify uncertainties in global and European land cover projections over a diverse range of model types and scenarios, extending the analysis beyond the agro-economic models included in previous comparisons. The results from 75 simulations over 18 models are analysed and show a large range in land cover area projections, with the highest variability occurring in future cropland areas. We demonstrate systematic differences in land cover areas associated with the characteristics of the modelling approach, which is at least as great as the differences attributed to the scenario variations. The results lead us to conclude that a higher degree of uncertainty exists in land use projections than currently included in climate or earth system projections. To account for land use uncertainty, it is recommended to use a diverse set of models and approaches when assessing the potential impacts of land cover change on future climate. Additionally, further work is needed to better understand the assumptions driving land use model results and reveal the causes of uncertainty in more depth, to help reduce model uncertainty and improve the projections of land cover. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Near-wall behavior of turbulent wall-bounded flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buschmann, Matthias H. [Institut fuer Luft- und Kaeltetechnik Dresden, Bertolt-Brecht-Allee 20, 01309 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: Matthias.Buschmann@ilkdresden.de; Indinger, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Aerodynamics, Boltzmannstr., 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284-3015 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    A data base compiling a large number of results from direct numerical simulations and physical experiments is used to explore the properties of shear and normal Reynolds stresses very close to the wall of turbulent channel/pipe flows and boundary layers. Three types of scaling are mainly investigated, classical inner, standard mixed, and pure outer scaling. The study focuses on the wall behavior, the location and the value of the peak Reynolds shear stress and the three normal stresses. A primary observation is that all of these parameters show a significant Karman number dependence. None of the scalings investigated works in an equal manner for all parameters. It is found that the respective first-order Taylor series expansion satisfactorily represents each stress only in a surprisingly thin layer very close to the wall. In some cases, a newly introduced scaling based on u{sub {tau}}{sup 3/2}u{sub e}{sup 1/2} offers a remedy.

  16. Estimating juniper cover from NAIP imagery and evaluating relationships between potential cover and environmental variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juniper management is constrained by limited tools to estimate juniper cover and potential cover at stand closure across landscapes. We evaluated if remotely sensed imagery (NAIP) could be used to estimate juniper cover and if environmental characteristic could be used to determine potential junipe...

  17. Orbifold groups, quasi-projectivity and covers

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Enrique Artal; Matei, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We discuss properties of complex algebraic orbifold groups, their characteristic varieties, and their abelian covers. In particular, we deal with the question of (quasi)-projectivity of orbifold groups. We also prove a structure theorem for the variety of characters of normal-crossing quasi-projective orbifold groups. Finally, we extend Sakuma's formula for the first Betti number of abelian covers of orbifold fundamental groups. Several examples are presented, including a compact orbifold group which is not projective and a Zariski pair of plane projective curves that can be told by considering an unbranched cover of the projective plane with an orbifold structure.

  18. Dicycle Cover of Hamiltonian Oriented Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A. Alsatami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A dicycle cover of a digraph D is a family F of dicycles of D such that each arc of D lies in at least one dicycle in F. We investigate the problem of determining the upper bounds for the minimum number of dicycles which cover all arcs in a strong digraph. Best possible upper bounds of dicycle covers are obtained in a number of classes of digraphs including strong tournaments, Hamiltonian oriented graphs, Hamiltonian oriented complete bipartite graphs, and families of possibly non-Hamiltonian digraphs obtained from these digraphs via a sequence of 2-sum operations.

  19. Optimisation of non-axisymmetric end wall contours for the rotor of a low speed, 1 1/2 stage research turbine with unshrouded blades

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bergh, J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available improvements could be obtained through the design of custom end walls for the turbine. This investigation therefore covers the design of custom non-axisymmetric end wall contours for the rotor row of an annular turbine rig with unshrouded blades (the same rig...

  20. EFFECT OF WALL THICKNESS ON THE SOLAR GAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KEREKES A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Utilized passive solar gain covers considerable part of heat losses, especially in well insulated buildings. At the same time the thermal insulation of the wall in such a building, e.g. approaching the “Passivhaus” standard is about 20 cm thick. Unless a light weight building is spoken of further 20-30 cm loadbearing layer and the surface finishing should be added resulting in a total thickness of 45-60 cm. The thick wall narrows the cross section through which the direct solar beam may enter the room thus decreases the solar gain. The movement of the solar beam during the day and season can be followed on the base of the sun path diagram. One could say that on the other hand a massive loadbearing layer - especially if it is on the inner side - increases the heat storage capacity, thus increases the utilized part of the solar gain. Series of thermal simulation proves that the effect of heat storage capacity is less important in comparison with the cross section through which the solar beam enters the room. In other terms a light weight building with thin walls performs better than a massive one with thick wall providing the U-value is the same in both cases. In this paper the results of simulation will be presented. Certainly the wall should fulfill many requirements including load, weather-proofness, thermal insulation, building technology. Solar beam is only one of the many aspects. Nevertheless simple geometric tricks may lead to a good compromise, e.g. bevel edge reveal which is not perpendicular to the façade. No doubt in this case the thermal bridge losses around the window perimeter will be higher however this will be compensated by the solar gain.

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Sonographic gallbladder wall thickness in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gallbladder wall thickness and the subjects' age, sex, height and weight .... sex distributions and mean height and weights were calculated. Results were expressed .... establishing of a population-based US gallbladder wall thickness so that.

  2. Brick Walls on the Brane

    CERN Document Server

    Medved, A J M

    2002-01-01

    The so-called ``brick-wall model'' is a semi-classical approach that has been used to explain black hole entropy in terms of thermal matter fields. Here, we apply the brick-wall formalism to thermal bulk fields in a Randall-Sundrum brane world scenario. In this case, the black hole entity is really a string-like object in the anti-de Sitter bulk, while appearing as a Schwarzchild black hole to observers living on the brane. In spite of these exotic circumstances, we establish that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy law is preserved. Although a similar calculation was recently considered in the literature, this prior work invoked a simplifying assumption (which we avoid) that can not be adequately justified.

  3. Brick walls on the brane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medved, A J M [Department of Physics and Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    2002-01-21

    The so-called 'brick-wall model' is a semiclassical approach that has been used to explain black hole entropy in terms of thermal matter fields. Here, we apply the brick-wall formalism to thermal bulk fields in a Randall-Sundrum brane world scenario. In this case, the black hole entity is really a string-like object in the anti-de Sitter bulk, while appearing as a Schwarzchild black hole to observers living on the brane. In spite of these exotic circumstances, we establish that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy law is preserved. Although a similar calculation was recently considered in the literature, this prior study invoked a simplifying assumption (which we avoid) that cannot be adequately justified.

  4. Creating universes with thick walls

    CERN Document Server

    Ulvestad, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherically symmetric false vacuum bubble embedded in a true vacuum region separated by a "thick wall", which is generated by a scalar field in a quartic potential. We study the "Farhi-Guth-Guven" (FGG) quantum tunneling process by constructing numerical solutions relevant to this process. The ADM mass of the spacetime is calculated, and we show that there is a lower bound that is a significant fraction of the scalar field mass. We argue that the zero mass solutions used to by some to argue against the physicality of the FGG process are artifacts of the thin wall approximation used in earlier work. We argue that the zero mass solutions should not be used to question the viability of the FGG process.

  5. Potential Energy Savings Due to Phase Change Material in a Building Wall Assembly: An Examination of Two Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Kenneth W [ORNL; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    Phase change material (PCM), placed in an exterior wall, alters the temperature profile within the wall and thus influences the heat transport through the wall. This may reduce the net energy transport through the wall via interactions with diurnal temperature swings in the external environment or reduce the electricity needed to meet the net load through the wall by shifting the time of the peak load to a time when the cooling system operates more efficiently. This study covers a broad range of parameters that can influence the effectiveness of such a merged thermal storage-thermal insulation system. These parameters included climate, PCM location within the wall, amount of PCM, midpoint of the PCM melting and freezing range relative to the indoor setpoint temperature, temperature range over which phase change occurs, and the wall orientation. Two climates are investigated using finite difference and optimization analyses: Phoenix and Baltimore, with two utility rate schedules. Although potential savings for a PCM with optimized properties were greater when the PCM was concentrated near the inside wall surface, other considerations described here lead to a recommendation for a full-thickness application. An examination of the temperature distribution within the walls also revealed the potential for this system to reduce the amount of energy transported through the wall framing. Finally, economic benefits can exceed energy savings when time-of-day utility rates are in effect, reflecting the value of peak load reductions for the utility grid.

  6. Central Asian Snow Cover from Hydrometeorological Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Central Asian Snow Cover from Hydrometeorological Surveys data are based on observations made by personnel for three river basins: Amu Darya, Sir Darya, and...

  7. 45 CFR 152.19 - Covered benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... offered by a PCIP shall not cover the following services: (1) Cosmetic surgery or other treatment for cosmetic purposes except to restore bodily function or correct deformity resulting from disease....

  8. Global Land Cover Characterization: 1992-1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a long history of involvement in multi-scale, and multi-temporal land cover characterization and mapping of the world. During...

  9. 5 CFR 890.903 - Covered services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Limit on Inpatient Hospital Charges, Physician Charges, and FEHB Benefit... inpatient hospital services apply to inpatient hospital services which are: (1) Covered under both...

  10. The Results: WLB's Cover Contest for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnofsky, Ruth

    1970-01-01

    Lists winners of a contest for a cover design among elementary school children, with entries submitted by school librarians from all over the country. Includes reproductions of some winning entries. (JS)

  11. Expansion of Medicaid Covered Smoking Cessation Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Expansionof Medicaid Covered Smoking Cessation Services - Maternal Smoking and Birth Outcomes. To assess whether Medicaid coverage of smoking cessation services...

  12. Determinants of woody cover in African savannas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sankaran, M

    2005-12-08

    Full Text Available Savannas are globally important ecosystems of great significance to human economies. In these biomes, which are characterized by the co-dominance of trees and grasses, woody cover is a chief determinant of ecosystem properties (1...

  13. C-CAP Niihau 2005 Land Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of land cover derived from high resolution imagery according to the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) protocol. This data set utilized 1...

  14. Covering radii are not matroid invariants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Britz, Thomas Johann; Rutherford, Carrie G.

    We show by example that the covering radius of a binary linear code is not generally determined the Tutte polynomial of the matroid. This answers Problem 361 (P. J. Cameron (ed.), Research problems, Discrete Math. 231 (2001) 469--478)....

  15. 49 CFR 192.327 - Cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... locations 36 (914) 24 (610) Drainage ditches of public roads and railroad crossings 36 (914) 24 (610) (b... least 24 inches (610 millimeters) of cover. (c) Where an underground structure prevents the installation...

  16. Orbifoldization, covering surfaces and uniformization theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bántay, P

    1998-01-01

    The connection between the theory of permutation orbifolds, covering surfaces and uniformization is investigated, and the higher genus partition functions of an arbitrary permutation orbifold are expressed in terms of those of the original theory.

  17. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; Stamatakos; Charikleia; Stefanaki; Konstantinos; Kontzoglou; Spyros; Stergiopoulos; Georgios; Giannopoulos; Michael; Safioleas

    2010-01-01

    Walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN), formerly known as pancreatic abscess is a late complication of acute pancreatitis. It can be lethal, even though it is rare. This critical review provides an overview of the continually expanding knowledge about WOPN, by review of current data from references identified in Medline and PubMed, to September 2009, using key words, such as WOPN, infected pseudocyst, severe pancreatitis, pancreatic abscess, acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), pancreas, inflammation and al...

  18. Droplets Evaporation on Heated Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misyura S. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various modes of evaporation in a wide range of droplet sizes and wall temperatures have been investigated in the present work. For any initial drop size there are three typical boiling regime: 1 the nucleate boiling; 2 the transitional regime; 3 the film boiling. The width of the transition region of boiling crisis increases with increasing the initial volume V0. Evaporation of large droplets at high superheat depends on the initial droplet shape.

  19. Statistical characteristics of simulated walls

    OpenAIRE

    Demianski, M.; Doroshkevich, A. G.; V.; Mueller; Turchaninov, V.

    2000-01-01

    The large scale matter distribution in three different simulations of CDM models is investigated and compared with corresponding results of the Zel'dovich theory of nonlinear gravitational instability. We show that the basic characteristics of wall-like structure elements are well described by this theory, and that they can be expressed by the cosmological parameters and a few spectral moments of the perturbation spectrum. Therefore the characteristics of such elements provide reasonable esti...

  20. Flooding Effect on Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Banimahd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Earth building is a sustainable, environmentally friendly and economical method of construction that has been used worldwide for many centuries. For the past three decades, earth has seen a revival as a building material for a modern construction method due to its benefits in terms of low carbon content, low cost and energy involved during construction, as well as the fact that it is a sustainable technology of building. Climate change is influencing precipitation levels and patterns around the world, and as a consequence, flood risk is increasing rapidly. When flooding occurs, earth buildings are exposed to water by submersion, causing an increase in the degree of saturation of the earth structures and therefore a decrease of the suction between particles. This study investigated the effect of cycles of flooding (consecutive events of flooding followed by dry periods on earth walls. A series of characterization tests were carried out to obtain the physical and mechanical properties of the studied earth material. In a second stage, Flooding Simulation Tests (FST were performed to explore the earth walls’ response to repeated flooding events. The results obtained for the tested earth wall/samples with reinforced material (straw reveal hydraulic hysteresis when wall/samples are subject to cycles of wetting and drying.

  1. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, P.R.

    1985-06-21

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  2. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagasse, P.R.

    1985-06-21

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  3. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, Paul R. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  4. Thermal insulation properties of walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat-protective qualities of building structures are determined by the qualities of the used materials, adequate design solutions and construction and installation work of high quality. This rule refers both to the structures made of materials similar in their structure and nature and mixed, combined by a construction system. The necessity to ecaluate thermal conductivity is important for a product and for a construction. Methods for evaluating the thermal protection of walls are based on the methods of calculation, on full-scale tests in a laboratory or on objects. At the same time there is a reason to believe that even deep and detailed calculation may cause deviation of the values from real data. Using finite difference method can improve accuracy of the results, but it doesn’t solve all problems. The article discusses new approaches to evaluating thermal insulation properties of walls. The authors propose technique of accurate measurement of thermal insulation properties in single blocks and fragments of walls and structures.

  5. 7 CFR 1.183 - Proceedings covered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards Act (7 U.S.C. 79(g)(3), 85, 86) U.S. Warehouse Act (7 U.S.C. 246, 253) Virus-Serum-Toxin Act (21 U... the filing of an application by a party who believes the proceeding is covered by EAJA; whether the proceeding is covered will then be an issue for resolution in proceedings on the application. (c) If a...

  6. Covering radii are not matroid invariants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Britz, Thomas Johann; Rutherford, Carrie G.

    We show by example that the covering radius of a binary linear code is not generally determined the Tutte polynomial of the matroid. This answers Problem 361 (P. J. Cameron (ed.), Research problems, Discrete Math. 231 (2001) 469--478).......We show by example that the covering radius of a binary linear code is not generally determined the Tutte polynomial of the matroid. This answers Problem 361 (P. J. Cameron (ed.), Research problems, Discrete Math. 231 (2001) 469--478)....

  7. Regulatory guidance on soil cover systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, J.D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in September 1991, completed revisions to 14 sections of the Standard Review Plan (SRP) for the Review of a License Application for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility. The major purposes of the SRP are to ensure the quality and uniformity of the NRC staff`s safety reviews, and to present a well-defined base from which to evaluate the acceptability of information and data provided in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) portion of the license application. SRP 3.2, entitled, Design Considerations for Normal and Abnormal/Accident Conditions, was one of the sections that was revised by the NRC staff. This revision was completed to provide additional regulatory guidance on the important considerations that need to be addressed for the proper design and construction of soil cover systems that are to be placed over the LLW. The cover system over the waste is acknowledged to be one of the most important engineered barriers for the long-term stable performance of the disposal facility. The guidance in revised SRP 3.2 summarizes the previous efforts and recommendations of the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and a peer review panel on the placement of soil cover systems. NRC published these efforts in NUREG/CR-5432. The discussions in this paper highlight selected recommendations on soil cover issues that the NRC staff considers important for ensuring the safe, long-term performance of the soil cover systems. The development phases to be discussed include: (1) cover design; (2) cover material selection; (3) laboratory and field testing; (4) field placement control and acceptance; and (5) penetrations through the constructed covers.

  8. Edge covers and independence: Algebraic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, E. A.; Khitrov, G. M.; Pogozhev, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, linear algebra methods are applied to solve some problems of graph theory. For ordinary connected graphs, edge coverings and independent sets are considered. Some results concerning minimum edge covers and maximum matchings are proved with the help of linear algebraic approach. The problem of finding a maximum matching of a graph is fundamental both practically and theoretically, and has numerous applications, e.g., in computational chemistry and mathematical chemistry.

  9. The cell wall of Fusarium oxysporum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoffelmeer, EAM; Klis, FM; Sietsma, JH; Cornelissen, BJC

    1999-01-01

    Sugar analysis of isolated cell walls from three formae speciales of Fusarium oxysporum showed that they contained not only glucose and (N-acetyl)-glucosamine, but also mannose, galactose, and uronic acids, presumably originating from cell wall glycoproteins. Cell wall glycoproteins accounted for

  10. The cell wall of Fusarium oxysporum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoffelmeer, EAM; Klis, FM; Sietsma, JH; Cornelissen, BJC

    1999-01-01

    Sugar analysis of isolated cell walls from three formae speciales of Fusarium oxysporum showed that they contained not only glucose and (N-acetyl)-glucosamine, but also mannose, galactose, and uronic acids, presumably originating from cell wall glycoproteins. Cell wall glycoproteins accounted for 50

  11. To detect anomalies in diaphragm walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, R.

    2015-01-01

    Diaphragm walls are potentially ideal retaining walls for deep excavations in densely built-up areas, as they cause no vibrations during their construction and provide structural elements with high strength and stiffness. In the recent past, however, several projects using diaphragm walls as soil an

  12. Static domain wall in braneworld gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, M.C.B.; Carlesso, P.F. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Instituto de Fisica Teiorica, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bloco II, Barra-Funda, Caixa Postal 70532-2, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hoff da Silva, J.M. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper we consider a static domain wall inside a 3-brane. Different from the standard achievement obtained in General Relativity, the analysis performed here gives a consistency condition for the existence of static domain walls in a braneworld gravitational scenario. Also the behavior of the domain wall's gravitational field in the newtonian limit is shown. (orig.)

  13. Methods & Strategies: Put Your Walls to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Julie; Durham, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides ideas and techniques to enhance your science teaching. This month's issue discusses planning and using interactive word walls to support science and reading instruction. Many classrooms have word walls displaying vocabulary that students have learned in class. Word walls serve as visual scaffolds to support instruction. To…

  14. Steel Sheet Pile Walls in Soft Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    For almost a century, steel sheet pile walls are applied worldwide as earth retaining structures for excavations and quay walls. Within the framework of the development of European structural codes for Civil Engineering works, the Eurocodes, Eurocode 3 Part 5 for design of steel sheet pile walls was

  15. Implications of bio-efficacy and persistence of insecticides when indoor residual spraying and long-lasting insecticide nets are combined for malaria prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okumu Fredros O

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bio-efficacy and residual activity of insecticides used for indoor residual spraying (IRS and long-lasting insecticide nets (LLINs were assessed against laboratory-reared and wild populations of the malaria vector, Anopheles arabiensis in south eastern Tanzania. Implications of the findings are examined in the context of potential synergies and redundancies where IRS and LLINs are combined. Methods Bioassays were conducted monthly for six months on three LLIN types (Olyset® PermaNet 2.0®,and Icon Life® and three IRS treatments (2 g/m2 pirimiphos-methyl, 2 g/m2 DDT and 0.03 g/m2 lambda-cyhalothrin, sprayed on mud walls and palm ceilings of experimental huts. Tests used susceptible laboratory-reared An. arabiensis exposed in cones (nets and IRS or wire balls (nets only. Susceptibility of wild populations was assessed using WHO diagnostic concentrations and PCR for knock-down resistance (kdr genes. Results IRS treatments killed ≥ 85% of mosquitoes exposed on palm ceilings and ≥ 90% of those exposed on mud walls, but up to 50% of this toxicity decayed within 1–3 months, except for DDT. By 6th month, only 7.5%, 42.5% and 30.0% of mosquitoes died when exposed to ceilings sprayed with pirimiphos-methyl, DDT or lambda-cyhalothrin respectively, while 12.5%, 36.0% and 27.5% died after exposure to mud walls sprayed with the same insecticides. In wire-ball assays, mortality decreased from 98.1% in 1st month to 92.6% in 6th month in tests on PermaNet 2.0®, from 100% to 61.1% on Icon Life® and from 93.2% to 33.3% on Olyset® nets. In cone bioassays, mortality reduced from 92.8% in 1st month to 83.3% in 6th month on PermaNet 2.0®, from 96.9% to 43.80% on Icon Life® and from 85.6% to 14.6% on Olyset®. Wild An. arabiensis were 100% susceptible to DDT, 95.8% to deltamethrin, 90.2% to lambda cyhalothrin and 95.2% susceptible to permethrin. No kdr gene mutations were detected. Conclusions In bioassays where sufficient contact with

  16. Local Impact Simulation of SC Wall Structures using Aircraft Engine Projectile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chulhun; Lee, Jungwhee; Lee, Hanjoo [Dankook Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Raeyoung; Hyun, Changhun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    SC wall structure developed for nuclear power plant buildings consists of plain concrete and two steel plates on both surface of the concrete, while RC structure consists of re bar and concrete. SC structure has higher scabbing resistance than RC structure due to the action of steel plate on the rear side of impact. Therefore SC structure is known as more effective structure from the viewpoint of aircraft crash than RC structure. However, most of the recent researches and experiments about local impact damage deal with RC structures, and the effect of re bar and steel plate is not considered reasonably. Although Walter et al. and Make-work et al. suggested a formula for evaluating perforation depth of steel plate covered RC walls, most of the previous researches about SC structure are focused on perforation and scabbing due to the impact of hard projectile, rather than soft projectile such as an aircraft. In this research a soft projectile, i. e. aircraft engine, is utilized for impact simulation of RC and SC walls. To evaluate local damage of SC wall structures, parametric study with the variables of wall thickness and steel ratio of the cover plate is performed, and the results are compared with those of RC structures. Since scabbing was prevented by the steel plates, penetration mode of damage was observed in SC walls while scabbing damage was occurred in RC walls. It is confirmed that the rear steel plate not only contains concrete debris, but also reduces the internal damage of the concrete walls. Penetration depth of SC walls did not largely vary due to the increasing steel ratio, and similar results to RC walls were observed when the wall thickness is larger than a certain value since the impact resistance of SC wall is mainly governed by the thickness of concrete part. Therefore, it is expected that similar level of impact resistance to RC structure can be produced with the minimum thickness of steel plates of SC structure. According to these results, SC

  17. Reconstruction with a patient-specific titanium implant after a wide anterior chest wall resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turna, Akif; Kavakli, Kuthan; Sapmaz, Ersin; Arslan, Hakan; Caylak, Hasan; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Demirkaya, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects is a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons, particularly after a wide resection of the chest wall that includes the sternum. The location and the size of the defect play a major role when selecting the method of reconstruction, while acceptable cosmetic and functional results remain the primary goal. Improvements in preoperative imaging techniques and reconstruction materials have an important role when planning and performing a wide chest wall resection with a low morbidity rate. In this report, we describe the reconstruction of a wide anterior chest wall defect with a patient-specific custom-made titanium implant. An infected mammary tumour recurrence in a 62-year old female, located at the anterior chest wall including the sternum, was resected, followed by a large custom-made titanium implant. Latissimus dorsi flap and split-thickness graft were also used for covering the implant successfully. A titanium custom-made chest wall implant could be a viable alternative for patients who had large chest wall tumours. PMID:24227881

  18. Cell wall modification in grapevine cells in response to UV stress investigated by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesniewska, E.; Adrian, M.; Klinguer, A.; Pugin, A

    2004-08-15

    Despite cell wall reinforcement being a well-known defence mechanism of plants, it remains poorly characterized from a physical point of view. The objective of this work was to further describe this mechanism. Vitis vinifera cv Gamay cells were treated with UV-light (254 nm), a well-known elicitor of defence mechanisms in grapevines, and physical cell wall modifications were observed using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) under native conditions. The grapevine cell suspensions were continuously observed in their culture medium from 30 min to 24 h after elicitation. In the beginning, cellulose fibrils covered by a matrix surrounded the control and treated cells. After 3 h, the elicited cells displayed sprouted expansions around the cell wall that correspond to pectin chains. These expansions were not observed on untreated grapevine cells. The AFM tip was used to determine the average surface elastic modulus of cell wall that account for cell wall mechanical properties. The elasticity is diminished in UV-treated cells. In a comparative study, grapevine cells showed the same decrease in cell wall elasticity when treated with a fungal biotic elicitor of defence response. These results demonstrate cell wall strengthening by UV stress.

  19. Rice Brittleness Mutants: A Way to Open the 'Black Box' of Monocot Cell Wall Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baocai Zhang; Yihua Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Rice is a model organism for studying the mechanism of cell wall biosynthesis and remolding in Gramineae.Mechanical strength is an important agronomy trait of rice(Oryza sativa L.)plants that affects crop lodging and grain yield.As a prominent physical property of cell walls,mechanical strength reflects upon the structure of different wall polymers and how they interact.Studies on the mechanisms that regulate the mechanical strength therefore consequently results in uncovering the genes functioning in cell wall biosynthesis and remodeling.Our group focuses on the study of isolation of brittle culm(bc)mutants and characterization of their corresponding genes.To date,several bc mutants have been reported.The identified genes have covered several pathways of cell wall biosynthesis,revealing many secrets of monocot cell wall biosynthesis.Here,we review the progress achieved in this research field and also highlight the perspectives in expectancy.All of those lend new insights into mechanisms of cell wall formation and are helpful for harnessing the waste rice straws for biofuel production.

  20. Thin Wall Austempered Ductile Iron (TWADI)

    OpenAIRE

    M. Górny; E. Fraś

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the analysis of thin walled castings made of ductile iron is considered. It is shown that thin wall austempered ductile iron can be obtained by means of short-term heat treatment of thin wall castings without addition of alloying elements. Metallographic examinations of 2 mm thin walled castings along with casting with thicker wall thickness (20x28 mm) after different austempring conditions are presented. It has been proved that short-term heat treatment amounted 20 minutes of a...

  1. Adding structure to land cover - using fractional cover to study animal habitat use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevanda, Mirjana; Horning, Ned; Reineking, Bjoern; Heurich, Marco; Wegmann, Martin; Mueller, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Linking animal movements to landscape features is critical to identify factors that shape the spatial behaviour of animals. Habitat selection is led by behavioural decisions and is shaped by the environment, therefore the landscape is crucial for the analysis. Land cover classification based on ground survey and remote sensing data sets are an established approach to define landscapes for habitat selection analysis. We investigate an approach for analysing habitat use using continuous land cover information and spatial metrics. This approach uses a continuous representation of the landscape using percentage cover of a chosen land cover type instead of discrete classes. This approach, fractional cover, captures spatial heterogeneity within classes and is therefore capable to provide a more distinct representation of the landscape. The variation in home range sizes is analysed using fractional cover and spatial metrics in conjunction with mixed effect models on red deer position data in the Bohemian Forest, compared over multiple spatio-temporal scales. We analysed forest fractional cover and a texture metric within each home range showing that variance of fractional cover values and texture explain much of variation in home range sizes. The results show a hump-shaped relationship, leading to smaller home ranges when forest fractional cover is very homogeneous or highly heterogeneous, while intermediate stages lead to larger home ranges. The application of continuous land cover information in conjunction with spatial metrics proved to be valuable for the explanation of home-range sizes of red deer.

  2. Seismic displacement of gravity retaining walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mohamed Hafez Ismail Ibrahim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Seismic displacement of gravity walls had been studied using conventional static methods for controlled displacement design. In this study plain strain numerical analysis is performed using Plaxis dynamic program where prescribed displacement is applied at the bottom boundary of the soil to simulate the applied seismic load. Constrained absorbent side boundaries are introduced to prevent any wave reflection. The studied soil is chosen dense granular sand and modeled as elasto-plastic material according to Mohr–Column criteria while the gravity wall is assumed elastic. By comparing the resulted seismic wall displacements calculated by numerical analysis for six historical ground motions with that calculated by the pseudo-static method, it is found that numerical seismic displacements are either equal to or greater than corresponding pseudo-static values. Permissible seismic wall displacement calculated by AASHTO can be used for empirical estimation of seismic displacement. It is also found that seismic wall displacement is directly proportional with the positive angle of inclination of the back surface of the wall, soil flexibility and with the earthquake maximum ground acceleration. Seismic wall sliding is dominant and rotation is negligible for rigid walls when the ratio between the wall height and the foundation width is less than 1.4, while for greater ratios the wall becomes more flexible and rotation (rocking increases till the ratio reaches 1.8 where overturning is susceptible to take place. Cumulative seismic wall rotation increases with dynamic time and tends to be constant at the end of earthquake.

  3. Pulmonary complications of abdominal wall defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitch, Howard B

    2015-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an integral component of the chest wall. Defects in the ventral abdominal wall alter respiratory mechanics and can impair diaphragm function. Congenital abdominal wall defects also are associated with abnormalities in lung growth and development that lead to pulmonary hypoplasia, pulmonary hypertension, and alterations in thoracic cage formation. Although infants with ventral abdominal wall defects can experience life-threatening pulmonary complications, older children typically experience a more benign respiratory course. Studies of lung and chest wall function in older children and adolescents with congenital abdominal wall defects are few; such investigations could provide strategies for improved respiratory performance, avoidance of respiratory morbidity, and enhanced exercise ability for these children.

  4. COVERS Neonatal Pain Scale: Development and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan L. Hand

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Newborns and infants are often exposed to painful procedures during hospitalization. Several different scales have been validated to assess pain in specific populations of pediatric patients, but no single scale can easily and accurately assess pain in all newborns and infants regardless of gestational age and disease state. A new pain scale was developed, the COVERS scale, which incorporates 6 physiological and behavioral measures for scoring. Newborns admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit or Well Baby Nursery were evaluated for pain/discomfort during two procedures, a heel prick and a diaper change. Pain was assessed using indicators from three previously established scales (CRIES, the Premature Infant Pain Profile, and the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale, as well as the COVERS Scale, depending upon gestational age. Premature infant testing resulted in similar pain assessments using the COVERS and PIPP scales with an r=0.84. For the full-term infants, the COVERS scale and NIPS scale resulted in similar pain assessments with an r=0.95. The COVERS scale is a valid pain scale that can be used in the clinical setting to assess pain in newborns and infants and is universally applicable to all neonates, regardless of their age or physiological state.

  5. Floating geomembrane cover improves biogas collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, J.

    2009-07-15

    Canadian corn products refiner, Casco Inc., recently upgraded a wastewater anaerobic digester at its automated corn wet milling facility on the St. Lawrence River, in Cardinal Ontario. The upgrade includes an improved floating and insulated geomembrane cover, designed and installed by Geomembrane Technologies Inc. The cover effectively streamlines biogas collection, improves biogas odour control and optimizes bioreactor heat retention. Casco's bulk volume fermenter (BVF) was designed and built in 1988 by ADI Systems Inc. It is limited to receiving 641,000 gallons of wastewater per day from several areas of the plant. Wastewater sludge is usually treated by anaerobic digestion. At Casco, raw solids are added directly to the BVF bioreactor, where they are digested, minimizing waste sludge handling. In essence, anaerobic digestion is a renewable energy source which converts wastewater to a methane- and carbon dioxide-rich biogas suitable for energy production, replacing fossil fuels. The insulated geomembrane cover captures and reclaims all the biogas from the treatment process that is going on inside the tank. Without a cover, the biogas would be released to the atmosphere. The new geomembrane cover collects an average of 236,000 cubic feet of biogas per day, at a 65 per cent methane concentration, from the BVF bioreactor. 2 figs.

  6. Orbital wall infarction in child with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, C; Claeys, L; Maes, P; Boiy, T; Wojciechowski, M

    2015-12-01

    We present the case of a 17-year-old boy, known with homozygous sickle cell disease, who was admitted because of generalised pain. He developed bilateral periorbital oedema and proptosis, without pain or visual disturbances. In addition to hyperhydration, oxygen and analgesia IV antibiotics were started, to cover a possible osteomyelitis. Patients with sickle cell disease are at risk for vaso-occlusive crises, when the abnormally shaped red blood cells aggregate and block the capillaries. Such a crisis typically presents at a location with high bone marrow activity, as the vertebrae and long bones. At an early age, the bone marrow is still active at other sites, for example the orbital wall, and thus infarction can also occur there. Thus, in young persons with sickle cell disease, it is important to consider orbital wall infarction in the differential diagnosis, since the approach is different from osteomyelitis. If the disease is complicated by an orbital compression syndrome, corticosteroids or surgical intervention may be necessary to preserve the vision. In our patient, an MRI of the orbitae demonstrated periorbital oedema with bone anomalies in the orbital and frontal bones, confirming orbital wall infarction. Ophthalmological examination revealed no signs of pressure on the nervus opticus. The patient recovered gradually with conservative treatment.

  7. Chest wall reconstruction in a patient with Cantrell syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Yasunaga, Hiroshi; Tananari, Yoshifumi

    2009-06-01

    Cantrell syndrome is a very rare congenital anomaly with up to five features: a midline, upper abdominal wall abnormality, lower sternal defect, anterior diaphragmatic defect, diaphragmatic pericardial defect, and congenital abnormalities of the heart. This report describes our experience of performing a reconstruction of a chest wall defect in a Cantrell syndrome case with herniation of the heart. The patient was a 1-month-old female infant who received surgical patch repair of a ventricular septal defect (VSD) and atrial septal defect (ASD) at the Department of Cardiac Surgery. Subsequently, the patient underwent reconstruction at the second-stage surgery. A rhomboid skin flap with an inferior pedicle was used to close the defect. In this process the flap, including portions of the rectus abdominis muscles, was elevated and transferred into the defect. The sectioned ends of the divided pectoralis major muscles were sutured together to simultaneously reconstruct the muscles. It has been 2 years since the surgery, and the defect is covered with normal skin, and the protrusion of the heart from the chest wall and the externally visible pulsation have been resolved. The progress has been very good functionally and cosmetically.

  8. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to &apos

  9. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, P.R.

    1987-01-06

    An apparatus is described for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item, the apparatus comprising: a. a base; b. a first support member having first and second ends, the first end being connected to the base, the first support member having a sufficiently small circumference that the tube can be slid over the first support member; c. a spherical element, the spherical element being connected to the second end of the first support member. The spherical element has a sufficiently small circumference at its equator that the tube can be slid over the spherical element, the spherical element having at its equator a larger circumference than the first support member; d. a second support member having first and second ends, the first end being connected to the base, the second support member being spaced apart form the first support member; e. a positioning element connected to and moveable relative to the second support member; and f. an indicator connected to the positioning element and being moveable thereby to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element, the contact ball contacting the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item, the rotatable needle being operatively connected to and responsive to the position of the contact ball.

  10. Water Walls for Life Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael T. (Inventor); Gormly, Sherwin J. (Inventor); Hammoudeh, Mona (Inventor); Richardson, Tra-My Justine (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A method and associated system for processing waste gases, liquids and solids, produced by human activity, to separate (i) liquids suitable for processing to produce potable water, (ii) solids and liquids suitable for construction of walls suitable for enclosing a habitat volume and for radiation shielding, and (iii) other fluids and solids that are not suitable for processing. A forward osmosis process and a reverse osmosis process are sequentially combined to reduce fouling and to permit accumulation of different processable substances. The invention may be used for long term life support of human activity.

  11. Explosive Fragmentation of Dividing Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    bloc~ks and the complexity of the molds that would have to be built, it was de- cided to use full-scale masonry blocks. The walls fabricated were 163...Z .y ,. ,- ;. -.. "COMBINED DISTRIBUTION FOR TESI SERIES 3W I o3 10 ’ I • I ’ ii i’i’I l’l ’ I ’-I"* I *1" PiiPl’ ’ 1 ’l i l• iT -7,62 cm Rs

  12. First Wall and Operational Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasnier, C; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Groth, M; Brooks, N; McLean, A; LaBombard, B; Sharpe, J; Skinner, C; Whyte, D; Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C

    2006-06-19

    In this chapter we review numerous diagnostics capable of measurements at or near the first wall, many of which contribute information useful for safe operation of a tokamak. There are sections discussing infrared cameras, visible and VUV cameras, pressure gauges and RGAs, Langmuir probes, thermocouples, and erosion and deposition measurements by insertable probes and quartz microbalance. Also discussed are dust measurements by electrostatic detectors, laser scattering, visible and IR cameras, and manual collection of samples after machine opening. In each case the diagnostic is discussed with a view toward application to a burning plasma machine such as ITER.

  13. Witten Index and Wall Crossing

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Kentaro; Yi, Piljin

    2014-01-01

    We compute the Witten index of one-dimensional gauged linear sigma models with at least ${\\mathcal N}=2$ supersymmetry. In the phase where the gauge group is broken to a finite group, the index is expressed as a certain residue integral. It is subject to a change as the Fayet-Iliopoulos parameter is varied through the phase boundaries. The wall crossing formula is expressed as an integral at infinity of the Coulomb branch. The result is applied to many examples, including quiver quantum mechanics that is relevant for BPS states in $d=4$ ${\\mathcal N}=2$ theories.

  14. Aortic Wall Injury Related to Endovascular Therapy for Aortic Coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretter, Justin T; Jones, Thomas K; McElhinney, Doff B

    2015-09-01

    Aortic wall complications can occur in unrepaired aortic coarctation (CoA) and after surgical repair or endovascular treatment. This review summarizes the available literature and current understanding of aortic wall injury (AWI) surrounding the management of CoA, focusing specifically on acute and follow-up AWI after endovascular treatment. There have been 23 reported cases of aortic rupture after endovascular treatment for CoA, including angioplasty alone, bare metal stenting, and primary covered stent therapy. Even if these published cases represent only a minority of ruptures that have actually occurred, the incidence is substantially <1%. The incidence of acute aneurysm formation was 0% to 13% after angioplasty, 0% to 5% after bare metal stent placement, and <1% after covered stent placement. The reported incidence and natural history of both acute and new AWI during follow-up after endovascular therapy for CoA varies considerably, likely secondary to ascertainment and reporting biases and inconsistent definitions. Although important AWI after endovascular treatment of CoA seems to be declining in frequency with increasing experience and improving technology, it remains one of the most important potential adverse outcomes. Long-term surveillance for new AWI and monitoring of existing AWI is mandatory, with institution of appropriate treatment when necessary. A central research focus in this population should be determination of the appropriate treatment for both native and recurrent CoA across various ages with regard to limiting recurrent CoA and preventing associated aortic wall complications, in addition to determining the appropriate treatment of various AWI. Consistent definitions and reporting are necessary to truly understand the incidence of, risk factors for, and measures protective against AWI after angioplasty or stent implantation for CoA.

  15. Ant Colony Optimization and Hypergraph Covering Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Pat, Ankit

    2011-01-01

    Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) is a very popular metaheuristic for solving computationally hard combinatorial optimization problems. Runtime analysis of ACO with respect to various pseudo-boolean functions and different graph based combinatorial optimization problems has been taken up in recent years. In this paper, we investigate the runtime behavior of an MMAS*(Max-Min Ant System) ACO algorithm on some well known hypergraph covering problems that are NP-Hard. In particular, we have addressed the Minimum Edge Cover problem, the Minimum Vertex Cover problem and the Maximum Weak- Independent Set problem. The influence of pheromone values and heuristic information on the running time is analysed. The results indicate that the heuristic information has greater impact towards improving the expected optimization time as compared to pheromone values. For certain instances of hypergraphs, we show that the MMAS* algorithm gives a constant order expected optimization time when the dominance of heuristic information is ...

  16. Spatial Scaling of Land Cover Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Small, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Spatial networks of land cover are well-described by power law rank-size distributions. Continuous field proxies for human settlements, agriculture and forest cover have similar spatial scaling properties spanning 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. Progressive segmentation of these continuous fields yields spatial networks with rank-size distributions having slopes near -1 for a wide range of thresholds. We consider a general explanation for this scaling that does not require different processes for each type of land cover. The same conditions that give rise to scale-free networks in general can produce power law distributions of component sizes for bounded spatial networks confined to a plane or surface. Progressive segmentation of a continuous field naturally results in growth of the network while the increasing perimeters of the growing components result in preferential attachment to the larger components with the longer perimeters. Progressive segmentation of two types of random continuous field results in progr...

  17. Cover song identification by sequence alignment algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Li; Zhong, Qian; Wang, Szu-Ying; Roychowdhury, Vwani

    2011-10-01

    Content-based music analysis has drawn much attention due to the rapidly growing digital music market. This paper describes a method that can be used to effectively identify cover songs. A cover song is a song that preserves only the crucial melody of its reference song but different in some other acoustic properties. Hence, the beat/chroma-synchronous chromagram, which is insensitive to the variation of the timber or rhythm of songs but sensitive to the melody, is chosen. The key transposition is achieved by cyclically shifting the chromatic domain of the chromagram. By using the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to obtain the time sequences of songs, the system is made even more robust. Similar structure or length between the cover songs and its reference are not necessary by the Smith-Waterman Alignment Algorithm.

  18. Replacing fallow by cover crops: economic sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, José Luis; Garrido, Alberto; Quemada, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Replacing fallow by cover crops in intensive fertilized systems has been demonstrated as an efficient tool for reducing nitrate leaching. However, despite the evident environmental services provided and the range of agronomic benefits documented in the literature, farmers' adoption of this new technology is still limited because they are either unwilling or unable, although adoption reluctance is frequently rooted in low economic profitability, low water se efficiency or poor knowledge. Economic analyses permit a comparison between the profit that farmers obtain from agricultural products and the cost of adopting specific agricultural techniques. The goal of this study was to evaluate the economic impact of replacing the usual winter fallow with cover crops (barley (Hordeum vulgare L., cv. Vanessa), vetch (Vicia villosa L., cv. Vereda) and rapeseed (Brassica napus L., cv. Licapo)) in irrigated maize systems and variable Mediterranean weather conditions using stochastic Monte-Carlo simulations of key farms' financial performance indicators. The three scenarios studied for each cover crop were: i) just leaving the cover crop residue in the ground, ii) leaving the cover crop residue but reduce following maize fertilization according to the N available from the previous cover crop and iii) selling the cover crop residue for animal feeding. All the scenarios were compared with respect to a typical maize-fallow rotation. With observed data from six different years and in various field trials, looking for different weather conditions, probability distribution functions of maize yield, cover crop biomass production and N fertilizer saving was fitted. Based in statistical sources maize grain price, different forage prices and the cost of fertilizer were fitted to probability distribution functions too. As result, introducing a cover crop involved extra costs with respect to fallow as the initial investment, because new seed, herbicide or extra field operations. Additional

  19. Sediment transport in ice-covered channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ian KNACK; Hung-tao SHEN

    2015-01-01

    The existence of ice cover has important effects on sediment transport and channel morphology for rivers in areas with an annual occurrence of an ice season. The interaction of sediment transport and surface ice is poorly understood. In this paper, data from existing flume experiments, each with a limited range of flow and sediment transport conditions, are analyzed. The analysis showed that the bed load transport in ice-covered channels can be described by conventional relationships for the equivalent free-surface flow if the flow strength is expressed in terms of the bed shear stress. A modified Rouse formulation considering the effect of the ice cover on velocity and turbulent diffusion is shown to be applicable for calculating the suspended sediment transport discharge.

  20. [Covering of a thoraco-lumbar defect by omentoplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Fourn, B; Loirat, Y; Sartre, J Y; Lejeune, F; Pannier, M

    1997-02-01

    With a case of thoraco-lumbar defect, the authors discuss about different procedures to cover it. In this place, the better procedure is certainly the latissimus dorsi flap, in all combinations. The indication for omentoplasty at this spinal site should not be performed by first intention but by exclusion of other procedures, as in the case considered by the authors. It was a 37-year-old man, paraplegic from the age of 16, with a deep chronic spinal wound, secondary to sepsis of a posterior segmental fixations. A staphylococcus aureus infection which developed as a surgical complication was initially treated with antibiotics and surgical cleaning procedures without removing instrumentation. However, the infection remained active and the material was finally removed. Spinal immobilisation was strengthened by external fixation. The area was cleared of all suspect material, including bone graft, leaving a wide back-wound open to the spine. Spontaneous healing was first attempted, but the size and the chronicity of the wound led us to use pedicled greater omentum to close the defect. The omentum was pedicled on the right gastroepiploic vessels and transferred to the back wound through the posterior abdominal wall muscles, next to the right kidney. This procedure allows rapid healing. In association with suitable antibiotics, it has prevented any recurrent infection after 18 months of follow-up. It was no feasible to cover the wound with a latissimus dorsi flap, considering the importance of this muscle in the movements of a paraplegic and considering the initial impossibility of removing the external fixation.

  1. Thematic accuracy of the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2001 land cover for Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkowitz, D.J.; Stehman, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2001 Alaska land cover classification is the first 30-m resolution land cover product available covering the entire state of Alaska. The accuracy assessment of the NLCD 2001 Alaska land cover classification employed a geographically stratified three-stage sampling design to select the reference sample of pixels. Reference land cover class labels were determined via fixed wing aircraft, as the high resolution imagery used for determining the reference land cover classification in the conterminous U.S. was not available for most of Alaska. Overall thematic accuracy for the Alaska NLCD was 76.2% (s.e. 2.8%) at Level II (12 classes evaluated) and 83.9% (s.e. 2.1%) at Level I (6 classes evaluated) when agreement was defined as a match between the map class and either the primary or alternate reference class label. When agreement was defined as a match between the map class and primary reference label only, overall accuracy was 59.4% at Level II and 69.3% at Level I. The majority of classification errors occurred at Level I of the classification hierarchy (i.e., misclassifications were generally to a different Level I class, not to a Level II class within the same Level I class). Classification accuracy was higher for more abundant land cover classes and for pixels located in the interior of homogeneous land cover patches. ?? 2011.

  2. Spontaneous Behaviors and Wall-Curvature Lead to Apparent Wall Preference in Planarian.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaro Akiyama

    Full Text Available The planarian Dugesia japonica tends to stay near the walls of its breeding containers and experimental dishes in the laboratory, a phenomenon called "wall preference". This behavior is thought to be important for environmental adaptation, such as hiding by planarians in nature. However, the mechanisms regulating wall-preference behavior are not well understood, since this behavior occurs in the absence of any particular stimulation. Here we show the mechanisms of wall-preference behavior. Surprisingly, planarian wall-preference behavior was also shown even by the head alone and by headless planarians. These results indicate that planarian "wall-preference" behavior only appears to be a "preference" behavior, and is actually an outcome of spontaneous behaviors, rather than of brain function. We found that in the absence of environmental cues planarians moved basically straight ahead until they reached a wall, and that after reaching a wall, they changed their direction of movement to one tangential to the wall, suggesting that this spontaneous behavior may play a critical role in the wall preference. When we tested another spontaneous behavior, the wigwag movement of the planarian head, using computer simulation with various wigwag angles and wigwag intervals, large wigwag angle and short wigwag interval reduced wall-preference behavior. This indicated that wigwag movement may determine the probability of staying near the wall or leaving the wall. Furthermore, in accord with this simulation, when we tested planarian wall-preference behavior using several assay fields with different curvature of the wall, we found that concavity and sharp curvature of walls negatively impacted wall preference by affecting the permissible angle of the wigwag movement. Together, these results indicate that planarian wall preference may be involuntarily caused by the combination of two spontaneous planarian behaviors: moving straight ahead until reaching a wall and

  3. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  4. Evaluating rammed earth walls: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P. [Deakin University, Geelong (Australia). Built Environment Research Group; La Trobe University, Wodonga (Australia); Luther, M.B. [Deakin University, Geelong (Australia). Built Environment Research Group

    2004-03-01

    The following research has been undertaken as a response to the recent controversy regarding the suitability of rammed earth wall construction as an effective building envelope in regard to its thermal performance. The R-value for rammed earth walls is low hence they might be expected to conduct heat into a building during summer. However the large mass of these walls and the associated thermal lag in heat transfer from outside to inside may result in the walls performing satisfactorily in a building which is only occupied during working hours. Internal rammed earth walls may act as moderators of large diurnal temperature swings helping to produce an even comfortable temperature within a building. Empirical (in situ) measurements of temperature and heat flux were taken on the walls of an existing rammed earth office building in New South Wales, Australia during the summer. An analysis was performed which established a methodology to measure the heat flow associated with the walls, floor, ceiling, windows and infiltration for one office during occupied hours and the net energy transferred between the office and these elements was established. During this time the earth walls performed well. External walls were found to transmit comparatively little heat to the office and the internal walls absorbed heat during this time. Diffuse sky radiation transmitted by the window and infiltration are both likely to be important factors in the summer heat load. (author)

  5. Immersion Refractometry of Isolated Bacterial Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Robert E.

    1973-01-01

    Immersion-refractometric and light-scattering measurements were adapted to determinations of average refractive indices and physical compactness of isolated bacterial cell walls. The structures were immersed in solutions containing various concentrations of polymer molecules that cannot penetrate into wall pores, and then an estimate was made of the polymer concentration or the refractive index of the polymer solution in which light scattering was reduced to zero. Because each wall preparation was heterogeneous, the refractive index of the medium for zero light scattering had to be estimated by extrapolation. Refractive indices for walls suspended in bovine serum albumin solutions ranged from 1.348 for walls of the rod form of Arthrobacter crystallopoietes to 1.382 for walls of the teichoic acid deficient, 52A5 strain of Staphylococcus aureus. These indices were used to calculate approximate values for solids content per milliliter, and the calculated values agreed closely with those estimated from a knowledge of dextran-impermeable volumes per gram, dry weight, of the walls. When large molecules such as dextrans or serum albumin were used for immersion refractometry, the refractive indices obtained were for entire walls, including both wall polymers and wall water. When smaller molecules that can penetrate wall pores to various extents were used with Micrococcus lysodeikticus walls, the average, apparent refractive index of the structures increased as the molecular size of probing molecules was decreased. It was possible to obtain an estimate of 1.45 to 1.46 for the refractive index of wall polymers, predominantly peptidoglycans in this case, by extrapolating the curve for refractive index versus molecular radius to a value of 0.2 nm, the approximate radius of a water molecule. This relatively low value for polymer refractive index was interpreted as evidence in favor of the amorphous, elastic model of peptidoglycan structure and against the crystalline, rigid

  6. The State of the GeoWall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, P. J.; Leigh, J.; van Keken, P.; Johnson, A.

    2003-12-01

    The GeoWall stereo projection technology has been widely adopted within Earth Science. Over 20,000 undergraduate students per year use a GeoWall in classroom and lab settings at over 80 institutions around the world using over 200 GeoWalls. We believe that critical mass for this technology has been reached in the Earth Science. Many collaborations have been initiated. With Iris, GeoWall is exploring new ways to monitor seismic networks in real-time and to visualize extremely large, whole Earth seismic simulations. We are also working with a number of drilling organizations including JOI, DOSECC and LacCore to bring modern visualization technology to core interpretation and drill site selection. Also, over 15 museums now have or are building GeoWalls for informal education. Much of the science that is being performed on the GeoWall is finding its way directly into the classroom and science museum. One of the success stories has been the GeoWall Consortium's interaction with industry. The basic hardware for the GeoWall has been spun off to companies that now sell variations of the hardware. In addition, many software companies including ESRI and Dynamic Graphics have added support for the GeoWall in their products. The future of GeoWall is four fold. Curriculum development will bring more material to all GeoWall users. Assessment of the curriculum and educational psychology will give us GeoWall best practices. In technology development, the GeoWall 2 is a 20+ million pixel, tiled display which brings more resolution to the Earth Sciences than ever. To support research the consortium is developing a volume rendering application to visualize extremely large datasets.

  7. BIOLUMINESCENCE: TEACHING BIOCHEMISTRY BEYOND THE UNIVERSITY WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Jesus de Almeida

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of video in teaching and learning processes provides a challenging environment, able to stimulate the intellect and facilitate understanding in life science studies. Videos can be of extraordinary importance in education and dissemination of knowledge, contributing to greater learning, but is rarely used and exploited properly, especially for teaching biochemistry. Biochemistry is considered complex because it involves many molecular structures and processes, especially considering the number of events and molecules involved in the metabolism. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to introduce biochemistry for the students of basic education using the theme "Light, Science and Life" in a playful and fun way. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A video about bioluminescence was designed and prepared aiming to use it as a support for learning biochemistry by students of basic education of public schools located in Salvador, Bahia. In order to prepare the video, undergraduate students initially revised the literature in order to acquire proper knowledge, and along with their teacher advisor worked the elaboration of texts, textbook and questionnaire and applied at school. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: Analysis the qualitative results of the experiment on the preparation and use of the video about "Bioluminescence" focused mainly on the content of biochemistry linked to theme Light, Science and Life, and demonstrated the importance of such work in the teaching-learning process. The dynamics used allowed greater interaction between students and teacher, and the teaching of biochemistry in a fun way beyond the university walls. CONCLUSION: The teaching through recreational resources, e.g. videos and other educational strategies that foster learning should be encouraged from basic education, always bearing in order to transmit through these teaching methods the main concepts covered in biochemistry.

  8. Do cover crop mixtures have the same ability to suppress weeds as competitive monoculture cover crops?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brust, Jochen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of farmers use cover crop mixtures instead of monoculture cover crops to improve soil and crop quality. However, only little information is available about the weed suppression ability of cover crop mixtures. Therefore, two field experiments were conducted in Baden-Württemberg between 2010 and 2012, to compare growth and weed suppression of monoculture cover crops and cover crop mixtures. In the first experiment, heterogeneous results between yellow mustard and the cover crop mixture occurred. For further research, a field experiment was conducted in 2012 to compare monocultures of yellow mustard and hemp with three cover crop mixtures. The evaluated mixtures were: “MELO”: for soil melioration; “BETA”: includes only plant species with no close relation to main cash crops in Central Europe and “GPS”: for usage as energy substrate in spring. Yellow mustard, MELO, BETA and GPS covered 90% of the soil in less than 42 days and were able to reduce photosynthetically active radiation (PAR on soil surface by more than 96% after 52 days. Hemp covered 90% of the soil after 47 days and reduced PAR by 91% after 52 days. Eight weeks after planting, only BETA showed similar growth to yellow mustard which produced the highest dry matter. The GPS mixture had comparatively poor growth, while MELO produced similar dry matter to hemp. Yellow mustard, MELO and BETA reduced weed growth by 96% compared with a no cover crop control, while hemp and GPS reduced weeds by 85% and 79%. In spring, weed dry matter was reduced by more than 94% in plots with yellow mustard and all mixtures, while in hemp plots weeds were only reduced by 71%. The results suggest that the tested cover crop mixtures offer similar weed suppression ability until spring as the monoculture of the competitive yellow mustard.

  9. Near wall flow parameters in the blade end-wall corner region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, R. K.; Raj, R.

    The effects of secondary end-wall corner flows on near wall flow parameters in turbomachinary are studied. Important near wall flow parameters such as the wall shear stress vector, the mean wall pressure, the wall pressure fluctuations, and the correlation of the wall pressure fluctuation with the velocity fluctuation in three-dimensional turbulent flows are first experimentally investigated. The blade end-wall corner region is simulated by mounting airfoil section of symmetric blades on both sides of the flat plate with semicircular leading edge. Observed changes in the maximum values of the wall shear stress and its location from the corner line could be associated with the streching and attenuation of the horseshoe vortex. The values of wall pressure fluctuation intensity in the blade end-wall corner region are found to be influenced by the changes of the strength of the horseshoe vortex. The correlation of the wall pressure fluctuation with the velocity fluctuation indicated higher values of correlation coefficient in the inner region as compared to the outer region of the shear layer. The values of wall pressure-velocity correlation coefficient in the blade end-wall corner region also decrease in the streamwise direction while increasing in the presence of favorable and adverse pressure gradients.

  10. Africa's Great Green Wall Initiative: a model for restoration success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrahmouni, Nora; Sacande, Moctar

    2014-05-01

    The Great Green Wall for the Sahara and the Sahel Initiative was launched to address the increasing challenges of land degradation, desertification and drought, climate change, food insecurity and poverty in more than 20 countries. Restoration of agro-sylvo-pastoral landscapes and degraded lands is one of the priority interventions initiated, enabling the springing up of green nests of life. When complete, the Great Green Wall of Africa will reverse the seemingly unstoppable desertification and address the development of its drylands' inhabitant rural communities. Today's planting of modest seedlings will grow into vast mosaics of forest and agroforestry landscapes and grasslands, which will provide essential ecosystem goods and services, restore lost livelihoods and create new wealth. The ambition of reforestation efforts within this initiative - the like of which the world has never seen before - sounds like an impossible dream. However, learning from past mistakes and capitalising on current advancement in science and technology, it is a reality that is taking root. Following a successful restoration model that RBG Kew experts have devised, we are helping to mobilise, train and support communities in four border regions in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. In collaboration with FAO, the Millennium Seed Bank Partnership is using its unique expertise to ensure that seeds of environmentally well-adapted and economically useful local species are collected and planted in communal gardens and village agroforestry systems managed by the communities themselves. In our first year, an estimated total of 162,000 seedlings and 61 kg of seeds from 40 useful native species, including grasses for livestock, have been planted to cover 237 ha of farmer-managed land in 19 villages. The keen interest it has created has indicated that these figures will rise five-fold in the second year. These green bricks are the foundations of the living wall that will eventually reach across the

  11. Numerical investigation of natural convection in two enclosures separated by anisotropic solid wall

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2014-10-28

    Purpose: The problem of natural convection in two cavities separated by an anisotropic central solid wall is considered numerically. When the thermal conductivity of the central wall is anisotropic, heat flux and temperature gradient vectors are no longer coincidence. This apparently has interesting influences on the heat and fluid flow patterns in this system. The paper aims to discuss these issues.Design/methodology/approach: In this work, several flow patterns have been investigated covering a wide range of Rayleigh number up to 108. Several thermal conductivity anisotropy scenarios of the central wall have been investigated including 0, 30, 60, 120 and 1501 principal anisotropy directions. The governing equations have been solved using control volume approach.Findings: Probably the most intriguing is that, for some anisotropy scenarios it is found that the temperature at the same elevation at the side of the central wall which is closer to the colder wall is higher than that at the side closer to the hot wall. Apparently this defies intuition which suggests the reverse to have happened. However, this behavior may be explained in light of the effect of anisotropy. Furthermore, the patterns of streamlines and temperature fields in the two enclosures also changes as a consequence of the change of the central wall temperatures for the different anisotropy scenarios.Originality/value: This work discusses a very interesting topic related to heat energy exchange among two compartments when the separating wall is anisotropic. In some anisotropy scenarios, this leads to more uniform distribution of Nusselt number than the case when the wall is isotropic. Interesting patterns of natural convection is investigated.

  12. Measure Guideline: Incorporating Thick Layers of Exterior Rigid Insulation on Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lstiburek, Joseph [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Baker, Peter [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This measure guideline provides information about the design and construction of wall assemblies that use layers of rigid exterior insulation thicker than 1-½ inches and that require a secondary cladding attachment location exterior to the insulation. The guideline is separated into several distinct sections that cover: fundamental building science principles relating to the use of exterior insulation on wall assemblies; design principles for tailoring this use to the specific project goals and requirements; and construction detailing to increase understanding about implementing the various design elements.

  13. Measure Guideline. Incorporating Thick Layers of Exterior Rigid Insulation on Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lstiburek, Joseph [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States); Baker, Peter [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2015-04-09

    This measure guideline, written by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America team Building Science Corporation, provides information about the design and construction of wall assemblies that use layers of rigid exterior insulation thicker than 1-½ in. and that require a secondary cladding attachment location exterior to the insulation. The guideline is separated into several distinct sections that cover: (1) fundamental building science principles relating to the use of exterior insulation on wall assemblies; (2) design principles for tailoring this use to the specific project goals and requirements; and (3) construction detailing to increase understanding about implementing the various design elements.

  14. Cast-in-place concrete thin-wall pipe pile as barrier for vibration isolation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张富有; 陈灿寿; 魏良甲; 张霆

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional analysis was performed by regarding vibration isolation performance cast-in-place concrete thin-wall pipe pile (PCC) and using the finite element analysis software ANSYS. The ground vertical amplitude was analyzed behind the single row cast-in-place concrete thin-wall pipe pile after the source vibration, and the influencing factors were also studied. The results indicate that in the one time of wavelength before the barrier, the oscillation amplitude is weakened; meanwhile the range which covers 4 times wavelength behind the barrier has a good vibration isolation effect, when the distance is larger than the barrier latter 4 times wavelength vibration isolation expiration.

  15. Capo Verde, Land Use Land Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This series of three-period land use land cover (LULC) datasets (1975, 2000, and 2013) aids in monitoring change in West Africa’s land resources (exception is...

  16. 19 CFR 212.03 - Proceedings covered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proceedings covered. 212.03 Section 212.03 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE... fees and expenses related to those portions of the proceedings conducted for the consideration...

  17. Mine Waste Technology Program Electrochemical Tailings Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 40, Electrochemical Tailings Cover, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). MSE Technology A...

  18. 16 CFR 436.3 - Cover page.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... with a cover page, in the order and form as follows: (a) The title “FRANCHISE DISCLOSURE DOCUMENT” in... begin operation of a franchise is . This includes that must be paid to the franchisor or affiliate. (2) This disclosure document summarizes certain provisions of your franchise agreement and...

  19. The Best Use of a Cover Letter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    So when should you use a cover letter? Only as part of a limited, targeted campaign to reach potential employers. Take the time to research and understand a company before committing yourself on paper as a potential employee, if you have no idea what the company does,

  20. 18 CFR 46.5 - Covered entities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... organization primarily engaged in the business of providing financial services or credit, a mutual savings bank... FOR PERSONS HOLDING INTERLOCKING POSITIONS § 46.5 Covered entities. Entities to which the general rule in § 46.4(b) applies are the following: (a) Any investment bank, bank holding company, foreign...

  1. 49 CFR 1520.7 - Covered persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... (e) Each person performing the function of a computer reservation system or global distribution system for airline passenger information. (f) Each person participating in a national or area security... SECURITY INFORMATION § 1520.7 Covered persons. Persons subject to the requirements of part 1520 are: (a...

  2. Emerging Infectious Disease Journal Cover Art

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-04

    Polyxeni Potter discusses the art used on the covers of the Emerging Infectious Diseases journal.  Created: 4/4/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/5/2012.

  3. On label graphoidal covering number-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugaperumal Anitha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Let G = (V,E be a graph with p vertices and q edges. An acyclicgraphoidal cover of G is a collection of paths in G which are internallydisjointand covering each edge of the graph exactly once. Let f : V !{1, 2, . . . , p} be a bijective labeling of the vertices of G. Let " Gf bethe directed graph obtained by orienting the edges uv of G from u tov provided f(u < f(v. If the set f of all maximal directed paths in"Gf , with directions ignored, is an acyclic graphoidal cover of G, then fis called a graphoidal labeling of G and G is called a label graphoidal graphand l = min{| f | : f is a graphoidal labeling of G} is called the labelgraphoidal covering number of G. In this paper we characterize graphsfor which (i l = q − m, where m is the number of vertices of degree 2and (ii l = q. Also, we determine the value of label graphoidal coveringnumber for unicyclic graphs.

  4. Determinants of woody cover in African savannas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sankaran, M.; Hanan, N.P.; Scholes, R.J.; Ratnam, J.; Augustine, D.J.; Cade, B.S.; Gignoux, J.; Higgins, S.I.; Roux, Le X.; Ludwig, F.; Ardo, J.; Banyikwa, F.; Bronn, A.; Bicini, G.; Caylor, K.K.; Coughenour, M.B.; Diouf, A.; Ekaya, W.; Feral, C.J.; February, E.C.; Frost, P.G.H.; Hiernaux, P.; Hrabar, H.; Metzger, K.L.; Prins, H.H.T.; Ringrose, S.; Sea, W.; Tews, J.; Worden, J.; Zambatis, N.

    2005-01-01

    Savannas are globally important ecosystems of great significance to human economies. In these biomes, which are characterized by the co-dominance of trees and grasses, woody cover is a chief determinant of ecosystem properties 1-3. The availability of resources (water, nutrients) and disturbance

  5. Soybean growth and yield under cover crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila de Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of cover crops in no-tillage systems can provide better conditions for the development of soybean plants with positive effects on grain yield and growth analysis techniques allow researchers to characterize and understand the behavior of soybean plants under different straw covers. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize, using growth analysis, yield components and agronomic performance of soybean under common bean, Brachiaria brizantha and pearl millet straws. The experiment was performed on a soil under cerrado in the municipality of Santo Antônio de Goiás, GO. The experiment was arranged in a randomized complete block design with three treatments (cover crops and five replications. Soybean grain yield was lower in the B. brizantha straw treatment (3,708 kg ha-1 than both in the pearl millet (4.772 kg ha-1 and common bean straw treatments (5,200 kg ha-1. The soybean growth analysis in B. brizantha, pearl millet and common bean allowed characterizing the variation in the production of dry matter of leaves, stems, pods and total and leaf area index that provided different grain yields. The cover crop directly affects the soybean grain yield.

  6. 31 CFR 800.207 - Covered transaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Covered transaction. 800.207 Section 800.207 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF..., which could result in control of a U.S. business by a foreign person....

  7. Geometric orbit datum and orbit covers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁科; 侯自新

    2001-01-01

    Vogan conjectured that the parabolic induction of orbit data is independent of the choice of the parabolic subgroup. In this paper we first give the parabolic induction of orbit covers, whose relationship with geometric orbit datum is also induced. Hence we show a geometric interpretation of orbit data and finally prove the conjugation for geometric orbit datum using geometric method.

  8. 22 CFR 171.41 - Covered employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ACCESS TO INFORMATION AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC Ethics in Government Act Provisions § 171.41 Covered employees. (a) Officers and employees (including special Government employees as defined in 18 U.S.C. 202) whose positions are classified at...

  9. Mine Waste Technology Program Electrochemical Tailings Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 40, Electrochemical Tailings Cover, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). MSE Technology A...

  10. 17 CFR 148.3 - Proceedings covered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proceedings covered. 148.3 Section 148.3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION IMPLEMENTATION OF... 14 of the Commodity Exchange Act, 7 U.S.C. 18, Commission review of exchange disciplinary and access...

  11. Covering radii are not matroid invariants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Britz, Thomas Johann; Rutherford, Carrie G.

    2005-01-01

    We show by example that the covering radius of a binary linear code is not generally determined by the Tutte polynomial of the matroid. This answers Problem 361 (P.J. Cameron (Ed.), Research problems, Discrete Math. 231 (2001) 469–478)....

  12. Improvement in greenhouse solar drying using inclined north wall reflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, V.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana 141004, Punjab (India); Arora, Sadhna [Department of Processing and Food Engineering, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana 141004, Punjab (India)

    2009-09-15

    A conventional greenhouse solar dryer of 6 m{sup 2} x 4 m{sup 2} floor area (east-west orientation) was improved for faster drying using inclined north wall reflection (INWR) under natural as well as forced convection mode. To increase the solar radiation availability onto the product (to be dried) during extreme summer months, a temporary inclined wall covered with aluminized reflector sheet (of 50 {mu}m thickness and reflectance 0.93) was raised inside the greenhouse just in front of the vertical transparent north wall. By doing so, product fully received the reflected beam radiation (which otherwise leaves through the north wall) in addition to the direct total solar radiation available on the horizontal surface during different hours of drying. The increment in total solar radiation input enhanced the drying rate of the product by increasing the inside air and crop temperature of the dryer. Inclination angle of the reflective north wall with vertical ({beta}) was optimized for various selective widths of the tray W (1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3 m) and for different realistic heights of existing vertical north wall (h) at 25 N, 30 N and 35 N latitudes (hot climatic zones). Experimental performance of the improved dryer was tested during the month of May 2008 at Ludhiana (30.56 N) climatic conditions, India by drying bitter gourd (Momordica charantia Linn) slices. Results showed that by using INWR under natural convection mode of drying, greenhouse air and crop temperature increased by 1-6.7 C and 1-4 C, respectively, during different drying hours as compared to, when INWR was not used and saved 13.13% of the total drying time. By using INWR under forced convection mode of drying, greenhouse air and crop temperature increased by 1-4.5 C and 1-3 C, respectively, during different drying hours as compared to, when INWR was not used and saved 16.67% of the total drying time. (author)

  13. Cell Wall Assembly in Fucus Zygotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quatrano, Ralph S.; Stevens, Patricia T.

    1976-01-01

    Fertilization triggers the assembly of a cell wall around the egg cell of three brown algae, Fucus vesiculosus, F. distichus, and F. inflatus. New polysaccharide polymers are continually being added to the cell wall during the first 24 hours of synchronous embryo development. This wall assembly involves the extracellular deposition of fibrillar material by cytoplasmic vesicles fusing with the plasma membrane. One hour after fertilization a fragmented wall can be isolated free of cytoplasm and contains equal amounts of cellulose and alginic acid with no fucose-containing polymers (fucans) present. Birefringence of the wall caused by oriented cellulose microfibrils is not detected in all zygotes until 4 hours, at which time intact cell walls can be isolated that retain the shape of the zygote. These walls have a relatively low ratio of fucose to xylose and little sulfate when compared to walls from older embryos. When extracts of walls from 4-hour zygotes are subjected to cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH 7, a single fucan (F1) can be detected. By 12 hours, purified cell walls are composed of fucans containing a relatively high ratio of fucose to xylose and high levels of sulfate, and contain a second fucan (F2) which is electrophoretically distinct from F1. F2 appears to be deposited in only a localized region of the wall, that which elongates to form the rhizoid cell. Throughout wall assembly, the polyuronide block co-polymer alginic acid did not significantly vary its mannuronic (M) to guluronic (G) acid ratio (0.33-0.55) or its block distribution (MG, 54%; GG, 30%; MM, 16%). From 6 to 24 hours of embryo development, the proportion of the major polysaccharide components found in purified walls is stable. Alginic acid is the major polymer and comprises about 60% of the total wall, while cellulose and the fucans each make-up about 20% of the remainder. During the extracellular assembly of this wall, the intracellular levels of the storage glucan laminaran

  14. Land cover change in Colombia: surprising forest recovery trends between 2001 and 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Sánchez-Cuervo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monitoring land change at multiple spatial scales is essential for identifying hotspots of change, and for developing and implementing policies for conserving biodiversity and habitats. In the high diversity country of Colombia, these types of analyses are difficult because there is no consistent wall-to-wall, multi-temporal dataset for land-use and land-cover change. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address this problem, we mapped annual land-use and land-cover from 2001 to 2010 in Colombia using MODIS (250 m products coupled with reference data from high spatial resolution imagery (QuickBird in Google Earth. We used QuickBird imagery to visually interpret percent cover of eight land cover classes used for classifier training and accuracy assessment. Based on these maps we evaluated land cover change at four spatial scales country, biome, ecoregion, and municipality. Of the 1,117 municipalities, 820 had a net gain in woody vegetation (28,092 km(2 while 264 had a net loss (11,129 km(2, which resulted in a net gain of 16,963 km(2 in woody vegetation at the national scale. Woody regrowth mainly occurred in areas previously classified as mixed woody/plantation rather than agriculture/herbaceous. The majority of this gain occurred in the Moist Forest biome, within the montane forest ecoregions, while the greatest loss of woody vegetation occurred in the Llanos and Apure-Villavicencio ecoregions. CONCLUSIONS: The unexpected forest recovery trend, particularly in the Andes, provides an opportunity to expand current protected areas and to promote habitat connectivity. Furthermore, ecoregions with intense land conversion (e.g. Northern Andean Páramo and ecoregions under-represented in the protected area network (e.g. Llanos, Apure-Villavicencio Dry forest, and Magdalena-Urabá Moist forest ecoregions should be considered for new protected areas.

  15. 77 FR 48733 - Transitional Program for Covered Business Method Patents-Definitions of Covered Business Method...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ...); (5) Transitional Program for Covered Business Method Patents-- Definition of Technological Invention...--Definition of Technological Invention, 77 FR 7095 (Feb. 10, 2012). This final rule revises the rules of... definition for technological invention for covered business method patent review proceedings. The...

  16. 7 CFR 1437.503 - Covered losses and recordkeeping requirements for covered tropical crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Covered losses and recordkeeping requirements for covered tropical crops. 1437.503 Section 1437.503 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS...

  17. Interrelationships between soil cover and plant cover depending on land use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Köster

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Interrelationships between soil cover and plant cover of normally developed (or postlithogenic mineral soils are analysed on the basis of four sampling soil groups. The four-link pedo-ecological sequence of analysed soils, rendzinas → brown soils → pseudopodzolic soils → gley-podzols, forms a representative cross section in relation to the normal mineral soils of Estonia. All groups differ substantially from each other in terms of soil properties (calcareousness, acidity, nutrition conditions, profile fabric and humus cover. The primary tasks of the research were (1 to elucidate the main pedo-ecological characteristics of the four soil groups and their suitability for plant cover, (2 to evaluate comparatively soils in terms of productivity, sustainability, biodiversity and environmental protection ability and (3 to analyse possibilities for ecologically sound matching of soil cover with suitable plant cover. On the basis of the same material, the influence of land-use change on humus cover (epipedon fabric, properties of the entire soil cover and soil–plant interrelationship were also analysed. An ecosystem approach enables us to observe particularities caused by specific properties of a soil type (species, variety in biological turnover and in the formation of biodiversity.

  18. feasibility of winter cover crop production under rainfed conditions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Low winter rainfall poses a challenge to production of high biomass from cover ... February planted cover crops had the lowest residues remaining at maize ..... Interaction effects of planting date and cover crop species on cover crop dry weight at termination in Eastern Cape ... to weed species density (per m2) at cover crop.

  19. Advancements in subsurface barrier wall technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutch, R.D. Jr.; Ash, R.E. IV; Caputi, J.R. [Eckenfelder Inc., Mahwah, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Subsurface barrier walls have been an important component of site remediation efforts for nearly thirty years. However, until the last decade, limited design options were available for barrier wall construction. Most barrier walls were constructed using traditional technologies such as soil-bentonite slurry trench and, in some instances, conventional compacted clay. While other technologies certainly existed, such as vibrating beam and sheet pile walls, they represented a minor share of the remediation market. Today the remediation engineer considering a subsurface barrier wall-based remediation is confronted with a baffling array, of new technologies and permutations of these technologies. Moreover, new technologies are entering the marketplace seemingly on a monthly basis. A partial listing of available barrier wall technologies is presented.

  20. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy to be dissipated per unit volume. We use the model to understand and contrast growth in bacteria with different shapes such as spherical, ellipsoidal, cylindrical and toroidal morphologies. Coupling growth to cell wall constriction, we predict a discontinuous shape transformation, from partial constriction to cell division, as a function of the chemical potential driving cell-wall synthesis. Our model for cell wall energy and shape dynamics relates growth kinetics with cell geometry, and provides a unified framework to d...

  1. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Leitao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.

  2. Motional Effect on Wall Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Samuel Alberg; Torben Fründ, Ernst; Yong Kim, Won

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and severe disability. Wall Shear Stress (WSS), the stress exerted on vessel walls by the flowing blood is a key factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is widely used for WSS estimations. Most CFD simulations...... are based on static models to ease computational burden leading to inaccurate estimations. The aim of this work was to estimate the effect of vessel wall deformations (expansion and bending) on WSS levels....

  3. Transport and coherent structures in wall turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tardu, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Wall bounded turbulent flows are of major importance in industrial and environmental fluid mechanics. The structure of the wall turbulence is intrinsically related to the coherent structures that play a fundamental role in the transport process. The comprehension of their regeneration mechanism is indispensable for the development of efficient strategies in terms of drag control and near wall turbulence management. This book provides an up-to-date overview on the progress made in this specific area in recent years.

  4. Electron-wall Interaction in Hall Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; M. Keidar; N.J. Fisch

    2005-02-11

    Electron-wall interaction effects in Hall thrusters are studied through measurements of the plasma response to variations of the thruster channel width and the discharge voltage. The discharge voltage threshold is shown to separate two thruster regimes. Below this threshold, the electron energy gain is constant in the acceleration region and therefore, secondary electron emission (SEE) from the channel walls is insufficient to enhance electron energy losses at the channel walls. Above this voltage threshold, the maximum electron temperature saturates.

  5. Experimental investigations on dry stone masonry walls

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Brick unreinforced masonry walls have been widely studied both from experimental and numerical point of view, but scarce experimental information is available for dry stone masonry walls that constitute the material more frequently used in the construction of ancient historical constructions. Therefore, the present work aims at increasing the insight about the behavior of typical ancient masonry walls under cyclic loading. To attain such goal, different experimental approaches are consi...

  6. Rectangular Blocks vs Polygonal Walls in Archaeoseismology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus-G. Hinzen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Collapsed or deformed walls in ancient structures constitute important evidence in archaeoseismology, where damage is interpreted in terms of earthquake ground motion. A large variety of wall types have been developed during the millennia in different cultural backgrounds. Often walls with polygonal-shaped building blocks are regarded as more earthquake-resistant than a wall consisting of rectangular elements and, as is sometimes speculated, that the irregular wall types were intentionally developed for that purpose. We use simply structured discrete element models of four walls with different block geometries, perfect rectangular, an Inka-type structure and two polygonal designs, to test their dynamic behavior. In addition to an analytic calculation of ground motion, we use measured strong motion signals as boundary conditions for the 3D wall models with varying height to width ratios. At peak ground accelerations between 1.0 and 9.0 m/s2 and major frequencies of 0.5 to 3 Hz, numeric experiments with the horizontally applied analytic ground motions result in clear differences in the resistance of the four wall types with the rectangular block wall being most vulnerable. For more complex measured 3D motions the Inka-type wall proves more stable than the rectangular block wall; however, height to width ratio still has equally strong influence on the stability. Internal deformation of non-collapsed walls shows some correlation with the parameters of the driving motion. For simple impulsive ground motions, a peak ground displacement threshold exists between toppling and remaining upright for all four models but peak acceleration cannot be reliably back calculated.

  7. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-01-01

    was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery...... pathway at the Digestive Disease Center, Bispebjerg Hospital, and compared to a control group of 16 patients included retrospectively in the period immediately prior to the implementation of the pathway. The enhanced recovery after surgery pathway included preoperative high-dose steroid, daily assessment...... of revised discharge criteria and an aggressive approach to restore bowel function (chewing gum and enema on postoperative day two). Patients who followed the enhanced recovery after surgery pathway reported low scores of pain, nausea and fatigue, and were discharged significantly faster than patients...

  8. Four ways across the wall

    CERN Document Server

    Pioline, Boris

    2011-01-01

    An important question in the study of N=2 supersymmetric string or field theories is to compute the jump of the BPS spectrum across walls of marginal stability in the space of parameters or vacua. I survey four apparently different answers for this problem, two of which are based on the mathematics of generalized Donaldson-Thomas invariants (the Kontsevich-Soibelman and the Joyce-Song formulae), while the other two are based on the physics of multi-centered black hole solutions (the Coulomb branch and the Higgs branch formulae, discovered in joint work with J. Manschot and A. Sen). Explicit computations indicate that these formulae are equivalent, though a combinatorial proof is currently lacking.

  9. Creating universes with thick walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvestad, Andrew; Albrecht, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherically symmetric false vacuum bubble embedded in a true vacuum region separated by a “thick wall”, which is generated by a scalar field in a quartic potential. We study the “Farhi-Guth-Guven” (FGG) quantum tunneling process by constructing numerical solutions relevant to this process. The Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass of the spacetime is calculated, and we show that there is a lower bound that is a significant fraction of the scalar field mass. We argue that the zero mass solutions used to by some to argue against the physicality of the FGG process are artifacts of the thin wall approximation used in earlier work. We argue that the zero mass solutions should not be used to question the viability of the FGG process.

  10. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  11. ON WALL SHEAR STRESS OF ARTERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhao-rong; Liu Bao-yu; Qin Kai-rong

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a method was proposed that the wall shear stress of artery could be determined by measuring the centerline axial velocity and radial motion of arterial wall simultaneously.The method is simple in application and can get higher precision when it is used to determine the shear stress of arterial wall in vivo.As an example, the shear stress distribution in periodic oscillatory flow of human carotid was calculated and discussed.The computed results show that the shear stress distribution at any given instant is almost uniform and will be zero at the centerline and tends to maximum at the vessel wall.

  12. Great attractor really a great wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebbins, A.; Turner, M.S.

    1988-11-01

    Some of the cosmological consequences are discussed of a late time phase transition which produces light domain walls. The observed peculiar velocity field of the Universe and the observed isotropy of the microwave background radiation severely constrain the wall surface density in such a scenario. The most interesting consequence of such a phase transition is the possibility that the local, coherent streaming motion reported by the Seven Samurai could be explained by the repulsive effect of a relic domain wall with the Hubble volume (the Great Wall).

  13. Scaling analysis on filtered near wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Prakash; Moser, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Large Eddy Simulations (LES) directly represent larger scale turbulent motions and model the effects of small scale motions. However in the near wall region the large dynamically important eddies scale in viscous wall units, which makes resolving them in a high Reynolds number LES very expensive. This motivates the use of wall-modeled LES, in which these near-wall eddies are modeled. To aid in the development of new wall models, we pursue an asymptotic analysis of the filtered Navier-Stokes equations, in the limit in which the horizontal filter scale is large compared to the thickness of the wall layer. It will be shown that in this limit the filtered velocities u and subgrid stresses τ in the near-wall layer are determined to zeroth order by filtered velocities at the boundary of the wall layer. Further the asymptotics suggest that there is a scaled universal velocity profile f and subgrid stress profile g in the near-wall region. The validity of this result will be tested and the profiles f and g will be evaluated through analysis of DNS data from channel flow at Reτ = 5200 .

  14. Determination of arterial wall shear stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The arteries can remodel their structure and function to adapt themselves to the mechanical environment. In various factors that lead to vascular remodeling, the shear stress on the arterial wall induced by the blood flow is of great importance. However, there are many technique difficulties in measuring the wall shear stress directly at present. In this paper, through analyzing the pulsatile blood flow in arteries, a method has been proposed that can determine the wall shear stress quantitatively by measuring the velocity on the arterial axis, and that provides a necessary means to discuss the influence of arterial wall shear stress on vascular remodeling.

  15. Statistical analysis of silo wall pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Berntsen, Kasper Nikolaj

    1998-01-01

    Previously published silo wall pressure measurements during plug flow of barley in alarge concrete silo are re-analysed under the hypothesis that the wall pressures are gamma-distributed.The fits of the gamma distribution type to the local pressure data from each measuring cell are satisfactory.......However, the estimated parameters of the gamma distributions turn out to be significantly inhomogeneous overthe silo wall surface. This inhomogeneity is attributed to the geometrical imperfections of the silo wall.Motivated by the engineering importance of the problem a mathematical model for constructing astochastic...

  16. Relevant surgical anatomy of the chest wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Babu V; Rajesh, Pala B

    2010-11-01

    The chest wall, like other regional anatomy, is a remarkable fusion of form and function. Principal functions are the protection of internal viscera and an expandable cylinder facilitating variable gas flow into the lungs. Knowledge of the anatomy of the whole cylinder (ribs, sternum, vertebra, diaphragm, intercostal spaces, and extrathoracic muscles) is therefore not only important in the local environment of a specific chest wall resection but also in its relation to overall function. An understanding of chest wall kinematics might help define the loss of function after resection and the effects of various chest wall substitutes. Therefore, this article is not an exhaustive anatomic description but a focused summary and discussion.

  17. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  18. Skyrmions from Instantons inside Domain Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Eto, M; Ohashi, K; Tong, D; Eto, Minoru; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Tong, David

    2005-01-01

    Some years ago, Atiyah and Manton described a method to construct approximate Skyrmion solutions from Yang-Mills instantons. Here we present a dynamical realization of this construction using domain walls in a five-dimensional gauge theory. The non-abelian gauge symmetry is broken in each vacuum but restored in the core of the domain wall, allowing instantons to nestle inside the wall. We show that the worldvolume dynamics of the wall is given by the Skyrme model, including the four-derivative term, and the instantons appear as Skyrmions.

  19. Microanalysis of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicolai Obel; Veronika Erben; Tatjana Schwarz; Stefan Kühne; Andrea Fodor; Markus Pauly

    2009-01-01

    Oligosaccharide Mass Profiling (OLIMP) allows a fast and sensitive assessment of cell wall polymer structure when coupled with Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The short time required for sample preparation and analysis makes possible the study of a wide range of plant organs, revealing a high degree of heterogeneity in the substitution pattern of wall polymers such as the cross-linking glycan xyloglucan and the pectic polysaccharide homogalacturonan. The high sensitivity of MALDI-TOF allows the use of small amounts of samples, thus making it possible to investigate the wall structure of single cell types when material is collected by such methods as laser micro-dissection. As an example, the analysis of the xyloglucan structure in the leaf cell types outer epidermis layer, entire epidermis cell layer, palisade mesophyll cells, and vascular bundles were investigated. OLIMP is amenable to in situ wall analysis, where wall polymers are analyzed on unprepared plant tissue itself without first iso-lating cell walls. In addition, OLIMP enables analysis of wall polymers in Golgi-enriched fractions, the location of nascent matrix polysaccharide biosynthesis, enabling separation of the processes of wall biosynthesis versus post-deposition apo-plastic metabolism. These new tools will make possible a semi-quantitative analysis of the cell wall at an unprecedented level.

  20. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  1. Holocene land-cover reconstructions for studies on land cover-climate feedbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-J. Gaillard

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The major objectives of this paper are: (1 to review the pros and cons of the scenarios of past anthropogenic land cover change (ALCC developed during the last ten years, (2 to discuss issues related to pollen-based reconstruction of the past land-cover and introduce a new method, REVEALS (Regional Estimates of VEgetation Abundance from Large Sites, to infer long-term records of past land-cover from pollen data, (3 to present a new project (LANDCLIM: LAND cover – CLIMate interactions in NW Europe during the Holocene currently underway, and show preliminary results of REVEALS reconstructions of the regional land-cover in the Czech Republic for five selected time windows of the Holocene, and (4 to discuss the implications and future directions in climate and vegetation/land-cover modeling, and in the assessment of the effects of human-induced changes in land-cover on the regional climate through altered feedbacks. The existing ALCC scenarios show large discrepancies between them, and few cover time periods older than AD 800. When these scenarios are used to assess the impact of human land-use on climate, contrasting results are obtained. It emphasizes the need of REVEALS model-based land-cover reconstructions. They might help to fine-tune descriptions of past land-cover and lead to a better understanding of how long-term changes in ALCC might have influenced climate. The REVEALS model is proved to provide better estimates of the regional vegetation/land-cover changes than the traditional use of pollen percentages. Thus, the application of REVEALS opens up the possibility of achieving a more robust assessment of land cover at regional- to continental-spatial scale throughout the Holocene. We present maps of REVEALS estimates for the percentage cover of 10 plant functional types (PFTs at 200 BP and 6000 BP, and of the two open-land PFTs "grassland" and "agricultural land" at five time-windows from 6000 BP to recent time. The LANDCLIM results are

  2. Electromagnetic approaches to wall characterization, wall mitigation, and antenna design for through-the-wall radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thajudeen, Christopher

    Through-the-wall imaging (TWI) is a topic of current interest due to its wide range of public safety, law enforcement, and defense applications. Among the various available technologies such as, acoustic, thermal, and optical imaging, which can be employed to sense and image targets of interest, electromagnetic (EM) imaging, in the microwave frequency bands, is the most widely utilized technology and has been at the forefront of research in recent years. The primary objectives for any Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging (TWRI) system are to obtain a layout of the building and/or inner rooms, detect if there are targets of interest including humans or weapons, determine if there are countermeasures being employed to further obscure the contents of a building or room of interest, and finally to classify the detected targets. Unlike conventional radar scenarios, the presence of walls, made of common construction materials such as brick, drywall, plywood, cinder block, and solid concrete, adversely affects the ability of any conventional imaging technique to properly image targets enclosed within building structures as the propagation through the wall can induce shadowing effects on targets of interest which may result in image degradation, errors in target localization, and even complete target masking. For many applications of TWR systems, the wall ringing signals are strong enough to mask the returns from targets not located a sufficient distance behind the wall, beyond the distance of the wall ringing, and thus without proper wall mitigation, target detection becomes extremely difficult. The results presented in this thesis focus on the development of wall parameter estimation, and intra-wall and wall-type characterization techniques for use in both the time and frequency domains as well as analysis of these techniques under various real world scenarios such as reduced system bandwidth scenarios, various wall backing scenarios, the case of inhomogeneous walls, presence

  3. Trombe walls with nanoporous aerogel insulation applied to UK housing refurbishments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Dowson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There is an opportunity to improve the efficiency of passive Trombe walls and active solar air collectors by replacing their conventional glass covers with lightweight polycarbonate panels filled with nanoporous aerogel insulation. This study investigates the thermal performance, energy savings, and financial payback period of passive Aerogel Trombe walls applied to the existing UK housing stock. Using parametric modeling, a series of design guidance tables have been generated, providing estimates of the energy savings and overheating risk associated with applying areas of Trombe wall to four different house types across the UK built to six notional construction standards. Calculated energy savings range from 183 kWh/m2/year for an 8 m2 system retrofitted to a solid walled detached house to 62 kWh/m2/year for a 32 m2 system retrofitted to a super insulated flat. Predicted energy savings from Trombe walls up to 24 m2 are found to exceed the energy savings from external insulation across all house types and constructions. Small areas of Trombe wall can provide a useful energy contribution without creating a significant overheating risk. If larger areas are to be installed, then detailed calculations would be recommended to assess and mitigate potential overheating issues.

  4. Land Use and Land Cover - LAND_COVER_2006_USGS_IN: Land Cover in Indiana, Derived from the 2006 National Land Cover Database (United States Geological Survey, 30-Meter TIFF Image)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — LAND_COVER_2006_USGS_IN is a grid (30-meter cell size) showing 2006 Land Cover data in Indiana. This grid is a subset of the National Land Cover Data (NLCD 2006)...

  5. Propagation of food and cover plants for waterfowl

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the propagation of food and cover plants for waterfowl. The report covers the general conditions of development of aquatic plants. Please note...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Land Cover for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset represents the percentage of land area that is classified as forest land cover, modified forest land cover, and natural land cover using the 2006...

  7. Interconnections between cell wall polymers, wall mechanics, and cortical microtubules: Teasing out causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chaowen; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-09-01

    In plants, cell wall components including cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins interact with each other to form complex extracellular network structures that control cell growth and maintain cell shape. However, it is still not clear exactly how different wall polymers interact, how the conformations and interactions of cell wall polymers relate to wall mechanics, and how these factors impinge on intracellular structures such as the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, based on studies of Arabidopsis thaliana xxt1 xxt2 mutants, which lack detectable xyloglucan in their walls and display aberrant wall mechanics, altered cellulose patterning and biosynthesis, and reduced cortical microtubule stability, we discuss the potential relationships between cell wall biosynthesis, wall mechanics, and cytoskeletal dynamics in an effort to better understand their roles in controlling plant growth and morphogenesis.

  8. Reconstruction of Intensity From Covered Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barabash, Rozaliya [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Watkins, Thomas R [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Meisner, Roberta Ann [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burchell, Timothy D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rosseel, Thomas M [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The safe handling of activated samples requires containment and covering the sample to eliminate any potential for contamination. Subsequent characterization of the surface with x-rays ideally necessitates a thin film. While many films appear visually transparent, they are not necessarily x-ray transparent. Each film material has a unique beam attenuation and sometimes have amorphous peaks that can superimpose with those of the sample. To reconstruct the intensity of the underlying activated sample, the x-ray attenuation and signal due to the film needs to be removed from that of the sample. This requires the calculation of unique deconvolution parameters for the film. The development of a reconstruction procedure for a contained/covered sample is described.

  9. Lifetime cover in private insurance markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H Shelton; Connelly, Luke B

    2005-03-01

    In the last few decades, private health insurance rates have declined in many countries. In countries and states with community rating, a major cause is adverse selection. In order to address age-based adverse selection, Australia has recently begun a novel approach which imposes stiff penalties for buying private insurance later in life, when expected costs are higher. In this paper, we analyze Australia's Lifetime Cover in the context of a modified version of the Rothschild-Stiglitz insurance model (Rothschild and Stiglitz, 1976). We allow empirically-based probabilities to increase by age for low-risk types. The model highlights the shortcomings of the Australian plan. Based on empirically-based probabilities of illness, we predict that Lifetime Cover will not arrest adverse selection. The model has many policy implications for government regulation encouraging long-term health coverage.

  10. Sky cover from MFRSR observations: cumulus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kassianov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their model clear-sky counterparts are two main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumulus clouds. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR. The MFRSR data are collected at the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumulus clouds. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

  11. Georadar Measurements for the Snow Cover Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Godio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground Probing Radar (GPR devices is adopted for the analysis of thickness and the mechanical properties (density of the snow cover in some test site in Alps, in Northern Italy. The performances of standard radar systems for the snow cover characterisation are analysed, the main aim is to assess the reliability of the method to estimate the snow density, the snowpack thickness and the depth resolution in terms of capability to detect thin layers. The main relationships between the electrical permittivity and the density of the dry-snow are applied to estimate the density vertical profiles inferred by the GPR investigation. The data were calibrated and compared with the results coming from direct measurements of the density and thickness.

  12. Automorphisms of double coverings of curves

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, F

    1994-01-01

    We study automorphisms of curves that commute with each other. We prove that the order and the number of fixed points of one of them satisfy certain relations involving those of the other. Then, we specialize our results to the case of double coverings of curves. For instance, if the genus of the curve is at least 4\\gamma+2 and \\gamma \\geqq 1 (\\gamma = the genus of the covered curve) we prove that the order of an automorphism is bounded above by 2\\gamma+1 (resp. 4\\gamma+2) provided it is prime (resp. it has at least five fixed points). We also improve Farkas' bound on the number of fixed points namely 4\\gamma+4 by showing that it involves the order of the automorphism except in the case of even order when such an improvement is obtained provided the automorphism and the \\gamma-involution has at least one common fixed point.

  13. Alternating group covers of the affine line

    CERN Document Server

    Muskat, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    We prove Abhyankar's Inertia Conjecture for the alternating group A_{p+2} on p+2 letters when p = 2 mod 3, by showing that every possible inertia group occurs for a (wildly ramified) A_{p+2}-Galois cover of the projective k-line branched only at infinity where k is an algebraically closed field of characteristic p > 0. More generally, when 1 < s < p and gcd(p-1, s+1)=1, we prove that all but finitely many rational numbers which satisfy the obvious necessary conditions occur as the upper jump in the filtration of higher ramification groups of an A_{p+s}-Galois cover of the projective line branched only at infinity.

  14. Cooling experiments using dummies covered by leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althaus, L; Stückradt, S; Henssge, C; Bajanowski, T

    2007-03-01

    One main method to estimate the time of death is the measurement of the body temperature. The cooling of a corpse depends on a number of conditions including the surroundings. In cases where the cooling conditions differ from the defined standard, a corrective factor is used to characterise the influence of clothing, air movement, the properties of the supporting base and the humidity. Nothing is known about the significance of other circumstances, for example of a tegument by leaves or wet leaves. Therefore, the cooling of dummies which were placed on a 2-cm-thick layer of wet/dry leaves and covered by a 10-cm-thick layer of leaves was investigated. Corrective factors of 1.0 for wet leaves on the ground and of 1.3 and 1.5 for drier leaves were found. If the dummies were additionally covered, corrective factors ranged between 1.8 and 2.7.

  15. Performance of geotextiles in landfills covers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, L.J.; Holtz, R.D.

    1997-11-01

    As part of the research into the performance of geotextiles in landfill covers, 14 test pits were excavated in five landfill covers constructed between 1988 and 1992 in Washington State. Materials used in the drainage system were examined and documented. Specimens of geotextiles (all 8 oz/yd{sup 2}, needle punched nonwovens) as well as samples of the vegetative and sand drainage soils, were obtained for laboratory analyses. Laboratory tests indicated that the geotextiles satisfactorily performed their intended filtration function. No apparent migration of fines into the drainage layer was detected. The degree of clogging was evaluated by performing permittivity tests on specimens of the exhumed geotextiles, as retrieved and after washing. Washing typically resulted in permittivity increases on the order of 30 to 90 percent.

  16. Comparing network covers using mutual information

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, Alcides Viamontes

    2012-01-01

    In network science, researchers often use mutual information to understand the difference between network partitions produced by community detection methods. Here we extend the use of mutual information to covers, that is, the cases where a node can belong to more than one module. In our proposed solution, the underlying stochastic process used to compare partitions is extended to deal with covers, and the random variables of the new process are simply fed into the usual definition of mutual information. With partitions, our extended process behaves exactly as the conventional approach for partitions, and thus, the mutual information values obtained are the same. We also describe how to perform sampling and do error estimation for our extended process, as both are necessary steps for a practical application of this measure. The stochastic process that we define here is not only applicable to networks, but can also be used to compare more general set-to-set binary relations.

  17. Land cover and water yield: inference problems when comparing catchments with mixed land cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. J. M. van Dijk

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlled experiments provide strong evidence that changing land cover (e.g. deforestation or afforestation can affect mean catchment streamflow (Q. By contrast, a similarly strong influence has not been found in studies that interpret Q from multiple catchments with mixed land cover. One possible reason is that there are methodological issues with the way in which the Budyko framework was used in the latter type studies. We examined this using Q data observed in 278 Australian catchments and by making inferences from synthetic Q data simulated by a hydrological process model (the Australian Water Resources Assessment system Landscape model. The previous contrasting findings could be reproduced. In the synthetic experiment, the land cover influence was still present but not accurately detected with the Budyko- framework. Likely sources of interpretation bias demonstrated include: (i noise in land cover, precipitation and Q data; (ii additional catchment climate characteristics more important than land cover; and (iii covariance between Q and catchment attributes. These methodological issues caution against the use of a Budyko framework to quantify a land cover influence in Q data from mixed land-cover catchments. Importantly, however, our findings do not rule out that there may also be physical processes that modify the influence of land cover in mixed land-cover catchments. Process model simulations suggested that lateral water redistribution between vegetation types and recirculation of intercepted rainfall may be important.

  18. Covering and piercing disks with two centers

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2013-04-01

    We give exact and approximation algorithms for two-center problems when the input is a set D of disks in the plane. We first study the problem of finding two smallest congruent disks such that each disk in D intersects one of these two disks. Then we study the problem of covering the set D by two smallest congruent disks. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Covering and piercing disks with two centers

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2011-01-01

    We consider new versions of the two-center problem where the input consists of a set D of disks in the plane. We first study the problem of finding two smallest congruent disks such that each disk in intersects one of these two disks. Then we study the problem of covering the set D by two smallest congruent disks. We give exact and approximation algorithms for these versions. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Domination, Eternal Domination, and Clique Covering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klostermeyer William F.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eternal and m-eternal domination are concerned with using mobile guards to protect a graph against infinite sequences of attacks at vertices. Eternal domination allows one guard to move per attack, whereas more than one guard may move per attack in the m-eternal domination model. Inequality chains consisting of the domination, eternal domination, m-eternal domination, independence, and clique covering numbers of graph are explored in this paper.