WorldWideScience

Sample records for lake water microcosms

  1. Population dynamics of transgenic strain Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7 in freshwater and saline lake water microcosms with differing microbial community structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, L. Yu; Kargatova, T. V.; Ganusova, E. E.; Lobova, T. I.; Boyandin, A. N.; Mogilnaya, O. A.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    2005-01-01

    Populations of Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7, a transgenic microorganism, were heterogenic in the expression of plasmid genes when adapting to the conditions of water microcosms of various mineralization levels and structure of microbial community. This TM has formed two subpopulations (ampicillin-resistant and ampicillin-sensitive) in every microcosm. Irrespective of mineralization level of a microcosm, when E. coli Z905/pPHL7 alone was introduced, the ampicillin-resistant subpopulation prevailed, while introduction of the TM together with indigenous bacteria led to the dominance of the ampicillin-sensitive subpopulation. A high level of lux gene expression maintained longer in the freshwater microcosms than in sterile saline lake water microcosms. A horizontal gene transfer has been revealed between the jointly introduced TM and Micrococcus sp. 9/pSH1 in microcosms with the Lake Shira sterile water. c2005 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Population dynamics of transgenic strain Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7 in freshwater and saline lake water microcosms with differing microbial community structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, L. Yu.; Kargatova, T. V.; Ganusova, E. E.; Lobova, T. I.; Boyandin, A. N.; Mogilnaya, O. A.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    Populations of Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7, a transgenic microorganism, were heterogenic in the expression of plasmid genes when adapting to the conditions of water microcosms of various mineralization levels and structure of microbial community. This TM has formed two subpopulations (ampicillin-resistant and ampicillin-sensitive) in every microcosm. Irrespective of mineralization level of a microcosm, when E. coli Z905/pPHL7 alone was introduced, the ampicillin-resistant subpopulation prevailed, while introduction of the TM together with indigenous bacteria led to the dominance of the ampicillin-sensitive subpopulation. A high level of lux gene expression maintained longer in the freshwater microcosms than in sterile saline lake water microcosms. A horizontal gene transfer has been revealed between the jointly introduced TM and Micrococcus sp. 9/pSH1 in microcosms with the Lake Shira sterile water.

  3. Lakes and rivers as microcosms, version 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Jenkins

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Limnology has been greatly influenced by The Lake as a Microcosm (Forbes, 1887, which described a holistic focus on the internal machinations of singular, island-like aquatic ecosystems. I consider three persistent influences of The Lake as a Microcosm: as an organizing paradigm for the teaching of limnology relative to its practice; the idea that inland waters are like islands, and the replicability of types of inland waters. Based on inspection of recent peer-reviewed literature and 32 limnology texts, we teach limnology according to Forbes but do not practice it in that holistic context. Instead, we practice limnology as aquatic ecology. Based on novel analyses of species-area relationships for 275 inland waters and 392 islands, inland waters are more like continental habitat patches than islands; the island metaphor is poetic but not accurate. Based on a quantitative review of beta diversity (40 data sets representing 10,576 inland waters and 26 data sets representing 1529 terrestrial sites, aquatic systems are no more replicable than are terrestrial systems; a typological approach to limnology is no more justified than it is in terrestrial systems. I conclude that a former distinction between limnology and aquatic ecology no longer applies, and that we should define limnology as the ecology of inland waters. Also, we should not consider lakes and rivers as islands that represent other systems of the same type, but should consider them as open, interactive habitat patches that vary according to their geology and biogeography. I suggest modern limnology operates according to 3 paradigms, which combine to form 3 broad limnological disciplines and establish a basis for a plural, interactive view of lakes and rivers as microcosms. This model of modern limnology may help better connect it to ecology and biogeography and help limnology be even more relevant to science and society.

  4. Abundance and dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in lake sediment microcosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Berglund

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance in bacteria causing disease is an ever growing threat to the world. Recently, environmental bacteria have become established as important both as sources of antibiotic resistance genes and in disseminating resistance genes. Low levels of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals are regularly released into water environments via wastewater, and the concern is that such environmental contamination may serve to create hotspots for antibiotic resistance gene selection and dissemination. In this study, microcosms were created from water and sediments gathered from a lake in Sweden only lightly affected by human activities. The microcosms were exposed to a mixture of antibiotics of varying environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., concentrations commonly encountered in wastewaters in order to investigate the effect of low levels of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance gene abundances and dynamics in a previously uncontaminated environment. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Abundances of seven antibiotic resistance genes and the class 1 integron integrase gene, intI1, were quantified using real-time PCR. Resistance genes sulI and ermB were quantified in the microcosm sediments with mean abundances 5 and 15 gene copies/10(6 16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Class 1 integrons were determined in the sediments with a mean concentration of 3.8 × 10(4 copies/106 16S rRNA gene copies. The antibiotic treatment had no observable effect on antibiotic resistance gene or integron abundances.

  5. LIMNOLOGY, LAKE BASINS, LAKE WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre GÂŞTESCU

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Limnology is a border discipline between geography, hydrology and biology, and is also closely connected with other sciences, from it borrows research methods. Physical limnology (the geography of lakes, studies lake biotopes, and biological limnology (the biology of lakes, studies lake biocoenoses. The father of limnology is the Swiss scientist F.A. Forel, the author of a three-volume entitled Le Leman: monographie limnologique (1892-1904, which focuses on the geology physics, chemistry and biology of lakes. He was also author of the first textbook of limnology, Handbuch der Seenkunde: allgemeine Limnologie,(1901. Since both the lake biotope and its biohydrocoenosis make up a single whole, the lake and lakes, respectively, represent the most typical systems in nature. They could be called limnosystems (lacustrine ecosystems, a microcosm in itself, as the American biologist St.A. Forbes put it (1887.

  6. Fate of Sulfamethazine in Surface Water Microcosms and Bioaccumulation in Sediment-dwelling Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antibiotic sulfamethazine can be transported from manured fields to surface water bodies. We investigated the degradation and fate of sulfamethazine in small pond water microcosms using 14C-phenyl-sulfamethazine, and found a 2.7-d half-life in pond water and 4.2-d half-life when added to the wat...

  7. Effect of imbalanced nutrients and immigration on Prymnesium parvum community dominance and toxicity: Results from in-lake microcosm experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errera, R.M.; Roelke, D.L.; Kiesling, R.L.; Brooks, B.W.; Grover, J.P.; Schwierzke, L.; Urena-Boeck, F.; Baker, J.W.; Pinckney, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Prymnesium parvum, a haptophyte species, forms harmful blooms, including those that have caused severe fish kills in Texas, USA, over the past 6 yr. We studied P. parvum dynamics using in situ microcosm experiments at Lake Possum Kingdom, Texas, during 3 seasons (fall 2004, winter and spring 2005). Experimental treatments included full and partial nutrient enrichment (encompassing nitrogen [N] and phosphorus [P] deficient treatments), P. parvum immigration and combinations of these factors. In the control and N and P deficient treatments, P. parvum populations dominated the community, but only in the N deficient treatments did P. parvum experience a significant growth in the population. In contrast, when nutrients were not limiting, P. parvum tended to lose its competitive edge to other taxa such as chlorophytes, euglenophytes and diatoms, which then dominated the community. Population growth of P. parvum was also stimulated through immigration, but only during the winter experiment, a period of the year when bloom initiation is common. This finding suggests that movement into the water column may be an important process leading to P. parvum bloom initiation. Toxicity of P. parvum to fish was also affected by the nutrient changes: during conditions of no nutrient addition P. parvum was most toxic; intermediate toxicity was observed under N and P deficient conditions, and full nutrient enrichments resulted in nearly non-toxic conditions. ?? Inter-Research 2008.

  8. Bacterial community response to petroleum hydrocarbon amendments in freshwater, marine, and hypersaline water-containing microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Marques, Joana Montezano; de Sousa Lima, Laryssa Ribeiro Fonseca; Dias, Felipe de Almeida; Seldin, Lucy

    2013-10-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial communities from freshwater, marine, and hypersaline Brazilian aquatic ecosystems (with water salinities corresponding to 0.2%, 4%, and 5%, respectively) were enriched with different hydrocarbons (heptadecane, naphthalene, or crude oil). Changes within the different microcosms of bacterial communities were analyzed using cultivation approaches and molecular methods (DNA and RNA extraction, followed by genetic fingerprinting and analyses of clone libraries based on the 16S rRNA-coding gene). A redundancy analysis (RDA) of the genetic fingerprint data and a principal component analysis (PCA) of the clone libraries revealed hydrocarbon-enriched bacterial communities specific for each ecosystem studied. However, within the same ecosystem, different bacterial communities were selected according to the petroleum hydrocarbon used. In general, the results demonstrated that Acinetobacter and Cloacibacterium were the dominant genera in freshwater microcosms; the Oceanospirillales order and the Marinobacter, Pseudomonas, and Cycloclasticus genera predominated in marine microcosms; and the Oceanospirillales order and the Marinobacter genus were selected in the different hydrocarbon-containing microcosms in hypersaline water. Determination of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) in all microcosms after 32 days of incubation showed a decrease in the hydrocarbon concentration compared to that for the controls. A total of 50 (41.3%) isolates from the different hydrocarbon-contaminated microcosms were associated with the dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) obtained from the clone libraries, and their growth in the hydrocarbon contaminating the microcosm from which they were isolated as the sole carbon source was observed. These data provide insight into the general response of bacterial communities from freshwater, marine, and hypersaline aquatic ecosystems to petroleum hydrocarbon contamination.

  9. [Microcosm Simulation Study and Methylmercury Forming Mechanism at Landscape Water of City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Si, You-bin; Guo, Zi-wei; Du, Cheng-zhu; Zhu, Cong-cong

    2016-04-15

    Mercury is harmful to the environment, which has gradually become one of the research hotspots. Sediments, as a main repository of pollutants, have an important impact on water quality and the internal organisms, which deserves our research. In this paper, we focused on Hefei landscape water sediment and tried to investigate the status of inorganic mercury and methylmercury pollutions in the sediment. To study the conversion process from inorganic mercury to methylmercury and their enrichment levels and mechanism, we established the ecological chain of "sediment-water-grass-fish" through analog microcosm examination. The results were as follows: from ten water and sediment samples in Hefei landscape water sediment, we found that the contents of inorganic mercury and methylmercury ranged 11.74-13.12 µg · kg⁻¹ and 0.37-2.23 µg · kg⁻¹, respectively. The microcosm examination showed that: with increasing culture time, inorganic mercury in sediments gradually decreased. There was a phenomenon that the content of methylmercury increased at first and then decreased to reach the balance later. Both the inorganic mercury and methylmercury in water change showed an increasing trend. The enrichment contents of inorganic mercury in Egeria densa Planch, and golden mandarin fish (Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner) were low while their enrichment of methylmercury could he great. In addition, we found that both the bioaccumulation ability and the enrichment coefficient of methylmercury in the body of golden mandarin fish were the maximum during the same period.

  10. Thermal characteristics of a marine microcosm designed to simulate the coastal water environment of the northern Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idso, S. B.; Idso, K. E.

    1982-05-01

    The construction and stocking of a 15 000-liter marine microcosm is described. The microcosm is located outdoors in the arid desert environment of Tempe, Arizona and is an attempt to simulate the coastal water environment of the northern Gulf of California near Puerto Penasco, Mexico. Temperature modulation is achieved by an appropriate area/volume ratio, partial shading of the water surface, and auxiliary solar panel heating. Long-term measurements demonstrate that the system is capable of accurately duplicating the mean monthly temperatures of Puerto Penasco waters throughout the entire year.

  11. Environmental Monitoring, Water Quality - Lakes Assessments - Attaining

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This layer shows only attaining lakes of the Integrated List. The Lakes Integrated List represents lake assessments in an integrated format for the Clean Water Act...

  12. Microbial composition in microcosms amended with natural and mineral fertilizers under different water regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brad, Traian; Chiriac, Cecilia; Szekeres, Edina; Coman, Cristian; Rudi, Knut; Sandor, Mignon

    2017-04-01

    Twenty microcosm enclosures containing two types of soil (i.e. a rich Chernozemic and a poorer soil) were fertilized with mineral (NPK-complex) and organic (Gülle, manure and a green fertilizer) materials and placed under dry and wet water regimes. After 10, 20 and 30 days of the experiment, soil samples were analyzed for the structure and composition of microbial communities using next generation sequencing techniques (Illumina) and statistical analysis. The differences between bacteria communities in different soil types, and in different fertilization and hydric treatments were analyzed using quantitative phylogenetic distances and the ANOSIM test. The two types of soil especially selected for the structure of microbial communities, while moisture and the type of fertilizer appeared to have a smaller influence on microbial diversity in microcosms. The alpha-diversity indices (species richness, evenness and phylogenetic diversity) had higher values for the poorer soil compared to the rich Chernozemic soil. For both soil types, the highest bacteria diversity values were obtained after fertilization with manure. The microbial communities in the analyzed soils were complex and dominated by sequences belonging to Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Firmicutes.

  13. Frontiers of the food-energy-water trilemma: Sri Lanka as a microcosm of tradeoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Debra; Hornberger, George

    2016-01-01

    Food, energy, and water are three critical resources for humanity. As climate variability, population growth, and lifestyle changes amplify the stress placed on each of the resources, the interrelationships among food, energy, and water systems become more pronounced. Political conflict, social and cultural norms, and spatial and temporal distribution of the resources add additional layers of complexity. It is in this context that the significance of understanding the impacts of water scarcity on the decisions around food and energy productions has emerged. Our work establishes tradeoff frontiers (TFs) as a method useful in illustrating the system-level tradeoffs between allocating water for food and water for energy. This paper illustrates how TFs can be used to (1) show how scarcity in water resources affects the tradeoffs between food and energy and (2) explore the political and social constraints that can move production away from what is feasible technically. We use Sri Lanka, a country where water resources are variable both in space and time and a country with relatively self-contained energy and agricultural sectors, as a microcosm of the food security, energy security, and water security trilemma. Nevertheless, our application of tradeoff frontiers is applicable widely to other systems.

  14. Contribution of vegetation and water table on isoprene emission from boreal peatland microcosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiiva, Päivi; Faubert, Patrick; Räty, Sanna;

    2009-01-01

    Boreal peatlands are substantial sources of isoprene, a reactive hydrocarbon. However, it is not known how much mosses, vascular plants and peat each contribute to isoprene emission from peatlands. Furthermore, there is no information on the effects of declining water table depth on isoprene emis....... In conclusion, isoprene emissions from peatlands will decrease, but the proportion of assimilated carbon lost as isoprene will increase, if the naturally high water table declines under the changing climate....... emission in these naturally wet ecosystems, although water table is predicted to decline due to climate warming. We studied the relative contribution of mosses vs. vascular plants to isoprene emission in boreal peatland microcosms in growth chambers by removing either vascular vegetation or both vascular...... hollows with intact vegetation, 45 ± 6 µg m-2 h-1, was decreased by 25% under water table drawdown. However, water table drawdown reduced net ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange more dramatically than isoprene emission. Isoprene emission strongly correlated with both CO2 exchange and methane emission...

  15. Nutrient Limitation in Surface Waters of the Oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean Sea: an Enrichment Microcosm Experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Tsiola, A.

    2015-12-01

    The growth rates of planktonic microbes in the pelagic zone of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea are nutrient limited, but the type of limitation is still uncertain. During this study, we investigated the occurrence of N and P limitation among different groups of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic (pico-, nano-, and micro-) plankton using a microcosm experiment during stratified water column conditions in the Cretan Sea (Eastern Mediterranean). Microcosms were enriched with N and P (either solely or simultaneously), and the PO4 turnover time, prokaryotic heterotrophic activity, primary production, and the abundance of the different microbial components were measured. Flow cytometric and molecular fingerprint analyses showed that different heterotrophic prokaryotic groups were limited by different nutrients; total heterotrophic prokaryotic growth was limited by P, but only when both N and P were added, changes in community structure and cell size were detected. Phytoplankton were N and P co-limited, with autotrophic pico-eukaryotes being the exception as they increased even when only P was added after a 2-day time lag. The populations of Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus were highly competitive with each other; Prochlorococcus abundance increased during the first 2 days of P addition but kept increasing only when both N and P were added, whereas Synechococcus exhibited higher pigment content and increased in abundance 3 days after simultaneous N and P additions. Dinoflagellates also showed opportunistic behavior at simultaneous N and P additions, in contrast to diatoms and coccolithophores, which diminished in all incubations. High DNA content viruses, selective grazing, and the exhaustion of N sources probably controlled the populations of diatoms and coccolithophores.

  16. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1939

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1939. The document provides tabulated data for each area of Medicine Lake NWR, including the...

  17. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1944. The document provides tabulated data for each area of Medicine Lake NWR, including the...

  18. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1946. The document provides tabulated data for each area of Medicine Lake NWR, including the...

  19. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1950. The document provides tabulated data for each area of Medicine Lake NWR, including the...

  20. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1951

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1951. The document provides tabulated data for each area of Medicine Lake NWR, including the...

  1. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1947

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1947. The document provides tabulated data for each area of Medicine Lake NWR, including the...

  2. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1952. The document provides tabulated data for each area of Medicine Lake NWR, including the...

  3. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1948. The document provides tabulated data for each area of Medicine Lake NWR, including the...

  4. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1943. The document provides tabulated data for each area of Medicine Lake NWR, including the...

  5. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1955. The document provides tabulated data for each area of Medicine Lake NWR, including the...

  6. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1949. The document provides tabulated data for each area of Medicine Lake NWR, including the...

  7. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1956. The document provides tabulated data for each area of Medicine Lake NWR, including the...

  8. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1945. The document provides tabulated data for each area of Medicine Lake NWR, including the...

  9. Effects of drain-fill cycling on chlorpyrifos mineralization in wetland sediment-water microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremariam, Seyoum Yami; Beutel, Marc W

    2010-03-01

    Constructed treatment wetlands are efficient at retaining a range of pesticides, however the ultimate fate of many of these compound is not well understood. This study evaluated the effect of drain-fill cycling on the mineralization of chlorpyrifos, a commonly used organophosphate insecticide, in wetland sediment-water microcosms. Monitoring of the fate of (14)C ring-labeled chlorpyrifos showed that drain-fill cycling resulted in significantly lower mineralization rates relative to permanently flooded conditions. The reduction in mineralization was linked to enhanced partitioning of the pesticide to the sediment phase, which could potentially inhibit chlorpyrifos hydrolysis and mineralization. Over the nearly two-month experiment, less than 2.5% of the added compound was mineralized. While rates of mineralization in this experiment were higher than those reported for other soils and sediments, their low magnitude underscores how persistent chlorpyrifos and its metabolites are in aquatic environments, and suggests that management strategies and ecological risk assessment should focus more on ultimate mineralization rather than the simple disappearance of the parent compound.

  10. Effects of Eichhornia crassipes and Ceratophyllum demersum on Soil and Water Environments and Nutrient Removal in Wetland Microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Kijune; Lee, Geun-Joo; Munster, Clyde

    2015-01-01

    Wetland plants are important components that influence the biogeochemistry of wetland ecosystems. Therefore, remediation performance in wetlands can differ depending on the growth forms of plants. In this study, the effects of Eichhornia crassipes (floating plant) and Ceratophyllum demersum (submerged plant) on the wetland soil and water environments were investigated using a microcosm study with simulated hydrology of retention-type wetlands between rainfall events. The C. demersum microcosm (SP) showed the fastest recovery with a diel fluctuation pattern of dissolved oxygen, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) from the impacts of nutrient inflow. Moreover, SP exhibited the lowest decrease in sediment ORP, the highest dehydrogenase activity, and more organic forms of nitrogen and phosphorus. E. crassipes microcosms exhibited the lowest water temperature, and efficiently controlled algae. In the presence of plants, the total nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in water rapidly decreased, and the composition of organic and inorganic nutrient forms was altered along with a decrease in concentration. The results indicate that wetland plants help retain nutrients in the system, but the effects varied based on the wetland plant growth forms.

  11. Accelerated biodegradation of BPA in water-sediment microcosms with Bacillus sp. GZB and the associated bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jukun; An, Taicheng; Li, Guiying; Peng, Ping'an

    2017-10-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic chemical primarily used to produce polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Significant industrial and consumer's consumption of BPA-containing products has contributed to extensive contamination in different environmental matrices. In this study, microcosms bioaugmented with Bacillus sp. GZB were constructed to investigate BPA biodegradation, identify the main bacterial community, and evaluate bacterial community responses in the microcosms. Under aerobic conditions, BPA was quickly depleted as a result of bioaugmentation with Bacillus sp. GZB in water-sediment contaminated with pollutants. The pollutants used were generally associated with the electronic wastes (mobile phones, computers, televisions) dismantling process. Adding BPA affected the bacterial community composition in the water-sediment. Furthermore, BPA biodegradation was enhanced by adding electron donors/co-substrates: humic acid, NaCl, glucose, and yeast extract. Metagenomic analysis of the total 16S rRNA genes from the BPA-degrading microcosms with bioaugmentation illustrated that the genera Bacillus, Thiobacillus, Phenylobacterium, and Cloacibacterium were dominant after a 7-week incubation period. A consortium of microorganisms from different bacterial genera may be involved in BPA biodegradation in electronic waste contaminated water-sediment. This study provides new insights about BPA bioaugmentation and bacterial ecology in the BPA-degrading environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hutton Lake NWR, Mortenson Lake NWR, and Bamforth Lake NWR : Annual water management plans, 2004 water use report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Water use reports for 2004 and annual water management plans for 2005 for Mortenson Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Hutton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, and Bamforth...

  13. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1967. The document includes summaries of 1967 water use, 1968 water program recommendations,...

  14. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1980. The document includes summaries of 1980 water use, 1981 water program recommendations,...

  15. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1969. The document includes summaries of 1969 water use, 1970 water program recommendations,...

  16. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1965. The document includes summaries of 1965 water use, 1966 water program recommendations,...

  17. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1966. The document includes summaries of 1966 water use, 1967 water program recommendations,...

  18. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 2000. The document includes summaries of 2000 water use, 2001 water program recommendations,...

  19. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1994. The document includes summaries of 1994 water use, 1995 water program recommendations,...

  20. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1971. The document includes summaries of 1971 water use, 1972 water program recommendations,...

  1. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1996. The document includes summaries of 1996 water use, 1997 water program recommendations,...

  2. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1972

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1972. The document includes summaries of 1972 water use, 1973 water program recommendations,...

  3. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 2001. The document includes summaries of 2001 water use, 2002 water program recommendations,...

  4. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1997. The document includes summaries of 1997 water use, 1998 water program recommendations,...

  5. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 2008. The document includes summaries of 2008 water use, 2009 water program recommendations,...

  6. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1989. The document includes summaries of 1989 water use, 1990 water program recommendations,...

  7. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1963. The document includes summaries of 1963 water use, 1964 water program recommendations,...

  8. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1962. The document includes summaries of 1962 water use, 1963 water program recommendations,...

  9. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 2013. The document includes summaries of 2013 water use, 2014 water program recommendations,...

  10. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1993. The document includes summaries of 1993 water use, 1994 water program recommendations,...

  11. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1988. The document includes summaries of 1988 water use, 1989 water program recommendations,...

  12. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1982. The document includes summaries of 1982 water use, 1983 water program recommendations,...

  13. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 2005. The document includes summaries of 2005 water use, 2006 water program recommendations,...

  14. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1985. The document includes summaries of 1985 water use, 1986 water program recommendations,...

  15. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1999. The document includes summaries of 1999 water use, 2000 water program recommendations,...

  16. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 2003. The document includes summaries of 2003 water use, 2004 water program recommendations,...

  17. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1958. Water rights are summarized, along with a detailed outline on the water management of the...

  18. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1982. The document includes summaries of 1981 water use, 1982 water program recommendations,...

  19. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 1970. The document includes summaries of 1970 water use, 1971 water program recommendations,...

  20. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1979. General water uses are discussed for 1979 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  1. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 2010. Short forms are supplied for the years water use report / management plan. These forms cover...

  2. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1958. The report highlights the weather, water, habitat, and wildlife conditions for the year of...

  3. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1987. General water uses are discussed for 1987 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  4. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1984. General water uses are discussed for 1984 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  5. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1985. General water uses are discussed for 1985 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  6. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1983. General water uses are discussed for 1983 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  7. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1986. General water uses are discussed for 1986 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  8. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1982. General water uses are discussed for 1982 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  9. Lake Andes NWR Water Use Report- 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Lake Andes NWR for 1971. General water uses are discussed for 1971 for each unit, impoundment data is tabulated...

  10. Water balance for Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathenson, Manuel

    1992-01-01

    A water balance for Crater Lake, Oregon, is calculated using measured lake levels and precipitation data measured at Park Headquarters and at a gage on the North Rim. Total water supply to the lake from precipitation and inflow from the crater walls is found to be 224 cm/y over the area of the lake. The ratio between water supply to the lake and precipitation at Park Headquarters is calculated as 1.325. Using leakage determined by Phillips (1968) and Redmond (1990), evaporation from the lake is approximately 85 cm/y. Calculations show that water balances with precipitation data only from Park Headquarters are unable to accurately define the water-level variation, whereas the addition of yearly precipitation data from the North Rim reduces the average absolute deviation between calculated and modeled water levels by one half. Daily precipitation and water-level data are modeled assuming that precipitation is stored on the rim as snow during fall and winter and released uniformly during the spring and early summer. Daily data do not accurately define the water balance, but they suggest that direct precipitation on the lake is about 10 % higher than that measured at Park Headquarters and that about 17 % of the water supply is from inflow from the rim.

  11. Establishment patterns of water-elm at Catahoula Lake, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen S. Doerr; Sanjeev Joshi; Richard F. Keim

    2015-01-01

    At Catahoula Lake in central Louisiana, an internationally important lake for water fowl, hydrologic alterations to the surrounding rivers and the lake itself have led to an expansion of water-elm (Planera aquatic J.F. Gmel.) into the lake bed. In this study, we used dendrochronology and aerial photography to quantify the expansion of water-elm in the lake and identify...

  12. Characterizing kinetics of transport and transformation of selenium in water-sediment microcosm free from selenium contamination using a simple mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, M; Ike, M; Hashimoto, R; Nakagawa, T; Yamaguchi, K; Soda, S O

    2005-02-01

    This study developed a seven-compartment model for predicting the fate of selenium (Se) in an aquatic environment containing a water-sediment boundary. Speciation of Se in water-sediment microcosms under microaerobic conditions was measured to evaluate first-order kinetics of Se transportation and transformation. The microcosm consisted of a 10-ml solution containing 1mM soluble Se as selenate (Se6+) or selenite (Se4+) and 8 g wet sediment that was free from Se contamination, sampled from the Senri, Yamato, or Yodo Rivers in Osaka, Japan. Stepwise reaction coefficients describing transportation and transformation were determined using an inverse method on this model which includes: selenate (Se(W)6+) and selenite (Se(W)4+) in ponded water; selenate (Se(S)6+) and selenite (Se(S)4+), elemental Se (Se0), organic Se (Se2-) in sediment; and gaseous Se (DMSe). During this 1-month experiment, soluble Se was transported from ponded water to the sediment and Se was transformed sequentially to other Se species through biochemical reactions. Experimental and kinetic analyses indicated quantitatively that the Yamato River microcosm, with its high organic matter content, had a high adsorption rate of soluble Se. The Yodo River microcosm had a low adsorption rate for Se6+ and a low Se reduction rate. The Senri River microcosm had an apparent high volatilization rate of DMSe. The model developed in this study is extremely useful for predicting fate of Se in aquatic environment in the field.

  13. Microcosm reloaded!

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2015-01-01

    On 20 July, Microcosm reopened its doors to the public. CERN’s guides are already leading many enthusiastic visitors through the new attractions of the popular exhibition. More areas will reopen progressively over the coming weeks before the official inauguration this autumn.   A group of visitors is guided through the new Microcosm exhibit. After six months of extensive refurbishment work, Microcosm is back and open for public visits. As some installations are not yet up and running, CERN’s guides are there to provide visitors with additional explanations. “The two groups I guided were amazed to see real detector components before their eyes, laid out in inviting and informative displays,” says Achintya Rao, member of the CMS collaboration and a CERN guide. “The life-sized CMS mock-up and the CCC panorama are excellent locations to have in-depth conversations with enthusiastic visitors and give them a glimpse into everyday life at CERN.&...

  14. Non-methane biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from boreal peatland microcosms under warming and water table drawdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faubert, P; Tiiva, P; Nakam, TA

    2011-01-01

    BVOC groups. Only isoprene emission was significantly increased by warming, parallel to the increased leaf number of the dominant sedge Eriophorum vaginatum. BVOC emissions from peat soil were higher under the control and warming treatments than water table drawdown, suggesting an increased activity...... assessed the combined effect of warming and water table drawdown on the BVOC emissions from boreal peatland microcosms. We also assessed the treatment effects on the BVOC emissions from the peat soil after the 7-week long experiment. Emissions of isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, other reactive VOCs...... and other VOCs were sampled using a conventional chamber technique, collected on adsorbent and analyzed by GC–MS. Carbon emitted as BVOCs was less than 1% of the CO2 uptake and up to 3% of CH4 emission. Water table drawdown surpassed the direct warming effect and significantly decreased the emissions of all...

  15. Water chemistry of Lake Albano (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioni, Roberto; Guidi, Massimo; Raco, Brunella; Marini, Luigi; Gambardella, Barbara

    2003-02-01

    Lake Albano was stratified at the time of our survey, in December 1997, in agreement with previous observations [Martini et al., Geochem. J. 28 (1994) 173-184; Cioni et al., Report for the Civil Protection Department (1995); Pedreschi, Accad. Lucch. Sci. Lett. Arti (1995) 39]. In the absence of phenomena induced by seismic activity, either local or regional, lake stratification may be perturbed by cooling of shallow waters below ˜8.5°C. Circulation is expected to homogenize lake waters and eventually to trigger gas exsolution when total gas pressure exceeds hydrostatic pressure. In December 1997, total gas pressure in lake water was very close to atmospheric pressure (0.9-1.3 bar) at all depths, possibly due to the occurrence of a recent episode of circulation and presumed gas exsolution. The state of saturation of Lake Albano waters and the similarity of the relative concentrations of Na, K, Mg, and Ca in lake waters, local groundwaters, and local volcanic rocks indicate that Na, K, Mg, and Ca concentrations in Lake Albano waters are mainly governed by incongruent dissolution of local volcanic rocks, coupled with minor calcite precipitation at shallow depths.

  16. Michigan lakes: An assessment of water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnerick, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Michigan has more than 11,000 inland lakes, that provide countless recreational opportunities and are an important resource that makes tourism and recreation a $15-billion-dollar per-year industry in the State (Stynes, 2002). Knowledge of the water-quality characteristics of inland lakes is essential for the current and future management of these resources.Historically the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) jointly have monitored water quality in Michigan's lakes and rivers. During the 1990's, however, funding for surface-water-quality monitoring was reduced greatly. In 1998, the citizens of Michigan passed the Clean Michigan Initiative to clean up, protect, and enhance Michigan's environmental infrastructure. Because of expanding water-quality-data needs, the MDEQ and the USGS jointly redesigned and implemented the Lake Water-Quality Assessment (LWQA) Monitoring Program (Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, 1997).

  17. Indian Lakes soil and water investigation

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this investigation is to determine whether the soil and/or water in the Indian Lakes area exceeds the EPA's hazardous waste level criterion for...

  18. Water-Quality and Lake-Stage Data for Wisconsin Lakes, Water Year 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Water Science Center Lake-Studies Team: Rose, W. J.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Marsh, S.B.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2007 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2007 is called 'water year 2007.' The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake?s watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in another volume: 'Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 2007.'

  19. Energy and water in the Great Lakes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

    2011-11-01

    The nexus between thermoelectric power production and water use is not uniform across the U.S., but rather differs according to regional physiography, demography, power plant fleet composition, and the transmission network. That is, in some regions water demand for thermoelectric production is relatively small while in other regions it represents the dominate use. The later is the case for the Great Lakes region, which has important implications for the water resources and aquatic ecology of the Great Lakes watershed. This is today, but what about the future? Projected demographic trends, shifting lifestyles, and economic growth coupled with the threat of global climate change and mounting pressure for greater U.S. energy security could have profound effects on the region's energy future. Planning for such an uncertain future is further complicated by the fact that energy and environmental planning and regulatory decisionmaking is largely bifurcated in the region, with environmental and water resource concerns generally taken into account after new energy facilities and technologies have been proposed, or practices are already in place. Based on these confounding needs, the objective of this effort is to develop Great Lakes-specific methods and tools to integrate energy and water resource planning and thereby support the dual goals of smarter energy planning and development, and protection of Great Lakes water resources. Guiding policies for this planning are the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The desired outcome of integrated energy-water-aquatic resource planning is a more sustainable regional energy mix for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

  20. Environmental Monitoring, Water Quality - Lakes Assessments - Non Attaining

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This layer shows only non attaining lakes of the Integrated List. The Lakes Integrated List represents lake assessments in an integrated format for the Clean Water...

  1. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN FRESHWATER MICROCOSMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, John T.

    1978-01-01

    Two cylindrical freshwater microcosms with a volume of 700 {ell} were maintained under controlled laboratory conditions for 190 days. The two microcosms were identical with regard to initial chemical composition and biological inocula, with the exceptions that in one microcosm (designated Tank 2) mosquitofish (Gambusia) and herbivorous catfish (Placostomas) were added. Three distinct communities developed in the tanks: (1) a phytoplankton-zooplankton assemblage and (2) two periphyton-zoobenthos communities associated with the sides and bottom of the tank, respectively. Community development and successional patterns were similar in both tanks. Major differences between the tanks involved timing of succession of the zooplankton and zoobenthos, attributable to predation by fish, principally Gambusia. A major drawback for these microcosms as use for experimental analogs such as lakes was a luxuriant periphyton growth which eventually overwhelmed the biomass of the system. The tanks displayed a degree of successional replicability, a large number of species, and a diversity of community development. Microcosms of this size could find use as experimental systems for higher level trophic manipulation and observation of life cycles not amenable to field studies.

  2. Entry of Yersinia pestis into the viable but nonculturable state in a low-temperature tap water microcosm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Pawlowski

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, has caused several pandemics throughout history and remains endemic in the rodent populations of the western United States. More recently, Y. pestis is one of several bacterial pathogens considered to be a potential agent of bioterrorism. Thus, elucidating potential mechanisms of survival and persistence in the environment would be important in the event of an intentional release of the organism. One such mechanism is entry into the viable but non-culturable (VBNC state, as has been demonstrated for several other bacterial pathogens. In this study, we showed that Y. pestis became nonculturable by normal laboratory methods after 21 days in a low-temperature tap water microcosm. We further show evidence that, after the loss of culturability, the cells remained viable by using a variety of criteria, including cellular membrane integrity, uptake and incorporation of radiolabeled amino acids, and protection of genomic DNA from DNase I digestion. Additionally, we identified morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of Y. pestis VBNC cells, such as cell rounding and large periplasmic spaces, by electron microscopy, which are consistent with entry into the VBNC state in other bacteria. Finally, we demonstrated resuscitation of a small number of the non-culturable cells. This study provides compelling evidence that Y. pestis persists in a low-temperature tap water microcosm in a viable state yet is unable to be cultured under normal laboratory conditions, which may prove useful in risk assessment and remediation efforts, particularly in the event of an intentional release of this organism.

  3. Water-Quality and Lake-Stage Data for Wisconsin Lakes, Water Year 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W.J.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Marsh, S.B.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2006 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006 is called 'water year 2006.' The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in another volume: 'Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 2006.' Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available through the World Wide Web on the Internet. The Wisconsin Water Science Center's home page is at http://wi.water.usgs.gov/. Information on the

  4. Water quality management for Lake Mariout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Donia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A hydrodynamic and water quality model was used to study the current status of the Lake Mariout subject to the pollution loadings from the agricultural drains and the point sources discharging directly to the Lake. The basic water quality modelling component simulates the main water quality parameters including the oxygen compounds (BOD, COD, DO, nutrients compounds (NH4, TN, TP, and finally the temperature, salinity and inorganic matter. Many scenarios have been conducted to improve the circulation and the water quality in the lake and to assess the spreading and mixing of the discharge effluents and its impact on the water quality of the main basin. Several pilot interventions were applied through the model in the Lake Mariout together with the upgrades of the East and West Waste Water Treatment Plants in order to achieve at least 5% reduction in the pollution loads entering the Mediterranean Sea through Lake Mariout in order to improve the institutional mechanisms for sustainable coastal zone management in Alexandria in particular to reduce land-based pollution to the Mediterranean Sea.

  5. Microbial safety assessment of recreation water at Lake Nabugabo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    Key words: Lake Nabugabo, microbial safety assessment, recreation water, water quality. INTRODUCTION .... bacteria of faecal origin. Lake Nabugabo ..... Waters of Tanzania. J. Biol. Life Sci. 4: 63-82. Ogutu-Ohwayo R (2002). The Effects of ...

  6. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water years 2008−2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteufel, S. Bridgett; Olson, Daniel L.; Robertson, Dale M.; Goddard, Gerald L.

    2016-09-30

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series.The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes during water years 2008–2011. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2007 through September 30, 2008 is called "water year 2008." Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are presented in this report for water years from 2008–2011. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake’s watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are available via the "USGS Annual Water Data Report" Web site: http://wdr.water.usgs.gov/.

  7. A Global Observatory of Lake Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Andrew N.; Hunter, Peter D.; Spyrakos, Evangelos; Neil, Claire; Simis, Stephen; Groom, Steve; Merchant, Chris J.; Miller, Claire A.; O'Donnell, Ruth; Scott, E. Marian

    2017-04-01

    Our planet's surface waters are a fundamental resource encompassing a broad range of ecosystems that are core to global biogeochemical cycling, biodiversity and food and energy security. Despite this, these same waters are impacted by multiple natural and anthropogenic pressures and drivers of environmental change. The complex interaction between physical, chemical and biological processes in surface waters poses significant challenges for in situ monitoring and assessment and this often limits our ability to adequately capture the dynamics of aquatic systems and our understanding of their status, functioning and response to pressures. Recent developments in the availability of satellite platforms for Earth observation (including ESA's Copernicus Programme) offers an unprecedented opportunity to deliver measures of water quality at a global scale. The UK NERC-funded GloboLakes project is a five-year research programme investigating the state of lakes and their response to climatic and other environmental drivers of change through the realization of a near-real time satellite based observatory (Sentinel-3) and archive data processing (MERIS, SeaWiFS) to produce a 20-year time-series of observed ecological parameters and lake temperature for more than 1000 lakes globally. However, the diverse and complex optical properties of lakes mean that algorithm performance often varies markedly between different water types. The GloboLakes project is overcoming this challenge by developing a processing chain whereby algorithms are dynamically selected according to the optical properties of the lake under observation. The development and validation of the GloboLakes processing chain has been supported by access to extensive in situ data from more than thirty partners around the world that are now held in the LIMNADES community-owned data repository developed under the auspices of GloboLakes. This approach has resulted in a step-change in our ability to produce regional and

  8. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteufel, S. Bridgett; Robertson, Dale M.

    2017-05-25

    IntroductionThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a database for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2014 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the periodOctober 1, 2013, through September 30, 2014, is called “water year 2014.”The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus, and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during nonfrozen periods are included for many lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes the location of the lake, area of the lake’s watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published online at http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/wi/nwis.Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available online. The Wisconsin Water Science Center’s home page is at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/wisconsin-water-science-center. Information

  9. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water years 2012–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteufel, S. Bridgett; Robertson, Dale M.

    2017-05-25

    IntroductionThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2012 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012, is called “water year 2012.”The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake’s watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published online at http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/wi/nwis.Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available online. The Wisconsin Water Science Center’s home page is at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/wisconsin-water-science-center. Information on

  10. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W.J.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Marsh, S.B.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical charac-teristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measure-ments of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series graphs of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive infor-mation for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks.

  11. THE WATER QUALITY FROM SAINT ANA LAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.VIGH

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Inside the Ciomad Massive appears a unique lake in Romania, with an exclusive precipitations alimentation regime. The lake’s origin and the morphometric elements, together with the touristic activity, determine the water’s quality and characteristics. Water status evaluation was realized using random samples taken between the years 2005 and 2010. Qualitative parameters indicate the existence of a clear water lake, belonging to ultra-oligotrophic faze. This is because the crater is covered with forest and the surface erosion is very poor. Also the aquatic vegetation is rare. From all analyzed indicators, only ammonium and total mineral nitrogen have higher values during last years. In the future, the lake needs a higher protection against water quality degradation.

  12. Conserving heat in a marine microcosm with a surface layer of fresh or brackish water: the ''semi-solar pond''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idso, S.B.; Idso, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    A modification of the standard solar pond is described, whereby thin surface layers of fresh or brackish water are used to retain heat captured naturally or supplied by passive solar panels to an underlying marine microcosm which simulates the coastal water environment of the northern Gulf of California near Puerto Penasco, Mexico. Several management options are discussed, combinations of which allow for about a 10/sup 0/C temperature advantage to be accrued as a result of employing the technique.

  13. Bioaccumulation of perfluoroalkyl acids including the isomers of perfluorooctane sulfonate in carp (Cyprinus carpio) in a sediment/water microcosm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shuhong; Zhang, Yifeng; Zhao, Shuyan; Qiang, Liwen; Chen, Meng; Zhu, Lingyan

    2016-12-01

    Carp (Cyprinus carpio) were exposed to perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) including perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) isomers in an artificially contaminated sediment/water microcosm. The uptake constant of PFAAs increased with increasing carbon chain length, whereas the elimination coefficient displayed the opposite trend, suggesting that carbon chain length plays an important role in the bioaccumulation of PFAAs. When the contribution of suspended particulate matter was taken into account, the bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) became lower (3.61-600 L/kg) compared with BAFs derived from only considering the absorption from free PFAAs in water (3.85-97000 L/kg). The results indicate that suspended particulate matter in water constitutes an important source of exposure for aquatic organisms to long-chain PFAAs. Linear (n-)PFOS was preferentially accumulated compared with branched isomers in carp. Among the branched isomers, 1m-PFOS displayed the greatest bioaccumulation, whereas m2 -PFOS had the lowest. Linear PFOS displayed greater partitioning ability from blood to other tissues over branched PFOS (br-PFOS) isomers, leading to a relatively lower n-PFOS proportion in blood. In summary, suspended particulate matter made a contribution to the accumulation of long-chain PFAAs in aquatic organisms, and n-PFOS was preferentially accumulated compared with br-PFOS isomers. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:3005-3013. © 2016 SETAC.

  14. Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge Annual Water Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) manages multiple water management units. Silver Lake is the largest unit that is utilized primarily as a water storage...

  15. (Bio)degradation of glyphosate in water-sediment microcosms - A stable isotope co-labeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shizong; Seiwert, Bettina; Kästner, Matthias; Miltner, Anja; Schäffer, Andreas; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Yang, Qi; Nowak, Karolina M

    2016-08-01

    Glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) are frequently detected in water and sediments. Up to date, there are no comprehensive studies on the fate of glyphosate in water-sediment microcosms according to OECD 308 guideline. Stable isotope co-labeled (13)C3(15)N-glyphosate was used to determine the turnover mass balance, formation of metabolites, and formation of residues over a period of 80 days. In the water-sediment system, 56% of the initial (13)C3-glyphosate equivalents was ultimately mineralized, whereas the mineralization in the water system (without sediment) was low, reaching only 2% of (13)C-glyphosate equivalents. This finding demonstrates the key role of sediments in its degradation. Glyphosate was detected below detection limit in the water compartment on day 40, but could still be detected in the sediments, ultimately reaching 5% of (13)C3(15)N-glyphosate equivalents. A rapid increase in (13)C(15)N-AMPA was noted after 10 days, and these transformation products ultimately constituted 26% of the (13)C3-glyphosate equivalents and 79% of the (15)N-glyphosate equivalents. In total, 10% of the (13)C label and 12% of the (15)N label were incorporated into amino acids, indicating no risk bearing biogenic residue formation from (13)C3(15)N-glyphosate. Initially, glyphosate was biodegraded via the sarcosine pathway related to microbial growth, as shown by co-labeled (13)C(15)N-glycine and biogenic residue formation. Later, degradation via AMPA dominated under starvation conditions, as shown by the contents of (13)C-glycine. The presented data provide the first evidence of the speciation of the non-extractable residues as well as the utilization of glyphosate as a carbon and nitrogen source in the water-sediment system. This study also highlights the contribution of both the sarcosine and the AMPA degradation pathways under these conditions.

  16. Removal of diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole from synthetic municipal waste water in microcosm downflow constructed wetlands: Start-up results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrotek, Monika; Sochacki, Adam; Felis, Ewa; Miksch, Korneliusz

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the start-up removal of pharmaceutical compounds diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole in microcosm downflow constructed wetlands and their effect on the performance of the studied constructed wetlands, and also to assess the effect of plants on the removal of these compounds. The experimental system that was used in this 86-day experiment consisted of 24 columns filled up to 70 cm with predominantly sandy material. Four types of columns were used (six replicates) depending on the presence of plants (Phalaris arundinacea L. var. picta L.) and the presence of pharmaceutical compounds in the influent. The influent was synthetic municipal waste water to which a mixture of 5 mg/L of diclofenac and 5 mg/L of sulfamethoxazole was added. The observed removal of diclofenac was moderate (approx. 50%) and the removal of sulfamethoxazole was relatively low (24-30%). It was found that the removal of diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole was not affected by the vegetation. The presence of diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole in the influent had significant effect on the effluent concentration of N-NO3 and the water loss in the columns, which in both cases were lower than in the control columns. The scope for further research was discussed.

  17. The Role of Ecological Research in Great Lakes Water Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    This talk will present some current ecological research in the Great Lakes. It will focus on how research examines aspects of water quality that relate to Basin-Lake and Human-Water interactions in the context of water sustainability issues for the Great Lakes.

  18. Molecular- and cultivation-based analyses of microbial communities in oil field water and in microcosms amended with nitrate to control H{sub 2}S production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaraswamy, Raji; Ebert, Sara; Fedorak, Phillip M.; Foght, Julia M. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Biological Sciences; Gray, Murray R. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2011-03-15

    Nitrate injection into oil fields is an alternative to biocide addition for controlling sulfide production ('souring') caused by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). This study examined the suitability of several cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent methods to assess potential microbial activities (sulfidogenesis and nitrate reduction) and the impact of nitrate amendment on oil field microbiota. Microcosms containing produced waters from two Western Canadian oil fields exhibited sulfidogenesis that was inhibited by nitrate amendment. Most probable number (MPN) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of uncultivated produced waters showed low cell numbers ({<=}10{sup 3} MPN/ml) dominated by SRB (>95% relative abundance). MPN analysis also detected nitrate-reducing sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NRSOB) and heterotrophic nitrate-reducing bacteria (HNRB) at numbers too low to be detected by FISH or denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). In microcosms containing produced water fortified with sulfate, near-stoichiometric concentrations of sulfide were produced. FISH analyses of the microcosms after 55 days of incubation revealed that Gammaproteobacteria increased from undetectable levels to 5-20% abundance, resulting in a decreased proportion of Deltaproteobacteria (50-60% abundance). DGGE analysis confirmed the presence of Delta- and Gammaproteobacteria and also detected Bacteroidetes. When sulfate-fortified produced waters were amended with nitrate, sulfidogenesis was inhibited and Deltaproteobacteria decreased to levels undetectable by FISH, with a concomitant increase in Gammaproteobacteria from below detection to 50-60% abundance. DGGE analysis of these microcosms yielded sequences of Gamma- and Epsilonproteobacteria related to presumptive HNRB and NRSOB (Halomonas, Marinobacterium, Marinobacter, Pseudomonas and Arcobacter), thus supporting chemical data indicating that nitrate-reducing bacteria out-compete SRB when nitrate is

  19. 33 CFR 162.138 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; speed rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... speed not greater than— (i) 12 statute miles per hour (10.4 knots) between Fort Gratiot Light and St... to Lake Erie; speed rules. 162.138 Section 162.138 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... REGULATIONS § 162.138 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; speed rules. (a) Maximum speed limit...

  20. Estimation of lake water - groundwater interactions in meromictic mining lakes by modelling isotope signatures of lake water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebach, Anne; Dietz, Severine; Lessmann, Dieter; Knoeller, Kay

    2008-03-01

    A method is presented to assess lake water-groundwater interactions by modelling isotope signatures of lake water using meteorological parameters and field data. The modelling of delta(18)O and deltaD variations offers information about the groundwater influx into a meromictic Lusatian mining lake. Therefore, a water balance model is combined with an isotope water balance model to estimate analogies between simulated and measured isotope signatures within the lake water body. The model is operated with different evaporation rates to predict delta(18)O and deltaD values in a lake that is only controlled by weather conditions with neither groundwater inflow nor outflow. Comparisons between modelled and measured isotope values show whether the lake is fed by the groundwater or not. Furthermore, our investigations show that an adaptation of the Craig and Gordon model [H. Craig, L.I. Gordon. Deuterium and oxygen-18 variations in the ocean and the marine atmosphere. In Stable Isotopes in Oceanographic Studies and Paleotemperature, Spoleto, E. Tongiorgi (Ed.), pp. 9-130, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Laboratorio di Geologia Nucleare, Pisa (1965).] to specific conditions in temperate regions seems necessary.

  1. 1997-1998 lake water quality assessment for Upper Des Lacs Lake, North Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of the data collected on Upper Des Lacs Lake as part of the State's Lake Water Quality Assessment Project. The Project is designed to characterize...

  2. LANDSAT-BASED WATER QUALITY MONITORING OF PYRAMID LAKE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe (PLPT) in cooperation with federal, state and local entities has been able to increase stream flow, establish water quality standards and improve fish habitat in the Truckee River, a primary source of water for pyramid Lake. In the past, pyramid Lake wat...

  3. Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge : 2002 Annual Water Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 2002 Annual Water Management Plan for Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge is used as aguide to manage the refuge's 4 lakes and 5 moist soil units, for...

  4. Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge : 2003 Annual Water Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 2003 Annual Water Management Plan for Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge is used as aguide to manage the refuge's 4 lakes and 5 moist soil units, for...

  5. Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge : 2006 Annual Water Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 2006 Annual Water Management Plan for Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge is used as aguide to manage the refuge's 4 lakes and 5 moist soil units, for...

  6. Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge : 2004 Annual Water Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 2004 Annual Water Management Plan for Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge is used as aguide to manage the refuge's 4 lakes and 5 moist soil units, for...

  7. Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge : 2000 Annual Water Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 2000 Annual Water Management Plan for Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge is used as aguide to manage the refuge's 4 lakes and 5 moist soil units, for...

  8. Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge : 2001 Annual Water Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 2001 Annual Water Management Plan for Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge is used as aguide to manage the refuge's 4 lakes and 5 moist soil units, for...

  9. Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge : 1999 Annual Water Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 1999 Annual Water Management Plan for Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge is used as aguide to manage the refuge's 4 lakes and 5 moist soil units, for...

  10. Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge : 2005 Annual Water Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 2005 Annual Water Management Plan for Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge is used as aguide to manage the refuge's 4 lakes and 5 moist soil units, for...

  11. Small-scale soil water repellency in pine rizhosphere associated with ectomycorrhiza is affected by nutrient patchiness: a soil microcosms study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Elena; Hallett, Paul; Johnson, David; Moore, Lucy; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Jiménez-Pinilla, Patricia; Arcenegui, Victoria

    2014-05-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) or hydrophobicity has been commonly related to organic compounds released from the roots or decomposition of different plant species (Doerr et al., 2000). In addition, fungi and microorganisms that are associated with specific plants, could also influence SWR through the production of exudates or cellular material that form hydrophobic coatings on soil surfaces (Feeney et al., 2004; Hallett and Young, 1999) or act as surfactants. Nutrient availability, microbial biomass, organic matter and specific exudates have all been associated with the development of SWR. In terms of plant productivity, these impacts can be significant as their interaction with pore structure changes at the root-soil interface regulates both water transport and storage (Sperry et al., 1998). In boreal forests, basidiomycetous fungi are known to have a large impact on the development of SWR. These fungi are important degraders of organic material and symbionts forming ectomycorrhizal fungi (EF) associations with trees. Although many researchers have suggested a strong positive impact of EF on the ability of plants to capture water from soils, their impact on SWR at the root-soil interface and spatially within soil with a patchy nutrient distribution has not yet been investigated. This study used microcosms with mycelia systems of the EF extending from Pinus sylvestris host plants. Each microcosm was incubated during 15 days and contained plastic cup with 33P under the roots. The transfer of P from the mycelium to the host plant was monitored using a radioactive tracers and a non-destructive electronic autoradiography system in another study (data not published). SWR was measured using different approaches; as repellency index, R using a microinfiltrometer with a contact radius of 0.1 mm (modified from Hallet et al., 2002) and with the water drop penetration time test (WDPT). Sorptivity and SWR were measured between 40-50 points/microcosms. Results obtained with both

  12. The effects of H2SO4 and (NH42SO4 treatments on the chemistry of soil drainage water and pine seedlings in forest soil microcosms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Stutter

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment comparing effects of sulphuric acid and reduced N deposition on soil water quality and on chemical and physical growth indicators for forest ecosystems is described. Six H2SO4 and (NH42SO4 treatment loads, from 0 – 44 and 0 – 25 kmolc ha-1 yr-1, respectively, were applied to outdoor microcosms of Pinus sylvestris seedlings in 3 acid to intermediate upland soils (calc-silicate, quartzite and granite for 2 years. Different soil types responded similarly to H2SO4 loads, resulting in decreased leachate pH, but differently to reduced N inputs. In microcosms of calc-silicate soil, nitrification of NH4 resulted in lower pH and higher cation leaching than in acid treatments. By contrast, in quartzite and granite soils, (NH42SO4 promoted direct cation leaching, although leachate pH increased. The results highlighted the importance of soil composition on the nature of the cations leached, the SO4 adsorption capacities and microbial N transformations. Greater seedling growth on calc-silicate soils under both treatment types was related to sustained nutrient availability. Reductions in foliar P and Mg with higher N treatments were observed for seedlings in the calc-silicate soil. There were few treatment effects on quartzite and granite microcosm tree seedlings since P limitation precluded seedling growth responses to treatments. Hence, any benefits of N deposition to seedlings on quartzite and granite soils appeared limited by availability of co-nutrients, exacerbated by rapid depletion of soil exchangeable base cations. Keywords: acidification, manipulation, nitrogen, ammonium, deposition, soil, drainage, pine, microcosms, forest

  13. Hydrology and water quality of Geneva Lake, Walworth County, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Dale M.; Goddard, Gerald L.; Mergener, Elizabeth A.; Rose, William J.; Garrision, Paul J.

    2002-01-01

    As part of continuing efforts to improve the water quality of Geneva Lake, a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and the Geneva Lake Environmental Agency was initiated in 1997 to document the present quality of the lake and its sediments, compute detailed hydrologic and nutrient (primarily phosphorus) budgets for the lake, estimate how changes in nutrient loading may affect water quality, and describe changes in the lake over the past 170 years by comparing water quality measured in this study with historical measurements and sediment-core information. This report presents the results of this collaborative study.

  14. Water quality of Wenchi Crater Lake in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malairajan Singanan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination of physico-chemical properties of water samples from Wenchi Crater Lake in Ethiopia was carried out. Selected heavy metals in water, sediment, and plant samples from the lake were also comparatively determined. The results indicated that most general physico-chemical properties of the lake water fell within those recommended for drinking water. However, the lake water was found to be high in some heavy metals, which also accumulated in the sediment. Bioconcentration of these metals was also observed in the plant samples.

  15. Methane oxidation in anoxic lake waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guangyi; Zopfi, Jakob; Niemann, Helge; Lehmann, Moritz

    2017-04-01

    Freshwater habitats such as lakes are important sources of methante (CH4), however, most studies in lacustrine environments so far provided evidence for aerobic methane oxidation only, and little is known about the importance of anaerobic oxidation of CH4 (AOM) in anoxic lake waters. In marine environments, sulfate reduction coupled to AOM by archaea has been recognized as important sinks of CH4. More recently, the discorvery of anaerobic methane oxidizing denitrifying bacteria represents a novel and possible alternative AOM pathway, involving reactive nitrogen species (e.g., nitrate and nitrite) as electron acceptors in the absence of oxygen. We investigate anaerobic methane oxidation in the water column of two hydrochemically contrasting sites in Lake Lugano, Switzerland. The South Basin displays seasonal stratification, the development of a benthic nepheloid layer and anoxia during summer and fall. The North Basin is permanently stratified with anoxic conditions below 115m water depth. Both Basins accumulate seasonally (South Basin) or permanently (North Basin) large amounts of CH4 in the water column below the chemocline, providing ideal conditions for methanotrophic microorganisms. Previous work revealed a high potential for aerobic methane oxidation within the anoxic water column, but no evidence for true AOM. Here, we show depth distribution data of dissolved CH4, methane oxidation rates and nutrients at both sites. In addition, we performed high resolution phylogenetic analyses of microbial community structures and conducted radio-label incubation experiments with concentrated biomass from anoxic waters and potential alternative electron acceptor additions (nitrate, nitrite and sulfate). First results from the unamended experiments revealed maximum activity of methane oxidation below the redoxcline in both basins. While the incubation experiments neither provided clear evidence for NOx- nor sulfate-dependent AOM, the phylogenetic analysis revealed the

  16. Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : 1983 Water Management Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes water management on Benton Lake NWR during 1983. The effects of water levels on marsh units, water elevations, and a pumping report are...

  17. Medicine Lake NWR Water Use Report- 2007 and 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains locations and water use at Medicine Lake NWR for 2007 and 2009. The document includes summaries of 2007 and 2009 water use, 2008 and 2010 water...

  18. Changes in Simpson’s Diversity Index in Microcosms Impacted with Monosodium Methane Arsenate

    OpenAIRE

    Peter A. Kish; Nelson W. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The objective of our studies is to analyze environmental impacts of Monosodium Methane Arsenate, MSMA, on aquatic habitats using the Aqua-Terra microcosm system. MSMA was applied at environmentally relevant(recommended) doses to microcosms to determine the change in biodiversity and the bio-concentration of arsenic in the aquatic plants (_Elodea Sp._) used in the microcosms as an oxygen source. The microcosms are filled with unfiltered pond water and the diversity of each microcosm was deter...

  19. Water quality of selected lakes in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington, with respect to lake acidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turney, G.L.; Dion, N.P.; Sumioka, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen lakes in Mount Rainier National park were evaluated for general chemical characteristics, sensitivity to acidification by acidic precipitation, and degree of existing acidification. The lakes studies were Allen, one of the Chenuis group, Crescent, Crystal, Eleanor, Fan, one of the Golfen group, Marsh, Mowich, Mystic, Shriner, and two unnamed lakes. The lakes were sampled in August 1983. The major cations were calcium and sodium, and the major anion was bicarbonate. Alkalinity concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 9.0 mg/L in 12 of the lakes. Allen Lake was the exception, having an alkalinity concentration of 27 mg/L. The pH values for all of the lakes ranged from 5.8 to 6.5. In most of the lakes, vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance were relatively uniform. Exceptions to general water quality patterns were observed in three lakes. Allen Lake had a specific conductance value of 58 Microsiemens/cm. The lake of the Golfen group was anaerobic at the bottom and had relatively high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved metals, and a lower light transmission than the other lakes studied. One of the unnamed lakes had relatively high concentrations of phytoplankton and dissolved organic carbon and relatively low levels of light transmission. Comparisons of lake data to acid-sensitivity thresholds for specific conductance and alkalinity indicated that all of the lakes except Allen would be sensitive to acidic precipitation. The small sizes of the lakes, and their locations in basins of high precipitation and weathering-resistant rock types, enhance their sensitivity. None of the lakes in this study appeared to be presently acidified.

  20. Continuous water-quality monitoring to improve lake management at Lake Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle Moorman; Tom Augspurger

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has partnered with U.S. Geological Survey to establish 2 continuous water-quality monitoring stations at Lake Mattamuskeet. Stations on the east and west side of the lake measure water level, clarity, dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, salinity, and conductivity.

  1. Watershed land use effects on lake water quality in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders; Trolle, Dennis; Søndergaard, Martin

    2012-01-01

    in the watershed. When examining the effect of different near-freshwater land zones in contrast to the entire watershed, relationships generally improved with size of zone (25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 m from the edge of lake and streams) but were by far strongest using the entire watershed. The proportion......Mitigating nutrient losses from anthropogenic nonpoint sources is today of particular importance for improving the water quality of numerous freshwater lakes worldwide. Several empirical relationships between land use and in-lake water quality variables have been developed, but they are often weak......, which can in part be attributed to lack of detailed information about land use activities or point sources. We examined a comprehensive data set comprising land use data, point-source information, and in-lake water quality for 414 Danish lakes. By excluding point-source-influenced lakes (n = 210...

  2. Water balance and irrigation water pumping of Lake Merdada for potato farming in Dieng Highland, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadlillah, Lintang N; Widyastuti, M

    2016-08-01

    Lakes provide water resources for domestic use, livestock, irrigational use, etc. Water availability of lakes can be estimated using lake water balance. Lake water balance is calculated from the water input and output of a lake. Dieng Highland has several volcanic lakes in its surroundings. Lake Merdada in Dieng Highland has been experiencing extensive water pumping for several years more than other lakes in the surrounding area. It provides irrigation water for potato farming in Dieng Highland. The hydrological model of this lake has not been studied. The modeled water balance in this research uses primary data, i.e., bathymetric data, soil texture, and outflow discharge, as well as secondary data, i.e., rainfall, temperature, Landsat 7 ETM+ band 8 image, and land use. Water balance input components consist of precipitation on the surface area, surface (direct) runoff from the catchment area, and groundwater inflow and outflow (G net), while the output components consist of evaporation, river outflow, and irrigation. It shows that groundwater is the dominant input and output of the lake. On the other hand, the actual irrigation water pumping plays the leading role as human-induced alteration of outflow discharge. The maximum irrigation pumping modeling shows that it will decrease lake storage up to 37.14 % per month and may affect the ecosystem inside the lake.

  3. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment: Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment report for Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information, provides an assessment of water...

  4. climate change and lake water resourcesin sub-saharan africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ABSTRACT. This review assesses the impact of climate change on lake water resources in Sub-Saharan Africa(SSA). ... population growth, water pollution, economic progress, land use .... et al., [29] pointed out that warmer air temperature is.

  5. Lake-level variability and water availability in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Douglas A.; Thompson, Todd A.; Booth, Robert K.; Nicholas, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    In this report, we present recorded and reconstructed (pre-historical) changes in water levels in the Great Lakes, relate them to climate changes of the past, and highlight major water-availability implications for storage, coastal ecosystems, and human activities. 'Water availability,' as conceptualized herein, includes a recognition that water must be available for human and natural uses, but the balancing of how much should be set aside for which use is not discussed. The Great Lakes Basin covers a large area of North America. The lakes capture and store great volumes of water that are critical in maintaining human activities and natural ecosystems. Water enters the lakes mostly in the form of precipitation and streamflow. Although flow through the connecting channels is a primary output from the lakes, evaporation is also a major output. Water levels in the lakes vary naturally on timescales that range from hours to millennia; storage of water in the lakes changes at the seasonal to millennial scales in response to lake-level changes. Short-term changes result from storm surges and seiches and do not affect storage. Seasonal changes are driven by differences in net basin supply during the year related to snowmelt, precipitation, and evaporation. Annual to millennial changes are driven by subtle to major climatic changes affecting both precipitation (and resulting streamflow) and evaporation. Rebounding of the Earth's surface in response to loss of the weight of melted glaciers has differentially affected water levels. Rebound rates have not been uniform across the basin, causing the hydrologic outlet of each lake to rise in elevation more rapidly than some parts of the coastlines. The result is a long-term change in lake level with respect to shoreline features that differs from site to site. The reconstructed water-level history of Lake Michigan-Huron over the past 4,700 years shows three major high phases from 2,300 to 3,300, 1,100 to 2,000, and 0 to 800

  6. Water pollution control technology and strategy for river-lake systems: a case study in Gehu Lake and Taige Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimin; Zhang, Yongchun; Gao, Yuexiang; Zhang, Houhu; Cao, Jianying; Cai, Jinbang; Kong, Xiangji

    2011-07-01

    The Taoge water system is located in the upstream of Taihu Lake basin and is characterized by its multi-connected rivers and lakes. In this paper, current analyses of hydrology, hydrodynamics and water pollution of Gehu Lake and Taige Canal are presented. Several technologies are proposed for pollution prevention and control, and water environmental protection in the Taihu Lake basin. These included water pollution control integration technology for the water systems of Gehu Lake, Taige Canal and Caoqiao River. Additionally, river-lake water quality and quantity regulation technology, ecological restoration technology for polluted and degraded water bodies, and water environmental integration management and optimization strategies were also examined. The main objectives of these strategies are to: (a) improve environmental quality of relative water bodies, prevent pollutants from entering Gehu Lake and Taige Canal, and ensure that the clean water after the pre-treatment through Gehu Lake is not polluted before entering the Taihu Lake through Taige Canal; (b) stably and efficiently intercept and decrease the pollution load entering the lake through enhancing the river outlet ecological system structure function and water self-purifying capacity, and (c) designate Gehu Lake as a regulation system for water quality and water quantity in the Taoge water system and thus guarantee the improvement of the water quality of the inflow into Taihu Lake.

  7. Clarks Hill Lake Water Quality Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    MACROINVERTEBRATE TAXONOMIC LIST CLARKS HILL LAKE 1981 Phylum Platyhelminthes Order Diptera Class Turbellaria Ablabesmyia parajanta unidentified Planariidae A...HILL LAKE 1981 Phylum Platyhelminthes Order Diptera (continued) Planaria sp.,’ Bezzia sp. 2 unidentified Planariidae Chaoborus punctipennis unidentified

  8. Water Quality Index for Assessment of Rudrasagar Lake Ecosystem, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyanta pal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water quality of lakes, rivers and reservoirs in developing countries like India is being degraded because of the contaminated inflows and surrounding influence. There is a serious need for appropriate water quality monitoring for future planning and management of Lake and other type of water resources. Quality of water in Rudrasagar Lake, Tripura, India has been investigated in this paper. Water Quality Index (WQI was applied in Rudrasagar Lake India using water quality parameters like pH, Turbidity, Conductivity, Hardness, Alkalinity, Dissolved Oxygen, Biochemical Oxygen Demand and Nitrate. Based on the importance of the parameter for aquatic life the relative weight is assigned to each water quality parameter ranged from 1 to 4. Tests were performed on site using electronic measuring device as well as on Laboratory with samples of water collected from different locations of Rudrasagar Lake. It shows that water quality of Rudrasagar Lake falls within the ‗good water‘ category but marginally. Continuous monitoring of Rudrasagar lake is suggested for proper management.

  9. [Water rights and use on Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge and Benton Lake Wetland Management District: 2004 water year

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The tables and graphs provided in this Excel Workbook summarize water use, water balance, gauge readings, pumping data, and marsh unit elevations on Benton Lake NWR...

  10. [Water rights and use on Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge and Benton Lake Wetland Management District: 2003 water year

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The tables and graphs provided in this Excel Workbook summarize water use, water balance, gauge readings, pumping data, and marsh unit elevations on Benton Lake NWR...

  11. Corexit 9500 microcosm data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Relative abundance of bacterial groups in the microcosms. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Techtman, S., M. Zhuang, P. Campo-Moreno, E....

  12. Analysis of black water aggregation in Taihu Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-hua LU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Black water aggregation (BWA in Taihu Lake is a disaster for the lake environment. It is a phenomenon resulting from water environmental deterioration and eutrophication caused by accumulation of pollutants in the lake, according to research on the water quality, pollutants of BWA, and occurrence mechanisms of BWA. Dead algae are the material base of BWA, the polluted sediment is an important factor for the formation of BWA, and hydrological and meteorological conditions such as sun light, air temperature, wind speed, and water flow are the other factors that may lead to the formation of BWA. Thioether substances such as dimethyl trisulfide are the representative pollutants of BWA. Parameters such as chlorophyll-a, DO, pH, and water temperature are sensitive indicators of BWA. Measures such as algae collection, ecological dredging, pollution control, and water diversion from the Yangtze River to the lake, are effective, and strengthening aeration is an emergency measure to control BWA.

  13. Perchlorate in Lake Water from an Operating Diamond Mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lianna J D; Ptacek, Carol J; Blowes, David W; Groza, Laura G; Moncur, Michael C

    2015-07-07

    Mining-related perchlorate [ClO4(-)] in the receiving environment was investigated at the operating open-pit and underground Diavik diamond mine, Northwest Territories, Canada. Samples were collected over four years and ClO4(-) was measured in various mine waters, the 560 km(2) ultraoligotrophic receiving lake, background lake water and snow distal from the mine. Groundwaters from the underground mine had variable ClO4(-) concentrations, up to 157 μg L(-1), and were typically an order of magnitude higher than concentrations in combined mine waters prior to treatment and discharge to the lake. Snow core samples had a mean ClO4(-) concentration of 0.021 μg L(-1) (n=16). Snow and lake water Cl(-)/ClO4(-) ratios suggest evapoconcentration was not an important process affecting lake ClO4(-) concentrations. The multiyear mean ClO4(-) concentrations in the lake were 0.30 μg L(-1) (n = 114) in open water and 0.24 μg L(-1) (n = 107) under ice, much below the Canadian drinking water guideline of 6 μg L(-1). Receiving lake concentrations of ClO4(-) generally decreased year over year and ClO4(-) was not likely [biogeo]chemically attenuated within the receiving lake. The discharge of treated mine water was shown to contribute mining-related ClO4(-) to the lake and the low concentrations after 12 years of mining were attributed to the large volume of the receiving lake.

  14. Fluctuations of Lake Orta water levels: preliminary analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmi Saidi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available While the effects of past industrial pollution on the chemistry and biology of Lake Orta have been well documented, annual and seasonal fluctuations of lake levels have not yet been studied. Considering their potential impacts on both the ecosystem and on human safety, fluctuations in lake levels are an important aspect of limnological research. In the enormous catchment of Lake Maggiore, there are many rivers and lakes, and the amount of annual precipitation is both high and concentrated in spring and autumn. This has produced major flood events, most recently in November 2014. Flood events are also frequent on Lake Orta, occurring roughly triennially since 1917. The 1926, 1951, 1976 and 2014 floods were severe, with lake levels raised from 2.30 m to 3.46 m above the hydrometric zero. The most important event occurred in 1976, with a maximum level equal to 292.31 m asl and a return period of 147 years. In 2014 the lake level reached 291.89 m asl and its return period was 54 years. In this study, we defined trends and temporal fluctuations in Lake Orta water levels from 1917 to 2014, focusing on extremes. We report both annual maximum and seasonal variations of the lake water levels over this period. Both Mann-Kendall trend tests and simple linear regression were utilized to detect monotonic trends in annual and seasonal extremes, and logistic regression was used to detect trends in the number of flood events. Lake level decreased during winter and summer seasons, and a small but statistically non-significant positive trend was found in the number of flood events over the period. We provide estimations of return period for lake levels, a metric which could be used in planning lake flood protection measures.

  15. Long-Term Variability of Satellite Lake Surface Water Temperatures in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierach, M. M.; Matsumoto, K.; Holt, B.; McKinney, P. J.; Tokos, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Great Lakes are the largest group of freshwater lakes on Earth that approximately 37 million people depend upon for fresh drinking water, food, flood and drought mitigation, and natural resources that support industry, jobs, shipping and tourism. Recent reports have stated (e.g., the National Climate Assessment) that climate change can impact and exacerbate a range of risks to the Great Lakes, including changes in the range and distribution of certain fish species, increased invasive species and harmful algal blooms, declining beach health, and lengthened commercial navigation season. In this study, we will examine the impact of climate change on the Laurentian Great Lakes through investigation of long-term lake surface water temperatures (LSWT). We will use the ATSR Reprocessing for Climate: Lake Surface Water Temperature & Ice Cover (ARC-Lake) product over the period 1995-2012 to investigate individual and interlake variability. Specifically, we will quantify the seasonal amplitude of LSWTs, the first and last appearances of the 4°C isotherm (i.e., an important identifier of the seasonal evolution of the lakes denoting winter and summer stratification), and interpret these quantities in the context of global interannual climate variability such as ENSO.

  16. Water quality of selected lakes in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington with respect to lake acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, G.L.; Dion, N.P.; Sumioka, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen lakes in Mount Rainier National Park were evaluated for general chemical characteristics, sensitivity to acidification by acidic precipitation, and degree of existing acidification. The lakes studies were Allen, one of the Chenuis group, Crescent , Crystal, Eleanor, Fan, one of the Golden group, Marsh, Mowich, Mystic, Shriner, and two unnamed lakes. The lakes were sampled in August 1983. Specific conductance values were generally 21 microsiemens/cm at 25 C or less, and dissolved solids concentrations were generally 20 mg/L or less. The major cations were calcium and sodium, and the major anion was bicarbonate. Alkalinity concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 9.0 mg/L in 12 of the lakes. Allen Lake was the exception, having an alkalinity concentration of 27 mg/L. The pH values for all of the lakes ranged from 5.8 to 6.5. In most of the lakes, vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance were relatively uniform. In the deeper lakes, temperature decreased with depth and dissolved-oxygen concentrations increased to about 20 feet, remained constant to 80 ft, then decreased with increasing depth. Exceptions to general water quality patterns were observed in three lakes. Allen Lake had a specific conductance value of 58 Microsiemens/cm. The lake of the Golden group was anaerobic at the bottom and had relatively high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved metals, and a lower light transmission than the other lakes studied. One of the unnamed lakes had relatively high concentrations of phytoplankton and dissolved organic carbon and relatively low levels of light transmission. Comparisons of lake data to acid-sensitivity thresholds for specific conductance and alkalinity indicated that all of the lakes except Allen would be sensitive to acidic precipitation. The small sizes of the lakes, and their locations in basins of high precipitation and weathering-resistant rock types, enhance their sensitivity. None of the

  17. THE WATER BALANCE OF LAKE LEŞU (ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba HORVÁTH

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Lake Leşu is one of the reservoirs that form the hidrotechnical complex Drăgan-Iad in the upper basin of the Crişul Repede River. The water balance of the lake is closely linked, to the primary functions of the lake. In this paper, we present each of the components that characterize the water balance, to understand which are the most significant ones. We will see how the different components of the water balance equation effect the change of volume in the reservoir. Every component is calculated separately, so precipitation, evaporation, runoff of the basin and the discharge of the dam.

  18. Characterization of lake water and ground water movement in the littoral zone of Williams Lake, a closed-basin lake in North central Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, P.F.; Reddy, M.M.; LaBaugh, J.W.; Parkhurst, R.S.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Winter, T.C.; Antweiler, R.C.; Dean, W.E.

    2003-01-01

    Williams Lake, Minnesota is a closed-basin lake that is a flow-through system with respect to ground water. Ground-water input represents half of the annual water input and most of the chemical input to the lake. Chemical budgets indicate that the lake is a sink for calcium, yet surficial sediments contain little calcium carbonate. Sediment pore-water samplers (peepers) were used to characterize solute fluxes at the lake-water-ground-water interface in the littoral zone and resolve the apparent disparity between the chemical budget and sediment data. Pore-water depth profiles of the stable isotopes ??18O and ??2H were non-linear where ground water seeped into the lake, with a sharp transition from lake-water values to ground-water values in the top 10 cm of sediment. These data indicate that advective inflow to the lake is the primary mechanism for solute flux from ground water. Linear interstitial velocities determined from ??2H profiles (316 to 528 cm/yr) were consistent with velocities determined independently from water budget data and sediment porosity (366 cm/yr). Stable isotope profiles were generally linear where water flowed out of the lake into ground water. However, calcium profiles were not linear in the same area and varied in response to input of calcium carbonate from the littoral zone and subsequent dissolution. The comparison of pore-water calcium profiles to pore-water stable isotope profiles indicate calcium is not conservative. Based on the previous understanding that 40-50 % of the calcium in Williams Lake is retained, the pore-water profiles indicate aquatic plants in the littoral zone are recycling the retained portion of calcium. The difference between the pore-water depth profiles of calcium and ??18O and ??2H demonstrate the importance of using stable isotopes to evaluate flow direction and source through the lake-water-ground-water interface and evaluate mechanisms controlling the chemical balance of lakes. Published in 2003 by John Wiley

  19. Assessment of water availability and demand in Lake Guiers , Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambou, D.; Weihrauch, D.; Hellwing, V.; Diekkrüger, B.; Höllermann, B.; Gaye, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Assessment of water availability and demand in Lake Guiers, SenegalWater resources are critical to economic growth and social development. In most African countries, supply of drinking water to satisfy population needs is a key issue because of population growth and climate and land use change. During the last three decades, increasing population, changing patterns of water demand, and concentration of population and economic activities in urban areas has pressurize Senegal's freshwater resources. To overcome this deficit, Senegal turned, to the exploitation of the Lake Guiers. It is the sole water reservoir which can be used extensively as a stable freshwater. Its water is use for irrigating crops and sugar refinery and as a drinking water resource for urban centres, including Dakar, the capital city of Senegal, as well as for the local population and animal herds. To ensure sustainability, a greater understanding of Lake Guiers's water resources and effective management of its use will be required. In this study we developed and quantified future water situation (water availability and demand) in Lake Guiers under scenarios of climate change and population growth until 2050, using the water management model WEAP (Water Evaluation And Planning system). The results show that the pressure on Lake Guiers's water resources will increase, leading to greater competition between agriculture and municipal demand site. Decreasing inflows due to climate change will aggravate this situation. WEAP results offer basis to assister lake Guiers water resources manager for an efficient long-term planning and management. Keywords: climate change, population growth , IWRM, Lake Guiers, Senegal

  20. Water quality assessment in a shallow lake used for tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dembowska Ewa A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The routine evaluation of water quality is limited to lakes with the largest area. In Poland, only lakes with an area exceeding 50 hectares are monitored by the State Environmental Monitoring System. For many local communities, however, small lakes are more important. This applies mainly to areas with a small number of lakes, where even the smallest lakes are used for various purposes. This paper presents the results of phytoplankton analysis in a small and shallow lake used for recreation. The study was conducted at three sites located in different parts of the lake. A total of 122 algae taxa were identified in the phytoplankton, mainly diatoms and green algae. The most constant taxa in the lake were: Stephanodiscus hantzschii, Desmodesmus communis, Pediastrum tetras and Crucigenia tetrapedia. The average phytoplankton biomass was 37 mg l−1. The maximum biomass, almost 140 mg dm−3, was recorded in late July at the site located near the beach. At that time, there was a massive cyanobacterial bloom composed of Microcystis wesenbergii and Aphanizomenon issatschenkoi. Based on these studies, the lake should be classified as hypertrophic with bad ecological status. This lake should not be used for recreational purposes in the current state.

  1. Water Quality Investigations at Lake Merritt in Oakland, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, G.; Casino, C.; Johnson, K.; Huang, J.; Le, A.; Truisi, V. M.; Turner, D.; Yanez, F.; Yu, J. F.; Unigarro, M.; Vue, G.; Garduno, L.; Cuff, K.

    2005-12-01

    Lake Merritt is a saltwater tidal lagoon that forms a portion of a wildlife refuge in downtown Oakland, California. The general area was designated as the nation's first wildlife refuge in 1869, and is currently the home to over 90 species of migrating waterfowl, as well as a variety of aquatic wildlife. Situated within an area composed of compacted marine sediment located near the center of Oakland, Lake Merritt also serves as a major local catchment basin, receiving significant urban runoff from a 4,650 acre local watershed through 60 storm drains and four culverted creeks. Due to factors related to its geographical location, Lake Merritt has suffered from poor water quality at various times throughout its history. In fact, in May of 1999 the US Environmental Protection Agency designated Lake Merritt as a body of water whose beneficial uses are impaired, mainly due to high levels of trash and low levels of dissolved oxygen. As a contribution to continuing efforts to monitor and assess water quality of the Lake, we began a water quality investigation during the Summer of 2005, which included the measurement of dissolved oxygen concentrations of samples collected near its surface at over 85 different locations. These measurements were made using a sensor attached to a PASCO data- logger. The sensor measures the electric current produced by a chemical reaction in its probe, which is composed of a platinum cathode and a silver anode surrounded by an electrolyte solution. Results of these measurements were statistically analyzed, mapped, and then used in assessing the quality of Lake Merritt's water, particularly in relation to supporting aquatic biota. Preliminary analysis of results obtained so far indicates that the highest quality waters in Lake Merritt occur in areas that are closest to a source of San Francisco Bay water, as well as those areas nearby where water circulation is robust. Significantly high levels of dissolved oxygen were measured in an area that

  2. Thermal structure of a lake with water in vertical motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zito, G.; Mongelli, F. (Bari Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Geodesia e Geofisica)

    The vertical temperature structures of the seasonal thermocline of two lakes in temperate latitude with different feedings have been examined experimentally and reproduced theoretically by the basic equation of heat diffusion. One of these lakes is fed mainly from springs emerging from the lake bottom: as a consequence a vertical motion of water is established. The other lake is fed from the former by a small superficial channel. It is argued that the observed quantitative features of the stratification cycle agree with the theoretical calculations in both lakes with the same value of the molecular thermal diffusivity. Moreover, the seasonal thermocline of the lake with the bottom feeding is reduced: this involves a faster drop in the temperature amplitude of the annual cycle.

  3. Monitoring water quality in Lake Atitlan, Guatemala using Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Cordova, A. I.; Christopher, S. A.; Griffin, R.; Limaye, A. S.; Irwin, D.

    2014-12-01

    Frequent and spatially continuous water quality monitoring is either unattainable or challenging for developing nations if only standard methods are used. Such standard methods rely on in situ water sampling, which is expensive, time-consuming and point specific. Through the Regional Visualization and Monitoring System (SERVIR), Lake Atitlan's water quality was first monitored in 2009 using Earth observation satellites. Lake Atitlan is a source of drinking water for the towns located nearby and a major touristic attraction for the country. Several multispectral sensors were used to monitor the largest algal bloom known to date for the lake, which covered 40% of the lake's 137 square kilometer surface. Red and Near-Infrared bands were used to isolate superficial algae from clean water. Local authorities, media, universities and local communities, broadly used the information provided by SERVIR for this event. It allowed estimating the real extent of the algal bloom and prompted immediate response for the government to address the event. However, algal blooms have been very rare in this lake. The lake is considered oligotrophic given its relatively high transparency levels that can reach 15 m in the dry season. To continue the support provided by SERVIR in the algal bloom event, an algorithm to monitor chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration under normal conditions was developed with the support of local institutions. Hyperspectral data from Hyperion on board EO-1 and in situ water quality observations were used to develop a semi-empirical algorithm for the lake. A blue to green band ratio successfully modeled Chl a concentration in Lake Atitlan with a relative error of 33%. This presentation will explain the process involved from providing an emergency response to developing a tailored tool for monitoring water quality in Lake Atitlan, Guatemala.

  4. Pathways of Snowmelt Water into an Ice-Covered Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, A.; MacIntyre, S.; Sadro, S.

    2015-12-01

    Discharge of water into ice-covered arctic lakes during snowmelt can be high, but no general framework exists to quantify the pathway of the flow into the lakes and the associated distribution of incoming resources including dissolved organic carbon (DOC) or greenhouse gases. In this study, we characterize the fate of the snowmelt water flowing into 1.5 km2 Toolik Lake, Alaska, in 2014 and 2015. We deployed arrays with temperature, conductivity, and oxygen sensors in the water column over the winter, performed high temporal and spatial resolution CTD surveys on four 500 m to 1 km long transect lines during spring, and obtained correlative meteorological and discharge data. During both study spring periods, we observed different snowmelt inflow regimes based on the discharge rate (low and high) which led to differences in the extent of vertical and horizontal dilution of the lake water. Our first estimates of horizontal dispersion of snowmelt water in Toolik Lake under a high discharge regime are in the upper range of values found for ice-covered lakes (O ~ (102) cm2 s-1). In both years, the incoming water spread over ~75% of the basin near the surface with associated loading of DOC and methane. Spring 2014 was typical of other years with a gradual snowmelt and restricted depth of penetration of the incoming water. In fact, the increased density gradient in the upper few meters created conditions which retarded subsequent mixing at ice off. In contrast, persistent high pressures over the Alaskan region caused an exceptionally warm spring and rapid snowmelt in 2015. The subsequent warming of stream waters meant that the within lake vertical density gradient was weakened and facilitated later mixing. The differences in magnitude of discharge and temperature of incoming water during the more average and the warm springs enable interpretations and predictions of the fate of solutes flowing into lakes during snowmelt under variable weather regimes.

  5. SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA A.K. Mohanty, K. Mahesh Kumar, B. A. Prakash and V.V.S. Gurunadha Rao Ecology and Environment Group National Geophysical Research Institute, (CSIR) Hyderabad - 500 606, India E-mail:atulyakumarmohanty@yahoo.com Abstract: Hyderabad Metropolitan Development Authority has taken up restoration of urban lakes around Hyderabad city under Green Hyderabad Environment Program. Restoration of Mir Alam Tank, Durgamcheruvu, Patel cheruvu, Pedda Cheruvu and Nallacheruvu lakes have been taken up under the second phase. There are of six lakes viz., RKPuramcheruvu, Nadimicheruvu (Safilguda), Bandacheruvu Patelcheruvu, Peddacheruvu, Nallacheruvu, in North East Musi Basin covering 38 sq km. Bimonthly monitoring of lake water quality for BOD, COD, Total Nitrogen, Total phosphorous has been carried out for two hydrological cycles during October 2002- October 2004 in all the five lakes at inlet channels and outlets. The sediments in the lake have been also assessed for nutrient status. The nutrient parameters have been used to assess eutrophic condition through computation of Trophic Status Index, which has indicated that all the above lakes under study are under hyper-eutrophic condition. The hydrogeological, geophysical, water quality and groundwater data base collected in two watersheds covering 4 lakes has been used to construct groundwater flow and mass transport models. The interaction of lake-water with groundwater has been computed for assessing the lake water budget combining with inflow and outflow measurements on streams entering and leaving the lakes. Individual lake water budget has been used for design of appropriate capacity of Sewage Treatment Plants (STPs) on the inlet channels of the lakes for maintaining Full Tank Level (FTL) in each lake. STPs are designed for tertiary treatment i.e. removal of nutrient load viz., Phosphates and Nitrates. Phosphates are

  6. Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Ruby Valley Nevada : 1991 Annual water management report 1992 Annual water management plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ruby Lake NWR 1991 Annual Water Management Report 1992 Annual Water Management Plan. Includes Ruby Lake 1991 weather summary, summary of 1991 water levels, water...

  7. Water management alternatives at Reelfoot Lake: Results of a workshop

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document summarizes a workshop for discussing water management alternatives at Reelfoot Lake National Wildlife Refuge. The objectives of the workshop were to...

  8. Observations on cyanobacterial population collapse in eutrophic lake water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gons, H.J.; Ebert, J.; Hoogveld, H.L.; Van den Hove, L.; Pel, R.; Takkenberg, W.; Woldringh, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    In two laboratory-scale enclosures of water from the shallow, eutrophic Lake Loosdrecht (the Netherlands), the predominating filamentous cyanobacteria grew vigorously for 2 weeks, but then their populations simultaneously collapsed, whereas coccoid cyanobacteria and algae persisted . The collapse co

  9. Regional assessment of lake water clarity using satellite remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. SKOLE

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Lake water clarity as measured by Secchi disk transparency (SDT is a cost-effective measure of water quality. However, in regions where there are thousands of lakes, sampling even a small proportion of those lakes for SDT year after year is cost prohibitive. Remote sensing has the potential to be a powerful tool for assessing lake clarity over large spatial scales. The overall objective of our study was to examine whether Landsat-7 ETM+ could be used to measure water clarity across a large range of lakes. Our specific objectives were to: 1 develop a regression model to estimate SDT from Landsat data calibrated using 93 lakes in Michigan, U.S.A., and to 2 examine how the distribution of SDT across the 93 calibration lakes influenced the model. Our calibration dataset included a large number of lakes with a wide range of SDT values that captured the summer statewide distribution of SDT values in Michigan. Our regression model had a much lower r2 value than previously published studies conducted on smaller datasets. To examine the importance of the distribution of calibration data, we simulated a calibration dataset with a different SDT distribution by sub-sampling the original dataset to match the distribution of previous studies. The sub-sampled dataset had a much higher percentage of lakes with shallow water clarity, and the resulting regression model had a much higher r2 value than our original model. Our study shows that the use of Landsat to measure water clarity is sensitive to the distribution of water clarity used in the calibration set.

  10. Hydrochemical determination of source water contributions to Lake Lungo and Lake Ripasottile (central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Archer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lake Lungo and Lake Ripasottile are two shallow (4-5 m lakes located in the Rieti Basin, central Italy, that have been described previously as surface outcroppings of the groundwater table. In this work, the two lakes as well as springs and rivers that represent their potential source waters are characterized physio-chemically and isotopically, using a combination of environmental tracers. Temperature and pH were measured and water samples were analyzed for alkalinity, major ion concentration, and stable isotope (δ2H, δ18O, δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon, and δ34S and δ18O of sulfate composition.  Chemical data were also investigated in terms of local meteorological data (air temperature, precipitation to determine the sensitivity of lake parameters to changes in the surrounding environment. Groundwater represented by samples taken from Santa Susanna Spring was shown to be distinct with SO42- and Mg2+ content of 270 and 29 mg/L, respectively, and heavy sulfate isotopic composition (δ34S=15.2 ‰ and δ18O=10‰. Outflow from the Santa Susanna Spring enters Lake Ripasottile via a canal and both spring and lake water exhibits the same chemical distinctions and comparatively low seasonal variability. Major ion concentrations in Lake Lungo are similar to the Vicenna Riara Spring and are interpreted to represent the groundwater locally recharged within the plain. The δ13CDIC exhibit the same groupings as the other chemical parameters, providing supporting evidence of the source relationships. Lake Lungo exhibited exceptional ranges of δ13CDIC (±5 ‰ and δ2H, δ18O (±5 ‰ and ±7 ‰, respectively, attributed to sensitivity to seasonal changes. The hydrochemistry results, particularly major ion data, highlight how the two lakes, though geographically and morphologically similar, represent distinct hydrochemical facies. These data also show a different response in each lake to temperature and precipitation patterns in the basin that

  11. Stable water isotopic composition of the Antarctic subglacial Lake Vostok: implications for understanding the lake's hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekaykin, Alexey A; Lipenkov, Vladimir Y; Kozachek, Anna V; Vladimirova, Diana O

    2016-01-01

    We estimated the stable isotopic composition of water from the subglacial Lake Vostok using two different sets of samples: (1) water frozen on the drill bit immediately after the first lake unsealing and (2) water frozen in the borehole after the unsealing and re-drilled one year later. The most reliable values of the water isotopic composition are: -59.0 ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18, -455 ± 1 ‰ for deuterium and 17 ± 1 ‰ for d-excess. This result is also confirmed by the modelling of isotopic transformations in the water which froze in the borehole, and by a laboratory experiment simulating this process. A comparison of the newly obtained water isotopic composition with that of the lake ice (-56.2 ‰ for oxygen-18, -442.4 ‰ for deuterium and 7.2 ‰ for d-excess) leads to the conclusion that the lake ice is very likely formed in isotopic equilibrium with water. In turn, this means that ice is formed by a slow freezing without formation of frazil ice crystals and/or water pockets. This conclusion agrees well with the observed physical and chemical properties of the lake's accreted ice. However, our estimate of the water's isotopic composition is only valid for the upper water layer and may not be representative for the deeper layers of the lake, so further investigations are required.

  12. Nitrogen Dynamics Variation in Overlying Water of Jinshan Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jinshan Lake is a famous urban landscape lake with approximately 8.8 km2 water area, which is located on the north of Zhenjiang, of Jiangsu Province, China. Eighteen sampled sites were selected and overlying water was sampled from 2013 to 2014 to study the seasonal and spatial variation of nitrogen in overlying water of Jinshan Lake. Results showed that physicochemical characteristics of temperature, pH, and DO showed high seasonal variation, whereas they had no significant spatial differences in the 18 sampling points (P>0.05 in overlying water of Jinshan Lake. Nitrogen concentrations showed strong seasonal variation trends. The ranked order of TN was as follows: spring > summer > autumn > winter; the order of NH4+-N was as follows: spring > autumn > summer > winter, whereas NO3--N concentrations revealed an inverse seasonal pattern, with maxima occurring in winter and minimal values occurring in spring. Nitrogen concentrations had dramatic spatial changes in 18 sampling points of Jinshan Lake. Physicochemical parameter difference, domestic wastes pollution, and rainfall runoff source may have led to seasonal and spatial fluctuation variations of nitrogen in overlying water of Jinshan Lake, China.

  13. Formation and water environmental evolution of the Nansihu Lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGZulu; SHENJi; LIUEnfeng; SUNQingyi; JIANGLuguang

    2003-01-01

    Through high-resolution research of sedimental chronology and the sediment environmental indexes,such as graininess ,minerals,magnetic parameters,pigment content organic carbon and chronology in Ds-core and Ws-core in Nansihu Lake,the authors analyze the formation cause of the Nansihu Lake and its water environmental changes,Historical documents are also analyzed here in order to reach the conclusion .Researches indicate that the Nansihu Lake came into being about 2500 aBP and its evolution succession can be divided into four stages.In this evolution process ,several scattered lakes merge into one large lake in the east of China,This process is distinctively affected by the overflow of the Yellow River,the excavation of the Grand Canal and other human activities.

  14. The springs of Lake Patzcuaro: chemistry, salt-balance, and implications for the water balance of the lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, James L.; Israde-Alcantara, Isabel; Garduno-Monroy, Victor H.; Shanks III, Wayne C

    2004-11-01

    Lake Patzcuaro, the center of the ancient Tarascan civilization located in the Mexican altiplano west of the city of Morelia, has neither river input nor outflow. The relatively constant lake-salinity over the past centuries indicates the lake is in chemical steady state. Springs of the south shore constitute the primary visible input to the lake, so influx and discharge must be via sub-lacustrine ground water. The authors report on the chemistry and stable isotope composition of the springs, deeming them representative of ground-water input. The springs are dominated by Ca, Mg and Na, whereas the lake is dominated by Na. Combining these results with previously published precipitation/rainfall measurements on the lake, the authors calculate the chemical evolution from spring water to lake water, and also calculate a salt balance of the ground-water-lake system. Comparing Cl and {delta}{sup 18}O compositions in the springs and lake water indicates that 75-80% of the spring water is lost evaporatively during evolution toward lake composition. During evaporation Ca and Mg are lost from the water by carbonate precipitation. Each liter of spring water discharging into the lake precipitates about 18.7 mg of CaCO{sub 3}. Salt balance calculations indicate that ground water input to the lake is 85.9 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3}/a and ground water discharge from the lake is 23.0 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3}/a. Thus, the discharge is about 27% of the input, with the rest balanced by evaporation. A calculation of time to reach steady-state ab initio indicates that the Cl concentration of the present day lake would be reached in about 150 a.

  15. The springs of Lake Pátzcuaro: chemistry, salt-balance, and implications for the water balance of the lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, James L.; Israde-Alcántara, Isabel; Garduno-Monroy, Victor H.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2004-01-01

    Lake Pa??tzcuaro, the center of the ancient Tarascan civilization located in the Mexican altiplano west of the city of Morelia, has neither river input nor outflow. The relatively constant lake-salinity over the past centuries indicates the lake is in chemical steady state. Springs of the south shore constitute the primary visible input to the lake, so influx and discharge must be via sub-lacustrine ground water. The authors report on the chemistry and stable isotope composition of the springs, deeming them representative of ground-water input. The springs are dominated by Ca, Mg and Na, whereas the lake is dominated by Na. Combining these results with previously published precipitation/rainfall measurements on the lake, the authors calculate the chemical evolution from spring water to lake water, and also calculate a salt balance of the ground-water-lake system. Comparing Cl and ??18O compositions in the springs and lake water indicates that 75-80% of the spring water is lost evaporatively during evolution toward lake composition. During evaporation Ca and Mg are lost from the water by carbonate precipitation. Each liter of spring water discharging into the lake precipitates about 18.7 mg of CaCO3. Salt balance calculations indicate that ground water input to the lake is 85.9??106 m3/a and ground water discharge from the lake is 23.0??106 m3/a. Thus, the discharge is about 27% of the input, with the rest balanced by evaporation. A calculation of time to reach steady-state ab initio indicates that the Cl concentration of the present day lake would be reached in about 150 a. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Protecting water resources from pollution in the Lake Badovc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdullahi, Sabri; Fejza, Islam; Tmava, Ahmet [Faculty of Geosciences and Technology, University of Prishtina, Str. Parku Industrial, 40000 Mitrovic, Republic of Kosova

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, the international community has witnessed incidence of climate variability and human activities. The objective of this paper is protecting water resources from pollution in the catchments area of Lake Badovc. The catchments area of the Lake Badovc has a size of 109 km² and the active storage volume of the lake is assessed to 26.4 Mill.m3. Around 28% of the total population of Municipality of Prishtina supply with drinking water from Lake Badovc. The hydrologic modelling system used, is HEC-HMS developed by the Hydrologic Engineering Centre of the US Corps of Engineers. The model is designed to simulate the rainfall-runoff processes of catchments areas and is applicable to a wide range of geographic areas.Water samples are taken from two streams reach Lake Badovc and from the lake in three different depths (5m, 10m and 15m) at different locations. Concerning the environment impact more than 140 interviews were conducted and questionnaires filled in the period October-November for Mramor area, concentrating on the most important issues: building, water supply, wastewater disposal and west disposal.

  17. Protecting water resources from pollution in the Lake Badovc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Avdullahi, Islam Fejza, Ahmet Tmava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the international community has witnessed incidence of climate variability and human activities. The objective of this paper is protecting water resources from pollution in the catchments area of Lake Badovc. The catchments area of the Lake Badovc has a size of 109 km² and the active storage volume of the lake is assessed to 26.4 Mill.m3. Around 28% of the total population of Municipality of Prishtina supply with drinking water from Lake Badovc. The hydrologic modelling system used, is HEC-HMS developed by the Hydrologic Engineering Centre of the US Corps of Engineers. The model is designed to simulate the rainfall-runoff processes of catchments areas and is applicable to a wide range of geographic areas. Water samples are taken from two streams reach Lake Badovc and from the lake in three different depths (5m, 10m and 15m at different locations. Concerning the environment impact more than 140 interviews were conducted and questionnaires filled in the period October-November for Mramor area, concentrating on the most important issues: building, water supply, wastewater disposal and west disposal.

  18. Water quality of streams tributary to Lakes Superior and Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Jerome W.

    1968-01-01

    Water quality of streams tributary to Lakes Superior and Michigan was analyzed for 142 stations on 99 streams tributary to Lake Superior and 83 stations on 56 streams tributary to Lake Michigan during 1962-65. Concentrations of aluminum, copper, and iron were not affected greatly by flow or season. Magnesium, calcium, chlorides, total alkalinity, total hardness, and conductivity varied with the flow, temperature, and season; the lowest values were during the spring runoff and heavy rains, and the highest were during low water in late summer and the colder periods of winter. Concentrations of nitrate, silica, and sulfates were lowest in the spring and summer. Concentrations of tanninlike and ligninlike compounds were highest during the spring runoff and other high-water periods, and were lowest during freezeup when surface runoff was minimal. The pH values were highest from June to September and lowest during the spring runoff. Phenolphthalein alkalinity was detected primarily in the summer and coincided occasionally with low flows just before the spring thaw. Total hardness usually was lower in streams tributary to Lake Superior than in streams tributary to Lake Michigan. The total hardness was higher in the streams in Wisconsin than in the streams in Michigan along the west shore of Lake Michigan. It was lowest in the northernmost streams. The water quality of the streams in an area was related to the geological characteristics of the land.

  19. Microcosm 2.011

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Microcosm, CERN's first exhibition centre, will soon be upgraded. While keeping its present character and many of its nice features, the use of new cutting-edge exhibition technologies together with an area for student experiments and physics demonstrations will make version 2.011 even more attractive to the general public and school classes.   Layout of the new Microcosm 2.011 exhibition. New Year, and a new look for Microcosm! CERN's popular exhibition centre will undergo a transformation that will see, among other things, the installation of a new area dedicated to modern physics experiments for school groups. “Microcosm will keep its main features and character,” says Rolf Landua, Head of the Education Group, which is in charge of the project. “While some parts will be replaced by more modern exhibition technologies and contemporary scenography, others will be moved to allow a better visitor flow and make room for the brand-new school lab and public demonstration...

  20. Detecting acid precipitation impacts on lake water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftis, Jim C.; Taylor, Charles H.

    1989-09-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency is planning to expand its long-term monitoring of lakes that are sensitive to acid deposition effects. Effective use of resources will require a careful definition of the statistical objectives of monitoring, a network design which balances spatial and temporal coverage, and a sound approach to data analysis. This study examines the monitoring objective of detecting trends in water quality for individual lakes and small groups of lakes. Appropriate methods of trend analysis are suggested, and the power of trend detection under seasonal (quarterly) sampling is compared to that of annual sampling. The effects of both temporal and spatial correlation on trend detection ability are described.

  1. TWO-DIMENSIONAL PLANE WATER FLOW AND WATER QUALITY DISTRIBUTION IN BOSTEN LAKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Min-quan; Zhou Xiao-de; Zheng Bang-min; Min Tao; Zhao Ke-yu

    2003-01-01

    The two-dimensional plane water flow and water quality was developed by using the techniques of coordinate transformation, alternating directions, staggered grid, linear recurrence, and implicit scheme in the study of large water body in lakes. The model was proved to be suitable for treating the irregular boundary and predicting quickly water flow and water quality. The application of the model to the Bosten Lake in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China shows that it is reasonable and practicable.

  2. Radium-226 in water, sediments, and fish from lakes near the city of Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clulow, F V; Davé, N K; Lim, T P; Avadhanula, R

    1998-01-01

    Ra-226 was measured by alpha-emission spectroscopy in water, sediments, and fish (tissues and gut contents), from five lakes in a watershed containing U mining and milling operations at Elliot Lake, Ontario, and from control lakes in an adjacent non-industrialized watershed. Ra-226 transfer parameters from lake water and sediments to fish tissues, and annual intakes by humans consuming fish, were estimated. Mean dissolved 226Ra levels ranged from approximately 76 mBq litre(-1) in water of the most affected lake, to Ra-226 levels in lake trout muscle were low and showed erratic variation among lakes whereas levels in whitefish muscle did not vary significantly among study and control sites. Lake herring (= cisco, Coregonus artedii), a planktivorous fish taken only from Quirke Lake, had mean 226Ra levels of 18 and 1.4 mBq g(-1) dry wt in bone and muscle, respectively. Gut 226Ra levels, highest in lake trout from McCabe and Quirke Lakes (126 +/- 53, 64 +/- 44 mBq g(-1) dry wt, respectively), and just detectable in McCabe and Elliot Lake whitefish (24 +/- 2, 36 +/- 14 mBq g(-1) dry wt, respectively), were below detection in lake trout and whitefish from other lakes. Concentration ratios (CRs) of 226Ra from water to muscle ranged from 8 to 14 in lake trout, 7 to 14 in whitefish, and 4 to 6 in lake herring. The water to bone CRs varied from 81 to 142, 314 to 548, and 126 to 272 in the same species. CRs were always 2 mSv year(-1)) and the public dose limit (5 mSv year(-1)).

  3. Opportunistic fungi in lake water and fungal infections in associated human population in Dal Lake, Kashmir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandh, Suhaib A; Kamili, Azra N; Ganai, Bashir A; Lone, Bashir A

    2016-04-01

    Natural habitats of opportunistic fungal pathogens are outside of the host; therefore, it is critically important to understand their ecology and routes of transmission. In this study, we investigated the presence of human pathogenic opportunistic fungi in lake water and incidence of fungal infections in associated population in Kashmir, India. Six hundred forty water samples were taken on seasonal basis from a wide network of sampling stations of the lake for an extended period of two years for screening their occurrence. The samples were inoculated onto rose bengal agar, malt extract agar, potato dextrose agar and other specified culture media supplemented with Chloramphenicol and Streptomycin followed by incubation at 37 °C. All the samples were positive for fungi, which were later identified by sequencing the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region aided by classical morphological culture techniques and physiological profiling. The whole process led to the isolation of sixteen species of opportunistic fungal pathogens belonging to genus Aspergillus, Candida, Penicillium, Cryptococcus, Fusarium, Rhizopus and Mucor in decreasing order of prevalence. Furthermore, 20% population (n = 384) of Dal inhabitants was examined for possible fungal infections and it was observed that only 8.07% individuals were positive for fungal infections with 4.68% skin infection cases, 2.34% onychomycosis cases and 1.04% candidiasis cases. Scrapings from onychomycosis and candidiasis patients showed the presence of Aversicolor and Calbicans respectively, resembling exactly the strains isolated from the lake water. However, the skin infection was because of a dermatophyte not isolated for the lake water. Higher prevalence of infection (6.77%) was seen in people using lake water followed by a positive prevalence of 1.30% using tap water. The results of present study suggest that the lake inhabitants are at a greater risk of getting life threatening fungal diseases which may lead to

  4. Chemistry of snow and lake water in Antarctic region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kaushar Ali; Sunil Sonbawane; D M Chate; Devendraa Siingh; P S P Rao; P D Safai; K B Budhavant

    2010-12-01

    Surface snow and lake water samples were collected at different locations around Indian station at Antarctica, Maitri, during December 2004-March 2005 and December 2006-March 2007.Samples were analyzed for major chemical ions. It is found that average pH value of snow is 6.1. Average pH value of lake water with low chemical content is 6.2 and of lake water with high chemical content is 6.5.The Na+ and Cl− are the most abundantly occurring ions at Antarctica. Considerable amount of SO$^{2-}_{4}$ is also found in the surface snow and the lake water which is attributed to the oxidation of DMS produced by marine phytoplankton.Neutralization of acidic components of snow is mainly done by NH$^{+}_{4}$ and Mg2+. The Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+ are nearly equally effective in neutralizing the acidic components in lake water.The NH$^{+}_{4}$ and SO$^{2-}_{4}$ occur over the Antarctica region mostly in the form of (NH4)2SO4.

  5. Speciation of 129I in sea, lake and rain waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehto, Jukka; Räty, Tero; Hou, Xiaolin;

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations of the very long-lived fission product 129I and stable iodine (127I) in the Baltic Sea and lake and rain waters from Finland, were measured as well as their occurrence as iodide (I−) and iodate (IO3−). The highest concentrations of both 127I and 129I occurred in sea water, on avera...

  6. Extreme drought causes distinct water acidification and eutrophication in the Lower Lakes (Lakes Alexandrina and Albert), Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siyue; Bush, Richard T.; Mao, Rong; Xiong, Lihua; Ye, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Droughts are set to increase in frequency and magnitude with climate change and water extraction, and understanding their influence on ecosystems is urgent in the Holocene. Low rainfall across the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) of Australia resulted in an unprecedented water level decline in the Lower Lakes (Lakes Alexandrina and Albert) at the downstream end of the river system. A comprehensive data covering pre-drought (2004-2006), drought (2007-2010) and post-drought (2010-2013) was firstly used to unravel drought effects on water quality in the contrasting main parts and margins of the two Lakes, particularly following water acidification resulting from acid sulfate soil oxidation. Salinity, nutrients and Chl-a significantly increased during the drought in the Lake main waterbody, while pH remained stable or showed minor shifts. In contrast to the Lake Alexandrina, total dissolved solid (TDS) and electrical conductivity (EC) during the post-drought more than doubled the pre-drought period in the Lake Albert as being a terminal lake system with narrow and shallow entrance. Rewetting of the exposed pyrite-containing sediment resulted in very low pH (below 3) in Lake margins, which positively contributed to salinity increases via SO42- release and limestone dissolution. Very acidic water (pH 2-3) was neutralised naturally by lake refill, but aerial limestone dosing was required for neutralisation of water acidity during the drought period. The Lower Lakes are characterized as hypereutrophic with much higher salinity, nutrient and algae concentrations than guideline levels for aquatic ecosystem. These results suggest that, in the Lower Lakes, drought could cause water quality deterioration through water acidification and increased nutrient and Chl-a concentrations, more effective water management in the lake catchment is thus crucial to prevent the similar water quality deterioration since the projected intensification of droughts. A comparative assessment on lake

  7. Water-quality and Llake-stage data for Wisconsin Lakes, Water Year 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W.J.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Marsh, S.B.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a data base for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2004 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the period October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004 is called 'water year 2004.' The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during non-frozen periods are included for all lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in another volume: 'Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 2004.' Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available throught the World Wide Web on the Internet. The Wisconsin Water Science Center's home page is at http://wi.water.usgs.gov/. Information on the

  8. Mercury and water level fluctuations in lakes of northern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.; Maki, Ryan P; Christensen, Victoria G.; Sandheinrich, Mark B.; LeDuc, Jaime F.; Kissane, Claire; Knights, Brent C.

    2017-01-01

    Large lake ecosystems support a variety of ecosystem services in surrounding communities, including recreational and commercial fishing. However, many northern temperate fisheries are contaminated by mercury. Annual variation in mercury accumulation in fish has previously been linked to water level (WL) fluctuations, opening the possibility of regulating water levels in a manner that minimizes or reduces mercury contamination in fisheries. Here, we compiled a long-term dataset (1997-2015) of mercury content in young-of-year Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) from six lakes on the border between the U.S. and Canada and examined whether mercury content appeared to be related to several metrics of WL fluctuation (e.g., spring WL rise, annual maximum WL, and year-to-year change in maximum WL). Using simple correlation analysis, several WL metrics appear to be strongly correlated to Yellow Perch mercury content, although the strength of these correlations varies by lake. We also used many WL metrics, water quality measurements, temperature and annual deposition data to build predictive models using partial least squared regression (PLSR) analysis for each lake. These PLSR models showed some variation among lakes, but also supported strong associations between WL fluctuations and annual variation in Yellow Perch mercury content. The study lakes underwent a modest change in WL management in 2000, when winter WL minimums were increased by about 1 m in five of the six study lakes. Using the PLSR models, we estimated how this change in WL management would have affected Yellow Perch mercury content. For four of the study lakes, the change in WL management that occurred in 2000 likely reduced Yellow Perch mercury content, relative to the previous WL management regime.

  9. Seasonal variations in pore water and sediment geochemistry of littoral lake sediments (Asylum Lake, MI, USA)

    OpenAIRE

    Miller Douglas; Haas Johnson R; Koretsky Carla M; Ndenga Noah T

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Seasonal changes in pore water and sediment redox geochemistry have been observed in many near-surface sediments. Such changes have the potential to strongly influence trace metal distribution and thus create seasonal fluctuations in metal mobility and bioavailability. Results Seasonal trends in pore water and sediment geochemistry are assessed in the upper 50 cm of littoral kettle lake sediments. Pore waters are always redox stratified, with the least compressed redox str...

  10. An environmental assessment of water replenishment to a floodplain lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lóczy, Dénes; Dezső, József; Czigány, Szabolcs; Prokos, Hedvig; Tóth, Gabriella

    2017-01-20

    There are numerous wetland rehabilitation projects worldwide, but their efficiency is seldom assessed comprehensively. Oxbow lakes are wetlands of particular sensitivity. Within a large-scale floodplain rehabilitation project in Hungary, the Old Drava Programme, water replenishment was first carried out for the Cún-Szaporca oxbow lakes, a key area in the project. To assess its sustainability, the entire hydrological system has been monitored. From the data of hydrological monitoring (infiltration, soil moisture, groundwater/lakewater interaction) it is claimed that water replenishment involves significant losses through seepage (4.1 and 1.46 mm d(-1)) and evaporation (3.01 and 1.44 mm d(-1)) in the studied pre-intervention and replenishment periods, resp. Infiltration alone is insufficient to replenish groundwater and raise oxbow lake levels. In the critical summer half-year evaporation is intensive in the neighbouring agricultural fields. Groundwater table dynamics are controlled by hyporheic and groundwater flow. Major impact on the water balance of the oxbow lakes is exerted by the regime of the Drava River. A deepened lakebed is recommended to ensure more effective water retention in the oxbow lake. From the local study conclusions are drawn for the feasibility of rehabilitation at floodplain scale and in areas with similar hydromorphological conditions.

  11. Discharge, water temperature, and selected meteorological data for Vancouver Lake, Vancouver, Washington, water years 2011-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, James R.; Marshall, Cameron A.; Sheibley, Rich W.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey partnered with the Vancouver Lake Watershed Partnership in a 2-year intensive study to quantify the movement of water and nutrients through Vancouver Lake in Vancouver, Washington. This report is intended to assist the Vancouver Lake Watershed Partnership in evaluating potential courses of action to mitigate seasonally driven blooms of harmful cyanobacteria and to improve overall water quality of the lake. This report contains stream discharge, lake water temperature, and selected meteorological data for water years 2011, 2012, and 2013 that were used to develop the water and nutrient budgets for the lake.

  12. Combined approach of isotope mass balance and hydrological water balance methods to constrain the sources of lake water as exemplified on the small dimictic lake Silbersee, northern Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmarami, Hatem; Meyer, Hanno; Massmann, Gudrun

    2017-05-01

    Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen are often used for water balance calculations of lakes. We present an approach combining the lake water balance with an isotope mass balance to constrain the sources and sinks of the water of a small dimictic lake subjected to eutrophication. Meteorological and hydraulic data in combination with measured isotope signatures of the different water compartments enabled to assess the degree of surface water/groundwater interaction and the amount of overland flow into the lake. Groundwater could be excluded as a lake water source, as its water level was always below the lake water level. In the absence of a channelled inflow, precipitation and overland flow were the remaining options, whereby the latter was only active during periods of exceptionally high rainfall. While the groundwater signatures adjacent to the lake showed an influence of lake water, the lake water balance itself indicated that the associated volumetric water loss to groundwater is rather negligible. In the present case, only a combined assessment of hydrological and isotopic data allowed for an accurate characterization of the studied lake and a quantification of its water sources and sinks, highlighting the importance of using more than one methodological approach for such a purpose.

  13. A radical shift from soft-water to hard-water lake: palaeolimnological evidence from Lake Kooraste Kõverjärv, southern Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiiu Alliksaar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Water Framework Directive (WFD of the European Union requires the quality of all European water bodies to be examined, and aims to achieve good status by 2015. This study was initiated to assess whether a potential reference lake for identifying lake-type specific reference conditions meets the WFD requirements, of being minimally impacted by human activity during the last centuries. The sediments of Lake Kooraste Kõverjärv were analysed for diatom assemblages and sediment composition; past changes in the lake-water pH and total phosphorus were reconstructed, using quantitative models on sedimentary diatoms. The chronology of sediments was established, using spheroidal fly-ash particles stratigraphy. Palaeolimnological investigations, supported by information from historical maps, revealed that man-made changes around the lake have severely influenced its ecological conditions. The lake, which had been oligotrophic with soft and clear water before the mid-17th century, has been trans­formed into a hard-water lake by modifications to the inflow and outflow. The lake water quality has also been altered by the infiltration of nutrients from a nearby hypertrophic lake that was used for flax retting since the 19th century. Although the ecological status of the lake has remained good despite all these changes, it is still questionable whether to nominate it as a reference lake for stratified hard-water lake types.

  14. INTERACTION OF METHYL-TERT BUTYL ETHER AND WATER STRESS ON SEED GERMINATION AND SEEDLING GROWTH IN SOIL MICROCOSMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a widespread contaminant in surface and ground water in the United States. Frequently irrigation is used to water fields to germinate planted seeds and sustain plant growth. A likely possibility exists that water used may have some MTBE. Our s...

  15. INTERACTION OF METHYL-TERT BUTYL ETHER AND WATER STRESS ON SEED GERMINATION AND SEEDLING GROWTH IN SOIL MICROCOSMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a widespread contaminant in surface and ground water in the United States. Frequently irrigation is used to water fields to germinate planted seeds and sustain plant growth. A likely possibility exists that water used may have some MTBE. Our s...

  16. Mercury bioaccumulation in the aquatic plant Elodea nuttallii in the field and in microcosm: accumulation in shoots from the water might involve copper transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, Nicole; Larras, Floriane; Bravo, Andrea Garcia; Ungureanu, Viorel-Gheorghe; Amouroux, David; Cosio, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that macrophytes might participate in bioaccumulation and biomagnification of toxic mercury (Hg) in aquatic environment. Hg bioaccumulation and uptake mechanisms in macrophytes need therefore to be studied. Amongst several macrophytes collected in an Hg contaminated reservoir in Romania, Elodea nuttallii showed a high organic and inorganic Hg accumulation and was then further studied in the laboratory. Tolerance and accumulation of Hg of this plant was also high in the microcosm. Basipetal transport of inorganic Hg was predominant, whereas acropetal transport of methyl-Hg was observed with apparently negligible methylation or demethylation in planta. Hg concentrations were higher in roots>leaves>stems and in top>middle>bottom of shoots. In shoots, more than 60% Hg was found intracellularly where it is believed to be highly available to predators. Accumulation in shoots was highly reduced by cold, death and by competition with Cu(+). Hg in E. nuttallii shoots seems to mainly originate from the water column, but methyl-Hg could also be remobilized from the sediments and might drive in part its entry in the food web. At the cellular level, uptake of Hg into the cell sap of shoots seems linked to the metabolism and to copper transporters. The present work highlights an important breakthrough in our understanding of Hg accumulation and biomagnifications: the remobilization of methyl-Hg from sediments to aquatic plants and differences in uptake mechanisms of inorganic and methyl-Hg in a macrophyte.

  17. Evaluation of Water Quality in Shallow Lakes, Case Study of Lake Uluabat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadet İLERİ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lake Uluabat, located 20 km south of the Marmara Sea, between 42° 12' North latitude, 28° 40'East longitude and is located in the province of Bursa. The Lake is one of the richest lakes in terms of aquatic plants besides fish and bird populations in Turkey. In this study, water quality of the Lake was monitored from June 2008 to May 2009 during the 12 month period with the samples taken from 8 points in the lake and spatial and temporal variations of the parameters were examined. pH, temperature (T, electrical conductivity (EC, dissolved oxygen (DO, suspended solids (SS, secchi depth (SD, water level (WL, nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N, total nitrogen (TN, phosphate-phosphorus (PO4-P, total phosphorus (TP, alkalinity, chemical oxygen demand (COD and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a were the monitoring parameters. As a result, concentrations of the parameters were found at high levels especially the 1st, 4th, 5th, and 8th stations and temporally were found at high levels often in the summer. According to the results of analysis of variance, regional and temporal variations of all parameters were found important except SS and NO3-N

  18. Conflict for Resources: Water in the Lake Chad Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    saline and unfit for human use.77 Of the remaining three percent of fresh water, eighty seven percent is located in polar ice. The thirteen percent of...correspondently moved the Sahel south. The change of the ecosystem affected the long term rainfalls which the Lake Chad system depends upon. As a result of the...desertification of the Sahel region causing population migration to the region, competition for water will grow. The competition for water increases

  19. Reduction of Waste Water in Erhai Lake Based on MIKE21 Hydrodynamic and Water Quality Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjun Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the ecological water environment in Erhai Lake, different monitoring sections were set to research the change of hydrodynamics and water quality. According to the measured data, MIKE21 Ecolab, the water quality simulation software developed by DHI, is applied to simulate the water quality in Erhai Lake. The hydrodynamics model coupled with water quality is established by MIKE21FM software to simulate the current situation of Erhai Lake. Then through the comparison with the monitoring data, the model parameters are calibrated and the simulation results are verified. Based on this, water quality is simulated by the two-dimensional hydrodynamics and water quality coupled model. The results indicate that the level of water quality in the north and south of lake is level III, while in the center of lake, the water quality is level II. Finally, the water environment capacity and total emmision reduction of pollutants are filtered to give some guidance for the water resources management and effective utilization in the Erhai Lake.

  20. Surface Water Quality Monitoring Site Optimization for Poyang Lake, the Largest Freshwater Lake in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a coupled method to optimize the surface water quality monitoring sites for a huge freshwater lake based on field investigations, mathematical analysis, and numerical simulation tests. Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China, was selected as the research area. Based on the field investigated water quality data in the 5 years from 2008 to 2012, the water quality inter-annual variation coefficients at all the present sites and the water quality correlation coefficients between adjacent sites were calculated and analyzed to present an optimization scheme. A 2-D unsteady water quality model was established to get the corresponding water quality data at the optimized monitoring sites, which were needed for the rationality test on the optimized monitoring network. We found that: (1 the water quality of Piaoshan (No. 10 fluctuated most distinguishably and the inter-annual variation coefficient of NH3-N and TP could reach 99.77% and 73.92%, respectively. The four studied indexes were all closely related at Piaoshan (No. 10 and Tangyin (No. 11, and the correlation coefficients of COD and NH3-N could reach 0.91 and 0.94 separately. (2 It was suggested that the present site No. 10 be removed to avoid repeatability, and it was suggested that the three sites of Changling, Huzhong, and Nanjiang be added to improve the representativeness of the monitoring sites. (3 According to the rationality analysis, the 21 optimized water quality monitoring sites could scientifically replace the primary network, and the new monitoring network could better reflect the water quality of the whole lake.

  1. Lake Surface Water Temperature of European Lakes retrieved from AVHRR Data - Time Series and Quality Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderle, S.; Lieberherr, G.; Riffler, M.

    2016-12-01

    Data analysis of the recent years showed an increase of lake surface water temperature for many lakes around the world. But due to sparse in-situ measurements, which are often not well documented, only satellite data can provide the needed information of the last decades. The importance of lakes for climate research was also highlighted by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) defining lakes as Essential Climate Variables (ECVs). Within the frame of a research project funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation a procedure was developed to retrieve lake surface water temperature with high accuracy based on our archived AVHRR data at the University of Bern, Switzerland. The data archive starts in 1985 and is continuously filled with NOAA-/MetOp-AVHRR data received by our antenna resulting in a time series of more than 30 years (WMO definition of a climate period). The data set covering Europe is also used by other teams for climate related studies resulting in improved pre-processing to guarantee precise calibration and geocoding. The first part of our presentation will be dedicated to the quality of the LSWT retrieval comparing various in-situ measurements from lakes in Switzerland with varying sizes (150km2 - 9km2). The quality of the used split-window approach is sensitive to the derived split-window coefficients. The influence of water vapor, view angle, temporal and spatial validity and day vs. night data will be shown. In addition, some information will be presented about the influence of topography and climatic regions (e.g. Scandinavia vs. Greece) on the quality of the LSWT product. Based on these findings compiling time series for different lakes in Europe will be the focus of the second part of our presentation with details of the applied quality assessment to avoid erroneous signals. Hence, some information is given about hierarchical quality checks which are needed to guarantee a dataset without artefacts. Finally, some results of time series

  2. Hydrology and water chemistry of the Benton Lake basin with emphasis on the fate of dissolved solids at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, west-central Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on a hydro geochemical study of the Benton Lake basin, in Benton Lake National Wildlife Refige. Toe hydrology and water chemistry of the Benton Lake...

  3. Water Quality and Hydrology of Silver Lake, Barron County, Wisconsin, With Special Emphasis on Responses of a Terminal Lake to Changes in Phosphorus Loading and Water Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Dale M.; Rose, William J.; Fitzpatrick, Faith A.

    2009-01-01

    Silver Lake is typically an oligotrophic-to-mesotrophic, soft-water, terminal lake in northwestern Wisconsin. A terminal lake is a closed-basin lake with surface-water inflows but no surface-water outflows to other water bodies. After several years with above-normal precipitation, very high water levels caused flooding of several buildings near the lake and erosion of soil around much of the shoreline, which has been associated with a degradation in water quality (increased phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations and decreased water clarity). To gain a better understanding of what caused the very high water levels and degradation in water quality and collect information to better understand the lake and protect it from future degradation, the U.S. Geological Survey did a detailed study from 2004 to 2008. This report describes results of the study; specifically, lake-water quality, historical changes in water level, water and phosphorus budgets for the two years monitored in the study, results of model simulations that demonstrate how changes in phosphorus inputs affect lake-water quality, and the relative importance of changes in hydrology and changes in the watershed to the water quality of the lake. From 1987 to about 1996, water quality in Silver Lake was relatively stable. Since 1996, however, summer average total phosphorus concentrations increased from about 0.008 milligrams per liter (mg/L) to 0.018 mg/L in 2003, before decreasing to 0.011 mg/L in 2008. From 1996 to 2003, Secchi depths decreased from about 14 to 7.4 feet, before increasing to about 19 feet in 2008. Therefore, Silver Lake is typically classified as oligotrophic to mesotrophic; however, during 2002-4, the lake was classified as mesotrophic to eutrophic. Because productivity in Silver Lake is limited by phosphorus, phosphorus budgets for the lake were constructed for monitoring years 2005 and 2006. The average annual input of phosphorus was 216 pounds: 78 percent from tributary and

  4. Determining surface water and bed sediment quality of Lake Kopa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurgul Kazangapovaa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the results of a hydro-chemical study of Lake Kopa in Kazakhstan are described, in the context of the regional geography and aggravating ecological problems of the lake. Besides analyzing the concentrations of all major ions, heavy-metal ions and other pollutants, their vertical and horizontal distribution were also assessed. Moreover, water pollution indices (WPI were calculated for individual ions, classes of pollutants, and total pollution, revealing serious overload of human- induced pollution within the lake’s ecosystem. Concentrations of major ions and WPI were monitored over 2009-2013 period, revealing a distinct seasonal pattern and a multi-year periodicity in respect to the measured parameters. In addition, studying ion exchange between lake water and bottom sediment showed complex non-equilibrium processes besides leaching out Ca2+ and its exchange for Na+.

  5. Unexpected response of high Alpine Lake waters to climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, Hansjörg; Nickus, Ulrike; Mair, Volkmar; Tessadri, Richard; Tait, Danilo; Thaler, Bertha; Psenner, Roland

    2007-11-01

    Over the past two decades, we have observed a substantial rise in solute concentration at two remote high mountain lakes in catchments of metamorphic rocks in the European Alps. At Rasass See, the electrical conductivity increased 18-fold. Unexpectedly high nickel concentrations at Rasass See, which exceeded the limit in drinking water by more than 1 order of magnitude, cannot be related to catchment geology. We attribute these changes in lake water quality to solute release from the ice of an active rock glacier in the catchment as a response to climate warming. Similar processes occurred at the higher elevation lake Schwarzsee ob Sölden, where electrical conductivity has risen 3-fold during the past two decades.

  6. Paradox reconsidered: Methane oversaturation in well-oxygenated lake waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Kam W.; McGinnis, Daniel F.; Frindte, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    was up to 5 mmol m22 d21. Mid-water methane oversaturation was also observed in nine other lakes that collectively showed a strongly negative gradient of methane concentration within 0–20% dissolved oxygen (DO) in the bottom water, and a positive gradient within ≥20% DO in the upper water column. Further......The widely reported paradox of methane oversaturation in oxygenated water challenges the prevailing paradigm that microbial methanogenesis only occurs under anoxic conditions. Using a combination of field sampling, incubation experiments, and modeling, we show that the recurring mid-water methane...... peak in Lake Stechlin, northeast Germany, was not dependent on methane input from the littoral zone or bottom sediment or on the presence of known micro-anoxic zones. The methane peak repeatedly overlapped with oxygen oversaturation in the seasonal thermocline. Incubation experiments and isotope...

  7. Human influences on water quality in Great Lakes coastal wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrice, John A; Danz, Nicholas P; Regal, Ronald R; Kelly, John R; Niemi, Gerald J; Reavie, Euan D; Hollenhorst, Tom; Axler, Richard P; Trebitz, Anett S; Cotter, Anne M; Peterson, Gregory S

    2008-03-01

    A better understanding of relationships between human activities and water chemistry is needed to identify and manage sources of anthropogenic stress in Great Lakes coastal wetlands. The objective of the study described in this article was to characterize relationships between water chemistry and multiple classes of human activity (agriculture, population and development, point source pollution, and atmospheric deposition). We also evaluated the influence of geomorphology and biogeographic factors on stressor-water quality relationships. We collected water chemistry data from 98 coastal wetlands distributed along the United States shoreline of the Laurentian Great Lakes and GIS-based stressor data from the associated drainage basin to examine stressor-water quality relationships. The sampling captured broad ranges (1.5-2 orders of magnitude) in total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), total suspended solids (TSS), chlorophyll a (Chl a), and chloride; concentrations were strongly correlated with stressor metrics. Hierarchical partitioning and all-subsets regression analyses were used to evaluate the independent influence of different stressor classes on water quality and to identify best predictive models. Results showed that all categories of stress influenced water quality and that the relative influence of different classes of disturbance varied among water quality parameters. Chloride exhibited the strongest relationships with stressors followed in order by TN, Chl a, TP, TSS, and DIN. In general, coarse scale classification of wetlands by morphology (three wetland classes: riverine, protected, open coastal) and biogeography (two ecoprovinces: Eastern Broadleaf Forest [EBF] and Laurentian Mixed Forest [LMF]) did not improve predictive models. This study provides strong evidence of the link between water chemistry and human stress in Great Lakes coastal wetlands and can be used to inform management efforts to improve water

  8. Impacts of population growth and economic development on water quality of a lake: case study of Lake Victoria Kenya water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juma, Dauglas Wafula; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Fengting

    2014-04-01

    Anthropogenic-induced water quality pollution is a major environmental problem in freshwater ecosystems today. As a result of this, eutrophication of lakes occurs. Population and economic development are key drivers of water resource pollution. To evaluate how growth in the riparian population and in the gross domestic product (GDP) with unplanned development affects the water quality of the lake, this paper evaluates Lake Victoria Kenyan waters basin. Waters quality data between 1990 and 2012 were analyzed along with reviews of published literature, papers, and reports. The nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N), soluble phosphorus (PO4-P), chlorophyll a, and Secchi transparencies were evaluated as they are key water quality indicators. The NO3-N increased from 10 μg l(-1) in 1990 to 98 μg 1(-1) in 2008, while PO4-P increased from 4 μg l(-1) in 1990 to 57 μg l(-1) in 2008. The population and economic growth of Kenya are increasing with both having minimums in 1990 of 24.143 million people and 12.18 billion US dollars, to maximums in 2010 of 39.742 million people and 32.163 billion US dollars, respectively. A Secchi transparency is reducing with time, indicating an increasing pollution. This was confirmed by an increase in aquatic vegetation using an analysis of moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) images of 2000 and 2012 of Kenyan waters. This study found that increasing population and GDP increases pollution discharge thus polluting lakes. One of major factors causing lake water pollution is the unplanned or poor waste management policy and service.

  9. Evolution of the water chemistry of Lake Orta after liming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele A. TARTARI

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Since 1963 Lake Orta has been an emblematic case of industrial pollution by heavy metals and acidifying compounds (ammonium sulphate, to the extent that up to 1989 it was the largest acidified deep lake in the world. The low pH values of between 3.9 and 4.4 helped to keep high the levels of toxic compounds in solution, such as copper, aluminium, zinc and nickel. The liming performed in 1989-1990 brought the pH back to neutral values, determining the precipitation of the metals and the recovery of normal chemical conditions. The main results of researches conducted continuously on the lake water chemistry from 1988 to March 2000 are as follows. The whole water mass has been completely neutralised since the beginning of 1991; pH subsequently rose until in 1999-2000 it reached the values (6.7-6.9 units of the years when the lake was in a natural condition. The alkaline reserve showed a continuous increase after the lake water was neutralised, until March 2000, when total alkalinity values levelled off at 0.19 meq l-1. The increase in pH has allowed a full recovery of nitrification processes; in fact, during the liming period the concentration of ammonium was drastically reduced, by over 80%; ammonium has been practically absent since the end of 1992, and it may be affirmed that the primary cause of the acidification of the lake has been completely removed. The nitrate content in the lake has almost halved compared with the mean concentrations measured before the liming; in March 2000 mean values of 2.0 mg N l-1 were measured, and it is likely that these values will fall further in the next few years, to below 1.5 mg N l-1. The concentrations of toxic metals have shown a progressive reduction, to the extent that in 1999 the content of copper and aluminium was close to zero in the whole water mass. The situation of Lake Orta has therefore improved enormously, and is now very similar to the original condition of the lake before it was polluted

  10. Human land uses enhance sediment denitrification and N2O production in Yangtze lakes primarily by influencing lake water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sediment denitrification in lakes alleviates the effects of eutrophication through removal of nitrogen to the atmosphere as N2O and N2. However, N2O contributes notably to the greenhouse effect and global warming. Human lands uses (e.g., agricultural and urban areas strongly affect lake water quality and sediment characteristics, which, in turn, may regulate lake sediment denitrification and N2O production. In this study, we investigated sediment denitrification and N2O production and their relationships to within-lake variables and watershed land uses in 20 lakes from the Yangtze River basin in China. The results indicated that both lake water quality and sediment characteristics were significantly influenced by watershed land uses. Increased background denitrification rate would result in increased N2O production rate. Background denitrification and N2O production rates were positively related to water nitrogen concentrations but were not significantly correlated with sediment characteristics and plant community structure. A significant positive relationship was observed between background denitrification rate and percentage of human-dominated land uses (HDL in watersheds. Structural equation modelling revealed that the indirect effects of HDL on sediment denitrification and N2O production in Yangtze lakes were mediated primarily through lake water quality. Our findings also suggest that although sediments in Yangtze lakes can remove large quantities of nitrogen through denitrification, they may also be an important source of N2O, especially in lakes with high nitrogen content.

  11. What caused the decline of China's largest freshwater lake? Attribution analysis on Poyang Lake water level variations in recent years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xuchun; Xu, Chong-Yu; Zhang, Qi

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, dramatic decline of water level of the Poyang Lake, China's largest freshwater lake, has raised wide concerns about the water security and wetland ecosystem. This remarkable hydrological change coincided with several factors like the initial operation of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) in 2003, the big change of lake bottom topography due to extensive sand mining in the lake since 2000, and also climate change and other human activities in the Yangtze River basin may add to this complexity. Questions raised to what extent that the lake hydrological changes is caused by climate change and/or human activities. In this study, quantitative assessment was conducted to clarify the magnitude and mechanism of specific influencing factors on recent lake decline (2003-2014), with reference to the period of 1980-1999. The attempts were achieved through the reconstruction of lake water level scenarios by the framework of neural network. Major result indicates that the effect of lake bottom topography change due to sand mining activities has became the dominant factor for the recent lake decline, especially in winter season with low water level. However, the effect of TGD regulation shows strong seasonal features, its effect can accounts for 33%-42% of the average water level decline across the lake during the impoundment period of September-October. In addition, the effect of climate change and other human activities over the Yangtze River basin needs to be highly addressed, which is particularly prominent on reducing lake water level during the summer flood season and autumn recession period. The result also revealed that due to different mechanism, the responses of the lake water level to the three influencing factors are not consistent and show great spatial and temporal differences.

  12. In situ sampling of interstitial water from lake sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, Albertus G.; van Raaphorst, Wim; Lijklema, Lambertus

    1982-01-01

    A sampler with a relatively high resolution has been developed, which allows interstitial water to be obtained from lake sediments at well defined depths, without serious disturbance of sediment structure. Oxidation effects are excluded. Sampling time is in the order of a day. Installation requires

  13. Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Lake Edku Water, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. OKBAH

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to evaluate the quality of Lake Edku water. Regional and seasonal variations of some physico-chemical parameters (nutrient salts, total nitrogen, total phosphorous and silicate, in addition to pH, total alkalinity, chlorosity, dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand and oxidizable organic matter that were determined during the period from January to December 2000. Important variations have occurred in the investigated area as a result of human activity and the discharge of wastewater to the lake. The relatively low pH values reflect the decreased productivity of the Lake as a result of the polluted water discharged into the lake. Total alkalinity varied between 2.25 ± 0.35 to 8.38 ± 0.9 meq/l. In comparison with previous decades chlorosity content (586-1562 mg/l showed the general decreasing trend. Dissolved oxygen varied (2.37 ± 0.72 - 4.47 ± 0.94 mg/l. The ratios of BOD/ OOM values indicate that the lake water has a biodegradable nature. There was a noticeable variation in ammonia levels; a lower ammonia content was recorded in summer and spring. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations in Lake Edku water showed values ranging from 3.7±1.4 to 7.8±1.9 ΜM and from 15.2±2.9 to 45.9±11.8 ΜM, respectively. The total nitrogen of the lake exhibited higher levels (53.1±12.2 – 164.2±30.7 ΜM. The ratio of NH4/TIN (0.09-0.45 seems to be highly representative of the microbial nitrification rate as well as of the varying agricultural inflows. It is interesting to note that increasing values of reactive phosphate (11.6±1.8 – 14.7±2.5 ΜM were determined in autumn and winter respectively. The higher concentrations of reactive silicate were directly proportional to drainage water discharged into the Lake. It is clear from the mean ratio of N/P (2.4-8.8 nitrogen is the limiting factor. The lower values of N/P ratio could be related to an allochthonous condition.

  14. Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Lake Edku Water, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. OKBAH

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to evaluate the quality of Lake Edku water. Regional and seasonal variations of some physico-chemical parameters (nutrient salts, total nitrogen, total phosphorous and silicate, in addition to pH, total alkalinity, chlorosity, dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand and oxidizable organic matter that were determined during the period from January to December 2000. Important variations have occurred in the investigated area as a result of human activity and the discharge of wastewater to the lake. The relatively low pH values reflect the decreased productivity of the Lake as a result of the polluted water discharged into the lake. Total alkalinity varied between 2.25 ± 0.35 to 8.38 ± 0.9 meq/l. In comparison with previous decades chlorosity content (586-1562 mg/l showed the general decreasing trend. Dissolved oxygen varied (2.37 ± 0.72 - 4.47 ± 0.94 mg/l. The ratios of BOD/ OOM values indicate that the lake water has a biodegradable nature. There was a noticeable variation in ammonia levels; a lower ammonia content was recorded in summer and spring. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations in Lake Edku water showed values ranging from 3.7±1.4 to 7.8±1.9 ΜM and from 15.2±2.9 to 45.9±11.8 ΜM, respectively. The total nitrogen of the lake exhibited higher levels (53.1±12.2 – 164.2±30.7 ΜM. The ratio of NH4/TIN (0.09-0.45 seems to be highly representative of the microbial nitrification rate as well as of the varying agricultural inflows. It is interesting to note that increasing values of reactive phosphate (11.6±1.8 – 14.7±2.5 ΜM were determined in autumn and winter respectively. The higher concentrations of reactive silicate were directly proportional to drainage water discharged into the Lake. It is clear from the mean ratio of N/P (2.4-8.8 nitrogen is the limiting factor. The lower values of N/P ratio could be related to an allochthonous condition.

  15. Determining lake surface water temperatures (LSWTs worldwide using a tuned 1-dimensional lake model (FLake, v1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Layden

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available FLake, a 1-dimensional freshwater lake model, is tuned for 244 globally distributed large lakes using lake surface water temperatures (LSWTs derived from Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSRs. The model, tuned using only 3 lake properties; lake depth, albedo (snow and ice and light extinction co-efficient, substantially improves the measured biases in various features of the LSWT annual cycle, including the LSWTs of saline and high altitude lakes. The daily mean absolute differences (MAD and the spread of differences (±2 standard deviations across the trial seasonally ice covered lakes (lakes with a lake-mean LSWT remaining below 1 °C for part of the annual cycle is reduced from 3.01± 2.25 °C (pre-tuning to 0.84 ± 0.51 °C (post-tuning. For non-seasonally ice-covered trial lakes (lakes with a lake-mean LSWT remaining above 1 °C throughout its annual cycle, the average daily mean absolute difference (MAD is reduced from 3.55 ± 3.20 °C to 0.96 ± 0.63 °C. The post tuning results for the trial lakes (35 lakes are highly representative of the post tuning results of the 244 lakes. The sensitivity of the summer LSWTs of deeper lakes to changes in the timing of ice-off is demonstrated. The modelled summer LSWT response to changes in ice-off timing is found to be strongly affected by lake depth and latitude, explaining 0.50 (R2adj, p = 0.001 of the inter-lake variance in summer LSWTs. Lake depth alone explains 0.35 (p =0.003 of the variance. The tuning approach undertaken in this study, overcomes the obstacle of the lack of available lake characteristic information (snow and ice albedo and light extinction co-efficient for individual lakes. Furthermore, the tuned values for lake depth, snow and ice albedo and light extinction co-efficient for the 244 lakes provide guidance for improving LSWTs modelling in FLake.

  16. Is water age a reliable indicator for evaluating water quality effectiveness of water diversion projects in eutrophic lakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Zou, Rui; Wang, Yilin; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Lei; Zhu, Xiang; Guo, Huaicheng

    2016-11-01

    Water diversion has been applied increasingly to promote the exchange of lake water and to control eutrophication of lakes. The accelerated water exchange and mass transport by water diversion can usually be represented by water age. But the responses of water quality after water diversion is still disputed. The reliability of using water age for evaluating the effectiveness of water diversion projects in eutrophic lakes should be thereby explored further. Lake Dianchi, a semi-closed plateau lake in China, has suffered severe eutrophication since the 1980s, and it is one of the three most eutrophic lakes in China. There was no significant improvement in water quality after an investment of approximately 7.7 billion USD and numerous project efforts from 1996 to 2015. After the approval of the Chinese State Council, water has been transferred to Lake Dianchi to alleviate eutrophication since December 2013. A three-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model and eight scenarios were developed in this study to quantity the influence of this water diversion project on water quality in Lake Dianchi. The model results showed that (a) Water quality (TP, TN, and Chla) could be improved by 13.5-32.2%, much lower than the approximate 50% reduction in water age; (b) Water exchange had a strong positive relationship with mean TP, and mean Chla had exactly the same response to water diversion as mean TN; (c) Water level was more beneficial for improving hydrodynamic and nutrient concentrations than variation in the diverted inflowing water volume; (d) The water diversion scenario of doubling the diverted inflow rate in the wet season with the water level of 1886.5 m and 1887 m in the remaining months was the best water diversion mode for mean hydrodynamics and TP, but the scenario of doubling the diverted inflow rate in the wet season with 1887 m throughout the year was optimum for mean TN and Chla; (e) Water age influenced the effectiveness of water diversion on the

  17. Water Quality Deterioration in Artificial Lake: Their Impact and Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Azlina Abd Aziz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Seven sampling stations were identified to determine the status of water quality in Cempaka Lake, Bandar Baru Bangi within two sampling periods of June 2010 and August 2010. The objectives of the study are to identify and classify the current water quality in the lake. A total of twelve water quality parameters have been analyzed in-situ and ex-situ and classified under WQI and NWQS classifications, four parameters were analyzed using HYDROLAB meter DataSonde, eight parameters were analyzed under the standard of the HACH and APHA methods. The results are pH  between 6.13 to 6.92, DO 1.63 to 4.94 mg/L, temperature 26.02 to 28.37 ºC, conductivity of 94 to 213mS/cm, BOD  0.38 up to 2.4 mg/L, NH3-N  2.00 to 2.84 mg/L, phosphate 0.21 to 0.56 mg/L, sulphate 21 to 35 mg/L, COD 9.3 to 69 mg/L, TSS of 1.8 to 33.3 mg/L, oil and grease 5.7 to 11.8 mg/L  and hardness 13.89 to 35.57 mg/L. Based on this classification, the water quality of Cempaka Lake was classified as Class II and III. The results are clearly shown that the majority of the water quality parameters in the study area are more polluted during the first sampling compared to the second sampling. Cempaka Lake has been contaminated due to residential activities, clinic centres, restaurants, petrol pump stations that release discharge into streams, rivers and eventually the lake become a brownish color and a smell of ammonia.

  18. Assessing water quality in Lake Naivasha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ndungu, J.N.

    2014-01-01

    Water quality in aquatic systems is important because it maintains the ecological processes that support biodiversity. However, declining water quality due to environmental perturbations threatens the stability of the biotic integrity and therefore hinders the ecosystem services and functions of

  19. A Preliminary Analysis of Lake Level and Water Storage Changes over Lakes Baikal and Balkhash from Satellite Altimetry and Gravimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheinway Hwang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lakes Baikal and Balkhash are two of the world¡¦s major lakes affecting fresh water supplies in their catchments. Measurements from satellite altimetry (TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and -2, satellite gravimetry (GRACE and a hydrological model (LDAS are used to see the relationship between lake level change (LLC and water storage change in these two lakes. At Lake Baikal, the average rate of LLC is negative for 1992 - 1998 and positive for 1998 - 2007, and the reversal of the LLC trend concurs with that of the temperature trend during the 1997 - 1998 El Nino. The rate of gravity change ranges from -0.5 to 0.5 ugal yr-1 with a low over the Tian Shan and a high over western Lake Baikal. Due to the climates over the two lakes, the phases of the annual gravity changes differ by up to 100 days. Using the rates of LLC and gravity changes, the ratios between the mass changes of the lake and its catchment over Lakes Baikal and Balkhash are estimated to 0.6 and 0.3, respectively. The result may help to establish water balance models over these two lakes.

  20. REMOTE SENSING OF WATER QUALITY IN OPTICALLY COMPLEX LAKES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kutser

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Solving of several global and regional problems requires adequate data about lake water quality parameters like the amount and type of phytoplankton dominating in the lakes, the amount of dissolved and coloured dissolved organic matter and/or concentration of suspended sediment. Remote sensing is the only practical way to study many lakes provided it can produce sufficiently accurate estimates of the water characteristics. We studied optically very variable lakes in order to test both physics based methods and conventional band-ratio type algorithms in retrieval of water parameters. The modelled spectral library used in the physics based approach provided very good results for chlorophyll-a retrieval. The number of different concentrations of CDOM and suspended matter used in the simulations was too low to provide good estimates of these parameters. Extending the spectral library is currently in progress. Band-ratio type algorithms worked well in chlorophyll-a and CDOM retrieval. None of the algorithms tested for total suspended matter, organic suspended matter and inorganic suspended matter retrieval performed well enough and there is need in further testing.

  1. Evaporation and transport of water isotopologues from Greenland lakes: The lake size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiahong; Lauder, Alex M.; Posmentier, Eric S.; Kopec, Ben G.; Virginia, Ross A.

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of evaporative flux from a lake are used in many hydrological and paleoclimate studies that help constrain the water budget of a lake and/or to infer changes in climate conditions. The isotopic fluxes of evaporation from a water surface are typically computed using a zero dimensional (0-D) model originally conceptualized by Craig and Gordon (1965). Such models generally have laminar and turbulent layers, assume a steady state condition, and neglect horizontal variations. In particular, the effect of advection on isotopic variations is not considered. While this classical treatment can be used for some sections of large open surface water bodies, such as an ocean or a large lake, it may not apply to relatively small water bodies where limited fetch does not allow full equilibration between air from land and the water surface. Both horizontal and vertical gradients in water vapor concentration and isotopic ratios may develop over a lake. These gradients, in turn, affect the evaporative fluxes of water vapor and its isotopic ratios, which is not adequately predicted by a 0-D model. We observed, for the first time, the vertical as well as horizontal components of vapor and isotopic gradients as relatively dry and isotopically depleted air advected over the surfaces of several lakes up to a 5 km fetch under winds of 1-5 m/s in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. We modeled the vapor and isotopic distribution in air above the lake using a steady state 2-D model, in which vertical diffusive transport balances horizontal advection. The model was verified by our observations, and then used to calculate evaporative fluxes of vapor and its isotopic ratios. In the special case of zero wind speed, the model reduces to 1-D. Results from this 1-D model are compared with those from the 2-D model to assess the discrepancy in isotopic fluxes between advection and no advection conditions. Since wind advection above a lake alters the concentrations, gradients, and

  2. Use of isotopic data to estimate water residence times of the Finger Lakes, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Robert L.; Kraemer, Thomas F.

    1995-01-01

    Water retention times in the Finger Lakes, a group of 11 lakes in central New York with similar hydrologic and climatic characteristics, were estimated by use of a tritium-balance model. During July 1991, samples were collected from the 11 lakes and selected tributary streams and were analyzed for tritium, deuterium, and oxygen-18. Additional samples from some of the sites were collected in 1990, 1992 and 1993. Tritium concentration in lake water ranged from 24.6 Tritium Units (TU) (Otisco Lake) to 43.2 TU (Seneca Lake).The parameters in the model used to obtain water retention time (WRT) included relative humidity, evaporation rate, tritium concentrations of inflowing water and lake water, and WRT of the lake. A historical record of tritium concentrations in precipitation and runoff was obtained from rainfall data at Ottawa, Canada, analyses of local wines produced during 1977–1991, and streamflow samples collected in 1990–1991. The model was simulated in yearly steps for 1953–1991, and the WRT was varied to reproduce tritium concentrations measured in each lake in 1991. Water retention times obtained from model simulations ranged from 1 year for Otisco Lake to 12 years for Seneca Lake, and with the exception of Seneca Lake and Skaneateles Lake, were in agreement with earlier estimates obtained from runoff estimates and chloride balances. The sensitivity of the model to parameter changes was tested to determine possible reasons for the differences calculated for WRT's for Seneca Lake and Skaneateles Lake. The shorter WRT obtained from tritium data for Lake Seneca (12 years as compared to 18 years) can be explained by a yearly addition of less than 3% by lake volume of ground water to the lake, the exact percentage depending on tritium concentration in the ground water.

  3. Monitoring eastern Oklahoma lake water quality using Landsat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Clay

    The monitoring of public waters for recreational, industrial, agricultural, and drinking purposes is a difficult task assigned to many state water agencies. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) is only physically monitoring a quarter of the lakes it is charged with monitoring in any given year. The minimal sample scheme adopted by the OWRB is utilized to determine long-term trends and basic impairment but is insufficient to monitor the water quality shifts that occur following influx from rains or to detect algal blooms, which may be highly localized and temporally brief. Recent work in remote sensing calibrates reflectance coefficients between extant water quality data and Landsat imagery reflectance to estimate water quality parameters on a regional basis. Remotely-sensed water quality monitoring benefits include reduced cost, more frequent sampling, inclusion of all lakes visible each satellite pass, and better spatial resolution results. The study area for this research is the Ozark foothills region in eastern Oklahoma including the many lakes impacted by phosphorus flowing in from the Arkansas border region. The result of this research was a moderate r2 regression value for turbidity during winter (0.52) and summer (0.65), which indicates that there is a seasonal bias to turbidity estimation using this methodology and the potential to further develop an estimation equation for this water quality parameter. Refinements that improve this methodology could provide state-wide estimations of turbidity allowing more frequent observation of water quality and allow better response times by the OWRB to developing water impairments.

  4. Assessing water quality in Lake Naivasha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ndungu, Jane Njeri

    2014-01-01

    Water quality in aquatic systems is important because it maintains the ecological processes that support biodiversity. However, declining water quality due to environmental perturbations threatens the stability of the biotic integrity and therefore hinders the ecosystem services and functions of aqu

  5. 76 FR 79604 - Effective Date for the Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 131 RIN 2040-AF36 Effective Date for the Water Quality Standards for the State of... of the ``Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Final Rule... for the ``Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Final...

  6. Water Quality, Hydrology, and Response to Changes in Phosphorus Loading of Nagawicka Lake, a Calcareous Lake in Waukesha County, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garn, Herbert S.; Robertson, Dale M.; Rose, William J.; Goddard, Gerald L.; Horwatich, Judy A.

    2006-01-01

    Nagawicka Lake is a 986-acre, usually mesotrophic, calcareous lake in southeastern Wisconsin. Because of concern over potential water-quality degradation of the lake associated with further development in its watershed, a study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey from 2002 to 2006 to describe the water quality and hydrology of the lake; quantify sources of phosphorus, including those associated with urban development; and determine the effects of past and future changes in phosphorus loading on the water quality of the lake. All major water and phosphorus sources were measured directly, and minor sources were estimated to construct detailed water and phosphorus budgets for the lake. The Bark River, near-lake surface inflow, precipitation, and ground water contributed 74, 8, 12, and 6 percent of the inflow, respectively. Water leaves the lake primarily through the Bark River outlet (88 percent) or by evaporation (11 percent). The water quality of Nagawicka Lake has improved dramatically since 1980 as a result of decreasing the historical loading of phosphorus to the lake. Total input of phosphorus to the lake was about 3,000 pounds in monitoring year (MY) 2003 and 6,700 pounds in MY 2004. The largest source of phosphorus entering the lake was the Bark River, which delivered about 56 percent of the total phosphorus input, compared with about 74 percent of the total water input. The next largest contributions were from the urbanized near-lake drainage area, which disproportionately accounted for 37 percent of the total phosphorus input but only about 5 percent of the total water input. Simulations with water-quality models within the Wisconsin Lakes Modeling Suite (WiLMS) indicated the response of Nagawicka Lake to 10 phosphorus-loading scenarios. These scenarios included historical (1970s) and current (base) years (MY 2003-04) for which lake water quality and loading were known, six scenarios with percentage increases or decreases in phosphorus loading from

  7. [Discussion on water conservancy projects and schistosomiasis control in Poyang Lake area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dao-Nan

    2013-02-01

    According to the schistosomiasis endemic situation in the Poyang Lake area, this paper analyzes the relationship between the water conservancy projects and schistosomiasis control, and reviews and discusses the effects of the Water Level Control Project of Poyang Lake, the Lake Dike Slope Hardening Project, and the Lifting Delta and Descending Beach Project on Oncomelania snail control.

  8. Study of the origin of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water of Lake Baikal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, M. Yu.; Snytko, V. A.; Marinaite, I. I.

    2017-06-01

    The concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the water of Lake Baikal is estimated. The published data on the composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in industrial and communal emissions and in crude oils are analyzed. Anthropogenic sources of lake water contamination are revealed. It is concluded that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons enter the lake as a result of natural oil release.

  9. UVR induce optical changes and phosphorous release of lake water and macrophyte leachates in shallow Andean lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz MODENUTTI

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We carried out laboratory experiments in order to study the effect of ultraviolet radiation (UVR on optical features and phosphorous release of Dissolved Organic Mater (DOM from lake water and macrophyte leachates. Lake water samples were obtained from lakes Escondido and El Trébol, and macrophytes (Potamogeton linguatus and Schoenoplectus californicus from their littoral zones. After UVR exposure, DOM from lake El Trébol seemed to react more quickly than that from Lake Escondido and this seems to be related with the degree of lability or aromaticity in the DOM bulk of each lake. Leachates from both macrophytes showed different absorbance spectra with differences in photochemical transformations after UVR exposure: S. californicus leachates exhibited the highest photodegradation. A significant Soluble Reactive Phosphorus (SRP release was observed in lake water after UVR exposure. Lake El Trébol showed the highest SRP concentrations, suggesting that the release of orthophosphate was favored by low molecular weight DOM. P. linguatus leachates have more dissolved phosphorus content than S. californicus ones and after UVR exposure, P. linguatus leachate did not react to UVR while S. californicus exhibited a decrease in SRP. However both macrophyte leachates showed the higher P release in darkness. The obtained results indicated that macrophyte leachates could contribute significantly to changes in the optical characteristics and in the nutrient content in shallow Andean lakes. An increasing input of P. linguatus leachates would produce DOM of high molecular size and a higher P release than S. californicus.

  10. Environmental Monitoring, Water Quality - TMDL Lakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Clean Water Act Section 303(d) establishes the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. The purpose of the TMDL program is to identify sources of pollution and...

  11. Environmental Monitoring, Water Quality - TMDL Lakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — The Clean Water Act Section 303(d) establishes the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. The purpose of the TMDL program is to identify sources of pollution and...

  12. Water quality assessment for Ulansuhai Lake using fuzzy clustering and pattern recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Water quality assessment of lakes is important to determine functional zones of water use. Considering the fuzziness during the partitioning process for lake water quality in an arid area, a multiplex model of fuzzy clustering with pattern recognition was developed by integrating transitive closure method, ISODATA algorithm in fuzzy clustering and fuzzy pattern recognition. The model was applied to partition the Ulansuhai Lake, a typical shallow lake in arid climate zone in the west part of Inner Mongolia, China and grade the condition of water quality divisions. The results showed that the partition well matched the real conditions of the lake, and the method has been proved accurate in the application.

  13. Arsenic, Fluoride, and Vanadium in surface water (Chasicó Lake, Argentina)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Puntoriero, María L; Volpedo, Alejandra V; Fernández Cirelli, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Chasicó Lake is the main water body in the southwest of the Chaco-Pampean plain. It shows some differences from the typical Pampean shallow lakes, such as high salinity and high arsenic and fluoride levels...

  14. Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Ruby Valley Nevada : 1992 Annual water management report 1993 Annual water management plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ruby Lake NWR 1992 Annual Water Management Report 1993 Annual Water Management Plan. Includes summary of 1992 weather, 1992 water levels, water availability forecast...

  15. Characterizing lake water quality, cyanotoxins, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbick, N.; Ziniti, B.; Stommel, E.; Linder, E.; Andrew, A.; Bradley, W.; Shi, X.

    2016-12-01

    Concern over toxins and public health threats resulting from Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms (CHABs) have gained attention as reoccurring and seasonal blooms persist in many waters. Concordantly, climate change has been suggested to increase the intensity, duration, and frequency of CHAB events. Humans may be exposed to the cyanotoxins produced by cyanobacteria via the food chain, drinking water, recreational use of waterbodies and by aerosolization. Exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) that has been found in the brains of ALS patients is a hypothesized mechanism. The goals of this research initiative are to investigate spatiotemporal relationships between inland lake water quality and ALS across northern New England (NNE). Multiscale satellite remote sensing was integrated with in situ lake and toxin sampling to provide robust spatiotemporal exposure risk metrics characterizing CHAB. Semi-analytical, shape, and empirical algorithms were bldned together tp generate spatiotemporal measures of chl-a and PC with R2 ranging from 0.65-0.92 using withheld samples. Postmortem aerosolization analysis found 85% of high risk patients to express phycobillin in lung tissue using fluroesence microscopy. To scal eup to the region we employed complementing spatial statistics and a Bayesian hierarchical framework to model relationships between lake risk metrics and ALS case location across NNE. The eco-epidemiolgical modeling results show that on average poorer water quality conditions and higher measures of cyanobacteria are associated with increased odds of belonging to a normalized ALS hot spots and risk of ALS. This has broad societal impacts as the frequency, duration, and magnitude of cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms are expanding and this work helps characterize lake ecosystem services and human health.

  16. Bacterial biota of Nigeen Lake waters (Kashmir Valley).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffar, Riasa M; Ganai, Bashir A

    2016-08-01

    One of the greatest apprehensions of water consumers all over the world with respect to the quality of drinking water is its contamination with pathogenic microorganisms. This research work determined the potential bacterial contaminants of the waters of Nigeen Lake, a subsidiary of Dal Lake and is regarded as a separate lake in Kashmir. The study was carried out from May 2014 to November 2014 excluding August and September at four different sites. During the study the bacterial flora showed variation in relation to the conditions prevailing at different sites. The highest viable count of bacteria was observed at Site:2 (surrounded by residential hamlets) followed by Site:1 (inlet) and Site:4 (centre) followed by Site:3 (outlet). Based on the examination of morphological features of bacterial colonies on nutrient agar plates after 48 h of incubation period, 40 different strains were isolated. The isolates were identified with the help of Gram's staining and DNA sequencing, 55% of the strains were Gram negative and 45% of the strains were Gram positive. With the help of 16S rRNA sequencing, out of the 40 isolates of bacteria, 7 strains were different at the genetic level. The bacteria which were identified with the help of DNA sequencing are Pseudomonas synxantha, Delftia acidovorans, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus licheniformis, Macrococcus caseolyticus, Azotobacter vinelandii, and Stenotrophomonas maltophiria.

  17. Water Management Report : Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year 1974

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes water management on Benton Lake NWR during 1974. Water quantity- including water levels, factors which affect consumption rates, water...

  18. 77 FR 74449 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Proposed Rule; Stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 131 RIN 2040-AF41 Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing... regulation the ``Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Final Rule... Information Does this action apply to me? Citizens concerned with water quality in Florida may be interested...

  19. Estimation of Lake Water Temperature with ASTER and Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS Thermal Infrared Bands: A Case Study Beysehir Lake (Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Sehnaz; Sener, Erhan

    2016-08-01

    Beyşehir Lake is the largest fresh water lake in our country with the 653 km2 surface area. Lake water have used for drinking water of several settlements in the basin. Beyşehir Lake is a shallow lake and, especially in recent years its water level was dropped due to unplanned usage and effects of climate change.In this study, determination of the water temperature in Lake Beyşehir is aimed using 90m resolution thermal infrared bands of ASTER (Advance Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) satellite and 30m resolution thermal infrared bands of Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS satellite. The Normalized Water Different Index (NWDI) has been applied to ASTER and Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS satellite images to determine lake surface area. Accordingly, the lake water temperature is generally proportional to the depth and it relatively higher in the shallow area.

  20. Challenge to the model of lake charr evolution: Shallow- and deep-water morphs exist within a small postglacial lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarie, Louise; Muir, Andrew M.; Zimmerman, Mara S.; Baillie, Shauna M.; Hansen, Michael J.; Nate, Nancy A.; Yule, Daniel L.; Middel, Trevor; Bentzen, Paul; Krueger, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    All examples of lake charr (Salvelinus namaycush) diversity occur within the largest, deepest lakes of North America (i.e. > 2000 km2). We report here Rush Lake (1.3 km2) as the first example of a small lake with two lake charr morphs (lean and huronicus). Morphology, diet, life history, and genetics were examined to demonstrate the existence of morphs and determine the potential influence of evolutionary processes that led to their formation or maintenance. Results showed that the huronicus morph, caught in deep-water, had a deeper body, smaller head and jaws, higher eye position, greater buoyancy, and deeper peduncle than the shallow-water lean morph. Huronicus grew slower to a smaller adult size, and had an older mean age than the lean morph. Genetic comparisons showed low genetic divergence between morphs, indicating incomplete reproductive isolation. Phenotypic plasticity and differences in habitat use between deep and shallow waters associated with variation in foraging opportunities seems to have been sufficient to maintain the two morphs, demonstrating their important roles in resource polymorphism. Rush Lake expands previous explanations for lake charr intraspecific diversity, from large to small lakes and from reproductive isolation to the presence of gene flow associated with strong ecological drivers.

  1. Water Quality Characterization of Varsity Lake, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aqeel Ashraf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lakes and reservoirs are important sources of water supply, generate electricity and to irrigate fields. Since, lakes act as catchment basins for close to 40% of the landscape so serve as recreational, sporting and fishing activities. Varsity Lake University of Malaya (UM is beautiful landscape at the front of the UM main entrance. It is used mainly for recreational and sporting (canoeing activities. Study has been carried out in order to analyze water quality, nutrients and metals load starting from water inlets into the lake basin. It was found that there is high concentration of oil and grease particles in water due to water flow from cafeteria of college 2, engineering and built environment faculties which cause BOD and TSS value to be higher then normal in the lake. It was one of the main factors that caused the death of fish in the lake in recent months. Mercury and nitrate concentration is also high in the lake. A body contact is involved due to sporting and recreational activities so parameters are compared with Malaysian Interim water quality standards and it was concluded that lake water quality is not fulfilling the recreational spot criteria and is hazardous to human and fish life in the lake. Recommendations are proposed for immediate action. Best management practices is also discussed for prevention of oil and grease particles from entry into lake water to protect this valuable water resource from being polluted.

  2. OBIA based hierarchical image classification for industrial lake water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uca Avci, Z D; Karaman, M; Ozelkan, E; Kumral, M; Budakoglu, M

    2014-07-15

    Water management is very important in water mining regions for the sustainability of the natural environment and for industrial activities. This study focused on Acigol Lake, which is an important wetland for sodium sulphate (Na2SO4) production, a significant natural protection area and habitat for local bird species and endemic species of this saline environment, and a stopover for migrating flamingos. By a hierarchical classification method, ponds representing the industrial part were classified according to in-situ measured Baumé values, and lake water representing the natural part was classified according to in-situ measurements of water depth. The latter is directly related to the water level, which should not exceed a critical level determined by the regulatory authorities. The resulting data, produced at an accuracy of around 80%, illustrates the status in two main regions for a single date. The output of the analysis may be meaningful for firms and environmental researchers, and authorizations can provide a good perspective for decision making for sustainable resource management in the region which has uncommon and specific ecological characteristics.

  3. Hydrology and water quality of East Lake Tohopekaliga, Osceola County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Donna M.

    1987-01-01

    East Lake Tohopekaliga, one of the major lakes in central Florida, is located in the upper Kissimmee River basin in north-east Osceola County. It is one of numerous lakes in the upper basin used for flood control, in addition to recreation and some irrigation of surrounding pasture. This report is the fourth in a series of lake reconnaissance studies in the Kissimmee River basin prepared in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District. The purpose of the report is to provide government agencies and the public with a brief summary of the lake 's hydrology and water quality. Site information is given and includes map number, site name, location, and type of data available (specific conductivity, pH, alkalinity, turbidity, color, dissolved oxygen, hardness, dissolved chlorides, dissolved sodium, dissolved calcium, dissolved magnesium, dissolved potassium, nitrogen, ammonia, nitrates, carbon and phosphorus). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintained a lake stage gaging station on East Lake Tohopekaliga from 1942 to 1968. The South Florida Water Management District has recorded lake stage since 1963. Periodic water quality samples have been collected from the lake by the South Florida Water Management District and USGS. Water quality and discharge data have been collected for one major tributary to the lake, Boggy Creek. Although few groundwater data are available for the study area, results of previous studies of the groundwater resources of Osceola County are included in this report. To supplement the water quality data for East Lake Tohopekaliga, water samples were collected at selected sites in November 1982 (dry season) and in August 1983 (rainy season). Samples were taken at inflow points, and in the lake, and vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen and temperature were measured in the lake. A water budget from an EPA report on the lake is also included. (Lantz-PTT)

  4. A New Exhibition in Microcosm

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Sebastien Pelletier explains states of matter to an enthusiastic group of youngsters during the opening of a new exhibition in Microcosm last week. The Fun with Physics workshop will be offered to all 13-14 year olds in school groups visiting CERN this year. The new Microcosm contents have been developed in collaboration with the local teaching community, and cover particles and the forces that act between them.

  5. District wide water resources investigation and management using LANDSAT data. Phase 1: Lake volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, S. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A technique for estimating available water storage volume using LANDSAT data was developed and applied to Lake Washington and Lake Harris in central Florida. The technique can be applied two ways. First, where the historical stage records are available, the historical LANDSAT data can be used to establish the relationship between lake volume and lake stage. In the second case, where the historical stage records are not available, the historical LANDSAT data can be used to estimate the historical lake stage after the lake volume and stage information become available in the future.

  6. Hydrological drivers of record-setting water level rise on Earth's largest lake system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronewold, A. D.; Bruxer, J.; Durnford, D.; Smith, J. P.; Clites, A. H.; Seglenieks, F.; Qian, S. S.; Hunter, T. S.; Fortin, V.

    2016-05-01

    Between January 2013 and December 2014, water levels on Lake Superior and Lake Michigan-Huron, the two largest lakes on Earth by surface area, rose at the highest rate ever recorded for a 2 year period beginning in January and ending in December of the following year. This historic event coincided with below-average air temperatures and extensive winter ice cover across the Great Lakes. It also brought an end to a 15 year period of persistently below-average water levels on Lakes Superior and Michigan-Huron that included several months of record-low water levels. To differentiate hydrological drivers behind the recent water level rise, we developed a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) routine for inferring historical estimates of the major components of each lake's water budget. Our results indicate that, in 2013, the water level rise on Lake Superior was driven by increased spring runoff and over-lake precipitation. In 2014, reduced over-lake evaporation played a more significant role in Lake Superior's water level rise. The water level rise on Lake Michigan-Huron in 2013 was also due to above-average spring runoff and persistent over-lake precipitation, while in 2014, it was due to a rare combination of below-average evaporation, above-average runoff and precipitation, and very high inflow rates from Lake Superior through the St. Marys River. We expect, in future research, to apply our new framework across the other Laurentian Great Lakes, and to Earth's other large freshwater basins as well.

  7. Effects of climate change on deep-water oxygen and winter mixing in a deep lake (Lake Geneva)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwefel, Robert; Alfred, Wüest; Damien, Bouffard

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen is the most important dissolved gas for lake ecosystems. Because low oxygen concentrations are an ongoing problem in many parts of the oceans and numerous lakes, oxygen depletion processes have been intensively studied over the last decades and were mainly attributed to high nutrient loads. Recently, climate-induced changes in stratification and mixing behavior were recognized as additional thread to hypolimnetic oxygen budgets in lakes and reservoirs [Matzinger et al., 2007; Zhang et al., 2015]. Observational data of Lake Geneva, a deep perialpine lake situated between France and Switzerland showed no decreasing trend in hypoxia over the last 43 years, despite an impressive reduction in nutrient input during this period. Instead, hypoxic conditions were predominantly controlled by deep mixing end of winter and in turn by winter temperatures. To test the sensitivity of Lake Geneva on future climate change and changes in water transparency, we simulated the hydrodynamics and temperature of Lake Geneva under varying conditions for atmospheric temperature and water clarity performed with the one-dimensional model SIMSTRAT [Goudsmit, 2002]. The results show, that the stratification in lakes is only weakly affected by changes in light absorption due to varying water quality. For conditions expected for the end of the century, a decrease in the annual mean deep convective mixing of up to 45 m is predicted. Also complete mixing events over the whole lake are less likely to occur. A change in the hypolimnetic oxygen concentration of up to 20% can thus be expected in the future. These results show, that changes in deep mixing have an equally strong impact as eutrophication on the deep-water oxygen development of oligomictic lakes and have to be considered in the prediction of the future development of lakes. References: Goudsmit, G. H., H. Burchard, F. Peeters, and A. Wüest (2002), Application of k-ɛ turbulence models to enclosed basins: The role of internal

  8. Stochastic modeling of Lake Van water level time series with jumps and multiple trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aksoy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the 1990s, water level in the closed-basin Lake Van located in the Eastern Anatolia, Turkey, has risen up about 2 m. Analysis of the hydrometeorological data shows that change in the water level is related to the water budget of the lake. In this study, stochastic models are proposed for simulating monthly water level data. Two models considering mono- and multiple-trend time series are developed. The models are derived after removal of trend and periodicity in the dataset. Trend observed in the lake water level time series is fitted by mono- and multiple-trend lines. In the so-called mono-trend model, the time series is treated as a whole under the hypothesis that the lake water level has an increasing trend. In the second model (so-called multiple-trend, the time series is divided into a number of segments to each a linear trend can be fitted separately. Application on the lake water level data shows that four segments, each fitted with a trend line, are meaningful. Both the mono- and multiple-trend models are used for simulation of synthetic lake water level time series under the hypothesis that the observed mono- and multiple-trend structure of the lake water level persist during the simulation period. The multiple-trend model is found better for planning the future infrastructural projects in surrounding areas of the lake as it generates higher maxima for the simulated lake water level.

  9. Variation Characteristics of Water Environmental Capacity in Poyang Lake under the Scheduling of Three Gorges Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the variation characteristics of water environmental capacity in Poyang Lake under the scheduling of Three Gorges Reservoir.[Method] Choosing chemical oxygen demand (COD),total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) as the control indexes of pollutants in Poyang Lake,the variation characteristics of water environmental capacity in Poyang Lake under the scheduling of Three Gorges Reservoir were analyzed based on the water environment mathematical models of organic compounds ...

  10. 75 FR 45579 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters; Supplemental Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 131 RIN 2040-AF11 Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing... 26, 2010, notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM), proposing numeric nutrient water quality criteria to protect aquatic life in lakes and flowing waters within the State of Florida. In the January 2010 NPRM...

  11. 1990 Annual water management report 1991 Annual water management plan : Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Ruby Valley Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ruby Lake NWR 1990 Annual Water Management Report 1991 Annual Water Management Plan. Includes 1990 weather summary, water availability forecast, summary of 1990...

  12. 1989 Annual water management report 1990 Annual water management plan : Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Ruby Valley Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ruby Lake NWR 1989 Annual Water Management Report 1990 Annual Water Management Plan. Includes 1989 weather summary, water availability forecast, summary of 1989...

  13. 1989 Annual water management plan : Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Ruby Valley Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ruby Lake NWR 1988 Annual Water Management Report 1989 Annual Water Management Plan. Includes 1988 weather summary, water availability forecast, summary of 1988...

  14. Water Management Report : Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes water management on Benton Lake NWR during 1975. Part I of the report covers water quantity, water quality, marsh vegetation, and flood...

  15. Water Management Report : Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year 1976

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes water management on Benton Lake NWR during 1976. Water quantity, water quality, marsh vegetation, and pool topography are discussed.

  16. Water level changes of high altitude lakes in Himalaya–Karakoram from ICESat altimetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Priyeshu Srivastava; Rakesh Bhambri; Prashant Kawishwar; D P Dobhal

    2013-12-01

    Himalaya–Karakoram (H–K) region hosts large number of high altitude lakes but are poorly gauged by in-situ water level monitoring method due to tough terrain conditions and poor accessibility. After the campaigns of ICESat during 2003–2009, now it is possible to achieve lake levels at decimetre accuracy. Therefore, in present study, high altitude lake levels were observed using ICESat/GLAS altimetry in H–K between 2003 and 2009 to generate baseline information. The study reveals that out of 13 lakes, 10 lakes show increasing trend of water levels at different rate (mean rate 0.173 m/y) whereas three lakes unveiled decreasing trend (mean rate −0.056 m/y). Out of five freshwater lakes, four lakes show an increasing trend of their level (mean rate 0.084 m/y) whereas comparatively six salt lakes (out of seven salt lakes) exhibited ∼3 times higher mean rate of lake level increase (0.233 m/y). These observed lake level rise can be attributed to the increased melt runoffs (i.e., seasonal snow and glacier melts) owing to the enhanced mean annual and seasonal air temperature during past decade in north-western (NW) Himalaya. Further, varied behaviours of lake level rises in inter- and intra-basins suggest that the local climatic fluctuations play prominent role along with regional and global climate in complex geographical system of NW Himalaya.

  17. Water Level Monitoring on Tibetan Lakes Based on Icesat and Envisat Data Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. W.; Qiao, G.; Wu, Y. J.; Cao, Y. J.; Mi, H.

    2017-09-01

    Satellite altimetry technique is an effective method to monitor the water level of lakes in a wide range, especially in sparsely populated areas, such as the Tibet Plateau (TP). To provide high quality data for time-series change detection of lake water level, an automatic and efficient algorithm for lake water footprint (LWF) detection in a wide range is used. Based on ICESat GLA14 Release634 data and ENVISat GDR 1Hz data, water level of 167 lakes were obtained from ICESat data series, and water level of 120 lakes were obtained from ENVISat data series. Among them, 67 lakes contained two data series. Mean standard deviation of all lakes is 0.088 meters (ICESat), 0.339 meters (ENVISat). Combination of multi-source altimetry data is helpful for us to get longer and more dense periods cover water level, study the lake level changes, manage water resources and understand the impacts of climate change better. In addition, the standard deviation of LWF elevation used to calculate the water level were analyzed by month. Based on lake data set for the TP from the 1960s, 2005, and 2014 in Scientific Data, it is found that the water level changes in the TP have a strong spatial correlation with the area changes.

  18. Study on the Water Quality and Protection Measures of Dongting Lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhangquan; ZENG; Canming; ZHANG; Xiquan; LI; Nan; Yang; Yandong; NIU; Zijian; WU

    2015-01-01

    From nitrogen and phosphorus,chemical oxygen demand,phytoplankton,and eutrophication,this article analyzes the current situation of water quality in the Dongting Lake area,and discusses the factors influencing the water quality of Dongting Lake. Based on the actual production,geographic characteristics and outstanding problem of grim water pollution situation in the Dongting Lake area,some specific proposed measures are put forward in order to provide the basis and reference for the future pollution control in the Dongting Lake area,such as strengthening the industrial pollution control,developing ecological agriculture,and enhancing ecological restoration and water quality early warning.

  19. Monitoring Changes in Water Resources Systems Using High Resolution Satellite Observations: Application to Lake Urmia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; AghaKouchak, A.; Madani, K.; Mirchi, A.; Farahmand, A.; Conway, C.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Urmia with its unique ecosystem in northwestern Iran is the second largest saltwater lake in the world. It is home of more than 300 species of birds, reptiles, and mammals with high salinity level of more than 300 g/l. In recent years, a significant water retreat has occurred in this lake. In this study, we tried to monitor the desiccation of the lake over more than four decades using remote sensing observations. Multi-spectral high-resolution LandSat images of the Lake Urmia region from 1972 to 2012 were acquired to derive the lake area. The composite maps of the lake were created, and a Bayesian Maximum Likelihood classification technique was used to classify land and water in the composite maps. The time series of the lake area reveals that it has shrunk by more than 40% in the past ten years. Moreover, water budget related components such as precipitation, soil moisture, and drought indices from remote sensing of the lake basin were utilized to investigate if droughts or climate change are the primary driving forces behind this phenomenon. These analyses show that the retreat of the lake is not related to droughts or global climate change as it has survived several drought events before year 2000. Similar analyses conducted on Lake Van located about 400 km west of Lake Urmia with very similar climate pattern revealed no significant areal change despite the lake's exposure to similar drought events. These results raise serious concern about the destructive role of unbridled development coupled with supply-oriented water management scheme driven by a classic upstream-downstream competition for water in the Lake Urmia region. There is an urgent need to investigate sustainable restoration initiatives for Lake Urmia in order to prevent an environmental disaster comparable to catastrophic death of Aral Sea.

  20. Calcium carbonate nucleation in an alkaline lake surface water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.; Hoch, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (Ω) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has Ω values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high Ω, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean Ω at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water Ω. Calcium concentration and Ω regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower Ω than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and Ω at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (Ω) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (Δ mM/Δ min) = -0.0026 Ω + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, Ω at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors.

  1. Parasites pitched against nature: Pitch Lake water protects guppies (Poecilia reticulata) from microbial and gyrodactylid infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelkle, Bettina; Mohammed, Ryan S; Coogan, Michael P; McMullan, Mark; Gillingham, Emma L; VAN Oosterhout, Cock; Cable, Joanne

    2012-11-01

    SUMMARY The enemy release hypothesis proposes that in parasite depleted habitats, populations will experience relaxed selection and become more susceptible (or less tolerant) to pathogenic infections. Here, we focus on a population of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) that are found in an extreme environment (the Pitch Lake, Trinidad) and examine whether this habitat represents a refuge from parasites. We investigated the efficacy of pitch in preventing microbial infections in Pitch Lake guppies, by exposing them to dechlorinated water, and reducing gyrodactylid infections on non-Pitch Lake guppies by transferring them to Pitch Lake water. We show that (i) natural prevalence of ectoparasites in the Pitch Lake is low compared to reference populations, (ii) Pitch Lake guppies transferred into aquarium water develop microbial infections, and (iii) experimentally infected guppies are cured of their gyrodactylid infections both by natural Pitch Lake water and by dechlorinated water containing solid pitch. These results indicate a role for Pitch Lake water in the defence of guppies from their parasites and suggest that Pitch Lake guppies might have undergone enemy release in this extreme environment. The Pitch Lake provides an ideal ecosystem for studies on immune gene evolution in the absence of parasites and long-term evolutionary implications of hydrocarbon pollution for vertebrates.

  2. Application of tidal energy for purification in fresh water lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Rho-Taek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to preserve the quality of fresh water in the artificial lake after the reclamation of an intertidal flat at the mouth of a river, we suggest two novel methods of water purification by using tidal potential energy and an enclosed permeable embankment called an utsuro (Akai et al., 1990 in the reclaimed region. One method uses an inflatable bag on the seabed within an utsuro, while the other uses a moored floating barge out of a dyke. Each case employs a subsea pipe to allow flow between the inside and outside of the utsuro. The change in water level in the utsuro, which is pushed through the pipe by the potential energy outside, caused circulation in the artificial lake. In this paper, we analyzed the inflatable bag and floating barge motion as well as the pipe flow characteristics and drafts as given by a harmonic sea level, and compared the theoretical value with an experimental value with a simple small model basin. The numerical calculation based on theory showed good agreement with experimental values.

  3. Viability report for the ByWater Lakes project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Passell, Howard David; Peplinski, William J.

    2013-10-01

    This report presents the results from the hydrological, ecological, and renewable energy assessments conducted by Sandia National Laboratories at the ByWater Lakes site in Espanola, New Mexico for ByWater Recreation LLC and Avanyu Energy Services through the New Mexico small business assistance (NMSBA) program. Sandia's role was to assess the viability and provide perspective for enhancing the site to take advantage of renewable energy resources, improve and sustain the natural systems, develop a profitable operation, and provide an asset for the local community. Integral to this work was the identification the pertinent data and data gaps as well as making general observations about the potential issues and concerns that may arise from further developing the site. This report is informational only with no consideration with regards to the business feasibility of the various options that ByWater and Avanyu may be pursuing.

  4. Determination of Ammonium Ion in Lake Water by Voltammetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Yun-hua; Fei Jun-jie; Dang Xue-ping; Hu Sheng-shui

    2004-01-01

    An electroanalytical method for the determination of armonium ion using a platinized platinum electrode is described. Under optimized analytical conditions, the linear range of the calibration graphs for ammonium ion is 3. 0×10(-5)-5.0×10-3 mol·L-1.The Method has been applide to the determination of ammonium ion in lake water samples and recoveries of 100%-103%0 are obtained. The results obtained are found to be in good agreement with spectrophotometric results.

  5. Chemical data for bottom sediment, lake water, bottom-sediment pore water, and fish in Mountain Creek Lake, Dallas, Texas, 1994-96

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S.A.; Van Metre, P.C.; Moring, J.B.; Braun, C.L.; Wilson, J.T.; Mahler, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    Mountain Creek Lake is a reservoir adjacent to two U.S. Department of the Navy facilities, the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant and the Naval Air Station in Dallas, Texas. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation found ground-water plumes containing chlorinated solvents on both facilities. These findings led to a U.S. Geological Survey study of Mountain Creek Lake adjacent to both facilities between June 1994 and August 1996. Bottom sediments, lake water, bottom-sediment pore water, and fish were collected for chemical analysis.

  6. Distribution, sources and composition of antibiotics in sediment, overlying water and pore water from Taihu Lake, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Laboratory of Riverine Ecological Conservation and Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang, Yuan, E-mail: zhangyuan@craes.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Laboratory of Riverine Ecological Conservation and Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhou, Changbo [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Guo, Changsheng; Wang, Dingming [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Laboratory of Riverine Ecological Conservation and Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Du, Ping [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Luo, Yi [College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Processes and Environmental Criteria, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wan, Jun; Meng, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Laboratory of Riverine Ecological Conservation and Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-11-01

    The occurrence of 15 antibiotics classified as sulphonamides, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, tetracyclines and trimethoprim in sediment, overlying water, and pore water matrices in Taihu Lake, China was studied. The total concentrations were from 4.1 μg/kg to 731 μg/kg, from 127 ng/L to 1210 ng/L, and from 1.5 ng/L to 216 ng/L in sediment, overlying water and pore water, respectively. Antibiotics in different locations originated from various sources, depending on human, agricultural and aquacultural activities. Composition analysis indicated that human-derived and animal-derived drugs significantly contributed to the total contamination of antibiotics in the lake, indicating the high complexity of contamination sources in Taihu Lake Basin. The in situ sediment–pore water partitioning coefficients were generally greater than sediment–overlying water partitioning coefficients, suggesting continuous inputs into the lake water. This study shows that antibiotics are ubiquitous in all compartments in Taihu Lake, and their potential hazards to the aquatic ecosystem need further investigation. - Highlights: • Antibiotics are ubiquitous in sediment, overlying water and pore water in Taihu Lake. • Antibiotics in Taihu Lake originated from human and nonhuman activities. • Ksp is higher than Ksw, indicating the continuous antibiotics input to lake water.

  7. Degradation characteristics of toxic microcystis viridis by mastigophora, monas guttula using aquatic large scale microcosm; Ogata tansui microcosm wo mochiita benmochurui monas guttula ni yoru yudoku microcystis viridis no bunkai tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwami, N.; Matsumura, M. [University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Inamori, Y. [National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba (Japan); Sugiura, N. [Ibaraki Prefectural Waterworks, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-02-10

    Mastigophora, monas guttula, is able to propagate even by using large aquatic microcosm. This mastigophora efficiently predated and degraded microcystis viridis producing toxic substance, microcystin, almost in the whole quantity in the wide water temperature range from 20{degree}C to 30{degree}C at which microcystis propagates and disappears in natural lakes. As a result of evaluating perdition and degradation effects of momas guttula by chlorophyll-a and COD, any of chlorophyll-a indicated a removal rate of more than 90% almost in a week, and microcystis-origin particle COD more than 80%. It was also found that three kinds of microcystin YR, LR, and RR which microcystis viridis produces are almost completely degraded. From these results, it was thought that perdation and degradation of microfauna like m. guttula can greatly contribute to degrading and disappearing toxic microcystis even in natural lakes. 21 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Water and nutrient budgets for Vancouver Lake, Vancouver, Washington, October 2010-October 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibley, Rich W.; Foreman, James R.; Marshall, Cameron A.; Welch, Wendy B.

    2014-01-01

    Vancouver Lake, a large shallow lake in Clark County, near Vancouver, Washington, has been undergoing water-quality problems for decades. Recently, the biggest concern for the lake are the almost annual harmful cyanobacteria blooms that cause the lake to close for recreation for several weeks each summer. Despite decades of interest in improving the water quality of the lake, fundamental information on the timing and amount of water and nutrients entering and exiting the lake is lacking. In 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 2-year field study to quantify water flows and nutrient loads in order to develop water and nutrient budgets for the lake. This report presents monthly and annual water and nutrient budgets from October 2010–October 2012 to identify major sources and sinks of nutrients. Lake River, a tidally influenced tributary to the lake, flows into and out of the lake almost daily and composed the greatest proportion of both the water and nutrient budgets for the lake, often at orders of magnitude greater than any other source. From the water budget, we identified precipitation, evaporation and groundwater inflow as minor components of the lake hydrologic cycle, each contributing 1 percent or less to the total water budget. Nutrient budgets were compiled monthly and annually for total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and orthophosphate; and, nitrogen loads were generally an order of magnitude greater than phosphorus loads across all sources. For total nitrogen, flow from Lake River at Felida, Washington, made up 88 percent of all inputs into the lake. For total phosphorus and orthophosphate, Lake River at Felida flowing into the lake was 91 and 76 percent of total inputs, respectively. Nutrient loads from precipitation and groundwater inflow were 1 percent or less of the total budgets. Nutrient inputs from Burnt Bridge Creek and Flushing Channel composed 12 percent of the total nitrogen budget, 8 percent of the total phosphorus budget, and 21 percent

  9. In situ microcosms in aquifer bioremediation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbaum, R T; Shati, M R; Ronen, D

    1997-07-01

    The extent to which aquifer microbiota can be studied under laboratory or simulated conditions is limited by our inability to authentically duplicate natural conditions in the laboratory. Therefore, extrapolation of laboratory results to real aquifer situations is often criticized, unless validation of the data is performed in situ. Reliable data acquisition is critical for the estimation of chemical and biological reaction rates of biodegradation processes in groundwater and as input data for mathematical models. Typically, in situ geobiochemical studies relied on the injection of groundwater spiked with compounds or bacteria of interest into the aquifer, followed by monitoring the changes over time and space. In situ microcosms provide a more confined study site for measurements of microbial reactions, yet closer to natural conditions than laboratory microcosms. Two basic types of in situ aquifer microcosm have been described in recent years, and both originated from in situ instruments initially designed for geochemical measurements. Gillham et al. [Ground Water 28 (1990) 858-862] constructed an instrument that isolates a portion of an aquifer for in situ biochemical rate measurements. More recently Shati et al. [Environ. Sci. Technol. 30 (1996) 2646-2653] modified a multilayer sampler for studying the activity of inoculated bacteria in a contaminated aquifer Keeping in mind recent advances in environmental microbiology methodologies such as immunofluorescence direct counts, oligonucleotide and PCR probes, fatty acid methyl esther analysis for the detection and characterization of bacterial communities, measurement of mRNA and expression of proteins, it is evident that much new information can now be gained from in situ work. Using in situ microcosms to study bioremediation efficiencies, the fate of introduced microorganisms and general geobiochemical aquifer processes can shed more realistic light on the microbial underworld. The aim of this paper is to

  10. Methanotrophy within the water column of a large meromictic tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morana, C.; Borges, A. V.; Roland, F. A. E.; Darchambeau, F.; Descy, J.-P.; Bouillon, S.

    2015-04-01

    The permanently stratified Lake Kivu is one of the largest freshwater reservoirs of dissolved methane (CH4) on Earth. Yet CH4 emissions from its surface to the atmosphere have been estimated to be 2 orders of magnitude lower than the CH4 upward flux to the mixed layer, suggesting that microbial CH4 oxidation is an important process within the water column. A combination of natural abundance stable carbon isotope analysis (δ13C) of several carbon pools and 13CH4-labelling experiments was carried out during the rainy and dry season to quantify (i) the contribution of CH4-derived carbon to the biomass, (ii) methanotrophic bacterial production (MBP), and (iii) methanotrophic bacterial growth efficiency (MBGE), defined as the ratio between MBP and gross CH4 oxidation. We also investigated the distribution and the δ13C of specific phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs), used as biomarkers for aerobic methanotrophs. Maximal MBP rates were measured in the oxycline, suggesting that CH4 oxidation was mainly driven by oxic processes. Moreover, our data revealed that methanotrophic organisms in the water column oxidized most of the upward flux of CH4, and that a significant amount of CH4-derived carbon was incorporated into the microbial biomass in the oxycline. The MBGE was variable (2-50%) and negatively related to CH4 : O2 molar ratios. Thus, a comparatively smaller fraction of CH4-derived carbon was incorporated into the cellular biomass in deeper waters, at the bottom of the oxycline where oxygen was scarce. The aerobic methanotrophic community was clearly dominated by type I methanotrophs and no evidence was found for an active involvement of type II methanotrophs in CH4 oxidation in Lake Kivu, based on fatty acids analyses. Vertically integrated over the water column, the MBP was equivalent to 16-60% of the average phytoplankton particulate primary production. This relatively high magnitude of MBP, and the substantial contribution of CH4-derived carbon to the overall

  11. Environmental Evolution of the Water Body of Qinghai Lake since the Postglacial Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彭熹; 张保珍; 等

    1989-01-01

    Based on the data developed from various s natural waters in the Qinghai Lake area and ostracode shells present in drill core QH-16A of recent lake-floor sediments ,this paper discusses the distribution of stable isotopes in the modern water body of Qinghai Lake,and the initial isotopic composition of the lake water has been deduced ,Studies of δ18O,δ13C,Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca in ostracode shells provide the basis for the establishment of the model of climatic fluctuation in the Qinghai Lake area since the postaglacial age,as well as for the elucidation of the environmental evolution of the water body of Qinghai Lake since the postglacial age.

  12. Traditional and Host-Associated Fecal Indicator Bacterial Patterns in Southern California Watersheds: Field Source Identification Studies and Laboratory Microcosms Investigating Presence and Persistence in Water and Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Kathryn Beth

    tracking tools including indicator ratios and detection frequencies. Source identification studies do not necessarily have to be long-term to identify consistent sources of pollution. For example, within the first four months of sampling at Ventura, the increased frequency of detection of HF183 at the Marina Dock sample location was apparent, and a dry weather influx of HF183 was seen in the Keys channels. In addition to the many sources of FIB to the environment such as storm drains, leaking sewers, and wildlife, there are important environmental reservoirs such as sand and seaweed that can foster FIB growth and persistence in the environment. As such, it is important to understand the effect of different factors on the ability of bacteria to survive and persist in these reservoirs. Microcosm experiments conducted during the course of this dissertation research found that in dry beach sand (0.1% moisture), the addition of moisture was detrimental to the survival of the indicators studied (General Bacteroidales, E. coli, and enterococci). While increased moisture was not always detrimental to bacterial survival, these results point to the ability of bacteria to persist for long periods of time in beach environments under in-situ conditions (including dry sand). These findings point to the importance of understanding the behavior of indicator bacteria populations that have evolved to survive in environmental conditions so that their potential impact on overlying or adjacent water quality can be better understood. In summation, results from this research point to the importance of selecting indicators and sample locations that are most relevant to watershed concerns rather than using a first tier such as FIB to preferentially select sites for further analysis. Measuring a marker for human fecal pollution in both watershed studies provided useful information for potential human inputs that would have been missed if sites were chosen based on high FIB levels. In addition it is

  13. Linking economic water use, freshwater ecosystem impacts, and virtual water trade in a Great Lakes watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubako, S. T.; Ruddell, B. L.; Mayer, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of human water uses and economic pressures on freshwater ecosystems is of growing interest for water resource management worldwide. This case study for a water-rich watershed in the Great Lakes region links the economic pressures on water resources as revealed by virtual water trade balances to the nature of the economic water use and the associated impacts on the freshwater ecosystem. A water accounting framework that combines water consumption data and economic data from input output tables is applied to quantify localized virtual water imports and exports in the Kalamazoo watershed which comprises ten counties. Water using economic activities at the county level are conformed to watershed boundaries through land use-water use relationships. The counties are part of a region implementing the Michigan Water Withdrawal Assessment Process, including new regulatory approaches for adaptive water resources management under a riparian water rights framework. The results show that at local level, there exists considerable water use intensity and virtual water trade balance disparity among the counties and between water use sectors in this watershed. The watershed is a net virtual water importer, with some counties outsourcing nearly half of their water resource impacts, and some outsourcing nearly all water resource impacts. The largest virtual water imports are associated with agriculture, thermoelectric power generation and industry, while the bulk of the exports are associated with thermoelectric power generation and commercial activities. The methodology is applicable to various spatial levels ranging from the micro sub-watershed level to the macro Great Lakes watershed region, subject to the availability of reliable water use and economic data.

  14. Assessment of microcystins in lake water and fish (Mugilidae, Liza sp.) in the largest Spanish coastal lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, Susana; Fernández, Francisca; Ouahid, Youness; Barón-Sola, Ángel

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria dominance and cyanotoxin production can become major threats to humans and aquatic life, especially in warm shallow lakes, which are often dominated by cyanobacteria. This study investigates the occurrence and distribution of microcystins (MCYST) in water, cell-bound and in the tissues of the commercial mugilid Liza sp. in the largest, coastal, Spanish Mediterranean lake (Albufera of Valencia). This is the first report concerning microcystin accumulation in tissues of mugilid fish species. Considerable amounts of microcystins were found in the water and seston, which correlated with development of Microcystis aeruginosa populations in the lake. The MCYST concentrations found in Lake Albufera (mean 1.7 and 17 μg/L and maximum 16 and 120 μg/L in water and seston, respectively) exceeded by one to two orders of magnitude the guideline levels proposed by the World Health Organization and were higher than that reported in other lakes of the Mediterranean zone. The presence of MCYST was found in all the fishes studied and accumulated differently among tissues of the commercial species Liza sp. Toxin accumulation in fish tissues showed that although the target organ for MCYST was the liver, high concentrations of microcystins were also found in other analysed tissues (liver>intestine>gills>muscle). Human tolerable daily intake for microcystins is assessed relative to the WHO guidelines, and potential toxicological risks for humans, wildlife and related ecosystems of the lake are discussed.

  15. Impact of water-level changes to aquatic vegetation in small oligotrophic lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egert VANDEL

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the effect of drastic water-level changes to the aquatic vegetation in three small oligotrophic lakes situated in Kurtna Kame Field in north-eastern Estonia. The area holds around 40 lakes in 30 km2 of which 18 lakes are under protection as Natura Habitat lakes (Natura 2000 network. The area is under a strong human impact as it is surrounded by oil shale mines, sand quarry, peat harvesting field etc. The most severe impact comes from the groundwater intake established in 1972 in the vicinity of three studied lakes. The exploitation of groundwater led to drastic water-level drops. In 1980s the water-level drops were measured to be up to 3 to 4 meters compared to the levels of 1946. Lake Martiska and Lake Kuradijärv were severely affected and only 29% and 45% of lake area respectively and 21% of initial volume remained. Both lakes were described as oligotrophic lakes before severe human impact and held characteristic macrophytes such as Isoëtes lacustris L., Sparganium angustifolium Michx and Lobelia dortmanna L. As the water level declined the lakes lost their rare characteristic species and can now be described more as a meso- or even eutrophic lakes. When the volume of groundwater abstraction decreased in the 1990s the water levels started to recover but did not reach the natural levels of pre-industrialized era. Also the vegetation did not show any signs of recovery. In 2012 the pumping rates increased again causing a new rapid decline in water levels which almost exceed the previous minimum levels. The water-level monitoring alongside with the macrophyte monitoring data gives us a good case study on how the long term abrupt water-level changes can affect the aquatic vegetation

  16. Ecological effects of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) on Lake Chapala, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Villamagna, Amy Marie

    2009-01-01

    Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is a floating non-native plant that has been reoccurring in Lake Chapala, Jalisco, Mexico for more than 100 years. In this research, I explore the effects of water hyacinth on freshwater ecosystems worldwide and specifically on Lake Chapala. In chapter 1, I reviewed studies conducted on water hyacinth worldwide and found that the effects of water hyacinth on water quality are similar but the magnitude of effects is dependent on the percent cover and p...

  17. Littoral zones in shallow lakes. Contribution to water quality in relation to water level regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sollie, S.

    2007-01-01

    Littoral zones with emergent vegetation are very narrow or even lacking in Dutch shallow lakes due to a combination of changed water level regime and unfavorable shore morphometry. These zones are important as a habitat for plants and animals, increasing species diversity. It has also been demonstra

  18. Littoral zones in shallow lakes. Contribution to water quality in relation to water level regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sollie, S.

    2007-01-01

    Littoral zones with emergent vegetation are very narrow or even lacking in Dutch shallow lakes due to a combination of changed water level regime and unfavorable shore morphometry. These zones are important as a habitat for plants and animals, increasing species diversity. It has also been

  19. Ecological and environmental water demand of the lakes in the Haihe-Luanhe Basin of North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a brief concept of the ecological and environmental water demand of lake. The present situation and affecting factors of lake ecological system in the Haihe-Luanhe Basin of North China was analyzed. The calculating method of the ecological and environmental water demand of the lake basis on the water body and the calculating method of the ecological and environmental water demand of the lake basis on the aquatic ecosystem, wetland and vegetation were compared and discussed. As the examples of Baiyangdian Lake and Beidagang Lake in Haihe-Luanhe river basin, the ecological and environmental water demand of the two lakes was calculated to be 27× 108m3 . It is 6.75 times to the water demand according to the calculating method of the ecological and environmental water demand of the lake basis on the water body. The research result indicated: ( 1 ) The calculating methods of the ecological and environmental water demand of the lake basis on the aquatic ecosystem should be better than only basis on the water body of lake. (2) The data, such as area of the vegetation kind around and in the lake, the vegetation coefficient, the evaporating amount of the vegetation and the vegetation water demand itself around and in the lake are lack and urgent need. Some suggestions for controlling and regulating the water resource of the lake in North China were proposed.

  20. Seasonal variations in pore water and sediment geochemistry of littoral lake sediments (Asylum Lake, MI, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Douglas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seasonal changes in pore water and sediment redox geochemistry have been observed in many near-surface sediments. Such changes have the potential to strongly influence trace metal distribution and thus create seasonal fluctuations in metal mobility and bioavailability. Results Seasonal trends in pore water and sediment geochemistry are assessed in the upper 50 cm of littoral kettle lake sediments. Pore waters are always redox stratified, with the least compressed redox stratification observed during fall and the most compressed redox stratification observed during summer. A 2-step sequential sediment extraction yields much more Fe in the first step, targeted at amorphous Fe(III (hydroxides (AEF, then in the second step, which targets Fe(II monosulfides. Fe extracted in the second step is relatively invariant with depth or season. In contrast, AEF decreases with sediment depth, and is seasonally variable, in agreement with changes in redox stratification inferred from pore water profiles. A 5-step Tessier extraction scheme was used to assess metal association with operationally-defined exchangeable, carbonate, iron and manganese oxide (FMO, organic/sulfide and microwave-digestible residual fractions in cores collected during winter and spring. Distribution of metals in these two seasons is similar. Co, As, Cd, and U concentrations approach detection limits. Fe, Cu and Pb are mostly associated with the organics/sulfides fraction. Cr and Zn are mostly associated with FMO. Mn is primarily associated with carbonates, and Co is nearly equally distributed between the FMO and organics/sulfide fractions. Conclusion This study clearly demonstrates that near-surface lake sediment pore water redox stratification and associated solid phase geochemistry vary significantly with season. This has important ramifications for seasonal changes in the bioavailability and mobility of trace elements. Without rate measurements, it is not possible to

  1. Vertical distribution patterns of zooplanktivorous fish in a shallow, eutrophic lake, mediated by water transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mous, P.J.; Densen, van W.L.T.; Machiels, M.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The vertical distribution pattern (VDP) of fish at shallow sites in eutrophic lake - Lake IJssel, the Netherlands - as affected by water transparency, was examined. The pattern was assessed by pair trawling at three depths and by hydroacoustics from June to August. Water transparency was estimated b

  2. Development of Turbulent Diffusion Transfer Algorithms to Estimate Lake Tahoe Water Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, G. B.; Schladow, S. G.; Reuter, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    The evaporative loss is a dominant component in the Lake Tahoe hydrologic budget because watershed area (813km2) is very small compared to the lake surface area (501 km2). The 5.5 m high dam built at the lake's only outlet, the Truckee River at Tahoe City can increase the lake's capacity by approximately 0.9185 km3. The lake serves as a flood protection for downstream areas and source of water supply for downstream cities, irrigation, hydropower, and instream environmental requirements. When the lake water level falls below the natural rim, cessation of flows from the lake cause problems for water supply, irrigation, and fishing. Therefore, it is important to develop algorithms to correctly estimate the lake hydrologic budget. We developed a turbulent diffusion transfer model and coupled to the dynamic lake model (DLM-WQ). We generated the stream flows and pollutants loadings of the streams using the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) supported watershed model, Loading Simulation Program in C++ (LSPC). The bulk transfer coefficients were calibrated using correlation coefficient (R2) as the objective function. Sensitivity analysis was conducted for the meteorological inputs and model parameters. The DLM-WQ estimated lake water level and water temperatures were in agreement to those of measured records with R2 equal to 0.96 and 0.99, respectively for the period 1994 to 2008. The estimated average evaporation from the lake, stream inflow, precipitation over the lake, groundwater fluxes, and outflow from the lake during 1994 to 2008 were found to be 32.0%, 25.0%, 19.0%, 0.3%, and 11.7%, respectively.

  3. Water-quality data collected at Lake Anne, Reston, Virginia, 1997-1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conko, Kathryn M.; Kennedy, Margaret M.; Rice, Karen C.

    2000-01-01

    Samples from the Lake Anne watershed were collected and analyzed to assess the water quality from December 1997 through January 1999. Lake Anne is a stream impoundment in suburban Northern Virginia and its outflow is a sub-tributary of the Potomac River. Samples of wet deposition (precipitation), lake water, and streamwater that drain into and from Lake Anne were collected and analyzed. Trace-element clean sampling and analysis protocols were followed throughout the project. This report is a compilation of the precipitation, lake-water, and streamwater data collected in the Lake Anne watershed and the associated quality assurance/quality control data. Concentrations of the trace elements arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, manganese, nickel, strontium, vanadium, and zinc, and of the major inorganic ions, aluminum, bicarbonate, calcium, chloride, hydrogen ion, iron, magnesium, potassium, nitrate, sodium, and sulfate are reported.

  4. Developing the greatest Blue Economy: Water productivity, fresh water depletion, and virtual water trade in the Great Lakes basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, A. S.; Ruddell, B. L.; Mubako, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    The Great Lakes basin hosts the world's most abundant surface fresh water reserve. Historically an industrial and natural resource powerhouse, the region has suffered economic stagnation in recent decades. Meanwhile, growing water resource scarcity around the world is creating pressure on water-intensive human activities. This situation creates the potential for the Great Lakes region to sustainably utilize its relative water wealth for economic benefit. We combine economic production and trade datasets with water consumption data and models of surface water depletion in the region. We find that, on average, the current economy does not create significant impacts on surface waters, but there is some risk that unregulated large water uses can create environmental flow impacts if they are developed in the wrong locations. Water uses drawing on deep groundwater or the Great Lakes themselves are unlikely to create a significant depletion, and discharge of groundwater withdrawals to surface waters offsets most surface water depletion. This relative abundance of surface water means that science-based management of large water uses to avoid accidentally creating "hotspots" is likely to be successful in avoiding future impacts, even if water use is significantly increased. Commercial water uses are the most productive, with thermoelectric, mining, and agricultural water uses in the lowest tier of water productivity. Surprisingly for such a water-abundant economy, the region is a net importer of water-derived goods and services. This, combined with the abundance of surface water, suggests that the region's water-based economy has room to grow in the 21st century.

  5. Developing the greatest Blue Economy: Water productivity, fresh water depletion, and virtual water trade in the Great Lakes basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alex; Mubako, Stanley; Ruddell, Benjamin L.

    2016-06-01

    The Great Lakes basin hosts the world's most abundant surface fresh water reserve. Historically an industrial and natural resource powerhouse, the region has suffered economic stagnation in recent decades. Meanwhile, growing water resource scarcity around the world is creating pressure on water-intensive human activities. This situation creates the potential for the Great Lakes region to sustainably utilize its relative water wealth for economic benefit. We combine economic production and trade datasets with water consumption data and models of surface water depletion in the region. We find that, on average, the current economy does not create significant impacts on surface waters, but there is some risk that unregulated large water uses can create environmental flow impacts if they are developed in the wrong locations. Water uses drawing on deep groundwater or the Great Lakes themselves are unlikely to create a significant depletion, and discharge of groundwater withdrawals to surface waters offsets most surface water depletion. This relative abundance of surface water means that science-based management of large water uses to avoid accidentally creating "hotspots" is likely to be successful in avoiding future impacts, even if water use is significantly increased. Commercial water uses are the most productive, with thermoelectric, mining, and agricultural water uses in the lowest tier of water productivity. Surprisingly for such a water-abundant economy, the region is a net importer of water-derived goods and services. This, combined with the abundance of surface water, suggests that the region's water-based economy has room to grow in the 21st century.

  6. Sustainable Lake Basin Water Resource Governance in China: The Case of Tai Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengning Pu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available China’s water pollution is severe and has a negative impact on its residents. Establishing an emissions trading mechanism will be helpful for reducing the pollution. However, the government in China controls the emission rights market. The “GDP Only” preference blocks equitable rules to address the externalities. To modify this distortion, we develop a multi-objective primary distribution model that optimizes economic efficiency, environmental contribution, and fairness. In addition, the geographical location of a company and the industry differential are two key factors that would affect the local government’s decision. According to the simulation results using data from Tai Lake in China, this model can effectively help to meet the political expectation that large-scale manufacturers with poor technology can take the initiative to reduce emissions through emission-rights distribution.

  7. Using Microcosms To Teach about the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Donald G.; Taylor, Lisa

    A microcosm is a small, completely sealed, self-sustaining ecosystem. Once a microcosm has been sealed in a transparent container, only light and some heat can enter and only excess heat can leave. This manual describes how to set up aquatic microcosms using glass jars and little or no collecting equipment. The activities can be tailored to suit…

  8. Stochastic modeling of Lake Van water level time series with jumps and multiple trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aksoy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In 1990s, water level in the closed-basin Lake Van located in the Eastern Anatolia, Turkey has risen up about 2 m. Analysis of the hydrometeorological shows that change in the water level is related to the water budget of the lake. In this study, a stochastic model is generated using the measured monthly water level data of the lake. The model is derived after removal of trend and periodicity in the data set. Trend observed in the lake water level time series is fitted by mono- and multiple-trend lines. For the multiple-trend, the time series is first divided into homogeneous segments by means of SEGMENTER, segmentation software. Four segments are found meaningful practically each fitted with a trend line. Two models considering mono- and multiple-trend time series are developed. The multiple-trend model is found better for planning future development in surrounding areas of the lake.

  9. Surficial substrates and bathymetry of five historical lake trout spawning reefs in near-shore waters of the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Brown, Charles L.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; French, John R. P.

    1992-01-01

    The reestablishment of self-sustaining stocks of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the lower four Great Lakes has been substantially impeded because planted fish do not produce enough progeny that survive and reproduce. The causes for this failure are unknown, but many historical spawning sites of lake trout have been degraded by human activities and can no longer produce viable swim-up fry. In this study, we used side-scan sonar and an underwater video camera to survey, map, and evaluate the sustainability of one reef in each of the five Great Lakes for lake trout spawning and fry production. At four of the reef sites, we found good-to-excellent substrate for spawning and fry production by the shallow-water strains of lake trout that are now being planted. These substrates were in water 6-22 m deep and were composed largely of rounded or angular rubble and cobble. Interstitial spaces in these substrates were 20 cm or deeper and would protect naturally spawned eggs and fry from predators, ice scour, and buffeting by waves and currents. Subsequent studies of egg survival by other researchers confirmed our evaluation that the best substrates at two of these sites still have the potential to produce viable swim-up fry.

  10. Hydrology and water quality of Shell Lake, Washburn County, Wisconsin, with special emphasis on the effects of diversion and changes in water level on the water quality of a shallow terminal lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckem, Paul F.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2013-01-01

    Shell Lake is a relatively shallow terminal lake (tributaries but no outlets) in northwestern Wisconsin that has experienced approximately 10 feet (ft) of water-level fluctuation over more than 70 years of record and extensive flooding of nearshore areas starting in the early 2000s. The City of Shell Lake (City) received a permit from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources in 2002 to divert water from the lake to a nearby river in order to lower water levels and reduce flooding. Previous studies suggested that water-level fluctuations were driven by long-term cycles in precipitation, evaporation, and runoff, although questions about the lake’s connection with the groundwater system remained. The permit required that the City evaluate assumptions about lake/groundwater interactions made in previous studies and evaluate the effects of the water diversion on water levels in Shell Lake and other nearby lakes. Therefore, a cooperative study between the City and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was initiated to improve the understanding of the hydrogeology of the area and evaluate potential effects of the diversion on water levels in Shell Lake, the surrounding groundwater system, and nearby lakes. Concerns over deteriorating water quality in the lake, possibly associated with changes in water level, prompted an additional cooperative project between the City and the USGS to evaluate efeffects of changes in nutrient loading associated with changes in water levels on the water quality of Shell Lake. Numerical models were used to evaluate how the hydrology and water quality responded to diversion of water from the lake and historical changes in the watershed. The groundwater-flow model MODFLOW was used to simulate groundwater movement in the area around Shell Lake, including groundwater/surface-water interactions. Simulated results from the MODFLOW model indicate that groundwater flows generally northward in the area around Shell Lake, with flow locally converging

  11. Lake size and water-column stability affect the importance of methane for pelagic food webs of boreal lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaala, Paula; Lopez-Bellido, Jessica; Ojala, Anne; Tulonen, Tiina; Jones, Roger I.

    2013-04-01

    Physical forcing, related to lake size and morphometry, plays an important role in the landscape-scale biogeochemical processing and fluxes of terrestrial carbon in lakes. Boreal lakes are typically dimictic, with mixing of the water column in spring and autumn, but in small, sheltered, humic, forest lakes the spring mixing is often incomplete. This leads to a steep summer stratification and oxygen depletion in the hypolimnion of the lakes. As a result of anaerobic decomposition of organic matter, high concentrations of CH4are typical in these lakes. At the oxic-anoxic interface zone methanotrophic microbes oxidize CH4 to CO2 and partly incorporate CH4-C into microbial biomass, and thus potentially provide a diet source for pelagic consumers. We studied production at the base of the pelagic food web by methane oxidising bacteria (MOB), heterotrophic bacteria (HB) and phytoplankton (PP) in five boreal lakes with a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration varying between 7 and 25 mg C L-1 and an area ranging from 0.004 to 13.4 km2. High MOB activity was detected in the water columns of the three smallest lakes having anoxia in the hypolimnion during summer. The highest MOB activities (ca. 2-12 μmol L-1 d-1) were observed when the CH4:O2 ratio varied between ca. 0.5-12. Seasonally, the highest MOB activities were measured during late-summer mixed layer deepening and autumnal mixing of the whole water column. The proportion of MOB in the total basal production was highest in the two smallest lakes (24-56 and 13-36%), having the steepest summertime stratification. The proportion MOB in the basal production decreased with lake size being 70% of basal production was by PP. In all studied lakes HB contributed only 10-23% of the total basal production, suggesting that a transfer of allochthonous DOC via HB plays only a modest role for the nutrition of the higher trophic levels.

  12. Relation between selected water-quality variables and lake level in Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Tamara M.; Fuhrer, Gregory J.; Morace, Jennifer L.

    1996-01-01

    Upper Klamath Lake is a large (140 square-mile), shallow (mean depth about 8 ft) lake in south-central Oregon that the historical record indicates has been eutrophic since its discovery by non-Native Americans. In recent decades, however, the lake has had annual occurrences of near- monoculture blooms of the blue-green alga Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. In 1988 two sucker species endemic to the lake, the Lost River sucker (Deltistes luxatus) and the shortnose sucker (Chasmistes brevirostris), were listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and it has been proposed that the poor water quality conditions associated with extremely long and productive blooms are contributing to the decline of those species.

  13. Impact of harmful algal blooms on several Lake Erie drinking water treatment facilities; methodology considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The propagation of cyanbacterial cells and their toxins were investigated at seven drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) on Lake Erie were investigated with regards to harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxin concentrations, water quality variations in treatment plant influents, and pr...

  14. Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge update and preliminary water report: January 1 through December 1, 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report includes current elevations, water flow measurements, precipitation and evaporation, water flow highlights, and plans for 1997 for Ruby Lake NWR.

  15. Bioaccumulation and metabolism of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in carp (Cyprinus carpio) in a water/sediment microcosm: important role of particulate matter exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shengyan; Zhu, Lingyan; Bian, Jingna; Fang, Shuhong

    2012-03-06

    Microcosms were built up to simulate a pond system with polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) contaminated sediment and bioorganisms. The microcosms were divided into groups A and B. In group A, both benthic invertebrates (tubificid worms) and carp (Cyprinu carpio) were added, while in group B, only fish were added. After exposure for 20 d, the fish were sampled (exposure I). A net was fixed in the microcosms, and new fish were added (exposure II). These fish were prohibited from contacting the sediment by the net, and the accumulation and depuration of PBDEs in the fish were investigated. Among 11 monitored PBDE congeners (BDE-28, BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-100, BDE-153, BDE-154, BDE-183, BDE-206, BDE-207, BDE-208, and BDE-209), only 5 congeners (BDE-28, BDE-47, BDE-100, BDE-153, and BDE-154) were detected in the carp fillets and liver. BDE-99 and BDE-183 were not detected in the fish because of the efficient metabolic debromination in carp tissues. The uptake of PBDEs in exposure I was significantly higher/faster than that in exposure II, since the fish in exposure I had an opportunity to take in more of the highly contaminated particles. The uptake kinetics (k(s)) and elimination (k(e)) rate coefficients showed a general trend of decreasing with increasing log K(ow). No significant difference was observed in uptake/depuration kinetics between groups A and B, indicating that the tubificids' reworking does not affect the bioaccumulation of sediment-associated PBDEs in fish significantly. All the PBDE congeners, including nona- and deca-BDEs, were bioaccumulated in the tubificid worms. The PBDE concentrations in the worms were significantly higher than those in the fish, and the congener profile of the sevem major congeners (BDE-28, BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-100, BDE-153, BDE-154, and BDE-183) was distinctly different from that of fish tissues. The biota-sediment accumulation factors in the worms ranged from 0.01 to 5.89 and declined with increasing bromination and log K(ow.).

  16. Interaction of a fresh water lake and a karstic spring via a syncline fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Abolfazl; Zare, Mohammad; Raeisi, Ezzatollah; Ghanbari, Reza Namdar

    2013-03-01

    Kaftar Lake is a high-altitude fresh water lake located in High Zagros, south of Iran. Despite the high annual evaporation to precipitation ratio in the area, lake water electrical conductivity is usually lower than 1000 µS/cm, this may be due to high seepage from the floor of the lake. Therefore, the hypothesis of possible underground connections between Namdan Basin, where the lake is located, and the surrounding basins with lower elevation (Aspas and Dehbid Basins) was investigated. Hydrogeology, hydrochemistry, and stable isotopes data of the lake and surrounding basins along with the lake water balance study were applied to test the hypothesis. Results indicate that Kaftar Lake has no connection with Aspas Basin in south, but it is hydraulically connected to Dehbid Basin. In Dehbid Basin, "Ghasr_e_Yaghoob spring" (average discharge ≅1200 L/s) emerges from a small outcrop (about 0.8 km(2) ) of Daryan limestone Formation, where this outcrop is much smaller than the required recharge area for such average discharge rate. The study shows that this spring is recharged by Kaftar Lake and Namdan Basin aquifer, through Daryan Formation of Gandboee Syncline located to the northern part of the lake.

  17. Analysis of Long-Term Water Level Variation in Dongting Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoqian Han

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The water level of Dongting Lake has changed because of the combined impact of climatic change and anthropogenic activities. A study of the long-term statistical properties of water level variations at Chenglingji station will help with the management of water resources in Dongting Lake. In this case, 54 years of water level data for Dongting Lake were analyzed with the non-parametric Mann–Kendall trend test, Sen’s slope test, and the Pettitt test. The results showed the following: (1 Trends in annual maximum lake water level (WLM, annual mean lake water level (WL, and annual minimum lake water level (WLm increased from 1961 to 2014; however, the three variables showed different trends from 1981 to 2014; (2 The annual change trends in Dongting Lake between 1961–2014 and 1981–2014 were found to be from approximately 0.90 cm/year to −2.27 cm/year, 1.65 cm/year to −0.79 cm/year, and 4.58 cm/year to 2.56 cm/year for WLM, WL, and WLm, respectively; (3 A greater degree of increase in water level during the dry season (November–April was found from 2003 to 2014 than from 1981 to 2002, but a smaller degree of increase, even to the point of decreasing, was found during the wet season (May–October; (4 The measured discharge data and numerical modeling results showed the operation of Three Gorge Reservoir (TGR pushed to influence partly the recent inter-annual variation of water level in Dongting Lake region, especially in the flood and dry seasons. The analysis indicated that the water level of Dongting Lake has changed in the long term with decreasing of range between WLM and WLm, and may decrease the probability of future drought and flood events. These results can provide useful information for the management of Dongting Lake.

  18. Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  19. Bathymetric mapping, sediment quality, and water quality of Lake Delhi, Iowa, 2001-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoebelen, Douglas J.; McVay, Jason C.; Barnes, Kymm K.; Becher, Kent D.

    2003-01-01

    Lake Delhi was formed in 1929 when the Interstate Power Company dammed the Maquoketa River near Delhi, Iowa, for generation of hydroelectric power. The resulting 450-acre lake became a popular area in eastern Iowa for boating, swimming, and fishing. Hydroelectric power generation ended in 1973, and lakeside residents purchased the dam to maintain the recreational opportunities of the lake. Increasing concerns about sediment deposition and water quality by lakeside residents led to a 2-year study that included a bathymetric survey, an assessment of sediment quality, and an assessment of water quality of Lake Delhi.

  20. Persistence and growth of faecal culturable bacterial indicators in water column and sediments of Vidy Bay, Lake Geneva, Switzerland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    POTE John; HALLER Laurence; KOTTELAT Régis; SASTRE Vincent; ARPAGAUS Philippe; WILDI Walter

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study was to investigate the persistence and the growth of culturable bacterial indicators (CBI) including total coliforms (TC) and faecal coliforms represented by E. coli, enterococcus (ENT), and aerobic mesophilic bacteria (AMB) in the surface sediments and the water column of the Bay of Vidy (Lake Geneva, City of Lausanne, Switzerland). The study was carried out for 60 d using microcosms containing Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) effluent water and non-sterile water without CBI, as well as contaminated and non-contaminated sediments. The effects of water temperature and of organic matter associated with sediments on the survival of CBI in the sediments and the water column were observed. The number of CBI colonies in the contaminated sediments of Vidy Bay and in the STP effluent water was almost identical in the order of 105--107, 104--106, 103--105, and 104--107 CFU/100 g sediment or /100 mL water for TC, E. coli, ENT, and AMB respectively. A degradation of CBI was observed in the sediments where organic mater content was low and in the water column at a temperature of 10℃ after 5 d of experimentation. In addition, a growth of CBI was observed in the sediment which is rich in organic matter at a temperature of 20℃. The results of this study indicate: (1) the higher concentrations of the CBI observed in different points in the water column of Vidy Bay may not be explained only by the recent contribution of the three potential sources of the Bay contamination including STP and the Chamberonne and Flon Rivers, but also by the persistence, removal from sediment and multiplication of CBI in the sediment and water column; (2) the sediment of Vidy Bay constitute a reservoir of CBI and can even support their growth. (3) the CBI not only survive in sediments, but also can be remobilized and increased in the water column, therefore it become a permanent microbiological pollution in Vidy Bay.

  1. Water Balance of the Eğirdir Lake and the Influence of Budget Components, Isparta,Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşen DAVRAZ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Water budget of lakes must be determined regarding to their sustainable usage as for all water resources. One of the major problems in the management of lakes is the estimation of water budget components. The lack of regularly measured data is the biggest problem in calculation of hydrological balance of a lake. A lake water budget is computed by measuring or estimating all of the lake’s water gains and losses and measuring the corresponding changes in the lake volume over the same time period. Eğirdir Lake is one of the most important freshwater lakes in Turkey and is the most important surface water resources in the region due to different usages. Recharge of the Eğirdir Lake is supplied from especially precipitation, surface and subsurface water inflow. The discharge components of the lake are evaporation and water intake for irrigation, drinking and energy purposes. The difference between recharge and discharge of the lake was calculated as 7.78 hm3 for 1970-2010 period. According to rainfall, evaporation and the lake water level relations, rainfall is dominantly effective on the lake water level such as direct recharge to the lake and indirect recharge with groundwater flow

  2. Lake Storage Measurements For Water Resources Management: Combining Remotely Sensed Water Levels and Surface Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakenridge, G. R.; Birkett, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Presently operating satellite-based radar altimeters have the ability to monitor variations in surface water height for large lakes and reservoirs, and future sensors will expand observational capabilities to many smaller water bodies. Such remote sensing provides objective, independent information where in situ data are lacking or access is restricted. A USDA/NASA (http://www.pecad.fas.usda.gov/cropexplorer/global_reservoir/) program is performing operational altimetric monitoring of the largest lakes and reservoirs around the world using data from the NASA/CNES, NRL, and ESA missions. Public lake-level products from the Global Reservoir and Lake Monitor (GRLM) are a combination of archived and near real time information. The USDA/FAS utilizes the products for assessing international irrigation potential and for crop production estimates; other end-users study climate trends, observe anthropogenic effects, and/or are are involved in other water resources management and regional water security issues. At the same time, the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (http://floodobservatory.colorado.edu/), its NASA GSFC partners (http://oas.gsfc.nasa.gov/floodmap/home.html), and associated MODIS data and automated processing algorithms are providing public access to a growing GIS record of the Earth's changing surface water extent, including changes related to floods and droughts. The Observatory's web site also provide both archival and near real time information, and is based mainly on the highest spatial resolution (250 m) MODIS bands. Therefore, it is now possible to provide on an international basis reservoir and lake storage change measurements entirely from remote sensing, on a frequently updating basis. The volume change values are based on standard numerical procedures used for many decades for analysis of coeval lake area and height data. We provide first results of this combination, including prototype displays for public access and data retrieval of water storage

  3. Know Thyself: Macrocosm and Microcosm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, Nigel

    2011-01-01

    There was a time when, in the Liberal Arts, philosophy and education enjoyed the most intimate and productive relationship. Drawing together philosophy and nature they sought to understand the greatest of human mysteries. This meant thinking about both the macrocosm and the microcosm and especially the relation between them. In this relation lies…

  4. Know Thyself: Macrocosm and Microcosm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, Nigel

    2011-01-01

    There was a time when, in the Liberal Arts, philosophy and education enjoyed the most intimate and productive relationship. Drawing together philosophy and nature they sought to understand the greatest of human mysteries. This meant thinking about both the macrocosm and the microcosm and especially the relation between them. In this relation lies…

  5. Variability of the water availability in a river lake system – A case study of Lake Symsar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuriata-Potasznik Angela B.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is predicted that climate change will result in the diminution of water resources available both on global and regional scales. Local climate change is harder to observe and therefore, while counteracting its effects, it seems advisable to undertake studies on pertinent regional and local conditions. In this research, our aim was to assess the impact of a river and its catchment on fluctuations in the water availability in a natural lake which belongs to a post-glacial river and lake system. River and lake systems behave most often like a single interacting hydrological unit, and the intensity of water exchange in these systems is quite high, which may cause temporary water losses. This study showed that water in the analyzed river and lake system was exchanged approx. every 66 days, which resulted from the total (horizontal and vertical water exchange. Also, the management of a catchment area seems to play a crucial role in the local water availability, as demonstrated by this research, where water retention was favoured by wooded and marshy areas. More intensive water retention was observed in a catchment dominated by forests, pastures and wetlands. Wasteland and large differences in the land elevation in the tested catchment are unfavourable to water retention because they intensify soil evaporation and accelerate the water run-off outside of the catchment. Among the actions which should be undertaken in order to counteract water deficiencies in catchment areas, rational use and management of the land resources in the catchment are most often mentioned.

  6. Climate change induced salinisation of artificial lakes in the Netherlands and consequences for drinking water production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonte, Matthijs; Zwolsman, John J G

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we present a modelling study to investigate the impacts of climate change on the chloride concentration and salinisation processes in two man-made freshwater lakes in the Netherlands, Lake IJsselmeer and Lake Markermeer. We used a transient compartmental chloride and water balance model to elucidate the salinisation processes occurring under present conditions and assess future salinisation under two climate forcing scenarios. The model results showed that the Rhine River is the dominant determinant for the chloride concentration in both lakes, followed by drainage of brackish groundwater from the surrounding polders. The results further show that especially during dry years, seawater intrusion through the tidal closure dam is an important source of chloride to Lake IJsselmeer. The results from the climatic forcing scenarios show that Lake IJsselmeer is especially vulnerable to climate-induced salinisation whereas effects on Lake Markermeer are relatively small. Peak chloride concentrations at the raw water intake of the Andijk drinking water facility on Lake IJsselmeer are projected to increase to values above 250 mg/l in the most far-reaching climate change scenario W+ in 2050 for dry years. This is well above the maximum allowable concentration of 150 mg/l for chloride in drinking water. Modelling showed that climate change impacts the chloride concentrations in a variety of ways: 1) an increasing occurrence of low river flows from summer to autumn reduces the dilution of the chloride that is emitted to the Rhine with a constant load thereby increasing its concentration; 2) increased open water evaporation and reduced rainfall during summer periods and droughts increases the chloride concentration in the water; and 3) rises in sea level increase seawater intrusion through the tidal closure dam of Lake IJsselmeer. The processes described here are likely to affect many other tidal rivers or lakes and should be considered when planning future raw

  7. Modeling hydrodynamics, temperature and water quality in Henry Hagg Lake, Oregon, 2000-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Annette B.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2004-01-01

    The two-dimensional model CE-QUAL-W2 was used to simulate hydrodynamics, temperature, and water quality in Henry Hagg Lake, Oregon, for the years 2000 through 2003. Input data included lake bathymetry, meteorologic conditions, tributary inflows, tributary temperature and water quality, and lake outflows. Calibrated constituents included lake hydrodynamics, water temperature, orthophosphate, total phosphorus, ammonia, algae, chlorophyll a, zooplankton, and dissolved oxygen. Other simulated constituents included nitrate, dissolved and particulate organic matter, dissolved solids, and suspended sediment. Two algal groups (blue-green algae, and all other algae) were included in the model to simulate the lakes algal communities. Measured lake stage data were used to calibrate the lakes water balance; calibration of water temperature and water quality relied upon vertical profile data taken in the deepest part of the lake near the dam. The model initially was calibrated with data from 200001 and tested with data from 200203. Sensitivity tests were performed to examine the response of the model to specific parameters and coefficients, including the light-extinction coefficient, wind speed, tributary inflows of phosphorus, nitrogen and organic matter, sediment oxygen demand, algal growth rates, and zooplankton feeding preference factors.

  8. Climate change driven water budget dynamics of a Tibetan inland lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Binquan; Zhang, Jianyun; Yu, Zhongbo; Liang, Zhongmin; Chen, Li; Acharya, Kumud

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the hydrologic processes of inland lake basins in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) could provide insights into the responses of Tibetan lake dynamics to climate change. An efficient approach for this purpose is to represent complex hydrologic behaviors of such Tibetan lake watersheds with plausible hydrologic models. In this study, water level fluctuations of Lake Nam Co, an inland lake in the central TP, were investigated using a lumped lake-watershed model. The degree-day factor method was introduced to improve the model applicability in glacier-covered basins. The model simulated the hydrologic processes as well as the lake water budget. Remote sensing images (Landsat MSS, TM, ETM + and OLI) from 1972 to 2015 were used to identify the glacier and lake boundaries. Multisource climate data (e.g., ground point observation, 0.25o gridded APHRODITE and TRMM 3B42 v7 precipitation products) were used to drive the hydrologic model at a monthly time step. Results of trend analysis showed that basin-wide annual air temperature increased by the rate 0.04 °C/yr from 1961 to 2015. Mean annual precipitation slowly increased from 1961 to the mid-1990s, and then rapidly increased from the late-1990s to the mid-2000s, and finally obviously decreased after the mid-2000s. As a response to climate change, glaciers decreased by 62.69 km2 (29%) and lake area increased by 91.83 km2 (4.7%) from 1972 to 2015. The analysis of lake water budget suggested that, the total basin runoff and on-lake precipitation contributed 1.36 km3/yr (66%) and 0.7 km3/yr (34%), respectively, to mean annual water gain of the lake. Glacier runoff was 14% of the basin runoff and 10% of the total water gain of the lake. The percentages of lake evaporation, water seepage and water surplus were 65%, 20% and 15%, respectively. Lake level increased with the rate of 0.14 m/yr for the study period 1961-2015. It could be concluded that precipitation was the dominant controlling factor for the different

  9. The protection and development of historic Lougang water resource features along Lake Tai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, J.; Tan, X. M.; Li, Y. P.; Wan, J. H.; Liu, J. G.; Zhou, B.

    2016-08-01

    Overcoming the conflicts between protecting water resource heritage features and the sustainable development of modern society is a major undertaking. Lougangs (rivulets) and polders are Lake-Tai-Basin-specific water resource engineering projects that hold a significant historic position. This paper presents background on water resource heritage features, based on the origins and evolution of Lougangs along Lake Tai. Through analysis of their value and current standing, we propose countermeasures for protection and development of the Lougang water resource heritage features along Lake Tai.

  10. Changes in lakes water volume and runoff over ungauged Sahelian watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, L.; Grippa, M.; Hiernaux, P.; Peugeot, C.; Mougin, E.; Kergoat, L.

    2016-09-01

    A large part of the Sahel consists of endorheic hydrological systems, where reservoirs and lakes capture surface runoff during the rainy season, making water available during the dry season. Monitoring and understanding the dynamics of these lakes and their relationships to the ecohydrological evolution of the region is important to assess past, present and future changes of water resources in the Sahel. Yet, most of Sahelian watersheds are still ungauged or poorly gauged, which hinders the assessment of the water flows feeding the lakes and the overall runoff over their watershed. In this paper, a methodology is developed to estimate water inflow to lakes for ungauged watersheds. It is tested for the Agoufou lake in the Gourma region in Mali, for which in situ water height measurements and surface areas estimations by remote sensing are simultaneously available. A Height-Volume-Area (HVA) model is developed to relate water volume to water height and lake surface area. This model is combined to daily evaporation and precipitation to estimate water inflow to the lake, which approximates runoff over the whole watershed. The ratio between annual water inflow and precipitation increases over the last sixty years as a result of a significant increase in runoff coefficient over the Agoufou watershed. The method is then extended to derive water inflow to three other Sahelian lakes in Mauritania and Niger. No in situ measurements are available and lake surface areas estimation by remote sensing is the only source of information. Dry season surface area changes and estimated evaporation are used to select a suited VA relationship for each case. It is found that the ratio between annual water inflow and precipitation has also increased in the last 60 years over these watersheds, although trends at the Mauritanian site are not statistically significant. The remote sensing approach developed in this study can be easily applied to recent sensors such as Sentinel-2 or Landsat-8

  11. Nutrient additions by waterfowl to lakes and reservoirs: predicting their effects on productivity and water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manny, Bruce A.; Johnson, W.C.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    Lakes and reservoirs provide water for human needs and habitat for aquatic birds. Managers of such waters may ask whether nutrients added by waterfowl degrade water quality. For lakes and reservoirs where primary productivity is limited by phosphorus (P), we developed a procedure that integrates annual P loads from waterfowl and other external sources, applies a nutrient load-response model, and determines whether waterfowl that used the lake or reservoir degraded water quality. Annual P loading by waterfowl can be derived from a figure in this report, using the days per year that each kind spent on any lake or reservoir. In our example, over 6500 Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and 4200 ducks (mostly mallards, Anas platyrhynchos) added 4462 kg of carbon (C), 280 kg of nitrogen (N), and 88 kg of P y-1 to Wintergreen Lake in southwestern Michigan, mostly during their migration. These amounts were 69% of all C, 27% of all N, and 70% of all P that entered the lake from external sources. Loads from all external sources totaled 840 mg P m-2 y-1. Application of a nutrient load-response model to this concentration, the hydraulic load (0.25 m y-1), and the water residence time (9.7 y) of Wintergreen Lake yielded an average annual concentration of total P in the lake of 818 mg m-3 that classified the lake as hypertrophic. This trophic classification agreed with independent measures of primary productivity, chlorophyll-a, total P, total N, and Secchi disk transparency made in Wintergreen Lake. Our procedure showed that waterfowl caused low water quality in Wintergreen Lake.

  12. Streptomyces lonarensis sp. nov., isolated from Lonar Lake, a meteorite salt water lake in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Trupti K; Mawlankar, Rahul; Sonalkar, Vidya V; Shinde, Vidhya K; Zhan, Jing; Li, Wen-Jun; Rele, Meenakshi V; Dastager, Syed G; Kumar, Lalitha Sunil

    2016-02-01

    A novel alkaliphilic actinomycete, strain NCL716(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected from the vicinity of Lonar Lake, an alkaline salt water meteorite lake in Buldhana district of Maharashtra State in India. The strain was characterised using a polyphasic taxonomic approach which confirmed that it belongs to the genus Streptomyces. Growth was observed over a pH range of 7-11 at 28 °C. The cell wall was found to contain LL-diaminopimelic acid and traces of meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major fatty acid components were identified as iso-C16:0 (46.8 %), C17:1 (12.4 %), anteiso-C15:0 (5.1 %) and anteiso-C17:1 (4.8 %). The major polar lipids were identified as diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol. The major menaquinones were determined to be MK-9 (H6) (70.3 %), MK-9 (H4) (15.5 %) and MK-9 (H8) (7.2 %). The G+C content of the DNA of the type strain was determined to be 71.4 mol %. The 16S rRNA gene sequence has been deposited in GenBank with accession number FJ919811. Although the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain NCL716(T) shares >99 % similarity with that of Streptomyces bohaiensis strain 11A07(T), DNA-DNA hybridization revealed only 33.2 ± 3.0 % relatedness between them. Moreover, these two strains can be readily distinguished by some distinct phenotypic characteristics. Hence, on the basis of phenotypic and genetic analyses, it is proposed that strain NCL716(T) represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces lonarensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is NCL 716(T) (=DSM 42084(T) = MTCC 11708(T) = KCTC 39684(T)).

  13. Spatial variation in nutrient and water color effects on lake chlorophyll at macroscales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergus, C. Emi; Finley, Andrew O.; Soranno, Patricia A.; Wagner, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    The nutrient-water color paradigm is a framework to characterize lake trophic status by relating lake primary productivity to both nutrients and water color, the colored component of dissolved organic carbon. Total phosphorus (TP), a limiting nutrient, and water color, a strong light attenuator, influence lake chlorophyll a concentrations (CHL). But, these relationships have been shown in previous studies to be highly variable, which may be related to differences in lake and catchment geomorphology, the forms of nutrients and carbon entering the system, and lake community composition. Because many of these factors vary across space it is likely that lake nutrient and water color relationships with CHL exhibit spatial autocorrelation, such that lakes near one another have similar relationships compared to lakes further away. Including this spatial dependency in models may improve CHL predictions and clarify how well the nutrient-water color paradigm applies to lakes distributed across diverse landscape settings. However, few studies have explicitly examined spatial heterogeneity in the effects of TP and water color together on lake CHL. In this study, we examined spatial variation in TP and water color relationships with CHL in over 800 north temperate lakes using spatially-varying coefficient models (SVC), a robust statistical method that applies a Bayesian framework to explore space-varying and scale-dependent relationships. We found that TP and water color relationships were spatially autocorrelated and that allowing for these relationships to vary by individual lakes over space improved the model fit and predictive performance as compared to models that did not vary over space. The magnitudes of TP effects on CHL differed across lakes such that a 1 μg/L increase in TP resulted in increased CHL ranging from 2–24 μg/L across lake locations. Water color was not related to CHL for the majority of lakes, but there were some locations where water color had a

  14. The Effects of Groundwater and Surface Water Use on Total Water Availability and Implication for Water Management: The Case of Lake Naivasha, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oel, van P.R.; Mulatu, D.W.; Odongo, V.O.; Meins, F.M.; Hogeboom, R.J.; Brecht, R.; Stein, A.; Onyando, J.O.; Veen, van der A.

    2013-01-01

    This study discusses the effects of water abstractions from two alternative sources on the available water volume around Lake Naivasha, Kenya: the lake itself and a connected aquifer. An estimation of the water abstraction pattern for the period 1999–2010 is made and its effect on the available wate

  15. The effects of groundwater and surface water use on total water availability and implications for water management : the case of Lake Naivasha, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oel, van Pieter R.; Mulatu, Dawit W.; Odongo, Vincent O.; Meins, Frank M.; Hogeboom, Rick J.

    2013-01-01

    This study discusses the effects of water abstractions from two alternative sources on the available water volume around Lake Naivasha, Kenya: the lake itself and a connected aquifer. An estimation of the water abstraction pattern for the period 1999–2010 is made and its effect on the available wate

  16. Virtual water flows and Water Balance Impacts of the U.S. Great Lakes Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddell, B. L.; Mayer, A. S.; Mubako, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    To assess the impacts of human water use and trade on water balances, we estimate virtual water flows for counties in the U.S. portion of the Great Lakes basin. This is a water-rich region, but one where ecohydrological 'hotspots' are created by water scarcity in certain locations (Mubako et al., 2012). Trade shifts water uses from one location to another, causing water scarcity in some locations but mitigating water scarcity in other locations. A database of water withdrawals was assembled to give point-wise withdrawals by location, source, and use category (commercial, thermoelectric power, industrial, agricultural, mining). Point-wise consumptive use is aggregated to the county level, giving direct, virtual water exports by county. A county-level trade database provides import and export data for the various use categories. We link the annual virtual water exported from a county for a given use category to corresponding annual trade exports. Virtual water balances for each county by use category are calculated, and then compared with the renewable annual freshwater supply. Preliminary findings are that overall virtual water balances (imports - exports) are positive for almost all counties, because urban areas import goods and services that are more water intensive than the exported goods and services. However, for some agriculturally-intensive counties, the overall impact of virtual water trade on the water balance is close to zero, and the balance for agricultural sector virtual water trade is negative, reflecting a net impact of economic trade on the water balance in these locations. We also compare the virtual water balance to available water resources, using annual precipitation less evapotranspiration as a crude estimate of net renewable water availability. In some counties virtual water exports approach 30% of the available water resources, indicating the potential for water scarcity, especially from an aquatic ecosystem standpoint.

  17. Groundwater-surface water interactions: the behavior of a small lake connected to groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoux, Marie; Barbecot, Florent; Gibert-Brunet, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between lakes and groundwater have been under concern in recent years and are still not well understood. Exchange rates are both spatially and temporally highly variable and are generally underestimated. However these interactions are of utmost importance for water resource management and need to be better understood since (i) the hydrogeological and geochemical equilibria within the lake drive the evolution of lakes' ecology and quality, and (ii) groundwater inflow, even in low rate, can be a key element in both the lake nutrient balance (and therefore in lake's eutrophication) and vulnerability to pollution. In many studies two main geochemical tracers, i.e. water stable isotopes and radon-222, are used to determine these interactions. However there are still many uncertainties on their time and space variations and their reliability to determine the lake budget. Therefore, a lake connected to groundwater on a small catchment was chosen to quantify groundwater fluxes change over time and the related influences on the lake's water geochemistry. Through analyse in time and space of both tracers and a precise instrumentation of the lake, their variations linked to groundwater inflows are determined. The results show that each tracer provides additional information for the lake budget with the interest to well determine the information given by each measurement: the radon-222 gives information on the groundwater inflows at a point in space and time while water stable isotopes highlight the dominant parameters of the yearly lake budget. The variation in groundwater inflows allow us to discuss lake's evolution regarding climate and environmental changes.

  18. Landscape-gradient assessment of thermokarst lake hydrology using water isotope tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narancic, Biljana; Wolfe, Brent B.; Pienitz, Reinhard; Meyer, Hanno; Lamhonwah, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Thermokarst lakes are widespread in arctic and subarctic regions. In subarctic Québec (Nunavik), they have grown in number and size since the mid-20th century. Recent studies have identified that these lakes are important sources of greenhouse gases. This is mainly due to the supply of catchment-derived dissolved organic carbon that generates anoxic conditions leading to methane production. To assess the potential role of climate-driven changes in hydrological processes to influence greenhouse-gas emissions, we utilized water isotope tracers to characterize the water balance of thermokarst lakes in Nunavik during three consecutive mid- to late summer sampling campaigns (2012-2014). Lake distribution stretches from shrub-tundra overlying discontinuous permafrost in the north to spruce-lichen woodland with sporadic permafrost in the south. Calculation of lake-specific input water isotope compositions (δI) and lake-specific evaporation-to-inflow (E/I) ratios based on an isotope-mass balance model reveal a narrow hydrological gradient regardless of diversity in regional landscape characteristics. Nearly all lakes sampled were predominantly fed by rainfall and/or permafrost meltwater, which suppressed the effects of evaporative loss. Only a few lakes in one of the southern sampling locations, which overly highly degraded sporadic permafrost terrain, appear to be susceptible to evaporative lake-level drawdown. We attribute this lake hydrological resiliency to the strong maritime climate in coastal regions of Nunavik. Predicted climate-driven increases in precipitation and permafrost degradation will likely contribute to persistence and expansion of thermokarst lakes throughout the region. If coupled with an increase in terrestrial carbon inputs to thermokarst lakes from surface runoff, conditions favorable for mineralization and emission of methane, these water bodies may become even more important sources of greenhouse gases.

  19. Factors affecting ground-water exchange and catchment size for Florida lakes in mantled karst terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terrie Mackin

    2002-01-01

    In the mantled karst terrain of Florida, the size of the catchment delivering ground-water inflow to lakes is often considerably smaller than the topographically defined drainage basin. The size is determined by a balance of factors that act individually to enhance or diminish the hydraulic connection between the lake and the adjacent surficial aquifer, as well as the hydraulic connection between the surficial aquifer and the deeper limestone aquifer. Factors affecting ground-water exchange and the size of the ground-water catchment for lakes in mantled karst terrain were examined by: (1) reviewing the physical and hydrogeological characteristics of 14 Florida lake basins with available ground-water inflow estimates, and (2) simulating ground-water flow in hypothetical lake basins. Variably-saturated flow modeling was used to simulate a range of physical and hydrogeologic factors observed at the 14 lake basins. These factors included: recharge rate to the surficial aquifer, thickness of the unsaturated zone, size of the topographically defined basin, depth of the lake, thickness of the surficial aquifer, hydraulic conductivity of the geologic units, the location and size of karst subsidence features beneath and onshore of the lake, and the head in the Upper Floridan aquifer. Catchment size and the magnitude of ground-water inflow increased with increases in recharge rate to the surficial aquifer, the size of the topographically defined basin, hydraulic conductivity in the surficial aquifer, the degree of confinement of the deeper Upper Floridan aquifer, and the head in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The catchment size and magnitude of ground-water inflow increased with decreases in the number and size of karst subsidence features in the basin, and the thickness of the unsaturated zone near the lake. Model results, although qualitative, provided insights into: (1) the types of lake basins in mantled karst terrain that have the potential to generate small and large

  20. [Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of lake water and geothermal spring water in arid area of south Tibet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ke; Shen, Li-Cheng; Wang, Peng

    2014-08-01

    The condition of water cycles in Tibet Plateau is a complex process, and the hydrogen and oxygen isotopes contain important information of this process. Based on the analysis of isotopic composition of freshwater lake, saltwater lake and geothermal water in the southern Tibetan Plateau, this study investigated water cycling, composition and variation of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes and the influencing factors in the study area. The study found that the mean values of delta18O and deltaD in Daggyaima lake water (-17.0 per thousand for delta18O and -138. 6 per thousand for deltaD), Langcuo lake water (-6.4 per thousand for delta18O and -87.4 per thousand for deltaD) and Dagejia geothermal water (-19.2 per thousand for delta18 and -158.2 per thousand for deltaD) all showed negative delta18O and deltaD values in Tibetan Plateau by the influence of altitude effects. Lake water and geothermal water were influenced by evaporation effects in inland arid area, and the slope of evaporation line was less than 8. Deuterium excess parameters of lake water and geothermal water were all negative. The temperature of geothermal reservoirs in Dagejia geothermal field was high,and oxygen shift existed in the relationship of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes.

  1. Recreational demand for clean water: Evidence from geotagged photographs by visitors to lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, B.; Wood, S.; Polasky, S.; Kling, C.; Filstrup, C.; Downing, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    More than 41,000 waters are listed as impaired by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Water Act. Regulations designed to address these impairments can be costly, raising questions about the value of the public benefits that would result from additional investments in improving surface water quality. Benefit studies often rely on costly surveys or other detailed data collection, limiting the ability to apply nonmarket valuation methods to address policy needs. We assessed the recreational value of changes in water quality using freely-available geotagged photographs as a proxy for recreational visits to lakes. We find that improved water clarity is associated with greater lake photo-visitation and that lake users are willing to travel further to visit clearer lakes. We estimate a one-meter increase in lake clarity in Minnesota and Iowa lakes is associated with $22 in increased willingness-to-pay per trip and generates 1,400 additional annual visits per lake, holding all other lake attributes constant. Our approach demonstrates the potential of data from social media to inform human responses to environmental change.

  2. Evolution and origin of sympatric shallow-water morphotypes of Lake Trout, Salvelinus namaycush, in Canada's Great Bear Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, L N; Chavarie, L; Bajno, R; Howland, K L; Wiley, S H; Tonn, W M; Taylor, E B

    2015-01-01

    Range expansion in north-temperate fishes subsequent to the retreat of the Wisconsinan glaciers has resulted in the rapid colonization of previously unexploited, heterogeneous habitats and, in many situations, secondary contact among conspecific lineages that were once previously isolated. Such ecological opportunity coupled with reduced competition likely promoted morphological and genetic differentiation within and among post-glacial fish populations. Discrete morphological forms existing in sympatry, for example, have now been described in many species, yet few studies have directly assessed the association between morphological and genetic variation. Morphotypes of Lake Trout, Salvelinus namaycush, are found in several large-lake systems including Great Bear Lake (GBL), Northwest Territories, Canada, where several shallow-water forms are known. Here, we assess microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA variation among four morphotypes of Lake Trout from the five distinct arms of GBL, and also from locations outside of this system to evaluate several hypotheses concerning the evolution of morphological variation in this species. Our data indicate that morphotypes of Lake Trout from GBL are genetically differentiated from one another, yet the morphotypes are still genetically more similar to one another compared with populations from outside of this system. Furthermore, our data suggest that Lake Trout colonized GBL following dispersal from a single glacial refugium (the Mississippian) and support an intra-lake model of divergence. Overall, our study provides insights into the origins of morphological and genetic variation in post-glacial populations of fishes and provides benchmarks important for monitoring Lake Trout biodiversity in a region thought to be disproportionately susceptible to impacts from climate change.

  3. Integron-bearing Gram-negative bacteria in lake waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczura, R; Semkowska, A; Mokracka, J

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the occurrence of integron-bearing Gram-negative bacteria in the water of four lakes located in Wielkopolski National Park, Poland. Altogether, 17 isolates harbouring class 1 or class 2 integrons were found. The integron-bearing bacteria were identified as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida and Aeromonas hydrophila. The variable regions of the class 1 integrons contained aadA1 and dfrA1-aadA1 gene cassettes, whereas class 2 integrons carried dfrA1-sat2-aadA1 gene cassette array. The isolates were resistant to 3-20 antimicrobials. One of them produced SHV-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase. Integrons play a major role in the spread of antibiotic resistance among bacteria. They are frequently found in clinical bacterial strains, but are also detected in environmental isolates in sites affected by anthropogenic pressure. Little is known, however, about the presence and characteristics of integrons in bacteria living in water environments in areas of nature preservation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study focused on detection and characterization of integrons in bacteria living in water ecosystems in a national park. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Underwater light field determined by water constituents in highly turbid water: the case of Taihu lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Chun Huang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The relationships between optical properties and water constituents in highly turbid productivewater were studied on the basis of the multiple bio-optical measurements and samplings of water constituents made during five cruises from 2006 to 2008 in Taihu lake. Taihu lake is a high dynamic ratio [(square root of area/depth] inland shallow lake. The spatial and temporal variation of water constituents and optical properties is significant. The inorganic suspended matter (ISMhas become the primary constituent in Taihu lake: its average percentage can reach 65.21%. The concentration of ISM is highly correlated to the optical properties in Taihu lake due to the sediment resuspension. Consequently, the ISM can be taken into account as an important optically-active constituent in Taihu lake. Resuspended sediments also lead to a poor correlation between scattering optical property and chlorophyll-a concentration (CChl-a. However, empirical relationship between the CChl-a and phytoplankton absorption coefficient at 675 nm is still valid when the package effect is removed. The parameters of linear equation in the present study have slight temporal variation, especially for the relationship between inherent optical properties (IOPs and concentration of total suspended matter (TSM. The relationship between apparent optical property (AOP (diffuse attenuation coefficient of particle, Kdbio and ISM has been examined as well. The Kdbio is strongly affected by ISM, and correlates to it with linear function. Thedifference between specific diffuse attenuation coefficients of organic [K*dOSM(λ] and inorganic [K*dISM(λ] particles is significant. K*dOSM(λ includes the absorption property of chlorophyll-a (chl-a at 675 nm, which is much higher than that of K*dISM(λ. This indicates that the attenuation ability of OSM is stronger than that of ISM although the Kdbio induced by large concentration of ISM is bigger than the Kdbio induced by small concentration of OSM

  5. Temporal and spatial changes of water quality and management strategies of Dianchi Lake in southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Zeng, W. H.; Wang, S. R.; Ni, Z. K.

    2014-04-01

    Temporal and spatial changes to the water quality of Dianchi Lake in southwest China were investigated using monthly monitoring data from 2005 to 2012. Dianchi Lake is divided into two parts, Caohai Lake and Waihai Lake, by a man-made dike. Caohai Lake lies at the north of Dianchi Lake, while Waihai Lake is the main water body of Dianchi Lake and accounts for 96.7% of the whole area of the lake. Based on the analysis of total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), and chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations, it was determined that, in Caohai Lake, the annual concentrations of these variables ranged from 0.19-1.46 mg L-1, 6.11-16.79 mg L-1, 0.06-0.14 mg L-1, respectively. In addition, the annual concentrations of TP, TN and Chl a in Waihai Lake ranged between 0.13 and 0.20 mg L-1, 1.82 and 3.01 mg L-1, and 0.04 and 0.09 mg L-1, respectively. Cluster analysis (CA) classified the 10 monitoring sites into two clusters (cluster A and cluster B) based on similarities of water quality characteristics. Our data revealed that the current status of water quality within Caohai Lake was much worse than that of Waihai Lake. Water quality was seriously degraded during the economic boom near the period of the "Eleventh Five-Year Plan" (2005-2010), and gradually improved from 2010 to 2012 because of the "standard emission directive to industry". The main factors that influenced the spatial and temporal changes to water quality were natural factors including lake evolution and regional characteristic as well as human factors such as pollution load into the lake and management strategies that were already adopted. Some activities and regulations were implemented to enhance the lake environment by controlling wastewater emissions and establishing regulations to protect the lakes in the Yunnan Province. However, problems with institutional fragmentation (horizontal and vertical), simple treatment methods, low-intensity investment in pollution control, and lack of meaningful endogenous

  6. Lake-Atmosphere Greenhouse Gas Exchange in Relation to Atmospheric Forcing and Water Clarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, J. J.; Ojala, A.; Mammarella, I.; Vesala, T.

    2015-12-01

    Even though lakes cover only 2 % of the world's land surface, it has been estimated that lakes release about 10 % of the carbon fixed annually by the terrestrial ecosystems back to the atmosphere. A critical parameter in the gas exchange estimates is the gas transfer velocity (k), which is governed by turbulence. The aim of our study was to assess the current global CO2 evasion estimates from lakes to the atmosphere by comparing parameterizations for kand the significance of wind and heat flux to the gas transfer in small lakes. To improve future predictions of gas evasion from lakes, we focused on the changes in water clarity and how they affect water column physics and processes in the air-water interface. We studied a small boreal lake and used the eddy covariance (EC) method for the high precision data needed, and therefore also aimed to improve the EC methodology on lakes. The air-water gas transfer was related to both wind and heat loss during times of seasonal stratification, but only to wind during autumn overturn. When wind-induced thermocline tilting and resulting spatial variability in surface water CO2 concentrations was accounted for, average k derived from the measurements dropped from 6.0 cm h-1 to 5.2 cm h-1. This was still over twice the estimate (2.2 cm h-1) calculated with a widely used model for kin lakes suggesting that the global estimates of gas evasion from lakes might be underestimations. Water clarity was a significant parameter defining the thermal stratification of the lake: a change from clear to dark water would lead to shorter stratification period and lower water column temperatures in small lakes and therefore have significant impact on the lake-atmosphere exchange processes. Figure 1. The isotherms of Lake Kuivajärvi throughout the open-water period 2013. The top left are the measured temperatures and the others are modeled with LAKE model using fixed light extinction coefficient, Kd. The horizontal dashed black line represents

  7. Groundwater and surface-water interactions near White Bear Lake, Minnesota, through 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Perry M.; Trost, Jared J.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Jackson, P. Ryan; Bode, Jenifer A.; O'Grady, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the White Bear Lake Conservation District, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, and other State, county, municipal, and regional planning agencies, watershed organizations, and private organizations, conducted a study to characterize groundwater and surface-water interactions near White Bear Lake through 2011. During 2010 and 2011, White Bear Lake and other lakes in the northeastern part of the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area were at historically low levels. Previous periods of lower water levels in White Bear Lake correlate with periods of lower precipitation; however, recent urban expansion and increased pumping from the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer have raised the question of whether a decline in precipitation is the primary cause for the recent water-level decline in White Bear Lake. Understanding and quantifying the amount of groundwater inflow to a lake and water discharge from a lake to aquifers is commonly difficult but is important in the management of lake levels. Three methods were used in the study to assess groundwater and surface-water interactions on White Bear Lake: (1) a historical assessment (1978-2011) of levels in White Bear Lake, local groundwater levels, and their relation to historical precipitation and groundwater withdrawals in the White Bear Lake area; (2) recent (2010-11) hydrologic and water-quality data collected from White Bear Lake, other lakes, and wells; and (3) water-balance assessments for White Bear Lake in March and August 2011. An analysis of covariance between average annual lake-level change and annual precipitation indicated the relation between the two variables was significantly different from 2003 through 2011 compared with 1978 through 2002, requiring an average of 4 more inches of precipitation per year to maintain the lake level. This shift in the linear relation between annual lake-level change and annual precipitation

  8. Water circulation and recharge pathways of coastal lakes along the southern Baltic Sea in northern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cieśliński Roman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe water circulation patterns for selected lakes found along the Baltic coast in northern Poland and to determine primary recharge mechanisms or pathways that produce an influx or loss of lake water. A secondary purpose of the paper is to determine the magnitude of recharge for each studied source of water – river water influx, surface runoff from direct catchments, forced influx from polders surrounding lakes, and periodic marine water intrusions from the nearby Baltic Sea. It is also important to determine the magnitude of water outflow from lakes to the sea via existing linkages as well as to compare horizontal influx and outflow data. The study area consisted of five lakes located along the Baltic Sea in northern Poland: Łebsko, Gardno, Bukowo, Kopań, Resko Przymorskie. The main driving force of the studied lakes are large rivers that drain lake catchment areas and periodic brackish water intrusions by the Baltic Sea.

  9. Great Lakes waters: radiation dose commitments, potential health effects, and cost-benefit considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainsworth, E.J.

    1977-07-01

    In 1972, a Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement was signed by the United States and Canadian Governments. It was stipulated that the operation and effectiveness of the agreement were to be reviewed comprehensively in 1977. Aspects of the agreement concern nondegradation of Great Lakes waters and maintenance of levels of radioactivity or other potential pollutants at levels considered as low as practicable. A refined radioactivity objective of one millirem is proposed in the Water Quality Agreement. The implications of adoption of this objective are not known fully. The Division of Environmental Impact Studies was commissioned by ERDA's Division of Technology Overview to summarize the information available on the current levels of radioactivity in Great Lakes waters, compute radiation-dose commitment (integrated dose over 50 years after consumption of 2.2 liters of water of one year), and to comment on the feasibility and cost-benefit considerations associated with the refined one-millirem objective. Current levels of radioactivity in the waters of Lakes Michigan, Ontario, Erie, and Huron result in dose commitments in excess of 1 mrem for whole body and 6 mrem for bone. Future projections of isotope concentrations in Great lakes water indicate similar dose commitments for drinking water in the year 2050. Reduction of the levels of radioactivity in Great Lakes waters is not feasible, but cost-benefit considerations support removal of /sup 226/Ra and /sup 90/Sr through interceptive technology before water consumption. Adoption of the one-millirem objective is not propitious.

  10. Near-shore talik development beneath shallow water in expanding thermokarst lakes, Old Crow Flats, Yukon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Leveillee, Pascale; Burn, Christopher R.

    2017-05-01

    It is generally assumed that permafrost is preserved beneath shallow lakes and ponds in the Western North American Arctic where water depth is less than about two thirds of the late-winter lake ice thickness. Here we present field observations of talik development beneath water as shallow as 0.2 m despite a lake ice thickness of 1.5 m, in Old Crow Flats (OCF), YT. Conditions leading to the initiation and development of taliks beneath shallow water were investigated with field measurements of shore erosion rates, bathymetry, ice thickness, snow accumulation, and lake bottom temperature near the shores of two expanding lakes in OCF. The sensitivity of talik development to variations in lake bottom thermal regime was then investigated numerically. Where ice reached the lake bottom, talik development was controlled by the ratio of freezing degree days to thawing degree days at the lake bottom (FDDlb/TDDlb). In some cases, spatial variations in on-ice snow depth had a minimal effect on annual mean lake bottom temperature (Tlb) but caused sufficient variations in FDDlb/TDDlb to influence talik development. Where Tlb was close to but greater than 0°C simulations indicated that the thermal offset allowed permafrost aggradation to occur under certain conditions, resulting in irregular near-shore talik geometries. The results highlight the sensitivity of permafrost to small changes in lake bottom thermal conditions where the water column freezes through in early winter and indicate the occurrence of permafrost degradation beneath very shallow water in the near-shore zone of Arctic ponds and lakes.

  11. Pile burning effects on soil water repellency, infiltration, and downslope water chemistry in the Lake Tahoe Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken Hubbert; Matt Busse; Steven Overby; Carol Shestak; Ross Gerrard

    2015-01-01

    Thinning of conifers followed by pile burning has become a popular treatment to reduce fuel loads in the Lake Tahoe Basin. However, concern has been voiced about burning within or near riparian areas because of the potential effect on nutrient release and, ultimately, lake water quality. Our objective was to quantify the effects of pile burning on soil physical and...

  12. Maintaining healthy rivers and lakes through water diversion from Yangtze River to Taihu lake in Taihu Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-yun WU

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the Taihu water resources assessment, an analysis of the importance and rationality of the water diversion from the Yangtze River to Taihu Lake in solving the water problem and establishing a harmonious eco-environment in the Taihu Basin is performed. The water quantity and water quality conjunctive dispatching decision-making support system, which ensures flood control, water supply and eco-aimed dispatching, is built by combining the water diversion with flood control dispatching and strengthening water resources monitoring and forecasting. With the practice and effect assessment, measures such as setting the integrated basin management format, further developing water diversion and improving the hydraulic engineering projects system and water monitoring system are proposed in order to maintain healthy rivers and guarantee the development of the economy and society in the Taihu Basin.

  13. Monitoring and modeling water temperature and trophic status of a shallow Mediterranean lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giadrossich, Filippo; Bueche, Thomas; Pulina, Silvia; Marrosu, Roberto; Padedda, Bachisio Mario; Mariani, Maria Antonietta; Vetter, Mark; Cohen, Denis; Pirastru, Mario; Niedda, Marcello; Lugliè, Antonella

    2017-04-01

    Lakes are sensitive to changes in climate and human activities. Over the last few decades, Mediterranean lakes have experienced various problems due to the current climate change (drought, flood, warming, salt accumulation, water quality changes, etc.), often amplified by water use, intensification of land use activities, and pollution. The overall impact of these changes on water resources is still an open question. In this study we monitor the trophic status and the dynamics of water temperature of Lake Baratz, the only natural lake in Sardinia, Italy, characterized by high salinity and shallow depth. We extend the research carried out in the past 8 years by integrating new physical, chemical and biological data using a multidisciplinary approach that combines hydrological and biological dynamics. In particular, the lake water balance and the thermal and hydrochemical regime are studied with a lake dynamic model (the General Lake Model or GLM) which combine the energy budget method for estimating lake evaporation, and a physically-based rainfall-runoff simulator for estimating lake inflow, calibrated with measurements at the cross section of the main inlet stream. The trophic state of the lake was evaluated applying the OCDE Probability Distribution Diagrams method, which requires nutrient concentrations in the lake (total phosphorus), phytoplankton chlorophyll a and Secchi disk transparency data. We collected field data from a raft station and a land station, measuring net solar radiation, air temperature and relative humidity, precipitation, wind velocity, atmospheric pressure, and temperature from thermistors submerged in the uppermost three centimeters of water and beneath the lake surface at depths of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 m. Samples for nutrients and chlorophyll a analyses were collected at the same above mentioned depths close to the raft station using a Niskin bottle. Temperature, salinity, pH, and dissolved oxygen were measured using a multi

  14. Wind-driven Water Bodies : a new paradigm for lake geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutz, A.; Schuster, M.; Ghienne, J. F.; Roquin, C.; Bouchette, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution we emphasize the importance in some lakes of wind-related hydrodynamic processes (fair weather waves, storm waves, and longshore, cross-shore and bottom currents) as a first order forcing for clastics remobilization and basin infill. This alternative view contrasts with more classical depositional models for lakes where fluvial-driven sedimentation and settling dominates. Here we consider three large lakes/paleo-lakes that are located in different climatic and geodynamic settings: Megalake Chad (north-central Africa), Lake Saint-Jean (Québec, Canada), and Lake Turkana (Kenya, East African Rift System). All of these three lake systems exhibit well developed modern and ancient high-energy littoral morphosedimentary structures which directly derive from wind-related hydrodynamics. The extensive paleo-shorelines of Megalake Chad are composed of beach-foredune ridges, spits, wave-dominated deltas, barriers, and wave-ravinment surface. For Lake Saint-Jean the influence of wind is also identified below the wave-base at lake bottom from erosional surfaces, and sediment drifts. In the Lake Turkana Basin, littoral landforms and deposits are identified for three different time intervals (today, Holocene, Plio-Pleistocene) evidencing that wind-driven hydrodynamics can be preserved in the geological record. Moreover, a preliminary global survey suggests that numerous modern lakes (remote sensing) and paleo-lakes (bibliographic review) behave as such. We thus coin the term "Wind-driven Water Bodies" (WWB) to refer to those lake systems where sedimentation (erosion, transport, deposition) is dominated by wind-induced hydrodynamics at any depth, as it is the case in the marine realm for shallow seas. Integrating wind forcing in lake models has strong implications for basin analysis (paleoenvironments and paleoclimates restitutions, resources exploration), but also for coastal engineering, wildlife and reservoirs management, or leisure activities.

  15. Lake Water Quality Indexing To Identify Suitable Sites For Household Utility: A Case Study Jambhulwadi Lake;Pune(MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aher D. N.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Water management practices need a fresh look in order to avoid water crisis in the next two decades. This essentially requires looking for proper management practices for growing economy and population. The water resources of the Lake basins remain almost constant while demand of water for various purposes is increasing. Water pollution as a corollary of accelerated industrial growth has drawn concerns over public health and environment. Water is required for different purposes like domestic, agricultural, hydro-power, navigation, recreation, etc. Utilization in all these diverse uses of water should be optimized and an awareness of water as a inadequate resource should be fostered. Water quality index (WQI is precious and unique rating to depict the overall water quality status in appropriate treatment technique to meet the concerned issues. This paper elaborates on the WQI concepts and current scenario of Jambhulwadi Lake which will help in future as natural potable groundwater resource. It also focuses on case scenario of calculating WQI using Weighted Arithmetic Water Quality Index an example dataset. The quality of water way to evaluate by testing various physicochemical parameters such as pH, Temperature, Total Dissolved Solid (TDS,Alkalinity Total Hardness, Dissolved Oxygen (DO, Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD,Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD, Nitrites, Phosphate, Conductivity.

  16. In-situ subaqueous capping of mercury-contaminated sediments in a fresh-water aquatic system, Part I—Bench-scale microcosm study to assess methylmercury production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Fimmen, Ryan [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States); Lal, Vivek; Darlington, Ramona [Battelle, 505 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Bench-scale microcosm experiments were designed to provide a better understanding of the potential for Hg methylation in sediments from an aquatic environment. Experiments were conducted to examine the function of sulfate concentration, lactate concentration, the presence/absence of an aqueous inorganic Hg spike, and the presence/absence of inoculums of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a strain of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) commonly found in the natural sediments of aquatic environments. Incubations were analyzed for both the rate and extent of (methylmercury) MeHg production. Methylation rates were estimated by analyzing MeHg and Hg after 2, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days. The production of metabolic byproducts, including dissolved gases as a proxy for metabolic utilization of carbon substrate, was also monitored. In all treatments amended with lactate, sulfate, Hg, and SRB, MeHg was produced (37 ng/g-sediment dry weight) after only 48 h of incubation and reached a maximum sediment concentration of 127 ng/g-sediment dry weight after the 42 day incubation period. Aqueous phase production of MeHg was observed to be 10 ng/L after 2 day, reaching a maximum observed concentration of 32.8 ng/L after 14 days, and declining to 10.8 ng/L at the end of the incubation period (42 day). The results of this study further demonstrates that, in the presence of an organic carbon substrate, sulfate, and the appropriate consortia of microorganisms, sedimentary Hg will be transformed into MeHg through bacterial metabolism. Further, this study provided the basis for evaluation of an in-situ subaqueous capping strategy that may limit (or potentially enhance) MeHg production. -- Highlights: • Hg methylation by SRB is limited by the depletion of sulfate and carbon. • Hg methylation is sensitive to competition by methanogens for carbon substrate. • In high lactate environment, all lactate was utilized in the microcosms within seven days. • In the absence of adequate metabolic fuel, Me

  17. Integrated Water Resources Management in a Lake System: A Case Study in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Casadei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lake Trasimeno is a closed lake in Central Italy and in historically its water level has been affected by wide fluctuations mostly depending on the climate. The lake has suffered many water crises due to water scarcity and in recent decades, droughts have also severely affected the economic and environmental situation. The aim of this study was to analyze the possibility of limiting these severe level fluctuations by evaluating of feasible water resource management policies that could also reduce the environmental stress of this area. Therefore, a specific decision support system (DSS has been developed in order to simulate different scenarios for the entire water system of the Trasimeno area. In particular, the hydrological model implemented in the DSS allowed for the simulation and validation of different management policy hypotheses for the water resource in order to mitigate environmental and water crises for the Lake Trasimeno. Results indicated that it is possible to transfer a certain amount of water from nearby reservoirs without affecting the availability of the resource for specific users. In this way, Lake Trasimeno can benefit both from an increase in water levels in the lake, so a possible better situation in quantitatively and qualitatively.

  18. The Contribution of Marsh Zones to Water Quality in Dutch Shallow Lakes: A Modeling Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sollie, S.; Janse, Jan H.; Mooij, Wolf M.; Coops, Hugo; Verhoeven, J.T.A.

    2008-01-01

    Many lakes have experienced a transition from a clear into a turbid state without macrophyte growth due to eutrophication. There are several measures by which nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations in the surface water can be reduced. We used the shallow lake model PCLake to evaluate

  19. Status of the amphipod Diporeia ssp. in coastal waters of the Laurentian Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diporeia has historically been the dominant benthic macroinvertebrate in deeper waters of the Laurentian Great Lakes, and its abundance has been proposed as an indicator of ecological condition. In 2010, the USEPA incorporated the Great Lakes into the National Coastal Condition A...

  20. Landscape-scale modeling of water quality in Lake Superior and Lake Michigan watersheds: How useful are forest-based indicators? Journal of Great Lakes Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus S. Seilheimer; Patrick L. Zimmerman; Kirk M. Stueve; Charles H. Perry

    2013-01-01

    The Great Lakes watersheds have an important influence on the water quality of the nearshore environment, therefore, watershed characteristics can be used to predict what will be observed in the streams. We used novel landscape information describing the forest cover change, along with forest census data and established land cover data to predict total phosphorus and...

  1. Ecological monitoring for assessing the state of the nearshore and open waters of the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Melanie A.; Painter, D. Scott; Warren, Glenn; Hites, Ronald A.; Basu, Ilora; Weseloh, D.V. Chip; Whittle, D. Michael; Christie, Gavin; Barbiero, Richard; Tuchman, Marc; Johannsson, Ora E.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Edsall, Thomas A.; Fleischer, Guy; Bronte, Charles; Smith, Stephen B.; Baumann, Paul C.

    2003-01-01

    The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement stipulates that the Governments of Canada and the United States are responsible for restoring and maintaining the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the waters of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem. Due to varying mandates and areas of expertise, monitoring to assess progress towards this objective is conducted by a multitude of Canadian and U.S. federal and provincial/state agencies, in cooperation with academia and regional authorities. This paper highlights selected long-term monitoring programs and discusses a number of documented ecological changes that indicate the present state of the open and nearshore waters of the Great Lakes.

  2. The effects of water-level fluctuations on vegetation in a Lake Huron wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, D.A.; Nichols, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    The diversity and resultant habitat value of wetland plant communities in the Laurentian Great Lake's are dependent on water-level fluctuations of varying frequency and amplitude. Conceptual models have described the response of vegetation to alternating high and low lake levels, but few quantitative studies have documented the changes that occur. In response to recent concerns over shoreline management activities during an ongoing period of low lake levels in lakes Superior, Michigan, and Huron that began in 1999, we analyzed a quantitative data set from Saginaw Bay of Lake Huron collected from 1988 to 1993 during a previous lake-level decline to provide the needed information on vegetation responses. Transects were established that followed topographic contours with water-level histories that differed across a six-year period, ranging from barely flooded to dewatered for varying numbers of years to never dewatered. Percent cover data from randomly placed quadrats along those transects were analyzed to assess floristic changes over time, document development of distinct plant assemblages, and relate the results to lake-level changes. Ordinations showed that plant assemblages sorted out by transects that reflect differing water-level histories. Distinction of assemblages was maintained for at least three years, although the composition and positioning of those assemblages changed as lake levels changed. We present a model that uses orthogonal axes to plot transects by years out of water against distance above water and sorted those transects in a manner that matched ordination results. The model suggests that vegetation response following dewatering is dependent on both position along the water level/soil moisture gradient and length of time since dewatering. This study provided quantitative evidence that lake-level fluctuations drive vegetative change in Great Lakes wetlands, and it may assist in making decisions regarding shoreline management in areas that

  3. Laboratory investigation of aluminum solubility and solid-phase properties following alum treatment of lake waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Jacob; Anderson, Michael A; Graham, Robert C

    2005-10-01

    Water samples from two southern California lakes adversely affected by internal nutrient loading were treated with a 20 mg/L dose of Al3+ in laboratory studies to examine Al solubility and solid-phase speciation over time. Alum [Al2(SO4)3 . 18 H2O] applications to water samples from Big Bear Lake and Lake Elsinore resulted in a rapid initial decrease in pH and alkalinity followed by a gradual recovery in pH over several weeks. Dissolved Al concentrations increased following treatment, reaching a maximum of 2.54 mg/L after 17 days in Lake Elsinore water and 0.91 mg/L after 48 days in Big Bear Lake water; concentrations in both waters then decreased to Lake Elsinore water. Surface areas also decreased over time as crystals reordered to form gibbsite/microcrystalline gibbsite species. DSC-TGA results suggested that the initially formed amorphous Al(OH)3 underwent transformation to >45% gibbsite. These results were supported by geochemical modeling using Visual MINTEQ, with Al solubility putatively controlled by amorphous Al(OH)3 shortly after treatment and approaching that of microcrystalline gibbsite after about 150 days. These findings indicate that Al(OH)3 formed after alum treatment undergoes significant chemical and mineralogical changes that may alter its effectiveness as a reactive barrier to phosphorus release from lake sediments.

  4. Evaluation of ERTS data for certain oceanographic uses. [upwelling, water circulation, and pollution in Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, A. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Upwelling along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan was occurring during the 3 and 21 August 1973 visits by ERTS-1. The NOAA-2 VHRR thermal-IR data are being digitized for comparison. Early indications are that these upwellings induced a calcium carbonate precipitate to form in the surface waters. It is most pronounced in the MSS-4 channel. On the lake bottom this jell-like sediment is known as marl and adds to the eutrophication of the lake. This phenomenon may help to explain the varve-like nature of bottom cores that have been observed in the Great Lakes.

  5. Water and chemical budgets of gravel pit lakes: Case studies of fluvial gravel pit lakes along the Meuse River (The Netherlands) and coastal gravel pit lakes along the Adriatic Sea (Ravenna, Italy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollema, P.N.

    2016-01-01

    Gravel pit lakes form when gravel is excavated from below the water table of a phreatic or shallow confined aquifer. Typically many of these lakes are concentrated along naturally occurring sedimentary gravel deposits in areas where gravel is needed for construction. Most gravel pit lakes are relati

  6. The role of depth in regulating water quality and fish assemblages in oxbow lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Daniel B.; Miranda, Leandro E.; Kroger, Robert; Andrews, Caroline S.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated water quality and fish assemblages in deep (> 3.0 m; N = 7) and shallow (water temperatures. Conversely, deeper lakes were represented by higher visibility, stable oxygen levels, and cooler water temperatures. Fish assemblages in shallow lakes were dominated by tolerant, small-bodied fishes and those able to breathe atmospheric oxygen. Deeper lakes had a greater representation of predators and other large-bodied fishes. Our evaluation suggests fish assemblages are reflective of oxbow lakes water quality, which is shaped by depth. Understanding the interactions between depth, water quality, and fish assemblages may facilitate development of effective management plans for improving conditions necessary to sustain diverse fish assemblages in agriculturally dominated basins.

  7. Water-quality characteristics of Michigan's inland lakes, 2001-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, L.M.; Taricska, C.K.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) jointly monitored for selected water-quality constituents and properties of inland lakes during 2001–10 as part of Michigan's Lake Water-Quality Assessment program. During 2001–10, 866 lake basins from 729 inland lakes greater than 25 acres were monitored for baseline water-quality conditions and trophic status. This report summarizes the water-quality characteristics and trophic conditions of the monitored lakes throughout the State; the data include vertical-profile measurements, nutrient measurements at three discrete depths, Secchi-disk transparency (SDT) measurements, and chlorophyll a measurements for the spring and summer, with major ions and other chemical indicators measured during the spring at mid-depth and color during the summer from near-surface samples. In about 75 percent of inland lake deep basins (index stations), trophic characteristics were associated with oligotrophic or mesotrophic conditions; 5 percent or less were categorized as hypereutrophic, and 80 percent of hypereutrophic lakes had a maximum depth of 30 feet or less. Comparison of spring and summer measurements shows that water clarity based on SDT measurements were clearer in the spring than in the summer for 63 percent of lakes. For near-surface measurements made in spring, 97 percent of lakes can be considered phosphorus limited and less than half a percent nitrogen limited; for summer measurements, 96 percent of lakes can be considered phosphorus limited and less than half a percent nitrogen limited. Spatial patterns of major ions, alkalinity, and hardness measured in the spring at mid-depth all showed lower values in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and a southward increase toward the southern areas of the Lower Peninsula, though the location of increase varied by constituent. A spatial analysis of the data based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Level III Ecoregions separated potassium

  8. Coastal processes influencing water quality at Great Lakes beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2013-01-01

    In a series of studies along the Great Lakes, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are examining the physical processes that influence concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria and related pathogens at recreational beaches. These studies aim to estimate human health risk, improve management strategies, and understand the fate and transport of microbes in the nearshore area. It was determined that embayed beaches act as traps, accumulating Escherichia coli (E. coli) and other bacteria in the basin and even in beach sand. Further, shear stress and wave run-up could resuspend accumulated bacteria, leading to water-contamination events. These findings are being used to target beach design and circulation projects. In previous research, it was determined that E. coli followed a diurnal pattern, with concentrations decreasing throughout the day, largely owing to solar inactivation, but rebounding overnight. Studies at a Chicago beach identified the impact of wave-induced mass transport on this phenomenon, a finding that will extend our understanding of bacterial fate in the natural environment. In another series of studies, scientists examined the impact of river outfalls on bacteria concentrations, using mechanistic and empirical modeling. Through these studies, the models can indicate range and extent of impact, given E. coli concentration in the source water. These findings have been extended to extended lengths of coastlines and have been applied in beach management using empirical predictive modeling. Together, these studies are helping scientists identify and eliminate threats to human and coastal health.

  9. Closure of Microcosm for refurbishment

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Since 1994, the Microcosm exhibition has given the opportunity to visitors of all ages and backgrounds to have a first glimpse into the secrets of physics.   To ensure that Microcosm can continue fulfilling its educational aims at the same level of quality for many years to come, it is closing for renovation work on 8 December 2014 and is expected to reopen during Summer 2015. During the closure, the “Fun with Physics” workshop will not take place, but the Universe of Particles exhibition in the Globe and the Passport to the Big Bang circuit will remain accessible to the public, free of charge and with no need to book in advance.  Guided tours of CERN are also available (advance booking required via this page).

  10. Photowalk Exhibition opens at Microcosm

    CERN Document Server

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The winning photographs from the 2010 Global Particle Physics Photowalk competition will go on display at Microcosm from 11 February to 2 April. The exhibition is part of a global photography event taking place over three continents, with Photowalk exhibitions opening simultaneously at Fermilab in the US, KEK in Japan and here at CERN.   DESY wire chamber - First place people's choice; second place global jury competition. Photographer: Hans-Peter Hildebrandt  If you were one of the 1,300 photography lovers who voted in last year’s Photowalk competition, this exhibition is your chance to see the winning entries in print. The exhibition will take place in the downstairs gallery of Microcosm, overlooking the garden. 15 photographs will be on display, with each of the laboratories that participated in Photowalk represented by their 3 winning entries. Among them will be the “people’s choice” sunburst photo of a particle detector at DESY (Photo 1), and...

  11. Maintaining healthy rivers and lakes through water diversion from Yangtze River to Taihu Lake in Taihu Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Haoyun; Hu Yan

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the Taihu water resources assessment, an analysis of the importance and rationality of the water diversion from the Yangtze River to Taihu Lake in solving the water problem and establishing a harmonious eco-environment in the Taihu Basin is performed. The water quantity and watcr quality conjunctive dispatching decision-making support system, which ensures flood control, water supply and eco-aimed dispatching, is built by combining the water diversion with flood control dispatching and strengthening water resources monitoring and forecasting. With the practice and effect assessment, measures such as setting the integrated basin management format, further developing water diversion and improving the hydraulic engineering projects system and water monitoring system are proposed in order to maintain healthy rivers and guarantee the development of the economy and society in the Taihu Basin.

  12. Application of digital image processing techniques and information systems to water quality monitoring of Lake Tahoe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. Y.; Blackwell, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The Tahoe basin occupies over 500 square miles of territory located in a graben straddling the boundary between California and Nevada. Lake Tahoe contains 126 million acre-feet of water. Since the 1950's the basin has experienced an ever increasing demand for land development at the expense of the natural watershed. Discharge of sediment to the lake has greatly increased owing to accelerated human interference, and alterations to the natural drainage patterns are evident in some areas. In connection with an investigation of the utility of a comprehensive system that takes into account the causes as well as the effects of lake eutrophication, it has been attempted to construct an integrated and workable data base, comprised of currently available data sources for the Lake Tahoe region. Attention is given to the image based information system (IBIS), the construction of the Lake Tahoe basin data base, and the application of the IBIS concept to the Lake Tahoe basin.

  13. Extending one-dimensional models for deep lakes to simulate the impact of submerged macrophytes on water quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachse, R.; Petzoldt, T.; Blumstock, M.; Moreira, S.; Pätzig, M.; Rücker, J.; Janse, J.H.; Mooij, W.M.; Hilt, S.

    2014-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes can stabilise clear water conditions in shallow lakes. However, many existing models for deep lakes neglect their impact. Here, we tested the hypothesis that submerged macrophytes can affect the water clarity in deep lakes. A one-dimensional, vertically resolved macrophyte mode

  14. Comparison of laboratory batch and flow-through microcosm bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Bernard J P; Delhaye, Hélène L; Triffault-Bouchet, Gaëlle G

    2014-10-01

    Since 1997, we have been developing a protocol for ecotoxicological bioassays in 2-L laboratory microcosms and have applied it to the study of various pollutants and ecotoxicological risk assessment scenarios in the area of urban facilities and transport infrastructures. The effects on five different organisms (micro-algae, duckweeds, daphnids, amphipods, chironomids) are assessed using biological responses such as growth, emergence (chironomids), reproduction (daphnids) and survival, with a duration of exposure of 3 weeks. This bioassay has mainly been used as a batch bioassay, i.e., the water was not renewed during the test. A flow-through microcosm bioassay has been developed recently, with the assumption that conditions for the biota should be improved, variability reduced, and the range of exposure patterns enlarged (e.g., the possibility of maintaining constant exposure in the water column). This paper compares the results obtained in batch and flow-through microcosm bioassays, using cadmium as a model toxicant. As expected, the stabilization of physico-chemical parameters, increased organism fitness and reduced variability were observed in the flow-through microcosm bioassay.

  15. Relationships between testate amoeba communities and water quality in Lake Donghu,a large alkaline lake in Wuhan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yangmin QIN; Bertrand FOURNIER; Enrique LARA; Yansheng GU; Hongmei WANG; Yongde CUI; Xiaoke ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    The middle Yangtze Reach is one of the most developed regions of China.As a result,most lakes in this area have suffered from eutrophication and serious environmental pollution during recent decades.The aquatic biodiversity in the lakes of the area is thus currently under significant threat from continuous human activities.Testate amoebae (TA) are benthic (rarely planktonic) microorganisms characterized by an agglutinated or autogenous shell.Owing to their high abundance,preservation potential in lacustrine sediments,and distinct response to environmental stress,they are increasingly used as indicators for monitoring water quality and reconstructing palaeoenvironmental changes.However this approach has not yet been developed in China.This study presents an initial assessment of benthic TA assemblages in eight lakes of Lake Donghu in the region of Wuhan,China.Testate amoeba community structure was most strongly correlated to water pH.In more alkaline conditions,communities were dominated by Centropyxis aculeata,Difflugia oblonga,Pontigulasia compressa,Pon.elisa and Lesquereusia modesta.These results are consistent with previous studies and show that TA could be useful for reconstructing past water pH fluctuations in China.To achieve this,the next step will be to expand the database and build transfer function models.

  16. Relationships between testate amoeba communities and water quality in Lake Donghu, a large alkaline lake in Wuhan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yangmin; Fournier, Bertrand; Lara, Enrique; Gu, Yansheng; Wang, Hongmei; Cui, Yongde; Zhang, Xiaoke; Mitchell, Edward A. D.

    2013-06-01

    The middle Yangtze Reach is one of the most developed regions of China. As a result, most lakes in this area have suffered from eutrophication and serious environmental pollution during recent decades. The aquatic biodiversity in the lakes of the area is thus currently under significant threat from continuous human activities. Testate amoebae (TA) are benthic (rarely planktonic) microorganisms characterized by an agglutinated or autogenous shell. Owing to their high abundance, preservation potential in lacustrine sediments, and distinct response to environmental stress, they are increasingly used as indicators for monitoring water quality and reconstructing palaeoenvironmental changes. However this approach has not yet been developed in China. This study presents an initial assessment of benthic TA assemblages in eight lakes of Lake Donghu in the region of Wuhan, China. Testate amoeba community structure was most strongly correlated to water pH. In more alkaline conditions, communities were dominated by Centropyxis aculeata, Difflugia oblonga, Pontigulasia compressa, Pon. elisa and Lesquereusia modesta. These results are consistent with previous studies and show that TA could be useful for reconstructing past water pH fluctuations in China. To achieve this, the next step will be to expand the database and build transfer function models.

  17. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan describes planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site in Salt Lake City, Utah. This plan identifies and justifies sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring of ground water, sediments, and surface waters at monitoring stations on the site.

  18. Cyanobacteria in lakes on Yungui Plateau, China are assembled via niche processes driven by water physicochemical property, lake morphology and watershed land-use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jingqiu; Zhao, Lei; Cao, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jinhua; Gao, Zhe; Wang, Jie; Jiang, Dalin; Fan, Hao; Huang, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Plateau lakes are important ecosystems with diverse ecological functions. Cyanobacteria play a key role in plateau lakes as primary producers. However, they are threatening when dense blooms occur. Identifying cyanobacteiral biogeography and the mechanism of assembly processes shaping the distribution of cyanobacteria in plateau lakes is critical for understanding cyanobacterial ecology and applying it to lake management. In the present study, the biogeographic pattern and importance of neutral and niche processes in assembly of cyanobacteria in 21 lakes on Yungui Plateau, China were examined. Results showed that cyanobacteria exhibit unique biogeographic pattern, and most of them have a narrow habitat preference in plateau lakes. They were assembled via niche processes driven by water physicochemical property, lake morphology and watershed land-use, which explained 62.4% of the biological variation. Neutral processes were not at play. Water physicochemical property (key variables - dissolved oxygen, salinity, trophic status and pH) was the most dominant driver shaping its unique biogeographic pattern. Watershed land-use especially urban land, water body and agricultural land also exhibited a strong impact on cyanobacterial distribution, followed by lake morphology. As most of the cyanobacteiral genus detected in these plateau lakes were potential toxin-producers, this study indicated that in order to protect waters from toxic-bloom in the future, reducing nutrient loading and land-use practices are two practical approaches in plateau lake management.

  19. Behind the scenes at Microcosm

    CERN Multimedia

    Emma Sanders

    2015-01-01

    Works advance at Microcosm in preparation for a progressive opening of the new exhibitions from mid-July onwards.   Construction of the section on the LHC experiments (mid-June 2015).   The Microcosm exhibition space is undergoing a total revamp and will feature many new objects. Old favourites, such as the LHC tunnel model and the Linac module, will be brought up to date with more modern exhibition techniques. Another main thrust of the new exhibitions will be the focus on the people that make CERN work. This is both to show the huge diversity of expertise needed at CERN and also to help students envisage where a career in physics or engineering might take them. With the project getting the go-ahead last autumn and the closure of the Globe for building works starting from May this year, the new Microcosm exhibition areas will open progressively as and when installations are completed to ensure that summer visitors who haven’t booked a guided tour will have something to ...

  20. Halogens in the Dry Valleys Lakes, Antarctica: dynamic cycling between water, sediment, and cryogenic evaporites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, G. T.; Dowling, C. B.; Harbert, A.; Lu, H.; Lyons, W. B.; Welch, K. A.

    2006-12-01

    Many of the McMurdo Dry Valleys lakes of Antarctica exhibit saline to hypersaline bottom waters whose chemistry is distinct from that of sea water. The source and relative abundance of dissolved Cl, Br, and I in these unusual waters has been modified by several potential processes including: seawater incursions, water- rock interactions, microbial scavenging, glacial melting and precipitation, and atmospheric deposition. Since all of these processes are affected by both long-term and short-term climate change, lake waters and the salts that are deposited around them provide sensitive indicators of lake dessication and refilling in the past. We present elemental analyses, not only of the lake water, but also of bottom sediments and cryogenic evaporites recovered from the Dry Valleys. XRD analyses indicate that gypsum and antarcticite are precipitated around saline lakes presently situated more than 40 km from the ocean (Vanda, Don Juan, Joyce), while mirabilite is found near small pools in the Garwood Valley, only a few km from the ocean. Lake water enrichments in Ca and Cl, relative to Na suggest that either dissolution of gypsum and antarcticite has occurred in Don Juan Pond and Lake Vanda, or that these two small bodies of water previously lost sodium to mirabilite formation. Lakes Fryxell and Joyce, as well as waters in Garwood Valley show near-sea water ratios. Dissolved iodine, and to a lesser extent bromine, are commonly associated with diagenesis of marine organic matter in regions of high productivity, so it is surprising that the Dry Valleys lake waters are enriched in these two elements. These enrichments are also apparent in pore fluids of shallow sediments on the lake bottoms. In addition, the sediments themselves are highly enriched in iodine in the upper 5 cm (up to 77 ppm). This is likely due to remobilization of dissolved iodide, which is mobile in reduced form, but becomes fixed as adsorbed or organic iodine upon diffusing into shallow oxic

  1. The effect of lake water quality and wind turbines on Rhode Island property sales price

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Susan Shim

    This dissertation uses the hedonic pricing model to study the impact of lake water quality and wind turbines on Rhode Island house sales prices. The first two manuscripts are on lake water quality and use RI house sales transactions from 1988--2012. The third studies wind turbines using RI house sales transactions from 2000--2013. The first study shows that good lake water quality increases lakefront property price premium. It also shows that environmental amenities, such as forests, substitute for lake amenity as the property's distance from the lake increases. The second lake water quality study incorporates time variables to examine how environmental amenity values change over time. The results show that property price premium associated with good lake water quality does not change as it is constant in proportion to housing prices with short term economic fluctuations. The third study shows that wind turbines have a negative and significant impact on housing prices. However, this is highly location specific and varies with neighborhood demographics. All three studies have policy implications which are discussed in detail in the manuscripts below.

  2. Lake Urmia (Iran): can future socio-ecologically motivated river basin management restore lake water levels in an arid region with extensive agricultural development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Nasim; Berndtsson, Ronny; Bertacchi Uvo, Cintia; Klove, Bjorn; Madani, Kaveh

    2015-04-01

    Lake Urmia, one of the world's largest hyper saline lakes located in northwest of Iran, is a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and Ramsar site, protected as a national park and, supports invaluable and unique biodiversity and related ecosystem services for the region's 6.5 million inhabitants. Due to increased development of the region's water resources for agriculture and industry and to a certain extent climate change, the lake has started to shrink dramatically since 1995 and now is holding less than 30 percent of its volume. Rapid development in agricultural sector and land-use changes has resulted in immense construction of dams and water diversions in almost all lake feeding rivers, intensifying lake shrinking, increasing salinity and degrading its ecosystem. Recently, lake's cultural and environmental importance and social pressure has raised concerns and brought government attention to the lake restoration plans. Along with poor management, low yield agriculture as the most water consuming activity in the region with, rapid, insufficient development is one of the most influential drivers in the lake desiccation. Part of the lake restoration plans in agricultural sector is to restrict the agricultural areas in the main feeding river basins flowing mostly in the southern part of the lake and decreasing the agricultural water use in this area. This study assess the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed plans and its influence on the lake level rise and its impacts on economy in the region using a system dynamics model developed for the Lake consist of hydrological and agro-economical sub-systems. The effect of decrease in agricultural area in the region on GDP and region economy was evaluated and compared with released water contribution in lake level rise for a five year simulation period.

  3. Environmental Monitoring, Water Quality - MO 2009 Water Quality Standards - Table G Lake Classifications and Use Designations (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data set contains Missouri Water Quality Standards (WQS) lake classifications and use designations described in the Missouri Code of State Regulations (CSR), 10...

  4. Spatial changes in water quality of urban lakes in Chennai (India)--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveen, R; Daniel, M

    2010-07-01

    Manifold increase in population of Chennai city (India) has resulted in a rapid decrease in the groundwater level due to its over exploitation. The Government of Tamil Nadu has been exploring various ways and means to combat this problem. The present study was undertaken to assess the quality of water in three important major lakes of Chennai and its suburbs such as Porur lake, Puzhal lake and Chembarambakkam lake which recharge the groundwater as well as these lakes are harnessed by the Tamil Nadu Government to supply potable water to the residents of Chennai. The parameters studied were colour, odour, taste, turbidity, temperature, pH, Dissolved Oxygen, Biological Oxygen Demand, Chemical Oxygen Demand, alkalinity, acidity, chlorides, Total Suspended Solids, Total Dissolved Solids and total hardness. Results indicate that the quality of water from these lakes is within the acceptable values. However, the TDS values were on the higher side in all the three lakes even though within the permissible limit prescribed by BIS. All the three lakes appear to be vulnerable to pollution as they are situated within or in close proximity to heavily populated areas.

  5. Cold-Active, Heterotrophic Bacteria from the Highly Oligotrophic Waters of Lake Vanda, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A. Vander Schaaf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The permanently ice-covered lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica are distinctive ecosystems that consist strictly of microbial communities. In this study, water samples were collected from Lake Vanda, a stratified Dry Valley lake whose upper waters (from just below the ice cover to nearly 60 m are highly oligotrophic, and used to establish enrichment cultures. Six strains of psychrotolerant, heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from lake water samples from a depth of 50 or 55 m. Phylogenetic analyses showed the Lake Vanda strains to be species of Nocardiaceae, Caulobacteraceae, Sphingomonadaceae, and Bradyrhizobiaceae. All Lake Vanda strains grew at temperatures near or below 0 °C, but optimal growth occurred from 18 to 24 °C. Some strains showed significant halotolerance, but no strains required NaCl for growth. The isolates described herein include cold-active species not previously reported from Dry Valley lakes, and their physiological and phylogenetic characterization broadens our understanding of these limnologically unique lakes.

  6. Monitoring the water microbial parameters of some lakes of Lura Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREJEVA GOLLOSHI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lura Park with surface of 1,280 hectares is located in northern Albania, in the eastern part of the massive mountain Lura Crown. This park has 14 glacial lakes, located at the height of 1350-1720 meters that create a colorful and attractive environment. In winter these lakes are covered by ice. The largest lake is the Great Lake with an area of 32 hectares. But in almost all the lakes the natural balance is broken, as a result of demographic changes of region and usage without any criteria of the vegetation around the lakes. Disposal of inert materials and solid waste, as well as those of liquid in many water environments of Lura, has damaged their appearance and quality. It is appreciated the quality of some lakes of Lura in different points, with microbial parameters in determining the total number of microorganisms (HET and the presence of coliforms and by comparing them with international norms allowed for surface waters. The results obtained, showed low levels of coliforms in the water lakes, which is within the limits allowed. The greater this contamination was observed during summer, and less in the winter.

  7. Chemical quality of surface waters in Devils Lake basin North Dakota, 1952-60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, Hugh T.; Rosene, Philip G. Scott; Chester, H.

    1968-01-01

    Above-normal precipitation in 1954, 1956, and 1957 caused the water surface of Devils Lake to rise to an altitude of 1,419.3 feet, its highest in 40 years. Nearly all the water entering the lake flowed through Big Coulee, and about three-fourths of that inflow was at rates greater than 100 cubic feet per second. At these rates, the inflow contained less than 600 ppm (parts per million) dissolved solids and was of the calcium bicarbonate type. Because the inflow was more dilute than the lake water, the dissolved solids in the lake decreased from 8,680 ppm in 1952 to about 6,000 ppm in 19,56 and 1957. Subsequently, however, they increased to slightly more than 8,000 ppm and averaged 6,800 ppm for the 1954-60 period. Sodium and sulfate were the principal dissolved constituents in the lake water. Although the concentration of dissolved solids varied significantly from time to time, the relative proportions of the chief constituents remained nearly the same. Water flowed from Devils Lake to Mission Bay in 1956, 1957, and 1958, and some flowed from Mission Bay into East Bay. However, no water moved between East Devils Lake, western Stump Lake, and eastern Stump Lake during 1952-60 ; these lakes received only local runoff, and the variations in their water volume caused only minor variations in dissolved solids. For the periods sampled, concentrations averaged 60,700 ppm for East Devils Lake, 23,100 ppm for western Stump Lake, and 127,000 ppm for eastern Stump Lake. Sodium and sulfate were the chief dissolved constituents in all the lakes of the Devils Lake chain. Water in eastern Stump Lake was saturated with sodium sulfate and precipitated large quantities of granular, hydrated sodium sulfate crystals on the lakebed and shore in fall and winter. A discontinuous layer of consolidated sodium sulfate crystals formed a significant part of the bed throughout the year. Measured concentrations of zinc, iron, manganese, fluoride, arsenic, boron, copper, and lead were not high

  8. Estimated effects on water quality of Lake Houston from interbasin transfer of water from the Trinity River, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscum, Fred; East, Jeffery W.

    2000-01-01

    The City of Houston is considering the transfer of water from the Trinity River to Lake Houston (on the San Jacinto River) to alleviate concerns about adequate water supplies for future water demands. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Houston, conducted a study to estimate the effects on the water quality of Lake Houston from the transfer of Trinity River water. A water-quality model, CE–QUAL–W2, was used to simulate six water-quality properties and constituents for scenarios of interbasin transfer of Trinity River water. Three scenarios involved the transferred Trinity River water augmenting streamflow in the East Fork of Lake Houston, and three scenarios involved the transferred water replacing streamflow from the West Fork of the San Jacinto River.The estimated effects on Lake Houston were determined by comparing volume-weighted daily mean water temperature, phosphorus, ammonia nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, algal biomass, and dissolved oxygen simulated for each of the transfer scenarios to simulations for a base dataset. The effects of the interbasin transfer on Lake Houston do not appear to be detrimental to water temperature, ammonia nitrogen, or dissolved oxygen. Phosphorus and nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen showed fairly large changes when Trinity River water was transferred to replace West Fork San Jacinto River streamflow. Algal biomass showed large decreases when Trinity River water was transferred to augment East Fork Lake Houston streamflow and large increases when Trinity River water was transferred to replace West Fork San Jacinto River streamflow. Regardless of the scenario simulated, the model indicated that light was the limiting factor for algal biomass growth.

  9. Water Quality and optical properties of Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Gary L.; Hoffman, Robert L.; McIntire, C.D.; Buktenica, M.W.; Girdner, Scott

    2007-01-01

    We examine observations of key limnological properties (primarily temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen), measured over a 14-year period in Crater Lake, Oregon, and discuss variability in the hypolimnion on time scales of days to a decade. During some years (e.g., 1994a??1995), higher-than-average wintertime deep convection and ventilation led to the removal of significant amounts of heat and salt from the hypolimnion, while dissolved oxygen concentrations increase. In other years, such as the winter of 1996a??1997, heat and salt concentrations increase throughout the year and dissolved oxygen levels drop, indicating conditions were dominated by the background geothermal inputs and dissolved oxygen consumption by bacteria (i.e., minimal deep convection). Over the entire 14 year period, no statistically significant trend was observed in the annual hypolimnetic heat and salt content. Measurements from several thermistors moored in the hypolimnion provide new insight into the time and space scales of the deep convection events. For some events, cool water intrusions are observed sequentially, from shallower depths to deeper depths, suggesting vertical mixing or advection from above. For other events, the cooling is observed first at the deepest sensors, suggesting a thin, cold water pulse that flows along the bottom and mixes more slowly upwards into the basin. In both cases, the source waters must originate from the epilimnion. Conditions during a strong ventilation year (1994a??1995) and a weak ventilation year (1996a??1997) were compared. The results suggest the major difference between these 2 years was the evolution of the stratification in the epilimnion during the first few weeks of reverse stratification such that thermobaric instabilities were easier to form during 1995 thana?#1997. Thus, the details of surface cooling and wind-driven mixing during the early stages ofa?#reverse stratification may determine the neta?#amount of ventilation possible during

  10. Environmental contaminants in water, sediment and biological samples from Playa Lakes in southeastern New Mexico - 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment, water, bird tissue, and invertebrates were collected from 10 playa lakes in Southeastern New Mexico in 1991 and 1992. These samples were analyzed for a...

  11. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) - Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) Summary Report for Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information, provides an...

  12. Big Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Water Management Plan : Calendar Year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Big Lake National Wildlife Refuge Water Management Plan has been developed to meet the station objectives set forth in the Master Plan. The purpose of this plan...

  13. Heavy metal distribution and water quality characterization of water bodies in Louisiana's Lake Pontchartrain Basin, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zengqiang; Wang, Jim J; Ali, Amjad; DeLaune, Ronald D

    2016-11-01

    The seasonal variation in physico-chemical properties, anions, and the heavy metal (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) concentration was evaluated in water from nine different rivers in Lake Pontchartrain Basin, Louisiana, USA. The water quality parameters were compared with toxicity reference values (TRV), US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) drinking/aquatic life protection, and WHO standards. Among physico-chemical properties, pH, DO, and turbidity were high during spring, while, EC, temperature, and DOC were high during summer and vice versa. The anion study revealed that the concentrations of F(-), Cl(-), and NO3(-) were higher during summer and Br(-) and SO4(-) were higher during spring. Our research findings showed anion concentration decreased in the order of Cl(-) > SO4(-) > NO3(-) > Br(-) > F(-), in accordance with the global mean anion concentration. The dissolved heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb) except Zn were higher during spring than summer. None of the rivers showed any Cd pollution for both seasons. Co showed higher concentrations in Amite River, Mississippi River, Industrial Canal, and Lacombe Bayou during summer. The Cr concentration was higher than WHO drinking water standards, implicating water unsuitability for drinking purposes in all the rivers associated with the Lake Pontchartrain Basin. Cu showed no pollution risk for the study area. Mn and Co were similar to concentration in Lacombe Bayou, Liberty Bayou, Blind River, and Industrial Canal. Mn levels were greater than WHO standards for the Tickfaw River, Tangipahoa River, and Blind River in both seasons. Blind River, Tangipahoa River, Tickfaw River, and Amite River will require more monitoring for determining possible Mn pollution. Ni content in river water during both seasons showed low pollution risk. Liberty Bayou and Industrial Canal concentrations were closer to the WHO regulatory standards, indicating possible risk of Pb pollution in these water bodies. The Zn

  14. Water level changes affect carbon turnover and microbial community composition in lake sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Lukas; Ulrich, Andreas; Moreano, Matilde; Gessler, Arthur; Kayler, Zachary E; Steger, Kristin; Zeller, Bernd; Rudolph, Kristin; Knezevic-Jaric, Jelena; Premke, Katrin

    2016-05-01

    Due to climate change, many lakes in Europe will be subject to higher variability of hydrological characteristics in their littoral zones. These different hydrological regimes might affect the use of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon sources. We used sandy sediment microcosms to examine the effects of different hydrological regimes (wet, desiccating, and wet-desiccation cycles) on carbon turnover. (13)C-labelled particulate organic carbon was used to trace and estimate carbon uptake into bacterial biomass (via phospholipid fatty acids) and respiration. Microbial community changes were monitored by combining DNA- and RNA-based real-time PCR quantification and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA. The shifting hydrological regimes in the sediment primarily caused two linked microbial effects: changes in the use of available organic carbon and community composition changes. Drying sediments yielded the highest CO2 emission rates, whereas hydrological shifts increased the uptake of allochthonous organic carbon for respiration. T-RFLP patterns demonstrated that only the most extreme hydrological changes induced a significant shift in the active and total bacterial communities. As current scenarios of climate change predict an increase of drought events, frequent variations of the hydrological regimes of many lake littoral zones in central Europe are anticipated. Based on the results of our study, this phenomenon may increase the intensity and amplitude in rates of allochthonous organic carbon uptake and CO2 emissions.

  15. Lake Ontario: Nearshore Conditions and Variability in Water Quality Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interest in recent years has increased regarding conditions in the nearshore of the Great Lakes. We conducted a high-resolution survey of the Lake Ontario nearshore along the 20 m contour using towed electronic instrumentation. The 720 km survey was conducted September 6-10, 20...

  16. Are Sierran Lakes Warming as a Result of Climate Change? The Effects of Climate Warming and Variation in Precipitation on Water Temperature in a Snowmelt-Dominated Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadro, S.; Melack, J. M.; Sickman, J. O.; Skeen, K.

    2016-12-01

    Water temperature regulates a broad range of fundamental ecosystem processes in lakes. While climate can be an important factor regulating lake temperatures, heterogeneity in the warming response of lakes is large, and variation in precipitation is rarely considered. We analyzed three decades of climate and water temperature data from a high-elevation catchment in the southern Sierra Nevada of California to illustrate the magnitude of warming taking place during different seasons and the role of precipitation in regulating lake temperatures. Significant climate warming trends were evident during all seasons except spring. Nighttime rates of climate warming were approximately 25% higher than daytime rates. Spatial patterns in warming were elevation dependent, with rates of temperature increase higher at sites above 2800 m.a.s.l. than below. Although interannual variation in snow deposition was high, the frequency and severity of recent droughts has contributed to a significant 3.4 mm year -1 decline in snow water equivalent over the last century. Snow accumulation, more than any other climate factor, regulated lake temperature; 94% of variation in summer lake temperature was regulated by precipitation as snow. For every 100 mm decrease in snow water equivalent there was a 0.62 ° increase in lake temperature. Drought years amplify warming in lakes by reducing the role of cold spring meltwaters in lake energy budgets and prolonging the ice-free period during which lakes warm. The combination of declining winter snowpack and warming air temperatures has the capacity to amplify the effect of climate warming on lake temperatures during drought years. Interactions among climatic factors need to be considered when evaluating ecosystem level effects, especially in mountain regions. For mountain lakes already affected by drought, continued climate warming during spring and autumn has the greatest potential to impact mean lake temperatures.

  17. Purification Process of Lake Water%湖水净化处理工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄亮; 赵子玲

    2012-01-01

    某人工湖水由于富营养成分较多,致使水体透明度下降,甚至有臭味散发。利用“过滤+消毒”的湖水净化组合工艺,使湖水经处理后可以湖内循环回用。%A artificial lake due to the more nutritious ingredients, resulting in water transparency decreased, and even smell distributing. By the means of combination decontaminate process of filter and disinfection, the lake water will be 1oo13 back to the lake.

  18. Is China's fifth-largest inland lake to dry-up? Incorporated hydrological and satellite-based methods for forecasting Hulun lake water levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zuansi; Jin, Taoyong; Li, Changyou; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Zhang, Sheng; Ding, Aizhong; Li, Jiancheng

    2016-08-01

    Hulun Lake, China's fifth-largest inland lake, experienced severe declines in water level in the period of 2000-2010. This has prompted concerns whether the lake is drying up gradually. A multi-million US dollar engineering project to construct a water channel to transfer part of the river flow from a nearby river to maintain the water level was completed in August 2010. This study aimed to advance the understanding of the key processes controlling the lake water level variation over the last five decades, as well as investigate the impact of the river transfer engineering project on the water level. A water balance model was developed to investigate the lake water level variations over the last five decades, using hydrological and climatic data as well as satellite-based measurements and results from land surface modelling. The investigation reveals that the severe reduction of river discharge (-364 ± 64 mm/yr, ∼70% of the five-decade average) into the lake was the key factor behind the decline of the lake water level between 2000 and 2010. The decline of river discharge was due to the reduction of total runoff from the lake watershed. This was a result of the reduction of soil moisture due to the decrease of precipitation (-49 ± 45 mm/yr) over this period. The water budget calculation suggests that the groundwater component from the surrounding lake area as well as surface run off from the un-gauged area surrounding the lake contributed ∼ net 210 Mm3/yr (equivalent to ∼ 100 mm/yr) water inflows into the lake. The results also show that the water diversion project did prevent a further water level decline of over 0.5 m by the end of 2012. Overall, the monthly water balance model gave an excellent prediction of the lake water level fluctuation over the last five decades and can be a useful tool to manage lake water resources in the future.

  19. Geographic setting influences Great Lakes beach microbiological water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Fuller, Lori M.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Johnson, Heather E.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of factors that influence Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) concentrations, pathogen occurrence, and microbial sources at Great Lakes beaches comes largely from individual beach studies. Using 12 representative beaches, we tested enrichment cultures from 273 beach water and 22 tributary samples for EC, ENT, and genes indicating the bacterial pathogens Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC), Shigella spp., Salmonella spp, Campylobacter jejuni/coli, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and 108–145 samples for Bacteroides human, ruminant, and gull source-marker genes. EC/ENT temporal patterns, general Bacteroides concentration, and pathogen types and occurrence were regionally consistent (up to 40 km), but beach catchment variables (drains/creeks, impervious surface, urban land cover) influenced exceedances of EC/ENT standards and detections of Salmonella and STEC. Pathogen detections were more numerous when the EC/ENT Beach Action Value (but not when the Geometric Mean and Statistical Threshold Value) was exceeded. EC, ENT, and pathogens were not necessarily influenced by the same variables. Multiple Bacteroides sources, varying by date, occurred at every beach. Study of multiple beaches in different geographic settings provided new insights on the contrasting influences of regional and local variables, and a broader-scale perspective, on significance of EC/ENT exceedances, bacterial sources, and pathogen occurrence.

  20. Changes in water quality and trophic status associated with cage aquaculture in Lake Maninjau, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henny, C.; Nomosatryo, S.

    2016-01-01

    The cage aquaculture unquestionably has been degrading lake water quality by increasing nutrients and organic carbon in lake water and sediments. The question is to what extend this condition affects other key indictors such as the temporal changes in trophic status and the thickness of anoxic hypolimnion layer where the anoxic water column is moving upward pushing up the oxic epilimnion layer. The condition in Lake Maninjau could be worse since the lake is steadily producing sulfide which can cause not only oxygen depletion in the water column but also the phosphate release from the sediments. The study is based on the long term monitoring data from on going research for about 8 years observation. The results indeed show the anoxic water column is moving upward increasing the thickness of anoxic hypolimnion layer and decreasing epilimnion layer from 30 m to 10 m depth. The trophic status of the lake also has changed from mesotrophic to eutrophic decreasing the water transparency to even a critical level < 1m. The months of July to September with prolonged hot season could be the critical time for trophic condition for the lake. The results suggest that determination of these conditions further could help identify and predict the critical time for possibility of fish kill.

  1. Sources of mercury in sediments, water, and fish of the lakes of Whatcom County, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Anthony J.

    2004-01-01

    Concerns about mercury (Hg) contamination in Lake Whatcom, Washington, were raised in the late 1990s after a watershed protection survey reported elevated concentrations of Hg in smallmouth bass. The U.S. Geological Survey, the Whatcom County Health Department, and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) cooperated to develop a study to review existing data and collect new data that would lead to a better understanding of Hg deposition to Lake Whatcom and other lakes in Whatcom County, Washington. A simple atmospheric deposition model was developed that allowed comparisons of the deposition of Hg to the surfaces of each lake. Estimates of Hg deposition derived from the model indicated that the most significant deposition of Hg would have occurred to the lakes north of the City of Bellingham. These lakes were in the primary wind pattern of two municipal waste incinerators. Of all the lakes examined, basin 1 of Lake Whatcom would have been most affected by the Hg emissions from the chlor-alkali plant and the municipal sewage-sludge incinerator in the City of Bellingham. The length-adjusted concentrations of Hg in largemouth and smallmouth bass were not related to estimated deposition rates of Hg to the lakes from local atmospheric sources. Total Hg concentrations in the surface sediments of Lake Whatcom are affected by the sedimentation of fine-grained particles, whereas organic carbon regulates the concentration of methyl-Hg in the surface sediments of the lake. Hg concentrations in dated sediment core samples indicate that increases in Hg sedimentation were largest during the first half of the 20th century. Increases in Hg sedimentation were smaller after the chlor-alkali plant and the incinerators began operating between 1964 and 1984. Analysis of sediments recently deposited in basin 1 of Lake Whatcom, Lake Terrell, and Lake Samish indicates a decrease in Hg sedimentation. Concentrations of Hg in Seattle precipitation and in tributary waters were

  2. Triple Isotope Water Measurements of Lake Untersee Ice using Off-Axis ICOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, E. S.; Huang, Y. W.; Andersen, D. T.; Gupta, M.; McKay, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Untersee (71.348°S, 13.458°E) is the largest surface freshwater lake in the interior of the Gruber Mountains of central Queen Maud Land in East Antarctica. The lake is permanently covered with ice, is partly bounded by glacier ice and has a mean annual air temperature of -10°C. In contrast to other Antarctic lakes the dominating physical process controlling ice-cover dynamics is low summer temperatures and high wind speeds resulting in sublimation rather than melting as the main mass-loss process. The ice-cover of the lake is composed of lake-water ice formed during freeze-up and rafted glacial ice derived from the Anuchin Glacier. The mix of these two fractions impacts the energy balance of the lake, which directly affects ice-cover thickness. Ice-cover is important if one is to understand the physical, chemical, and biological linkages within these unique, physically driven ecosystems. We have analyzed δ2H, δ18O, and δ17O from samples of lake and glacier ice collected at Lake Untersee in Dec 2014. Using these data we seek to answer two specific questions: Are we able to determine the origin and history of the lake ice, discriminating between rafted glacial ice and lake water? Can isotopic gradients in the surface ice indicate the ablation (sublimation) rate of the surface ice? The triple isotope water analyzer developed by Los Gatos Research (LGR 912-0032) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology and incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for high sensitivity and optimal instrument stability. This analyzer measures δ2H, δ18O, and δ17O from water, as well as the calculated d-excess and 17O-excess. The laboratory precision in high performance mode for both δ17O and δ18O is 0.03 ‰, and for δ2H is 0.2 ‰. Methodology and isotope data from Lake Untersee samples are presented. Figure: Ice samples were collected across Lake Untersee from both glacial and lake ice regions for this study.

  3. Evaluation of the Environmental State and WQI Variations in Waters of Tirana Artificial Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARVIOLA HODAJ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A study of the water quality due to nutrients concentration in waters of the artificial Lake of Tirana was conducted in six different stations of the lake, during the period 2011-2014. A total of 14 water quality parameters were measured, while Water Quality Index, WQI was calculated in order to classify the water quality. The physical and chemical variables were temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO, conductivity, pH, total dissolved solid (TDS, chlorophyll- a, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD, chemical oxygen demand (COD, total suspended solid (TSS, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate-N and phosphate Results show that based on WQI, the waters of Tirana Lake are mainly classified as “class II”, which is suitable for recreational activities and allows body contact. With respect to the Water Quality Standard (WQS, parameters like DO, pH, turbidity, BOD, COD and ammonia-N are categorized under class II. Comparison with eutrophic status related to chlorophyll-a concentration, indicated that the lake appears to be on mesotrophic condition. In general, water quality indicators varied temporally and spatially in waters of Tirana Lake.

  4. Rapid and highly variable warming of lake surface waters around the globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Catherine; Sharma, Sapna; Gray, Derek; Hampton, Stephanie; Read, Jordan S.; Rowley, Rex J.; Schneider, Philipp; Lenters, John D.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Kraemer, Benjamin M.; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Straile, Dietmar; Dong, Bo; Adrian, Rita; Allan, Mathew G.; Anneville, Orlane; Arvola, Lauri; Austin, Jay; Bailey, John L.; Baron, Jill S.; Brookes, Justin D; de Eyto, Elvira; Dokulil, Martin T.; Hamilton, David P.; Havens, Karl; Hetherington, Amy L.; Higgins, Scott N.; Hook, Simon; Izmest'eva, Lyubov R.; Jöhnk, Klaus D.; Kangur, Külli; Kasprzak, Peter; Kumagai, Michio; Kuusisto, Esko; Leshkevich, George; Livingstone, David M.; MacIntyre, Sally; May, Linda; Melack, John M.; Mueller-Navara, Doerthe C.; Naumenko, Mikhail; Noges, Peeter; Noges, Tiina; North, Ryan P.; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Rigosi, Anna; Rimmer, Alon; Rogora, Michela; Rudstam, Lars G.; Rusak, James A.; Salmaso, Nico; Samal, Nihar R.; Schindler, Daniel E.; Schladow, Geoffrey; Schmid, Martin; Schmidt, Silke R.; Silow, Eugene A.; Soylu, M. Evren; Teubner, Katrin; Verburg, Piet; Voutilainen, Ari; Watkinson, Andrew; Williamson, Craig E.; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    In this first worldwide synthesis of in situ and satellite-derived lake data, we find that lake summer surface water temperatures rose rapidly (global mean = 0.34°C decade−1) between 1985 and 2009. Our analyses show that surface water warming rates are dependent on combinations of climate and local characteristics, rather than just lake location, leading to the counterintuitive result that regional consistency in lake warming is the exception, rather than the rule. The most rapidly warming lakes are widely geographically distributed, and their warming is associated with interactions among different climatic factors—from seasonally ice-covered lakes in areas where temperature and solar radiation are increasing while cloud cover is diminishing (0.72°C decade−1) to ice-free lakes experiencing increases in air temperature and solar radiation (0.53°C decade−1). The pervasive and rapid warming observed here signals the urgent need to incorporate climate impacts into vulnerability assessments and adaptation efforts for lakes.

  5. Spatial Variation of P and N in Water and Sediments of Dianchi Lake, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Jun-Jie; YANG Hao; GAO Li; YU Tian-Ying

    2005-01-01

    Dianchi Lake is one of the most eutrophic lakes in China. In order to understand this eutrophication and to help control the pollution, this research investigated the spatial distribution of Kjeldahl nitrogen (K-N) and total phosphorus(TP) through analysis of bottom water and sediment (3 depths) samples collected at 118 sites around Dianchi Lake. The concentrations of K-N and TP for the lake bottom water in the Caohai part of the lake were much higher than those in the Waihai part, generally decreasing from north to south. In the sediments, the K-N concentration was higher in the Caohai part and the middle of the Waihai part. On the other hand, TP in the sediments was greater in the southern and western parts. Both K-N and TP had similar spatial distributions for the sediment samples of three different depths.Vertically, the K-N and TP concentration in the sediments decreased with an increase in depth. This was evidence that eutrophication and pollution of Dianchi Lake was becoming gradually more severe. Exterior factors including uncontrolled input of domestic and industrial effluents as well as non-point pollution around the lake were the main reasons for serious eutrophication; therefore, controlling these was the first step in reducing eutrophication of Dianchi Lake.

  6. Spatiotemporal Variability of Lake Water Quality in the Context of Remote Sensing Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly Hyatt Hansen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates a number of methods for using field sampling and observed lake characteristics and patterns to improve techniques for development of algae remote sensing models and applications. As satellite and airborne sensors improve and their data are more readily available, applications of models to estimate water quality via remote sensing are becoming more practical for local water quality monitoring, particularly of surface algal conditions. Despite the increasing number of applications, there are significant concerns associated with remote sensing model development and application, several of which are addressed in this study. These concerns include: (1 selecting sensors which are suitable for the spatial and temporal variability in the water body; (2 determining appropriate uses of near-coincident data in empirical model calibration; and (3 recognizing potential limitations of remote sensing measurements which are biased toward surface and near-surface conditions. We address these issues in three lakes in the Great Salt Lake surface water system (namely the Great Salt Lake, Farmington Bay, and Utah Lake through sampling at scales that are representative of commonly used sensors, repeated sampling, and sampling at both near-surface depths and throughout the water column. The variability across distances representative of the spatial resolutions of Landsat, SENTINEL-2 and MODIS sensors suggests that these sensors are appropriate for this lake system. We also use observed temporal variability in the system to evaluate sensors. These relationships proved to be complex, and observed temporal variability indicates the revisit time of Landsat may be problematic for detecting short events in some lakes, while it may be sufficient for other areas of the system with lower short-term variability. Temporal variability patterns in these lakes are also used to assess near-coincident data in empirical model development. Finally, relationships

  7. 77 FR 13496 - Effective Date for the Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes and Flowing Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 131 RIN 2040-AF36 Effective Date for the Water Quality Standards for the State of... of the March 6, 2012 effective date of the ``Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Lakes...? Citizens concerned with water quality in Florida may be interested in this rulemaking. Entities...

  8. Isotopic Estimation of Water Balance and Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions of Tropical Wetland Lakes in the Pantanal, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, J.; Johnson, M. S.; Weiler, M.; Couto, E. G.

    2009-12-01

    The Pantanal is the largest and most pristine wetland of the world, yet hydrological research there is still in its infancy. In particular the water balance of the millions of lakes and ponds and their interaction with the groundwater and the rivers are not known. The aim of this study was to assess the hydrological behaviour between different water bodies in the dry season of the northern Pantanal wetland, Brazil, to provide a more general understanding of the hydrological functioning of tropical floodplain lakes and surface water-groundwater interactions of wetlands. In the field 6-9 water sample of seven different lakes were taken during 3 months and were analyzed for stable water isotopes and chloride. In addition meteorological data from a nearby station was used to estimate daily evaporation from the water surface. This information was then used to predict the hydrological dynamics to determine whether the lakes are evaporation-controlled or throughflow-dominated systems. A chloride mass balance served to evaluate whether Cl- enrichment took place due to evaporation only, or whether the system has significant inflow and/or outflow rates. The results of those methods showed that for all lakes the water budget in the dry season, output was controlled by strong evaporation while significant inflow rates were also apparent. Inflow rates and their specific concentrations in stable isotopes and chloride were successfully estimated using the simple mass balance model MINA TrêS. This approach enabled us to calculate the water balance for the lakes as well as providing an information on source water flowing into the lakes.

  9. Air-Water Exchange of Legacy and Emerging Organic Pollutants across the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, R.; Ruge, Z.; Khairy, M.; Muir, D.; Helm, P.

    2014-12-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are transported to great water bodies via long-range atmospheric transport and released from the surface water as air concentrations continue to diminish. As the largest fresh water bodies in North America, the Great Lakes have both the potential to accumulate and serve as a secondary source of persistent bioaccumulative toxins. OCP and PCB concentrations were sampled at 30+ sites across Lake Superior, Ontario and Erie in the summer of 2011. Polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were simultaneously deployed in surface water and near surface atmosphere to determine air-water gaseous exchange of OCPs and PCBs. In Lake Superior, surface water and atmospheric concentrations were dominated by α-HCH (average 250 pg/L and 4.2 pg/m3, respectively), followed by HCB (average 17 pg/L and 89 pg/m3, respectively). Air-water exchange varied greatly between sites and individual OCPs, however α-endosulfan was consistently deposited into the surface water (average 19 pg/m2/day). PCBs in the air and water were characterized by penta- and hexachlorobiphenyls with distribution along the coast correlated with proximity to developed areas. Air-water exchange gradients generally yielded net volatilization of PCBs out of Lake Superior. Gaseous concentrations of hexachlorobenzene, dieldrin and chlordanes were significantly higher (p population data was used to explain variability in the atmospheric concentrations. Results indicated that landuse (urban and/or cropland) greatly explained the variability in the data. Freely dissolved concentrations of OCPs (human health from the consumption of fish. Spatial distributions of freely dissolved OCPs in Lakes Erie and Ontario were influenced by loadings from areas of concern and the water circulation patterns. Air-water exchange calculations indicated that the majority of OCPs were volatilizing from the water; therefore the lower Great Lakes were acting as a secondary source to

  10. Simulation and assessment of groundwater flow and groundwater and surface-water exchanges in lakes of the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2003 through 2013: Chapter B of Water levels and groundwater and surface-water exchanges in lakes of the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Perry M.; Roth, Jason L.; Trost, Jared J.; Christenson, Catherine A.; Diekoff, Aliesha L.; Erickson, Melinda L.

    2017-09-05

    Water levels during 2003 through 2013 were less than mean water levels for the period 1925–2013 for several lakes in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area in Minnesota. Previous periods of low lake-water levels generally were correlated with periods with less than mean precipitation. Increases in groundwater withdrawals and land-use changes have brought into question whether or not recent (2003–13) lake-water-level declines are solely caused by decreases in precipitation. A thorough understanding of groundwater and surface-water exchanges was needed to assess the effect of water-management decisions on lake-water levels. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Metropolitan Council and the Minnesota Department of Health, developed and calibrated a three-dimensional, steady-state groundwater-flow model representing 2003–13 mean hydrologic conditions to assess groundwater and lake-water exchanges, and the effects of groundwater withdrawals and precipitation on water levels of 96 lakes in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area.Lake-water budgets for the calibrated groundwater-flow model indicated that groundwater is flowing into lakes in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area and lakes are providing water to underlying aquifers. Lake-water outflow to the simulated groundwater system was a major outflow component for Big Marine Lake, Lake Elmo, Snail Lake, and White Bear Lake, accounting for 45 to 64 percent of the total outflows from the lakes. Evaporation and transpiration from the lake surface ranged from 19 to 52 percent of the total outflow from the four lakes. Groundwater withdrawals and precipitation were varied from the 2003‒13 mean values used in the calibrated model (30-percent changes in groundwater withdrawals and 5-percent changes in precipitation) for hypothetical scenarios to assess the effects of groundwater withdrawals and precipitation on water budgets and levels in Big Marine Lake, Snail Lake

  11. Water quality and water pollution sources in Poyang lake, China; Poyang ko ni okeru suishitsu chosa to odakugen kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, M. [Shin-Nippon Meteorological and Oceanographical Consultant Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-01-10

    This paper summarizes the current status of water quality and pollution sources in Poyang Lake in China. The lake is located in Chianghsi Province of China, and a largest fresh water lake in China that flows out into the Yangtze river. The basin is surrounded by mountains on three sides and faces the Yangtze on one side, whereas the plains formed by the lake and the rivers flowing in extends in the center of the basin. The plains around the lake has the city of Nanchang, the capital of the province, the city of Jiujiang (both cities have a population of about 4 million, respectively), and four other cities with a size of one million people including Jingdezhen. Water supply system in the basin is used in a 37% area of the urban areas, and no sewage facilities of whatsoever are available as of 1991. The lake has COD of about 3 mg{times}1/l. No severe pollution by organic matters is seen. While the T-P concentration is at a high level, PO4-P is low. Majority of phosphorus flowing into the basin exists in the form trapped in soil particles. In order to maintain the current water quality in the future, waste water treatment is required in the basin. Construction of an oxidation pond in the vast land exposed during the drought period is a measure that can be tackled relatively easily. 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  12. Polycyclic Musks in the Air and Water of the Lower Great Lakes: Spatial Distribution and Volatilization from Surface Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Carrie A; Helm, Paul A; Muir, Derek; Puggioni, Gavino; Lohmann, Rainer

    2016-11-01

    Polycyclic musks (PCMs) are synthetic fragrance compounds used in personal care products and household cleaners. Previous studies have indicated that PCMs are introduced to aquatic environments via wastewater and river discharge. Polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were deployed in air and water during winter 2011 and summer 2012 to investigate the role of population centers as sources of these contaminants to the Great Lakes and determine whether the lakes were acting as sources of PCMs via volatilization. Average gaseous Σ5PCM ranged from below detection limits (Lake Erie in Toledo. Average dissolved Σ5PCM ranged from Lake Ontario near the mouth of the Oswego River. Significant correlations were observed between population density and Σ5PCM in both air and water, with strongest correlations within a 25 and 40 km radius, respectively. At sites where HHCB was detected it was generally volatilizing, while the direction of AHTN air-water exchange was variable. Volatilization fluxes of HHCB ranged from 11 ± 6 to 341 ± 127 ng/m(2)/day, while air-water exchange fluxes of AHTN ranged from -3 ± 2 to 28 ± 10 ng/m(2)/day. Extrapolation of average air-water exchange flux values over the surface area of the lakes' coastal boundary zone suggested volatilization may be responsible for the loss of 64-213 kg/year of dissolved Σ5PCM from the lakes.

  13. Comparison of MTI Water Temperatures with Ground Truth Measurements at Crater Lake, OR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurzeja, R.J.

    2002-12-09

    Water surface temperatures calculated with the Los Alamos National Laboratory Robust algorithm were compared with ground truth water temperature measurements near the Oregon State University buoy in Crater Lake, OR. Bulk water measurements at the OSU buoy were corrected for the skin temperature depression and temperature gradient in the top 10 cm of the water to find the water surface temperature for 18 MTI images for June 2000 to Feb 2002. The MTI robust temperatures were found to be biased by 0.1C, with an RMS error of 1.9C compared with the ground truth water surface temperatures. When corrected for the errors in the buoy temperatures the RMS was reduced to 1.3C. This RMS difference is greater than the 1C found at the Pacific Island of Nauru because of the greater variability in the lake temperature and the atmosphere at Crater Lake and the much smaller target area used in the comparison.

  14. ANALYSIS OF WATER QUALITY IN SHALLOW LAKES WITH A TWO-DIMENSIONAL FLOW-SEDIMENT MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The governing equation for sediment pollutions was derived based on the turbulent diffusion of pollutants in shallow lakes. Coupled with shallow water equations, a depth-averaged 2-D flow and water quality model was developed. By means of the conservation law, a proposed differential equation for the change of sediment pollutants was linked to the 2-D equations. Under the framework of the finite volume method, the Osher approximate Riemann solver was employed to solve the equations. An analytical resolution was used to examine the model capabilities. Simulated results matched the exact solutions especially well. As an example, the simulation of CODMn in the Wuli Lake, a part of the Taihu lake, was conducted, which led to reasonable results. This study provides a new approach and a practical tool for the simulation of flow and water quality in shallow lakes.

  15. Microbial community-level toxicity testing of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates in aquatic microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Kristian K; Jørgensen, Niels O G; Nielsen, Tommy H; Winding, Anne

    2004-08-01

    Complex microbial communities may serve as ideal and ecologically relevant toxicity indicators. We here report an assessment of frequently used methods in microbial ecology for their feasibility to detect toxic effects of the environmentally important surfactant linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) on microbial communities in lake water and treated waste water. The two microbial communities were evaluated for changes in community structure and function over a period of 7 weeks in replicated aquatic microcosms amended with various levels of LAS (0, 0.1, 1, 10 or 100 mg l(-1)) and inorganic nutrients. In general, the two communities behaved similarly when challenged with LAS. Following lag periods of 1-3 weeks, LAS was degraded to non-toxic substances. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene fragments and [3H]leucine incorporation were the most sensitive assays with effect levels of 0-1 and 1-10 mg LAS l(-1), respectively. Community-level physiological profiles and pollution-induced community tolerance determinations using Biolog microplates demonstrated less sensitivity with effect levels of 10-100 mg LAS l(-1). Total cell counts and net uptake of inorganic N and P were unaffected even at 100 mg LAS l(-1). Interestingly, different microbial communities developed in some replicate microcosms, indicating the importance of stochastic events for community succession. We conclude that microbial community-level toxicity testing holds great promise and suggest a polyphasic approach involving a range of independent methods targeting both the structure and function of the tested microbial communities.

  16. Flood frequency matters: Why climate change degrades deep-water quality of peri-alpine lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Gabriel; Wessels, Martin; Wüest, Alfred

    2016-09-01

    Sediment-laden riverine floods transport large quantities of dissolved oxygen into the receiving deep layers of lakes. Hence, the water quality of deep lakes is strongly influenced by the frequency of riverine floods. Although flood frequency reflects climate conditions, the effects of climate variability on the water quality of deep lakes is largely unknown. We quantified the effects of climate variability on the potential shifts in the flood regime of the Alpine Rhine, the main catchment of Lake Constance, and determined the intrusion depths of riverine density-driven underflows and the subsequent effects on water exchange rates in the lake. A simplified hydrodynamic underflow model was developed and validated with observed river inflow and underflow events. The model was implemented to estimate underflow statistics for different river inflow scenarios. Using this approach, we integrated present and possible future flood frequencies to underflow occurrences and intrusion depths in Lake Constance. The results indicate that more floods will increase the number of underflows and the intensity of deep-water renewal - and consequently will cause higher deep-water dissolved oxygen concentrations. Vice versa, fewer floods weaken deep-water renewal and lead to lower deep-water dissolved oxygen concentrations. Meanwhile, a change from glacial nival regime (present) to a nival pluvial regime (future) is expected to decrease deep-water renewal. While flood frequencies are not expected to change noticeably for the next decades, it is most likely that increased winter discharge and decreased summer discharge will reduce the number of deep density-driven underflows by 10% and favour shallower riverine interflows in the upper hypolimnion. The renewal in the deepest layers is expected to be reduced by nearly 27%. This study underlines potential consequences of climate change on the occurrence of deep river underflows and water residence times in deep lakes.

  17. Analysing the temporal water quality dynamics of Lake Basaka, Central Rift Valley of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olumana Dinka, Megersa

    2017-01-01

    This study presents the general water quality status and temporal quality dynamics of Lake Basaka water in the past about 5 decades. Water samples were collected and analysed for important physico-chemical quality parameters following standard procedures. The result showed that Lake Basaka water is highly saline and alkaline and experiencing a general reducing trends in ionic concentrations of quality parameters due to the dilution effect. About 10-fold reduction of total ionic concentration occurred in the Lake over the period of 2 decades (1960-1980). There was a sharp and fast decline in EC, Cl, SO4, Na, and K ions from early 1960s up to the late 1980s, and then became relatively stable. Some ions (eg. Na, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO4) are showing increment in recent years. This characteristics of the lake water is terrible in relation to its potential to inundate the nearby areas in the near future. The expansion of such quality water has negative effects on the water resources of the region, especially soil quality, drainage and groundwater, in terms of salinity, sodicity and specific ion toxicity. The regimes of soil moisture, solute and groundwater could be affected, concurrently affecting the productivity and sustainability of the sugar estate. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify the potential sources of water and chemicals to the lake and devise an appropriate mitigation and/or remedial measures.

  18. Recent reduction in the water level of Lake Victoria has created more habitats for Anopheles funestus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futami Kyoko

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The water level of Lake Victoria has fallen more than 1.5 m since 1998, revealing a narrow strip of land along the shore. This study determined whether the recent drop in the water level has created additional breeding grounds for malaria vectors. Methods The recent and past shorelines were estimated using landmarks and a satellite image. The locations of breeding habitats were recorded using a GPS unit during the high and low lake water periods. GIS was used to determine whether the breeding habitats were located on newly emerged land between the new and old shorelines. Results Over half of the breeding habitats existed on newly emerged land. Fewer habitats for the Anopheles gambiae complex were found during the low water level period compared to the high water period. However, more habitats for Anopheles funestus were found during the high water level period, and they were all located on the newly emerged land. Conclusion The recent reduction in water level of Lake Victoria has increased the amount of available habitat for A. funestus. The results suggest that the water drop has substantially affected the population of this malaria vector in the Lake Victoria basin, particularly because the lake has a long shoreline that may harbour many new breeding habitats.

  19. The Water Level Fall of Lake Megali Prespa (N Greece): an Indicator of Regional Water Stress Driven by Climate Change and Amplified by Water Extraction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schriek, Tim; Giannakopoulos, Christos

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean stands out globally due to its sensitivity to (future) climate change, with future projections predicting an increase in excessive drought events and declining rainfall. Regional freshwater ecosystems are particularly threatened: precipitation decreases, while extreme droughts increase and human impacts intensify (e.g. water extraction, drainage, pollution and dam-building). Many Mediterranean lake-wetland systems have shrunk or disappeared over the past two decades. Protecting the remaining systems is extremely important for supporting global biodiversity and for ensuring sustainable water availability. This protection should be based on a clear understanding of lake-wetland hydrological responses to natural and human-induced changes, which is currently lacking in many parts of the Mediterranean. The interconnected Prespa-Ohrid Lake system is a global hotspot of biodiversity and endemism. The unprecedented fall in water level (~8m) of Lake Megali Prespa threatens this system, but causes remain debated. Modelling suggests that the S Balkan will experience rainfall and runoff decreases of ~30% by 2050. However, projections revealing the potential impact of these changes on future lake level are unavailable as lake regime is not understood. A further drop in lake level may have serious consequences. The Prespa Lakes contribute ~25% of the total inflow into Lake Ohrid through underground karst channels; falling lake levels decrease this discharge. Lake Ohrid, in turn, feeds the Drim River. This entire catchment may therefore be affected by falling lake levels; its water resources are of great importance for Greece, Albania, FYROM and Montenegro (e.g. tourism, agriculture, hydro-energy, urban & industrial use). This new work proves that annual water level fluctuations of Lake Megali Prespa are predominantly related to precipitation during the first 7 months (Oct-Apr) of the hydrological year (Oct-Sep). Lake level is very sensitive to regional and

  20. Wintertime storage of water in buried supraglacial lakes across the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Koenig

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface melt over the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS is increasing and estimated to account for half or more of the total mass loss. Little, however, is known about the hydrologic pathways that route surface melt within the ice sheet. In this study, we present over-winter storage of water in buried supraglacial lakes as one hydrologic pathway for surface melt, referred to as buried lakes. Airborne radar echograms are used to detect the buried lakes that are distributed extensively around the margin of the GrIS. The subsurface water can persist through multiple winters and is, on average, ~4.2 + 0.4 m below the surface. The few buried lakes that are visible at the surface of the GrIS have a~unique visible signature associated with a darker blue color where subsurface water is located. The volume of retained water in the buried lakes is likely insignificant compared to the total mass loss from the GrIS but the water will have important implications locally for the development of the englacial hydrologic network, ice temperature profiles and glacial dynamics. The buried lakes represent a small but year-round source of meltwater in the GrIS hydrologic system.

  1. Tectonic, climatic and hydrothermal control on sedimentation and water chemistry of northern Lake Malawi (Nyasa), Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchu, Philippe; Bergonzini, Laurent; Delvaux, Damien; De Batist, Marc; Golubev, Vladimir; Benedetti, Marc; Klerkx, Jean

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a multi-disciplinary characterisation of processes that influence sedimentation and lake water chemistry in the northern part of the Lake Malawi (or Lake Nyasa), East Africa. This characterisation is based on geophysical (heat-flow), tectonic, hydrological, hydrochemical (major elements, stable isotopes) and sedimentological (seismic profiles, core mineralogy) studies of data acquired from 1990 to 1994 during the CASIMIR project (Comparative Analysis of Sedimentary Infill Mechanisms in Rifts). Sub-surface activity is expressed through seismic and volcanic activity, as well as elevated heat-flow values, both beneath the lake and the surrounding area; hydrothermal activity is observed in the watershed however it was not clearly identified in the sub-lacustrine environment. Relatively high heat-flow values (80-90 mW/m 2) and the chemical composition of hydrothermal fluids in hot springs suggest the presence of a magmatic body at depth. The influence of Quaternary tectonic activity on sedimentary dynamics and infilling is observed not only on land but also in the lake through high-resolution seismic profiles. The main feature is a general tilting of the Kyela Plain as shown by a shift in the river course. The Quaternary stacking pattern of seven sedimentary sequences identified on a grid of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles represents a complete long-term lake-level cycle, from a lake lowstand at about 320 m below the present level to the present-day lake highstand. The North-Kiwira and Songwe River delta systems, composed of a number of stacked lobes, were developed in response to the interplay between gradual lake-level rise, tectonic movement and sediment input. The river dynamics is also recorded in a short core by a mineralogical evolution probably due to a decrease of detrital inputs from the Songwe River in response to hydroclimatic changes. Such changes are very important as this northern part of the watershed is considered as a

  2. Effects of sorption, sulphate reduction, and Phragmites australis on the removal of heavy metals in subsurface flow constructed wetland microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, E; Rousseau, D P L; Van de Moortel, A; Tack, F M G; De Pauw, N; Verloo, M G

    2007-01-01

    The removal of Co, Ni, Cu and Zn from synthetic industrial wastewater was studied in subsurface flow constructed wetland microcosms filled with gravel or a gravel/straw mixture. Half of the microcosms were planted with Phragmites australis and half were left unplanted. All microcosms received low-strength wastewater (1 mg L(-1) of Co, Ni, and Zn, 0.5 mg L(-1) Cu, 2,000mg L(-1) SO4) during seven 14-day incubation batches. The pore water was regularly monitored at two depths for heavy metals, sulphate, organic carbon and redox potential. Sorption properties of gravel and straw were assessed in a separate experiment. A second series of seven incubation batches with high-strength wastewater (10 mg L(-1) of each metal, 2,000 mg L(-1) SO4) was then applied to saturate the substrate. Glucose was added to the gravel microcosms together with the high-strength wastewater. Sorption processes were responsible for metal removal during start-up, with the highest removal efficiencies in the gravel microcosms. The lower initial efficiencies in the gravel/straw microcosms were presumably caused by the decomposition of straw. However, after establishment of anaerobic conditions (Eh approximately -200 mV), precipitation as metal sulphides provided an additional removal pathway in the gravel/straw microcosms. The addition of glucose to gravel microcosms enhanced sulphate reduction and metal removal, although Phragmites australis negatively affected these processes in the top-layer of all microcosms.

  3. Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuefer, Svetlana

    2013-03-31

    This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska's oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near‐surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow‐control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009

  4. Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuefer, Svetlana

    2013-03-31

    This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska's oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near‐surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow‐control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009

  5. Water Management Planning Study: Wapato Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has recently acquired the Wapato Lake bed and surrounding land located in Washington and Yamhill Counties, Oregon, with...

  6. The effects of the environment and ecology projects on lake management and water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Cengiz

    2008-11-01

    In this study, the characteristics, benefits, and effects of the environment and ecology project, which has been implemented in Turkey for the first time to restore the natural life that has been spoilt and the ecological balance of Lake Bafa located in Great Meander Basin, are searched. Moreover, the water samples taken from the stations that were spotted in the lake have been analyzed for the physical and chemical changes taking place in water quality before and after the project. The water cycle occurring as a result of giving water that was raised in Great Meander River by the Rubber regulator, which is the most important element of the project, through the Serçin inlet and feeder channel; and draining the saline and low-quality water to the river bed of the Great Meander, will improve the water quality, the natural life, and the ecological balance of the lake in time. Thanks to the water given to the lake within the scope of project, the salinity of the lake water decreased from 25,500 to 22,500 mmhos cm( - 1). The electrical conductivity, Na+, Mg+2, Ca+2, Cl(-), CO3(-2), HCO3(-), and the amount of the organic substances were found as over the appropriate values for fishery. Besides, the decreases in the amounts of NO3(-), HN3(-) and PO4(-3) affect the living beings in the lake negatively. In addition, the measures to take are specified, so that the natural life of the Lake and the ecological balance can renew themselves within a short time.

  7. Water quality of two glacial alpine Italian lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelano, Vincenzo; Zambrotta, Maria; Defilippi, Albino; Torazzo, Annamaria

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize, in a period of one year, two glacial lakes, Alice and Meugliano, located in an alpine reservoir on the basis of physical and chemical features. The two lakes show two periods of mixing: one in the spring and one in the autumn, so can be classified as dimictic lakes. They are characterized by pH, alkalinity, low conductivity and and quite dilute ionic concentrations. With regard to nutrients, most nitrogen occurred in the nitric form in the superficial layers. During the period of thermal stratification, in the anoxic layer NO3- decreases and NH4+ increases, confirming the activity of the anaerobic denitrificant bacteria. Total and soluble phosphorus levels show homogeneity during the cold period at different depths, while with stratification concentrations increase in the hypolimnium and metalimnium. In both lakes there is an inverse correlation between transparency and chlorophyll a. To evaluate the trophic state the conventional criteria of Nurnberg 2 and four lake trophic indices (TSIs) are used. Both evaluations suggest that the two lakes are eutrophic, with worse conditions in Alice. Deviations of the trophic states, based on the relation between TSIs, indicate that factors other than phosphorous limit the algal biomass, and that non-algal particles influence light attenuation

  8. Lake Diefenbaker: Water Quality Assessment and Modeling for Management under Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereda, J.; Wheater, H. S.; Hudson, J.; Doig, L.; Liber, K.; Jones, P.; Giesy, J.; Bharadwaj, L.

    2011-12-01

    Preliminary results are presented for a comprehensive inter-disciplinary study on Lake Diefenbaker initiated by the Global Institute for Water Security to understand the physical and biogeochemical processes affecting water quality under climate change and their policy implications. Lake Diefenbaker is a large reservoir (surface area ~500km2 and Zmean ~33m) located in Southern Saskatchewan, Canada and is a critically-important water resource for Saskatchewan. It receives nearly all of its flow from the South Saskatchewan River, which flows through some of the most urbanized and intense agricultural lands of southern Alberta. As a result these waters contain high levels of nutrients [nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)] along with a variety of chemical contaminants characteristic of anthropogenic activity. In addition, riparian and in-lake activities provide local sources of nutrients, from domestic sewage, agriculture and fish farming. The South Saskatchewan River has been identified by the World Wildlife Fund (2009) as Canada's most threatened river in terms of environmental flow. Lake Diefenbaker has numerous large deep embayments (depth >20m) and an annual water level fluctuation of ~6m. A deep thermocline (~25m) forms infrequently. Stratification does not occur throughout the lake. Anecdotal information suggests that the frequency and severity of algal blooms are increasing; although blooms have been sporadic and localized. This localized eutrophication may be related to local stratification patterns, point source nutrient loading, and/or internal lake processes (i.e., internal nutrient loading). A paleolimnological reconstruction has begun to assess historical nutrient and contaminant loading to Lake Diefenbaker and hence the trajectory of water quality in the lake. Major point sources and diffuse sources of N and P are also under investigation. In addition, the type (N versus P) and degree of nutrient limitation of bacteria and algae are being assessed (spatially

  9. A hydrological simulation of the water regime in two playa lakes located in southern Spain

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez Miguel; Schilling Malte

    2014-08-01

    The subject of this paper is the detailed hydrological simulation of two playa lakes located in southern Spain from January 2011 to March 2012 on a daily basis. These playas are placed over a 400-km2 shallow aquifer, which is exposed to an increasing stress caused by agricultural activities, mainly olive grove plantations. The objective of the paper is to elaborate a detailed numeric model that simulates the water regime of each playa lake on a daily scale. The simulation is compared to measured water level (WL) data of the playas in order to characterize the groundwater–surface interactions. The ultimate objective of this paper is to assess the environmental impact of the increasing anthropogenic water consumption within the area of research. The results of the GW–surface interaction were very consistent with previous works. One of the playa lakes is groundwater-dependent and the other one is presumably a perched playa lake. The GW discharge of the former playa (214 mm) during the research period stands in sharp contrast to no regional GW discharge in the latter. Water level data prove that the hydrological year (2011–2012) had a very negative water budget. The evapotranspiration estimation was almost as high as double the sum of the precipitation, the runoff, and the groundwater discharge. The simulation of an anthropologically altered water regime proves that water retrieval has a harmful impact on the WL of the playa lakes as well as on the aquifer.

  10. Exploratory normalized difference water indices for semi-automated extraction of Antarctic lake features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawak, Shridhar D.; Luis, Alvarinho J.

    2016-05-01

    This work presents various normalized difference water indices (NDWI) to delineate lakes from Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica, by using a very high resolution WorldView-2 (WV-2) satellite imagery. Schirmacher oasis region hosts a number of fresh as well as saline water lakes, such as epishelf lakes, ice-free or landlocked lakes, which are completely frozen or semi-frozen and in a ice-free state. Hence, detecting all these types of lakes distinctly on satellite imagery was the major challenge, as the spectral characteristics of various types of lakes were identical to the other land cover targets. Multiband spectral index pixel-based approach is most experimented and recently growing technique because of its unbeatable advantages such as its simplicity and comparatively lesser amount of processing-time. In present study, semiautomatic extraction of lakes in cryospheric region was carried out by designing specific spectral indices. The study utilized number of existing spectral indices to extract lakes but none could deliver satisfactory results and hence we modified NDWI. The potentials of newly added bands in WV-2 satellite imagery was explored by developing spectral indices comprising of Yellow (585 - 625 nm) band, in combination with Blue (450 - 510 nm), Coastal (400 - 450 nm) and Green (510 - 580 nm) bands. For extraction of frozen lakes, use of Yellow (585 - 625 nm) and near-infrared 2 (NIR2) band pair, and Yellow and Green band pair worked well, whereas for ice-free lakes extraction, a combination of Blue and Coastal band yielded appreciable results, when compared with manually digitized data. The results suggest that the modified NDWI approach rendered bias error varying from 1 to 34 m2.

  11. Water-saving interventions assessment framework: an application for the Urmia Lake Restoration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadkam, Somayeh; Oel, Pieter; Kabat, Pavel; Ludwig, Fulco

    2017-04-01

    Increasing water demand often results in unsustainable water use leaving insufficient amounts of water for sustaining natural environments. Therefore, to save natural resources water-saving interventions have been introduced to the environmental policy agenda in many (semi)-arid regions. Many policies, however, have failed reaching their objectives to increase water availability for the environment. This calls for a comprehensive tool to assess water-saving policies. Therefore, this study introduces a constructive framework to assess the policies by estimating five components: 1) Total water demand under socio-economic scenarios, 2) Water supply under climate change scenarios, 3) Water withdrawal for different sectors, 4) Water depletion and 5) Environmental flow. The framework, was applied to assess Urmia Lake Restoration Program (ULRP), which aims to restore the drying Urmia Lake in north-western Iran by increasing the lake inflow by 3.1×106m3yr-1. Results suggest that although the ULRP helps to increase inflow by up to 57% it is unlikely to fully reach its target. The analysis shows that there are three main reasons for the potential poor performance. The first reason is decreasing return flows due to increasing irrigation efficiency. This means that the expected increase in lake inflow volume is smaller than the volume saved by increasing irrigation efficiency. The second reason is increased depletion which is due to neglecting the fact that agricultural water demand is currently higher than available water for agriculture. As a result, increasing water use efficiency may result in increased water depletion. The third reason is ignoring the potential impact of climate change, which might decrease future water availability by 3% to 15%. Our analysis suggests that to reach the intervention target, measures need to focus on reducing Water demand and Water depletion rather than on reducing Water withdrawals. The assessment framework can be used to comprehensively

  12. EFFECT OF SANTA ROSA LAKE ON GROUND WATER FLOW TO THE PECOS RIVER, NEW MEXICO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Dennis W.

    1985-01-01

    In 1980, Santa Rosa Dam began impounding water on the Pecos River about 7 miles (11 kilometers) north of Santa Rosa, New Mexico, to provide flood control and storage for irrigation. Santa Rosa Lake has caused changes in the ground water flow system, which may cause changes in the streamflow of the Pecos River that cannot be detected at the present streamflow-gaging stations, which are used to administer water rights along the Pecos River. The effect of the lake on streamflow was investigated using a three-dimensional ground water flow model. These simulations indicated that the net change in ground water flow to the river would be almost zero if the lake were maintained at its flood control pool for 90 days.

  13. A Spaceborne Multisensory, Multitemporal Approach to Monitor Water Level and Storage Variations of Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Taravat

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lake Urmia, the second largest saline Lake on earth and a highly endangered ecosystem, is on the brink of a serious environmental disaster similar to the catastrophic death of the Aral Sea. Progressive drying has been observed during the last decade, causing dramatic changes to Lake Urmia’s surface and its regional water supplies. The present study aims to improve monitoring of spatiotemporal changes of Lake Urmia in the period 1975–2015 using the multi-temporal satellite altimetry and Landsat (5-TM, 7-ETM+ and 8-OLI images. In order to demonstrate the impacts of climate change and human pressure on the variations in surface extent and water level, Lake Sevan and Van Lake with different characteristics were studied along with the Urmia Lake. Normalized Difference Water Index-Principal Components Index (NDWI-PCs, Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI, Modified NDWI (MNDWI, Normalized Difference Moisture Index (NDMI, Water Ratio Index (WRI, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, Automated Water Extraction Index (AWEI, and MultiLayer Perceptron Neural Networks (MLP NNs classifier were investigated for the extraction of surface water from Landsat data. The presented results revealed that MLP NNs has a better performance in the cases where the other models generate poor accuracy. The results show that the area of Lake Sevan and Van Lake have increased while the area of Lake Urmia has decreased by ~65.23% in the past decades, far more than previously reported (~25% to 50%. Urmia Lake’s shoreline has been receding severely between 2010 and 2015 with no sign of recovery, which has been partly blamed on prolonged droughts, aggressive regional water resources development plans, intensive agricultural activities, and anthropogenic changes to the system. The results also indicated that (among the proposed factors changes in inflows due to overuse of surface water resources and constructing dams (mostly during 1995–2005 are the main reasons

  14. Accurate Linking of Lake Erie Water Level with Shoreline Datum Using GPS Buoy and Satellite Altimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chien Cheng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to accurately link the water level to the shoreline vertical datum for various applications including coastal management, lake/river/estuary/wetland hydrological or storm surge modeling/forecasting. Coastal topography is historically surveyed and referenced to the predetermined vertical datum in terms of orthometric heights, or the heights above the geoid, which is poorly known in terms of accuracy and lack of adequate spatial resolution for coastal applications such as estuary or storm surge modeling. We demonstrate an accurate linking of the lake surface to a shoreline datum using satellite techniques, including GPS buoy and satellite altimetry, water level gauges, and local geoid and lake circulation models. The possible error sources are analyzed and an error budget is reported in this study. An innovated method to estimate geoid height near the water level gauge using a GPS buoy is proposed. It is found that at a 95% confidence interval, the method is consistent with the National Geodetic Survey GEOID03 geoid model. The lake surface represented using a lake circulation model provided by the Great Lakes Forecasting Systems is also verified with kriging based on the data (1999 - 2001 from the water level gauge, and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter. Mean discrepancies of 2.7 and 7.2 cm are found with the data from the gauges around Lake Erie, and from the combination of the gauges and the altimeter, respectively. It reveals that the current dominant limitation of more accurate linking of water surface to shoreline is the insufficient knowledge of geoid in the current models. Further improvement is feasible through more accurate and higher resolution modeling of the lake geoid.

  15. Regional economic impacts of water management alternatives: the case of Devils Lake, North Dakota, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistritz, F Larry; Leitch, Jay A; Bangsund, Dean A

    2002-12-01

    Devils Lake, located in a closed basin in northeastern North Dakota has over a century-long history of highly fluctuating water levels. The lake has risen nearly 25 feet (7.7 m) since 1993, more than doubling its surface area. Rising water levels have affected rural lands, transportation routes, and communities near the lake. In response to rising lake levels, Federal, state and local agencies have adopted a three-part approach to flood damage reduction, consisting of (1) upper basin water management to reduce the amount of water reaching the lake, (2) protection for structures and infrastructure if the lake continues to rise, and (3) developing an emergency outlet to release some lake water. The purpose of this study was to provide information about the net regional economic effects of a proposed emergency outlet for Devils Lake. An input-output model was used to estimate the regional economic effects of the outlet, under two scenarios: (1) the most likely future situation (MLS) and (2) a best case situation (BCS) (i.e., where the benefits from the outlet would be greatest), albeit an unlikely one. Regional economic effects of the outlet include effects on transportation (road and railroad construction), agriculture (land kept in production, returned to production sooner, or kept in production longer), residential relocations, and outlet construction expenditures. Effects are measured as changes in gross business volume (gross receipts) for various sectors, secondary employment, and local tax collections. The net regional economic effects of the proposed outlet would be relatively small, and consideration of these economic impacts would not strengthen the case for an outlet.

  16. Improved prediction of vegetation composition in NW European softwater lakes by combining location, water and sediment chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulido Pérez, Cristina; Jensen, Kaj Sand; Lucassen, Esther C.H.E.T.;

    2012-01-01

    composition. This complex analysis can also account for high sediment variability in the littoral zone of individual lakes, by using site-specific physico-chemical sediment factors, and offer better predictions of vegetation composition when lake water chemistry is relatively homogeneous among lakes within...

  17. Comparison of surface water chemistry and weathering effects of two lake basins in the Changtang Nature Reserve, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Zhaofei; Jiang, Liguang; Yao, Zhijun; Wang, Junbo; Ju, Jianting

    2016-03-01

    The geochemistry of natural waters in the Changtang Nature Reserve, northern Tibet, can help us understand the geology of catchments, and provide additional insight in surface processes that influence water chemistry such as rock weathering on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. However, severe natural conditions are responsible for a lack of scientific data for this area. This study represents the first investigation of the chemical composition of surface waters and weathering effects in two lake basins in the reserve (Lake Dogaicoring Qiangco and Lake Longwei Co). The results indicate that total dissolved solids (TDS) in the two lakes are significantly higher than in other gauged lakes on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, reaching 20-40g/L, and that TDS of the tectonic lake (Lake Dogaicoring Qiangco) is significantly higher than that of the barrier lake (Lake Longwei Co). Na(+) and Cl(-) are the dominant ions in the lake waters as well as in the glacier-fed lake inflows, with chemical compositions mainly affected by halite weathering. In contrast, ion contents of inflowing rivers fed by nearby runoff are lower and concentrations of dominant ions are not significant. Evaporite, silicate, and carbonate weathering has relatively equal effects on these rivers. Due to their limited scope, small streams near the lakes are less affected by carbonate than by silicate weathering.

  18. Mercury in sediment, water, and fish in a managed tropical wetland-lake ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malczyk, Evan A; Branfireun, Brian A

    2015-08-15

    Mercury pollution has not been well documented in the inland lakes or fishes of Mexico, despite the importance of freshwater fish as a source of protein in local diets. Total mercury and methylmercury in waters, sediments, and the commercial fish catch were investigated in Lake Zapotlán, Mexico. Concentrations of total and methylmercury were very high in runoff and wastewater inputs, but very low in sediments and surface waters of the open water area of the lake. Concentrations of total mercury in tilapia and carp were very low, consistent with the low concentrations in lake water and sediments. Particle settling, sorption, the biogeochemical environment, and/or bloom dilution are all plausible explanations for the significant reductions in both total mercury and methylmercury. Despite very high loading of mercury, this shallow tropical lake was not a mercury-impaired ecosystem, and these findings may translate across other shallow, alkaline tropical lakes. Importantly, the ecosystem services that seemed to be provided by peripheral wetlands in reducing mercury inputs highlight the potential for wetland conservation or restoration in Mexico.

  19. Active subglacial lakes and channelized water flow beneath the Kamb Ice Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Hoon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Seo, Ki-Weon; Lee, Won Sang; Scambos, Ted

    2016-12-01

    We identify two previously unknown subglacial lakes beneath the stagnated trunk of the Kamb Ice Stream (KIS). Rapid fill-drain hydrologic events over several months are inferred from surface height changes measured by CryoSat-2 altimetry and indicate that the lakes are probably connected by a subglacial drainage network, whose structure is inferred from the regional hydraulic potential and probably links the lakes. The sequential fill-drain behavior of the subglacial lakes and concurrent rapid thinning in a channel-like topographic feature near the grounding line implies that the subglacial water repeatedly flows from the region above the trunk to the KIS grounding line and out beneath the Ross Ice Shelf. Ice shelf elevation near the hypothesized outlet is observed to decrease slowly during the study period. Our finding supports a previously published conceptual model of the KIS shutdown stemming from a transition from distributed flow to well-drained channelized flow of subglacial water. However, a water-piracy hypothesis in which the KIS subglacial water system is being starved by drainage in adjacent ice streams is also supported by the fact that the degree of KIS trunk subglacial lake activity is relatively weaker than those of the upstream lakes.

  20. Century-Long Warming Trends in the Upper Water Column of Lake Tanganyika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Benjamin M; Hook, Simon; Huttula, Timo; Kotilainen, Pekka; O'Reilly, Catherine M; Peltonen, Anu; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Sarvala, Jouko; Tamatamah, Rashid; Vadeboncoeur, Yvonne; Wehrli, Bernhard; McIntyre, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    Lake Tanganyika, the deepest and most voluminous lake in Africa, has warmed over the last century in response to climate change. Separate analyses of surface warming rates estimated from in situ instruments, satellites, and a paleolimnological temperature proxy (TEX86) disagree, leaving uncertainty about the thermal sensitivity of Lake Tanganyika to climate change. Here, we use a comprehensive database of in situ temperature data from the top 100 meters of the water column that span the lake's seasonal range and lateral extent to demonstrate that long-term temperature trends in Lake Tanganyika depend strongly on depth, season, and latitude. The observed spatiotemporal variation in surface warming rates accounts for small differences between warming rate estimates from in situ instruments and satellite data. However, after accounting for spatiotemporal variation in temperature and warming rates, the TEX86 paleolimnological proxy yields lower surface temperatures (1.46 °C lower on average) and faster warming rates (by a factor of three) than in situ measurements. Based on the ecology of Thaumarchaeota (the microbes whose biomolecules are involved with generating the TEX86 proxy), we offer a reinterpretation of the TEX86 data from Lake Tanganyika as the temperature of the low-oxygen zone, rather than of the lake surface temperature as has been suggested previously. Our analyses provide a thorough accounting of spatiotemporal variation in warming rates, offering strong evidence that thermal and ecological shifts observed in this massive tropical lake over the last century are robust and in step with global climate change.

  1. Long-term citizen-collected data reveal geographical patterns and temporal trends in lake water clarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lottig, Noah R; Wagner, Tyler; Norton Henry, Emily; Spence Cheruvelil, Kendra; Webster, Katherine E; Downing, John A; Stow, Craig A

    2014-01-01

    We compiled a lake-water clarity database using publically available, citizen volunteer observations made between 1938 and 2012 across eight states in the Upper Midwest, USA. Our objectives were to determine (1) whether temporal trends in lake-water clarity existed across this large geographic area and (2) whether trends were related to the lake-specific characteristics of latitude, lake size, or time period the lake was monitored. Our database consisted of >140,000 individual Secchi observations from 3,251 lakes that we summarized per lake-year, resulting in 21,020 summer averages. Using Bayesian hierarchical modeling, we found approximately a 1% per year increase in water clarity (quantified as Secchi depth) for the entire population of lakes. On an individual lake basis, 7% of lakes showed increased water clarity and 4% showed decreased clarity. Trend direction and strength were related to latitude and median sample date. Lakes in the southern part of our study-region had lower average annual summer water clarity, more negative long-term trends, and greater inter-annual variability in water clarity compared to northern lakes. Increasing trends were strongest for lakes with median sample dates earlier in the period of record (1938-2012). Our ability to identify specific mechanisms for these trends is currently hampered by the lack of a large, multi-thematic database of variables that drive water clarity (e.g., climate, land use/cover). Our results demonstrate, however, that citizen science can provide the critical monitoring data needed to address environmental questions at large spatial and long temporal scales. Collaborations among citizens, research scientists, and government agencies may be important for developing the data sources and analytical tools necessary to move toward an understanding of the factors influencing macro-scale patterns such as those shown here for lake water clarity.

  2. Long-term citizen-collected data reveal geographical patterns and temporal trends in lake water clarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lottig, Noah R.; Wagner, Tyler; Henry, Emily N.; Cheruvelil, Kendra Spence; Webster, Katherine E.; Downing, John A.; Stow, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    We compiled a lake-water clarity database using publically available, citizen volunteer observations made between 1938 and 2012 across eight states in the Upper Midwest, USA. Our objectives were to determine (1) whether temporal trends in lake-water clarity existed across this large geographic area and (2) whether trends were related to the lake-specific characteristics of latitude, lake size, or time period the lake was monitored. Our database consisted of >140,000 individual Secchi observations from 3,251 lakes that we summarized per lake-year, resulting in 21,020 summer averages. Using Bayesian hierarchical modeling, we found approximately a 1% per year increase in water clarity (quantified as Secchi depth) for the entire population of lakes. On an individual lake basis, 7% of lakes showed increased water clarity and 4% showed decreased clarity. Trend direction and strength were related to latitude and median sample date. Lakes in the southern part of our study-region had lower average annual summer water clarity, more negative long-term trends, and greater inter-annual variability in water clarity compared to northern lakes. Increasing trends were strongest for lakes with median sample dates earlier in the period of record (1938–2012). Our ability to identify specific mechanisms for these trends is currently hampered by the lack of a large, multi-thematic database of variables that drive water clarity (e.g., climate, land use/cover). Our results demonstrate, however, that citizen science can provide the critical monitoring data needed to address environmental questions at large spatial and long temporal scales. Collaborations among citizens, research scientists, and government agencies may be important for developing the data sources and analytical tools necessary to move toward an understanding of the factors influencing macro-scale patterns such as those shown here for lake water clarity.

  3. Long-term citizen-collected data reveal geographical patterns and temporal trends in lake water clarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah R Lottig

    Full Text Available We compiled a lake-water clarity database using publically available, citizen volunteer observations made between 1938 and 2012 across eight states in the Upper Midwest, USA. Our objectives were to determine (1 whether temporal trends in lake-water clarity existed across this large geographic area and (2 whether trends were related to the lake-specific characteristics of latitude, lake size, or time period the lake was monitored. Our database consisted of >140,000 individual Secchi observations from 3,251 lakes that we summarized per lake-year, resulting in 21,020 summer averages. Using Bayesian hierarchical modeling, we found approximately a 1% per year increase in water clarity (quantified as Secchi depth for the entire population of lakes. On an individual lake basis, 7% of lakes showed increased water clarity and 4% showed decreased clarity. Trend direction and strength were related to latitude and median sample date. Lakes in the southern part of our study-region had lower average annual summer water clarity, more negative long-term trends, and greater inter-annual variability in water clarity compared to northern lakes. Increasing trends were strongest for lakes with median sample dates earlier in the period of record (1938-2012. Our ability to identify specific mechanisms for these trends is currently hampered by the lack of a large, multi-thematic database of variables that drive water clarity (e.g., climate, land use/cover. Our results demonstrate, however, that citizen science can provide the critical monitoring data needed to address environmental questions at large spatial and long temporal scales. Collaborations among citizens, research scientists, and government agencies may be important for developing the data sources and analytical tools necessary to move toward an understanding of the factors influencing macro-scale patterns such as those shown here for lake water clarity.

  4. Satellite remote sensing of water turbidity in Alqueva reservoir and implications on lake modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Potes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The quality control and monitoring of surface freshwaters is crucial, since some of these water masses constitute essential renewable water resources for a variety of purposes. In addition, changes in the surface water composition may affect the physical properties of lake water, such as temperature, which in turn may impact the interactions of the water surface with the lower atmosphere.

    The use of satellite remote sensing to estimate the water turbidity of Alqueva reservoir, located in the south of Portugal, is explored. A validation study of the satellite derived water leaving spectral reflectance is firstly presented, using data taken during three field campaigns carried out during 2010 and early 2011. Secondly, an empirical algorithm to estimate lake water surface turbidity from the combination of in situ and satellite measurements is proposed. Finally, the importance of water turbidity on the surface energy balance is tested in the form of a study of the sensitivity of a lake model to the extinction coefficient of water (estimated from turbidity, showing that this is an important parameter that affects the lake surface temperature.

  5. Consideration of Water Uses for Its Sustainable Management, the Case of Issyk-Kul Lake, Kyrgyzstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burul Alymkulova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Water is an essential element for life, and development would not be possible without its availability. This study identified the main water consumers and their likely impact on water lake level for the case of Issyk-Kul Lake Basin, Kyrgyzstan. Data on precipitation, lake level, irrigation, household and industrial water consumption from 1980 to 2014 were provided by the Department of Water Resources and Irrigation, Ministry of Agriculture and Land Reclamation of the Kyrgyz Republic. The input data was analyzed with OriginPro 8.5 for Statistical Analysis. The results indicated a decreasing irrigation water consumption from 2029.42 to 461.76 million·m3 in 1980 and 2014, respectively. Likewise, households consumed 27.02 million·m3 in 1980 falling to 16.55 million·m3 in 2014, similar to the manufacture’s water consumption. However, it was noted that agriculture is a high water consumer, whose water demand for irrigation rises from April to August, the period during which the precipitation also increases. Nevertheless, manufactures and household water consumption do not have timed limits of use like in agriculture, which in turn affects the lake water level. Therefore, as the rainfall increases by April to August, we suggest to harvest and only use the rainfall water during its abundance period. This would help in restoring the lake’s water level during the time of rainwater uses, and leads to water consumption balance, flood management and lake biodiversity conservation as well.

  6. Assimilation of lake water surface temperature observations using an extended Kalman filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Kourzeneva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A new extended Kalman filter (EKF-based algorithm to assimilate lake water surface temperature (LWST observations into the lake model/parameterisation scheme Freshwater Lake (FLake has been developed. The data assimilation algorithm has been implemented into the stand-alone offline version of FLake. The mixed and non-mixed regimes in lakes are treated separately by the EKF algorithm. The timing of the ice period is indicated implicitly: no ice if water surface temperature is measured. Numerical experiments are performed using operational in-situ observations for 27 lakes and merged observations (in-situ plus satellite for 4 lakes in Finland. Experiments are analysed, potential problems are discussed, and the role of early spring observations is studied. In general, results of experiments are promising: (1 the impact of observations (calculated as the normalised reduction of the LWST root mean square error comparing to the free model run is more than 90% and (2 in cross-validation (when observations are partly assimilated, partly used for validation the normalised reduction of the LWST error standard deviation is more than 65%. The new data assimilation algorithm will allow prognostic variables in the lake parameterisation scheme to be initialised in operational numerical weather prediction models and the effects of model errors to be corrected by using LWST observations.

  7. Water levels and groundwater and surface-water exchanges in lakes of the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Perry M.; Trost, Jared J.; Erickson, Melinda L.

    2016-10-19

    OverviewThis study assessed lake-water levels and regional and local groundwater and surface-water exchanges near northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes applying three approaches: statistical analysis, field study, and groundwater-flow modeling.  Statistical analyses of lake levels were completed to assess the effect of physical setting and climate on lake-level fluctuations of selected lakes. A field study of groundwater and surface-water interactions in selected lakes was completed to (1) estimate potential percentages of surface-water contributions to well water across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, (2) estimate general ages for waters extracted from the wells, and (3) assess groundwater inflow to lakes and lake-water outflow to aquifers downgradient from White Bear Lake.  Groundwater flow was simulated using a steady-state, groundwater-flow model to assess regional groundwater and surface-water exchanges and the effects of groundwater withdrawals, climate, and other factors on water levels of northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes.

  8. Retrieval study of lake water depth by using multi-spectral remote sensing in Bangong Co Lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Zheng; ZhengDong Deng; Xin Ye

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviewed studies on remote sensing of water depth retrieval. Four water depth retrieval models (single-band, dou-ble-ratio-band, multi-band, and BP network models) were evaluated using TM image and water data from Bangong Co Lake, which is located in China’s Tibet Autonomous Region and Indian Kashmir. Tested by independent data, comparison of these four models demonstrates that BP network model performed better than the multi-band model, with the single-band model performing the worst. To sum up, this study demonstrates that first, BP network model performed better than the traditional model;second, precise atmospheric correction and radiation study, affected by different water level sand sediment, could improve the precision of water depth retrieval.

  9. Longevity and effectiveness of aluminum addition to reduce sediment phosphorus release and restore lake water quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huser, Brian J; Egemose, Sara; Harper, Harvey;

    2016-01-01

    114 lakes treated with aluminum (Al) salts to reduce internal phosphorus (P) loading were analyzed to identify factors driving longevity of post-treatment water quality improvements. Lakes varied greatly in morphology, applied Al dose, and other factors that may have affected overall treatment...... (OI, a morphological index), and watershed to lake area ratio (related to hydraulic residence time, WA:LA) were the most important variables determining treatment longevity. Multiple linear regression showed that Al dose, WA:LA, and OI explained 47, 32 and 3% respectively of the variation in treatment...

  10. Geochemistry of highly acidic mine water following disposal into a natural lake with carbonate bedrock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisskirchen, Christian, E-mail: ChristianWisskirchen@web.de [Institute of Mineralogy and Geochemistry, University of Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Dold, Bernhard [Institute of Mineralogy and Geochemistry, University of Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Instituto de Geologia Economica Aplicada, Universidad de Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Friese, Kurt [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Lake Research, D-39114 Magdeburg (Germany); Spangenberg, Jorge E. [Institute of Mineralogy and Geochemistry, University of Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Morgenstern, Peter [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Analytical Chemistry, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Glaesser, Walter [Institute of Geophysics and Geology, University of Leipzig, D-04211 Leipzig (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Mean lake water element composition did not differ greatly from discharged AMD. {yields} Most elements showed increasing concentrations from the surface to lake bottom. {yields} Jarosite formed in the upper part, settled, and dissolved in the deeper part of the lake. {yields} Elements migrated into the underlying carbonates in the sequence As< Pb {approx} Cu < Cd < Zn = Mn. {yields} Gypsum and hydroxide precipitation had not resulted in complete clogging of the lake bedrocks. - Abstract: Acid mine drainage (AMD) from the Zn-Pb(-Ag-Bi-Cu) deposit of Cerro de Pasco (Central Peru) and waste water from a Cu-extraction plant has been discharged since 1981 into Lake Yanamate, a natural lake with carbonate bedrock. The lake has developed a highly acidic pH of {approx}1. Mean lake water chemistry was characterized by 16,775 mg/L acidity as CaCO{sub 3}, 4330 mg/L Fe and 29,250 mg/L SO{sub 4}. Mean trace element concentrations were 86.8 mg/L Cu, 493 mg/L Zn, 2.9 mg/L Pb and 48 mg/L As, which did not differ greatly from the discharged AMD. Most elements showed increasing concentrations from the surface to the lake bottom at a maximal depth of 41 m (e.g. from 3581 to 5433 mg/L Fe and 25,609 to 35,959 mg/L SO{sub 4}). The variations in the H and O isotope compositions and the element concentrations within the upper 10 m of the water column suggest mixing with recently discharged AMD, shallow groundwater and precipitation waters. Below 15 m a stagnant zone had developed. Gypsum (saturation index, SI {approx} 0.25) and anglesite (SI {approx} 0.1) were in equilibrium with lake water. Jarosite was oversaturated (SI {approx} 1.7) in the upper part of the water column, resulting in downward settling and re-dissolution in the lower part of the water column (SI {approx} -0.7). Accordingly, jarosite was only found in sediments from less than 7 m water depth. At the lake bottom, a layer of gel-like material ({approx}90 wt.% water) of pH {approx}1 with a

  11. [Variation of nitrogen during the high suspended sediments concentration water supply in an artificial shallow lake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You-yuan; Shen, Yu; Yang, Shi-ying

    2013-09-01

    The effect of water quality and suspended sediments in the process of water supply is of an increasing concern recently in an artificial shallow lake. The water supply from the Yellow River to Dongchang Lake happened on April 23rd to 25th, 2012. The synchronous monitoring of flow velocity, suspended sediment concentration, dissolved nitrogen and particulate nitrogen concentration was conducted during the three days in five monitoring sites of the longitudinal profile from inlet to outlet. The spatio-temporal variation of nitrogen and the relationship between nitrogen concentration and suspended sediment concentration was analyzed. Moreover, the analysis of different nitrogen forms in surface water and bottom sediment was also made in the whole lake before and after the water supply. Results showed that the process of water supplement had an obvious effect on flow velocities and suspended sediment concentrations around the inlet area. The influence area was a limited scope. The spatial distribution of nitrogen presented a certain concentration gradient along the flow direction. Around the water inlet, concentrations of all nitrogen forms in water and bottom sediment was higher than those in other lake zones. The amplitude of variation of all nitrogen concentrations in surface water, suspended sediments showed a decreasing trend from water inlet to outlet. And concentrations of total dissolved and particulate nitrogen increased at different ratios after water supply in the lake. Total particulate nitrogen concentration increase was higher. It revealed the water supply of the Yellow River had a great influence on lake water. The dissolved nitrogen was the main nitrogen form in water supply. The ratio of total dissolved nitrogen to particulate nitrogen was 7.3 : 1. Nitrate was the primary form in dissolved nitrogen, and ammonium was the primary form in particulate nitrogen, respectively. The correlation between concentration of suspended sediments and ammonium, total

  12. Distribution and ecology of cyanobacteria in the rocky littoral of an english lake district water body, devoke water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentecost, Allan

    2014-12-16

    Cyanobacteria were sampled along two vertical and two horizontal transects in the littoral of Devoke Water, English Lake District. Profiles of cyanobacterium diversity and abundance showed that both attained a maximum close to the water line, but declined rapidly 20-40 cm above it. The distribution of individual species with height together with species and site ordinations showed that several taxa occurred in well-defined zones. A narrow "black zone" in the supralittoral was colonised mainly by species of Calothrix, Dichothrix and Gloeocapsa with pigmented sheaths. There was no evidence of lateral variation of species around the lake, but the height of the black zone correlated positively with wind exposure. The flora of Devoke Water is that of a base-poor mountain lake with some elements of a lowland, more alkaline water-body.

  13. A multi-source satellite data approach for modelling Lake Turkana water level: Calibration and validation using satellite altimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpuri, N.M.; Senay, G.B.; Asante, K.O.

    2012-01-01

    Lake Turkana is one of the largest desert lakes in the world and is characterized by high degrees of interand intra-annual fluctuations. The hydrology and water balance of this lake have not been well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable ground truth datasets. Managing surface water resources is a great challenge in areas where in-situ data are either limited or unavailable. In this study, multi-source satellite-driven data such as satellite-based rainfall estimates, modelled runoff, evapotranspiration, and a digital elevation dataset were used to model Lake Turkana water levels from 1998 to 2009. Due to the unavailability of reliable lake level data, an approach is presented to calibrate and validate the water balance model of Lake Turkana using a composite lake level product of TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, and ENVISAT satellite altimetry data. Model validation results showed that the satellitedriven water balance model can satisfactorily capture the patterns and seasonal variations of the Lake Turkana water level fluctuations with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.90 and a Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient of Efficiency (NSCE) of 0.80 during the validation period (2004-2009). Model error estimates were within 10% of the natural variability of the lake. Our analysis indicated that fluctuations in Lake Turkana water levels are mainly driven by lake inflows and over-the-lake evaporation. Over-the-lake rainfall contributes only up to 30% of lake evaporative demand. During the modelling time period, Lake Turkana showed seasonal variations of 1-2m. The lake level fluctuated in the range up to 4m between the years 1998-2009. This study demonstrated the usefulness of satellite altimetry data to calibrate and validate the satellite-driven hydrological model for Lake Turkana without using any in-situ data. Furthermore, for Lake Turkana, we identified and outlined opportunities and challenges of using a calibrated satellite-driven water balance

  14. Pre-operational monitor system of large inland lake water quality with MODIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoyu, Zhang; Dingtian, Yang; Xiaofeng, Zhang; Difeng, Wang; Shujing, Li; Delu, Pan

    2005-10-01

    EOS\\MODIS data have been proved a suitable and relative low-cost complementary tool to monitor large inland lake water quality for its re-visit frequency, moderate spatial and spectral resolution and appropriate channels designed for inversing water quality parameters. In this study, by the support of hi-tech research and development program of China, Lake water quality remote monitoring pre-operational system (LWQRMPS) was constructed aimed for practical monitoring of Taihu Lake water quality. The main water quality parameters including Chl-a and SPM, TN and TP inversion algorithm were developed. These parameters were obtained every month from time series fusion satellite data. With the routine trophic state evaluation system, the water quality was assessed every month based on the above retrieved MODIS water quality parameters, varied level of eutrophic area was computed. The obvious high reflectance in near-infrared spectrum caused by blue-green algal bloom support the application of 250m MODIS data in the algal bloom emergency monitor. Therefore, MODIS data were utilized successfully for inversing water quality parameters, evaluating eutrophication status, and detecting algal bloom in near real time. Standard thematic maps were produced and distributed to corresponding management departments. The accuracy of products and retrieve algorithm for operational use were tested with separate data sets. The result suggested that system is good enough for practical monitoring water quality of large size lakes and acquired identification.

  15. Assessing heat fluxes and water quality trends in subalpine lakes from EO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Ilaria; Giardino, Claudia; Bresciani, Mariano; Elli, Chiara; Valerio, Giulia; Pilotti, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Lakes play a fundamental role in providing ecosystem services such as water supplying, hydrological regulation, climate change mitigation, touristic recreation (Schallenberg et al., 2013). Preserving and improving of quality of lakes waters, which is a function of either both natural and human influences, is therefore an important action to be considered. Remote Sensing techniques are spreading as useful instrument for lakes, by integrating classical in situ limnological measurements to frequent and synoptic monitoring capabilities. Within this study, Earth Observation data are exploited for understanding the temporal changes of water quality parameters over a decade, as well as for measuring the surface energy fluxes in recent years in deep clear lakes in the European subalpine ecoregion. According to Pareth et al. (2016), subalpine lakes are showing a clear response to climate change with an increase of 0.017 °C /year of lake surface temperature, whilst the human activities contribute to produce a large impact (agriculture, recreation, industry, fishing and drinking) on these lakes. The investigation is focused on Lake Iseo, which has shown a significant deterioration of water quality conditions since the seventies, and on Lake Garda, the largest Italian lake where EO data have been widely used for many purposes and applications (Giardino et al., 2014). Available ENVISAT-MERIS (2002-2012) and Landsat-8-OLI (2013-on going) imagery has been exploited to produce chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentration maps, while Landsat-8-TIRS imagery has been used for estimating lake surface temperatures. MERIS images were processed through a neural network (namely the C2R processor, Doerffer et al., 2007), to correct the atmospheric effects and to retrieve water constituents concentration in optically complex deep waters. With regard to L8's images, some atmospheric correctors (e.g. ACOLITE and 6SV) were tested and validated to indentify, for each of the two lakes, the more accurate

  16. Analysis of water-level fluctuations of Lakes Winona and Winnemissett-- two landlocked lakes in a karst terrane in Volusia County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    The water levels of Lakes Winona and Winnemissett in Volusia County, Fla., correlate reasonably well during dry spells but only poorly during wet spells. Disparities develop mostly at times when the lake levels rise abruptly owing to rainstorms passing over the lake basins. The lack of correlation is attributed to the uneven distribution of the storm rainfall, even though the average annual rainfall at National Weather Service gages in the general area of the lakes is about the same. Analyses of the monthly rainfall data show that the rainfall variability between gages is sufficient to account for most of the disparity between monthly changes in the levels of the two lakes. The total annual rainfall at times may differ between rainfall gages by as much as 15 to 20 inches. Such differences tend to balance over the long term but may persist in the same direction for two or more years, causing apparent anomalies in lake-level fluctuations. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Microcosm Simulation Study and Methylmercury Forming Mechanism at Landscape Water of City%城市景观水体甲基汞的形成机制及微宇宙模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘小红; 司友斌; 郭子薇; 杜成竹; 朱聪聪

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is harmful to the environment, which has gradually become one of the research hotspots. Sediments, as a main repository of pollutants, have an important impact on water quality and the internal organisms, which deserves our research. In this paper, we focused on Hefei landscape water sediment and tried to investigate the status of inorganic mercury and methylmercury pollutions in the sediment. To study the conversion process from inorganic mercury to methylmercury and their enrichment levels and mechanism, we established the ecological chain of “sediment-water-grass-fish” through analog microcosm examination. The results were as follows: from ten water and sediment samples in Hefei landscape water sediment, we found that the contents of inorganic mercury and methylmercury ranged 11. 74-13. 12 μg•kg-1 and 0. 37-2. 23 μg•kg-1 , respectively. The microcosm examination showed that: with increasing culture time, inorganic mercury in sediments gradually decreased. There was a phenomenon that the content of methylmercury increased at first and then decreased to reach the balance later. Both the inorganic mercury and methylmercury in water change showed an increasing trend. The enrichment contents of inorganic mercury in Egeria densa Planch. and golden mandarin fish ( Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner) were low while their enrichment of methylmercury could be great. In addition, we found that both the bioaccumulation ability and the enrichment coefficient of methylmercury in the body of golden mandarin fish were the maximum during the same period.%汞对环境的危害已经成为研究热点之一,尤其是水体底泥作为污染物的主要储蓄库,其对水质以及生物的影响研究非常重要.本文以合肥市景观水体为研究对象,调查分析底泥中无机汞和甲基汞的污染现状,并采用微宇宙试验模拟“底泥-水-草-鱼”生态系统中无机汞和甲基汞的转化过程及其甲基汞的富集机制.结果

  18. Impacts on water quality and biota from natural acid rock drainage in Colorado's Lake Creek watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, D.A.; Sares, Matthew A.; Policky, Greg A.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Church, Stanley E.

    2006-01-01

    Colorado's Lake Creek watershed hosts natural acid rock drainage that significantly impacts surface water, streambed sediment, and aquatic life. The source of the ARD is a group of iron-rich springs that emerge from intensely hydrothermally altered, unexploited, low-grade porphyry copper mineralization in the Grizzly Peak Caldera. Source water chemistry includes pH of 2.5 and dissolved metal concentrations of up to 277 mg/L aluminum, 498 mg/L iron, and 10 mg/L copper. From the hydrothermally altered area downstream for 27 kilometers to Twin Lakes Reservoir, metal concentrations in streambed sediment are elevated and the watershed experiences locally severe adverse impacts to aquatic life due to the acidic, metal-laden water. The water and sediment quality of Twin Lakes Reservoir is sufficiently improved that the reservoir supports a trout fishery, and remnants of upstream ARD are negligible.

  19. Assessment of Water and Sediment Physical-Chemical Composition in the West Coast of Maracaibo Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Moronta-Riera

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation was to determine the physical and chemical composition of the water streams and sediments of the Maracaibo Lake in three sampling areas located in Tía Juana, Lagunillas and Ceuta in order to know the level of contamination and assess water quality based on permissible values established by the 883 Decree. The results indicate that the overall hydrocarbon concentrations in the water and sediments are above permissible levels. It is concluded that petroleum prospection is the root cause of the lake contamination.

  20. Relationships between water quality parameters in rivers and lakes: BOD5, COD, NBOPs, and TOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewoong; Lee, Seunghyun; Yu, Soonju; Rhew, Doughee

    2016-04-01

    Biological oxygen demand (BOD5) or chemical oxygen demand (COD) analysis is widely used to evaluate organic pollutants in water systems as well as the efficiency of wastewater treatment plants. However, both analysis methods have restrictions such as being insensitive, imprecise, time-consuming, and the production of chemical waste. Therefore, total organic carbon (TOC) analysis for organic pollutants has been considered for an alternative analysis instead of BOD5 or COD. Several studies have investigated the replacement of BOD5 or COD with TOC in wastewater samples; however, few studies have investigated the relationships between water quality parameters in rivers and lakes. Therefore, this study evaluated the relationships between BOD5, COD, or NBOPs and TOC by the analysis of national water quality monitoring data of rivers and lakes for 5 years. High correlation coefficients (r) of 0.87 and 0.66 between BOD5 and TOC (p TOC (p TOC was 0.93 for rivers and 0.72 for lakes. The coefficients of determination (R 2) were 0.75 and 0.44 between BOD5 and TOC for rivers and lakes as well as were 0.87 and 0.57 between COD and TOC for rivers and lakes, respectively. The coefficient of determination (R 2) between NBOPs and TOC was 0.73 for rivers and 0.52 for lakes.

  1. The Influence of Element Diffusion at the Sediment—Water Interface on the Basic Chemical Composition of Overlying Water Mass in Lake Lugu,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴丰昌; 万国江; 等

    1996-01-01

    Little work has been done on the influence of seiments on the basic chemical composition of overlying water mass.This paper deals with the vertical profile of the basic constituents such as Ca+,K+,Na+,and HCO3-,as well as of pH in the overlying water mass and sediment porewater of Lake Lugu-a semi-closed,deep lake in Yunnan Province.The reand sediment porewater of Lake Lugu- a semi-closed,deep lake in Yunnan Province.The results revealed that those basic constituents may diffuse and transport from bottom sediments to overlying water mass through porewater.In the paper are also quantitatively evaluated the diffusive fluxes and the extent of their influence on overlying water mass,indicating that the lake sediment-water interface diffusion plays an important role in controlling the basic chemical composition of water in the whole lake.

  2. Seasonal Spatial Patterns of Surface Water Temperature, Surface Heat Fluxes and Meteorological Forcing Over Lake Geneva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani Rahaghi, A.; Lemmin, U.; Bouffard, D.; Riffler, M.; Wunderle, S.; Barry, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    In many lakes, surface heat flux (SHF) is the most important component controlling the lake's energy content. Accurate methods for the determination of SHF are valuable for water management, and for use in hydrological and meteorological models. Large lakes, not surprisingly, are subject to spatially and temporally varying meteorological conditions, and hence SHF. Here, we report on an investigation for estimating the SHF of a large European lake, Lake Geneva. We evaluated several bulk formulas to estimate Lake Geneva's SHF based on different data sources. A total of 64 different surface heat flux models were realized using existing representations for different heat flux components. Data sources to run the models included meteorological data (from an operational numerical weather prediction model, COSMO-2) and lake surface water temperature (LSWT, from satellite imagery). Models were calibrated at two points in the lake for which regular depth profiles of temperature are available, and which enabled computation of the total heat content variation. The latter, computed for 03.2008-12.2012, was the metric used to rank the different models. The best calibrated model was then selected to calculate the spatial distribution of SHF. Analysis of the model results shows that evaporative and convective heat fluxes are the dominant terms controlling the spatial pattern of SHF. The former is significant in all seasons while the latter plays a role only in fall and winter. Meteorological observations illustrate that wind-sheltering, and to some extent relative humidity variability, are the main reasons for the observed large-scale spatial variability. In addition, both modeling and satellite observations indicate that, on average, the eastern part of the lake is warmer than the western part, with a greater temperature contrast in spring and summer than in fall and winter whereas the SHF spatial splitting is stronger in fall and winter. This is mainly due to negative heat flux

  3. Quantitation of microorganic compounds in waters of the Great Lakes by adsorption on activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Stacy L.; Kempe, Lloyd L.; Graham, E. S.; Beeton, Alfred M.

    1963-01-01

    Microorganic compounds in waters of Lakes Michigan and Huron have been sampled by adsorption on activated carbon in filters installed aboard the M/V Cisco and at the Hammond Bay Laboratory of the U.S. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries. The organic compounds were eluted from the carbon according to techniques developed at the U.S. Public Health Service. On the assumption that chloroform eluates represent less polar compounds from industrial sources and alcohol eluates the more polar varieties of natural origin, plots of chloroform eluates against alcohol eluates appear to be useful in judging water qualities. Based upon these criteria, the data in this paper indicate that both the waters of northern Lake Michigan and of Lake Huron, in the vicinity of Hammond Bay, Michigan, are relatively free from pollution. The limnetic waters of Lake Michigan showed a particularly high ratio of alcohol to chloroform eluates. Data for monthly samples indicated that this ratio fluctuated seasonally. The periodicity of the fluctuations was similar to those of lake levels and water temperatures.

  4. Modeling Hydrodynamics, Water Temperature, and Suspended Sediment in Detroit Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Sobieszczyk, Steven; Bragg, Heather M.

    2007-01-01

    Detroit Lake is a large reservoir on the North Santiam River in west-central Oregon. Water temperature and suspended sediment are issues of concern in the river downstream of the reservoir. A CE-QUAL-W2 model was constructed to simulate hydrodynamics, water temperature, total dissolved solids, and suspended sediment in Detroit Lake. The model was calibrated for calendar years 2002 and 2003, and for a period of storm runoff from December 1, 2005, to February 1, 2006. Input data included lake bathymetry, meteorology, reservoir outflows, and tributary inflows, water temperatures, total dissolved solids, and suspended sediment concentrations. Two suspended sediment size groups were modeled: one for suspended sand and silt with particle diameters larger than 2 micrometers, and another for suspended clay with particle diameters less than or equal to 2 micrometers. The model was calibrated using lake stage data, lake profile data, and data from a continuous water-quality monitor on the North Santiam River near Niagara, about 6 kilometers downstream of Detroit Dam. The calibrated model was used to estimate sediment deposition in the reservoir, examine the sources of suspended sediment exiting the reservoir, and examine the effect of the reservoir on downstream water temperatures.

  5. Anthropogenic impacts on the water and salt budgets of St Lucia estuarine lake in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, Robynne A.; Stretch, Derek D.

    2011-05-01

    Lake St Lucia in South Africa is part of a UNESCO World Heritage site and a Ramsar wetland of international importance. Like many coastal wetlands worldwide, anthropogenic activities including catchment land-use changes, water diversions/abstractions, and manipulation of the mouth state have significantly affected its functioning over the past century. Questions concerning its sustainability have motivated a re-evaluation of management decisions made in the past and of options for the future. A model for the water and salt budgets has therefore been used to investigate "what if" scenarios in terms of past anthropogenic interventions. In particular, simulations allow us to evaluate the effects of diverting the Mfolozi river from St Lucia on the functioning of the system and on the occurrence of various water level/salinity states that drive the biological functioning of the ecosystem. In the past, when the St Lucia estuary and the Mfolozi river had a combined inlet, the mouth was predominantly open. The lake had relatively stable water levels but variable salinities that increased during dry conditions due to evaporative losses and saltwater inflows from the sea. If the mouth closed, the Mfolozi flow was diverted into the lake which reduced salinities and maintained or increased water levels. Simulations indicate that without a link to the Mfolozi the lake system would naturally have a mainly closed inlet with lower average salinities but more variable water levels. During dry conditions water levels would reduce and result in desiccation of large areas of the lake as has recently occurred. We conclude that the artificial separation of the St Lucia and Mfolozi inlets underpins the most significant impacts on the water & salt budget of the lake and that its reversal is key to the sustainability of the system.

  6. Measuring water heights in rivers and lakes from lightweight Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandini, Filippo; Butts, Michael; Olesen, Daniel Haugård

    and a tracking of the terrestrial water bodies not able to detect water heights in small rivers or lakes; ii) a limited temporal resolution which limits the ability to determine rapid temporal changes, especially during extremes. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are one technology able to fill the gap between...

  7. 77 FR 47282 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Air and Water Show, Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... safety zone during this year's air show. This safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion... spectators and vessels from the hazards associated with an air show over water. DATES: This rule will be... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Air and Water Show, Lake Michigan...

  8. Do zooplankton contribute to an ultraviolet clear-water phase in lakes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williamson, C.E.; Lange, de H.J.; Leech, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    Seasonal increases in the ultraviolet (UV) transparency of the surface waters of an oligotrophic lake in Pennsylvania suggest that clear-water phase (CWP) events similar to those previously observed for visible light also exist for the potentially damaging UV wavelengths. Seasonal increases in

  9. Estimating Water Balance Components of Lakes and Reservoirs Using Various Open Access Satellite Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duan, Z.

    2014-01-01

    There are millions of lakes and ten thousands of reservoirs in the world. The number of reservoirs is still increasing through the construction of large dams to meet the growing demand for water resources, hydroelectricity and economic development. Accurate information on the water balance component

  10. Do zooplankton contribute to an ultraviolet clear-water phase in lakes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williamson, C.E.; Lange, de H.J.; Leech, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    Seasonal increases in the ultraviolet (UV) transparency of the surface waters of an oligotrophic lake in Pennsylvania suggest that clear-water phase (CWP) events similar to those previously observed for visible light also exist for the potentially damaging UV wavelengths. Seasonal increases in zoopl

  11. Spatial–Temporal Dynamics of Wetland Vegetation Related to Water Level Fluctuations in Poyang Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Tan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological properties are driving forces of wetland systems. The influence of water level fluctuations on vegetation distribution is of growing interest as wetlands are increasingly disturbed by climate change and intensive human activity. Based on time series MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer imagery from 2000 to 2012, we investigated the spatial–temporal dynamics of wetland vegetation in Poyang Lake using a combined Sen’s slope and Mann–Kendall (MK test approach, and explored their correlations with water level fluctuations in different hydrological periods. The results showed that more than 34% of wetlands at lower elevations of Poyang Lake had experienced an increasing trend in the enhanced vegetation index (EVI, whereas EVI in about 11% of the wetlands at higher elevations decreased significantly. Responses of grassland area extracted from MODIS EVI were found to be more sensitive to water level fluctuations in the southern lakes. The change rate of grassland area decreased with the rising water level during the rising period, but increased with the rising water level during the retreating period. Correlations between grassland area and water level were much weaker in the dry period. In addition, we found fluctuations of the main water body had negligible effect on grassland area since the water level at Xingzi station was below 14 m. These results provide new insights for predicting future changes of wetland vegetation influenced by the ongoing threats from climate change and human activity, and form a foundation for ecosystem management of Poyang Lake.

  12. Estimating Water Balance Components of Lakes and Reservoirs Using Various Open Access Satellite Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duan, Z.

    2014-01-01

    There are millions of lakes and ten thousands of reservoirs in the world. The number of reservoirs is still increasing through the construction of large dams to meet the growing demand for water resources, hydroelectricity and economic development. Accurate information on the water balance component

  13. Use of Satellite and In Situ Reflectance Data for Lake Water Color Characterization in the Everest Himalayan Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Matta

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study applied remote sensing techniques to the study of water color in Himalayan glacial lakes as a proxy of suspended solid load. In situ measurements gathered in 5 lakes in October 2014 during satellite data acquisition enabled the characterization of water reflectance and clarity and supported image processing. Field data analysis led to a distinction between 3 water colors and a consequent lake water color classification on a regional scale from Landsat-8 data previously corrected for atmospheric and adjacency effects. Several morphometric parameters (lake size and shape, distance between lake and glacier were also computed for the lakes thus classified. The results showed spatial and temporal variations in lake water color, suggestive of relationships between glacier shrinkage and the presence of brighter and more turbid water. A finer-scale analysis of the spatial variability of water reflectance on Chola Lake (based on GeoEye-1 data captured on 18 October 2014 showed the contribution of water component absorption from the inflow. Overall, the findings support further research to monitor Himalayan lakes using both Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 (with its improved resolutions.

  14. Modeling Water Quantity and Quality in the Devils Lake Watershed Coupling SWAT and CE-QUAL-W2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, A.; Zhang, X.; Ell, M.

    2016-12-01

    Devils Lake is a terminal lake in the sub-basin of the Red River of the North basin in northeastern North Dakota. During the last two decades, the lake level has risen by nearly 10 m, causing floods that have costed more than 1 billion USD in mitigation measures. Another increase of approximate 1.5 m in the lake level would cause water to spill naturally into the Sheyenne River. To alleviate this potential yet catastrophic spillage, two artificial outlets were constructed. However, artificially draining water to the Sheyenne River raises a concern of water quality because the Devils Lake water contains significantly higher concentrations of dissolved solids, particularly sulfate, than the surrounding water bodies. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) coupled with CE-QUAL-W2 were used to simulate water quantity and quality over the watershed and the lake. The SWAT model performed well to simulate daily flow, total suspend sediment (TSS), total nitrogen (TN), and phosphorous (TP) in the tributaries. The developed SWAT model is able to simulate to the lake level with a root mean square error of 0.35 m for the period time from 1995 to 2014.The CE-QUAL-W2 successfully simulated sulfate concentration (R2=0.4 and PBIAS < 6%) and concentrations of TP in the lake that are in general agreement with the observations. Keywords: Devils Lake, flooding, SWAT, CE-QUAL-W2, water quality

  15. Spatiotemporal assessment of water chemistry in intermittently open/closed coastal lakes of Southern Baltic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astel, Aleksander M.; Bigus, Katarzyna; Obolewski, Krystian; Glińska-Lewczuk, Katarzyna

    2016-12-01

    Ionic profile, pH, electrolytic conductivity, chemical oxygen demand and concentration of selected heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Zn, Fe and Mn) were determined in water of 11 intermittently closed and open lakes and lagoons (ICOLLs) located in Polish coastline. Multidimensional data set was explored by the use of the self-organizing map (SOM) technique to avoid supervised and predictable division for fully isolated, partially and fully connected lakes. Water quality assessment based on single parameter's mean value allowed classification of majority of lakes to first or second class of purity according to regulation presenting classification approach applicable to uniform parts of surface waters. The SOM-based grouping revealed seven clusters comprising water samples of similar physico-chemical profile. Fully connected lakes were characterized by the highest concentration of components characteristic for sea salts (NaCl, MgCl2, MgSO4, CaSO4, K2SO4 and MgBr2), however spring samples from Łebsko were shifted to another cluster suggesting that intensive surface run-off and fresh-water inflow through Łupawa river decreases an impact of sea water intrusions. Forecasted characteristic of water collected in Resko Przymorskie lake was disturbed by high contamination by nitrites indicating accidental and local contamination due to usage of sodium nitrite for the curing of meat. Some unexpected sources of contamination was discovered in intermittently open and closed lakes. Presumably Zn contamination is due to use of wood preservatives to protect small wooden playgrounds or camping places spread around one of the lake, while increased concentration of Ni could be connected with grass and vegetation burning. Waters of Jamno lake are under the strongest anthropogenic impact due to inefficient removal of phosphates by waste water treatment plant and contamination by Fe and Mn caused by backwashing of absorption filters. Generally, the quality of ICOLLs' water was diversified, while

  16. Phytoplankton Community Dynamics in West Lake After Drawing Water from the Qiantang River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏印心; 李瑾; 虞左明

    2004-01-01

    Seventeen phytoplankton dominant species of 218 taxa were found to have contributed to more than 80% of the biomass after analysis of the January, 1955 to December, 1996 phytoplankton population at five stations in West Lake after Qiantang River water had been drawn into the lake for a decade. The seasonal fluctuations were obvious; the maximum cell density of 90.91×107-93.58×107 cells/L and biomass of 57.41-58.61 mg/L occurred mainly in summer of 1996,largely as a result of the development of Lyngbya contorta, Merismopedia tenuissima, Oscillatoria limnetica, Spirulina laxissima and Scenedesmus quadricauda, etc. at Stations 2 and 4. At Station 1 located near the inlet for drawing water from the Qiantang River, the species number, cell density, biomass, chlorophyll a concentration and physico-chemical parameters (except for total nitrogen) were obviously greater than those at the other four stations, also greater than the corresponding parameters before the drawing of water from the Qiantang River into the lake.Compared with the results of study on the phytoplankton community in 1980 before the drawing of Qiantang River into the lake, the species number and the total individual density were increased, the dominant species changed somewhat, the biomass was decreased. The water quality was improved (especially at Station 1) after the drawing of river water into the lake.Based on criteria for evaluating trophic status, the biological and chemical indicators such as species composition and dominant species, and other parameters such as annual mean value cell densities (36.06×107-51.27×107 cells/L), biomass (29.03-39.74 mg/L), chl a concentrations (41.29-67.67μg/L), total nitrigen (1.72-2.89 mg/L), total phosphorus (0.12-0.16 mg/L) obtained at Stations 2, 3, 4 and 5, showed that West Lake is still at eutrophic lake.

  17. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN HYDROWEB DATABASE Water level time series on lakes and reservoirs (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretaux, J.; Arsen, A.; Calmant, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present the current state of the Hydroweb database as well as developments in progress. It provides offline water level time series on rivers, reservoirs and lakes based on altimetry data from several satellites (Topex/Poseidon, ERS, Jason-1&2, GFO and ENVISAT). The major developments in Hydroweb concerns the development of an operational data centre with automatic acquisition and processing of IGDR data for updating time series in near real time (both for lakes & rivers) and also use of additional remote sensing data, like satellite imagery allowing the calculation of lake's surfaces. A lake data centre is under development at the Legos in coordination with Hydrolare Project leaded by SHI (State Hydrological Institute of the Russian Academy of Science). It will provide the level-surface-volume variations of about 230 lakes and reservoirs, calculated through combination of various satellite images (Modis, Asar, Landsat, Cbers) and radar altimetry (Topex / Poseidon, Jason-1 & 2, GFO, Envisat, ERS2, AltiKa). The final objective is to propose a data centre fully based on remote sensing technique and controlled by in situ infrastructure for the Global Terrestrial Network for Lakes (GTN-L) under the supervision of WMO and GCOS. In a longer perspective, the Hydroweb database will integrate data from future missions (Jason-3, Jason-CS, Sentinel-3A/B) and finally will serve for the design of the SWOT mission. The products of hydroweb will be used as input data for simulation of the SWOT products (water height and surface variations of lakes and rivers). In the future, the SWOT mission will allow to monitor on a sub-monthly basis the worldwide lakes and reservoirs bigger than 250 * 250 m and Hydroweb will host water level and extent products from this

  18. In-situ observations of water vapor isotopes in near surface air over Lakes Superior and Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, L.; Meyer, A. L.; Griffis, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes play an important role in the climate of the midwestern to northeastern United States. Evaporation from the lakes is not well quantified, and the factors controlling lake evaporation are not fully understood. Two isotopic tracer methods have been used to study lake evaporation. The first is a lake water isotopic mass balance to solve for evaporation rates from precipitation and runoff inputs and the residual lake water. The second method is monitoring downwind precipitation and atmospheric water vapor for evidence of lake evaporation. Accurate estimates of the isotopic composition of evaporation from the lakes are critical inputs in both methods for modern and paleo studies. Traditionally, evaporation is assumed to follow the Craig-Gordon model of isotopic fractionation. To our knowledge, this model has not been tested on large lakes like the Great Lakes, whose evaporation flux strongly influences the moisture in the air above the lake. To test the Craig-Gordon model, we made measurements of the hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios above the surface of Lakes Superior and Michigan during June 2016 during a 4-day cruise on the R/V Blue Heron research vessel that traveled from Duluth, MN to Milwaukee, WI. Air was sampled at 2 intakes, approximately 5 m and 15 m above the lake surface, using an LGR triple water vapor isotope analyzer. The isotopic composition of lake water became more enriched in the heavy isotopes from Lake Superior to Lake Michigan. The timing of these measurements in late spring is not an optimal time to observe evaporation off the lakes, because often the lake temperature is cooler than the air temperature, thereby suppressing the evaporation flux. At times, vertical gradients of water vapor mixing in the near surface air approached 2,000-3,000 ppm, with higher moisture at the lower intake than the upper intake. At night, we observed times when this gradient reversed, and there was higher moisture aloft compared to the

  19. Water Quality and Hydrology of Whitefish (Bardon) Lake, Douglas County, Wisconsin, With Special Emphasis on Responses of an Oligotrophic Seepage Lake to Changes in Phosphorus Loading and Water Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Dale M.; Rose, William J.; Juckem, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    Whitefish Lake, which is officially named Bardon Lake, is an oligotrophic, soft-water seepage lake in northwestern Wisconsin, and classified by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources as an Outstanding Resource Water. Ongoing monitoring of the lake demonstrated that its water quality began to degrade (increased phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations) around 2002 following a period of high water level. To provide a better understanding of what caused the degradation in water quality, and provide information to better understand the lake and protect it from future degradation, the U.S. Geological Survey did a detailed study from 2004 to 2008. The goals of the study were to describe the past and present water quality of the lake, quantify water and phosphorus budgets for the lake, simulate the potential effects of changes in phosphorus inputs on the lake's water quality, analyze changes in the water level in the lake since 1900, and relate the importance of changes in climate and changes in anthropogenic (human-induced) factors in the watershed to the water quality of the lake. Since 1998, total phosphorus concentrations increased from near the 0.005-milligrams per liter (mg/L) detection limit to about 0.010 mg/L in 2006, and then decreased slightly in 2007-08. During this time, chlorophyll a concentrations and Secchi depths remained relatively stable at about 1.5 micrograms per liter (ug/L) and 26 feet, respectively. Whitefish Lake is typically classified as oligotrophic. Because the productivity in Whitefish Lake is limited by phosphorus, phosphorus budgets were constructed for the lake. Because it was believed that much of its phosphorus comes from the atmosphere, phosphorus deposition was measured in this study. Phosphorus input from the atmosphere was greater than computed based on previously reported wetfall phosphorus concentrations. The concentrations and deposition rates can be used to estimate atmospheric loading in future lake studies. The

  20. Water ecological carrying capacity of urban lakes in the context of rapid urbanization: A case study of East Lake in Wuhan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lei; Chen, Kun-lun; Cheng, Sheng-gao; Wang, Xu

    With the excessive development of social economy, water scarcity and water environment deterioration become a common phenomenon in metropolis. As a crucial component of urban water environment system, urban lake is mainly influenced by social economic system and tourism system. In this paper, a framework for quantitatively evaluating development sustainability of urban lake was established by a multi-objective model that represented water ecological carrying capacity (WECC). And nine key indicators including population, irrigation area, tourist quantity, the average number of hotel daily reception, TP, TN, CODMn, BOD5 were chosen from urban social-economy system and natural resilience aspects, with their index weight was determined by using the Structure Entropy Weight method. Then, we took Wuhan East Lake, the largest urban lake in China as a case study, and selected five time sections including 2002, 2004, 2007, 2009 and 2012 to synthetically evaluate and comparatively analyze the dynamic change of WECC. The results showed that: firstly, the water ecological carrying capacity values of the East Lake in five time sections were 1.17, 1.07, 1.64, 1.53 and 2.01 respectively, which all exceeded 1 and increased fluctuation. The rapid growth of population and GDP lead to sharply increasing demand for water quantity. However, a large amount of the domestic sewage and industrial waste led by economic development increases pressure on ecological environment of urban lakes. Secondly, the carrying capacity of the East Lake for tourist activities was still low. The value in 2012 was only 0.22, keeping at a slowly increasing phase, which indicates that the East Lake has large opportunity and space for developing the water resource carrying capacity and could make further efforts to attract tourists. Moreover, the WECC of the East Lake was mainly affected by rapid social and economic development and water environment damage caused by organic pollutants. From the view of urban

  1. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Frindte, Katharina; Dziallas, Claudia; Eckert, Werner; Tang, Kam W

    2011-12-01

    The prevailing paradigm in aquatic science is that microbial methanogenesis happens primarily in anoxic environments. Here, we used multiple complementary approaches to show that microbial methane production could and did occur in the well-oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake (Lake Stechlin, Germany). Oversaturation of methane was repeatedly recorded in the well-oxygenated upper 10 m of the water column, and the methane maxima coincided with oxygen oversaturation at 6 m. Laboratory incubations of unamended epilimnetic lake water and inoculations of photoautotrophs with a lake-enrichment culture both led to methane production even in the presence of oxygen, and the production was not affected by the addition of inorganic phosphate or methylated compounds. Methane production was also detected by in-lake incubations of lake water, and the highest production rate was 1.8-2.4 nM⋅h(-1) at 6 m, which could explain 33-44% of the observed ambient methane accumulation in the same month. Temporal and spatial uncoupling between methanogenesis and methanotrophy was supported by field and laboratory measurements, which also helped explain the oversaturation of methane in the upper water column. Potentially methanogenic Archaea were detected in situ in the oxygenated, methane-rich epilimnion, and their attachment to photoautotrophs might allow for anaerobic growth and direct transfer of substrates for methane production. Specific PCR on mRNA of the methyl coenzyme M reductase A gene revealed active methanogenesis. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water represents a hitherto overlooked source of methane and can be important for carbon cycling in the aquatic environments and water to air methane flux.

  2. Water-quality and bottom-material characteristics of Cross Lake, Caddo Parish, Louisiana, 1997-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Benton D.

    2004-01-01

    Cross Lake is a shallow, monomictic lake that was formed in 1926 by the impoundment of Cross Bayou. The lake is the primary drinking-water supply for the City of Shreveport, Louisiana. In recent years, the lakeshore has become increasinginly urbanized. In addition, the land use of the watershed contributing runoff to Cross Lake has changed. Changes in land use and urbanization could affect the water chemistry and biology of the Lake. Water-quality data were collected at 10 sites on Cross Lake from February 1997 to February 1999. Water-column and bottom-material samples were collected. The water-column samples were collected at least four times per year. These samples included physical and chemical-related properties such as water temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance; selected major inorganic ions; nutrients; minor elements; organic chemical constituents; and bacteria. Suspended-sediment samples were collected seven times during the sampling period. The bottom-material samples, which were collected once during the sampling period, were analyzed for selected minor elements and inorganic carbon. Aside from the nutrient-enriched condition of Cross Lake, the overall water-quality of Cross Lake is good. No primary Federal or State water-quality criteria were exceeded by any of the water-quality constituents analyzed for this report. Concentrations of major inorganic constituents, except iron and manganese, were low. Water from the lake is a sodium-bicarbonate type and is soft. Minor elements and organic compounds were present in low concentrations, many below detection limits. Nitrogen and phosphorus were the nutrients occurring in the highest concentrations. Nutrients were evenly distributed across the lake with no particular water-quality site indicating consistently higher or lower nutrient concentrations. No water samples analyzed for nitrate exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Contaminant Level of 10 milligrams per

  3. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in Minnesota lakes - Water-quality and hydrological data from 2008 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B.; Writer, Jeffrey H.; Keefe, Steffanie K.; Brown, Greg K.; Ferrey, Mark L.; Jahns, Nathan D.; Kiesling, Richard L.; Lundy, James R.; Poganski, Beth H.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Taylor, Howard E.; Woodruff, Olivia P.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sources, fate, and effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals in aquatic ecosystems is important for water-resource management. This study was conducted during 2008 and 2010 to establish a framework for assessing endocrine disrupting chemicals, and involved a statewide survey of their occurrence in 14 Minnesota lakes and a targeted study of different microhabitats on a single lake. The lakes ranged in size from about 0.1 to 100 square kilometers, varied in trophic status from oligotrophic to eutrophic, and spanned a range of land-uses from wetlands and forest to agricultural and urban use. Water and sediment samples were collected from the near-shore littoral environment and analyzed for endocrine disrupting chemicals, including trace elements, acidic organic compounds, neutral organic compounds, and steroidal hormones. In addition, polar organic compound integrative samplers were deployed for 21 days and analyzed for the same organic compounds. One lake was selected for a detailed microhabitat study of multiple near-shore environments. This report compiles the results from the field measurements and laboratory chemical analysis of water, sediment, and polar organic compound integrative sampler samples collected during 2008 and 2010. Most of the organic compounds measured were not detected in any of the water samples, although a few compounds were detected in several of the lakes.

  4. Numerical Study of Wind Shielding Impacts on Water Quality in a Tropical Urban Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Haiyan; Xing, Zikun; Chua, Lloyd

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the impact of wind shielding effect on hydrodynamics and water quality in Marina reservoir, a tropical lake located in downtown Singapore. This kind of urban lakes are usually smaller and shallower comparing with naturally formed ones and therefore, subject to a higher degree of interaction with wind. To establish wind field over the lake surface, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling was conducted to simulate seasonal impacts of two dominant monsoon seasons, in which the prevailing wind patterns interact very differently with urban landscape. The CFD model results were then used as input to a 3D lake hydrodynamics and water quality model to study the impacts to the hydrodynamics and water quality in the lake. By comparing simulations using uniform and spatial variable wind field, this study demonstrates that wind forcing variability in urban reservoirs that arise from shielding effects can have significant impacts on the thermal stratification and mixing, and phytoplankton distribution in both vertical and horizontal directions. There exist significant seasonal differences in wind field, hydrodynamics and water quality between the northeast and southwest monsoon seasons. This work is supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation (project 1002-IRIS-09).

  5. Water Level Effects on Growth of Melaleuca Seedlings from Lake Okeechobee (Florida, USA) Littoral Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOCKHART; AUSTIN; AUMEN

    1999-05-01

    / The invasive exotic wetland tree, Melaleuca quinquenervia, is expanding rapidly throughout seasonally wet areas of southern Florida (USA), including the littoral zone of Lake Okeechobee. Natural resource managers are concerned that a lower lake level regulation schedule under consideration for Lake Okeechobee, while potentially beneficial to overall ecosystem health, might increase the rate of Melaleuca expansion. To investigate this possibility, Melaleuca saplings (harvested from the littoral zone) and 7-week-old seedlings (grown from harvested seeds) were subjected to various hydroperiod treatments in replicated mesocosms. Hydroperiod treatments were selected based on a simulation of historical water level variations. Saplings grew taller under longer hydroperiods with fluctuating water levels, including periods of submersion. Time since germination affected the response of seedlings to inundation. Submersed 7-week-old seedlings grew slower and had less biomass than submersed 12-week-old seedlings, yet mortality was low at both ages. Melaleuca's plasticity allows it to adapt to hypoxic, aquatic conditions by means of aquatic heterophylly and adventitious roots. Algae and drought also increased mortality. Based on faster growth of Melaleuca under longer hydroperiods and its adaptability to seasonal flooding, a lower lake regulation schedule may not stimulate its expansion. Therefore, water levels should not be manipulated only to control Melaleuca. Control of Melaleuca should continue using current practices such as manual removal or chemical treatment. KEY WORDS: Melaleuca; Lake Okeechobee; Littoral zone; Water level; Regulation schedule

  6. Lake Bolsena (Central Italy: an updating study on its water chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero BRUNI

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In spite of its importance as regards size (volume 9.2 106 m3, max depth 151 m and as a source of drinking water, Lake Bolsena has not been studied from a hydrochemical point of view since the second half of the 60s, when a group of researchers from the Istituto Italiano di Idrobiologia co-ordinated a complete study of the limnology of the Latium lakes Bolsena, Albano, Vico, and Bracciano. In the following years analyses were performed sporadically; since the 90s, temperature and oxygen profiles and other studies were made by the Associazione Lago di Bolsena. Based on chemical profiles made in 2001-2003, this paper discusses the present chemical composition of Lake Bolsena waters, and compares them with those of other volcanic lakes in Latium (Bracciano, Albano, Nemi and Vico. The paper briefly considers the main factors influencing the water chemistry of Lake Bolsena, the variations observed from the analyses of the 60s, and the main sources of risk to water quality.

  7. Under trees and water at Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joel E.; Bacon, Charles R.; Wayne, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Crater Lake partially fills the caldera that formed approximately 7,700 years ago during the eruption of a 12,000-ft-high volcano known as Mount Mazama. The caldera-forming, or climactic, eruption of Mount Mazama devastated the surrounding landscape, left a thick deposit of pumice and ash in adjacent valleys, and spread a blanket of volcanic ash as far away as southern Canada. Prior to the climactic event, Mount Mazama had a 400,000-year history of volcanic activity similar to other large Cascade volcanoes such as Mounts Shasta, Hood, and Rainier. Since the caldera formed, many smaller, less violent eruptions occurred at volcanic vents below Crater Lake's surface, including Wizard Island. A survey of Crater Lake National Park with airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) resulted in a digital elevation map of the ground surface beneath the forest canopy. The average resolution is 1.6 laser returns per square meter yielding vertical and horizontal accuracies of ±5 cm. The map of the floor beneath the surface of the 1,947-ft-deep (593-m-deep) Crater Lake was developed from a multibeam sonar bathymetric survey and was added to the map to provide a continuous view of the landscape from the highest peak on Mount Scott to the deepest part of Crater Lake. Four enlarged shaded-relief views provide a sampling of features that illustrate the resolution of the LiDAR survey and illustrate its utility in revealing volcanic landforms and subtle features of the climactic eruption deposits. LiDAR's high precision and ability to "see" through the forest canopy reveal features that may not be easily recognized-even when walked over-because their full extent is hidden by vegetation, such as the 1-m-tall arcuate scarp near Castle Creek.

  8. Vertical distribution of a deep-water moss and associated epiphytes in Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntire, C.D.; Phinney, H.K.; Larson, Gary L.; Buktenica, M.W.

    1994-01-01

    A one-person submersible was used to examine the vertical distribution of the deep-water moss Drepanocladus aduncus (Hedw.) Warnst in Crater Lake (Oregon). Living specimens were found attached to sediment and rocks at depths between 25 m and 140 m. Dense beds of the moss were observed at depths between 30 m and 80 m, a region that corresponded roughly to the zone of maximum primary production by phytoplankton. The moss population supported a diverse assemblage of epiphytic algae, of which the most abundant genera included Cladophora,Oedogonium, Rhizoclonium, Tribonema, Vaucheria, and the diatoms Cocconeis, Cymbella, Epithemia, Fragilaria, Gomphonema, Melosira, Navicula, and Synedra. Chemical and physical data supported the hypothesis that the lower limit of distribution of the moss is determined by light limitation, whereas the upper limit is related to the availability of nutrients, particularly nitrate-nitrogen and trace elements. Deep-water videotapes of the moss population indicated that D. aduncus with its epiphytic algae was abundant enough in regions associated with the metalimnion and upper hypolimnion to have a potential influence on the nutrient dynamics of the Crater Lake ecosystem. Although the maximum depth at which living bryophytes occur in Crater Lake is similar to that found for Lake Tahoe, conditions in Lake Tahoe allow the growth and survival of a much more diverse assemblage of bryophytes and charophytes than is present in Crater Lake.

  9. CONCENTRATION OF URANIUM IN WATERS OF THE BIGGEST LAKES OF THE TYWA RIVER DRAINAGE BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Kubiak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research of uranium concentrations in its different kinds – suspended and dissolved – in waters of the largest lakes located in the catchment area of the River Tywa – Strzeszowskie Lake, Dłużyna Lake, Długie Lake and Dłuzec Lake. Small (or the order of several 0,01 µg/l variations in concentration of uranium in different lakes were noted. The study has also shown a seasonal variation – in a similar range – in concentrations of the above species of uranium, as well as total uranium. The content of dissolved uranium was highest in the autumn and winter, lower in the spring and summer. Overall, total uranium was found in greatest concentrations during the fall, in other seasons concentrations were lower and similar to each other. Suspended uranium was found in largest concentrations in autumn and summer, in lower ones in spring and winter. Concentrations of the different species of uranium during the study period showed a small variation – variation coefficient below 10% for total uranium and dissolved uranium, and about 25% for suspended uranium. The observed concentrations of uranium were typical of uncontaminated unpolluted water.

  10. Toward a generic method for studying water renewal, with application to the epilimnion of Lake Tanganyika

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourgue, Olivier; Deleersnijder, Eric; White, Laurent

    2007-09-01

    We present a method, based on the concept of age and residence time, to study the water renewal in a semi-enclosed domain. We split the water of this domain into different water types. The initial water is the water initially present in the semi-enclosed domain. The renewing water is defined as the water entering the domain of interest. Several renewing water types may be considered depending on their origin. We present the equations for computing the age and the residence time of a certain water type. These timescales are of use to understand the rate at which the water renewal takes place. Computing these timescales can be achieved at an acceptable extra computer cost. The above-mentioned method is applied to study the renewal of epilimnion (i.e. the surface layer) water in Lake Tanganyika. We have built a finite element reduced-gravity model modified to take into account the water exchange between the epilimnion and the hypolimnion (i.e. the bottom layer), the water supply from precipitation and incoming rivers, and the water loss from evaporation and the only outgoing river. With our water renewal diagnoses, we show that the only significant process in the renewal of epilimnion water in Lake Tanganyika is the water exchange between the epilimnion and the hypolimnion, other phenomena being negligible.

  11. 28. DIOXIN-LIKE AND ESTROGEN-LIKE POTENTIALS IN SURFACE WATER SAMPLES FROM TAIHU LAKE, YANGTZE DELTA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Taihu Lake is a major water source for Yangtze Delta, which is one of the most urbanized and economically prosperous areas in China. In last couple of decades, some parts of the lake were found to be heavily polluted due to eutrophication, In this study a batch of short-term biochemical assays were applied for the assessment of endocrine disruptive potentials and dioxin-like potentials in surface water samples from Taihu Lake.

  12. Assessing variability of water quality in a groundwater-fed perennial lake of Kashmir Himalayas using linear geostatistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah, S.; Jeelani, Gh.; Ahmed, Shakeel

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a study on Manasbal lake, which is one of the high altitude lakes in the Kashmir Valley, India. Eighteen water samples were analysed for major ions and trace elements to assess the variability of water quality of the lake for various purposes. Geostatistics, the theory of regionalized variables, was then used to enhance the dataset and estimate some missing spatial values. Results indicated that the concentration of major ions in the water samples in winter was higher than in summer. The scatter diagrams suggested the dominance of alkaline earths over the alkali elements. Three types of water were identified in the lake that are referred to as Ca-HCO3, Mg-HCO3 and hybrid types. The lake water was found to be controlled by rock-water interaction with carbonate lithology as a dominant source of the solutes. The major (Ca2 + , Mg2 + , Na + , K + , NO3 and {{HCO}}3-, CO3 and Cl) and trace elements of the lake water were within the World Health Organization standards, therefore the lake water was considered chemically safe for drinking purposes. Although NO3 concentration (ranging from 1.72 to 2 mg/L), is within the permissible limit and not very alarming, the gradually increasing trend is not acceptable. It is however, important to guard its spatio-temporal variability as the water is used for domestic as well as agricultural purposes. This study is significant as hydrogeological information on such high altitude lakes in India is scanty.

  13. Improving Multi-Objective Management of Water Quality Tipping Points: Revisiting the Classical Shallow Lake Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J. D.; Reed, P. M.; Keller, K.

    2015-12-01

    Recent multi-objective extensions of the classical shallow lake problem are useful for exploring the conceptual and computational challenges that emerge when managing irreversible water quality tipping points. Building on this work, we explore a four objective version of the lake problem where a hypothetical town derives economic benefits from polluting a nearby lake, but at the risk of irreversibly tipping the lake into a permanently polluted state. The trophic state of the lake exhibits non-linear threshold dynamics; below some critical phosphorus (P) threshold it is healthy and oligotrophic, but above this threshold it is irreversibly eutrophic. The town must decide how much P to discharge each year, a decision complicated by uncertainty in the natural P inflow to the lake. The shallow lake problem provides a conceptually rich set of dynamics, low computational demands, and a high level of mathematical difficulty. These properties maximize its value for benchmarking the relative merits and limitations of emerging decision support frameworks, such as Direct Policy Search (DPS). Here, we explore the use of DPS as a formal means of developing robust environmental pollution control rules that effectively account for deeply uncertain system states and conflicting objectives. The DPS reformulation of the shallow lake problem shows promise in formalizing pollution control triggers and signposts, while dramatically reducing the computational complexity of the multi-objective pollution control problem. More broadly, the insights from the DPS variant of the shallow lake problem formulated in this study bridge emerging work related to socio-ecological systems management, tipping points, robust decision making, and robust control.

  14. Phosphorus mobility among sediments, water and cyanobacteria enhanced by cyanobacteria blooms in eutrophic Lake Dianchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xin; Wang, Yiqi; He, Jian; Luo, Xingzhang; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-12-01

    This study was focused on the phosphorus mobility among sediments, water and cyanobacteria in eutrophic Lake Dianchi. Four conditions lake water, water and algae, water and sediments, and three objects together were conducted to investigate the effects of cyanobacteria growth on the migration and transformation of phosphorus. Results showed a persistent correlation between the development of cyanobacterial blooms and the increase of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) in the lake water under the condition of three objects together. Time-course assays measuring different forms of phosphorus in sediments indicated that inorganic phosphorus (IP) and NaOH-P were relatively more easier to migrate out of sediment to the water and cyanobacteria. Further studies on phosphorus mobility showed that up to 70.2% of the released phosphorus could be absorbed by cyanobacteria, indicating that sediment is a major source of phosphorus when external loading is reduced. Time-course assays also showed that the development of cyanobacterial blooms promoted an increase in pH and a decrease in the redox potential of the lake water. The structure of the microbial communities in sediments was also significantly changed, revealed a great impaction of cyanobacterial blooms on the microbial communities in sediments, which may contribute to phosphorus release. Our study simulated the cyanobacterial blooms of Lake Dianchi and revealed that the cyanobacterial blooms is a driving force for phosphorus mobility among sediments, water and cyanobacteria. The outbreak of algal blooms caused deterioration in water quality. The P in the sediments represented a significant supply for the growth of cyanobacteria.

  15. Meteorological factors affecting the sudden decline in Lake Urmia's water level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkian, Foroozan; Nicholson, Sharon E.; Ziaie, Bahareh

    2016-11-01

    Lake Urmia, in northwest Iran, is the second most saline lake in the world. During the past two decades, the level of water has markedly decreased. In this paper, climate of the lake region is investigated by using data from four meteorological stations near the lake. The data include climatic parameters such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, wind speed, sunshine hours, number of rain days, and evaporation. Climate around the lake is examined by way of climate classification in the periods before and after the reduction in water level. Rainfall in the lake catchment is also evaluated using both gauge and satellite data. The results show a significant decreasing trend in mean annual precipitation and wind speed and an increasing trend in annual average temperature and sunshine hours at the four stations. Precipitation and wind speed have decreased by 37 mm and 2.7 m/s, respectively, and the mean annual temperature and sunshine hours have increased by 1.4 °C and 41.6 days, respectively, over these six decades. Only the climate of the Tabriz region is seen to have significantly changed, going from semiarid to arid. Gauge records and satellite data show a large-scale decreasing trend in rainfall since 1995. The correlation between rainfall and year-to-year changes in lake level is 0.69 over the period 1965 to 2010. The relationship is particularly strong from the early 1990s to 2005. This suggests that precipitation has played an important role in the documented decline of the lake.

  16. Temporal Variation in the Stable Isotopic Composition of Water and Sediment in Seneca Lake, NY (USA): Implications for Paleoclimate Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, T.; Finkelstein, D. B.; Gunn, P.

    2014-12-01

    Paleoclimatic studies often use stratigraphic changes in the oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) of lacustrine carbonate to infer changes in water temperature and/or the δ18O of lake water. To better understand the environmental factors that influence the isotopic composition of lacustrine carbonates and the assumptions that need to be made to infer past changes in climate, we undertook a four-year study of the water chemistry and sediment trap material in Seneca Lake (NY, USA), a large, monomictic, glacial, hardwater lake. Sediment trap material collected weekly between May 2009 and 2013 together with isotopic monitoring of surface and bottom water allow for analysis of the controls on calcite precipitation in the lake. We show that calcite mainly accumulates in traps July through September when the lake water column is stratified and epilimnetic water temperature exceeds 20°C. Up to ~70% of the sediment is comprised of calcite during summer and only ~10% of the sediment is calcite during autumn, winter, and spring. The δ18O of Seneca Lake epilimnetic water varies by only ~0.6 ‰ throughout the year whereas the δ18O of bulk carbonate varies by as much as 2.4‰. As calcite precipitates in the eplimnion, the δ18O declines. Likely due to the large volume and residence time of water, the δ18O of Seneca Lake water appears to track changes in temperature. Our temperature reconstruction using the δ18O of calcite and epilimnetic lake water reveals that calcite was a reasonable proxy for lake surface temperature from July through September. During the remainder of the year, reconstructed temperatures exceed actual temperatures by as much as 18°C. Sediment resuspension (including calcite) during isothermal conditions may explain why calcite is a poor predictor of lake surface temperature in late autumn though spring. The δ18O of calcite in this lake records summer temperatures rather than year-round conditions.

  17. Physical and hydrochemical evidence of lake leakage near Jim Woodruff lock and dam and ground-water inflow to Lake Seminole, and an assessment of karst features in and near the lake, southwestern Georgia and northwestern Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torak, Lynn J.; Crilley, Dianna M.; Painter, Jaime A.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogeologic data and water-chemistry analyses indicate that Lake Seminole leaks into the Upper Floridan aquifer near Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam, southwestern Georgia and northwestern Florida, and that ground water enters Lake Seminole along upstream reaches of the lake's four impoundment arms (Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers, Spring Creek, and Fishpond Drain). Written accounts by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers geologists during dam construction in the late 1940s and early 1950s, and construction-era photographs, document karst-solution features in the limestone that comprise the lake bottom and foundation rock to the dam, and confirm the hydraulic connection of the lake and aquifer. More than 250 karst features having the potential to connect the lake and aquifer were identified from preimpoundment aerial photographs taken during construction. An interactive map containing a photomosaic of 53 photographic negatives was orthorectfied to digital images of 1:24,000-scale topographic maps to aid in identifying karst features that function or have the potential to function as locations of water exchange between Lake Seminole and the Upper Floridan aquifer. Some identified karst features coincide with locations of mapped springs, spring runs, and depressions that are consistent with sinkholes and sinkhole ponds. Hydrographic surveys using a multibeam echosounder (sonar) with sidescan sonar identified sinkholes in the lake bottom along the western lakeshore and in front of the dam. Dye-tracing experiments indicate that lake water enters these sinkholes and is transported through the Upper Floridan aquifer around the west side of the dam at velocities of about 500 feet per hour to locations where water 'boils up' on land (at Polk Lake Spring) and in the channel bottom of the Apalachicola River (at the 'River Boil'). Water discharging from Polk Lake Spring joins flow from a spring-fed ground-water discharge zone located downstream of the dam; the combined flow disappears into

  18. Seasonal radon measurements in Darbandikhan Lake water resources at Kurdistan region-northeastern of Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafir, Adeeb Omer; Ahmad, Ali Hassan; Saridan, Wan Muhamad

    2016-03-01

    A total of 164 water samples were collected from Darbandikhan Lake with their different resources (spring, stream, and lake) during the four seasons, and the measurements were carried out using the electronic RAD 7 detector. For spring water the average radon concentration for spring, summer, autumn and summer were found to be 8.21 Bq/1, 8.94 Bq/1, 7.422 Bq/1, and 8.06 Bq/1, respectively, while for lake and streams the average values were found to be 0.43 Bq/1, 0.877 Bq/1, 0.727 Bq/1, 0.575 Bq/1 respectively. The radon concentration level was higher in summer and lower in spring, and only two samples from spring water have radon concentrations more than 11.1 Bq/1 recommended by the EPA. Total annual effective dose due to ingestion and inhalation has been estimated, the mean annual effective dose during the whole year for spring water was 0.022 mSv/y while for lake with streams was 0.00157 mSv/y. The determined mean annual effective dose in water was lower than the 0.1 mSv/y recommended by WHO. Some physicochemical parameters were measured and no correlation was found between them and radon concentration except for the conductivity of the spring drinking water which reveals a strong correlation for the four seasons.

  19. ECONOMETRIC MODELLING OD THE INFLUENCE OF LAKE WATER QUALITY CHANGES ON FISHING ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Antoni Ramczyk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The econometric model can be a precise instrument for the analysis of the impact of the natural environment's degradation on fishing economy. This paper aims at analysing the influence of the water quality changes in lake Charzykowskie on the fishing economy. This dissertation present the results of a research on the lake water pollution's impact on fishing economy. The economic-ecological models have been constructed, explaining the changes of economic effects of the lake fishery in the conditions of an increasing water pollution in the epilimnion on the example of the catch of Rutilus rutilus, Abramis brama, Blicca bjoerkna, Coregonus albula, Coregonus lavaretus, Anguilla anguilla and Esox lucius in Lake Charzykowskie. Performed empirical research looked into the influence of the environmental factors on the size of fish catch. Calculations and analysis show clearly that though the habitat factors do influence the catch size of each studied fish species, they do it with different intensity and in various combinations. Both lake water quality and climate factors changes cause measurable effects on fishing industry of lake Charzykowskie. Among all the examined Rutilus rutilus, Abramis brama and Blicca bjoerkna the highest environmental requirements concerning water quality has Blicca bjoerkna. Whereas Abramis brama has slightly higher environmental requirements than Rutilus rutilus. Empirical calculations showed as well that Coregonus albula and Coregonus lavaretus have considerably higher water cleanness requirements than Rutilus rutilus, Abramis brama and Blicca bjoerkna. While when talking about Rutilus rutilus, Abramis brama and Blicca bjoerkna, most water characteristics still rather stimulated these species' development, when it comes to Coregonus albula and Coregonus lavaretus, in general they suppressed their development. The model has also proved quite high habitat requierements of Anquilla anquilla and correctness of the thesis that

  20. Water level changes for Lake Turkana and climate variability during the African Humid Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloszies, C.; Forman, S. L.; Wright, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    The chronology of East African paleoclimate suggests the transition through the African Humid Period (AHP) at ca. 15 to 5 ka was a binary shift from wet conditions in the Late Pleistocene to current aridity. Previous studies indicate that water levels for Lake Turkana for the AHP were stable at ~88 to 98 m above current level with outflow into the White Nile Basin. This study of relict beaches around Lake Turkana indicates surprisingly >50 m variability in water level between 14 and 4 ka. The elevation of past water level is constrained by barometric and GPS-based altimetry of relict beaches and age control by 14C dating of associated mollusks and OSL dating of quartz grains from surrounding littoral and sublittoral deposits. We also include well provenanced lake level data from prior studies to constrain more fully the timing and height of water level fluctuations in the Late Quaternary. Additionally, previous studies indicate that peak water levels may be regionally amplified by increased precipitation causing overflow into the Lake Turkana Basin from the adjacent Suguta and Chew Bahir basins, particularly during high stands at ca. >8.5 ka and at 6.3 ka. Our analysis of the Lake Turkana strandplain reveals that water level may have varied by × 60 m, potentially reaching the outlet elevation at ca.11.3, 10.3, 9.0, 6.3 and 5.1 ka. There are other possible high stands at ca. 13.0, 8.4, 7.8 and 7.0 ka with limited elevational and age constraints; it is unknown if these lake stands reached the outlet elevation. Evidence from relict strand plains indicate that lake level was probably below 20 m since ca. 4.5 ka, though there were two noticeable high stands up to >12 to 18 m at ca. 830 years ago and extreme water level variability, rather than a sustained water level, with a final and rapid fall in lake level between 5.0 and 4.5 ka associated with increasing aridity.

  1. Short-term effects of drawing water for connectivity of rivers and lakes on zooplankton community structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhenbin; LIU Aifen; ZHANG Shiyang; CHENG Shuiping; WU Xiaohui

    2008-01-01

    During 28-29,September 2005,water was drawn from Hanjiang River and Houguan Lake to the Yangzi River via Sanjiao Lake and Nantaizi Lake in Wuhan in order to provide favorable conditions for ecosystem restoration.To evaluate the feasibility and validity of drawing water as a means of ecosystem restoration,zooplankton populations were studied 3 times (before,immediately after finishing and a month after drawing water)at seven locations from 27 Sept.2005 to 2 Nov.2005.Water quality in the lakes was mostly improved and zooplankton species richness decreased as soon as drawing water had finished but increased a month after drawing water.Zooplankton density and biomass was reduced in the lakes by drawing water but was increased at the entrance to Sanjiao Lake because of landform geometry change.Before drawing water,most species in Sanjiao lake e.g.,Brachionus sp.and Keratella sp.were tolerant of contamination.After drawing water oligotrophic-prone species such as Lecane ludwigii and Gastropus stylifer emerged.We conclude that drawing water could be important for improving water quality and favour ecosystem restoration.Dilution of nutrient concentrations may be an important role in the effect.

  2. The Legacy of Arsenic Contamination from Giant Mine, Northern Canada: An Assessment of Impacts Based on Lake Water and Lake Sediment Core Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, J. M.; Korosi, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Giant Mine, which operated between 1948 and 2004 and located near the City of Yellowknife (Northwest Territories, Canada), has left a legacy of arsenic, antimony, and mercury contamination extending to the present day. Over 20,000 tonnes of arsenic trioxide dust was released from roaster stack emissions during its first 10 years of operations, leading to a significant contamination of the surrounding landscape. Here we present a summary of impacts by the recent contamination from Giant Mine on the surrounding region. A survey we conducted of 25 lakes of the region in 2010 revealed that most lake water within a 15 km radius of the roaster stack had arsenic concentrations in water > 10 mg/L, the standard for drinking water, with concentrations declining exponentially with increasing distance from the roaster stack. Sediment cores from lakes were collected near the Giant Mine roaster stack and radiometrically dated by 137Cs and excess 210Pb. Arsenic concentrations in these sediments increased by 1700% during the 1950s and 60s, consistent with the history of arsenic releases from roaster emissions. Correspondingly, pelagic diatoms and cladocerans were extirpated from one lake during this period, based on microfossil analysis of lake sediment deposits. Sediment core analysis further showed that this lake ecosystem has not recovered, even ten years after closure of the mine. Likely causes for the lack of recent recovery are explored with the use of sediment toxicity bioassays, using a novel paleo-ecotoxicological approach of using toxicity assessments of radiometrically dated lake sediment horizons.

  3. The greatest soda-water lake in the world and how it is influenced by climatic change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadioǧlu, M.; Şen, Z.; Batur, E.

    1997-11-01

    Global warming resulting from increasing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and the local climate changes that follow affect local hydrospheric and biospheric environments. These include lakes that serve surrounding populations as a fresh water resource or provide regional navigation. Although there may well be steady water-quality alterations in the lakes with time, many of these are very much climate-change dependent. During cool and wet periods, there may be water-level rises that may cause economic losses to agriculture and human activities along the lake shores. Such rises become nuisances especially in the case of shoreline settlements and low-lying agricultural land. Lake Van, in eastern Turkey currently faces such problems due to water-level rises. The lake is unique for at least two reasons. First, it is a closed basin with no natural or artificial outlet and second, its waters contain high concentrations of soda which prevent the use of its water as a drinking or agricultural water source. Consequently, the water level fluctuations are entirely dependent on the natural variability of the hydrological cycle and any climatic change affects the drainage basin. In the past, the lake-level fluctuations appear to have been rather systematic and unrepresentable by mathematical equations. Herein, monthly polygonal climate diagrams are constructed to show the relation between lake level and some meteorological variables, as indications of significant and possible climatic changes. This procedure is applied to Lake Van, eastern Turkey, and relevant interpretations are presented.

  4. Renegotiation of the 1987 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement: From Confusion to Promise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Krantzberg

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available For nearly four decades, the Great Lakes regime has invoked the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement as the mechanism for binational cooperation on programs and policies. Many advances in water quality have led to unquestionable improvements in ecosystem quality, habitat and biodiversity, and water infrastructure. Still, Great Lakes scientists have issued compelling evidence that the ecological health of the basin ecosystem is at significant risk. In 2012, the Agreement will be revised for the first time in 25 years. The degree of engagement in a future Agreement, including scope, issues of significant importance, governance and collaboration will hinge on a thorough analytical process, so far seemingly absent, coupled with real consultation, so far marginally evident. Renegotiating the Agreement to generate a revitalized and sustainable future mandates that science inform contemporary public policy, and that inclusive discourse and public engagement be integral through the process. Many of these steps are still absent, and the analysis presented here strongly suggests that the constituents of the Great Lakes regime voice their views critically, emphatically, and often. If the negotiators listen, we can collectively make the Lakes Great.

  5. Managing the financial risk of low water levels in Great Lakes with index-based contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, E.; Characklis, G. W.; Brown, C. M.; Moody, P.

    2014-12-01

    Low water levels in the Great Lakes have recently had significant financial impacts on the region's commercial shipping, responsible for transporting millions of dollars' worth of bulk goods each year. Low lake levels can significantly affect shipping firms, as cargo capacity is a function of draft, or the distance between water level and the ship's bottom. Draft increases with weight, and lower lake levels force ships to reduce cargo to prevent running aground in shallow harbors, directly impacting the finances of shipping companies. Risk transfer instruments may provide adaptable, yet unexplored, alternatives for managing these financial risks, at significantly less expense than more traditional solutions (e.g., dredging). Index-based financial instruments can be particularly attractive as contract payouts are directly linked to well-defined transparent metrics (e.g., lake levels), eliminating the need for subjective adjustors, as well as concerns over moral hazard. In developing such instruments, a major challenge is identifying an index that is well correlated with financial losses, and thus a contract that reliably pays out when losses are experienced (low basis risk). In this work, a relationship between lake levels and shipping revenues is developed, and actuarial analyses of the frequency and magnitude of revenue losses is completed using this relationship and synthetic water level data. This analysis is used to develop several types of index-based contracts. A standardized suite of binary contracts is developed, with each indexed to lake levels and priced according to predefined thresholds. These are combined to form portfolios with different objectives (e.g. options, collars), with optimal portfolio structure and length of coverage determined by limiting basis risk and contract cost, using simulations over the historic dataset. Results suggest that portfolios of these binary contracts can substantially reduce the risk of financial losses during periods of

  6. Comparative study of water quality of rivers used for raw water supply & ex-mining lakes in Perak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orji, K. U.; Sapari, N.; Yusof, K. W.; Asadpour, R.; Olisa, E.

    2013-06-01

    Ex-mining lakes are seldom used as sources of raw water for the treatment of public water supply due to the general view that they are highly polluted. This study examined the water quality of these lakes, compared and contrasted them to the water quality of the rivers used for Perak drinking water supply. Ten water samples were analyzed from different ex-mining lakes. Two water samples were from Kinta and Perak rivers. They were analyzed for physico-chemical properties such as temperature, pH, EC, TDS, SO42- COD, Cl- Na+ Fe, As, and Pb. The results showed that temperature varied from 28.1°C to 34.1°C, pH 6.2 to 9.0, EC 55 to 400 μs/cm, turbidity 5.6 to 74.2 NTU, TDS 36.8 to 268mg/l, Cl- 0.483 to 3.339mg/l, SO42- 0.051 to 15.307mg/l, Na 0.669 to 3.668mg/l, Fe 0 to 0.14mg/l, As 0 to 0.004mg/l, and Pb 0.019 to 0.075mg/l. All the samples were highly turbid, had slightly high concentration of Pb, and had common water quality problem. The ex-mining lakes can also be used to supply water after treatment since these rivers are already being used by the Metropolitan Utilities Corporation for water treatment. The ex-mining pools can be used as alternative sources of drinking water supply to the people of Perak.

  7. Cyanobacterial flora and the physico-chemical environment of six tropical fresh water lakes of Udaipur, India.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The cyanobacteria and physico-chemical environments of six tropical fresh water lakes of Udaipur, India were investigated. These lakes receive varying nutrient inputs from different sources. Altogether 51 species of cyanobacteria were recorded. Species composition varied between lakes and between seasons. Lake VI (Baghdara), which receives nutrients from natural sources only, differed considerably from the others in water chemistry and composition of dominant species. Lake II (Swaroop Sagar), eutrophied due to sewage inputs, was species poor. Non-diazotrophs, represented by 27 species, dominated during summer. With few exceptions, N2-fixing species, both heterocystous and unicellular diazotrophs (represented by 24 species), were dominant during winter. Microcystis aeruginosa, Phormidium sp. and Anabaena flos-aque were the dominant taxa of lakes characterized by sewage eutrophication. The study shows that both, species diversity and community composition were affected by water chemistry.

  8. Mesoscale modeling of lake effect snow over Lake Erie - sensitivity to convection, microphysics and the water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theeuwes, N.E.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Krikken, F.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Lake effect snow is a shallow convection phenomenon during cold air advection over a relatively warm lake. A severe case of lake effect snow over Lake Erie on 24 December 2001 was studied with the MM5 and WRF mesoscale models. This particular case provided over 200 cm of snow in Buffalo (NY), caused

  9. Water-quality effects on Baker Lake of recent volcanic activity at Mount Baker, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortleson, Gilbert Carl; Wilson, Reed T.; Foxworthy, B.L.

    1976-01-01

    Increased volcanic activity on Mount Baker, which began in March 1975, represents the greatest known activity of a Cascade Range volcano since eruptions at Lassen Peak, Calif. during 1914-17. Emissions of dust and increased emanations of steam, other gases, and heat from the Sherman Crater area of the mountain focused attention on the possibility of hazardous events, including lava flows, pyroclastic eruptions, avalanches, and mudflows. However, the greatest undesirable natural results that have been observed after one year of the increased activity are an increase in local atmospheric pollution and a decrease in the quality of some local water resources, including Baker Lake. Baker Lake, a hydropower reservoir behind Upper Baker Dam, supports a valuable fishery resource and also is used for recreation. The lake's feedwater is from Baker River and many smaller streams, some of which, like Boulder Creek, drain parts of Mount Baker. Boulder Creek receives water from Sherman Crater, and its channel is a likely route for avalanches or mudflows that might originate in the crater area. Boulder Creek drains only about 5 percent of the total drainage area of Baker Lake, but during 1975 carried sizeable but variable loads of acid and dissolved minerals into the lake. Sulfurous gases and the fumarole dust from Sherman Crater are the main sources for these materials, which are brought into upper Boulder Creek by meltwater from the crater. In September 1973, before the increased volcanic activity, Boulder Creek near the lake had a pH of 6.0-6.6; after the increase the pH ranged as low as about 3.5. Most nearby streams had pH values near 7. On April 29, in Boulder Creek the dissolved sulfate concentration was 6 to 29 times greater than in nearby creeks or in Baker River; total iron was 18-53 times greater than in nearby creeks; and other major dissolved constituents generally 2 to 7 times greater than in the other streams. The short-term effects on Baker Lake of the acidic

  10. MICROCOSM - INSTALLATION OF THE LHC MODEL

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This week, installation of a 6m long section of the LHC starts in Microcosm. This full-scale model is the first part of a new exhibition highlighting the technological challenges and the exciting physics of the LHC era. Many people at CERN have helped with the preparations for the model and the Microcosm team would like to thank all those involved. An inauguration for the press will take place at the start of the next school term.

  11. Arsenic, Fluoride and Vanadium in surface water (Chasicó Lake, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria laura ePuntoriero

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chasicó Lake is the main water body in the southwest of the Chaco-Pampean plain. It shows some differences from the typical Pampean shallow lakes, such as high salinity and high arsenic and fluoride levels. The aim of this paper is to analyze the trace elements [arsenic (As, fluoride (F- and vanadium (V] present in Chasicó Lake. Surface and groundwater were sampled in dry and wet periods, during 2010 and 2011. Fluoride was determined with a selective electrode. As and V were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES. Significant correlation in surface water was only found for As and F- (r=0.978, p<0.01. The As, F- and V concentration values were higher and more widely dispersed in surface water than in groundwater, as a consequence of evaporation. The fact that these elements do not correlate in surface water may also indicates that groundwater would not be the main source of origin of As, F- and V in surface water. The origin of these trace elements is from volcanic glass from Pampean loess. As, F- and V concentration were higher than in national and international guideline levels for the protection of aquatic biota. Hence, this issue is relevant since the silverside (Odontesthes bonariensis is the most important commercial species in Chasicó Lake. This fish is both consumed locally and exported to other South-American countries through commercial and sport fishing.

  12. Measuring the value of water quality improvements in Lake Tai, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-wen ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    Despite widespread concerns and elevated policy debates,little is known about the Chinese public's perceptions of water pollution and willingness to cooperate with government policies.Based on survey data,this study examined Lake Tai resident perception of water pollution,willingness to pay (WTP) for water quality improvements,and its influencing factors,Contingent valuation (CV) results showed that respondents would prefer to pay 141 CNY per household a year,approximately 0.70% of their annual per capita disposable income,as an environmental fee to improve water quality in Lake Tai.Aggregate WTP for all five lakeside cities of Lake Tai was estimated at about 3.8 billion CNY,without discounts,in the next ten years.WTP was found to increase with income and female respondents were willing to pay more than males.Those respondents who were dissatisfied with water quality were more likely to pay more.The usage of Lake Tai did not strongly affect WTP.

  13. Physical, chemical and microbiological analysis of the water quality of Rawal Lake, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehreen Hassan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available What better gift of nature would be than good quality water? In order to assess the quality of water of Rawal Lake, following research was carried out. Rawal lake is a source of drinking water supplied to many areas of Rawalpindi and Islamabad’ the capital city of Pakistan. Water of this lake is being highly polluted by the local communities alongside the lake through solid waste dumping. Samples of surface water were collected, tested and analyzed in the laboratory on the basis of physical, chemical and microbiological parameters. The results showed uncertainties in many of the selected parameters. Microbiological analysis revealed high contamination of E. coli, fecal coliform and total coliform in the samples proving it unfit for drinking. It was found that the concentration of all physical parameters such as nitrates, chloride, pH and conductivity were within the normal limits. The level of heavy metals like lead, iron, chromium etc. was also found low. Turbidity at some points exceeded the maximum acceptable limit as per WHO statement.

  14. Combined ICESat and CryoSat-2 Altimetry for Accessing Water Level Dynamics of Tibetan Lakes over 2003–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunqiao Song

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Long-term observations of lake water level are essential to our understanding of the evolution of Tibetan lake system. CryoSat-2 radar altimetry data over the Tibetan Plateau (2010–2014, P2 is used to extend lake level measurements from ICESat laser altimetry (2003–2009, P1. This study evaluates the performance of CryoSat-2 data by comparing with gauge-based water levels that are calibrated by ICESat-observed water level time series, and quantifies the uncertainty of water-level change rate estimates from satellite altimetry measurements. We completely investigate the 131 lakes that were observed by both ICESat and CryoSat-2. The mean change rate of water level for all of examined lakes in P2 (0.19 ± 0.03 m·year–1 is slightly lower than that (0.21 ± 0.02 m·year–1 observed in P1. The extended lake level time series also indicates that, in the past few years, lakes in the Northern Changtang (especially in Hol Xil showed accelerated growth; and that the extensive lake level rises north to the Gangdise Mountains, during 2003–2009, were found dampened during the CryoSat-2 observation period. The spatio-temporal heterogeneity of precipitation observed from weather stations can be used to partly explain the observed temporal pattern of lake level changes over different sub-zones of the plateau.

  15. Water level and volume estimations of the Albano and Nemi lakes (central Italy

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    A. Mazzoni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In April 2006 an airborne laser scanning (LIDAR survey of the Albano and Nemi craters was carried out to obtain a high resolution digital terrain model (DTM of the area. We have integrated the LIDAR survey of the craters and the recent bathymetry of the Albano lake to achieve a complete DTM, useful for morphological studies. In addition, with a GPS RTK survey (July 2007 we estimated the Albano and Nemi mean lake levels respectively at 288.16 m and 319.02 m (asl. Based on the integrated DTM and the newly estimated water level values, we evaluated about 21.7·106 m3 the water volume loss of the Albano lake from 1993 to 2007, with an average rate of about 1.6·106 m3/yr.

  16. Trends in the chemistry of atmospheric deposition and surface waters in the Lake Maggiore catchment

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    M. Rogora

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lake Maggiore catchment is the area of Italy most affected by acid deposition. Trend analysis was performed on long-term (15-30 years series of chemical analyses of atmospheric deposition, four small rivers draining forested catchments and four high mountain lakes. An improvement in the quality of atmospheric deposition was detected, due to decreasing sulphate concentration and increasing pH. Similar trends were also found in high mountain lakes and in small rivers. Atmospheric deposition, however, is still providing a large and steady flux of nitrogen compounds (nitrate and ammonium which is causing increasing nitrogen saturation in forest ecosystems and increasing nitrate levels in rivers. Besides atmospheric deposition, an important factor controlling water acidification and recovery is the weathering of rocks and soils which may be influenced by climate warming. A further factor is the episodic deposition of Saharan calcareous dust which contributes significantly to base cation deposition. Keywords: trend, atmospheric deposition, nitrogen, stream water chemistry.

  17. Seasonal variation in physicochemical parameters and heavy metals in water of Upper Lake of Bhopal.

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    Virha, Rachna; Biswas, A K; Kakaria, V K; Qureshi, T A; Borana, K; Malik, Neetu

    2011-02-01

    Heavy metal pollution of fresh water is the single most important environmental threat to the future. Upper Lake is a freshwater lake, which is the major source of drinking water in the city of Bhopal, the capital city of M.P., the central province of India, but due to anthropogenic activities this lake is being polluted. During the investigation heavy metals and physicochemical parameters were analyzed to determine the water quality seasonally in the year of 2006 and 2007. All the physicochemical parameters except DO (6.50-6.97 mg l⁻¹), Free CO₂ (0.8-1.6 mg l⁻¹) and BOD (5.47-6.85 mg l⁻¹) were below the prescribed limit as recommended by Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) for drinking water standards. In case of heavy metals, Ni (0.173-0.253 mg l⁻¹) and Cr (0.047-0.087 mg l⁻¹) were found beyond the prescribed limits (0.02 and 0.05 mg l⁻¹, respectively), whereas Pb (0.057-0.087 mg l⁻¹), Cu (0.016-0.020 mg l⁻¹) and Hg (0.0006-0.0011 mg l⁻¹) were within the safe limit. This study reveals that water of upper lake is partially polluted with heavy metals. It is recommended that strict vigilance and constant monitoring are needed to maintain water quality of the lake, which is a major source of potable water for the Bhopal city.

  18. Water quality in Lake Xochimilco, Mexico: zooplankton indicators and Vibrio cholerae

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    Sarma Nandini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lake Xochimilco is a eutrophic water body in Mexico City used by the local population for aquaculture and agriculture. Water level is maintained with inputs of partially treated waste water from the Cerro de la Estrella treatment plant. In this study we analysed the water quality at two sites of Lake Xochimilco, Lake Xaltocan and the Santa Cruz Canal using various indicators such as zooplankton diversity, saprobic indices, bacterial concentrations and physico-chemical variables. Eighty litres of water was filtered from Lake Xochimilco from each site, once a month from March to October of 2012, and the rotifers, cladocerans and copepods were enumerated and identified. Physico-chemical parameters such as temperature, pH, Secchi depth, water depth, nitrogen and phosphorus and chlorophyll a concentrations, and bacterial densities were measured. During the study we recorded 33 species of rotifers, the most abundant being Brachionus angularis, B. calyciflorus and B. havanaensis.  Among the microcrustaceans the most abundant were the cladoceran Moina micrura and the copepods Acanthocyclops americanus and Arctodiaptomus dorsalis. The species diversity was around 2 bits/ind. and the saprobic index between 1.5-2.0, indicating that both sites were β meso-saprobic.  At both sites nitrogen was <1 mg/L and phosphorus ranged between 2.5-7.8 mg/L. Chlorophyll a concentrations were between 66-136 µg/L. The toxigenic (Vibrio cholerae No-O1/No-O139 and the non-toxigenic (Vibrio cholerae No-O135 strains of the bacterium were recorded, closely associated with littoral rotifers and cladocerans particularly Brachionus quadridentatus and  Alona sp. All variables indicate that these sites in Lake Xochimilco are eutrophic and highly contaminated and that the water quality needs to be improved.

  19. Hydraulic, geomorphic, and trout habitat conditions of the Lake Fork of the Gunnison River in Hinsdale County, Lake City, Colorado, Water Years 2010-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cory A.; Richards, Rodney J.; Schaffrath, Keelin R.

    2015-01-01

    Channel rehabilitation, or reconfiguration, to mitigate a variety of riverine problems has become a common practice in the western United States. However, additional work to monitor and assess the channel response to, and the effectiveness of, these modifications over longer periods of time (decadal or longer) is still needed. The Lake Fork of the Gunnison River has been an area of active channel modification to accommodate the needs of the Lake City community since the 1950s. The Lake Fork Valley Conservancy District began a planning process to assess restoration options for a reach of the Lake Fork in Lake City to enhance hydraulic and ecologic characteristics of the reach. Geomorphic channel form is affected by land-use changes within the basin and geologic controls within the reach. The historic channel was defined as a dynamic, braided channel with an active flood plain. This can result in a natural tendency for the channel to braid. A braided channel can affect channel stability of reconfigured reaches when a single-thread meandering channel is imposed on the stream. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board and Colorado River Water Conservation District, began a study in 2010 to quantify existing hydraulic and habitat conditions for a reach of the Lake Fork of the Gunnison River in Lake City, Colorado. The purpose of this report is to quantify existing Lake Fork hydraulic and habitat conditions and establish a baseline against which post-reconfiguration conditions can be compared. This report (1) quantifies the existing hydraulic and geomorphic conditions in a 1.1-kilometer section of the Lake Fork at Lake City that has been proposed as a location for future channel-rehabilitation efforts, (2) characterizes the habitat suitability of the reach for two trout species based on physical conditions within the stream, and (3) characterizes the current riparian canopy density.

  20. Seasonal Variations in δ18O of Inflowing River Water, Lake Water, Sediment Trap Material and Ostracod Shells of Lake Nam Co and its Catchment (Tibet, China) — a Proxy Calibration Study

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    Daut, G.; Wang, J.; Ju, J.; Plessen, B.; Fürstenberg, S.; Baade, J.; Frenzel, P.; Haberzettl, T.; Maeusbacher, R.; Zhu, L.

    2014-12-01

    δ18O is a very common proxy used in palaeoclimate studies all over the world, but for most parts of the world and especially the Tibetan Plateau modern studies that trace the pathway of this isotope from sink to source are lacking. In this study, financed by the BMBF (German Ministry of Science and Education, Project CADY), we present data that fill this gap. The study was performed in the terminal lake Nam Co, the biggest lake on the central Tibetan Plateau and its catchment. Water of the main tributaries to the lake, lake water at three different stations and from different water depths, bulk carbonate collected from different water depths with sediment traps and shells of living ostracods were collected for one year at lake Nam Co in approx. monthly intervals and analyzed for their δ18O values. The inflowing river waters mainly reflect the precipitation and show regional as well as seasonal variations depending on their location and on Monsoon or Westerly season but are in general on the global meteoric waterline. The lake water shows only minor vertical and spatial variations and is clearly off the meteoric waterline due to strong evaporation effects in this terminal lake. δ18O values of the bulk carbonate of sediment collected in sediment traps show only minor vertical and spatial variations during the year and the δ18O offset compared to the lake water is with around 1 ‰ quite small. Most probably this is attributed to chemical fractionation during formation of monohydrocalcite in the water column. In contrast δ18O values of ostracod shells are significant heavier than the lake water indicating isotopic fractionation (vital effect) during shell formation. In addition a seasonal variability is visible. The data of this proxy calibration study give now for the first time the opportunity to validate δ18O proxy data measured on core material from Lake Nam Co for their palaeoclimatic significance.