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Sample records for lake erie coastal

  1. Profiles of Wind and Turbulence in the Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer of Lake Erie

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H

    2014-06-16

    Prediction of wind resource in coastal zones is difficult due to the complexity of flow in the coastal atmospheric boundary layer (CABL). A three week campaign was conducted over Lake Erie in May 2013 to investigate wind characteristics and improve model parameterizations in the CABL. Vertical profiles of wind speed up to 200 m were measured onshore and offshore by lidar wind profilers, and horizontal gradients of wind speed by a 3-D scanning lidar. Turbulence data were collected from sonic anemometers deployed onshore and offshore. Numerical simulations were conducted with the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model with 2 nested domains down to a resolution of 1-km over the lake. Initial data analyses presented in this paper investigate complex flow patterns across the coast. Acceleration was observed up to 200 m above the surface for flow coming from the land to the water. However, by 7 km off the coast the wind field had not yet reached equilibrium with the new surface (water) conditions. The surface turbulence parameters over the water derived from the sonic data could not predict wind profiles observed by the ZephlR lidar located offshore. Horizontal wind speed gradients near the coast show the influence of atmospheric stability on flow dynamics. Wind profiles retrieved from the 3-D scanning lidar show evidence of nocturnal low level jets (LLJs). The WRF model was able to capture the occurrence of LLJ events, but its performance varied in predicting their intensity, duration, and the location of the jet core.

  2. Macroinvertebrate Community Responses to the Chemical Removal of Phragmites in a Lake Erie Coastal Wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesza, A. E.; Holomuzki, J. R.; Klarer, D. M.

    2005-05-01

    The invasive giant reed, Phragmites australis, can quickly form near-monotypic stands in North American wetlands, and as a result, sometimes reduce system biodiversity. However, the effects of Phragmites, and of the glyphosate herbicides used to control it, on trophic structure in benthic communities in these systems are less well known. Our study compares macroinvertebrate, algal, and juvenile fish diversity in replicate 10 x 5 m stands of Typha angustifolia (narrow-leaf cattail), glyphosate-sprayed Phragmites, and unsprayed Phragmites in a Lake Erie coastal wetland in Huron, Ohio. Macroinvertebrate diversity and proportions of functional feeding groups did not differ among stand types. However, overall densities of macroinvertebrates did vary among stands. Snails and larval chironomids and odonates were typically higher in Phragmites than in Typha stands. Interactions between changing water levels, algal densities, and prevailing flow patterns partly explain these outcomes. Ovipositing adult odonates did not prefer a particular stand type. Similarly, captures of juvenile fish did not vary among stands. Our results suggest that Phragmites, at least in small to moderately sized-patches, and herbicide application to these patches, does not detrimentally affect diversity in wetland, benthic communities.

  3. Limited Regulation of Lake Erie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    Ontario,, Cedar Point in Ohio, Presque Isle in Pennsylvania and Hamlin in New York. Recreational boating is a significant activity on Lake Erie . Along...RD-Al47 936 LIMITED REGULATION OF LAKE ERIE (U) INTERNATIONAL LAKE i/i ERIE REGULATION STUDY BOARD NOV 83 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 13/2 N lhhhhh..hEmhhI...o lake Erie ’Governmen of 4,- % * L CTE " 84100400 .- Canad Unite Stte INTRNAIONL OIN COMISIO 4WD’ This document hais been ow for public rleoe and so

  4. Distribution of native mussel (unionidae) assemblages in coastal areas of Lake Erie, Lake St. Clair, and connecting channels, twenty-five years after a dreissenid invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, David T.; Bossenbroek, Jonathan M.; Burlakova, Lyubov E.; Crail, Todd D.; Szalay, Ferenc de; Griffith, Traci A.; Kapusinski, Douglas; Karatayev, Alexander Y.; Krebs, Robert A.; Meyer, Elizabeth S.; Paterson, Wendy L.; Prescott, Trevor J.; Rowe, Matthew T.; Schloesser, Donald W.; Walsh, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, unionid mussels in the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America have been adversely impacted by invasive dreissenid mussels, which directly (e.g., by attachment to unionid shells) and indirectly (e.g., by competing for food) cause mortality. Despite the invasion, unionids have survived in several areas in the presence of dreissenid mussels. We investigated current spatial patterns in these native mussel refuges based on surveys for unionid mussels across 48 sampling locations (141 sites) in 2011 and 2012, and documented species abundance and diversity in coastal areas of lakes St. Clair and Erie. The highest-quality assemblages of native mussels (densities, richness, and diversity) appear to be concentrated in the St. Clair delta, where abundance continues to decline, as well as in in Thompson Bay of Presque Isle in Lake Erie and in just a few coastal wetlands and drowned river-mouths in the western basin of Lake Erie. The discovery of several new refuge areas suggests that unionids have a broader distribution within the region than previously thought.

  5. Human health-related ecosystem services of avian-dense coastal wetlands adjacent to a Western Lake Erie swimming beach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Chris L; Bisesi, Michael S; Mitsch, William; Andridge, Rebecca; Lee, Jiyoung

    2015-03-01

    Wetlands provide many valuable ecosystem services, including water quality improvement to protect downstream aquatic ecosystems such as lakes, rivers, and estuaries. However, their ability to improve water quality to safe levels for direct human exposure while largely surrounded by agricultural lands and hosting large wildlife populations remains unknown. Our aim was to examine the ecosystem service capabilities of an avian-dense coastal wetland surrounded by agricultural lands along the southwestern shore of Lake Erie in Ohio by assessing the quality of water as it flows through the wetland (Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge (ONWR)) and into Lake Erie beach waters. Our study used total phosphorus and fecal indicator (Escherichia coli) concentrations as water quality metrics across the wetland and at an adjacent Lake Erie swimming beach during the 2012 summer swim season. E. coli and total P levels were consistently highest at the site, where water enters the ONWR (mean E. coli = 507 CFU/100 mL; mean total P = 535 μg/L), and steadily decreased as water flowed through the wetland and into the adjacent beach (mean E. coli = 10 CFU/100 mL; mean total P = 41 μg/L). E. coli and total P showed statistically significant (α = 0.01) correlations with phycocyanin, chlorophyll-a, turbidity, specific conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and pH; total P was also significantly correlated with total N. The results suggest that this wetland may be contributing to improving water quality, which is beneficial for human health as well as to downstream ecosystem health (e.g., limiting eutrophication promoting conditions, etc.).

  6. Lake Erie Fish Community Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Lake Erie Biological Station (LEBS), located in Sandusky, Ohio, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). LEBS is the primary federal agency...

  7. 78 FR 53675 - Safety Zone; Lake Erie Heritage Foundation, Battle of Lake Erie Reenactment; Lake Erie, Put-in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... Lake Erie Reenactment; Lake Erie, Put-in-Bay, OH AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule... vicinity of Put-In-Bay, OH. This safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Lake Erie during Battle of Lake Erie Reenactment near Put-In-Bay. This temporary safety zone is necessary...

  8. Bathymetry of Lake Erie and Lake Saint Clair

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Erie and Lake Saint Clair has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and...

  9. Lake Erie Fish Community Data, 2013 - 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Lake Erie Biological Station (LEBS), located in Sandusky, Ohio, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). LEBS is the primary federal agency...

  10. Lake Erie phosphorus loading and Cladophora updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation will focus on updates or progress being made on each Phosphorus Loadings and Cladophora for Lake Erie. The format will give a brief summary of data, findings, and results that were used by the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA) Annex 4 Nutrients Modeli...

  11. Targets set to reduce Lake Erie algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In February 2016, the Great Lakes Executive Committee, which oversees the implementation of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA) between the U.S. and Canada, approved phosphorus loading targets for Lake Erie to reduce the size of harmful algal blooms (HABs), reduce the presence of the low oxygen zone in the central basin, and protect nearshore water quality. The targets are set with respect to the nutrient loads calculated for 2008. To reduce the impacts of HABs on Lake Erie a target was set of a 40 percent reduction in total and soluble reactive phosphorus loads in the spring from two Canadian rivers and several Michigan and Ohio rivers, especially the Maumee River (https://binational.net/2016/02/22/ finalptargets-ciblesfinalesdep/). States and the province of Ontario are already developing Domestic Action Plans to accomplish the reductions and scientists are developing research and monitoring plans to assess progress.

  12. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Erie: a case history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Floyd C.; Muth, Kenneth M.; Kenyon, Roger

    1995-01-01

    Native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) once thrived in the deep waters of eastern Lake Erie. The impact of nearly 70 years of unregulated exploitation and over 100 years of progressively severe cultural eutrophication resulted in the elimination of lake trout stocks by 1950. Early attempts to restore lake trout by stocking were unsuccessful in establishing a self-sustaining population. In the early 1980s, New York's Department of Environmental Conservation, Pennsylvania's Fish and Boat Commission, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service entered into a cooperative program to rehabilitate lake trout in the eastern basin of Lake Erie. After 11 years of stocking selected strains of lake trout in U.S. waters, followed by effective sea lamprey control, lake trout appear to be successfully recolonizing their native habitat. Adult stocks have built up significantly and are expanding their range in the lake. Preliminary investigations suggest that lake trout reproductive habitat is still adequate for natural reproduction, but natural recruitment has not been documented. Future assessments will be directed toward evaluation of spawning success and tracking age-class cohorts as they move through the fishery.

  13. Gill net catch data in Lake Erie, 2010-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes site characteristics and fish catch rate information for gill nets deployed in Lake Erie. Catches of walleye (Sander vitreus), clupeidae, and...

  14. 33 CFR 162.138 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; speed rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... speed not greater than— (i) 12 statute miles per hour (10.4 knots) between Fort Gratiot Light and St... to Lake Erie; speed rules. 162.138 Section 162.138 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... REGULATIONS § 162.138 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; speed rules. (a) Maximum speed limit...

  15. Remote sensing of algal blooms by aircraft and satellite in Lake Erie and Utah Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    During late summer, when the surface waters of Lake Erie reach their maximum temperature, an algal bloom is likely to develop. Such phenomena, which characterize eutrophic conditions, have been noticed on other shallow lakes using the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1). The concentration of the algae into long streamers provides additional information on surface circulations. To augment the ERTS Multispectral Scanner Subsystem data of Lake Erie, an aircraft was used to obtain correlative thermal-IR and additional multiband photographs. A large bloom of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae observed in Utah Lake together with recent bloom history in Lake Erie is used to verify the Great Lakes bloom.

  16. Western Lake Erie Restoration Assessment Degree Flowlines

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This represents the flowline network in Western Lale Erie Restoration Assessment (WLERA). It is attributed with the number of disconnections between the reach and...

  17. Managing inherent complexity for sustainable walleye fisheries in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseman, Edward F.; Drouin, Richard; Gaden, Marc; Knight, Roger; Tyson, Jeff; Zhao, Yingming; Taylor, William W.; Lynch, Abigail J.; Leonard, Nancy J.

    2012-01-01

    In Lake Erie, Walleye (Sander vitreus vitreus) is king. The naturally occurring species is the foundation of commercial fishing operations on the Canadian side of the lake and is a much-prized sport fish on the American side. Management of Lake Erie walleye fisheries is complex and takes place in an inter-jurisdictional setting composed of resource agencies from the states of Michigan (MDNR), Ohio (ODNR), Pennsylvania (PFBC), and New York (NYDEC) and the province of Ontario (OMNR). The complexity of walleye management is exacerbated by interactions among environmental and ecological changes in Lake Erie, complex life-history characteristics of the species, public demand for walleye, and cultural/governance differences among managing groups and their respective constituents. Success of future management strategies will largely hinge upon our ability to understand these inherent complexities and to employ tactics that successfully accommodate stock productivity and human demand in a highly dynamic environment. In this report, we review the history of Lake Erie walleye management, outline the multi-jurisdictional process for international management of walleye, and discuss strategies to address challenges facing managers.

  18. Quantifying the Urban and Rural Nutrient Fluxes to Lake Erie Using a Paired Watershed Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, M.; Beck, M.; Rossi, E.; Luh, N.; Allen-King, R. M.; Lowry, C.

    2016-12-01

    Excess nutrients have a detrimental impact on the water quality of Lake Erie, specifically nitrate and phosphate, which can lead to toxic algae blooms. Algae blooms have negatively impacted Lake Erie, which is the main source of drinking water for many coastal Great Lake communities. In 2014 the city of Toledo, Ohio was forced to shut down its water treatment plant due to these toxic algae blooms. The objective of this research is to quantify surface water nutrient fluxes to the eastern basin of Lake Erie using a paired watershed approach. Three different western New York watersheds that feed Lake Erie were chosen based on land use and areal extent: one small urban, one small rural, and one large rural. These paired watersheds were chosen to represent a range of sources of potential nutrient loading to the lake. Biweekly water samples were taken from the streams during the 2015-2016 winter to summer seasonal transition to quantify springtime snow melt effects on nutrient fluxes. These results were compared to the previous year samples, collected over the summer of 2015, which represented wetter conditions. Phosphorous levels were assessed using the ascorbic acid colorimetric assay, while nitrate was analyzed by anion-exchange chromatography. Stream gaging was used to obtain flow measurements and establish a rating curve, which was incorporated to quantify seasonal nutrient fluxes entering the lake. Patterns in the nutrient levels show higher level of nutrients in the rural watersheds with a decrease in concentration over the winter to spring transition. However, nutrient patterns in the urban stream show relatively constant patters of nutrient flux, which is independent of seasonal transition or stream discharge. A comparison of wet and dry seasons shows higher nutrient concentrations during summers with greater rainfall. By identifying the largest contributors of each nutrient, we can better allocate limited attenuation resources.

  19. Annotated Bibliography for Lake Erie. Volume V. Physical,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    to deal with the plin of the U. S. Public Health Service for their operations in Lake Erie. Langlols, Marina Holmes - See: Thomas Huxley Langlois, No...103:3. Jones, P. H. 1965. Waste treatment in the urban society. Canadian Medical Assoc. J. 93:26-32. 256 Jordan , Frederick J. R. 1968. Recent

  20. Population models of burrowing mayfly recolonization in Western Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, C.P.; Schloesser, D.W.; Krieger, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    Burrowing mayflies, Hexagenia spp. (H. limbata and H. rigida), began recolonizing western Lake Erie during the 1990s. Survey data for mayfly nymph densities indicated that the population experienced exponential growth between 1991 and 1997. To predict the time to full recovery of the mayfly population, we fitted logistic models, ranging in carrying capacity from 600 to 2000 nymphs/m2, to these survey data. Based on the fitted logistic curves, we forecast that the mayfly population in western Lake Erie would achieve full recovery between years 1998 and 2000, depending on the carrying capacity of the western basin. Additionally, we estimated the mortality rate of nymphs in western Lake Erie during 1994 and then applied an age-based matrix model to the mayfly population. The results of the matrix population modeling corroborated the exponential growth model application in that both methods yielded an estimate of the population growth rate, r, in excess of 0.8 yr-1. This was the first evidence that mayfly populations are capable of recolonizing large aquatic ecosystems at rates comparable with those observed in much smaller lentic ecosystems. Our model predictions should prove valuable to managers of power plant facilities along the western basin in planning for mayfly emergences and to managers of the yellow perch (Perca flavescens) fishery in western Lake Erie.

  1. 78 FR 53677 - Safety Zone; Battle of Lake Erie Fireworks, Lake Erie, Put-In-Bay, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ..., Put-In- Bay, OH AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing temporary safety zone in the waters of Lake Erie, Put-In-Bay, Ohio. This zone is intended to... the launching of fireworks in the vicinity of Put-In-Bay, OH on September 1, 2013. The Captain of...

  2. Internal loading of phosphate in Lake Erie Central Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paytan, Adina; Roberts, Kathryn; Watson, Sue; Peek, Sara; Chuang, Pei-Chuan; Defforey, Delphine; Kendall, Carol

    2017-02-01

    After significant reductions in external phosphorus (P) loads, and subsequent water quality improvements in the early 1980s, the water quality of Lake Erie has declined considerably over the past decade. The frequency and magnitude of harmful algal blooms (primarily in the western basin) and the extent of hypoxic bottom waters in the central basin have increased. The decline in ecosystem health, despite meeting goals for external P loads, has sparked a renewed effort to understand P cycling in the lake. We use pore-water P concentration profiles and sediment cores incubation experiments to quantify the P flux from Lake Erie central basin sediments. In addition, the oxygen isotopes of phosphate were investigated to assess the isotopic signature of sedimentary phosphate inputs relative to the isotopic signature of phosphate in lake water. Extrapolating the total P sediment flux based on the pore-water profiles to the whole area of the central basin ranged from 300 to 1250metric tons per year and using the flux based on core incubation experiments an annual flux of roughly 2400metric tons of P is calculated. These estimates amount to 8-20% of the total external input of P to Lake Erie. The isotopic signature of phosphate in the extractable fraction of the sediments (~18‰) can explain the non-equilibrium isotope values of dissolved phosphate in the deep water of the central basin of Lake Erie, and this is consistent with sediments as an important internal source of P in the Lake. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental review of natural gas production in Lake Erie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shea, K. [Dillon Consulting Ltd., Cambridge, ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The water of Lake Erie is used as a source of drinking water for Ontario, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Michigan. An environmental review has been conducted to determine the impact of drilling operations on the overall ecology of the lake. Since 1913, 2000 natural gas wells have been drilled in Lake Erie, of which 550 currently produce gas and account for 75 per cent of Ontario's total gas production. 180 wells are shut-in or suspended and the remaining wells have been abandoned. The gas wells are connected to onshore production facilities by approximately 1,600 km of small diameter pipelines that lie buried near shore or on top of the lake bed. Nearly 90 per cent of the in-lake infrastructure is in water depths of more than 20 metres. Talisman Energy is actively involved with the Canadian Coast Guard, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, and the Ministry of Natural Resources to ensure cooperation between regulators and off-shore personnel. The environmental assessment of natural gas production in Lake Erie included a review of regulatory and best management practices, a biophysical overview of the lake, and a review of drilling practices, well completions, handling of waste streams, materials management, operations inspections, wastewater discharge, air emissions, and oil spills. It was revealed that for most drilling programs, cuttings are washed and discharged to the Lake. Ongoing testing will determine the impact that this practice has on benthic populations. The drill muds used for drilling operations are water based, environmentally friendly, and re-used between well locations. For completion programs, all well activities are closed circuit operations. Wells are abandoned through plugging with cement, removing wellheads and casing below the lake bottom. There has been a reported volume of about 23,000 litres of spilled product from 1990 to 2001, of which 68 per cent has come from 3 industrial companies that operate near Lake Erie. The offshore gas

  4. Informing Lake Erie agriculture nutrient management via scenario evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavia, Donald; Kalcic, Margaret; Muenich, Rebecca Logsdon; Aloysius, Noel; Arnold, Jeffrey; Boles, Chelsie; Confesor, Remegio; DePinto, Joseph; Gildow, Marie; Martin, Jay; Read, Jennifer; Redder, Todd; Robertson, Dale; Sowa, Scott P.; Wang, Yu-Chen; White, Michael; Yen, Haw

    2016-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have been increasing in extent and intensity in the western basin of Lake Erie. The cyanobacteria Microcystis produces toxins that pose serious threats to animal and human health, resulting in beach closures and impaired water supplies, and have even forced a “do not drink” advisory for the City of Toledo water system for several days in the summer of 2014. The main driver of Lake Erie HABs is elevated phosphorus loading from watersheds draining to the western basin, particularly from the Maumee River watershed (Obenour et al. 2014). Through the 2012 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA), the U.S. and Canadian governments agreed to revise Lake Erie phosphorus loading targets to decrease HAB severity below levels representing a hazard to ecosystem and human health. New targets limit March-July loadings from the Maumee River to 186 metric tonnes of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) and 860 metric tonnes of total phosphorus (TP) – a 40% reduction from 2008 loads (GLWQA 2016).

  5. Remote sensing study of Maumee River effects of Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svehla, R.; Raquet, C.; Shook, D.; Salzman, J.; Coney, T.; Wachter, D.; Gedney, R.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of river inputs on boundary waters were studied in partial support of the task to assess the significance of river inputs into receiving waters, dispersion of pollutants, and water quality. The effects of the spring runoff of the Maumee River on Lake Erie were assessed by a combination of ship survey and remote sensing techniques. The imagery obtained from a multispectral scanner of the west basin of Lake Erie is discussed: this clearly showed the distribution of particulates throughout the covered area. This synoptic view, in addition to its qualitative value, is very useful in selecting sampling stations for shipboard in situ measurements, and for extrapolating these quantitative results throughout the area of interest.

  6. Intercalibration of research survey vessels on Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, J.T.; Johnson, T.B.; Knight, C.T.; Bur, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Fish abundance indices obtained from annual research trawl surveys are an integral part of fisheries stock assessment and management in the Great Lakes. It is difficult, however, to administer trawl surveys using a single vessel-gear combination owing to the large size of these systems, the jurisdictional boundaries that bisect the Great Lakes, and changes in vessels as a result of fleet replacement. When trawl surveys are administered by multiple vessel-gear combinations, systematic error may be introduced in combining catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) data across vessels. This bias is associated with relative differences in catchability among vessel-gear combinations. In Lake Erie, five different research vessels conduct seasonal trawl surveys in the western half of the lake. To eliminate this systematic bias, the Lake Erie agencies conducted a side-by-side trawling experiment in 2003 to develop correction factors for CPUE data associated with different vessel-gear combinations. Correcting for systematic bias in CPUE data should lead to more accurate and comparable estimates of species density and biomass. We estimated correction factors for the 10 most commonly collected species age-groups for each vessel during the experiment. Most of the correction factors (70%) ranged from 0.5 to 2.0, indicating that the systematic bias associated with different vessel-gear combinations was not large. Differences in CPUE were most evident for vessels using different sampling gears, although significant differences also existed for vessels using the same gears. These results suggest that standardizing gear is important for multiple-vessel surveys, but there will still be significant differences in catchability stemming from the vessel effects and agencies must correct for this. With standardized estimates of CPUE, the Lake Erie agencies will have the ability to directly compare and combine time series for species abundance. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  7. The occurrence of the longjaw cisco, Leucichthys alpenae, in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, W.B.; Smith, Stanford H.

    1962-01-01

    The longjaw cisco, Leucichthys alpenae, is shown to be a species new to the Lake Erie fauna. The taxonomic work on Lake Erie ciscoes is reviewed. Thirty three specimens of L. alpenae taken in 1946, 1947 and 1957 are compared morphometrically with Leucichthys artedi of Lake Erie, the only other cisco species in the lake. L. alpenae has a longer and deeper head, longer maxillary and fewer gill rakers. L. alpenae is more distinct from L. artedi in Lake Huron than in Lake Erie. The rate of growth of L. alpenae in Lake Erie compares favourably with that in Lake Michigan.

  8. Accurate Linking of Lake Erie Water Level with Shoreline Datum Using GPS Buoy and Satellite Altimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chien Cheng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to accurately link the water level to the shoreline vertical datum for various applications including coastal management, lake/river/estuary/wetland hydrological or storm surge modeling/forecasting. Coastal topography is historically surveyed and referenced to the predetermined vertical datum in terms of orthometric heights, or the heights above the geoid, which is poorly known in terms of accuracy and lack of adequate spatial resolution for coastal applications such as estuary or storm surge modeling. We demonstrate an accurate linking of the lake surface to a shoreline datum using satellite techniques, including GPS buoy and satellite altimetry, water level gauges, and local geoid and lake circulation models. The possible error sources are analyzed and an error budget is reported in this study. An innovated method to estimate geoid height near the water level gauge using a GPS buoy is proposed. It is found that at a 95% confidence interval, the method is consistent with the National Geodetic Survey GEOID03 geoid model. The lake surface represented using a lake circulation model provided by the Great Lakes Forecasting Systems is also verified with kriging based on the data (1999 - 2001 from the water level gauge, and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter. Mean discrepancies of 2.7 and 7.2 cm are found with the data from the gauges around Lake Erie, and from the combination of the gauges and the altimeter, respectively. It reveals that the current dominant limitation of more accurate linking of water surface to shoreline is the insufficient knowledge of geoid in the current models. Further improvement is feasible through more accurate and higher resolution modeling of the lake geoid.

  9. 75 FR 33741 - Safety Zone; Tracey/Thompson Wedding, Lake Erie, Catawba Island, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Tracey/Thompson Wedding, Lake Erie, Catawba... zone is intended to restrict vessels from portions of Lake Erie during the Tracey/Thompson Wedding... and vessels during the setup, loading, and launching of the Tracey/Thompson Wedding Fireworks...

  10. 78 FR 36662 - Safety Zone; Fairport Harbor Mardi Gras, Lake Erie, Fairport, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Fairport Harbor Mardi Gras, Lake Erie... restrict vessels from a portion of Lake Erie during the Fairport Harbor Mardi Gras Fireworks display. This... necessary to ensure the safety of spectators and vessels during the Fairport Harbor Mardi Gras. This...

  11. 78 FR 35787 - Safety Zones; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie, Sandusky Bay, Cedar Point, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie... restrict vessel traffic during the swim portion of the Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie, Sandusky Bay, OH.... Basis and Purpose Each year, the Revolution 3 Triathlon occurs at Cedar Point near Sandusky, OH....

  12. 77 FR 49401 - Safety Zones; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie, Sandusky Bay, Cedar Point, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie... restrict vessel traffic during the swim portion of the Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie, Sandusky Bay, OH... later notice in the Federal Register. B. Basis and Purpose Each year, the Revolution 3 Triathlon...

  13. Seasonal thermal ecology of adult walleye (Sander vitreus) in Lake Huron and Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tyler B; Hayden, Todd A.; Gutowsky, Lee F G; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Fielder, David G.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Murchie, Karen J; Dettmers, John M.; Krueger, Charles C.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize thermal patterns and generate occupancy models for adult walleye from lakes Erie and Huron with internally implanted biologgers coupled with a telemetry study to assess the effects of sex, fish size, diel periods, and lake. Sex, size, and diel periods had no effect on thermal occupancy of adult walleye in either lake. Thermal occupancy differed between lakes and seasons. Walleye from Lake Erie generally experienced higher temperatures throughout the spring and summer months than did walleye in Lake Huron, due to limnological differences between the lakes. Tagged walleye that remained in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron (i.e., adjacent to the release location), as opposed to those migrating to the main basin of Lake Huron, experienced higher temperatures, and thus accumulated more thermal units (the amount of temperature units amassed over time) throughout the year. Walleye that migrated toward the southern end of Lake Huron occupied higher temperatures than those that moved toward the north. Consequently, walleye that emigrated from Saginaw Bay experienced thermal environments that were more favorable for growth as they spent more time within their thermal optimas than those that remained in Saginaw Bay. Results presented in this paper provide information on the thermal experience of wild fish in a large lake, and could be used to refine sex- and lake-specific bioenergetics models of walleye in the Great Lakes to enable the testing of ecological hypotheses.

  14. Seasonal thermal ecology of adult walleye (Sander vitreus) in Lake Huron and Lake Erie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tyler B; Hayden, Todd A; Gutowsky, Lee F G; Vandergoot, Christopher S; Fielder, David G; Madenjian, Charles P; Murchie, Karen J; Dettmers, John M; Krueger, Charles C; Cooke, Steven J

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize thermal patterns and generate occupancy models for adult walleye from lakes Erie and Huron with internally implanted biologgers coupled with a telemetry study to assess the effects of sex, fish size, diel periods, and lake. Sex, size, and diel periods had no effect on thermal occupancy of adult walleye in either lake. Thermal occupancy differed between lakes and seasons. Walleye from Lake Erie generally experienced higher temperatures throughout the spring and summer months than did walleye in Lake Huron, due to limnological differences between the lakes. Tagged walleye that remained in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron (i.e., adjacent to the release location), as opposed to those migrating to the main basin of Lake Huron, experienced higher temperatures, and thus accumulated more thermal units (the amount of temperature units amassed over time) throughout the year. Walleye that migrated toward the southern end of Lake Huron occupied higher temperatures than those that moved toward the north. Consequently, walleye that emigrated from Saginaw Bay experienced thermal environments that were more favorable for growth as they spent more time within their thermal optimas than those that remained in Saginaw Bay. Results presented in this paper provide information on the thermal experience of wild fish in a large lake, and could be used to refine sex- and lake-specific bioenergetics models of walleye in the Great Lakes to enable the testing of ecological hypotheses.

  15. Internal loading of phosphorus in western Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matisoff, Gerald; Kaltenberg, Eliza M.; Steely, Rebecca L.; Hummel, Stephanie K.; Seo, Jinyu; Gibbons, Kenneth J.; Bridgeman, Thomas B.; Seo, Youngwoo; Behbahani, Mohsen; James, William F.; Johnson, Laura; Doan, Phuong; Dittrich, Maria; Evans, Mary Anne; Chaffin, Justin D.

    2016-01-01

    This study applied eight techniques to obtain estimates of the diffusive flux of phosphorus (P) from bottom sediments throughout the western basin of Lake Erie. The flux was quantified from both aerobic and anaerobic incubations of whole cores; by monitoring the water encapsulated in bottom chambers; from pore water concentration profiles measured with a phosphate microelectrode, a diffusive equilibrium in thin films (DET) hydrogel, and expressed pore waters; and from mass balance and biogeochemical diagenetic models. Fluxes under aerobic conditions at summertime temperatures averaged 1.35 mg P/m2/day and displayed spatial variability on scales as small as a centimeter. Using two different temperature correction factors, the flux was adjusted to mean annual temperature yielding average annual fluxes of 0.43–0.91 mg P/m2/day and a western basin-wide total of 378–808 Mg P/year as the diffusive flux from sediments. This is 3–7% of the 11,000 Mg P/year International Joint Commission (IJC) target load for phosphorus delivery to Lake Erie from external sources. Using these average aerobic fluxes, the sediment contributes 3.0–6.3 μg P/L as a background internal contribution that represents 20–42% of the IJC Target Concentration of 15 μg P/L for the western basin. The implication is that this internal diffusive recycling of P is unlikely to trigger cyanobacterial blooms by itself but is sufficiently large to cause blooms when combined with external loads. This background flux may be also responsible for delayed response of the lake to any decrease in the external loading.

  16. Mesoscale modeling of lake effect snow over Lake Erie - sensitivity to convection, microphysics and the water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theeuwes, N.E.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Krikken, F.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Lake effect snow is a shallow convection phenomenon during cold air advection over a relatively warm lake. A severe case of lake effect snow over Lake Erie on 24 December 2001 was studied with the MM5 and WRF mesoscale models. This particular case provided over 200 cm of snow in Buffalo (NY), caused

  17. Recent changes in burbot growth in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, M.A.; Edwards, W.H.; Witzel, L.D.

    2011-01-01

    Recruitment of burbot Lota lota in eastern Lake Erie, estimated by catches of age-4 burbot, was high during 1997–2001 and then abruptly declined to low levels during 2002–2007. The invasive round goby Neogobius melanostomus, a benthic species, was first collected in trawl assessments in eastern Lake Erie in 1999, and was first found in stomachs of burbot in 2001. By 2003, round goby became an important prey in the diet of burbot. We hypothesized that the combined effects of low recruitment and consumption of round goby would result in increased size-at-age in burbot. We reasoned that: (i) decreased competition for resources among juveniles should result in larger adults, and (ii) consumption of a benthic prey by a bottom-dwelling predator such as burbot should require less foraging in the water column, and thus less energetic expenditure. We divided our data into two temporal periods: one in which burbot belonged to strong year classes and ate few, if any round goby (i.e., year classes 1989–1997 collected during 1997–2001) and one in which burbot belonged to weak year classes and probably ate round gobies by age 4 (year classes 1998–2003 collected during 2002–2007). Mass and total lengths at ages 4–7 were generally higher during the second period. However, the rates of growth between ages 4 and 7 were not different for the two periods. The results indicate that greater growth at ages 0–4 resulted in larger size at ages 4–7 in the latter period. More information on juvenile diet and growth in burbot is needed for effective conservation of burbot stocks.

  18. Impact of harmful algal blooms on several Lake Erie drinking water treatment facilities; methodology considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The propagation of cyanbacterial cells and their toxins were investigated at seven drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) on Lake Erie were investigated with regards to harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxin concentrations, water quality variations in treatment plant influents, and pr...

  19. THE CLADOCERAN SPECIES OF INSHORE HABITATS OF LAKE ERIE AT PRESQUE ISLE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    JOHN M. CAMPBELL

    1993-01-01

    On 10 dates from October 1985 through July 1992, Lake Erie's littoral cladoceran community was sampled by a variety of methods at 34 different inshore sites at Presque Isle. Sampling sites (0.3-9 m deep...

  20. Thermal and hydrologic suitability of Lake Erie and its major tributaries for spawning of Asian carps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocovsky, Patrick M.; Chapman, Duane C.; McKenna, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Bighead carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis, silver carp H. molitrix, and grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella (hereafter Asian carps) have expanded throughout the Mississippi River basin and threaten to invade Lakes Michigan and Erie. Adult bighead carp and grass carp have been captured in Lake Erie, but self-sustaining populations probably do not exist. We examined thermal conditions within Lake Erie to determine if Asian carps would mature, and to estimate time of year when fish would reach spawning condition. We also examined whether thermal and hydrologic conditions in the largest tributaries to western and central Lake Erie were suitable for spawning of Asian carps. We used length of undammed river, predicted summer temperatures, and predicted water velocity during flood events to determine whether sufficient lengths of river are available for spawning of Asian carps. Most rivers we examined have at least 100 km of passable river and summer temperatures suitable (> 21 C) for rapid incubation of eggs of Asian carps. Predicted water velocity and temperature were sufficient to ensure that incubating eggs, which drift in the water column, would hatch before reaching Lake Erie for most flood events in most rivers if spawned far enough upstream. The Maumee, Sandusky, and Grand Rivers were predicted to be the most likely to support spawning of Asian carps. The Black, Huron, Portage, and Vermilion Rivers were predicted to be less suitable. The weight of the evidence suggests that the largest western and central Lake Erie tributaries are thermally and hydrologically suitable to support spawning of Asian carps.

  1. Seasonal and interannual effects of hypoxia on fish habitat quality in central Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Kristin K.; Beletsky, Dmitry; DePinto, Joseph; Ludsin, Stuart A.; Roberts, James J.; Rucinski, Daniel K.; Scavia, Donald; Schwab, David J.; Höök, Tomas O.

    2011-01-01

    1. Hypoxia occurs seasonally in many stratified coastal marine and freshwater ecosystems when bottom dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations are depleted below 2–3 mg O2 L-1. 2. We evaluated the effects of hypoxia on fish habitat quality in the central basin of Lake Erie from 1987 to 2005, using bioenergetic growth rate potential (GRP) as a proxy for habitat quality. We compared the effect of hypoxia on habitat quality of (i) rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax mordax Mitchill (young-of-year, YOY, and adult), a cold-water planktivore, (ii) emerald shiner, Notropis atherinoides Rafinesque (adult), a warm-water planktivore, (iii) yellow perch, Perca flavescens Mitchill (YOY and adult), a cool-water benthopelagic omnivore and (iv) round goby Neogobius melanostomus Pallas (adult) a eurythermal benthivore. Annual thermal and DO profiles were generated from 1D thermal and DO hydrodynamics models developed for Lake Erie’s central basin. 3. Hypoxia occurred annually, typically from mid-July to mid-October, which spatially and temporally overlaps with otherwise high benthic habitat quality. Hypoxia reduced the habitat quality across fish species and life stages, but the magnitude of the reduction varied both among and within species because of the differences in tolerance to low DO levels and warm-water temperatures. 4. Across years, trends in habitat quality mirrored trends in phosphorus concentration and water column oxygen demand in central Lake Erie. The per cent reduction in habitat quality owing to hypoxia was greatest for adult rainbow smelt and round goby (mean: -35%), followed by adult emerald shiner (mean: -12%), YOY rainbow smelt (mean: -10%) and YOY and adult yellow perch (mean: -8.5%). 5. Our results highlight the importance of differential spatiotemporally interactive effects of DO and temperature on relative fish habitat quality and quantity. These effects have the potential to influence the performance of individual fish species as well as population dynamics

  2. Life history of the spottail shiner (Notropis hudsonius) in southeastern Lake Michigan, the Kalamazoo River, and western Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, LaRue; House, Robert

    1974-01-01

    In southeastern Lake Michigan spottail shiners in samples ranged from ages 0 to V, but most were in age groups I-IV. In the Kalamazoo River (a tributary of southeastern Lake Michigan) age group II was commonest in the catches, and no fish older than age IV were sampled. In western Lake Erie, most shiners were in age groups 0-II, and none were older than age IV. Mortality of males was much higher than that of females after age II in Lake Michigan and after age I in Lake Erie. Growth of spottail shiners was fastest in western Lake Erie (125 mm at the end of the third year, sexes combined) and slowest (77 mm) in the Kalamazoo River; in all three waters growth declined rapidly after the first year. Females grew faster than males.

  3. Ancient Shores of Lake Erie, Student Guide and Teacher Guide. OEAGLS Investigation 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comienski, James; Mayer, Victor J.

    This guidebook for teachers is accompanied by a student workbook. The investigations are intended to offer the students an opportunity to learn to use topographic maps and profiles to locate evidence of ancient water levels of Lake Erie and man's use of the beach ridges near the lake. Maps, diagrams, and data tables accompany the written material.…

  4. 76 FR 55564 - Safety Zone; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie, Cedar Point, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Sandusky Bay, Lake... intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Lake Erie during the Revolution 3 Triathlon. This temporary... a triathlon event. DATES: This rule is effective from 6 to 11 a.m. on September 11, 2011....

  5. 77 FR 24880 - Safety Zone; Jet Express Triathlon, Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie, Lakeside, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Jet Express Triathlon, Sandusky Bay, Lake... intended to restrict vessels from portions of Lake Erie during the Jet Express Triathlon. This proposed... triathlon event. DATES: Comments and related materials must be received by the Coast Guard on or before...

  6. 77 FR 50923 - Safety Zone; Jet Express Triathlon, Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie, Lakeside, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Jet Express Triathlon, Sandusky Bay, Lake... from portions of Lake Erie during the Jet Express Triathlon. ] This safety zone is necessary to protect participants, spectators and vessels from the hazards associated with triathlon event. DATES: This final...

  7. 75 FR 30319 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Rule to remove the Lake Erie Watersnake...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... islands on which the Lake Erie Watersnake occurs provide seasonal residences and vacation areas to large... recreational and fishing opportunities, and is a regional destination area, particularly during the summer... the islands since the Lake Erie Watersnake was listed in 1999 include the following types of...

  8. Erie National Wildlife Refuge (Sugar Lake Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Erie National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  9. Fisheries research and monitoring activities of the Lake Erie Biological Station, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodamer Scarbro, Betsy L.; Edwards, W.H.; Kocovsky, Patrick M.; Kraus, Richard T.; Rogers, M. R.; Schoonyan, A. L.; Stewart, T. R.

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Lake Erie Biological Station (LEBS) successfully completed large vessel surveys in all three of Lake Erie’s basins. Lake Erie Biological Station’s primary vessel surveys included the Western Basin Forage Fish Assessment and East Harbor Fish Community Assessment as well as contributing to the cooperative multi-agency Central Basin Hydroacoustics Assessment, the Eastern Basin Coldwater Community Assessment, and Lower Trophic Level Assessment (see Forage and Coldwater Task Group reports). In 2015, LEBS also initiated a Lake Erie Central Basin Trawling survey in response to the need for forage fish data from Management Unit 3 (as defined by the Yellow Perch Task Group). Results from these surveys contribute to Lake Erie Committee Fish Community Goals and Objectives. Our 2015 vessel operations were initiated in early April and continued into late November. During this time, crews of the R/V Muskie and R/V Bowfin deployed 121 bottom trawls covering 83.2 ha of lake-bottom and catching 105,600 fish totaling 4,065 kg during four separate trawl surveys in the western and central basins of Lake Erie. We deployed and lifted 9.5 km of gillnet, which caught an additional 805 fish, 100 (337 kg) of which were the native coldwater predators Lake Trout, Burbot, and Lake Whitefish (these data are reported in the 2016 Coldwater Task Group report). We also conducted 317 km of hydroacoustic survey transects (reported in the 2016 Forage Task Group report), collected 114 lower trophic (i.e. zooplankton and benthos) samples, and obtained 216 water quality observations (e.g., temperature profiles, and water samples). The LEBS also assisted CLC member agencies with the maintenance and expansion of GLATOS throughout all three Lake Erie sub-basins. Within the following report sections, we describe results from three trawl surveys – the spring and autumn Western Basin Forage Fish Assessment and the East Harbor Forage Fish Assessment – and

  10. 76 FR 63991 - Midwest Rail d/b/a Toledo, Lake Erie and Western Railway-Lease and Operation Exemption-Toledo...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... Surface Transportation Board Midwest Rail d/b/a Toledo, Lake Erie and Western Railway--Lease and Operation Exemption--Toledo, Lake Erie and Western Railway and Museum, Inc. Midwest Rail d/b/a Toledo, Lake Erie and Western Railway (Toledo), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31...

  11. Fish assemblages, connectivity, and habitat rehabilitation in a diked Great Lakes coastal wetland complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Kurt P.; Wiley, Michael J.; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Fish and plant assemblages in the highly modified Crane Creek coastal wetland complex of Lake Erie were sampled to characterize their spatial and seasonal patterns and to examine the implications of the hydrologic connection of diked wetland units to Lake Erie. Fyke netting captured 52 species and an abundance of fish in the Lake Erie–connected wetlands, but fewer than half of those species and much lower numbers and total masses of fish were captured in diked wetland units. Although all wetland units were immediately adjacent to Lake Erie, there were also pronounced differences in water quality and wetland vegetation between the hydrologically isolated and lake-connected wetlands. Large seasonal variations in fish assemblage composition and biomass were observed in connected wetland units but not in disconnected units. Reestablishment of hydrologic connectivity in diked wetland units would allow coastal Lake Erie fish to use these vegetated habitats seasonally, although connectivity does appear to pose some risks, such as the expansion of invasive plants and localized reductions in water quality. Periodic isolation and drawdown of the diked units could still be used to mimic intermediate levels of disturbance and manage invasive wetland vegetation.

  12. A dynamic multimedia environmental and bioaccumulation model for brominated flame retardants in Lake Huron and Lake Erie, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong-Hee; Lastoskie, Christian M

    2011-05-01

    Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) may pose a worldwide pollution problem because of their persistence, long-range transport capability, and predisposition to bioaccumulate. The ubiquitous presence of PBBs and PBDEs has heightened interest in determination of their fate. We report results for a fugacity-based dynamic environmental and bioaccumulation model of the fate of hexabromobiphenyl (hexaBB) discharged into the Saginaw Bay region of Lake Huron, USA. We calculated transient fugacity profiles of hexaBB in Lake Huron and Lake Erie water and sediment during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. The hexaBB concentrations in the environmental compartments were used as inputs for a dynamic bioaccumulation model of Lake Huron and Lake Erie aquatic biota. The model results indicate that the sediment compartments of Lakes Huron and Erie serve as reservoirs for the accumulation and slow transfer of hexaBB to the food web constituents of these lakes. We present bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and compare the predicted hexaBB concentrations in lake trout from the bioaccumulation model with measurements during the period 1980 to 2000. An uncertainty analysis for this model suggests that errors associated with input parameter uncertainty can be reduced by refining estimates of the sediment degradation half-life of hexaBB. The corroborated PBB model has carryover application for modeling the fate of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) contaminants in the Great Lakes. By fitting model outputs to field measurement data using the transformed least square fit method, we report estimations of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) emission rates into the Lake Huron and Lake Erie watershed areas.

  13. Age and growth of the lake whitefish, Coregonus clupeaformis (Mitchill), in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oosten, John; Hile, Ralph

    1949-01-01

    Although the whitefish has by no means ranked first from the standpoint of production, it has always been an important commercial species in Lake Erie. Trends in the output of whitefish have differed in the United States and Canadian waters of the lake. The 1893–1946 average annual yield of 1,201,000 pounds in the United States was only 38.3 percent of the 1879–1890 mean of 3,133,000 pounds, whereas in Canada the more recent (1907–1946) average annual take of 1,397,000 pounds has been 5.48 times the 1871–1906 mean of 255,000 pounds. The United States fishery was centered in the western part of Lake Erie (61.5 percent of the production in Michigan and Ohio) before 1921 and in the eastern part (62.6 percent in Pennsylvania and New York) in 1921–1946. The eastern part of Lake Erie (east of Port Burwell) dominated the Canadian production in 1900–1909 (65.4 percent) and in 1922–1946 (57.2 percent) but the western end was the more productive in 1871–1899 (79.8 percent) and 1910–1921 (69.7 percent). Ages were determined and individual growth histories calculated from the examination and measurement of the scales of 3,399 Lake Erie whitefish captured off four ports (Sandusky, Lorain, and Conneaut, Ohio, and Erie, Pennsylvania) over the period, 1927–1930. The number of specimens used for the investigation of other phases of the life history varied according to the amount of data available or required. Age-group III was typically (but not invariably) dominant in random samples from gear employed for the commercial production of whitefish (trap nets, pound nets, and large-mesh gill nets). The same age group also dominated most samples of the marketable catch (that is, whitefish that equalled or exceeded the minimum legal weight of 1 3/4 pounds) taken in late summer, autumn, and early winter. Age-group IV, however, was strongest among marketable fish from trap nets in early July although the III group was dominant in the random samples from the same nets

  14. Examination of issues related to U. S. Lake Erie natural gas development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, D.L.

    1978-09-01

    A report is presented which marks the culmination of a preliminary identification and examination of issues related to U.S. Lake Erie (USLE) natural gas development. A brief synopsis of the Canadian Lake Erie gas development program is presented. Also reviewed are (1) relevant natural gas economics, (2) the existing institutional framework for administering a USLE gas development program, and (3) drilling technology related to Lake Erie gas exploitation. The issues were identified through a structured selection process, and are examined using a question-response format following each of the topical (economic, institutional, technological) overviews. The results of research and analysis efforts described briefly at the end of the report are crucial to conclusions developed in the final environmental impact statement. The study region addressed is defined by U.S. waters extending eastward from a north-south boundary line between Marblehead, Ohio, and the tip of Pt. Pelee, Ontario, to Buffalo, New York--an area which corresponds roughly to the U.S. portion of the central and eastern basins of Lake Erie. The inland portion of the study area includes those counties of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York adjacent to the Lake, from Ottawa, Ohio, to Erie, New York. This region was defined to concentrate assessment efforts to those areas where development and production activities would have direct environmental consequences. However, where appropriate, the study area was expanded to meet the needs of issue identification and examination. Examination of natural gas economics often required expansion of investigation to a state, regional, or national level. Also, many environmental parameters were examined to gain a Great Lakes watershed perspective.

  15. Out-of-sample validation for structured expert judgment of Asian carp establishment in Lake Erie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooke, R.M.; Wittmann, M.E.; Lodge, D.M.; Rothlisberger, J.D.; Rutherford, E.S.; Zhang, H.; Mason, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Structured expert judgment (SEJ) is used to quantify the uncertainty of nonindigenous fish (bighead carp [Hypophthalmichthys nobilis] and silver carp [H. molitrix]) establishment in Lake Erie. The classical model for structured expert judgment model is applied. Forming a weighted combination (called

  16. Pollution in Lake Erie: An Introduction. Student Guide and Teacher Guide. OEAGLS Investigation 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basehore, Carole P.; Fortner, Rosanne

    Presented are a student workbook and teacher's manual for a unit which combines a study of water pollution with instruction in critical reading skills. In the two activities students study the types and effects of pollution in Lake Erie. At the same time they learn how to read critically, evaluate their reading skills, and analyze written material…

  17. BILIARY PAH METABOLITES AS A BIOLOGICAL INDICATOR OF FISH EXPOSURE IN TRIBUTARIES OF LAKE ERIE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biliary polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) metabolites have been studied as a biological indicator of fish exposure to PAHs since the mid 1980's. Brown bullheads were collected from the following Lake Erie tributaries: Buffalo River (BUF), Niagara River at Love Canal (NIA)...

  18. USGS Lake Erie East Harbor bottom trawl data series, 1961-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Lake Erie Biological Station’s East Harbor sampling program began in 1961 with the commissioning of the research vessel Musky II. It is the longest known...

  19. Increased soluble phosphorus loads to Lake Erie: Unintended consequences of conservation practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumulative daily flux timeseries show that the early 2000s marked the start of large-scale and widespread increases in riverine soluble reactive phosphorus fluxes entering western Lake Erie basin, from three major tributaries: the Maumee, Sandusky and Raisin Rivers. These elevated soluble reactive ...

  20. Lake Erie, phosphorus and microcystin: Is it really the farmer's fault?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural loss of phosphorus (P) have been identified as a primary contributor to eutrophication and the associated release of toxins (i.e., mycrocystin) in Lake Erie. These losses are commonly deemed excessive by the media and the public, singling out agriculture as the culprit in spite of redu...

  1. 77 FR 71531 - Special Local Regulation; Kelley's Island Swim, Lake Erie; Kelley's Island, Lakeside, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... Regulation; Kelley's Island Swim, Lake Erie; Kelley's Island, Lakeside, OH in the Federal Register (77 FR... Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking TFR Temporary Final Rule A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Kelley's Island Swim,...

  2. 75 FR 55477 - Safety Zone; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie & Sandusky Bay, Cedar Point, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Revolution 3 Triathlon, Lake Erie... Point Triathlon. The temporary safety zone is necessary to protect participants of the swim portion of the triathlon race from potential hazards from vessels operating in the area. DATES: This rule...

  3. 76 FR 50680 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removal of the Lake Erie Watersnake (Nerodia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... structures, and vegetation control (ODNR 2005, pp. 3-6). Some of these management actions include: Avoiding... opinion survey found that 31 percent of respondents' attitudes toward Lake Erie watersnakes have become... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 RIN 1018-AW62 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants...

  4. Wave climatology of Lake Erie based on an unstructured-grid wave model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Qianru; Xia, Meng

    2016-10-01

    Hindcast of wave dynamics in Lake Erie during 2002 to 2012 was conducted using a state-of-art finite-volume coastal ocean surface wave model (FVCOM-SWAVE). After model calibration, the surface gravity wave dynamics were examined from the aspects of wave climate and seasonality, inter-basin wave interactions, as well as its potential susceptibility to regional climate change. Compared to the Central and Eastern Basins, the Western Basin has relatively gentle wave climate. The Western Basin and the nearshore areas are most susceptible to the wave-induced bottom orbital oscillations on the seasonal mean scale, and the offshore Central Basin is sensitive to them as well during episodic events. Profound seasonality was found in both mean and extreme wave dynamics during ice-free cycles. Mean significant wave height (SWH) is highest during fall with more occurrences of extreme events (SWH > 3.1 m) and is lowest during summer, which is controlled by wind speed and direction collectively. Besides, swells generated in the Central and Eastern Basins could interact with each other under various wind directions, whereas wave generated in the Central Basin could hardly propagate into the Western Basin. In addition, the regression analysis of surrounding meteorological stations indicates increasing SWH in the Western Basin and decreasing SWH in the Eastern Basin.

  5. Review of Reports on Lake Erie-Lake Ontario Waterway, New York. Appendix E. Impact Assessment and Environment Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-10-01

    northward from the Gulf of Mexico . Lake Erie has a moderating effect on temperature and also pro- vides additional moisture to the air passing over...087 Fq - 2 f, i. tFruit prduction is not ulij’orni t hr(,Ugl,ut tii ’unty !ll is . cent rated in specific /,(tes. (1raptpc ar, pr(lued in a / one

  6. Spawning site fidelity and apparent annual survival of walleye (Sander vitreus) differ between a Lake Huron and Lake Erie tributary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Todd A.; Binder, Thomas; Holbrook, Christopher; Vandergoot, Christopher; Fielder, David G.; Cooke, Steven J.; Dettmers, John M; Krueger, Charles Conrad

    2017-01-01

    Fidelity to spawning habitats can maximise reproductive success of fish by synchronising movements to sites of previous recruitment. To determine the role of reproductive fidelity in structuring walleye Sander vitreus populations in the Laurentian Great Lakes, we used acoustic telemetry combined with Cormack–Jolly–Seber capture–recapture models to estimate spawning site fidelity and apparent annual survival for the Tittabawassee River in Lake Huron and Maumee River in Lake Erie. Walleye in spawning condition were tagged from the Tittabawassee River in Lake Huron and Maumee River in Lake Erie in 2011–2012. Site fidelity and apparent annual survival were estimated from return of individuals to the stream where tagged. Site fidelity estimates were higher in the Tittabawassee River (95%) than the Maumee River (70%) and were not related to sex or fish length at tagging. Apparent annual survival of walleye tagged in the Tittabawassee did not differ among spawning seasons but was higher for female than male walleye and decreased linearly as fish length increased. Apparent annual survival of walleye tagged in the Maumee River did not differ among spawning seasons but was higher for female walleye than male walleye and increased linearly as fish length increased. Greater fidelity of walleye tagged in the Tittabawassee River than walleye tagged in the Maumee River may be related to the close proximity to the Maumee River of other spawning aggregations and multiple spawning sites in Lake Erie. As spawning site fidelity increases, management actions to conserve population structure require an increasing focus on individual stocks.

  7. GC-MS analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagula, Mary C.; Vartak, Marissa; Tallmadge, Weslene

    2012-06-01

    Lake Erie is one of the five great lakes of North America. It is the shallowest, the warmest, and the most biologically productive of the Great Lakes producing more fish than all of the other four lakes combined. It is also a source of drinking water for 11 million people and a recreational asset. On the flipside, it is also very vulnerable and troubled with environmental challenges because it has the smallest water volume, but the greatest pressures from the human settlement. One of the many issues faced by the Lake is pollution. It receives larger loads of many pollutants than any other Great Lake. Even with the best pollution controls many pesticides and organohalogens continue to enter the lake. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of flame-retardants that have been used in a variety of consumer products since the 1970s. They are added to many commercial and household products such as computers, foam mattresses, carpets, etc. Being largely non-polar and chemically stable, these chemicals are extremely lipophilic and resist degradation in the environment, thus giving them a high affinity for their bioaccumulation. Due to these properties PBDEs have become ubiquitous environmental contaminants. These compounds are reported to be endocrine disruptors and could cause oxidative damage. This report presents the sample preparation protocol, the GC-MS analysis of PBDEs in Lake Erie sediment samples.

  8. Relative contributions of hypoxia and natural gas extraction to atmospheric methane emissions from Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disbennett, D. A.; Townsend-Small, A.; Bourbonniere, R.; Mackay, R.

    2013-12-01

    Reduced oxygen availability in lakes due to summer stratification can create conditions suitable for methanogenic activity, which ultimately contributes to atmospheric methane emissions. Lake Erie has persistent low oxygen conditions in bottom waters during summer, which contributes to methane production through anaerobic organic matter respiration. Lake Erie also has substantial subsurface natural gas deposits that are currently being extracted in Canadian waters. We hypothesized that the lake would be a source of methane to the atmosphere in late summer, prior to fall turnover, and that natural gas wells and pipelines would contribute to additional methane emissions from resource extraction areas in Canadian waters. Initial sampling was conducted at a total of 20 sites in central and western Lake Erie during early September 2012. Sites were selected to collect samples from a wide range of environmental conditions in order to better establish the baseline flux from these areas. We selected an array of sites in the offshore environment, sites from a very shallow bay and sites within the Canadian gas fields. Air samples were gathered using floating flux chambers tethered to the research vessel. Dissolved gas water samples were collected using a Van Dorn bottle. We found a consistent positive flux of methane throughout the lake during late summer, with flux rates adjacent to natural gas pipelines up to an order of magnitude greater than elsewhere. Stable isotope analysis yielded results that were not entirely expected. The δ13C of surface samples from areas of fossil fuel extraction and suspected biogenic sources were very similar, likely due to oxidation of methane in the water column. Additional sampling occurred during 2012 and 2013 concentrating on bottom waters and surface fluxes which should allow us to further constrain sources of CH4 from Lake Erie. This project is an effort to constrain the global warming potential of hypoxia in the Great Lakes, and

  9. Impacts of Lake Level Regulation on Beaches and Boating Facilities--Lakes Erie and Ontario and Connecting Waterways. Recreation Beaches Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-18

    feet, the crews were in- structed to take additional measurements. At very long beaches, such as at Presque Isle State Park, in Pennsylvania , the...REGULATION ON BEACHES AND BOATING FACILITIES- LAKES ERIE AND) ONTARIO AND CONNECTING WATERWAYS -I RECREATION BEACHES INVENTORY 3 December 18, 1979 Contract...CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Impacts of Lake Level Regulation on Beaches and Boating Facilities--Lake Erie and

  10. Optimizing multiple dam removals under multiple objectives: Linking tributary habitat and the Lake Erie ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Pearl Q.; Hobbs, Benjamin F.; Koonce, Joseph F.

    2009-12-01

    A model is proposed for optimizing the net benefits of removing multiple dams in U.S. watersheds of Lake Erie by quantifying impacts upon social, ecological, and economic objectives of importance to managers and stakeholders. Explicit consideration is given to the linkages between newly accessible tributary habitat and the lake's ecosystem. The model is a mixed integer linear program (MILP) that selects a portfolio of potential dam removals that could achieve the best possible value of a weighted sum of the objective(s), while still satisfying the constraints. Using response functions extracted from the Lake Erie Ecological Model and an empirical cost model, the MILP accounts for ecological and economic effects of habitat changes for both desirable native walleye and undesirable sea lamprey. The solutions show the effect on removal decisions of alternative prioritizations among cost and environmental objectives and the resulting trade-offs among those objectives. The MILP can be used as a screening model to identify portfolios of dam removals that are potentially cost-effective enhancements of habitat and the Lake Erie ecosystem; subsequent site-specific studies would be needed prior to actually removing dams.

  11. The effect of mayfly (Hexagenia spp.) burrowing activity on sediment oxygen demand in western Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, William J.; Soster, Frederick M.; Matisoff, Gerald; Schloesser, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies support the hypothesis that large numbers of infaunal burrow-irrigating organisms in the western basin of Lake Erie may increase significantly the sediment oxygen demand, thus enhancing the rate of hypolimnetic oxygen depletion. We conducted laboratory experiments to quantify burrow oxygen dynamics and increased oxygen demand resulting from burrow irrigation using two different year classes of Hexagenia spp. nymphs from western Lake Erie during summer, 2006. Using oxygen microelectrodes and hot film anemometry, we simultaneously determined oxygen concentrations and burrow water flow velocities. Burrow oxygen depletion rates ranged from 21.7 mg/nymph/mo for 15 mm nymphs at 23 °C to 240.7 mg/nymph/mo for 23 mm nymphs at 13 °C. Sealed microcosm experiments demonstrated that mayflies increase the rate of oxygen depletion by 2-5 times that of controls, depending on size of nymph and water temperature, with colder waters having greater impact. At natural population densities, nymph pumping activity increased total sediment oxygen demand 0.3-2.5 times compared to sediments with no mayflies and accounted for 22-71% of the total sediment oxygen demand. Extrapolating laboratory results to the natural system suggest that Hexagenia spp. populations may exert a significant control on oxygen depletion during intermittent stratification. This finding may help explain some of the fluctuations in Hexagenia spp. population densities in western Lake Erie and suggests that mayflies, by causing their own population collapse irrespective of other environmental conditions, may need longer term averages when used as a bio-indicator of the success of pollution-abatement programs in western Lake Erie and possibly throughout the Great Lakes.

  12. Assessment of suitable habitat for Phragmites australis (common reed) in the Great Lakes coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson Mazur, Martha L.; Kowalski, Kurt P.; Galbraith, David

    2014-01-01

    In the Laurentian Great Lakes, the invasive form of Phragmites australis (common reed) poses a threat to highly productive coastal wetlands and shorelines by forming impenetrable stands that outcompete native plants. Large, dominant stands can derail efforts to restore wetland ecosystems degraded by other stressors. To be proactive, landscape-level management of Phragmites requires information on the current spatial distribution of the species and a characterization of areas suitable for future colonization. Using a recent basin-scale map of this invasive plant’s distribution in the U.S. coastal zone of the Great Lakes, environmental data (e.g., soils, nutrients, disturbance, climate, topography), and climate predictions, we performed analyses of current and predicted suitable coastal habitat using boosted regression trees, a type of species distribution modeling. We also investigated differential influences of environmental variables in the upper lakes (Lakes Superior, Michigan, and Huron) and lower lakes (Lakes St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario). Basin-wide results showed that the coastal areas most vulnerable to Phragmites expansion were in close proximity to developed lands and had minimal topographic relief, poorly drained soils, and dense road networks. Elevated nutrients and proximity to agriculture also influenced the distribution of Phragmites. Climate predictions indicated an increase in suitable habitat in coastal Lakes Huron and Michigan in particular. The results of this study, combined with a publicly available online decision support tool, will enable resource managers and restoration practitioners to target and prioritize Phragmites control efforts in the Great Lakes coastal zone.

  13. Assessing and addressing the re-eutrophication of Lake Erie: central basin hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavia, Donald; Allan, J. David; Arend, Kristin K.; Bartell, Steven; Beletsky, Dmitry; Bosch, Nate S.; Brandt, Stephen B.; Briland, Ruth D.; Daloğlu, Irem; DePinto, Joseph V.; Dolan, David M.; Evans, Mary Anne; Farmer, Troy M.; Goto, Daisuke; Han, Haejin; Höök, Tomas O.; Knight, Roger; Ludsin, Stuart A.; Mason, Doran; Michalak, Anna M.; Richards, R. Peter; Roberts, James J.; Rucinski, Daniel K.; Rutherford, Edward; Schwab, David J.; Sesterhenn, Timothy M.; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhou, Yuntao

    2014-01-01

    Relieving phosphorus loading is a key management tool for controlling Lake Erie eutrophication. During the 1960s and 1970s, increased phosphorus inputs degraded water quality and reduced central basin hypolimnetic oxygen levels which, in turn, eliminated thermal habitat vital to cold-water organisms and contributed to the extirpation of important benthic macroinvertebrate prey species for fishes. In response to load reductions initiated in 1972, Lake Erie responded quickly with reduced water-column phosphorus concentrations, phytoplankton biomass, and bottom-water hypoxia (dissolved oxygen 2) requires cutting total phosphorus loads by 46% from the 2003–2011 average or reducing dissolved reactive phosphorus loads by 78% from the 2005–2011 average. Reductions to these levels are also protective of fish habitat. We provide potential approaches for achieving those new loading targets, and suggest that recent load reduction recommendations focused on western basin cyanobacteria blooms may not be sufficient to reduce central basin hypoxia to 2000 km2.

  14. Historical Sediment Budget (1860s to Present) for the United States Shoreline of Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    construction • trapping sediment at harbor fillets • depositing material dredged from river mouths into deep water or onto land. Figure 3. Sediment...from the following web pages: • Chautauqua County: http://www.nysgis.state.ny.us/gateway/mg/2008/chautauqua/ • Erie County: http...Service, Coastal Services Center (CSC), distributes these data via an interactive web page. In terrain where tree cover obscured the bluff edge in

  15. Using oxygen isotopes of phosphate to trace phosphorus sources and cycling in Lake Erie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsbury, Katy E; Paytan, Adina; Ostrom, Nathaniel E; Kendall, Carol; Young, Megan B; McLaughlin, Karen; Rollog, Mark E; Watson, Sue

    2009-05-01

    Water samples collected during three sampling trips to Lake Erie displayed oxygen isotopic values of dissolved phosphate (delta18Op) that were largely out of equilibrium with ambient conditions, indicating that source signatures may be discerned. delta18Op, values in the Lake ranged from +10% per hundred to +17% per hundred, whereas the equilibrium value was expected to be around +14% per hundred. The riverine weighted average delta18Op, value was +11% per hundred and may represent one source of phosphate to the Lake. The lake delta18Op, values indicated that there must be one or more as yet uncharacterized source(s) of phosphate with a high delta18Op value. Potential sources other than rivers are not yet well-characterized with respectto delta18Op of phosphate, but we speculate that a likely source may be the release of phosphate from sediments under reducing conditions created during anoxic events in the hypolimnion of the central basin of Lake Erie. Identifying potential phosphorus sources to the Lake is vital for designing effective management plans for reducing nutrient inputs and associated eutrophication.

  16. Using oxygen isotopes of phosphate to trace phosphorus sources and cycling in lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsbury, K.E.; Paytan, A.; Ostrom, N.E.; Kendall, C.; Young, M.B.; McLaughlin, K.; Rollog, M.E.; Watson, S.

    2009-01-01

    Water samples collected during three sampling trips to Lake Erie displayed oxygen isotopic values of dissolved phosphate (??18O p) that were largely out of equilibrium with ambient conditions, indicating that source signatures may be discerned. ??18O p values in the Lake ranged from +10??? to +17???, whereas the equilibrium value was expected to be around +14???. The riverine weighted average ??18Op value was +11??? and may represent one source of phosphate to the Lake. The lake ?? 18Op values indicated that there must be one or more as yet uncharacterized source(s) of phosphate with a high ?? 18Op value. Potential sources other than rivers are not yet well-characterized with respect to ??18O of phosphate, but we speculate that a likely source may be the release of phosphate from sediments under reducing conditions created during anoxic events in the hypolimnion of the central basin of Lake Erie. Identifying potential phosphorus sources to the Lake is vital for designing effective management plans for reducing nutrient inputs and associated eutrophication. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  17. Dynamic hypoxic zones in Lake Erie compress fish habitat, altering vulnerability to fishing gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Richard T.; Knight, Carey T.; Farmer, Troy M.; Gorman, Ann Marie; Collingsworth, Paris D.; Warren, Glenn J.; Kocovsky, Patrick M.; Conroy, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal degradation of aquatic habitats from hypoxia occurs in numerous freshwater and coastal marine systems and can result in direct mortality or displacement of fish. Yet, fishery landings from these systems are frequently unresponsive to changes in the severity and extent of hypoxia, and population-scale effects have been difficult to measure except in extreme hypoxic conditions with hypoxia-sensitive species. We investigated fine-scale temporal and spatial variability in dissolved oxygen in Lake Erie as it related to fish distribution and catch efficiencies of both active (bottom trawls) and passive (trap nets) fishing gears. Temperature and dissolved oxygen loggers placed near the edge of the hypolimnion exhibited much higher than expected variability. Hypoxic episodes of variable durations were frequently punctuated by periods of normoxia, consistent with high-frequency internal waves. High-resolution interpolations of water quality and hydroacoustic surveys suggest that fish habitat is compressed during hypoxic episodes, resulting in higher fish densities near the edges of hypoxia. At fixed locations with passive commercial fishing gear, catches with the highest values occurred when bottom waters were hypoxic for intermediate proportions of time. Proximity to hypoxia explained significant variation in bottom trawl catches, with higher catch rates near the edge of hypoxia. These results emphasize how hypoxia may elevate catch rates in various types of fishing gears, leading to a lack of association between indices of hypoxia and fishery landings. Increased catch rates of fish at the edges of hypoxia have important implications for stock assessment models that assume catchability is spatially homogeneous.

  18. Engaging Stakeholders To Define Feasible and Desirable Agricultural Conservation in Western Lake Erie Watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalcic, Margaret McCahon; Kirchhoff, Christine; Bosch, Nathan; Muenich, Rebecca Logsdon; Murray, Michael; Griffith Gardner, Jacob; Scavia, Donald

    2016-08-02

    Widespread adoption of agricultural conservation measures in Lake Erie's Maumee River watershed may be required to reduce phosphorus loading that drives harmful algal blooms and hypoxia. We engaged agricultural and conservation stakeholders through a survey and workshops to determine which conservation practices to evaluate. We investigated feasible and desirable conservation practices using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool calibrated for streamflow, sediment, and nutrient loading near the Maumee River outlet. We found subsurface placement of phosphorus applications to be the individual practice most influential on March-July dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) loading from row croplands. Perennial cover crops and vegetated filter strips were most effective for reducing seasonal total phosphorus (TP) loading. We found that practices effective for reducing TP and DRP load were not always mutually beneficial, culminating in trade-offs among multiple Lake Erie phosphorus management goals. Adoption of practices at levels considered feasible to stakeholders led to nearly reaching TP targets for western Lake Erie on average years; however, adoption of practices at a rate that goes beyond what is currently considered feasible will likely be required to reach the DRP target.

  19. Annotated Bibliography for Lake Erie. Volume I. Biological,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    Cecelia Santus Dorothy Terpln Lama Reynolds Judy Maith I TABLE OF CONTENTS Page I. Introduction .................................... 1 II. Subject...concerning yeast3 from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans is also compared to that of the Great Lakes. Jenry, No ma Scott - See: Jessie Finley Klocke, et al...o. 433. Jessie Finley Klocke, et al, lHo. 434. 128 35. lienson, E. Bennette. 1966. A review of Great Lakes benthos research. Univ. MTich. Great

  20. Seasonal dynamics in dissolved organic matter, hydrogen peroxide, and cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Erie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose M. Cory

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 has been suggested to influence cyanobacterial community structure and toxicity. However, no study has investigated H2O2 concentrations in freshwaters relative to cyanobacterial blooms when sources and sinks of H2O2 may be highly variable. For example, photochemical production of H2O2 from chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM may vary over the course of the bloom with changing CDOM and UV light in the water column, while microbial sources and sinks of H2O2 may change with community biomass and composition. To assess relationships between H2O2 and harmful algal blooms dominated by toxic cyanobacteria in the western basin of Lake Erie, we measured H2O2 weekly at six stations from June – November, 2014 and 2015, with supporting physical, chemical, and biological water quality data. Nine additional stations across the western, eastern, and central basins of Lake Erie were sampled during August and October, 2015. CDOM sources were quantified from the fluorescence fraction of CDOM using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC. CDOM concentration and source were significantly correlated with specific conductivity, demonstrating that discharge of terrestrially-derived CDOM from rivers can be tracked in the lake. Autochthonous sources of CDOM in the lake increased over the course of the blooms. Concentrations of H2O2 in Lake Erie ranged from 47 ± 16 nM to 1570 ± 16 nM (average of 371 ± 17 nM; n = 225, and were not correlated to CDOM concentration or source, UV light, or estimates of photochemical production of H2O2 by CDOM. Temporal patterns in H2O2 were more closely aligned with bloom dynamics in the lake. In 2014 and 2015, maximum concentrations of H2O2 were observed prior to peak water column respiration and chlorophyll a, coinciding with the onset of the widespread Microcystis blooms in late July. The spatial and temporal patterns in H2O2 concentrations suggested that production and decay of H2O2 from aquatic

  1. Fisheries research and monitoring activities of the Lake Erie Biological Station, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodamer Scarbro, Betsy L.; Edwards, William; Gawne, Carrie; Kocovsky, Patrick M.; Kraus, Richard T.; Rogers, Mark W.; Stewart, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the USGS LEBS successfully completed large vessel surveys in all three of Lake Erie’s basins. Lake Erie Biological Station’s primary vessel surveys included the Western Basin Forage Fish Assessment and East Harbor Forage Fish Assessment as well as contributing to the cooperative multi-agency Central Basin Hydroacoustics Assessment, the Eastern Basin Coldwater Community Assessment, and LTLA (see FTG, CWTG, and FTG reports, respectively). Results from the surveys contribute to Lake Erie Committee Task Group data needs and analyses of trends in Lake Erie’s fish communities. The cruise survey schedule in 2014 was greatly increased by LEBS’s participation in the Lake Erie CSMI, which consisted of up-to two weeks of additional sampling per month from April to October. CSMI is a bi-national effort that occurs at Lake Erie every five years with the purpose of addressing data and knowledge gaps necessary to management agencies and the Lake Erie LaMP. LEBS deepwater science capabilities also provided a platform for data collection by Lake Erie investigators from multiple agencies and universities including: the USGS GLSC, ODW, KSU, OSU, UM, PU, UT, and the USNRL. Samples from this survey are being processed and a separate report of the findings will be made available in a separate document. Our 2014 vessel operations were initiated in mid-April, as soon after ice-out as possible, and continued into early December. During this time, crews of the R/V Muskie and R/V Bowfin deployed 196 bottom trawls covering 48.5 km of lake-bottom, nearly 6 km of gillnet, collected data from 60 hydroacoustics transects, 285 lower trophic (i.e., zooplankton and benthos) samples, and 330 water quality measures (e.g., temperature profiles, water samples). Thus, 2014 was an intensive year of field activity. Our June and September bottom trawl surveys in the Western Basin were numerically dominated by Emerald Shiner, White Perch, and Yellow Perch; however, Freshwater Drum were

  2. Isolation, Identification and Phenotypic Characterization of Microcystin-Degrading Bacteria from Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, A.; Mou, X. J.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Erie, the smallest and warmest lake among the Laurentian Great Lakes, is known for its problem of eutrophication and frequent occurrence of harmful cyanobacterial blooms (CyanoHABs). One major harmful effect of CyanoHABs is the production of cyanotoxins, especially microcystins. Microcystins (MC) are a group of hepatotoxins and the predominant variant of them is MC-LR. Field measurements and lab experiments indicate that MC degradation in Lake Erie is mainly carried out by indigenous bacteria. However, our knowledge on taxa involved in this process is very limited. This study aimed to fill this knowledge gap using a culture-dependent approach. Water and surface sediment samples were collected from Lake Erie in 2014 and 2015 and enriched with MC-LR. Cells were plated on a number of culturing media. The obtained pure bacterial cultures were screened for MC degrading abilities by MT2 BIO-LOG assays and by growing cells in liquid media containing MC-LR as the sole carbon source. In the latter experiment, MC concentrations were measured using HPLC. Isolates showing positive MC degradation activities in the screening steps were designated MC+ bacteria and characterized based on their phenotypic properties, including colony pigmentation, elevation, opacity, margin, gram nature and motility. The taxonomic identity of MC+ bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene full-length DNA sequencing. The presence of mlrA, a gene encoding MC cleavage pathway, was detected by PCR. Our culturing efforts obtained 520 pure cultures; 44 of them were identified as MC+. These MC+ isolates showed diversity in taxonomic identities and differed in their morphology, gram nature, colony characteristics and motility. PCR amplification of mlrA gene yield negative results for all MC+ isolates, indicating that the primers that were used may not be ubiquitous enough to cover the heterogeneity of mlrA genes or, more likely, alternative degradative genes/pathways were employed by Lake Erie bacteria

  3. Suitability of Lake Erie for bigheaded carps based on bioenergetic models and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Karl R.; Chapman, Duane C.; Wynne, Timothy; Masagounder, Karthik; Paukert, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Algal blooms in the Great Lakes are a potential food source for silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and bighead carp (H. nobilis; together bigheaded carps). Understanding these blooms thus plays an important role in understanding the invasion potential of bigheaded carps. We used remote sensing imagery, temperatures, and improved species specific bioenergetics models to determine algal concentrations sufficient for adult bigheaded carps. Depending on water temperature we found that bigheaded carp require between 2 and 7 μg/L chlorophyll or between 0.3 and 1.26 × 105cells/mL Microcystis to maintain body weight. Algal concentrations in the western basin and shoreline were found to be commonly several times greater than the concentrations required for weight maintenance. The remote sensing images show that area of sufficient algal foods commonly encompassed several hundred square kilometers to several thousands of square kilometers when blooms form. From 2002 to 2011, mean algal concentrations increased 273%–411%. This indicates Lake Erie provides increasingly adequate planktonic algal food for bigheaded carps. The water temperatures and algal concentrations detected in Lake Erie from 2008 to 2012 support positive growth rates such that a 4 kg silver carp could gain between 19 and 57% of its body weight in a year. A 5 kg bighead carp modeled at the same water temperatures could gain 20–81% of their body weight in the same period. The remote sensing imagery and bioenergetic models suggest that bigheaded carps would not be food limited if they invaded Lake Erie.

  4. A potential new energy pathway in Central Lake Erie: The round goby connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T.B.; Bunnell, D.B.; Knight, C.T.

    2005-01-01

    Round gobies, invasive fish that entered Lake Erie in 1994, are altering energy, contaminant, and nutrient pathways. Our objective was to quantify how they alter energy pathways in the central basin of Lake Erie by describing their diet and identifying the degree to which predatory fish feed upon round gobies. We used bioenergetic models parameterized with data collected in the central basin between 1995 and 2002 to estimate the type and amount of prey eaten, the biomass accumulation rate for the round goby population, and a partitioning of the food energy into “new” energy derived from dreissenids as opposed to existing energy derived from zooplankton and non-dreissenid benthic prey. Mean (± SE) prey consumption peaked at 5.98 ± 2.17×104 tonnes wet mass in 1999 coincident with the maximum population size of 4.2 ± 1.5 billion round gobies. Zooplankton (40.2% by biomass) and dreissenid mussels (38.3%) dominated the prey consumed. Almost 90% of the zooplankton biomass was consumed by age-0 round gobies, while over 80% of the dreissenids were eaten by older ages. Standing stock biomass of round gobies ranged between 203 and 4,803 tonnes y−1 (interannual range), with an additional 475 to 8,943 tonnes of biomass accumulating through growth each year. Piscivorous fish showed an increasing reliance on round gobies as prey, with round gobies being the dominant prey fish in the diets of benthic-oriented predators. Hence, by being one of the few benthivores that exploit dreissenid mussels as prey, our analyses reveal that round gobies transfer new energy up the central Lake Erie food web.

  5. Reducing Lake Erie's Harmful Algal Blooms: Projection and Adoption of Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J.; Aloysius, N.; Howard, G.; Kalcic, M. M.; Wilson, R. S.; Scavia, D.; Roe, B.

    2016-12-01

    In early 2016, the United States and Canada formally agreed to reduce phosphorus inputs to Lake Erie by 40% to reduce the severity of annual Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). These blooms have become more severe, with record events occurring in 2011 and 2015, and have compromised public safety, shut down drinking water supplies, and negatively impacted the economy of the western Lake Erie basin. Now, key questions revolve around the ability to reach the 40% reduction, required management changes, and resources to support these changes. This presentation will highlight interdisciplinary research to compare the amount and types of practices needed for this reduction to the current and projected levels of adoption. Economic resources to support these management changes are also compared with the financial support from the general public to improve Lake Erie water quality. Multiple models of the Maumee watershed identified management plans and adoption rates needed to reach the reduction targets. For example, one successful scenario estimated necessary adoption rates of 50% for subsurface application of fertilizer on row crops, 58% for cover crops, and 78% for buffer strips. Current adoption is below these levels, but future projections based on farmer surveys shows these levels are possible. Public support is necessary to generate the funding to support cost sharing and other programs aimed at increasing adoption of recommended practices. Comparing results from willingness-to-pay surveys of the general public with the estimated need for these management plans shows a gap in resources to support these levels of adoption. In general, these results show that accelerated adoption of management plans is needed compared to past adoption rates, but that these rates are possible based on likely adoption rates. Projected support from the general public indicates it will be challenging to fund these rates of adoption, especially during climate changes that may require even greater

  6. Metagenomic identification of bacterioplankton taxa and pathways involved in microcystin degradation in lake erie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Mou

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial harmful blooms (CyanoHABs that produce microcystins are appearing in an increasing number of freshwater ecosystems worldwide, damaging quality of water for use by human and aquatic life. Heterotrophic bacteria assemblages are thought to be important in transforming and detoxifying microcystins in natural environments. However, little is known about their taxonomic composition or pathways involved in the process. To address this knowledge gap, we compared the metagenomes of Lake Erie free-living bacterioplankton assemblages in laboratory microcosms amended with microcystins relative to unamended controls. A diverse array of bacterial phyla were responsive to elevated supply of microcystins, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria of the alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subdivisions and Verrucomicrobia. At more detailed taxonomic levels, Methylophilales (mainly in genus Methylotenera and Burkholderiales (mainly in genera Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Polaromonas, Ralstonia, Polynucleobacter and Variovorax of Betaproteobacteria were suggested to be more important in microcystin degradation than Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria. The latter taxa were previously thought to be major microcystin degraders. Homologs to known microcystin-degrading genes (mlr were not overrepresented in microcystin-amended metagenomes, indicating that Lake Erie bacterioplankton might employ alternative genes and/or pathways in microcystin degradation. Genes for xenobiotic metabolism were overrepresented in microcystin-amended microcosms, suggesting they are important in bacterial degradation of microcystin, a phenomenon that has been identified previously only in eukaryotic systems.

  7. The impact of introduced round gobies (Neogobius melanostomus) on phosphorus cycling in central Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, D.B.; Johnson, T.B.; Knight, C.T.

    2005-01-01

    We used an individual-based bioenergetic model to simulate the phosphorus flux of the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) population in central Lake Erie during 1995-2002. Estimates of round goby diet composition, growth rates, and population abundance were derived from field sampling. As an abundant introduced fish, we predicted that round gobies would influence phosphorus cycling both directly, through excretion, and indirectly, through consumption of dreissenid mussels, whose high mass-specific phosphorus excretion enhances recycling. In 1999, when age-1+ round gobies reached peak abundance near 350 million (2.4 kg??ha-1), annual phosphorus excretion was estimated at 7 t (1.4 ?? 10-3 mg P??m-2??day -1). From an ecosystem perspective, however, round gobies excreted only 0.4% of the phosphorus needed by the benthic community for primary production. Indirectly, round gobies consumed <0.2% of dreissenid population biomass, indicating that round gobies did not reduce nutrient availability by consuming dreissenids. Compared with previous studies that have revealed introduced species to influence phosphorus cycling, round gobies likely did not attain a sufficiently high biomass density to influence phosphorus cycling in Lake Erie. ?? 2005 NRC Canada.

  8. Metagenomic identification of bacterioplankton taxa and pathways involved in microcystin degradation in lake erie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Xiaozhen; Lu, Xinxin; Jacob, Jisha; Sun, Shulei; Heath, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful blooms (CyanoHABs) that produce microcystins are appearing in an increasing number of freshwater ecosystems worldwide, damaging quality of water for use by human and aquatic life. Heterotrophic bacteria assemblages are thought to be important in transforming and detoxifying microcystins in natural environments. However, little is known about their taxonomic composition or pathways involved in the process. To address this knowledge gap, we compared the metagenomes of Lake Erie free-living bacterioplankton assemblages in laboratory microcosms amended with microcystins relative to unamended controls. A diverse array of bacterial phyla were responsive to elevated supply of microcystins, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria of the alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subdivisions and Verrucomicrobia. At more detailed taxonomic levels, Methylophilales (mainly in genus Methylotenera) and Burkholderiales (mainly in genera Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Polaromonas, Ralstonia, Polynucleobacter and Variovorax) of Betaproteobacteria were suggested to be more important in microcystin degradation than Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria. The latter taxa were previously thought to be major microcystin degraders. Homologs to known microcystin-degrading genes (mlr) were not overrepresented in microcystin-amended metagenomes, indicating that Lake Erie bacterioplankton might employ alternative genes and/or pathways in microcystin degradation. Genes for xenobiotic metabolism were overrepresented in microcystin-amended microcosms, suggesting they are important in bacterial degradation of microcystin, a phenomenon that has been identified previously only in eukaryotic systems.

  9. The re-eutrophication of Lake Erie: Harmful algal blooms and hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Susan B; Miller, Carol; Arhonditsis, George; Boyer, Gregory L; Carmichael, Wayne; Charlton, Murray N; Confesor, Remegio; Depew, David C; Höök, Tomas O; Ludsin, Stuart A; Matisoff, Gerald; McElmurry, Shawn P; Murray, Michael W; Peter Richards, R; Rao, Yerubandi R; Steffen, Morgan M; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2016-06-01

    Lake Erie supplies drinking water to more than 11 million consumers, processes millions of gallons of wastewater, provides important species habitat and supports a substantial industrial sector, with >$50 billion annual income to tourism, recreational boating, shipping, fisheries, and other industries. These and other key ecosystem services are currently threatened by an excess supply of nutrients, manifested in particular by increases in the magnitude and extent of harmful planktonic and benthic algal blooms (HABs) and hypoxia. Widespread concern for this important international waterbody has been manifested in a strong focus of scientific and public material on the subject, and commitments for Canada-US remedial actions in recent agreements among Federal, Provincial and State agencies. This review provides a retrospective synthesis of past and current nutrient inputs, impairments by planktonic and benthic HABs and hypoxia, modelling and Best Management Practices in the Lake Erie basin. The results demonstrate that phosphorus reduction is of primary importance, but the effects of climate, nitrogen and other factors should also be considered in the context of adaptive management. Actions to reduce nutrient levels by targeted Best Management Practices will likely need to be tailored for soil types, topography, and farming practices. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Comparative Sensor Fusion between Hyperspectral and Multispectral Remote Sensing Data for Monitoring Microcystin Distribution in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban growth and agricultural production have caused an influx of nutrients into Lake Erie, leading to eutrophic zones. These conditions result in the formation of algal blooms, some of which are toxic due to the presence of Microcystis (a cyanobacteria), which produces the hepat...

  11. Arcobacter in Lake Erie beach waters: an emerging gastrointestinal pathogen linked with human-associated fecal contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Agidi, Senyo; Marion, Jason W; Lee, Jiyoung

    2012-08-01

    The genus Arcobacter has been associated with human illness and fecal contamination by humans and animals. To better characterize the health risk posed by this emerging waterborne pathogen, we investigated the occurrence of Arcobacter spp. in Lake Erie beach waters. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 35 times from the Euclid, Villa Angela, and Headlands (East and West) beaches, located along Ohio's Lake Erie coast. After sample concentration, Arcobacter was quantified by real-time PCR targeting the Arcobacter 23S rRNA gene. Other fecal genetic markers (Bacteroides 16S rRNA gene [HuBac], Escherichia coli uidA gene, Enterococcus 23S rRNA gene, and tetracycline resistance genes) were also assessed. Arcobacter was detected frequently at all beaches, and both the occurrence and densities of Arcobacter spp. were higher at the Euclid and Villa Angela beaches (with higher levels of fecal contamination) than at the East and West Headlands beaches. The Arcobacter density in Lake Erie beach water was significantly correlated with the human-specific fecal marker HuBac according to Spearman's correlation analysis (r = 0.592; P Arcobacter sequences were closely related to Arcobacter cryaerophilus, which is known to cause gastrointestinal diseases in humans. Since human-pathogenic Arcobacter spp. are linked to human-associated fecal sources, it is important to identify and manage the human-associated contamination sources for the prevention of Arcobacter-associated public health risks at Lake Erie beaches.

  12. Michigan 2006 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the MI coasts of Lake Huron, Lake Erie and the St....

  13. New York 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Niagara River and Lake Erie and Lake Ontario...

  14. New York 2011 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Proram

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the NY coasts of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario in 2011....

  15. Potential impact of Chironomus plumosus larvae on hypolimnetic oxygen in the central basin of Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soster, Frederick M.; Matisoff, Gerald; Schloesser, Donald W.; Edwards, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that burrow-irrigating infauna can increase sediment oxygen demand (SOD) and impact hypolimnetic oxygen in stratified lakes. We conducted laboratory microcosm experiments and computer simulations with larvae of the burrowing benthic midge Chironomus plumosus to quantify burrow oxygen uptake rates and subsequent contribution to sediment oxygen demand in central Lake Erie. Burrow oxygen uptake and water flow velocities through burrows were measured using oxygen microelectrodes and hot film anemometry, respectively. Burrow oxygen consumption averaged 2.66 × 10− 10 (SE = ± 7.82 × 10− 11) mol O2/burrow/s at 24 °C and 9.64 × 10− 10 (SE = ± 4.86 × 10− 10) mol O2/burrow/s at 15 °C. In sealed microcosm experiments, larvae increased SOD 500% at 24 °C (density = 1508/m2) and 375% at 15 °C (density = 864/m2). To further evaluate effects of densities of C. plumosus burrows on SOD we developed a 3-D transport reaction model of the process. Using experimental data and chironomid abundance data in faunal surveys in 2009 and 2010, we estimated that bioirrigation by a population of 140 larvae/m2 could account for between 2.54 × 10− 11 mol/L/s (model results) and 5.58 × 10− 11 mol/L/s (experimental results) of the average 4.22 × 10− 11 mol/L/s oxygen depletion rate between 1970 and 2003, which could have accounted for 60–132% of the oxygen decline. At present, it appears that the population density of this species may be an important factor in development of hypoxic or anoxic conditions in central Lake Erie.

  16. Using LANDSAT to expand the historical record of phytoplankton blooms in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J. C.; Michalak, A. M.; Stumpf, R. P.; Bridgeman, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    Freshwater harmful algal blooms are occurring with increasing frequency worldwide, intensifying the need for deeper understanding of the processes driving bloom formation. Such understanding is a prerequisite for developing management strategies for limiting bloom occurrence. Unfortunately, however, data for developing robust predictive models of bloom formation are lacking. Even in the well-studied Lake Erie, where diatom and cyanobacteria blooms have occurred for several decades in the Western Basin, previous in-situ and remote-sensing data collection efforts have been hampered by spatial and temporal sampling limitations, resulting in a sparse historical record. Leveraging available data to expand the historical record of algal blooms would thus make it possible to better evaluate hypotheses about factors influencing bloom formation. In this work, remotely-sensed observations of phytoplankton obtained using LANDSAT imagery are presented for 1984-2011. Several phytoplankton detection algorithms based on LANDSAT 5 imagery are evaluated during the period also covered by MERIS (2002-2011), which offers a relatively detailed assessment of bloom occurrence over the last decade. The best algorithm is then applied to historical LANDSAT data, and results are used to obtain new information about historical conditions and assess implications for developing improved models of bloom formation. Estimates of historical bloom occurrence and bloom seasonality shed new light on the widely-held view that phosphorus controls and invasive mussels resulted in substantial bloom reductions in the early 1990s. The new estimated records are not consistent with limited in-situ phytoplankton measurements from that period, and provide additional information on bloom occurrence during years with little to no supporting literature. This work demonstrates the potential to unearth new insights about historical phytoplankton blooms in Lake Erie, as well as in freshwater lakes broadly, and is a

  17. Effects of dreissenids on monitoring and management of fisheries in western Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Kocovsky, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Water clarity increased in nearshore areas of western Lake Erie by the early-1990s mainly as a result of the filtering activities of dreissenid mussels (Dreissena spp.), which invaded in the mid-1980s. We hypothesized that increased water clarity would result in greater trawl avoidance and thus reduced ability to capture fish in bottom trawls during daytime compared to nighttime. We examined this hypothesis by summarizing three analyses on fish data collected in western Lake Erie. First, we used a two-tiered modeling approach on the ration (R) of catch per hour (CPH) of age-0 yellow perch (Perca flavencens Mitchell) at night to CPH during daytime in 1961-2005. The best a priori and a posteriori models indicated a shift to higher CPH at night (R > 1) between 1990 and 1991, which corresponded to 3 years after the dreissenid invasion and when water clarity noticeably increased at nearshore sites. Secondly, we examined effects of nighttime sampling on estimates of abundance of age-2 and older yellow perch, which form the basis for recommended allowable harvest (RAH). When data from night sampling were included in models that predict abundance of age-2 yellow perch from indices of abundance of age-0 and age-1 yellow perch, predicted abundance was lower and model precision, as measured by r-squared, was higher compared to models that excluded data collected at night. Furthermore, the use of only CPH data collected at night typically resulted in lower estimates of abundance and more precise models compared to models that included CPH data collected during both daytime and nighttime. Thirdly, we used presence/absence data from paired bottom trawl samples to calculate an index of capture probability (or catchability) to determine if our ability to capture the four most common benthic species in western Lake Erie was affected by dreissenid-caused increased water clarity. Three species of fish(white perch, Morone americana Gmelin; yellow perch; and trout-perch, Percopsis

  18. Out-of-sample validation for structured expert judgment of Asian carp establishment in Lake Erie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Roger M; Wittmann, Marion E; Lodge, David M; Rothlisberger, John D; Rutherford, Edward S; Zhang, Hongyan; Mason, Doran M

    2014-10-01

    Structured expert judgment (SEJ) is used to quantify the uncertainty of nonindigenous fish (bighead carp [Hypophthalmichthys nobilis] and silver carp [H. molitrix]) establishment in Lake Erie. The classical model for structured expert judgment model is applied. Forming a weighted combination (called a decision maker) of experts' distributions, with weights derived from performance on a set of calibration variables from the experts' field, exhibits greater statistical accuracy and greater informativeness than simple averaging with equal weights. New methods of cross validation are applied and suggest that performance characteristics relative to equal weighting could be predicted with a small number (1-2) of calibration variables. The performance-based decision maker is somewhat degraded on out-of-sample prediction, but remained superior to the equal weight decision maker in terms of statistical accuracy and informativeness.

  19. Yeasts present during spontaneous fermentation of Lake Erie Chardonnay, Pinot Gris and Riesling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keulen, Harry; Lindmark, Donald G; Zeman, Kathleen E; Gerlosky, Wes

    2003-01-01

    The composition of wine yeast populations, present during spontaneous fermentation of Chardonnay, Pinot Gris and Riesling from the Lake Erie Region was studied. A combination of biochemical and molecular techniques was used to identify non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces yeast isolates. The biochemical techniques included analysis of yeast isolates by sugar fermentation and carbon and nitrogen assimilation. Molecular techniques involved ribotyping of a highly variable segment in the 26S rRNA gene using DNA sequence analysis and restriction fragment length polymorphism of amplified DNA. The results show that of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts, several related species of Hanseniaspora, were the most abundant yeasts present during early stages of fermentation. Later in fermentation S. cerevisiae dominated, and based on biochemical analyses consisted of a heterogeneous group of genotypes. There were no major differences in yeast populations among the three types of juice analyzed.

  20. Use of structured expert judgment to forecast invasions by bighead and silver carp in Lake Erie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Marion E; Cooke, Roger M; Rothlisberger, John D; Rutherford, Edward S; Zhang, Hongyan; Mason, Doran M; Lodge, David M

    2015-02-01

    Identifying which nonindigenous species will become invasive and forecasting the damage they will cause is difficult and presents a significant problem for natural resource management. Often, the data or resources necessary for ecological risk assessment are incomplete or absent, leaving environmental decision makers ill equipped to effectively manage valuable natural resources. Structured expert judgment (SEJ) is a mathematical and performance-based method of eliciting, weighting, and aggregating expert judgments. In contrast to other methods of eliciting and aggregating expert judgments (where, for example, equal weights may be assigned to experts), SEJ weights each expert on the basis of his or her statistical accuracy and informativeness through performance measurement on a set of calibration variables. We used SEJ to forecast impacts of nonindigenous Asian carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.) in Lake Erie, where it is believed not to be established. Experts quantified Asian carp biomass, production, and consumption and their impact on 4 fish species if Asian carp were to become established. According to experts, in Lake Erie Asian carp have the potential to achieve biomass levels that are similar to the sum of biomasses for several fishes that are harvested commercially or recreationally. However, the impact of Asian carp on the biomass of these fishes was estimated by experts to be small, relative to long term average biomasses, with little uncertainty. Impacts of Asian carp in tributaries and on recreational activities, water quality, or other species were not addressed. SEJ can be used to quantify key uncertainties of invasion biology and also provide a decision-support tool when the necessary information for natural resource management and policy is not available.

  1. Lake Superior Coastal Wetland Fish Assemblages and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of the coastal margin and the watershed context in defining the ecology of even very large lakes is increasingly being recognized and examined. Coastal wetlands are both important contributors to the biodiversity and productivity of large lakes and important mediators of the lake-basin connection. We explored wetland-watershed connections and their relationship to wetland function and condition using data collected from 37 Lake Superior wetlands spanning a substantial geographic and geomorphic gradient. While none of these wetlands are particularly disturbed, there were nevertheless clear relationships between watershed landuse and wetland habitat and biota, and these varied consistently across wetland type categories that reflected the strength of connection to the watershed. For example, water clarity and vegetation structure complexity declined with decreasing percent natural land cover, and these effects were strongest in riverine wetlands (having generally large watersheds and tributary-dominated hydrology) and weakest in lagoon wetlands (having generally small watersheds and lake-dominate hydrology). Fish abundance and species richness both increased with decreasing percent natural land cover while species diversity decreased, and again the effect was strongest in riverine wetlands. Lagoonal wetlands, which lack any substantial tributary, consistently harbored the fewest species of fish and a composition different from the more watershed-lin

  2. Mortality of unionid bivalves (Mollusca) associated with Dreissenid mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis) in Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloesser, Don W.; Masteller, Edwin C.

    1999-01-01

    Two exotic species of dreissenid mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis) began to colonize bottom substrates in Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie in 1990. By 1991, all native unionid (Unionidae) shells were infested by dreissenids. In 1990 and 1991, about 500 individual unionids of 15 species were collected: in 1992, 246 individuals of 12 species were collected; in 1993, 64 individuals of 6 species; in 1994, three individuals of three species; and in 1995, no unionids were found. In general, infestation indices of unionids were relatively low in 1990 and 1991, increased in 1992, and decreased in 1993. Mortality of unionids associated with infestation in the bay occurred in a shorter period of time (ca. two to three years) than has been documented in other water bodies. Observations in an area of Presque Isle not included in the present study, indicate that a small remnant population of unionids exists in the presence of heavily-colonized substrates by dreissenid mussels. Since other shallow-water areas of Lake Erie support infestation-free unionids in the presence of dreissenid mussels, it is hoped that some unionids will survive in Presque Isle Bay of Lake Erie.

  3. Aeromonas hydrophila and Aeromonas veronii predominate among potentially pathogenic ciprofloxacin- and tetracycline-resistant aeromonas isolates from Lake Erie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skwor, Troy; Shinko, Jasmine; Augustyniak, Alexander; Gee, Christopher; Andraso, Greg

    2014-02-01

    Members of the genus Aeromonas are ubiquitous in nature and have increasingly been implicated in numerous diseases of humans and other animal taxa. Although some species of aeromonads are human pathogens, their presence, density, and relative abundance are rarely considered in assessing water quality. The objectives of this study were to identify Aeromonas species within Lake Erie, determine their antibiotic resistance patterns, and assess their potential pathogenicity. Aeromonas strains were isolated from Lake Erie water by use of Aeromonas selective agar with and without tetracycline and ciprofloxacin. All isolates were analyzed for hemolytic ability and cytotoxicity against human epithelial cells and were identified to the species level by using 16S rRNA gene restriction fragment length polymorphisms and phylogenetic analysis based on gyrB gene sequences. A molecular virulence profile was identified for each isolate, using multiplex PCR analysis of six virulence genes. We demonstrated that Aeromonas comprised 16% of all culturable bacteria from Lake Erie. Among 119 Aeromonas isolates, six species were identified, though only two species (Aeromonas hydrophila and A. veronii) predominated among tetracycline- and ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates. Additionally, both of these species demonstrated pathogenic phenotypes in vitro. Virulence gene profiles demonstrated a high prevalence of aerolysin and serine protease genes among A. hydrophila and A. veronii isolates, a genetic profile which corresponded with pathogenic phenotypes. Together, our findings demonstrate increased antibiotic resistance among potentially pathogenic strains of aeromonads, illustrating an emerging potential health concern.

  4. Selective food preferences of walleyes of the 1959 year class in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, John W.

    1971-01-01

    Stomachs were examined from 1,473 walleyes (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum) of the 1959 year class collected in western Lake Erie from June 1959 to October 1960. In the same period, the relative abundance and lengths of potential forage species were determined from trawl catches. The walleye fed almost entirely on fish. In 1959 the food was dominated first (in June and July) by yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and then, in sequence, by spottail shiners (Notropis hudsonius) and emerald shiners (Notropis atherinoides). In 1960, the walleyes fed mostly on yearling spottail shiners and emerald shiners in the spring and summer but young alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) became the dominant food in the fall. The length of forage fish increased with the length of walleyes and walleyes of a given length usually ate forage fish within a restricted range of lengths. This size preference was shown by walleyes of the same length in the same and different months. The increased in length of forage fish with length of walleye was not proportionate. Walleyes 2.5 inches long ate forage fish 0.44 times their length whereas walleyes 15.5 inches long ate forage fish only 0.28 times their length. The diet of the walleyes changed according to species and lengths of forage fish available. Since young of several species hatched in different months and grew at different rates, abundance and suitability as forage sometimes changed rapidly.

  5. Petrology of the Devonian gas-bearing shale along Lake Erie helps explain gas shows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadhead, R.F.; Potter, P.E.

    1980-11-01

    Comprehensive petrologic study of 136 thin sections of the Ohio Shale along Lake Erie, when combined with detailed stratigraphic study, helps explain the occurrence of its gas shows, most of which occur in the silty, greenish-gray, organic poor Chagrin Shale and Three Lick Bed. Both have thicker siltstone laminae and more siltstone beds than other members of the Ohio Shale and both units also contain more clayshales. The source of the gas in the Chagrin Shale and Three Lick Bed of the Ohio Shale is believed to be the bituminous-rich shales of the middle and lower parts of the underlying Huron Member of the Ohio Shale. Eleven petrographic types were recognized and extended descriptions are provided of the major ones - claystones, clayshales, mudshales, and bituminous shales plus laminated and unlaminated siltstones and very minor marlstones and sandstones. In addition three major types of lamination were identified and studied. Thirty-two shale samples were analyzed for organic carbon, whole rock hydrogen and whole rock nitrogen with a Perkin-Elmer 240 Elemental Analyzer and provided the data base for source rock evaluation of the Ohio Shale.

  6. Food of forage fishes in western Lake Erie, 1975-76

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, Kenneth M.; Busch, Wolf-Dieter N.

    1989-01-01

    In western Lake Erie in the summer and fall of 1975–1976, food eaten by seven forage fishes—emerald shiner (Notropis atherinoides), spottail shiner (Notropis hudsonius), trout-perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus), andyoung-of-the-year (YOY) of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), white bass (Morone chrysops), and freshwater drum (Aplodi-notus grunniens)—was divided among six major taxa: Cladocera, Copepoda, Diptera, Ostracoda, Amphipoda, and Algae. In addition, fish were eaten by YOY white bass, and Rotifera were consumed by YOY gizzard shad. Interspecies diet overlap indices, calculated to compare the food of the different species and to evaluate diet similarities, were usually highest for YOY white bass and YOY freshwater drum when compared with the other species and usually lowest between emerald shiners and all other forage fishes. Understanding the feeding interactions among fishes that could influence production at the forage-food level of the food web could provide insight into how cascading trophic interactions influence the production of piscivorous predators.

  7. Sex difference in polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations of burbot Lota lota from Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, C.P.; Stapanian, M.A.; Rediske, R.R.; O’Keefe, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Whole-fish polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations were determined for 25 female and 25 male burbot Lota lota from Lake Erie. Bioenergetics modeling was used to investigate whether the sex difference in growth rate resulted in a difference in gross growth efficiency (GGE) between the sexes. For ages 6–13 years, male burbot averaged 28 % greater PCB concentrations than female burbot. The sex difference in PCB concentrations widened for ages 14–17 years, with male burbot having, on average, 71 % greater PCB concentrations than female burbot. Bioenergetics modeling results showed that the faster growth rate exhibited by female burbot did not lead to greater GGE in female individuals of the younger burbot and that the faster growth by female fish led to female GGE being only 2 % greater than male GGE in older burbot. Although our bioenergetics modeling could not explain the observed sex difference in PCB concentrations, we concluded that a sex difference in GGE was the most plausible explanation for the sex difference in PCB concentrations of burbot ages 6–13 years. Not only are male fish likely to be more active than female fish, but the resting metabolic rate of male fish may be greater than that of female fish. We also concluded that the widening of the sex difference in PCB concentrations for the older burbot may be due to many of the older male burbot spending a substantial amount of time in the vicinity of mouths of rivers contaminated with PCBs.

  8. Associations among Human-Associated Fecal Contamination, Microcystis aeruginosa, and Microcystin at Lake Erie Beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Marion, Jason W; Cheung, Melissa; Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Jiyoung

    2015-09-11

    Lake Erie beaches exhibit impaired water quality due to fecal contamination and cyanobacterial blooms, though few studies address potential relationships between these two public health hazards. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Microcystis aeruginosa was monitored in conjunction with a human-associated fecal marker (Bacteroides fragilis group; g-Bfra), microcystin, and water quality parameters at two beaches to evaluate their potential associations. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 32 times from both Euclid and Villa Angela beaches. The phycocyanin intergenic spacer (PC-IGS) and the microcystin-producing (mcyA) gene in M. aeruginosa were quantified with qPCR. PC-IGS and mcyA were detected in 50.0% and 39.1% of samples, respectively, and showed increased occurrences after mid-August. Correlation and regression analyses showed that water temperature was negatively correlated with M. aeruginosa markers and microcystin. The densities of mcyA and the g-Bfra were predicted by nitrate, implicating fecal contamination as contributing to the growth of M. aeruginosa by nitrate loading. Microcystin was correlated with mcyA (r = 0.413, p microcystin production. Additionally, microcystin was correlated with total phosphorus (r = 0.628, p microcystin concentrations at Euclid.

  9. Movements of brown bullheads in Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, M.J.; Smith, D.R.; Obert, E.; Grazio, J.; Bartron, M.L.; Wellington, C.; Grise, S.; Rafferty, S.; Wellington, R.; Julian, S.

    2009-01-01

    Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie, was listed as an Area of Concern (AOC) by the International Joint Commission in part because of the high incidence of external tumor in brown bullheads. Verifying the source of the possible contaminant exposure is critical to addressing the AOC designation. We used telemetry tracking (n = 49 fish) to test the hypothesis that adult bullheads captured within the bay during spawning season do not exit the bay during the post-spawning summer and fall months. We analyzed genetic variation at 15 microsatellite loci for 112 adult fish from 5 locations, 4 inside the bay and 1 outside, in order to test for possible differences. Data from fixed-station receivers suggested fish did not leave Presque Isle Bay during the study period. Predicted locations outside Presque Isle Bay were only 0.1% of all predicted locations and were below the 0.2% error rate based on known manual relocations. However, there was evidence for movement within Presque Isle Bay. Most movement was between Misery Bay or Lagoons and the open bay area. Whereas telemetry results showed tendency for adult site fidelity, genetic results showed no differences among locations, indicating that there is a single panmictic population. Our telemetry data suggest that brown bullheads are likely a useful indicator species for environmental conditions in Presque Isle Bay, since adults likely are retained in the system.

  10. Abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in sediments of trophic end members of the Laurentian Great Lakes, Erie and Superior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, Annette; Bullerjahn, George S; McKay, Robert Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first step of nitrification carried out by ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and Bacteria (AOB). Lake Superior and Erie are part of the Great Lakes system differing in trophic status with Lake Superior being oligotrophic and Lake Erie meso- to eutrophic. Sediment samples were collected from both lakes and used to characterize abundance and diversity of AOA and AOB based on the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene. Diversity was accessed by a pyro-sequencing approach and the obtained sequences were used to determine the phylogeny and alpha and beta diversity of the AOA and AOB populations. In Lake Erie copy numbers of bacterial amoA genes were in the same order of magnitude or even higher than the copy numbers of the archaeal amoA genes, while in Lake Superior up to 4 orders of magnitude more archaeal than bacterial amoA copies were detected. The AOB detected in the samples from Lake Erie belonged to AOB that are frequently detected in freshwater. Differences were detected between the phylogenetic affiliations of the AOA from the two lakes. Most sequences detected in Lake Erie clustered in the Nitrososphaera cluster (Thaumarchaeal soil group I.1b) where as most of the sequences in Lake Superior were found in the Nitrosopumilus cluster (Thaumarchaeal marine group I.1a) and the Nitrosotalea cluster. Pearson correlations and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that the differences in abundance and diversity of AOA are very likely related to the sampling location and thereby to the different trophic states of the lakes.

  11. Fusion of hyperspectral remote sensing data for near real-time monitoring of microcystin distribution in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannah, Benjamin; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2013-09-01

    Urban growth and agricultural production have caused an influx of nutrients into Lake Erie, leading to eutrophic zones. These conditions result in the formation of algal blooms, some of which are toxic due to the presence of Microcystis (a cyanobacteria), which produces the hepatotoxin microcystin. Microcystis has a unique advantage over its competition as a result of the invasive zebra mussel population that filters algae out of the water column except for the toxic Microcystis. The toxin threatens human health and the ecosystem, and it is a concern for water treatment plants using the lake water as a tap water source. This presentation demonstrates the prototype of a near real-time early warning system using Integrated Data Fusion techniques with the aid of both hyperspectral remote sensing data to determine spatiotemporal microcystin concentrations. The temporal resolution of MODIS is fused with the higher spatial and spectral resolution of MERIS to create synthetic images on a daily basis. As a demonstration, the spatiotemporal distributions of microcystin within western Lake Erie are reconstructed using the band data from the fused products and applied machine-learning techniques. Analysis of the results through statistical indices confirmed that the this type of algorithm has better potential to accurately estimating microcystin concentrations in the lake, which is better than current two band models and other computational intelligence models.

  12. Spatial variation in biofouling of a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea) across the western basin of Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.; Evans, Mary; Richardson, William B.; Schaeffer, Jeff; Nelson, John

    2016-01-01

    Invasion of North American waters by nonnative Dreissena polymorpha and D. rostriformis bugensishas resulted in declines of the Unionidae family of native North American mussels. Dreissenid mussels biofoul unionid mussels in large numbers and interfere with unionid movement, their acquisition of food, and the native mussels' ability to open and close their shells. Initial expectations for the Great Lakes included extirpation of unionids where they co-occurred with dreissenids, but recently adult and juvenile unionids have been found alive in several apparent refugia. These unionid populations may persist due to reduced dreissenid biofouling in these areas, and/or due to processes that remove biofoulers. For example locations inaccessible to dreissenid veligers may reduce biofouling and habitats with soft substrates may allow unionids to burrow and thus remove dreissenids. We deployed caged unionid mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea) at 36 sites across the western basin of Lake Erie to assess spatial variation in biofouling and to identify other areas that might promote the persistence or recovery of native unionid mussels. Biofouling ranged from 0.03 – 26.33 g per mussel, reached a maximum in the immediate vicinity of the mouth of the Maumee River, and appeared to primarily consist of dreissenid mussels. A known mussel refugium in the vicinity of a power plant near the mouth of the Maumee actually exhibited very high biofouling rates, suggesting that low dreissenid colonization did not adequately explain unionid survival in this refugium. In contrast, the southern nearshore area of Lake Erie, near another refugium, had very low biofouling. A large stretch of the western basin appeared to have low biofouling rates and muddy substrates, raising the possibility that these open water areas could support remnant and returning populations of unionid mussels. Previous observations of unionid refugia and the occurrence of low biofouling rates in large areas of the western

  13. Testing and Refining the Ohio Nowcast at Two Lake Erie Beaches-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francy, Donna S.; Bertke, Erin E.; Darner, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    The Ohio Nowcast has been providing real-time beach advisories to the public on the basis of predictive models since 2006. In support of the nowcast, data were collected during the recreational season of 2008 to validate and refine predictive models at two Lake Erie beaches. Predictive models yield data on the probability that the single-sample bathing-water standard for E. coli will be exceeded. Field personnel collected or compiled data on Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations as well as variables expected to affect these concentrations, including manual and automated measurements of turbidity, wave height, and water temperature; lake level; and radar and airport rainfall amounts. Two new variables were measured during 2008 - photosynthetically-active radiation at Huntington (Bay Village) and foreshore head at Edgewater (Cleveland). (The foreshore is a strip of land along a body of water between low and high water marks.) The performance of the nowcast was monitored during 2008. The Huntington nowcast yielded a greater percentage of correct responses (84.9 percent) than did the previous day's E. coli concentration (75.2 percent). In contrast, at Edgewater, the nowcast yielded a slightly higher percentage of correct responses (61.0 percent) as compared to the previous day's E. coli concentration (56.5 percent), but both percentages were relatively low. Lake levels in 2008 were significantly higher than levels in the data used to develop the Edgewater models (2004-7), confounding their abilities to provide correct responses. At Edgewater during 2008, the strongest relation (as measured by Pearson's correlation) was between E. coli concentrations and the difference in foreshore head over the past 24 hours (r=0.48), a variable not included in the models. At Huntington, photosynthetically-active radiation on the previous day showed a significant negative relation to E. coli concentrations (r=-0.33) during 2008. Refined models were developed for Huntington and

  14. Using Wind Setdown and Storm Surge on Lake Erie to Calibrate the Air-Sea Drag Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1. PMID:23977309

  15. Using wind setdown and storm surge on Lake Erie to calibrate the air-sea drag coefficient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Drews

    Full Text Available The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS. Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN. Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1.

  16. Benefits of Turbid River Plume Habitat for Lake Erie Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) Recruitment Determined by Juvenile to Larval Genotype Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreon-Martinez, Lucia B.; Walter, Ryan P.; Johnson, Timothy B.; Ludsin, Stuart A.; Heath, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient-rich, turbid river plumes that are common to large lakes and coastal marine ecosystems have been hypothesized to benefit survival of fish during early life stages by increasing food availability and (or) reducing vulnerability to visual predators. However, evidence that river plumes truly benefit the recruitment process remains meager for both freshwater and marine fishes. Here, we use genotype assignment between juvenile and larval yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from western Lake Erie to estimate and compare recruitment to the age-0 juvenile stage for larvae residing inside the highly turbid, south-shore Maumee River plume versus those occupying the less turbid, more northerly Detroit River plume. Bayesian genotype assignment of a mixed assemblage of juvenile (age-0) yellow perch to putative larval source populations established that recruitment of larvae was higher from the turbid Maumee River plume than for the less turbid Detroit River plume during 2006 and 2007, but not in 2008. Our findings add to the growing evidence that turbid river plumes can indeed enhance survival of fish larvae to recruited life stages, and also demonstrate how novel population genetic analyses of early life stages can contribute to determining critical early life stage processes in the fish recruitment process. PMID:25954968

  17. Benefits of Turbid River Plume Habitat for Lake Erie Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) Recruitment Determined by Juvenile to Larval Genotype Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreon-Martinez, Lucia B; Walter, Ryan P; Johnson, Timothy B; Ludsin, Stuart A; Heath, Daniel D

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient-rich, turbid river plumes that are common to large lakes and coastal marine ecosystems have been hypothesized to benefit survival of fish during early life stages by increasing food availability and (or) reducing vulnerability to visual predators. However, evidence that river plumes truly benefit the recruitment process remains meager for both freshwater and marine fishes. Here, we use genotype assignment between juvenile and larval yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from western Lake Erie to estimate and compare recruitment to the age-0 juvenile stage for larvae residing inside the highly turbid, south-shore Maumee River plume versus those occupying the less turbid, more northerly Detroit River plume. Bayesian genotype assignment of a mixed assemblage of juvenile (age-0) yellow perch to putative larval source populations established that recruitment of larvae was higher from the turbid Maumee River plume than for the less turbid Detroit River plume during 2006 and 2007, but not in 2008. Our findings add to the growing evidence that turbid river plumes can indeed enhance survival of fish larvae to recruited life stages, and also demonstrate how novel population genetic analyses of early life stages can contribute to determining critical early life stage processes in the fish recruitment process.

  18. Benefits of Turbid River Plume Habitat for Lake Erie Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens Recruitment Determined by Juvenile to Larval Genotype Assignment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia B Carreon-Martinez

    Full Text Available Nutrient-rich, turbid river plumes that are common to large lakes and coastal marine ecosystems have been hypothesized to benefit survival of fish during early life stages by increasing food availability and (or reducing vulnerability to visual predators. However, evidence that river plumes truly benefit the recruitment process remains meager for both freshwater and marine fishes. Here, we use genotype assignment between juvenile and larval yellow perch (Perca flavescens from western Lake Erie to estimate and compare recruitment to the age-0 juvenile stage for larvae residing inside the highly turbid, south-shore Maumee River plume versus those occupying the less turbid, more northerly Detroit River plume. Bayesian genotype assignment of a mixed assemblage of juvenile (age-0 yellow perch to putative larval source populations established that recruitment of larvae was higher from the turbid Maumee River plume than for the less turbid Detroit River plume during 2006 and 2007, but not in 2008. Our findings add to the growing evidence that turbid river plumes can indeed enhance survival of fish larvae to recruited life stages, and also demonstrate how novel population genetic analyses of early life stages can contribute to determining critical early life stage processes in the fish recruitment process.

  19. Reconnaissance survey for lightweight and carbon tetrachloride extractable hydrocarbons in the central and eastern basins of Lake Erie: September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapotosky, J.E.; White, W.S.

    1980-10-01

    A reconnaissance survey of the central and eastern basins of Lake Erie (22,240 km/sup 2/) was conducted from September 17 to 27, 1978. The survey provided baseline information on natural gas and oil losses from geologic formations, prior to any potential development of natural gas resources beneath the United States portion of the Lake. Lightweight hydrocarbons indicative of natural gas (methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, and n-butane) are introduced into the waters of Lake Erie by escape from geologic formations and by biological/photochemical processes. The geochemical exploration technique of hydrocarbon sniffing provided enough data to reveal significant distribution patterns, approximate concentrations, and potential sources. Twelve sites with elevated lightweight hydrocarbon concentrations had a composition similar to natural gas. In one area of natural gas input, data analysis suggested a potential negative effect of natural gas on phytoplanktonic metabolism (i.e., ethylene concentration). Samples taken for liquid hydrocarbon analysis (carbon tetrachloride extractable hydrocarbons) correlated best with biologically derived lightweight hydrocarbons.

  20. Increasingly, Data Availability Limits Model Predictive Capacity: the Western Lake Erie Basin, a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrman, K. D.; Johnson, M. V. V.; Atwood, J. D.; Norfleet, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Recent algal blooms in Western Lake Erie Basin (WLEB) have renewed scientific community's interest in developing process based models to better understand and predict the drivers of eutrophic conditions in the lake. At the same time, in order to prevent future blooms, farmers, local communities and policy makers are interested in developing spatially explicit nutrient and sediment management plans at various scales, from field to watershed. These interests have fueled several modeling exercises intended to locate "hotspots" in the basin where targeted adoption of additional agricultural conservation practices could provide the most benefit to water quality. The models have also been used to simulate various scenarios representing potential agricultural solutions. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and its sister model, the Agricultural Policy Environmental eXtender (APEX), have been used to simulate hydrology of interacting land uses in thousands of scientific studies around the world. High performance computing allows SWAT and APEX users to continue to improve and refine the model specificity to make predictions at small-spatial scales. Consequently, data inputs and calibration/validation data are now becoming the limiting factor to model performance. Water quality data for the tributaries and rivers that flow through WLEB is spatially and temporally limited. Land management data, including conservation practice and nutrient management data, are not publicly available at fine spatial and temporal scales. Here we show the data uncertainties associated with modeling WLEB croplands at a relatively large spatial scale (HUC-4) using site management data from over 1,000 farms collected by the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP). The error associated with downscaling this data to the HUC-8 and HUC-12 scale is shown. Simulations of spatially explicit dynamics can be very informative, but care must be taken when policy decisions are made based on models

  1. Ohio 2006 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Erie coast of OH in 2006. The data types...

  2. Pennsylvania 2006 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Erie coast of PA in 2006. The data types...

  3. Pennsylvania 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Erie coast of PA in 2007. The data types...

  4. Measuring spatial variation in secondary production and food quality using a common consumer approach in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.; Richardson, William B.; Evans, Mary Anne; Schaeffer, Jeff; Wynne, Timothy; Bartsch, Michelle; Bartsch, Lynn; Nelson, J. C.; Vallazza, Jon M.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Erie is a large lake straddling the border of the U.S. and Canada that has become increasingly eutrophic in recent years. Eutrophication is particularly focused in the shallow western basin. The western basin of Lake Erie is hydrodynamically similar to a large estuary, with riverine inputs from the Detroit and Maumee Rivers mixing together and creating gradients in chemical and physical conditions. This study was driven by two questions: How does secondary production and food quality for consumers vary across this large mixing zone? and Are there correlations between cyanobacterial abundance and secondary production or food quality for consumers? Measuring spatial and temporal variation in secondary production and food quality is difficult for a variety of logistical reasons, so here a common consumer approach was used. In a common consumer approach, individuals of a single species are raised under similar conditions until placed in the field across environmental gradients of interest. After some period of exposure, the response of that common consumer is measured to provide an index of spatial variation in conditions. Here, a freshwater mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea) was deployed at 32 locations that spanned habitat types and a gradient in cyanobacterial abundance in the western basin of Lake Erie to measure spatial variation in growth (an index of secondary production) and fatty acid (FA) content (an index of food quality). We found secondary production was highest within the Maumee rivermouth and lowest in the open waters of the lake. Mussel tissues in the Maumee rivermouth also included more eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic fatty acids (EPA and DPA, respectively), but fewer bacterial FAs, suggesting more algae at the base of the food web in the Maumee rivermouth compared to open lake sites. The satellite-derived estimate of cyanobacterial abundance was not correlated to secondary production, but was positively related to EPA and DPA content in the

  5. Nutrient Application and Algal Blooms: Farmer Decisions Regarding the Use of Best Management Practices in Lake Erie's Maumee River Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeren, A.; Toman, E.; Wilson, R. S.; Martin, J.

    2016-12-01

    Lake Erie is the most productive of the Great Lakes. However, harmful algal blooms (HABs) caused by nutrient run-off threaten the lake. Experts have proposed numerous best management practices (BMPs) designed to reduce nutrient and sediment run-off. However, for these practices to be effective at reducing HABs, a significant portion of farmers and landowners within Lake Erie's watersheds have to first adopt and implement these practices. In order to better understand how farmers and landowners make decisions about whether or not to adopt and implement BMPs we conducted a series of focus groups and a mail survey of Lake Erie's largest watershed. We found that many farmers were supportive of adopting BMPs. For example, 60% of farmers in the watershed have already adopted using grid soil sampling while another 30% are willing to adopt the practice in the future. However, other practices were less popular, for example, only 18% of farmers had already adopted cover crops. Farmers also expressed several reservations about adopting some BMPs. For example, farmers were concerned about the costs of some BMPs, such as cover crops and drainage management systems, and how such practices might interfere with the planting of subsequent crops. Our research has several implications for reducing nutrient production by promoting BMPs. First, we identified potential concerns and limitations farmers faced in implementing specific BMPs. For example, conservationists can design future programs and communication efforts to target these specific concerns. Second, through examining the socio-psychological and cognitive characteristics that influence farmer decision-making, we identified that willingness to adopt nutrient BMPs is association with how strongly a farmer identifies with conservation and how effective they believed the BMP was at reducing run-off. Messages and information about BMPs may be more effective if they are framed in a way that aligns with identities and beliefs about

  6. Molecular evidence of undescribed Ceratonova sp. (Cnidaria: Myxosporea) in the freshwater polychaete, Manayunkia speciosa, from western Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakauskas, David M.; Snipes, Robert Benjamin; Thompson, Ann M.; Schloesser, Donald W.

    2016-01-01

    We used PCR to screen pooled individuals of Manayunkia speciosa from western Lake Erie, Michigan, USA for myxosporean parasites. Amplicons from positive PCRs were sequenced and showed a Ceratonova species in an estimated 1.1% (95% CI = 0.46%, 1.8%) of M. speciosa individuals. We sequenced 18S, ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2 and most of the 28S rDNA regions of this Ceratonova sp., and part of the protein-coding EF2 gene. Phylogenetic analyses of ribosomal and EF2 sequences showed the Lake Erie Ceratonova sp. is most similar to, but genetically distinct from, Ceratonova shasta. Marked interspecific polymorphism in all genes examined, including the ITS barcoding genes, along with geographic location suggests this is an undescribed Ceratonova species. COI sequences showed M. speciosa individuals in Michigan and California are the same species. These findings represent a third parasite in the genus Ceratonovapotentially hosted by M. speciosa.

  7. Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Polychlorinated Dioxins-Furans in Lake Trout and Whitefish Composite Samples from Commercial Fisheries in Lakes Erie, Huron, and Superior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawn, Dorothea F K; Dowd, Michael; Scuby, Matthew J S; Pantazopoulos, Peter P; Feeley, Mark

    2017-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs; sum of 36 congeners) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs; sum of 17 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners) were measured in 93 composite samples prepared from individual lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) samples collected from Lake Erie, Lake Huron, and Lake Superior. All samples had detectable concentrations of PCBs and PCDD/Fs; maximum PCB concentrations in both trout (750 ng g(-1) whole weight [ww]) and whitefish (210 ng g(-1) ww) were found in composites from fish collected from Lake Huron. The maximum toxic equivalent concentration was found in a lake trout composite sample from Lake Huron (53 pg g(-1) ww). PCB and PCDD/F congener profiles were comparable to patterns observed in fishes collected from other regions of Canada, although concentrations were above those found in other regions. A positive correlation was found between PCB concentrations determined using the historical Aroclor equivalency method and those determined using the sum of the congeners measured (r(2) = 0.871; Spearman correlation r = 0.917) or using the six indicator PCB congeners (28, 52, 101, 138, 153, and 180; r(2) = 0.850; Spearman correlation r = 0.935). PCBs were the dominant contributor to the overall toxic equivalent concentrations in the fish composite samples tested. These findings provide insight into PCB and PCDD/F concentrations in two commercially important fish species over a discrete time period.

  8. 2015 RFA for Great Lakes Coastal Wetland Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Request for Applications solicits applications from eligible entities for a cooperative agreement to be awarded for a project to continue monitoring and assessment of Great Lakes coastal wetlands.

  9. Monitoring of Harmful Algal Blooms through Drinking Water Treatment Facilities Located on Lake Erie in the 2014 and 2015 Bloom Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of drinking water treatment plants on Lake Erie have supplied water samples on a monthly basis for analysis related to the occurrence of harmful algal blooms (HABs). General water quality parameters including total organic carbon (TOC), orthophosphate, and chlorophyll-A ...

  10. Monitoring for Harmful Algal Blooms in Influent Waters and Through Treatment on Lake Erie in the 2013 and 2014 Bloom Seasons 

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monitoring of Harmful Algal Blooms in Influent and Through Drinking Water Treatment Facilities Located on Lake Erie in the 2013 and 2014 Bloom SeasonsToby Sanan, Nicholas Dugan, Darren Lytle, Heath MashHarmful algal blooms (HABs) and their associated toxins are emerging as signif...

  11. Cultural Resources in the Southern Lake Erie Basin: A Predictive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Eudora : Schooner. Wrecked at;Dunkirk in 1851. 133 tons. Built in Charleston, OH, in 1843. H-14 245. 5Dla+ Golden Gate: Sidewheel steamer. Burned at Erie...tradition in Michigan: A distribu- tional analysis. Michigan Archaeologist 9:21-24. 1963b The Welti Site: A multicomponent site in southeastern

  12. Vertical distribution of buoyant Microcystis blooms in a Lagrangian particle tracking model for short-term forecasts in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, M. D.; Anderson, E. J.; Wynne, T. T.; Stumpf, R. P.; Fanslow, D. L.; Kijanka, K.; Vanderploeg, H. A.; Strickler, J. R.; Davis, T. W.

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CHABs) are a problem in western Lake Erie, and in eutrophic fresh waters worldwide. Western Lake Erie is a large (3000 km2), shallow (8 m mean depth), freshwater system. CHABs occur from July to October, when stratification is intermittent in response to wind and surface heating or cooling (polymictic). Existing forecast models give the present location and extent of CHABs from satellite imagery, then predict two-dimensional (surface) CHAB movement in response to meteorology. In this study, we simulated vertical distribution of buoyant Microcystis colonies, and 3-D advection, using a Lagrangian particle model forced by currents and turbulent diffusivity from the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). We estimated the frequency distribution of Microcystis colony buoyant velocity from measured size distributions and buoyant velocities. We evaluated several random-walk numerical schemes to efficiently minimize particle accumulation artifacts. We selected the Milstein scheme, with linear interpolation of the diffusivity profile in place of cubic splines, and varied the time step at each particle and step based on the curvature of the local diffusivity profile to ensure that the Visser time step criterion was satisfied. Inclusion of vertical mixing with buoyancy significantly improved model skill statistics compared to an advection-only model, and showed greater skill than a persistence forecast through simulation day 6, in a series of 26 hindcast simulations from 2011. The simulations and in situ observations show the importance of subtle thermal structure, typical of a polymictic lake, along with buoyancy in determining vertical and horizontal distribution of Microcystis.

  13. Culture-based Identification Of Microcystin-Degrading Bacteria In the Sandusky Bay and Maumee Bay of Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormiston, A.; Mou, X.

    2012-12-01

    Harmful cyanobacteria blooms (cyanoHABs) are a serious issue that affects wildlife, human health, recreation and local economics worldwide. CyanoHABs produce cyanotoxins, such as microcystins (MCs) that lead to skin irritation, illness and liver tumors. Bacterially mediated degradation of MCs plays a key role to transform these toxic substrates to less harmful metabolites in natural environments. However, only a few Sphingomonos species have been isolated for degradation of MCs and many of which are from other habitats such as water plants. This project aims to isolate and identify bacteria that can degrade MC-LR and MC-RR, two major forms of MCs found during cyanoHABs in Lake Erie. Water samples were collected from the surface of Sandusky Bay and Maumee Bay of Lake Erie and immediately filtered through 3.0 -μm-pore-size membrane filters to obtain bacterioplankton fraction. The filtrates were amended with excessive inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus compounds and incubated in the dark for a week to purposely establish a carbon-limited condition. Afterwards, enrichment microcosms were established in flasks filled with pre-incubated bacterioplankton and single MC compounds (final concentration 10 μM). Once cell growth was confirmed by flow cytometry-based cell counting, bacterial cells in enriched microcosms were transferred onto solid surfaces, i.e., GFF filter and noble agar for colony isolation. Obtained single colonies were inoculated in defined liquid media with MCs as single carbon source. DNA was extracted from each purified isolate and analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP). A total of 18 different RFLP banding patterns were found, indicating MC-degrading bacteria may be heterogeneous in studied water samples. 16S rRNA genes of selected bacterial isolates were PCR amplified and sequenced for taxonomic identification. Our results demonstrated that MCs can be degraded by multiple bacterial species in Lake Erie. Future directions

  14. Estimates of sediment trapping rates for two reservoirs in the Lake Erie watershed: Past and present scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alighalehbabakhani, Fatemeh; Miller, Carol J.; Selegean, James P.; Barkach, John; Sadatiyan Abkenar, Seyed Mohsen; Dahl, Travis; Baskaran, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Sediment accumulation can significantly impact the useful life of dams and the multiple functions served by those dams such as flood attenuation, hydropower, and water supply. However, there is only limited information, and even fewer physical measurements, assessing the rate of sediment accumulation in reservoirs behind dams. Many of the dams within the Great Lakes Watershed were constructed between 100 and 120 years ago, and there is reasonable concern that these dams and their associated reservoirs may be reaching capacity with respect to sediment storage. As a reservoir reaches its sediment storage capacity, there are numerous risks. Excess sediment can compromise the water intake for supply systems. Dam failure or removal can potentially allow large quantities of impounded sediment to migrate downstream, negatively impacting fish habitat and water quality. This research investigates the historical function of dams as sediment storage points. Also, this research assesses the effect of anthropogenic influences including land use change and dam construction on sediment yield and accumulation within the Lake Rockwell and Ballville Dam watershed. To better understand the historical and current sediment yield within the Lake Erie watershed, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) models of the Lake Rockwell and Ballville Dam watersheds were developed. The resulting model suggests that the average of sediment accumulation rate within Lake Rockwell Dam reservoir varies between the minimum of 1.6 and the maximum of 4.6 g/cm2/yr from 1988 to 2007. Within the Ballville Dam reservoir, the rate varies between the minimum of 2.6 and the maximum of 23.2 g/cm2/yr from 1980 to 1999.

  15. Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) Project NY1405: ERIE CANAL, NY.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) is to improve the coordination among federal, state and local government, non-governmental and private...

  16. Detecting and Mapping Invasive Phragmites australis in the coastal Great Lakes with ALOS PALSAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeau-chavez, L. L.; Scarbrough, K.; Jenkins, L. K.; Riordan, K.; Powell, R. B.; Brooks, C.; Kowalski, K.; Carlson Mazur, M.; Huberty, B.

    2011-12-01

    Phragmites australis is a non-native invasive plant that can form dense monocultures, causing negative impacts on coastal Great Lakes wetlands by reducing ecosystem services including habitat and therefore, biological diversity. Through Great Lakes Restoration Initiative funding, ALOS PALSAR imagery is being used to map the invasive plant as it occurs in monoculture stands of the U.S. coastal Great Lakes wetlands. These invasive Phragmites maps are being used as part of a USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) and US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) program to identify major environmental drivers of invasive Phragmites distribution, to assess areas vulnerable to new invasion, and to provide this information to regional stakeholders through a decision support tool. The invasive Phragmites map is the first U.S. basin-wide map to be produced on the distribution of this species. Methods include maximum likelihood classification of multi-season ALOS PALSAR HH and HV polarization data. PALSAR is an L-band (23 cm wavelength) imaging radar sensor which is sensitive to differences in plant biomass and inundation patterns, allowing for the extraction of these tall (up to 15 m), high-density, high-biomass Phragmites wetland stands. To improve discrimination of Phragmites australis, the three date (spring, summer, fall) dataset is being used, which takes advantage of phenological changes in vegetation and inundation patterns over the seasons. Field collections of training and randomly selected validation data were conducted in spring summer and fall of 2010-11 to aid in the mapping and for accuracy assessment. The minimum mapping unit is 1/2 acre and thus all field sites were sampled at 1/2 acre units. All map products and field validation data will be complete by December 2011. Maps are being completed on a Lake basin basis. The first final map product was delivered for Lake Erie coastal wetlands to 10 km inland, with an overall map accuracy

  17. Maumee Bay State Park, Ohio. Shoreline Erosion Beach Restoration Study. Final Feasibility Report and Final Environmental Impact Statement. Interim to Western Lake Erie Shore Study. Volume 2. Appendices. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    systems at Presque Isle State Park, Lakeview Park, available research literature and design information on the subject and a revised wave analysis...an important commercial fish to Canada. Most smelt spawning areas are located in Canadian, New York, and Pennsylvania waters of Lake Erie . Smelt will...Water Quality Administration. 1968. Pollution of Lake Erie and its tributaries - Indiana, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania . Progress Evaluation

  18. Spatial and temporal patterns in the seasonal distribution of toxic cyanobacteria in Western Lake Erie from 2002-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, Timothy T; Stumpf, Richard P

    2015-05-12

    Lake Erie, the world's tenth largest freshwater lake by area, has had recurring blooms of toxic cyanobacteria for the past two decades. These blooms pose potential health risks for recreation, and impact the treatment of drinking water. Understanding the timing and distribution of the blooms may aid in planning by local communities and resources managers. Satellite data provides a means of examining spatial patterns of the blooms. Data sets from MERIS (2002-2012) and MODIS (2012-2014) were analyzed to evaluate bloom patterns and frequencies. The blooms were identified using previously published algorithms to detect cyanobacteria (~25,000 cells mL-1), as well as a variation of these algorithms to account for the saturation of the MODIS ocean color bands. Images were binned into 10-day composites to reduce cloud and mixing artifacts. The 13 years of composites were used to determine frequency of presence of both detectable cyanobacteria and high risk (>100,000 cells mL-1) blooms. The bloom season according to the satellite observations falls within June 1 and October 31. Maps show the pattern of development and areas most commonly impacted during all years (with minor and severe blooms). Frequencies during years with just severe blooms (minor bloom years were not included in the analysis) were examined in the same fashion. With the annual forecasts of bloom severity, these frequency maps can provide public water suppliers and health departments with guidance on the timing of potential risk.

  19. Freshwater polychaetes (Manayunkia speciosa) near the Detroit River, western Lake Erie: Abundance and life‐history characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloesser, Donald W.; Malakauskas, David M.; Malakauskas, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater polychaetes are relatively rare and little-studied members of the benthos of lakes and rivers. We studied one polychaete species (Manayunkia speciosa) in Lake Erie near the mouth of the Detroit River. Abundances at one site were determined between 1961 and 2013 and life‐history characteristics at two sites were determined seasonally (March–November) in 2009–2010 and 2012–2013. Life‐history characteristics included abundances, length‐frequency distributions, presence/absence of constructed tubes, sexual maturity, and number and maturation of young of year (YOY) in tubes. Long-term abundances decreased in successive time periods between 1961 and 2003 (mean range = 57,570 to 2583/m2) but few changes occurred between 2003 and 2013 (mean = 5007/m2; range/y = 2355–8216/m2). Seasonal abundances varied substantially between sites and years, but overall, abundances were low in March–April, high in May–August, and low in September–November. Although reproduction was continuous throughout warmer months, en masse recruitment, as revealed by length–frequency distributions, occurred in a brief period late‐June to mid-July, and possibly in early-September. All life history characteristics, including tube construction, were dependent on water temperatures (> 5 °C in spring and < 15 °C in fall). These results generally agree with and complement laboratory studies of M. speciosa in the Pacific Northwest where M. speciosa hosts parasites that cause substantial fish mortalities. Although abundance ofM. speciosa near the mouth of the Detroit River was 33-fold lower in 2013 than it was in 1961, this population has persisted for five decades and, therefore, has the potential to harbor parasites that may cause fish mortalities in the Great Lakes.

  20. Development of a Bi-National Great Lakes Coastal Wetland and Land Use Map Using Three-Season PALSAR and Landsat Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bourgeau-Chavez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Methods using extensive field data and three-season Landsat TM and PALSAR imagery were developed to map wetland type and identify potential wetland stressors (i.e., adjacent land use for the United States and Canadian Laurentian coastal Great Lakes. The mapped area included the coastline to 10 km inland to capture the region hydrologically connected to the Great Lakes. Maps were developed in cooperation with the overarching Great Lakes Consortium plan to provide a comprehensive regional baseline map suitable for coastal wetland assessment and management by agencies at the local, tribal, state, and federal levels. The goal was to provide not only land use and land cover (LULC baseline data at moderate spatial resolution (20–30 m, but a repeatable methodology to monitor change into the future. The prime focus was on mapping wetland ecosystem types, such as emergent wetland and forested wetland, as well as to delineate wetland monocultures (Typha, Phragmites, Schoenoplectus and differentiate peatlands (fens and bogs from other wetland types. The overall accuracy for the coastal Great Lakes map of all five lake basins was 94%, with a range of 86% to 96% by individual lake basin (Huron, Ontario, Michigan, Erie and Superior.

  1. Bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic diversity of a cold sulfur-rich spring on the shoreline of Lake Erie, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, A.; Haack, S.K.; Duris, J.W.; Marsh, T.L.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of sulfidic springs have provided new insights into microbial metabolism, groundwater biogeochemistry, and geologic processes. We investigated Great Sulphur Spring on the western shore of Lake Erie and evaluated the phylogenetic affiliations of 189 bacterial and 77 archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from three habitats: the spring origin (11-m depth), bacterial-algal mats on the spring pond surface, and whitish filamentous materials from the spring drain. Water from the spring origin water was cold, pH 6.3, and anoxic (H2, 5.4 nM; CH4, 2.70 ??M) with concentrations of S2- (0.03 mM), SO42- (14.8 mM), Ca2+ (15.7 mM), and HCO3- (4.1 mM) similar to those in groundwater from the local aquifer. No archaeal and few bacterial sequences were >95% similar to sequences of cultivated organisms. Bacterial sequences were largely affiliated with sulfur-metabolizing or chemolithotrophic taxa in Beta-, Gamma-, Delta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria. Epsilonproteobacteria sequences similar to those obtained from other sulfidic environments and a new clade of Cyanobacteria sequences were particularly abundant (16% and 40%, respectively) in the spring origin clone library. Crenarchaeota sequences associated with archaeal-bacterial consortia in whitish filaments at a German sulfidic spring were detected only in a similar habitat at Great Sulphur Spring. This study expands the geographic distribution of many uncultured Archaea and Bacteria sequences to the Laurentian Great Lakes, indicates possible roles for epsilonproteobacteria in local aquifer chemistry and karst formation, documents new oscillatorioid Cyanobacteria lineages, and shows that uncultured, cold-adapted Crenarchaeota sequences may comprise a significant part of the microbial community of some sulfidic environments. Copyright ?? 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic diversity of a cold sulfur-rich spring on the shoreline of Lake Erie, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anita; Haack, Sheridan Kidd; Duris, Joseph W; Marsh, Terence L

    2009-08-01

    Studies of sulfidic springs have provided new insights into microbial metabolism, groundwater biogeochemistry, and geologic processes. We investigated Great Sulphur Spring on the western shore of Lake Erie and evaluated the phylogenetic affiliations of 189 bacterial and 77 archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences from three habitats: the spring origin (11-m depth), bacterial-algal mats on the spring pond surface, and whitish filamentous materials from the spring drain. Water from the spring origin water was cold, pH 6.3, and anoxic (H(2), 5.4 nM; CH(4), 2.70 microM) with concentrations of S(2-) (0.03 mM), SO(4)(2-) (14.8 mM), Ca(2+) (15.7 mM), and HCO(3)(-) (4.1 mM) similar to those in groundwater from the local aquifer. No archaeal and few bacterial sequences were >95% similar to sequences of cultivated organisms. Bacterial sequences were largely affiliated with sulfur-metabolizing or chemolithotrophic taxa in Beta-, Gamma-, Delta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria. Epsilonproteobacteria sequences similar to those obtained from other sulfidic environments and a new clade of Cyanobacteria sequences were particularly abundant (16% and 40%, respectively) in the spring origin clone library. Crenarchaeota sequences associated with archaeal-bacterial consortia in whitish filaments at a German sulfidic spring were detected only in a similar habitat at Great Sulphur Spring. This study expands the geographic distribution of many uncultured Archaea and Bacteria sequences to the Laurentian Great Lakes, indicates possible roles for epsilonproteobacteria in local aquifer chemistry and karst formation, documents new oscillatorioid Cyanobacteria lineages, and shows that uncultured, cold-adapted Crenarchaeota sequences may comprise a significant part of the microbial community of some sulfidic environments.

  3. Transient Social–Ecological Stability: the Effects of Invasive Species and Ecosystem Restoration on Nutrient Management Compromise in Lake Erie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D. Conroy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Together, lake ecosystems and local human activity form complex social–ecological systems (SESs characterized by feedback loops and discontinuous change. Researchers in diverse fields have suggested that complex systems do not have single stable equilibria in the long term because of inevitable perturbation. During this study, we sought to address the general question of whether or not stable social–ecological equilibria exist in highly stressed and managed lacustrine systems. Using an integrated human–biophysical model, we investigated the impacts of a species invasion and ecosystem restoration on SES equilibrium, defined here as a compromise in phosphorus management among opposing stakeholders, in western Lake Erie. Our integrated model is composed of a calibrated ecological submodel representing Sandusky Bay, and a phosphorus management submodel that reflects the societal benefits and costs of phosphorus regulation. These two submodels together form a dynamic feedback loop that includes freshwater ecology, ecosystem services, and phosphorus management. We found that the invasion of dreissenid mussels decreased ecosystem resistance to eutrophication, necessitating increased phosphorus management to preserve ecosystem services and thus creating the potential for a shift in social–ecological equilibrium. Additionally, our results suggest that net benefits in the region following the invasion of dreissenids may never again reach the pre-invasion level if on-site phosphorus control is the sole management lever. Further demonstrating transient system stability, large-scale wetland restoration shifted points of management compromise to states characterized by less on-site phosphorus management and higher environmental quality, resulting in a significant increase in net benefits in the region. We conclude that lacustrine SESs are open and dynamic, and we recommend that future models of these systems emphasize site-specific perturbation over

  4. Forecasting the impacts of silver and bighead carp on the Lake Erie food web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.; Rutherford, E.S.; Mason, D.M.; Breck, J.T.; Wittmann, M.E.; Cooke, R.M.; Lodge, D.M.; Rothlisberger, J.D.; Zhu, Z.; Johnson, T.B.

    2016-01-01

    Nonindigenous bigheaded carps (Bighead Carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis and Silver Carp H. molitrix; hereafter, “Asian carps” [AC]) threaten to invade and disrupt food webs and fisheries in the Laurentian Great Lakes through their high consumption of plankton. To quantify the potential effects of AC

  5. 78 FR 35135 - Special Local Regulation; Kelley's Island Swim, Lake Erie; Kelley's Island, Lakeside, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... of the Federal Register (77 FR 71531). These special local regulations will be enforced from 7 a.m... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Kelley's Island Swim, Lake... Kelley's Island Swim from. This special local regulated area is necessary to protect swimmers from...

  6. 77 FR 33130 - Special Local Regulation; Kelley's Island Swim, Lake Erie; Kelley's Island, Lakeside, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Kelley's Island Swim, Lake... annual Kelley's Island Swim. This special local regulated area is necessary to protect swimmers...

  7. Human influences on water quality in Great Lakes coastal wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrice, John A; Danz, Nicholas P; Regal, Ronald R; Kelly, John R; Niemi, Gerald J; Reavie, Euan D; Hollenhorst, Tom; Axler, Richard P; Trebitz, Anett S; Cotter, Anne M; Peterson, Gregory S

    2008-03-01

    A better understanding of relationships between human activities and water chemistry is needed to identify and manage sources of anthropogenic stress in Great Lakes coastal wetlands. The objective of the study described in this article was to characterize relationships between water chemistry and multiple classes of human activity (agriculture, population and development, point source pollution, and atmospheric deposition). We also evaluated the influence of geomorphology and biogeographic factors on stressor-water quality relationships. We collected water chemistry data from 98 coastal wetlands distributed along the United States shoreline of the Laurentian Great Lakes and GIS-based stressor data from the associated drainage basin to examine stressor-water quality relationships. The sampling captured broad ranges (1.5-2 orders of magnitude) in total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), total suspended solids (TSS), chlorophyll a (Chl a), and chloride; concentrations were strongly correlated with stressor metrics. Hierarchical partitioning and all-subsets regression analyses were used to evaluate the independent influence of different stressor classes on water quality and to identify best predictive models. Results showed that all categories of stress influenced water quality and that the relative influence of different classes of disturbance varied among water quality parameters. Chloride exhibited the strongest relationships with stressors followed in order by TN, Chl a, TP, TSS, and DIN. In general, coarse scale classification of wetlands by morphology (three wetland classes: riverine, protected, open coastal) and biogeography (two ecoprovinces: Eastern Broadleaf Forest [EBF] and Laurentian Mixed Forest [LMF]) did not improve predictive models. This study provides strong evidence of the link between water chemistry and human stress in Great Lakes coastal wetlands and can be used to inform management efforts to improve water

  8. Geology and Historical Evolution of Sheldon Marsh Nature Preserve, Lake Erie, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    kinds of wildflowers .1 1 From Ohio Department of Natural Resources, http...1998, close to the long-term mean. By January of 2000, the water level was at 173.8 m (570.3 ft), the lowest since the spring of 1967. Since then...orienta- tion, during northeasters , northeast winds blow along the axis of the lake and cause seiching. The result can be short-term water level

  9. An Examination of Issues Related to U.S. Lake Erie Natural Gas Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    wall that has just been drilled. The casing pipe effectively seals off the vertical flow of liquids or gases between adjacent rock formations. When...Lake itself and there is no steel casing ( pipe ) to transport cuttings, gases, or fluids back to the rig floor level. Use of this drilling technology...forces the cement upward between the casing pipe and surrounding strata. A worst- case accident would occur as a result of pump failure while the cement

  10. Progress in understanding the importance of coastal wetland nursery habitat to Great Lakes fisheries support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Great Lakes coastal wetlands provide important habitat for Great Lakes fishes of all life stages. A literature review of ichthyoplankton surveys conducted in Great Lakes coastal wetlands found at least 82 species reported to be captured during the larval stage. Twenty of those sp...

  11. A description of the nearshore fish communities in the Huron-Erie Corridor using multiple gear types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, James T.; Chiotti, Justin A.; Boase, James C.; Thomas, Mike V.; Manny, Bruce A.; Roseman, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    Great Lakes coastal wetlands provide a critical habitat for many fish species throughout their life cycles. Once home to one of the largest wetland complexes in the Great Lakes, coastal wetlands in the Huron–Erie Corridor (HEC) have decreased dramatically since the early 1900s. We characterized the nearshore fish communities at three different wetland complexes in the HEC using electrofishing, seines, and fyke nets. Species richness was highest in the Detroit River (63), followed by the St. Clair Delta (56), and Western Lake Erie (47). The nearshore fish communities in the Detroit River and St. Clair Delta consisted primarily of shiners, bluntnose minnow, centrarchids, and brook silverside, while the Western Lake Erie sites consisted of high proportions of non-native taxa including common carp, gizzard shad, goldfish, and white perch. Species richness estimates using individual-based rarefaction curves were higher when using electrofishing data compared to fyke nets or seine hauls at each wetland. Twelve fish species were captured exclusively during electrofishing assessments, while one species was captured exclusively in fyke nets, and none exclusively during seine hauls. Western Lake Erie wetlands were more indicative of degraded systems with lower species richness, lower proportion of turbidity intolerant species, and increased abundance of non-native taxa. This work highlights the importance of coastal wetlands in the HEC by capturing 69 different fish species utilizing these wetlands to fulfill life history requirements and provides insight when selecting gears to sample nearshore littoral areas.

  12. LAKERS (Lake-Aware Kids Engaged in Relevant Science) Observe Coastweeks: A Manual of Classroom & Coastal Activities for Middle Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jax, Daniel W.

    The purpose of the activities presented in this guide is to develop awareness among middle school students of the Great Lakes, particularly Lake Erie. Activity topics include Lake Awareness, Human Activities, Shore Processes, and Shoreline Clean-up. The appendix includes Coastweek 1995 Reference Information. (YDS)

  13. Longshore water-current velocity and the potential for transport of contaminants—A pilot study in Lake Erie from Walnut Creek to Presque Isle State Park beaches, Erie, Pennsylvania, June and August 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hittle, Elizabeth A.

    2017-04-20

    Bacteria-driven restrictions and (or) advisories on swimming at beaches in Presque Isle State Park (PISP), Erie, Pennsylvania, can occur during the summer months. One of the suspected sources of bacteria is sediment. A terrestrial sediment source to the west of PISP is Walnut Creek, which discharges to Lake Erie about 8.5 kilometers southwest of PISP Beach 1. On June 24, June 25, August 18, and August 19, 2015, synoptic surveys were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Sea Grant, in Lake Erie between Walnut Creek and PISP Beach 1 to characterize the water-current velocity and direction to determine whether sediment from Walnut Creek could be affecting the PISP beaches. Water-quality data (temperature, specific conductance, and turbidity) were collected in conjunction with the synoptic surveys in June. Water-quality data (Escherichia coli [E. coli] bacteria, temperature, and turbidity) were collected about a meter from the shore (nearshore) on June 24, August 19, and after a precipitation event on August 11, 2015. Additionally, suspended sediment was collected nearshore on June 24 and August 11, 2015. Samples collected near Walnut Creek during all three bacterial sampling events contained higher counts than other samples. Counts steadily decreased from west to east, then increased about 1–2 kilometers from PISP Beach 1; however, this study was not focused on examining other potential sources of bacteria.The Velocity Mapping Toolbox (VMT) was used to process the water-current synoptic surveys, and the results were visualized within ArcMap. For the survey accomplished on June 24, 2015, potential paths a particle could take between Walnut Creek and PSIP Beach 1 if conditions remained steady over a number of hours were visualized. However, the water-current velocity and direction were variable from one day to the other, indicating this was likely an unrealistic assumption for the study area. This analysis was not accomplished

  14. An optical water type framework for selecting and blending retrievals from bio-optical algorithms in lakes and coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Timothy S; Dowell, Mark D; Bradt, Shane; Verdu, Antonio Ruiz

    2014-03-05

    Bio-optical models are based on relationships between the spectral remote sensing reflectance and optical properties of in-water constituents. The wavelength range where this information can be exploited changes depending on the water characteristics. In low chlorophyll-a waters, the blue/green region of the spectrum is more sensitive to changes in chlorophyll-a concentration, whereas the red/NIR region becomes more important in turbid and/or eutrophic waters. In this work we present an approach to manage the shift from blue/green ratios to red/NIR-based chlorophyll-a algorithms for optically complex waters. Based on a combined in situ data set of coastal and inland waters, measures of overall algorithm uncertainty were roughly equal for two chlorophyll-a algorithms-the standard NASA OC4 algorithm based on blue/green bands and a MERIS 3-band algorithm based on red/NIR bands-with RMS error of 0.416 and 0.437 for each in log chlorophyll-a units, respectively. However, it is clear that each algorithm performs better at different chlorophyll-a ranges. When a blending approach is used based on an optical water type classification, the overall RMS error was reduced to 0.320. Bias and relative error were also reduced when evaluating the blended chlorophyll-a product compared to either of the single algorithm products. As a demonstration for ocean color applications, the algorithm blending approach was applied to MERIS imagery over Lake Erie. We also examined the use of this approach in several coastal marine environments, and examined the long-term frequency of the OWTs to MODIS-Aqua imagery over Lake Erie.

  15. Factors affecting Escherichia coli concentrations at Lake Erie public bathing beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francy, Donna S.; Darner, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The environmental and water-quality factors that affect concentrations of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in water and sediment were investigated at three public bathing beachesEdgewater Park, Villa Angela, and Sims Parkin the Cleveland, Ohio metropolitan area. This study was done to aid in the determination of safe recreational use and to help water- resource managers assess more quickly and accurately the degradation of recreational water quality. Water and lake-bottom sediments were collected and ancillary environmental data were compiled for 41 days from May through September 1997. Water samples were analyzed for E. coli concentrations, suspended sediment concentrations, and turbidity. Lake- bottom sediment samples from the beach area were analyzed for E. coli concentrations and percent dry weight. Concentrations of E. coli were higher and more variable at Sims Park than at Villa Angela or Edgewater Park; concentrations were lowest at Edgewater Park. Time-series plots showed that short-term storage (less than one week) of E. coli in lake-bottom sediments may have occurred, although no evidence for long-term storage was found during the sampling period. E. coli concentrations in water were found to increase with increasing wave height, but the resuspension of E. coli from lake-bottom sediments by wave action could not be adequately assessed; higherwave heights were often associated with the discharge of sewage containing E. coli during or after a rainfall and wastewater-treatment plant overflow. Multiple linear regression (MLR) was used to develop models to predict recreational water quality at the in water. The related variables included turbidity, antecedent rainfall, antecedent weighted rainfall, volumes of wastewater-treatment plant overflows and metered outfalls (composed of storm-water runoff and combined-sewer overflows), a resuspension index, and wave heights. For the beaches in this study, wind speed, wind direction, water temperature, and the prswimmers

  16. Hydrologic Factors Determining Linkages of Great Lake Coastal Wetlands to Watershed and Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water can enter Great Lakes coastal wetlands (CWs) from both watershed and offshore sources. Identifying the relative contribution of these potential sources, and the spatial scale at which sources are influenced by human activities, are critical steps in wetland protection. We d...

  17. Western Lake Erie Basin: Soft-data-constrained, NHDPlus resolution watershed modeling and exploration of applicable conservation scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Haw; White, Michael J; Arnold, Jeffrey G; Keitzer, S Conor; Johnson, Mari-Vaughn V; Atwood, Jay D; Daggupati, Prasad; Herbert, Matthew E; Sowa, Scott P; Ludsin, Stuart A; Robertson, Dale M; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Rewa, Charles A

    2016-11-01

    Complex watershed simulation models are powerful tools that can help scientists and policy-makers address challenging topics, such as land use management and water security. In the Western Lake Erie Basin (WLEB), complex hydrological models have been applied at various scales to help describe relationships between land use and water, nutrient, and sediment dynamics. This manuscript evaluated the capacity of the current Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to predict hydrological and water quality processes within WLEB at the finest resolution watershed boundary unit (NHDPlus) along with the current conditions and conservation scenarios. The process based SWAT model was capable of the fine-scale computation and complex routing used in this project, as indicated by measured data at five gaging stations. The level of detail required for fine-scale spatial simulation made the use of both hard and soft data necessary in model calibration, alongside other model adaptations. Limitations to the model's predictive capacity were due to a paucity of data in the region at the NHDPlus scale rather than due to SWAT functionality. Results of treatment scenarios demonstrate variable effects of structural practices and nutrient management on sediment and nutrient loss dynamics. Targeting treatment to acres with critical outstanding conservation needs provides the largest return on investment in terms of nutrient loss reduction per dollar spent, relative to treating acres with lower inherent nutrient loss vulnerabilities. Importantly, this research raises considerations about use of models to guide land management decisions at very fine spatial scales. Decision makers using these results should be aware of data limitations that hinder fine-scale model interpretation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Large-scale Watershed Modeling: NHDPlus Resolution with Achievable Conservation Scenarios in the Western Lake Erie Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, H.; White, M. J.; Arnold, J. G.; Keitzer, S. C.; Johnson, M. V. V.; Atwood, J. D.; Daggupati, P.; Herbert, M. E.; Sowa, S. P.; Ludsin, S.; Robertson, D. M.; Srinivasan, R.; Rewa, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    By the substantial improvement of computer technology, large-scale watershed modeling has become practically feasible in conducting detailed investigations of hydrologic, sediment, and nutrient processes. In the Western Lake Erie Basin (WLEB), water quality issues caused by anthropogenic activities are not just interesting research subjects but, have implications related to human health and welfare, as well as ecological integrity, resistance, and resilience. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the finest resolution stream network, NHDPlus, were implemented on the WLEB to examine the interactions between achievable conservation scenarios with corresponding additional projected costs. During the calibration/validation processes, both hard (temporal) and soft (non-temporal) data were used to ensure the modeling outputs are coherent with actual watershed behavior. The results showed that widespread adoption of conservation practices intended to provide erosion control could deliver average reductions of sediment and nutrients without additional nutrient management changes. On the other hand, responses of nitrate (NO3) and dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) dynamics may be different than responses of total nitrogen and total phosphorus dynamics under the same conservation practice. Model results also implied that fewer financial resources are required to achieve conservation goals if the goal is to achieve reductions in targeted watershed outputs (ex. NO3 or DIP) rather than aggregated outputs (ex. total nitrogen or total phosphorus). In addition, it was found that the model's capacity to simulate seasonal effects and responses to changing conservation adoption on a seasonal basis could provide a useful index to help alleviate additional cost through temporal targeting of conservation practices. Scientists, engineers, and stakeholders can take advantage of the work performed in this study as essential information while conducting policy

  19. Western Lake Erie Basin: Soft-data-constrained, NHDPlus resolution watershed modeling and exploration of applicable conservation scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Haw; White, Michael J.; Arnold, Jeffrey G.; Keitzer, S. Conor; Johnson, Mari-Vaughn V; Atwood, Jay D.; Daggupati, Prasad; Herbert, Matthew E.; Sowa, Scott P.; Ludsin, Stuart A.; Robertson, Dale; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Rewa, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Complex watershed simulation models are powerful tools that can help scientists and policy-makers address challenging topics, such as land use management and water security. In the Western Lake Erie Basin (WLEB), complex hydrological models have been applied at various scales to help describe relationships between land use and water, nutrient, and sediment dynamics. This manuscript evaluated the capacity of the current Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT2012) to predict hydrological and water quality processes within WLEB at the finest resolution watershed boundary unit (NHDPlus) along with the current conditions and conservation scenarios. The process based SWAT model was capable of the fine-scale computation and complex routing used in this project, as indicated by measured data at five gaging stations. The level of detail required for fine-scale spatial simulation made the use of both hard and soft data necessary in model calibration, alongside other model adaptations. Limitations to the model's predictive capacity were due to a paucity of data in the region at the NHDPlus scale rather than due to SWAT functionality. Results of treatment scenarios demonstrate variable effects of structural practices and nutrient management on sediment and nutrient loss dynamics. Targeting treatment to acres with critical outstanding conservation needs provides the largest return on investment in terms of nutrient loss reduction per dollar spent, relative to treating acres with lower inherent nutrient loss vulnerabilities. Importantly, this research raises considerations about use of models to guide land management decisions at very fine spatial scales. Decision makers using these results should be aware of data limitations that hinder fine-scale model interpretation.

  20. Study on ecological structures of coastal lakes in Antarctic continent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Coastal region on the Antarctic continent, where it is under the influences both of ocean and ice sheet, as well as frequent human activities, could be considered as a fragile zone in Antarctic ecological environment. There are many lakes in coastal region, showing much differences from each other in physical-chemical features because of individual evolutionary history in their geographical environments, and suffering from different outside factors, such as climate changes and precipitation. Thus, it results in respective biological distribution and ecological structure in lakes. The present paper reports the results from the studies of chemical components, species distributions and community structures, which mainly consisted of planktons in lakes in the Vestfold Hills (68°38'S, 78°06'E), and the Larsemann Hills (69°30'S, 76°20'E), East Antarctica. It also treats the biological diversities and nutrient relationships of these different types of lakes. So as to provide more scientific basis for monitoring of climate changes and environmental protection in Antarctica.

  1. Estimating microcystin levels at recreational sites in western Lake Erie and Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francy, Donna S; Brady, Amie M G; Ecker, Christopher D; Graham, Jennifer L; Stelzer, Erin A; Struffolino, Pamela; Dwyer, Daryl F; Loftin, Keith A

    2016-09-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cyanoHABs) and associated toxins, such as microcystin, are a major global water-quality issue. Water-resource managers need tools to quickly predict when and where toxin-producing cyanoHABs will occur. This could be done by using site-specific models that estimate the potential for elevated toxin concentrations that cause public health concerns. With this study, samples were collected at three Ohio lakes to identify environmental and water-quality factors to develop linear-regression models to estimate microcystin levels. Measures of the algal community (phycocyanin, cyanobacterial biovolume, and cyanobacterial gene concentrations) and pH were most strongly correlated with microcystin concentrations. Cyanobacterial genes were quantified for general cyanobacteria, general Microcystis and Dolichospermum, and for microcystin synthetase (mcyE) for Microcystis, Dolichospermum, and Planktothrix. For phycocyanin, the relations were different between sites and were different between hand-held measurements on-site and nearby continuous monitor measurements for the same site. Continuous measurements of parameters such as phycocyanin, pH, and temperature over multiple days showed the highest correlations to microcystin concentrations. The development of models with high R(2) values (0.81-0.90), sensitivities (92%), and specificities (100%) for estimating microcystin concentrations above or below the Ohio Recreational Public Health Advisory level of 6μgL(-1) was demonstrated for one site; these statistics may change as more data are collected in subsequent years. This study showed that models could be developed for estimates of exceeding a microcystin threshold concentration at a recreational freshwater lake site, with potential to expand their use to provide relevant public health information to water resource managers and the public for both recreational and drinking waters.

  2. Fall diets of red-breasted merganser (Mergus serrator) and walleye (Sander vitreus) in Sandusky Bay and adjacent waters of western Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bur, M.T.; Stapanian, M.A.; Bernhardt, G.; Turner, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    Although published studies indicate the contrary, there is concern among many sport anglers that migrating red-breasted mergansers (Mergus serrator) and other waterbirds pose a competitive threat to sport fish species such as walleye (Sander vitreus) in Lake Erie. We quantified the diet of autumn-migrant mergansers and walleye during 1998-2000 in Sandusky Bay and adjacent waters of western Lake Erie. We hypothesized that the diets of both predators would be similar in species composition, but because of different foraging ecologies their diets would differ markedly in size of prey consumed. In addition to predator samples, we used trawl data from the same general area as an index of prey availability. We found that mergansers fed almost exclusively on fish (nine species). Gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), emerald shiner (Notropis atherinoides) and round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) were consumed in the greatest numbers, most frequently and comprised the greatest biomass. Walleye fed exclusively on fish: gizzard shad, alewife (Alosa psuedoharengus) and emerald shiner were consumed in the greatest numbers, most frequently and comprised the greatest biomass. Diet overlap between mergansers and walleye was 67% by weight and 66% by species frequency. Mean total lengths of gizzard shad, emerald shiner and round goby found in walleye stomachs exceeded those captured in trawls by 47%, on average. Mean total lengths of gizzard shad, emerald shiner and round goby were greater in walleye stomachs than in merganser stomachs. Mean total lengths of emerald shiner and round goby were less in merganser stomachs than in trawls. Our results suggest that although the diets of walleye and mergansers overlapped considerably, mergansers generally consumed smaller fish than walleye. Given the abundance and diversity of prey species available, and the transient nature of mergansers on Lake Erie during migration, we conclude that competition for food between these species is minimal.

  3. Interacting Watershed Size and Landcover Influences on Habitat and Biota of Lake Superior Coastal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal wetlands are important contributors to the productivity and biodiversity of large lakes and important mediators of the lake - watershed connection. This study explores how strength of connection to the watershed (represented by watershed size and wetland morphological ty...

  4. EPA Awards Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Grant to Central Michigan University to Monitor Coastal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHICAGO -- The U.S Environmental Protection Agency today announced that Central Michigan University in Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, has received a $10 million Great Lakes Restoration Initiative grant to monitor coastal wetlands around the Great Lakes basin over

  5. Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement: U.S. Lake Erie Natural Gas Resource Development in Offshore Waters of New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    carnivores, or herbivores; in a well-balanced system, all three types likely will be present. They include deposit and detritus feeders, parasites , s...susceptibility to diseases, parasites , and predation; and reduced growth survival, fecundity, and fitness. Additionally, some chemicals may be subject to...14 ]I WiIc Is. (i. F’qui Ument., Coists, ,lid i’crsonne t for th, ’. S. Lake Erie Refe.rnCe1L Prograil Gas Process Planta J’IiiyJŽ1 p~’C IngSpec if

  6. Circulation, mixing, and transport in nearshore Lake Erie in the vicinity of Villa Angela Beach and Euclid Creek, Cleveland, Ohio, September 11-12, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, P. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Villa Angela Beach, on the Lake Erie lakeshore near Cleveland, Ohio, is adjacent to the mouth of Euclid Creek, a small, flashy stream draining approximately 23 square miles and susceptible to periodic contamination from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) (97 and 163 CSO events in 2010 and 2011, respectively). Concerns over high concentrations of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in water samples taken along this beach and frequent beach closures led to the collection of synoptic data in the nearshore area in an attempt to gain insights into mixing processes, circulation, and the potential for transport of bacteria and other CSO-related pollutants from various sources in Euclid Creek and along the lakefront. An integrated synoptic survey was completed by the U.S. Geological Survey on September 11–12, 2012, during low-flow conditions on Euclid Creek, which followed rain-induced high flows in the creek on September 8–9, 2012. Data-collection methods included deployment of an autonomous underwater vehicle and use of a manned boat equipped with an acoustic Doppler current profiler. Spatial distributions of water-quality measures and nearshore currents indicated that the mixing zone encompassing the mouth of Euclid Creek and Villa Angela Beach is dynamic and highly variable in extent, but can exhibit a large zone of recirculation that can, at times, be decoupled from local wind forcing. Observed circulation patterns during September 2012 indicated that pollutants from CSOs in Euclid Creek and water discharged from three shoreline CSO points within 2,000 feet of the beach could be trapped along Villa Angela Beach by interaction of nearshore currents and shoreline structures. In spite of observed coastal downwelling, denser water from Euclid Creek is shown to mix to the surface via offshore turbulent structures that span the full depth of flow. While the southwesterly longshore currents driving the recirculation pattern along the beach front were observed during the 2011–12

  7. Water Quality, Cyanobacteria, and Environmental Factors and Their Relations to Microcystin Concentrations for Use in Predictive Models at Ohio Lake Erie and Inland Lake Recreational Sites, 2013-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francy, Donna S.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Ecker, Christopher D.; Brady, Amie M G.; Pam Struffolino,; Loftin, Keith A.

    2015-11-06

    Harmful cyanobacterial “algal” blooms (cyanoHABs) and associated toxins, such as microcystin, are a major water-quality issue for Lake Erie and inland lakes in Ohio. Predicting when and where a bloom may occur is important to protect the public that uses and consumes a water resource; however, predictions are complicated and likely site specific because of the many factors affecting toxin production. Monitoring for a variety of environmental and water-quality factors, for concentrations of cyanobacteria by molecular methods, and for algal pigments such as chlorophyll and phycocyanin by using optical sensors may provide data that can be used to predict the occurrence of cyanoHABs.

  8. Lake Superior Coastal Wetland Fish Assemblages and Habitat Conditions in Relation to Watershed Connectivity and Landcover

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of the coastal margin and the watershed context in defining the ecology of even very large lakes is increasingly being recognized and examined. Coastal wetlands are both important contributors to the biodiversity and productivity of large lakes and important mediators o...

  9. Sponge species composition, abundance, and cover in marine lakes and coastal mangroves in Berau, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becking, L.E.; Cleary, D.F.R.; Voogd, de N.J.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the species composition, abundance, and cover of sponges in 2 marine lakes (Kakaban Lake and Haji Buang Lake) and adjacent coastal mangroves on the islands of Kakaban and Maratua in the Berau region of Indonesia. We recorded a total of 115 sponge species, 33 of which were restricted to

  10. Sponge species composition, abundance, and cover in marine lakes and coastal mangroves in Berau, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becking, L.E.; Cleary, D.F.R.; Voogd, de N.J.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the species composition, abundance, and cover of sponges in 2 marine lakes (Kakaban Lake and Haji Buang Lake) and adjacent coastal mangroves on the islands of Kakaban and Maratua in the Berau region of Indonesia. We recorded a total of 115 sponge species, 33 of which were restricted to K

  11. Potential nitrate removal in a coastal freshwater sediment (Haringvliet Lake, The Netherlands) and response to salinization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, A.M.; Canavan, R.W.; Slomp, C.P.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen transformations and their response to salinization were studied in bottom sediment of a coastal freshwater lake (Haringvliet Lake, The Netherlands). The lake was formed as the result of a river impoundment along the south-western coast of the Netherlands, and is currently targeted for resto

  12. Georeferencing the Large-Scale Aerial Photographs of a Great Lakes Coastal Wetland: A Modified Photogrammetric Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Marilyn K.; Kowalski, Kurt P.; Grapentine, Joel L.

    2010-01-01

    The geocontrol template method was developed to georeference multiple, overlapping analog aerial photographs without reliance upon conventionally obtained horizontal ground control. The method was tested as part of a long-term wetland habitat restoration project at a Lake Erie coastal wetland complex in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge. As in most coastal wetlands, annually identifiable ground-control features required to georeference photo-interpreted data are difficult to find. The geocontrol template method relies on the following four components: (a) an uncontrolled aerial photo mosaic of the study area, (b) global positioning system (GPS) derived horizontal coordinates of each photo’s principal point, (c) a geocontrol template created by the transfer of fiducial markings and calculated principal points to clear acetate from individual photographs arranged in a mosaic, and (d) the root-mean-square-error testing of the system to ensure an acceptable level of planimetric accuracy. Once created for a study area, the geocontrol template can be registered in geographic information system (GIS) software to facilitate interpretation of multiple images without individual image registration. The geocontrol template enables precise georeferencing of single images within larger blocks of photographs using a repeatable and consistent method.

  13. Beaver Census on the Erie Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this study was to determine an approximate population number for beaver (castor canadensis) on the Sugar Lake division of the Erie Wildlife Refuge....

  14. 75 FR 36292 - Safety Zone; Bay Swim III, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... of Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie, near Erie, Pennsylvania between 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. on June 26, 2010.... The safety zone will encompass specified waters of Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania starting at... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bay Swim III, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA...

  15. The first US National Coastal Condition Assessment survey in the Great Lakes: Development of the GIS frame and exploration of spatial variation in nearshore water quality results

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive approach to assess conditions in the Great Lakes nearshore zone has been lacking for decades. We had the opportunity to conduct a pilot survey in Lake Erie (45 sites) in summer 2009 and to develop a full survey across the 5 lakes (~400 sites) as part of the US N...

  16. Fringe benefit: Value of restoring coastal wetlands for Great Lakes fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishery support is recognized as a valuable ecosystem service provided by Great Lakes coastal wetlands, but it is challenging to quantify because multiple species and habitats are involved. Recent studies indicate that coastal wetland area is proportional to fishery harvest among...

  17. LANDSCAPE-SCALE MONITORING OF AN OPPORTUNIST: PHRAGMITES AUSTRALIS (CAV) STEUDEL IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal wetlands of the Laurentian Great Lakes (LGL) are among the most fragmented ecosystems in the world, with a long history of human-induced disturbances, primarily as a result of agricultural conversions and hydrologic changes. A substantial number of remnant LGL coastal wet...

  18. Status of the amphipod Diporeia ssp. in coastal waters of the Laurentian Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diporeia has historically been the dominant benthic macroinvertebrate in deeper waters of the Laurentian Great Lakes, and its abundance has been proposed as an indicator of ecological condition. In 2010, the USEPA incorporated the Great Lakes into the National Coastal Condition A...

  19. Systematically variable planktonic carbon metabolism along a land-to-lake gradient in a Great Lakes coastal zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinke, Anthony D; Kendall, Scott T; Kroll, Daniel J; Strickler, Eric A; Weinert, Maggie E; Holcomb, Thomas M; Defore, Angela A; Dila, Deborah K; Snider, Michael J; Gereaux, Leon C; Biddanda, Bopaiah A

    2014-11-01

    During the summers of 2002-2013, we measured rates of carbon metabolism in surface waters of six sites across a land-to-lake gradient from the upstream end of drowned river-mouth Muskegon Lake (ML) (freshwater estuary) to 19 km offshore in Lake Michigan (LM) (a Great Lake). Despite considerable inter-year variability, the average rates of gross production (GP), respiration (R) and net production (NP) across ML (604 ± 58, 222 ± 22 and 381 ± 52 µg C L(-1) day(-1), respectively) decreased steeply in the furthest offshore LM site (22 ± 3, 55 ± 17 and -33 ± 15 µg C L(-1)day(-1), respectively). Along this land-to-lake gradient, GP decreased by 96 ± 1%, whereas R only decreased by 75 ± 9%, variably influencing the carbon balance along this coastal zone. All ML sites were consistently net autotrophic (mean GP:R = 2.7), while the furthest offshore LM site was net heterotrophic (mean GP:R = 0.4). Our study suggests that pelagic waters of this Great Lakes coastal estuary are net carbon sinks that transition into net carbon sources offshore. Reactive and dynamic estuarine coastal zones everywhere may contribute similarly to regional and global carbon cycles.

  20. Systematically variable planktonic carbon metabolism along a land-to-lake gradient in a Great Lakes coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinke, Anthony D.; Kendall, Scott T.; Kroll, Daniel J.; Strickler, Eric A.; Weinert, Maggie E.; Holcomb, Thomas M.; Defore, Angela A.; Dila, Deborah K.; Snider, Michael J.; Gereaux, Leon C.; Biddanda, Bopaiah A.

    2014-01-01

    During the summers of 2002–2013, we measured rates of carbon metabolism in surface waters of six sites across a land-to-lake gradient from the upstream end of drowned river-mouth Muskegon Lake (ML) (freshwater estuary) to 19 km offshore in Lake Michigan (LM) (a Great Lake). Despite considerable inter-year variability, the average rates of gross production (GP), respiration (R) and net production (NP) across ML (604 ± 58, 222 ± 22 and 381 ± 52 µg C L−1 day−1, respectively) decreased steeply in the furthest offshore LM site (22 ± 3, 55 ± 17 and −33 ± 15 µg C L−1day−1, respectively). Along this land-to-lake gradient, GP decreased by 96 ± 1%, whereas R only decreased by 75 ± 9%, variably influencing the carbon balance along this coastal zone. All ML sites were consistently net autotrophic (mean GP:R = 2.7), while the furthest offshore LM site was net heterotrophic (mean GP:R = 0.4). Our study suggests that pelagic waters of this Great Lakes coastal estuary are net carbon sinks that transition into net carbon sources offshore. Reactive and dynamic estuarine coastal zones everywhere may contribute similarly to regional and global carbon cycles. PMID:25954055

  1. Functional values of Great Lakes coastal wetlands: What we know and what we can be working towards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water quality improvement, shoreline protection, carbon sequestration, and lake productivity subsidy are among the functional values commonly attributed to Great Lakes coastal wetlands (GLCWs). There is much less information concerning these than there is concerning habitat and f...

  2. Coastal processes influencing water quality at Great Lakes beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2013-01-01

    In a series of studies along the Great Lakes, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are examining the physical processes that influence concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria and related pathogens at recreational beaches. These studies aim to estimate human health risk, improve management strategies, and understand the fate and transport of microbes in the nearshore area. It was determined that embayed beaches act as traps, accumulating Escherichia coli (E. coli) and other bacteria in the basin and even in beach sand. Further, shear stress and wave run-up could resuspend accumulated bacteria, leading to water-contamination events. These findings are being used to target beach design and circulation projects. In previous research, it was determined that E. coli followed a diurnal pattern, with concentrations decreasing throughout the day, largely owing to solar inactivation, but rebounding overnight. Studies at a Chicago beach identified the impact of wave-induced mass transport on this phenomenon, a finding that will extend our understanding of bacterial fate in the natural environment. In another series of studies, scientists examined the impact of river outfalls on bacteria concentrations, using mechanistic and empirical modeling. Through these studies, the models can indicate range and extent of impact, given E. coli concentration in the source water. These findings have been extended to extended lengths of coastlines and have been applied in beach management using empirical predictive modeling. Together, these studies are helping scientists identify and eliminate threats to human and coastal health.

  3. Importance of coastal change variables in determining vulnerability to sea- and lake-level change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, E.A.; Thieler, E.R.; Williams, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey began conducting scientific assessments of coastal vulnerability to potential future sea- and lake-level changes in 22 National Park Service sea- and lakeshore units. Coastal park units chosen for the assessment included a variety of geological and physical settings along the U.S. Atlantic, Pacific, Gulf of Mexico, Gulf of Alaska, Caribbean, and Great Lakes shorelines. This research is motivated by the need to understand and anticipate coastal changes caused by accelerating sea-level rise, as well as lake-level changes caused by climate change, over the next century. The goal of these assessments is to provide information that can be used to make long-term (decade to century) management decisions. Here we analyze the results of coastal vulnerability assessments for several coastal national park units. Index-based assessments quantify the likelihood that physical changes may occur based on analysis of the following variables: tidal range, ice cover, wave height, coastal slope, historical shoreline change rate, geomorphology, and historical rate of relative sea- or lake-level change. This approach seeks to combine a coastal system's susceptibility to change with its natural ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions, and it provides a measure of the system's potential vulnerability to the effects of sea- or lake-level change. Assessments for 22 park units are combined to evaluate relationships among the variables used to derive the index. Results indicate that Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico parks have the highest vulnerability rankings relative to other park regions. A principal component analysis reveals that 99% of the index variability can be explained by four variables: geomorphology, regional coastal slope, water-level change rate, and mean significant wave height. Tidal range, ice cover, and historical shoreline change are not as important when the index is evaluated at large spatial scales (thousands of kilometers

  4. Utilization of legacy P in soils, a strategic approach meeting the 40% loading reduction goal while sustaining agricultural production in the Lake Erie basin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiequan; Tan, Chin, S.; Wang, Yutao; Welacky, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Legacy phosphorus (P) in agricultural lands has been deemed the major source contributing to eutrophication of the Lake Erie. Canada and USA bilateral governments have set up a goal of 40% P loading reduction by 2025. Soil P draw-down (PDD) is a potential beneficial management practice for high P soils to overcome legacy P effect and mitigate soil P loss. A field experiment was conducted to assess the effects of PDD on crop yields, soil test P change, and soil P losses in both surface runoff and tile drainage under a corn-soybean rotation in a Brookston clay loam soil in a 9-year period from 2008 to 2016. Both yields of corn and soybean with PDD were highly identical to those with continuous P addition (CPA). Soil Olsen P with PDD declined with time at about 2.3 mg P kg-1 year-1, while with CPA it remained unchanged. Relative to CPA, PDD significantly decreased dissolved P and particular P losses, eventually the total P loss by 36%. In addition, farmers' production profitability increased by 15% through savings in investment for P fertilizer. The results indicate that utilization of soil legacy P can be an effective approach that enables us to reach the agri-P loading reduction goal, while improving production profitability and conserving world P resource.

  5. On-Farm Water Recycling as an Adaptation Strategy for Drained Agricultural Land in the Western Lake Erie Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    On-farm water recycling is in agricultural landscapes today, and a few examples exist in the Great Lakes region. They have been implemented primarily where both irrigation is needed for high value crops and groundwater is inadequate to provide the rates needed. Crop yield benefits of irrigation fr...

  6. Lake size and fish diversity in southern Brazil coastal lagoons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Ribeiro Rodrigues

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The coastal plain of Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil, presents a series of shallow lagoons with diverse size and morphology. The objective of this study is to determine whether the size of the lagoon is an effective factor for structuring fish diversity. In this regard, nine lagoons with distinct areas were sampled: three with an area up to 40 hectares, three with area between 40 and 80 hectares, and three with an area of over 80 hectares. Each lagoon was sampled once on the littoral and pelagic zones. At each point, fish were captured through a set of gill nets with different mesh sizes. Captured specimens were identified, quantified and evaluated for weight and length. A total of 24 fish species belonging to 10 families was obtained, with Characidae presenting the highest species richness. Cyanocharax alburnus was the only species that occurred in all lagoons. Cyphocharax voga, Astyanax eigenmmaniorum, Oligosarcus jenynsii and O. robustus were also frequent species, present in most of the sampled lagoons. Lycengraulis grossidens was captured in just two lagoons with increased conductivity. The community structure showed the highest species richness in lakes with an area over 40 ha, however the highest mean diversity values were observed in ponds up to 40 ha. Cluster Analysis yielded the formation of two groups: a group formed by just one lagoon and a second one cluster grouping all the other lagoons. This pattern may be associated with the presence of Lycengraulis grossidens as a dominant species in this lagoon clustered apart. The results indicate that lagoons with up to 40 ha present greater homogeneity on the species composition and higher average values of diversity; while intermediate ponds (between 40 and 80 ha have lower average diversity for the fish fauna due to increased heterogeneity in species abundance.

  7. Coastal Lake Record of Holocene Paleo-Storms from Northwest Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, J. F.; Coor, J. L.; Wang, Y.; Das, O.; Kish, S.; Elsner, J.; Hu, X. B.; Niedoroda, A. W.; Ye, M.

    2009-12-01

    The northwest Florida coast of the Gulf of Mexico has an unusually active storm history. Climate records for a study area in the mid-region of the Florida panhandle coast show that 29 hurricanes have made landfall within a 100-km radius during historic time. These events included 9 major storms (category 3 or higher). A longer-term geologic record of major storm impacts is essential for better understanding storm climatology and refining morphodynamic models. The Florida panhandle region contains a series of unique coastal lakes which are long-lived and whose bottom sediments hold a long-term record of coastal storm occurrence. The lakes are normally isolated from the open Gulf, protected behind a near-continuous dune barrier. Lake water is normally fresh to brackish. Lake bottom sediments consist of organic-rich muds. During major storms the dunes are breached and the lakes are temporarily open to marine water and the possibility of sandy overwash. Both a sedimentologic and geochemical signature is imparted to the lake sediments by storm events. Bottom sediment cores have been collected from the lakes. The cores have been subsampled and subjected to sedimentologic, stable isotopic and geochronologic analyses. The result is a sediment history of the lakes, and a record of storm occurrence during the past few millennia. The outcome is a better understanding of the long-term risk of major storms. The findings are being incorporated into a larger model designed to make reliable predictions of the effects of near-future climate change on natural coastal systems and on coastal infrastructure, and to enable cost-effective mitigation and adaptation strategies.

  8. Connecting Indigenous Knowledge to Thaw Lake Cycle Research on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, W. R.; Cuomo, C. J.; Hinkel, K. M.; Jones, B. M.; Hurd, J.

    2005-12-01

    Thaw lakes cover about 20% of the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska. Another 26% is scarred by basins that form when lakes drain, and these drained thaw-lake basins are sites for preferential carbon accumulation as plant biomass. Recent studies in the continuous permafrost zone of Western Siberia suggest that lakes have been expanding in the past several decades in response to regional warming. Anticipated regional warming would likely mobilize sequestered soil organic carbon, resulting in the emission of CO2 and CH4. Our understanding of the processes leading to thaw lake formation, expansion, and drainage in northern Alaska has been limited because models are specific to the flat, young Outer (seaward) Coastal Plain comprising 1/3 of the region. Furthermore, spatial and temporal analysis of lake dynamics is largely restricted to the period since 1948, when aerial photographs first became available across large regions of the Coastal Plain. In order to fill these gaps, we have been interviewing Iñupiaq elders, hunters, and berry pickers from the villages of Atqasuk and Barrow. The objective of these interviews is to obtain accounts of lake formation, expansion and drainage that have occurred within living or oral memory, and extend the record back several generations. To date, we have interviewed fifteen Iñupiat; most of these are people who travel the tundra frequently and have done so for decades. They have first-hand experience of lake drainage, sea cliff and river bank erosion, permafrost degradation, and other landscape changes. Many informants expressed concern that landscape changes are occurring at an increasingly rapid rate. They have identified lakes that have drained, areas where the permafrost is thawing, and places where the sea and river coastline is eroding. We have been able to corroborate reports of lake drainage from our informants with a series of aerial photographs, satellite images, and radiocarbon dates. In many instances, the elders have

  9. Evaluating the power to detect temporal trends in fishery independent surveys: A case study based on Gillnets Set in the Ohio waters of Lake Erie for walleye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tyler; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Tyson, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Fishery-independent (FI) surveys provide critical information used for the sustainable management and conservation of fish populations. Because fisheries management often requires the effects of management actions to be evaluated and detected within a relatively short time frame, it is important that research be directed toward FI survey evaluation, especially with respect to the ability to detect temporal trends. Using annual FI gill-net survey data for Lake Erie walleyes Sander vitreus collected from 1978 to 2006 as a case study, our goals were to (1) highlight the usefulness of hierarchical models for estimating spatial and temporal sources of variation in catch per effort (CPE); (2) demonstrate how the resulting variance estimates can be used to examine the statistical power to detect temporal trends in CPE in relation to sample size, duration of sampling, and decisions regarding what data are most appropriate for analysis; and (3) discuss recommendations for evaluating FI surveys and analyzing the resulting data to support fisheries management. This case study illustrated that the statistical power to detect temporal trends was low over relatively short sampling periods (e.g., 5–10 years) unless the annual decline in CPE reached 10–20%. For example, if 50 sites were sampled each year, a 10% annual decline in CPE would not be detected with more than 0.80 power until 15 years of sampling, and a 5% annual decline would not be detected with more than 0.8 power for approximately 22 years. Because the evaluation of FI surveys is essential for ensuring that trends in fish populations can be detected over management-relevant time periods, we suggest using a meta-analysis–type approach across systems to quantify sources of spatial and temporal variation. This approach can be used to evaluate and identify sampling designs that increase the ability of managers to make inferences about trends in fish stocks.

  10. Evaluation of Real-Time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) to Determine Escherichia coli Concentrations at Two Lake Erie Beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kephart, Christopher M.; Bushon, Rebecca N.

    2009-01-01

    During the recreational seasons of 2006 and 2007, the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method was used to determine Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations in samples from two Lake Erie beaches. Results from the qPCR method were compared to those obtained by traditional culturing on modified mTEC agar. Regression analysis showed strong, statistically significant correlations between results from the two methods for both years. Correlation coefficients at Edgewater and Villa Angela Beaches were 0.626 and 0.789 for 2006 and 0.667 and 0.829 for 2007, respectively. Linear regression analyses were done to determine how well E. coli concentrations could have been predicted from qPCR results. These hypothetical predictions were compared to the current practice of determining recreational water quality from E. coli concentrations determined for samples collected on the previous day. The qPCR method resulted in a greater percentage of correct predictions of water-quality exceedances than the current method for both beaches and both years. However, because regression equations differed somewhat between both sites and both years, the study did not result in any single relation reliable enough to use for actual real-time prediction of water-quality exceedances for either beach; therefore, a posterior analysis of data was done. Additional years of data may be needed to develop such a relation. Results from this study support the continued development and testing of a qPCR method for providing rapid and accurate estimates of E. coli concentrations for monitoring recreational water quality.

  11. Application of bilinear factor models to determine water quality parameters in the optically complex waters of the Western Basin of Lake Erie using first-derivative VIS/NiR hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adem Ali, K.; Ortiz, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Lake Erie is biological the most active among the Great Lakes and experiences frequent large scale algal bloom during the summer period. Harmful algal blooms (HABs) such as Microcystis aeruginosa have been documented and these are of great concern for human health and are detrimental to the lake's biodiversity. Therefore, efficient lake monitoring tools are required for early detection and forecasting purposes. Satellite remote sensing is an efficient tool with high spatial and temporal coverage that can allow accurate and timely detection of HABs. However, in optically complex aquatic environments such as the Western Basin of Lake Erie (WBLE) where multiple color producing agents (CPAs) including phytoplankton, suspended sediment, and dissolved organic carbon are present the recorded spectra represent a convolution of the spectral responses from multiple constituents and the discrimination between the various constituents requires separation of the mostly overlapping scattering and absorption properties. This presents a challenge to the application of remote sensing data for determining a single in-water constituent. To assess the controls on the optical properties in the lake, we conducted weekly research cruises, collecting samples and conducting in-situ spectroscopy from a total of 90 stations that encompass many of the environments in Lake Erie ranging from deeper waters, shallower bay waters and riverine discharges. First-derivative of the hyperspectral data clearly revealed known spectral features of phytoplankton, a primary constituent in the WBLE, which include absorption minima near 560 and 700 nm attributed to the minimum absorption capacity and fluorescence effects, respectively. The signal also extracted the red absorption peak due to chlorophyll a (a proxy used for phytoplankton density) near 675 nm. Attenuation effects due to dissolved organic matter, detritus and suspended inorganic matters are also evident in the spectral signatures. This study

  12. Reassessment of the Genesis of "Thaw Lakes" on the Arctic Coastal Plain in Northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, Y.; Jorgenson, M. T.

    2004-12-01

    Oriented lakes and drained lake basins on the Arctic Coastal Plain in northern Alaska have been the subject of numerous studies for more than 50 years. From the beginning, the waterbodies have been described as "thaw lakes" and since then a thermokarst genesis for the lakes has been accepted without any quantitative analysis of the initial permafrost conditions and thaw-susceptibility of the upper permafrost. We initially sought to quantify ground ice changes in support of this concept through detailed permafrost and terrain studies in the northeastern NPRA, an area with thick deposits of loamy sand and abundant lakes. During 2001-2004 we conducted detailed terrain analyses that included field surveys, permafrost investigations, and photogrammetry. A terrain-unit approach was used to relate soil and ground ice properties to surficial deposits related to lake development. Cryogenic structures, ice volumes, and properties of upper permafrost were described from borehole cores taken from every stage of lake-basin development and in surrounding areas. Ground ice also was described and sampled at 20 exposures at lake and riverbanks. We classified stages of drained basin development and quantified their permafrost characteristics. The primary stage of lake development is usually described as degradation of ice-wedges at their intersections. A thaw bulb then develops under the deep water and the thaw lakes expand laterally through both mechanical and thermal erosion. Although we observed numerous ponds at ice-wedge crossings we did not observe later sequential stages of thaw lake development. Instead, we observed that initial shallow ponds were soon colonized by vegetation, which halted thermokarst. In addition, ice volumes and thaw settlement properties of soils were insufficient to allow thaw lake development. Under the standard concept of lake development, the formation of ice wedges raises the surface and allows the development of new thermokarst, and thus creates a

  13. Effect of lighting conditions of coastal zone of Knyaginya lake on composition of macrophyte biohydrocenoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. O. Baranovsky

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In articlе the stuffs of researches of influence of a mode of illuminating intensity of coastal zone of a different exposition flood-land of lake Knyaginya (valley Samara on composition of highest aqueous green and macrozoobentos macrophytes biogeocenose are submitted.

  14. EPA’s National Coastal Condition Assessment: Pilot research in Great Lakes connecting channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA Office of Water’s 5-year cycles of national surveys of wetlands, lakes, rivers, and coastal areas help satisfy the assessment and antidegradation provisions of the Clean Water Act. Measuring extant conditions precedes measuring change in conditions. Surveys are chal...

  15. Coastal wetland support of Great Lakes fisheries: progress from concept to quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishery support is recognized as a valuable ecosystem service provided by aquatic systems but is harder to quantify than to describe conceptually. In this paper, we intersect data on fish inhabiting Great Lakes coastal wetlands with information on commercial and recreational har...

  16. Assessment of microcystins in lake water and fish (Mugilidae, Liza sp.) in the largest Spanish coastal lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, Susana; Fernández, Francisca; Ouahid, Youness; Barón-Sola, Ángel

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria dominance and cyanotoxin production can become major threats to humans and aquatic life, especially in warm shallow lakes, which are often dominated by cyanobacteria. This study investigates the occurrence and distribution of microcystins (MCYST) in water, cell-bound and in the tissues of the commercial mugilid Liza sp. in the largest, coastal, Spanish Mediterranean lake (Albufera of Valencia). This is the first report concerning microcystin accumulation in tissues of mugilid fish species. Considerable amounts of microcystins were found in the water and seston, which correlated with development of Microcystis aeruginosa populations in the lake. The MCYST concentrations found in Lake Albufera (mean 1.7 and 17 μg/L and maximum 16 and 120 μg/L in water and seston, respectively) exceeded by one to two orders of magnitude the guideline levels proposed by the World Health Organization and were higher than that reported in other lakes of the Mediterranean zone. The presence of MCYST was found in all the fishes studied and accumulated differently among tissues of the commercial species Liza sp. Toxin accumulation in fish tissues showed that although the target organ for MCYST was the liver, high concentrations of microcystins were also found in other analysed tissues (liver>intestine>gills>muscle). Human tolerable daily intake for microcystins is assessed relative to the WHO guidelines, and potential toxicological risks for humans, wildlife and related ecosystems of the lake are discussed.

  17. EAARL Coastal Topography--North Shore, Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, was produced from remotely sensed, geographically referenced...

  18. EAARL Coastal Topography--North Shore, Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, was produced from remotely sensed, geographically referenced...

  19. Great Lakes Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lakes Michigan, Erie, Saint Clair, Ontario and Huron has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and...

  20. Coastal lake sediments reveal 5500 years of tsunami history in south central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Philipp; Moernaut, Jasper; Van Daele, Maarten; Vandoorne, Willem; Pino, Mario; Urrutia, Roberto; De Batist, Marc

    2017-04-01

    We present an exceptionally long and continuous coastal lacustrine record of ∼5500 years from Lake Huelde on the west coast of Chiloé Island in south central Chile. The study area is located within the rupture zone of the giant 1960 CE Great Chilean Earthquake (MW 9.5). The subsequent earthquake-induced tsunami inundated Lake Huelde and deposited mud rip-up clasts, massive sand and a mud cap in the lake. Long sediment cores from 8 core sites within Lake Huelde reveal 16 additional sandy layers in the 5500 year long record. The sandy layers share sedimentological similarities with the deposit of the 1960 CE tsunami and other coastal lake tsunami deposits elsewhere. On the basis of general and site-specific criteria we interpret the sandy layers as tsunami deposits. Age-control is provided by four different methods, 1) 210Pb-dating, 2) the identification of the 137Cs-peak, 3) an infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) date and 4) 22 radiocarbon dates. The ages of each tsunami deposit are modelled using the Bayesian statistic tools of OxCal and Bacon. The record from Lake Huelde matches the 8 regionally known tsunami deposits from documented history and geological evidence from the last ∼2000 years without over- or underrepresentation. We extend the existing tsunami history by 9 tsunami deposits. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various sedimentary environments for tsunami deposition and preservation, e.g. we find that Lake Huelde is 2-3 times less sensitive to relative sea-level change in comparison to coastal marshes in the same region.

  1. Benthic foraminifera from two coastal lakes of southern Latium (Italy). Preliminary evaluation of environmental quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carboni, Maria Gabriella; Succi, Maria Cristina; Bergamin, Luisa; Di Bella, Letizia; Frezza, Virgilio; Landini, Bruna

    2009-01-01

    Benthic foraminifera and sediment texture were studied on a total of 37 samples, collected from two brackish-water coastal basins: Fogliano Lake and Lungo Lake (central Italy). The research was performed as a preliminary low-cost survey to highlight the degree of the environmental stress and to recognize a possible anthropogenic disturbance. The sedimentological and foraminiferal data were processed by bivariate and multivariate statistical analysis. Three distinct assemblages, referable to different environments were recognized for the Fogliano Lake: inner, intermediate and outer lagoon. Only the outer lagoon assemblage was found in the Lungo Lake. The distribution of foraminifera in the Fogliano Lake suggests a natural environmental stress probably due to the ecological instability typical of marginal environments, while the absence of the inner and intermediate lagoon assemblages in the Lungo Lake suggests an environmental disturbance possibly related to human activities. An interdisciplinary survey including geochemical analyses is recommended in order to deduce the nature and degree of pollution in the Lungo Lake.

  2. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: Lake Charles, Texas WFO

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital elevation model (DEM) is a part of a series of DEMs produced for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's...

  3. Lake Shorelines: Earth Analogs for Hypothesized Martian Coastal Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Williams, S. H.; Johnston, A. K.; Head, James W.

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of oceans on Mars has generated a lot of interest in the science community, but conclusive evidence supporting or refuting the ocean hypothesis has remained somewhat elusive. Precise topographic measurements of fresh-appearing shorelines from glacial Lake Lahontan were collected recently in an effort to obtain well-constrained data for comparison with the hypothesized Martian shorelines. This report summarizes the first results of the on-going research project.

  4. Bioaccumulation of Aluminium in Hydromacrophytes in Polish Coastal Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senze Magdalena

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The research on aluminium content was conducted in water and on aquatic flora of Polish lakes in the central part of the coast. The study included the lakes Sarbsko, Choczewskie, Bia.e, K.odno, D.brze and Salino investigated in the summer of 2013. The examined lakes belong mainly to the direct basin of the Baltic Sea. Samples of aquatic plants and lake waters were collected. In the water samples pH and electrolytic conductivity were measured. The aluminium content was determined both in water and aquatic plants. Submerged hydromacrophyte studies included Myriophyllum alterniflorum L., Potamogeton perfoliatus L. and Ceratophyllum demersum L. Emergent hydromacrophyte studies included Phragmites australis (Cav. Trin. ex Steud., Juncus bulbosus L., Iris pseudacorus L., Eleocharis palustris (L. Roem. % Schult., Phalaris arundinacea L., Carex riparia Curt., Mentha aquatic L., Stratiotes aloides L., Alisma plantago-aquatica L., Glyceria maxima (Hartman Holmb., Sagittaria sagittifolia L., Scirpus lacustris L. and Typha angustifolia L. The purpose of this investigation was the determination of the aluminium content in submerged and emergent hydromacrophytes and also the definition of their bioaccumulative abilities. The average concentration of aluminium in water was 2.68 fęg Al dm.3. The average content of aluminium in plants was 2.8015 mg Al kg.1. The bioaccumulation factor ranged from BCF=19.74 to BCF=16619. On the basis of the analysis of the aluminium content in water and aquatic plants results show that both water and plants were characterized by a moderate level of aluminium. The recorded concentrations indicate a mid-range value and are much lower than those which are quoted for a variety of surface waters in various parts of the world.

  5. Coastal geology and recent origins for Sand Point, Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Krantz, David E.; Castaneda, Mario R.; Loope, Walter L.; Jol, Harry M.; Goble, Ronald J.; Higley, Melinda C.; DeWald, Samantha; Hansen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Sand Point is a small cuspate foreland located along the southeastern shore of Lake Superior within Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore near Munising, Michigan. Park managers’ concerns for the integrity of historic buildings at the northern periphery of the point during the rising lake levels in the mid-1980s greatly elevated the priority of research into the geomorphic history and age of Sand Point. To pursue this priority, we recovered sediment cores from four ponds on Sand Point, assessed subsurface stratigraphy onshore and offshore using geophysical techniques, and interpreted the chronology of events using radiocarbon and luminescence dating. Sand Point formed at the southwest edge of a subaqueous platform whose base is probably constructed of glacial diamicton and outwash. During the post-glacial Nipissing Transgression, the base was mantled with sand derived from erosion of adjacent sandstone cliffs. An aerial photograph time sequence, 1939–present, shows that the periphery of the platform has evolved considerably during historical time, infl uenced by transport of sediment into adjacent South Bay. Shallow seismic refl ections suggest slump blocks along the leading edge of the platform. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) and shallow seismic refl ections to the northwest of the platform reveal large sand waves within a deep (12 m) channel produced by currents fl owing episodically to the northeast into Lake Superior. Ground-penetrating radar profi les show transport and deposition of sand across the upper surface of the platform. Basal radiocarbon dates from ponds between subaerial beach ridges range in age from 540 to 910 cal yr B.P., suggesting that Sand Point became emergent during the last ~1000 years, upon the separation of Lake Superior from Lakes Huron and Michigan. However, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages from the beach ridges were two to three times as old as the radiocarbon ages, implying that emergence of Sand Point may have begun

  6. Predictive mechanistic bioenergetics to model habitat suitability of shellfish culture in coastal lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, A.; Montalto, V.; Manganaro, A.; Mazzola, A.; Mirto, S.; Sanfilippo, M.; Sarà, G.

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative tools based on mechanistic modelling of functional traits able to enhance the sustainability of aquaculture and most other human activities (i.e. reducing the likelihood of detrimental impacts optimising productions), are especially important factors in the decision to site aquaculture facilities in coastal lakes, ponds and lagoons and, in the case of detrimental impact, to adopt mitigation measures. We tested the ability of mechanistic functional trait based models to predict life history traits of cultivable shellfish in shallow coastal lakes. Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models were run to generate spatially explicit predictions of Mytilus galloprovincialis life history (LH) traits (e.g. body size and fecundity). Using fortnightly data of food supply and hourly data of body temperatures, and exploiting the power of mechanistic rules, we estimated the amount of faeces ejected by a fixed quantity of organisms cultivated in two shallow Southern Mediterranean (Sicily) lakes. These differed in terms of temperature and food density, implying large differences in life history traits of mussels in the two study areas. This information could help facilitate the selection of sites where environmental conditions are more suitable for aquaculture and contextually compatible with sustainability. The validation exercise obtained by comparing the predicted and observed data was nearly consistent. Therefore, a mechanistic functional traits-based model seems able to capture the link between habitat characteristics and functional traits of organisms, delineating the fundamental portion of an ecological niche, the possibility of predicting LH traits and potential ecological applications in the management of natural coastal resources.

  7. Lake Erie Wastewater Management Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    loadings varied froem a loe of 5,700 mt/yr to a high of 11,900 at/yr during the 1970’s. The varieties ms a result of dif- ferent weather conditions...0 Ai p .u3u 04-J- c- 0 P4. 4 4-a4. o co C -4 - .3jdo 4.oQ 080d 143. 14 0W C4 0 0 sw 6 0 W -4 £fl’ rL2J(4 c 0 044 to -i cc- IŘ QOL -J 0 0 W. 4- o V... escala - tion index for operation and maintenance. (2) From Johnson at. al (Ref 6) Level I updated, using an escalation index for operation and maintenance

  8. Temporal trend in the intensity of subsurface saltwater ingressions to coastal Lake Sarbsko (northern Poland) during the last few decades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woszczyk, Michal; Lutynska, M [Department of Quaternary Geology and Paleogeography, Adam Mickiewicz University, Dziegielowa 27, 61-680 Poznan (Poland); Spychalski, W [Department of Soil Science, Poznan Uniwersity of Life Sciences, Szydlowska 50, 60-656 Poznan (Poland); Cieslinski, R, E-mail: woszczyk@amu.edu.p [Department of Hydrology, University of Gdansk, Dmowskiego 16a, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

    2010-03-15

    The present paper provides evidence of the increasing intensity of subsurface saltwater ingressions (SSI) to coastal Lake Sarbsko (northern Poland) during the last few decades. Saltwater ingressions to the lake were recognized by spatial and seasonal changes in the concentrations of chlorides in pore waters from the lake surface sediments. Temporal trends in SSI were reconstructed based on diatom proxies from a lake sediment core located within the range of saltwater ingressions. The data showed that subsurface saltwater input to Lake Sarbsko occurs during severe winter storms on the Baltic Sea, when saltwater is pumped to the lake from under the barrier separating the lake from the sea. Due to accelerated sea level rise, increased frequency of storms and lack of ice cover on the Baltic since at least the mid 20th century, saline groundwater supply to the lake has distinctly increased.

  9. Attenuation of landscape signals through the coastal zone: A basin-wide analysis for the US Great Lakes shoreline, circa 2002-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    We compare statistical models developed to describe a) the relationship between watershed properties and Great Lakes coastal wetlands with b) the relationship developed between watershed properties and the Great Lakes nearshore. Using landscape metrics from the GLEI project (Dan...

  10. Recent hydrographic measurements in the Lake Issyk Kul: Coastal currents, thermohaline structure, water quality indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavialov, Peter; Osadchiev, Alexander; Pelevin, Vadim; Konovalov, Boris; Goncharenko, Igor

    2015-04-01

    Issyk Kul is a deep (670 m) terminal lake in the northern Tian Shan mountains in eastern Kyrgyzstan. It is the tenth largest lake in the world by volume, and the second largest saline lake after the Caspian Sea. The lake is a Ramsar site of globally significant biodiversity. We report preliminary results of a field survey undertaken in the northern coastal part of the lake, off Cholpon-Ata township, on September 10-13, 2014. A fishery boat was used to carry out CTD profiling and water sampling at 16 stations. An UV fluorescent lidar working continuosly throughout the survey yielded surface concentrations of chlorophyll-a, suspended matter, and dissolved organic substances. In addition, we deployed 3 mooring stations equipped with current meters, all at approximately 15 m isobath, recording the velocity and direction of the near-bottom currents with 10 min sampling intervals. During the experiment, the coastal waters of the lake were fully mixed down to the depth of 15-20 m and nearly uniform vertically at salinity about 5 g/kg. The only exception referred to the areas adjacent to the mouths of small river and creeks, where stable salinity stratification developed at 0.01-0.03 g/kg per 1 m of depth. The temperature stratification generally followed the diurnal pattern. The dominant coastal currents were directed westward, which agrees with the established notion about the cyclonic character of the basin-scale circulation. Superimposed on this general cyclonic pattern, there was a persistent variability of currents at the periods of 17 to 24 hours, likely associated with the interplay between the inertial oscillation and signal of breeze in the wind forcing. There was an evidence of mesoscale eddies, possibly, associated with topographic features of the shoreline. The observed velocity in the near-bottom layer was about 9 cm/s on the average, with the maximum values exceeding 25 cm/s. The Issyk Kul lake is ultra-oligotrophic - the concentrations of chlorophyll-a were

  11. Persistent toxic substances in remote lake and coastal sediments from Svalbard, Norwegian Arctic: levels, sources and fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Liping; Zheng, Gene J; Minh, Tu Binh; Richardson, Bruce; Chen, Liqi; Zhang, Yuanhui; Yeung, Leo W; Lam, James C W; Yang, Xulin; Lam, Paul K S; Wong, Ming H

    2009-04-01

    Surface sediments from remote lakes and coastal areas from Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norwegian Arctic were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). Relatively high levels of PAHs were encountered from several lakes from Ny-Alesund, which were within the range of levels reported for European high mountain lakes and some urban/industrialized areas in the world, pointing to the role of remote Arctic lakes as potential reservoir of semi-volatile organic compounds. Specific patterns of PBDEs were observed, showing higher concentrations of lower brominated compounds such as BDE-7, 17 and 28. Estimated surface sediment fluxes of PAHs in Ny-Alesund remote lakes were similar to those observed for some European high mountain lakes. The current PAH levels in sediments from three lakes exceeded Canadian sediment quality guidelines, suggesting the presence of possible risks for aquatic organisms and the need for further studies.

  12. Methods to assess natural and anthropogenic thaw lake drainage on the western Arctic coastal plain of northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, Kenneth M.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Eisner, Wendy R.; Cuomo, Chris J.; Beck, R.A.; Frohn, R.

    2007-01-01

    Thousands of lakes are found on the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska and northwestern Canada. Developed atop continuous permafrost, these thaw lakes and associated drained thaw lake basins are the dominant landscape elements and together cover 46% of the 34,570 km2western Arctic Coastal Plain (WACP). Lakes drain by a variety of episodic processes, including coastal erosion, stream meandering, and headward erosion, bank overtopping, and lake coalescence. Comparison of Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) imagery from the mid-1970s to Landsat 7 enhanced thematic mapper (ETM+) imagery from around 2000 shows that 50 lakes completely or partially drained over the approximately 25 year period, indicating landscape stability. The lake-specific drainage mechanism can be inferred in some cases and is partially dependant on geographic settings conducive to active erosion such as riparian and coastal zones. In many cases, however, the cause of drainage is unknown. The availability of high-resolution aerial photographs for the Barrow Peninsula extends the record back to circa 1950; mapping spatial time series illustrates the dynamic nature of lake expansion, coalescence, and drainage. Analysis of these historical images suggests that humans have intentionally or inadvertently triggered lake drainage near the village of Barrow. Efforts to understand landscape processes and identify events have been enhanced by interviewing Iñupiaq elders and others practicing traditional subsistence lifestyles. They can often identify the year and process by which individual lakes drained, thereby providing greater dating precision and accuracy in assessing the causal mechanism. Indigenous knowledge has provided insights into events, landforms, and processes not previously identified or considered.

  13. Ecological, biogeochemical and salinity changes in coastal lakes and wetlands over the last 200 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lucy; Holmes, Jonathan; Horne, David

    2016-04-01

    Shallow lakes provide extensive ecosystem services and are ecologically important aquatic resources supporting a diverse flora and fauna. In marginal-marine areas, where such lakes are subjected to the multiple pressures of coastal erosion, sea level rise, increasing sea surface temperature and increasing frequency and intensity of storm surges, environments are complex and unstable. They are characterised by physico-chemical variations due to climatic (precipitation/evaporation cycles) and dynamic factors (tides, currents, freshwater drainage and sea level changes). Combined with human activity in the catchment these processes can alter the salinity, habitat and ecology of coastal fresh- to brackish water ecosystems. In this study the chemical and biological stability of coastal lakes forming the Upper Thurne catchment in the NE of the Norfolk Broads, East Anglia, UK are seriously threatened by long-term changes in salinity resulting from storm surges, complex hydrogeology and anthropogenic activity in the catchment. Future management decisions depend on a sound understanding of the potential ecological impacts, but such understanding is limited by short-term observations and measurements. This research uses palaeolimnological approaches, which can be validated and calibrated with historical records, to reconstruct changes in the aquatic environment on a longer time scale than can be achieved by observations alone. Here, salinity is quantitatively reconstructed using the trace-element geochemistry (Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca) of low Mg-calcite shells of Ostracoda (microscopic bivalved crustaceans) and macrophyte and macroinvertebrate macrofossil remains are used as a proxy to assess ecological change in response to variations in salinity. δ13C values of Cladocera (which are potentially outcompeted by the mysid Neomysis integer with increasing salinity and eutrophication) can be used to reconstruct carbon cycling and energy pathways in lake food webs, which alongside

  14. EPA Awards $10 Million Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Grant for Great Lakes Coastal Wetland Monitoring Program, SUNY Brockport Among the Project Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    (New York, N.Y.) The U.S Environmental Protection Agency today announced it has awarded a $10 million five-year grant to Central Michigan University to continue implementation of EPA's Great Lakes Coastal Wetland Monitoring Program. Central Michigan Univer

  15. A conceptual framework for Lake Michigan coastal/nearshore ecosystems, with application to Lake Michigan Lakewide Management Plan (LaMP) objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelbach, Paul W.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Bunnell, David Bo; Haack, Sheridan K.; Rogers, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    The Lakewide Management Plans (LaMPs) within the Great Lakes region are examples of broad-scale, collaborative resource-management efforts that require a sound ecosystems approach. Yet, the LaMP process is lacking a holistic framework that allows these individual actions to be planned and understood within the broader context of the Great Lakes ecosystem. In this paper we (1) introduce a conceptual framework that unifies ideas and language among Great Lakes managers and scientists, whose focus areas range from tributary watersheds to open-lake waters, and (2) illustrate how the framework can be used to outline the geomorphic, hydrologic biological, and societal processes that underlie several goals of the Lake Michigan LaMP, thus providing a holistic and fairly comprehensive roadmap for tackling these challenges. For each selected goal, we developed a matrix that identifies the key ecosystem processes within the cell for each lake zone and each discipline; we then provide one example where a process is poorly understood and a second where a process is understood, but its impact or importance is unclear. Implicit in these objectives was our intention to highlight the importance of the Great Lakes coastal/nearshore zone. Although the coastal/nearshore zone is the important linkage zone between the watershed and open-lake zones—and is the zone where most LaMP issues are focused--scientists and managers have a relatively poor understanding of how the coastal/nearshore zone functions. We envision follow-up steps including (1) collaborative development of a more detailed and more complete conceptual model of how (and where) identified processes are thought to function, and (2) a subsequent gap analysis of science and monitoring priorities.

  16. Assessment of priority phenolic compounds in sediments from an extremely polluted coastal wetland (Lake Maryut, Egypt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairy, Mohammed A

    2013-01-01

    Although high concentrations of trace organic pollutants were recorded along the Egyptian Mediterranean Coast and its corresponding coastal wetlands, no published data are available for the levels of phenolic compounds. Thus, this work aimed to investigate the levels of phenolic compounds in sediments of a heavily polluted coastal wetland (Lake Maryut, Egypt). For that purpose, a method was optimized for the extraction and detection of chlorophenols, methylphenols, and nitrophenols in sediments using GC-MS. Sediments were extracted with 0.1 M NaOH/methanol by sonication. Cleanup of sediment extracts using liquid-liquid extraction and SPE was found important to remove most of the interfering co-extracts. The proposed analytical methodology was validated by analysis of matrix spikes. Detection limits were 0.063-0.694 μg/kg dw for sediments. Good recoveries (70-110%) and precision values (RSD Lake Maryut. Results revealed that higher concentrations were observed in the main basin (MB) of Lake Maryut affected by the discharge of effluents from a primary wastewater treatment plant, direct discharge of industrial effluents, domestic wastes, and agricultural effluents from Qalaa Drain (QD). Chlorophenols (CPs) were the major group detected in the lake sediments followed by methylphenols (MPs) and nitrophenols (NPs). CPs were dominated by 2-, 4-, and 3-chlorophenols. Concentrations of CPs were higher at the north and northwestern parts of the MB indicating the influence of industrial effluents discharged into the lake. On the other hand, higher concentrations of NPs were observed at the south and southwestern parts of the MB, which is subjected to the discharge of agricultural and domestic effluents via QD. Results of the risk assessment revealed that phenol, cresols, 2,4-dinitrophenol, 4-NP, 2-CP, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol and 2,4-dimethylphenol are contaminants of concern and that adverse ecological effects could possibly occur to benthic species from the exposure to

  17. Hydrogeochemistry and spatio-temporal changes of a tropical coastal wetland system: Veli-Akkulam Lake, Thiruvananthapuram, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajinkumar, K. S.; Revathy, A.; Rani, V. R.

    2017-06-01

    The backwater of Veli-Akkulam, adjoining the Arabian Sea in the south-west part of Indian Peninsula, is a coastal wetland system and forms an integral part of the local ecosystem. In addition to the usual marine interactions, this water body is subjected to anthropogenic interference due to their proximity to the Thiruvananthapuram City urban agglomeration. This paper showcases how an urban agglomeration alters wetland system located within a tropical monsoonal environment. Water samples from this lake together with different feeder streams reveal that the lake is under the threat to eutrophication. A spatio-temporal analysis has shown that the lake and adjacent wetlands are shrinking in a fast pace. Over a period of about seven decades, the lake has shrunk by 28.05 % and the wetlands by 37.81 %. And hence, there is a pressing requirement of eco-management practices to be adopted to protect this lake.

  18. Promoting species establishment in a phragmites-dominated great lakes coastal wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, M.L.; Kowalski, K.P.; Wilcox, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined efforts to promote species establishment and maintain diversity in a Phragmites-dominated wetland where primary control measures were underway. A treatment experiment was performed at Crane Creek, a drowned-river-mouth wetland in Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge along the shore of western Lake Erie. Following initial aerial spraying of Phragmites with glyphosate, this study tested combinations of cutting, raking, and additional hand spraying of Phragmites with glyphosate as methods to promote growth of other wetland species and increase plant diversity. Percent-cover vegetation data were collected in permanent plots before and after treatments, and follow-up sampling was performed the following year. Increased species richness, species emergence, and relative dominance of non-Phragmites taxa were used as measures of treatment success. We also examined treatment effects on Phragmites cover. Dimensionality of seedbank and soil properties was reduced using principal component analysis. With the exception of nitrogen, soil nutrients affected species establishment, non-Phragmites taxa dominance, and Phragmites cover. A more viable seedbank led to greater species emergence. Treatments had differential effects on diversity depending on elevation and resulting degree of hydrologic inundation. Whereas raking to remove dead Phragmites biomass was central to promoting species establishment in dry areas, spraying had a greater impact in continually inundated areas. For treatment success across elevations into the year following treatments, spraying in combination with cutting and raking had the greatest effect. The results of this study suggest that secondary treatments can produce a short-term benefit to the plant community in areas treated for Phragmites.

  19. HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING, GPS, AND GIS APPLICATIONS IN OPPORTUNISTIC PLANT SPECIES MONITORING OF GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal wetlands of the Laurentian Great Lakes (LGL) are among the most fragmented and disturbed ecosystems of the world, with a long history of human-induced disturbance. LGL wetlands have undergone losses in the biological diversity that coincides with an increase in the presen...

  20. Can a rapid underwater video approach enhance the benthic assessment capability of the National Coastal Condition Assessmentin the Great Lakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the U.S. National Coastal Condition Assessment (NCCA) field survey in summer 2010, over 400 sites in the nearshore zone of the U.S. Great Lakes were sampled. As a supplement to core NCCA benthic taxonomy and sediment chemistry, underwater video images of the bottom condition ...

  1. Bulinus globosus (Planorbidae; Gastropoda) populations in the Lake Victoria basin and coastal Kenya show extreme nuclear genetic differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyakaana, Silvester; Stothard, J. Russell; Nalugwa, Allen

    2013-01-01

    -fertilizing, this species has been reported to be preferentially out crossing. In this study, we characterized the population genetic structure of 19 B. globosus populations sampled across the Lake Victoria basin and coastal Kenya using four polymorphic microsatellite loci. Population genetic structure was characterized...

  2. Forecasting Lake-Effect Snow in the Great Lakes Using NASA Satllite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipullo, Michelle; Molthan, Andrew; Shafer, Jackie; Case, Jonathan; Jedlovec, Gary

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the forecast of the lake effect snow in the Great Lakes region using models and infrared estimates of Great Lake Surface Temperatures (GLSTs) from the MModerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on Terra and Aqua satellites, and other satellite data. This study analyzes Lake Erie and Lake Ontario which produce storm total snowfall ranged from 8-18 inches off of Lake Ontario and 10-12 inches off of Lake Erie for the areas downwind.

  3. An integrated assessment for wind energy in Lake Michigan coastal counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordman, Erik; VanderMolen, Jon; Gajewski, Betty; Isely, Paul; Fan, Yue; Koches, John; Damm, Sara; Ferguson, Aaron; Schoolmaster, Claire

    2015-04-01

    The benefits and challenges of onshore and offshore wind energy development were assessed for a 4-county area of coastal Michigan. Economic, social, environmental, and spatial dimensions were considered. The coastal counties have suitable wind resources for energy development, which could contribute toward Michigan's 10% renewable energy standard. Wind energy is cost-effective with contract prices less than the benchmark energy price of a new coal-fired power plant. Constructing a 100 MW wind farm could have a $54.7 million economic impact. A patchwork of township-level zoning ordinances regulates wind energy siting. Voluntary collaborations among adjacent townships standardizing the ordinances could reduce regulatory complexity. A Delphi Inquiry on offshore wind energy in Lake Michigan elicited considerable agreement on its challenges, but little agreement on the benefits to coastal communities. Offshore turbines could be acceptable to the participants if they reduced pollution, benefited coastal communities, involved substantial public participation, and had minimal impact on property values and tourism. The US Coast Guard will take a risk-based approach to evaluating individual offshore developments and has no plans to issue blanket restrictions around the wind farms. Models showed that using wind energy to reach the remainder of the 10% renewable energy standard could reduce SO2 , NOx , and CO2 pollution by 4% to 7%. Turbines are highly likely to impact the area's navigational and defense radar systems but planning and technological upgrades can reduce the impact. The integrated assessment shows that responsible wind energy development can enhance the quality of life by reducing air pollution and associated health problems and enhancing economic development. Policies could reduce the negative impacts to local communities while preserving the benefits to the broader region. © 2015 SETAC.

  4. Invasive Ponto-Caspian hydrozoan Cordylophora caspia (hydrozoa: Cnidaria) in southern Baltic coastal lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obolewski, Krystian; Jarosiewicz, Anna; Ożgo, Małgorzata

    2015-12-01

    Cordylophora caspia Pall. is a highly invasive Ponto-Caspian colonial hydroid with a worldwide distribution. It is a biofouling organism colonizing industrial water installations and causing serious economic problems. Here, we give the first report of its occurrence in southern Baltic coastal lakes, and analyze its distribution in relation to environmental factors and likely colonization routes. Samples were collected from the stalks of Phragmites australis at the total of 102 sites in 15 lakes and lagoons. The species was most numerous in lagoons, i.e. ß-oligohaline water bodies with a surface hydrological connection with the sea, where it reached mean densities of 1200-4800 hydranths m-2. In regression tree analysis, chloride concentration, followed by pH, were the strongest explanatory variables for its occurrence, with highest densities observed at chloride concentration above 1.18 g Cl L-1 and pH 8.05-9.26. At pH 5.77-8.04 higher densities were observed at temperatures above 20.3 °C. Generally, within the range of parameters observed in our study, high densities of C. caspia were associated with high chloride concentration, pH, temperature and electrical conductivity values. The species was also present in freshwater lakes; these colonies may have the highest capacity for future invasions of such habitats. Within lakes, high densities were observed at canals connecting these water bodies with the sea, and at sites close to the inflow of rivers. This distribution pattern can facilitate its further spread into inland waters.

  5. Drainage network structure and hydrologic behavior of three lake-rich watersheds on the Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arp, C.D.; Whitman, M.S.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Kemnitz, R.; Grosse, G.; Urban, F.E.

    2012-01-01

    Watersheds draining the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) of Alaska are dominated by permafrost and snowmelt runoff that create abundant surface storage in the form of lakes, wetlands, and beaded streams. These surface water elements compose complex drainage networks that affect aquatic ecosystem connectivity and hydrologic behavior. The 4676 km2 Fish Creek drainage basin is composed of three watersheds that represent a gradient of the ACP landscape with varying extents of eolian, lacustrine, and fluvial landforms. In each watershed, we analyzed 2.5-m-resolution aerial photography, a 5-m digital elevation model, and river gauging and climate records to better understand ACP watershed structure and processes. We show that connected lakes accounted for 19 to 26% of drainage density among watersheds and most all channels initiate from lake basins in the form of beaded streams. Of the > 2500 lakes in these watersheds, 33% have perennial streamflow connectivity, and these represent 66% of total lake area extent. Deeper lakes with over-wintering habitat were more abundant in the watershed with eolian sand deposits, while the watershed with marine silt deposits contained a greater extent of beaded streams and shallow thermokarst lakes that provide essential summer feeding habitat. Comparison of flow regimes among watersheds showed that higher lake extent and lower drained lake-basin extent corresponded with lower snowmelt and higher baseflow runoff. Variation in baseflow runoff among watersheds was most pronounced during drought conditions in 2007 with corresponding reduction in snowmelt peak flows the following year. Comparison with other Arctic watersheds indicates that lake area extent corresponds to slower recession of both snowmelt and baseflow runoff. These analyses help refine our understanding of how Arctic watersheds are structured and function hydrologically, emphasizing the important role of lake basins and suggesting how future lake change may impact hydrologic

  6. Peripatric differentiation among adjacent marine lake and lagoon populations of a coastal fish, Sphaeramia orbicularis (Apogonidae, Perciformes, Teleostei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Ryo O; Sekimoto, Hidekatsu; Chiba, Satoru N; Hanzawa, Naoto

    2009-08-01

    The effect of geographical isolation on speciation, particularly within short geographical ranges, is poorly understood among marine organisms. Focusing on marine lakes of the Palau Islands, we investigated the effect of geographical isolation on Sphaeramia orbicularis, a coastal fish inhabiting marine lakes and lagoons. We collected a total of 157 individuals from three meromictic marine lakes and three lagoon sites, and analyzed the genetic diversity and differentiation of the populations based on complete sequences of the mitochondrial control region (824 bp). The analyses show that the genetic diversity of marine lake populations is much lower than that of lagoon populations. Moreover, a mismatch distribution analysis suggests that marine lake populations have experienced a decrease followed by a rapid expansion of their population size. These results reveal that marine lake populations have experienced severe founder and/or bottleneck events during the last thousand to tens of thousand years. Pairwise Phi(ST )values ranged from 0.531 to 0.848 between marine lake and lagoon populations and from 0.429 to 0.870 among marine lake populations, indicating a high degree of genetic differentiation. We speculate that such peripatric differentiation between marine lake and lagoon populations was caused by a small number of individuals colonizing the lakes from the lagoon (founder event) followed by repetitive bottleneck events, such as those generated by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). So far, such high genetic divergences in extremely short geographical ranges (approximately 150-250 m) have scarcely been reported for marine organisms. We suggest that the marine lake is one of the good model of geographical isolation in marine organisms and each marine lake population is in the early stages of speciation.

  7. Evolution of sediment composition of the coastal Lake San Puoto (Latium, Italy in the last two centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico DINELLI

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The sediment composition of the coastal Lake San Puoto (Central Italy was studied to obtain information on its recent environmental evolution (last 200 years. The explorative fieldwork was performed within the framework of the EU-funded PALICLAS Project. Sediment and mass accumulation rates, calculated from 210Pb analysis, show mean values of 0.27 cm y-1 and 0.11 g cm-2 y-1 respectively, with increasing values from 10 cm to the top (i.e. from ca 1960 AD to the present. The evolution of the recent sedimentation of Lake San Puoto is characterized by the interplay of three main components: detrital (either siliciclastic and/or carbonatic, organic-rich and authigenic phases. The first reflects the input from coastal dunes and rocky outcrops; the other two indicate variations in lake productivity. Sedimentological, geochemical, and mineralogical analyses of two cores collected near the center of the lake were used to define five lithological units: i a laminated unit representing the last eutrophication period, starting ca 1925 AD; ii a few turbidite layers, probably due to a lowering of the lake level around 1920 AD; iii a productive phase of the lake, which occurred around the end of the XIX and the beginning of the XX century; iv a coarse siliciclastic sediment interval, possibly deposited following the digging of the channel connecting Lake San Puoto to Lake Lungo; and v an older unit representing the natural allochthonous detritic sedimentation deriving from the present dune deposits surrounding the lake shores. Metal fluxes were calculated for recent times by means of 210Pb sedimentation rates. Zn, Cu and Pb record considerably higher fluxes above 10 cm depth (i.e. 1960 AD, as confirmed by Al-normalized metal depth profiles. Episodes of eutrophication occurred between 1890 and 1920 and between 1925 and the present.

  8. Persistent toxic substances in remote lake and coastal sediments from Svalbard, Norwegian Arctic: Levels, sources and fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao Liping [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Key Laboratory of Global Change and Marine-Atmospheric Chemistry, State Oceanic Administration, 178 Daxue Road, Xiamen, Fijian (China); Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, 178 Daxue Road, Xiamen, Fujian (China); Zheng, Gene J. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Minh, Tu Binh; Richardson, Bruce [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chen Liqi; Zhang Yuanhui [Key Laboratory of Global Change and Marine-Atmospheric Chemistry, State Oceanic Administration, 178 Daxue Road, Xiamen, Fijian (China); Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, 178 Daxue Road, Xiamen, Fujian (China); Yeung, Leo W.; Lam, James C.W. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Yan, Xulin [Key Laboratory of Global Change and Marine-Atmospheric Chemistry, State Oceanic Administration, 178 Daxue Road, Xiamen, Fijian (China); Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, 178 Daxue Road, Xiamen, Fujian (China); Lam, Paul K.S. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: bhpksl@cityu.edu.hk; Wong, Ming H. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: mhwong@hkbu.edu.hk

    2009-04-15

    Surface sediments from remote lakes and coastal areas from Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norwegian Arctic were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). Relatively high levels of PAHs were encountered from several lakes from Ny-Alesund, which were within the range of levels reported for European high mountain lakes and some urban/industrialized areas in the world, pointing to the role of remote Arctic lakes as potential reservoir of semi-volatile organic compounds. Specific patterns of PBDEs were observed, showing higher concentrations of lower brominated compounds such as BDE-7, 17 and 28. Estimated surface sediment fluxes of PAHs in Ny-Alesund remote lakes were similar to those observed for some European high mountain lakes. The current PAH levels in sediments from three lakes exceeded Canadian sediment quality guidelines, suggesting the presence of possible risks for aquatic organisms and the need for further studies. - High levels of PAHs and specific patterns of PBDEs were found in sediments from the remote Norwegian Arctic lakes.

  9. (90)Sr in fish from the southern Baltic Sea, coastal lagoons and freshwater lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewska, Tamara; Saniewski, Michał; Suplińska, Maria; Rubel, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    Activity concentrations of radioactive (90)Sr were studied in four fish species: herring, flounder, sprat and cod caught in the southern Baltic Sea in two periods: 2005-2009 and 2013-2014. The study included also perch from the coastal lagoons - Vistula Lagoon and Szczcin Lagoon and a freshwater lake - Żarnowieckie Lake as well as additional lake species: pike and bream. (90)Sr activity concentrations were compared in relation to species and to particular tissue: muscle, whole fish (eviscerated) and bones. In 2014, in the Baltic, the maximal (90)Sr concentrations were found in fishbones: herring - 0.39 Bq kg(-1) w.w., cod - 0.48 Bq kg(-1) w.w., and flounder - 0.54 Bq kg(-1) w.w. In the whole fish the maximal concentrations were found in flounder - 0.16 Bq kg(-1) w.w. and cod - 0.15 Bq kg(-1) w.w., while in herring - 0.022 Bq kg(-1) w.w. and sprat - 0.026 Bq kg(-1) w.w. they stayed at lower level. Relatively high (90)Sr concentrations were detected in whole fish from freshwater Lake Żarnowieckie: perch - 0.054 Bq kg(-1) w.w., pike - 0.062 Bq kg(-1) w.w. and bream - 0.140 Bq kg(-1) w.w. Concentration ratio (CR) determined for particular fish tissues and for whole eviscerated fish in relation to (90)Sr concentrations in seawater and lake water were showing significant variability unlike the corresponding (137)Cs concentration ratios which are stable and specific for fish species. The study corroborates with the conviction of the growing role of (90)Sr in the overall radioactivity in the southern Baltic Sea as compared to (137)Cs.

  10. Occurrence of alkylphenolic substances in a Great Lakes coastal marsh, Cootes Paradise, ON, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, T. [National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd. Burlington, ON, L7R 4A6 (Canada)]. E-mail: tanya.mayer@ec.gc.ca; Bennie, D. [National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd. Burlington, ON, L7R 4A6 (Canada); Rosa, F. [National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd. Burlington, ON, L7R 4A6 (Canada); Rekas, G. [National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd. Burlington, ON, L7R 4A6 (Canada); Palabrica, V. [National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd. Burlington, ON, L7R 4A6 (Canada); Schachtschneider, J. [National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd. Burlington, ON, L7R 4A6 (Canada)

    2007-06-15

    Occurrence and fate of alkylphenols (APs), known endocrine disruptors, were investigated in a Great Lakes coastal wetland, Cootes Paradise, ON. The wetland, which receives discharges from a Wastewater Treatment Plant (WTP) and several Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), is an important spawning ground for fish and crucial habitat for other fauna. Elevated concentrations of nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs) and their degradation product nonylphenol (NP) were found in water and sediment samples near the sources. Since transfer of APs through the food chain is of concern, we compared their concentrations in invertebrates from clean and contaminated sites. The results reveal transfer of alkylphenolics from sediments to biota and their accumulation in the invertebrate tissue, particularly the highly hydrophobic 4-NP, whose concentrations ranged from 1.9 to 6.3 {mu}g g{sup -1}. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate AP concentrations in tissue of benthic invertebrates under real environmental conditions. - Concentrations of alkylphenolic compounds in water, sediments and benthic invertebrates in a large coastal wetland and implications for trophic transfer.

  11. Water management sustainability in reclaimed coastal areas. The case of the Massaciuccoli lake basin (Tuscany, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Rudy; Baneschi, Ilaria; Basile, Paolo; Guidi, Massimo; Pistocchi, Chiara; Sabbatini, Tiziana; Silvestri, Nicola; Bonari, Enrico

    2010-05-01

    The lake of Massaciuccoli (7 km2 wide and about 2 m deep) and its palustrine nearby areas (about 13 km2 wide) constitute a residual coastal lacustrine and marshy area largerly drained by 1930. In terms of hydrological boundaries, the lake watershed is bordered by carbonate to arenaceous reliefs on the east, by a sandy coastal shallow aquifer on the west (preventing groundwater salinisation), while south and north by the Serchio River and the Burlamacca-Gora di Stiava channels alignment respectively. Since reclamation of the peaty soils started, subsidence began (2 to 3 m in 70 years), leaving the lake perched and central respect the low drained area, now 0 to -3 m below m.s.l., and requiring 16 km embankment construction. During the dry summer season, the lake undergoes a severe water stress, that, along with nutrients input, causes the continuous ecosystem degradation resulting in water salinisation and eutrophication. Water stress results in a head decrease below m.s.l., causing seawater intrusion along the main outlet, and reaching its highest point at the end of the summer season (common head values between -0.40 and -0.5 a.m.s.l.). The water budget for an average dry season lasting about 100 days was computed, considering a 10% error, in order to understand and evaluate all the components leading to the above mentioned water stress by means of several multidisciplinary activities during the years 2008-2009. They started with a thoroughly literature review, continued with hydrological, hydrogeochemical monitoring and testing (both for surface water and the shallow aquifer) and agronomical investigations (to characterize cropping systems, evapotranspiration rates and irrigation schemes). All the collected data were then processed by means of statistical methods, time series analysis, numerical modelling of the shallow aquifer and hydrological modelling. The results demonstrate the presence of two interrelated hydrological sub-systems: the lake and the reclaimed

  12. Diatom species composition and indices for determining the ecological status of coastal Mediterranean Spanish lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antón-Garrido, Beatriz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Diatom indices have been used and tested mainly for assessing the ecological status of rivers and deep lakes, but there are scarce studies that determine their effectiveness in shallow lakes and in coastal Mediterranean lakes. This study evaluates the validity of several common diatom indices (SPI, BDI, CEC and TDIL for the determination of the ecological quality of three coastal lakes (Valencia, Spain and presents descriptions and ecological data of the main diatom species recorded. Diatom samples were collected from phytobenthos, both from epiphyton of the dominant submerged macrophytes and the sediment. The ecological status of the systems was determined according to different physico-chemical variables and was compared with the results obtained from epiphytic diatom communities. The results showed discrepancies among diatom indices and also with the state determined by the environmental variables. The effectiveness of the indices depended on the number of species assessed for each index with respect to the total species recorded and the suitability of the weight assigned to each species. The results reveal the need to gather more information about the composition and ecology of the diatoms and microalgae characteristic of coastal Mediterranean standing waters. This work contributes to their better knowledge.Los índices de diatomeas han sido aplicados y contrastados principalmente en la evaluación del estado ecológico de los sistemas lóticos y lagos profundos, pero son escasos los estudios sobre su eficacia en lagos someros y lagunas litorales mediterráneas. Este trabajo evalúa la validez de varios índices conocidos de diatomeas (IPS, IBD, CEE y TDIL para la determinación de la calidad ecológica de tres lagunas litorales (Valencia, España y presenta las descripciones y datos ecológicos de las principales especies de diatomeas registradas. Las muestras de diatomeas se recogieron del fitobentos, tanto del epifiton desarrollado sobre

  13. NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) true color (RGB) orthorectified mosaic image tiles, Lake Charles, Louisiana 2009-2010 (NODC Accession 0075827)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative of Lake Charles,...

  14. Influence of near-surface stratigraphy on coastal landslides at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Lake Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhardt, W.A.; Jaffe, B.E.; Kayen, R.E.; Cochrane, G.R.

    2004-01-01

    Lake-level change and landslides are primary controls on the development of coastal environments along the coast of northeastern Lake Michigan. The late Quaternary geology of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore was examined with high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and boreholes. Based on sequence-stratigraphic principles, this study recognizes ten stratigraphic units and three major unconformities that were formed by late Pleistocene glaciation and postglacial lake-level changes. Locally high sediment supply, and reworking by two regressions and a transgression have produced a complex stratigraphy that is prone to episodic failure. In 1995, a large landslide deposited approximately 1 million m3 of sediment on the lake floor. The highly deformed landslide deposits, up to 18 m thick, extend 3-4 km offshore and unconformably overlie well-stratified glacial and lacustrine sediment. The landslide-prone bluff is underlain by channel-fill deposits that are oriented nearly perpendicular to the shoreline. The paleochannels are at least 10 m deep and 400 m wide and probably represent stream incision during a lake-level lowstand about 10.3 ka B.P. The channels filled with sediment during the subsequent transgression and lake-level highstand, which climaxed about 4.5 ka B.P. As lake level fell from the highstand, the formation of beach ridges and sand dunes sealed off the channel and isolated a small inland lake (Glen Lake), which lies 5 m above the level of Lake Michigan and may be a source of piped groundwater. Our hypothesis is that the paleochannels act as conduits for pore water flow, and thereby locally reduce soil strength and promote slope failure.

  15. The bounding-surfaces record of a barrier spit from Huangqihai Lake, North China: implications for coastal barrier boundary hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xin; Yu, Xinghe; Clift, Peter D.; Wang, Tianyi; Tan, Chengpeng; Jin, Lina

    2016-09-01

    Ground-penetrating radar and trenching studies of a barrier spit on the north shore of Huangqihai Lake were made, that reveal important implications for the coastal washover barrier boundary hierarchy and interpretations of this depositional record. A four-fold hierarchy bounding-surface model, representing different levels of impact and genesis, is defined. Each level of the hierarchy is enclosed by a distinct kind of surface characterized by different ground-penetrating radar reflection features, sedimentary characteristics (color, grain size, sorting, rounding and sedimentary structures) and origin. We suggest that this hierarchical model can be applied to any coastal washover barrier deposits.

  16. Chemical characteristics of surface waters in the Forsmark area. Evaluation of data from lakes, streams and coastal sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonesten, Lars [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Assessment

    2005-06-01

    This report is an evaluation of the chemical composition of surface water in lakes, streams, and at coastal sampling sites in the Forsmark area. The aim with this study is to characterise the surface water systems in the area, and the further aim with this characterisation is to be used as input material to the safety analyses and environmental impact assessments for the potential deep repository of used nuclear fuels. The data used consist of water chemical composition of lakes, streams and coastal sites from the period March 2002 - April 2004. The sampling has been performed predominantly on a monthly basis. The emphasis of the assessment has been on surface waters (0.5 m), as the water depth at all sampling locations is limited, and thereby the water systems are rarely stratified for prolonged periods. The characterisations have been restricted to the most commonly measured chemical parameters.The assessment has been divided into three parts: Comparisons within and between the lakes, streams, and coastal sites, respectively; Temporal and spatial variation, predominantly within lakes and stream sites; and Relationships between the various chemical parameters. Beside comparisons between the sampling sites within the Forsmark area, comparisons have also been made with regional and national data from the latest Swedish National Survey (2000). The analyses of temporal and spatial variation have been concentrated on the freshwater systems in the Norra Bassaengen catchment area. This catchment area is the most comprehensively investigated, and it also includes the Bolundsfjaerden sub-catchment, which is the area where the continued site investigations will be concentrated. The relationships among the sampling sites, the catchment areas, as well as the chemical parameters investigated, were examined by applying PCA analyses on the lake and stream data. In general, the freshwater systems in the Forsmark area are characterised by small and shallow oligotrophic hardwater

  17. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in snow, lake, surface runoff water and coastal seawater in Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Minghong; Yang, Haizhen; Xie, Zhiyong; Zhao, Zhen; Wang, Feng; Lu, Zhibo; Sturm, Renate; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2012-03-30

    The multi-matrices samples from snow (n=4), lake water (n=4), surface runoff water (SRW) (n=1) and coastal seawater (n=10) were collected to investigate the spatial distribution and the composition profiles of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica in 2011. All samples were prepared by solid-phase extraction and analyzed by using high performance liquid chromatography/negative electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/(-)ESI-MS/MS). 14 PFASs in snow, 12 PFASs in lake water, 9 PFASs in SRW and 13 PFASs in coastal seawater were quantified, including C(4), C(7), C(8), C(10) PFSAs, C(4)-C(9), C(11)-C(14), C(16) PFCAs, and FOSA. PFOA was detected in all samples with the highest concentration (15,096 pg/L) in coastal seawater indicating a possible influence of local sewage effluent. High concentration and mostly frequency of PFBA occurred in snow (up to 1112 pg/L), lake water (up to 2670 pg/L) and SRW (1431 pg/L) while detected in the range of method detection limited (MDL) in the coastal seawaters indicate that PFBA is mainly originated from atmospheric dust contamination and also affected by the degradation of their precursors. No geographical differences in PFOS concentrations (n=8, 18 ± 3 pg/L) were measured in all snow and lake water samples also suggests that PFOS could be originated from the degradation of their precursors which can transported by long-range atmospheric route, but in a very low level.

  18. A 1300 Year Sub-Decadally Resolved Hydrologic Record from the Coastal Southwestern United States (Crystal Lake, CA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, J. A.; Kirby, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents a 1300 year sub-decadally resolved record of hydrologic variability from coastal southwestern United States (Crystal Lake, CA). Crystal Lake is a small (0.02 km2), alpine landslide dammed lake in the Angeles National Forest of the San Gabriel Mountains. The hydrologically closed lake is the only permanent, freshwater lake in the range; its catchment is small (0.77 km2). In May 2014, lake depth measured 5.5 m, however the spillover point in the southeastern end of the lake indicates a max depth of ~50 m. Two Livingston piston cores were taken in May 2014, 15 m apart in the lake's depocenter. Magnetic susceptibility, LOI 550 °C and 950 °C, and grain size were measured at 1 cm contiguous intervals; C:N ratios and C and N isotopic analyses were measured every 2 cm. In addition, representative allochthonous and autochthonous vegetation were collected within the drainage basin for δ13Corg values. An age model was generated using Bacon v2.2, based on 11 AMS 14C dates of discrete organic matter (i.e. charcoal or wood). Age control for the past 200 years is based on correlation to Rothenberg et al. (2010) core ages. Initial results suggest a history of event sedimentation (large storms) superimposed on multi-decadal to centennial hydrologic changes (wet vs. dry periods) such as the Little Ice Age and the Medieval Climate Anomaly. Additionally, the Crystal Lake record is compared to preexisting regional records to further explore the record's spatial coherence. Mechanisms driving these hydrologic shifts are explored.

  19. (210)Pb, (137)Cs and (7)Be in the sediments of coastal lakes on the polish coast: Implications for sedimentary processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woszczyk, Michał; Poręba, Grzegorz; Malinowski, Łukasz

    2017-04-01

    In this study we combined radioisotopes ((210)Pb, (137)Cs and (7)Be) and hydrodynamic modeling to investigate sedimentary processes in three coastal lakes on the Polish Baltic coast. The research aimed at establishing the depth of sediment mixing and its effects on sediment geochemistry as well as showing the relationship between lake water salinity and radionuclide distribution in the sediment cores. We established that the intensity of mixing displayed appreciable variability throughout the lakes and the thickness of sediment mixing layer was between coastal lakes were strongly affected by the early diagenetic processes, which caused diffusive migration of radionuclides. The inventories of (210)Pbex and (137)Cs in the lakes were positively related to salinity. The high inventories of both isotopes (3.2-10.9 kBq ·m(-2) for (210)Pbex and 3.0-6.0 kBq·m(-2) for (137)Cs) in coastal lakes were explained by enhanced sedimentation within estuarine mixing zone and delivery of "additional" (210)Pb and (137)Cs to the lakes during saltwater ingressions. The results of this study have implications for the paleolimnology, sedimentology and biogeochemistry of coastal lakes.

  20. Evaluation of the lake model FLake over a coastal lagoon during the THAUMEX field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Le Moigne

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The THAUMEX measurement campaign, carried out during the summer of 2011 in Thau, a coastal lagoon in southern France, focused on episodes of marine breezes. During the campaign, three intensive observation periods (IOPs were conducted and a large amount of data were collected. Subsequently, standalone modelling using the FLake lake model was used, first to assess the surface temperature and the surface energy balance, and second to determine the energy budget of the water column at the measurement site. Surface fluxes were validated against in situ measurements, and it was determined that heat exchanges are dominated by evaporation. We also demonstrated that the model was sensitive to the light extinction coefficient at Thau, due to its shallowness and clarity nature. A heat balance was calculated, and the inclusion of a radiative temperature has improved it, especially by reducing the nocturnal evaporation. The FLake lake model was then evaluated in three-dimensional numerical simulations performed with the Meso-NH mesoscale model, in order to assess the changing structure of the boundary layer above the lagoon during the IOPs more accurately. We highlighted the first time ever when Meso-NH and FLake were coupled and proved the ability of the coupled system to forecast a complex phenomenon but also the importance of the use of the FLake model was pointed out. We demonstrated the impact of the lagoon and more precisely the Lido, a sandy strip of land between the lagoon and the Mediterranean Sea, on the vertical distribution of turbulent kinetic energy, evidence of the turbulence induced by the breeze. This study showed the complementarities between standalone and coupled simulations.

  1. Evaluating the power to detect temporal trends in fishery-independent time surveys: A case study based on gill nets set in the Ohio waters of Lake Erie for walleyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tyler; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Tyson, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Fishery-independent (FI) surveys provide critical information used for the sustainable management and conservation of fish populations. Because fisheries management often requires the effects of management actions to be evaluated and detected within a relatively short time frame, it is important that research be directed toward FI survey evaluation, especially with respect to the ability to detect temporal trends. Using annual FI gill-net survey data for Lake Erie walleyes Sander vitreus collected from 1978 to 2006 as a case study, our goals were to (1) highlight the usefulness of hierarchical models for estimating spatial and temporal sources of variation in catch per effort (CPE); (2) demonstrate how the resulting variance estimates can be used to examine the statistical power to detect temporal trends in CPE in relation to sample size, duration of sampling, and decisions regarding what data are most appropriate for analysis; and (3) discuss recommendations for evaluating FI surveys and analyzing the resulting data to support fisheries management. This case study illustrated that the statistical power to detect temporal trends was low over relatively short sampling periods (e.g., 5–10 years) unless the annual decline in CPE reached 10–20%. For example, if 50 sites were sampled each year, a 10% annual decline in CPE would not be detected with more than 0.80 power until 15 years of sampling, and a 5% annual decline would not be detected with more than 0.8 power for approximately 22 years. Because the evaluation of FI surveys is essential for ensuring that trends in fish populations can be detected over management-relevant time periods, we suggest using a meta-analysis–type approach across systems to quantify sources of spatial and temporal variation. This approach can be used to evaluate and identify sampling designs that increase the ability of managers to make inferences about trends in fish stocks.

  2. Seawater intrusion into groundwater aquifer through a coastal lake - complex interaction characterised by water isotopes (2)H and (18)O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemitzi, Alexandra; Stefanopoulos, Kyriakos; Schmidt, Marie; Richnow, Hans H

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the complex interactions among surface waters, groundwaters and a coastal lake in northeastern Greece, using their stable isotopic composition (δ(18)O, δ(2)H) in combination with hydrogeological and hydrochemical data. Seasonal and spatial trends of water isotopes were studied and revealed that all water bodies in the study area interact. It was also shown that the aquifer's increased salinity is not due to fossil water from past geological periods, but is attributed to brackish lake water intrusion into the aquifer induced by the extensive groundwater pumping for irrigation purposes. Quantification of the contribution of the lake to the aquifer was achieved using the simple dilution formula. The isotopic signatures of the seawater and the groundwaters are considerably different, so there is a very little possibility of direct seawater intrusion into the aquifer.

  3. Holocene environmental and climatic changes at Gorgo Basso, a coastal lake in southern Sicily, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinner, Willy; van Leeuwen, Jacqueline F. N.; Colombaroli, Daniele; Vescovi, Elisa; van der Knaap, W. O.; Henne, Paul D.; Pasta, Salvatore; D'Angelo, Stefania; La Mantia, Tommaso

    2009-07-01

    We used a new sedimentary record to reconstruct the Holocene vegetation and fire history of Gorgo Basso, a coastal lake in south-western Sicily (Italy). Pollen and charcoal data suggest a fire-prone open grassland near the site until ca 10,000 cal yr BP (8050 cal BC), when Pistacia shrubland expanded and fire activity declined, probably in response to increased moisture availability. Evergreen Olea europaea woods expanded ca 8400 to decline abruptly at 8200 cal yr BP, when climatic conditions became drier at other sites in the Mediterranean region. Around 7000 cal yr BP evergreen broadleaved forests ( Quercus ilex, Quercus suber and O. europaea) expanded at the cost of open communities. The expansion of evergreen broadleaved forests was associated with a decline of fire and of local Neolithic ( Ficus carica-Cerealia based) agriculture that had initiated ca 500 years earlier. Vegetational, fire and land-use changes ca 7000 cal yr BP were probably caused by increased precipitation that resulted from (insolation-forced) weakening of the monsoon and Hadley circulation ca 8000-6000 cal yr BP. Low fire activity and dense coastal evergreen forests persisted until renewed human activity (probably Greek, respectively Roman colonists) disrupted the forest ca 2700 cal yr BP (750 BC) and 2100 cal yr BP (150 BC) to gain open land for agriculture. The intense use of fire for this purpose induced the expansion of open maquis, garrigue, and grassland-prairie environments (with an increasing abundance of the native palm Chamaerops humilis). Prehistoric land-use phases after the Bronze Age seem synchronous with those at other sites in southern and central Europe, possibly as a result of climatic forcing. Considering the response of vegetation to Holocene climatic variability as well as human impact we conclude that under (semi-)natural conditions evergreen broadleaved Q. ilex- O. europaea (s.l.) forests would still dominate near Gorgo Basso. However, forecasted climate change and

  4. Spatio-temporal analysis of gyres in oriented lakes on the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska based on remotely sensed images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shengan; Beck, Richard A.; Hinkel, Kenneth M.; Liu, Hongxing; Jones, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of oriented thermokarst lakes on the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska has been the subject of debate for more than half a century. The striking elongation of the lakes perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction has led to the development of a preferred wind-generated gyre hypothesis, while other hypotheses include a combination of sun angle, topographic aspect, and/or antecedent conditions. A spatio-temporal analysis of oriented thermokarst lake gyres with recent (Landsat 8) and historical (Landsat 4, 5, 7 and ASTER) satellite imagery of the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska indicates that wind-generated gyres are both frequent and regionally extensive. Gyres are most common in lakes located near the Arctic coast after several days of sustained winds from a single direction, typically the northeast, and decrease in number landward with decreasing wind energy. This analysis indicates that the conditions necessary for the Carson and Hussey (1962) wind-generated gyre for oriented thermokarst lake formation are common temporally and regionally and correspond spatially with the geographic distribution of oriented lakes on the Arctic Coastal Plain. Given an increase in the ice-free season for lakes as well as strengthening of the wind regime, the frequency and distribution of lake gyres may increase. This increase has implications for changes in northern high latitude aquatic ecosystems, particularly if wind-generated gyres promote permafrost degradation and thermokarst lake expansion.

  5. A long record of extreme wave events in coastal Lake Hamana, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Evelien; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Schmidt, Sabine; Riedesel, Svenja; Fujiwara, Osamu; Nakamura, Atsunori; Garrett, Ed; Heyvaert, Vanessa; Brückner, Helmut; De Batist, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Coastal Lake Hamana is located near the convergent tectonic boundary of the Nankai-Suruga Trough, along which the Philippine Sea slab is subducted underneath the Eurasian Plate, giving rise to repeated tsunamigenic megathrust earthquakes (Mw ≥ 8). A good understanding of the earthquake- and tsunami-triggering mechanisms is crucial in order to better estimate the complexity of seismic risks. Thanks to its accommodation space, Lake Hamana may represent a good archive for past events, such as tsunamis and tropical storms (typhoons), also referred to as "extreme wave" events. Characteristic event layers, consisting of sediment entrained by these extreme waves and their backwash, are witnesses of past marine incursions. By applying a broad range of surveying methods (reflection-seismic profiling, gravity coring, piston coring), sedimentological analyses (CT-scanning, XRF-scanning, multi-sensor core logging, grain size, microfossils etc.) and dating techniques (210Pb/137Cs, 14C, OSL, tephrochronology), we attempt to trace extreme wave event deposits in a multiproxy approach. Seismic imagery shows a vertical stacking of stronger reflectors, interpreted to be coarser-grained sheets deposited by highly energetic waves. Systematic sampling of lake bottom sediments along a transect from ocean-proximal to ocean-distal sites enables us to evaluate vertical and lateral changes in stratigraphy. Ocean-proximal, we observe a sequence of eight sandy units separated by silty background sediments, up to a depth of 8 m into the lake bottom. These sand layers quickly thin out and become finer-grained land-inward. Seismic-to-core correlations show a good fit between the occurrence of strong reflectors and sandy deposits, hence confirming presumptions based on acoustic imagery alone. Sand-rich intervals typically display a higher magnetic susceptibility, density and stronger X-ray attenuation. However, based on textural and structural differences, we can make the distinction between

  6. Cryogenic formation of brine and sedimentary mirabilite in submergent coastal lake basins, Canadian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasby, Stephen E.; Rod Smith, I.; Bell, Trevor; Forbes, Donald L.

    2013-06-01

    Two informally named basins (Mirabilite Basins 1 and 2) along a submergent coastline on Banks Island, Canadian Arctic Archipelago, host up to 1 m-thick accumulations of mirabilite (Na2SO4·10H2O) underlying stratified water bodies with basal anoxic brines. Unlike isostatically uplifting coastlines that trap seawater in coastal basins, these basins formed from freshwater lakes that were transgressed by seawater. The depth of the sill that separates the basins from the sea is shallow (1.15 m), such that seasonal sea ice formation down to 1.6 m isolates the basins from open water exchange through the winter. Freezing of seawater excludes salts, generating dense brines that sink to the basin bottom. Progressive freezing increases salinity of residual brines to the point of mirabilite saturation, and as a result sedimentary deposits of mirabilite accumulate on the basin floors. Brine formation also leads to density stratification and bottom water anoxia. We propose a model whereby summer melt of the ice cover forms a temporary freshwater lens, and rather than mixing with the underlying brines, it is exchanged with seawater once the ice plug that separates the basins from the open sea melts. This permits progressive brine development and density stratification within the basins.

  7. Zooplankton diversity and distribution in a deep and anoxic Mediterranean coastal lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. KEHAYIAS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The variation of the smaller size fraction of zooplankton was investigated during a two-year period in a brackish deep and anoxic coastal lake of western Greece (Aitoliko, along with the specific environmental characteristics of this ecosystem. The zooplanktonic community comprised a relatively small number of taxa and it was dominated by brackish-water calanoid copepods (Paracartia latisetosa, Calanipeda aquaedulcis and in certain periods by rotifers and tintinnids. The zooplankton abundance showed an increase in the warmer period starting from late spring and reached maximum values in July. In the well oxygenated surface layer, temperature was the most important parameter influencing the seasonal cycles of all groups. In contrast, the oxygen depletion a few meters under the surface affected the vertical distribution of most of the zooplankton groups, which were found restricted in the surface layer especially from spring until autumn. Only the meroplanktonic larvae of polychaetes presented increased proportions in the deeper layers. Salinity has not significantly influenced the zooplanktonic assemblages. The results point out the degraded status of the Aitoliko basin where the hypoxic/anoxic layers resulted to a high portion of dead organic material identified as copepod carcasses, and underlines the necessity of monitoring of this ecosystem.

  8. Chlamydial seasonal dynamics and isolation of 'Candidatus Neptunochlamydia vexilliferae' from a Tyrrhenian coastal lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzetti, Ilaria; Schulz, Frederik; Tyml, Tomáš; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Amann, Rudolf; Horn, Matthias; Fazi, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    The Chlamydiae are a phylum of obligate intracellular bacteria comprising important human and animal pathogens, yet their occurrence in the environment, their phylogenetic diversity and their host range has been largely underestimated. We investigated the seasonality of environmental chlamydiae in a Tyrrhenian coastal lake. By catalysed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization, we quantified the small planktonic cells and detected a peak in the abundance of environmental chlamydiae in early autumn with up to 5.9 × 10(4) cells ml(-1) . Super-resolution microscopy improved the visualization and quantification of these bacteria and enabled the detection of pleomorphic chlamydial cells in their protist host directly in an environmental sample. To isolate environmental chlamydiae together with their host, we applied a high-throughput limited dilution approach and successfully recovered a Vexillifera sp., strain harbouring chlamydiae (93% 16S rRNA sequence identity to Simkania negevensis), tentatively named 'Candidatus Neptunochlamydia vexilliferae'. Transmission electron microscopy in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to prove the intracellular location of these bacteria representing the first strain of marine chlamydiae stably maintained alongside with their host in a laboratory culture. Taken together, this study contributes to a better understanding of the distribution and diversity of environmental chlamydiae in previously neglected marine environments.

  9. Evaluation of factors influencing accumulation of stable Sr and Cs in lake and coastal fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, L; Bradshaw, C; Andersson, E; Lindqvist, D; Kautsky, U

    2016-08-01

    As a result of nuclear accidents and weapons tests, the radionuclides Cs-137 and Sr-90 are common contaminants in aquatic ecosystems. Concentration ratios (CR) based on concentrations of stable Cs and Sr in biota and media are used for the estimation of transfer of their radioisotopes for radiation dose calculations in environmental and human safety assessments. Available element-specific CRs vary by over an order of magnitude for similar organisms, thus affecting the dose estimates proportionally. The variation could be reduced if they were based on a better understanding of the influence of the underlying data and how that affects accumulation and potential biomagnification of stable Cs and Sr in aquatic organisms. For fish, relationships have been identified between water concentrations of K and CR of Cs-137, and between water concentrations of Ca and CR of Sr-90. This has not been confirmed for stable Cs and Sr in European waters. In this study, we analysed an existing dataset for stable Cs and Sr, as well as K and Ca, in four Swedish lakes and three Baltic Sea coastal areas, in order to understand the behaviour of these elements and their radioisotopes in these ecosystems. We found significant seasonal variations in the water concentrations of Cs, Sr, K and Ca, and in electrical conductivity (EC), especially in the lakes. CR values based on measurements taken at single or few time points may, therefore, be inaccurate or introduce unnecessarily large variation into risk assessments. Instead, we recommend incorporating information about the underlying variation in water concentrations into the CR calculations, for example by using the variation of the mean. The inverse relationships between fish CR(Cs)-[K]water and fish CR(Sr)-[Ca]water, confirmed that stable Cs and Sr follow the same trends as their radioisotopes. Thus, they can be used as proxies when radioisotope data are lacking. EC was also strongly correlated with K and Ca concentrations in the water and

  10. U.S. Coastal Lidar Elevation Data - Including the Great Lakes and Territories, 1996 - present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Coastal Services Center manages and distributes lidar data for the coastal United States, including territorial possessions via the Digital Coast Data...

  11. The new data on the seasonal distribution of diatoms in the Southern Baltic coastal lakes as a basis for diatom-based transfer functions to reconstruct past environmental changes in the Baltic coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzodkiewicz, Monika; Szpikowska, Grażyna; Woszczyk, Michał; Suchińska, Anita; Burchardt, Lubomira; Messyasz, Beata

    2016-04-01

    Lakes ecosystems are very sensitive to climate and environment changes. In lake sediments there are preserved remains of plant and animals that lived in the lake and its surroundings in the past. The species composition of past assemblages is a basis for quantitative and qualitative reconstruction of the past environmental changes (climate changes). One of the most commonly used bio-proxy for the reconstruction of lake development are subfossil diatoms which are sensitive to lake water pH, nutrient status, salinity and temperature. In this poster we present the new data from the coastal lakes on the Southern Baltic coast. The main goal of this research was to quantify the relationships between modern diatom assemblages and present-day environmental conditions. These relationships will be used to develop diatom-based transfer functions that will be applied to future studies of environmental change on the Polish Baltic coast. Water samples for diatom and chemical analyses were collected a few times per year between 2012 and 2014 from 12 coastal lakes located along the Polish Baltic coast as well as from the Baltic Sea. We analysed the whole phytoplankton composition. However the special focus was put on diatoms. At each site, a suite of important water quality parameters was collected, including chemical (e.g., chlorides, phosphorous and sulphur) and physical (e.g., Secchi depth) variables. Diatom assemblages from each site were counted and identified to the most specific taxonomic level possible. Diatom data were compiled for comparison to corresponding environmental data and development of indicator models. The results of the analysis show seasonal changes in diatom distribution as well as the chemical and physical water propertieswhich are mainly related to saltwater ingressions to the lakes. Lake Koprowo, Lake Resko Przymorskie, Lake Bukowo and Lake Łebsko are under the constant of seawater influence, which makes them similar to lagoons. In Lake Gardno seawater

  12. Sea level change and environmental evolution of coastal lakes in Vestfol d Hills, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Ecological end palaeoecological studies were carried out in a series of lakes in the Vestfold Hills (68°38'S, 78°06'E) on eastern Antarctic continent. Dynamics types of the lakes in environmental geomorphology and physic-chemistry, as well as features of biological community structures in different lakes were analyzed. Marine macro- and micro-fossils collected from the terraces and beaches surrounding these lakes and determined in 14C radiocarbon ages to be the Late Pleistocene, were used as evidences tc show the evolutionary processes of the lakes after sea level changes and transgressions since 18000 a B.P.. Basic modals of evolution for the lakes given in the paper could be regarded as not only explaining the history of environmental and ecological changes in VH lakes, and also reflecting of local environmental evolution in Antarctic region and global climate changes from past to present time.

  13. Evaluation of the Benefit of Flood Reduction by Artificial Groundwater Recharge Lake Operation in a Coastal Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Nuo; Tsai, Chih-Heng

    2017-04-01

    Inundation disasters often occur in the southwestern coastal plains of Taiwan. The coastal plains suffers mostly from land-subsidence, surface water is difficult to be drained during the typhoon period, leading to more severe flood disasters. Global climate warming has become more significant, which in turn has resulted in the increase in amplitude and frequency of climate change related disasters. In addition, climate change also induces a rise in sea water level year by year. The rise in sea water level does not only weakens the function of existing drainage system but also increases tidal levels and storm tide levels, which increases the probability and amount of inundation disasters. The serious land subsidence area at Linbian river basin was selected as the study area. An artificial groundwater recharge lake has been set up in Linbian river basin by Pingtung government. The development area of this lake is 58 hectare and the storage volume is 2.1 million cubic meters (210 × 104m3). The surface water from Linbian basin during a wet season is led into the artificial groundwater recharge lake by water diversion project, and then employ special hydro-geological conditions of the area for groundwater recharge, increase groundwater supply and decrease land subsidence rate, and incidentally some of the flood diversion, detention, reduce flooding. In this study, a Real-time Interactive Inundation Model is applied to simulate different flooding storage volume and gate operations to estimate the benefits of flood mitigation. According to the simulation results, the hydrograph shape, peak-flow reduction and time lag to peak of the flood reduction hydrograph into the lake are apparently different for each case of different gate operation at the same storage volume. Therefore, the effect of flood control and disaster mitigation is different. The flood control and disaster mitigation benefits are evaluated by different operation modes, which provide decision makers to

  14. Population structure of an invasive parthenogenetic gastropod in coastal lakes and estuaries of northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson A F Miranda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Estuaries and coastal lakes receive little attention despite being heavily invaded by non-indigenous invasive species (NIS. In these situations, studies of population dynamics in invaded habitats can provide valuable insights into how NIS interact with new environments. Tarebia granifera is a prosobranch gastropod from south-east Asia which has invaded other sub-tropical parts of the world. This study addresses whether a small number of key environmental factors influences gastropod communities, and specifically how the population density and size structure of T. granifera were influenced by environmental change in estuaries and coastal lakes in southern Africa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: T. granifera's density, number of brooded juveniles and size structure were measured at the St. Lucia Estuary, Mgobozeleni Estuary, Lake Sibaya and Lake Nhlange. Size structure was classified according to shell height (SH. All dissected individuals were found to be female and free from trematode infection. Salinity, water depth, temperature, and pH were the main factors correlated with population density of gastropod communities. T. granifera often reached densities well over 1000 ind. m(-2, displacing indigenous gastropods and becoming a dominant component of the benthic community. T. granifera successfully invaded estuaries despite frequent exposure to high salinity and desiccation, which could together eliminate >97% of the population. The persistence of T. granifera was ensured due to its high fecundity and the environmental tolerance of large adults (20-30 mm SH which carried an average of 158±12.8 SD brooded juveniles. Repeat introductions were not essential for the success of this parthenogenetic NIS. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: There is a need for a broader study on the reproductive biology of T. granifera (including the previously overlooked "brood pouch ecology", which affects population dynamics and may be relevant to other

  15. Land use mapping in Erie County, Pennsylvania: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); May, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility of mapping land use in the Great Lakes Basin area utilizing ERTS-1 data. Small streams were clearly defined by the presence of trees along their length in predominantly agricultural country. Field patterns were easily differentiated from forested areas; dairy and beef farms were differentiated from other farmlands, but no attempt was made to identify crops. Large railroad lines and major highway systems were identified. The city of Erie and several smaller towns were identified, as well as residential areas between these towns, and docks along the shoreline in Erie. Marshes, forests, and beaches within Presque Isle State Park were correctly identified, using the DCLUS program. Bay water was differentiated from lake water, with a small amount of misclassification.

  16. Planetary science: Eris under scrutiny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbis, Amanda

    2011-10-01

    A stellar occultation by the dwarf planet Eris provides a new estimate of its size. It also reveals a surprisingly bright planetary surface, which could indicate the relatively recent condensation of a putative atmosphere. See Letter p.493

  17. Mapping invasive Phragmites australis in the coastal Great Lakes with ALOS PALSAR satellite imagery for decision support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeau-Chavez, Laura L.; Kowalski, Kurt P.; Carlson Mazur, Martha L.; Scarbrough, Kirk A.; Powell, Richard B.; Brooks, Colin N.; Huberty, Brian; Jenkins, Liza K.; Banda, Elizabeth C.; Galbraith, David M.; Laubach, Zachary M.; Riordan, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The invasive variety of Phragmites australis (common reed) forms dense stands that can cause negative impacts on coastal Great Lakes wetlands including habitat degradation and reduced biological diversity. Early treatment is key to controlling Phragmites, therefore a map of the current distribution is needed. ALOS PALSAR imagery was used to produce the first basin-wide distribution map showing the extent of large, dense invasive Phragmites-dominated habitats in wetlands and other coastal ecosystems along the U.S. shore of the Great Lakes. PALSAR is a satellite imaging radar sensor that is sensitive to differences in plant biomass and inundation patterns, allowing for the detection and delineation of these tall (up to 5 m), high density, high biomass invasive Phragmites stands. Classification was based on multi-season ALOS PALSAR L-band (23 cm wavelength) HH and HV polarization data. Seasonal (spring, summer, and fall) datasets were used to improve discrimination of Phragmites by taking advantage of phenological changes in vegetation and inundation patterns over the seasons. Extensive field collections of training and randomly selected validation data were conducted in 2010–2011 to aid in mapping and for accuracy assessments. Overall basin-wide map accuracy was 87%, with 86% producer's accuracy and 43% user's accuracy for invasive Phragmites. The invasive Phragmites maps are being used to identify major environmental drivers of this invader's distribution, to assess areas vulnerable to new invasion, and to provide information to regional stakeholders through a decision support tool.

  18. Lake Erie Water Level Study. Main Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    of projection. That is, there will be no major development or modernization, except the Poe Lock which will be permitted to pass vessels of1,100 feet...of small "canallers," uneconomical and incapable of survival In an era of mass production and mass movement. Since the opening of the Poe Lock in...Member, July 13, 1977 to completion Chairman, July 13, 1977 to August 17, 1978 Allan C. Tedrow John M. Spratt New York Department of Environmental

  19. Western Lake Erie Restoration Assessment Dikes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is the output of a python script/ArcGIS model that identifes dikes as having a difference in elevation above a certain threshold. If the elevation...

  20. Western Lake Erie Restoration Assessment Composite Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Well-established conservation planning principles and techniques framed by geodesign were used to assess the restorability of areas that historically supported...

  1. The decline and restoration of a coastal lagoon (Lake Veere) in the Dutch Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, S.; Escaravage, V.L.; Daemen, E.; Hummel, H.

    2010-01-01

    The former tidal inlet Lake Veere was turned into a stagnant brackish lake in 1961. Ever since, the system has shown a continuous degradation. The current study shows the monitoring results for the macrozoobenthic communities and the abiotic conditions for the period 1990–2008. This includes the fir

  2. Water circulation and recharge pathways of coastal lakes along the southern Baltic Sea in northern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cieśliński Roman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe water circulation patterns for selected lakes found along the Baltic coast in northern Poland and to determine primary recharge mechanisms or pathways that produce an influx or loss of lake water. A secondary purpose of the paper is to determine the magnitude of recharge for each studied source of water – river water influx, surface runoff from direct catchments, forced influx from polders surrounding lakes, and periodic marine water intrusions from the nearby Baltic Sea. It is also important to determine the magnitude of water outflow from lakes to the sea via existing linkages as well as to compare horizontal influx and outflow data. The study area consisted of five lakes located along the Baltic Sea in northern Poland: Łebsko, Gardno, Bukowo, Kopań, Resko Przymorskie. The main driving force of the studied lakes are large rivers that drain lake catchment areas and periodic brackish water intrusions by the Baltic Sea.

  3. EXOTIC AND INVASIVE AQUATIC PLANTS IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS: DISTRIBUTION AND RELATION TO WATERSHED LAND USE AND PLANT RICHNESS AND COVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manuscript provides previously unavailable information to researchers and managers concerning exotic plants in the Great Lakes...This work arises out of our broader efforts to describe biota - habitat relationships in coastal wetlands, and as such falls under Aquatic Stresso...

  4. ALL THAT "PHRAG": BRINGING ENGINEERING, WETLAND ECOLOGY, ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE, AND LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY TO BEAR ON THE QUESTION OF COMMON REED IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal wetlands are among the most fragmented and disturbed ecosystems and the Great Lakes are no exception. One possible result is the observed increase in the presence and dominance of invasive and other opportunistic plant species, such as the common reed (Phragmites australi...

  5. Energy and nutrient flows connecting coastal wetland food webs to land and lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both landscape character and hydrologic forces (principally, tributary discharge and seiches) can influence utilization of externally-derived energy and nutrients in coastal wetland food webs. We quantified the contribution of internal vs external energy and nutrients among wetla...

  6. The ERIS adaptive optics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, A.; Esposito, S.; Agapito, G.; Antichi, J.; Biliotti, V.; Blain, C.; Briguglio, R.; Busoni, L.; Carbonaro, L.; Di Rico, G.; Giordano, C.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Spanò, P.; Xompero, M.; Baruffolo, A.; Kasper, M.; Egner, S.; Suàrez Valles, M.; Soenke, C.; Downing, M.; Reyes, J.

    2016-07-01

    ERIS is the new AO instrument for VLT-UT4 led by a Consortium of Max-Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, UK-ATC, ETH-Zurich, ESO and INAF. The ERIS AO system provides NGS mode to deliver high contrast correction and LGS mode to extend high Strehl performance to large sky coverage. The AO module includes NGS and LGS wavefront sensors and, with VLT-AOF Deformable Secondary Mirror and Laser Facility, will provide AO correction to the high resolution imager NIX (1-5um) and the IFU spectrograph SPIFFIER (1-2.5um). In this paper we present the preliminary design of the ERIS AO system and the estimated correction performance.

  7. The ERIS Adaptive Optics System

    CERN Document Server

    Riccardi, A; Agapito, G; Antichi, J; Biliotti, V; Blain, C; Briguglio, R; Busoni, L; Carbonaro, L; Di Rico, G; Giordano, C; Pinna, E; Puglisi, A; Spanò, P; Xompero, M; Baruffolo, A; Kasper, M; Egner, S; Valles, M Suàrez; Soenke, C; Downing, M; Reyes, J

    2016-01-01

    ERIS is the new AO instrument for VLT-UT4 led by a Consortium of Max-Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, UK-ATC, ETH-Zurich, ESO and INAF. The ERIS AO system provides NGS mode to deliver high contrast correction and LGS mode to extend high Strehl performance to large sky coverage. The AO module includes NGS and LGS wavefront sensors and, with VLT-AOF Deformable Secondary Mirror and Laser Facility, will provide AO correction to the high resolution imager NIX (1-5um) and the IFU spectrograph SPIFFIER (1-2.5um). In this paper we present the preliminary design of the ERIS AO system and the estimated correction performance.

  8. Monitoring and assessment of a eutrophicated coastal lake using multivariate approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.G. Abhjna

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate statistical techniques such as cluster analysis, multidimensional scaling and principal component analysis were applied to evaluate the temporal and spatial variations in water quality data set generated for two years (2008-2010 from six monitoring stations of Veli-Akkulam Lake and compared with a regional reference lake Vellayani of south India. Seasonal variations of 14 different physicochemical parameters analyzed were as follows: pH (6.42-7.48, water temperature (26.0-31.28°C, salinity (0.50-26.81 ppt, electrical conductivity (47-20656.31 µs/cm, dissolved oxygen (0.078-7.65 mg/L, free carbon-dioxide (3.8-51.8 mg/L, total hardness (27.20-2166.6 mg/L, total dissolved solids (84.66-4195 mg/L, biochemical oxygen demand (1.57-25.78 mg/L, chemical oxygen demand (5.35-71.14 mg/L, nitrate (0.012-0.321 µg/ml, nitrite (0.24-0.79 µg/ml, phosphate (0.04-5.88 mg/L, and sulfate (0.27-27.8 mg/L. Cluster analysis showed four clusters based on the similarity of water quality characteristics among sampling stations during three different seasons (pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon. Multidimensional scaling in conjunction with cluster analysis identified four distinct groups of sites with varied water quality conditions such as upstream, transitional and downstream conditions  in Veli-Akkulam Lake and a reference condition at Vellayani Lake. Principal Component Analysis showed that Veli-Akkulam Lake was seriously deteriorated in water quality while acceptable water quality conditions were observed at reference lake Vellayani. Thus the present study could estimate the effectiveness of multivariate statistical approaches for assessing water quality conditions in lakes.

  9. The Holocene environmental history of a small coastal lake on the north-eastern Kamchatka Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovieva, N.; Klimaschewski, A.; Self, A. E.; Jones, V. J.; Andrén, E.; Andreev, A. A.; Hammarlund., D.; Lepskaya, E. V.; Nazarova, L.

    2015-11-01

    A radiocarbon and tephra-dated sediment core from Lifebuoy Lake, located on the north-east coast of Kamchatka Peninsula, was analysed for pollen, spores, diatoms, chironomids and tephra in order to uncover regional environmental history. The 6500-year environmental history of Lifebuoy Lake correlates with the broad regional patterns of vegetation development and climate dynamics with both diatoms and chironomids showing near-synchronous changes. Between ca. 6300 and 3900 cal yr BP, the lake ecosystem was naturally enriched, with several Stephanodiscus species dominating the diatom plankton. This natural eutrophication state is likely to be due to a combination of the base-rich catchment geology, the fertilisation effect of several fires in the catchment, silica input from tephra layers and, possibly, nitrogen input from seabirds. The substantial tephra deposit at about 3850 cal yr BP might have stopped sedimentary phosphorus from entering the lake water thus decreasing the trophic state of the lake and facilitating the shift in diatom composition to a benthic Fragiliariaceae complex. Both diatoms and chironomids showed simultaneous compositional changes, which are also reflected by statistically significant changes in their rates of change 300-400 years after the arrival of Pinus pumila in the lake catchment. The rapid increase in both total diatom concentration and the percentage abundance of the large heavy species, Aulacoseira subarctica might be a response to the change in timing and intensity of lake spring turn-over due to the changes in the patterns of North Pacific atmospheric circulation, most notably westward shift of the Aleutian Low. The two highest peaks in A. subarctica abundance at Lifebouy Lake occurred during opposite summer temperature inferences: the earlier peak (3500-2900 cal yr BP) coincided with warm summers and the latter peak (300 cal yr BP-present) occurred during the cold summer period. These imply that A. subarctica shows no direct

  10. Impacts of Precipitation on Pathogens and a Fecal Indicator in a Tributary and Near-Coastal Area of Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepp, R. G.; Molina, M.; Cyterski, M.; Whelan, G.; Parmar, R.; Wolfe, K.; Villegas, E. N.; Corsi, S. R.; Borchardt, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Great Lakes have over 100 tributaries contributing a variety of pollutants, including pathogens. This loading results in contamination of near coastal sites on the lakes by pathogens and fecal indicator bacteria, such as enterococci. Here, we present data, relationships and modeling tools for evaluating exposure to microorganisms in Lake Michigan near Manitowoc, WI and in the Manitowoc River, a tributary that flows into Lake Michigan at Manitowoc. Increased precipitation and subsequent runoff during a basin-wide storm in June 2011 caused an order of magnitude increase in riverine discharge, a 100-fold increase in enterococci densities and a doubling of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the river. CDOM is a UV-protective substance that decreases UV inactivation of enterococci and most pathogens. Water samples were collected at four riverine sites including at a USGS gage station with large-volume pathogen sampling equipment, one beach site at Lake Michigan and at a nearby stormwater outflow. Potential sources of microbial contamination include agricultural activities such as manure application and wastewater treatment effluent; therefore, additional samples were collected from the effluent stream of the Manitowoc Wastewater Treatment Facility and manure from spreading trucks. Pathogens measured included Campylobacter jejuni, E. coli O157:H7, Enterovirus - 5' UTR , Adenovirus Groups A , B, C, D, and F, Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis. Meteorological data were also collected at nearby weather stations and water-quality data such as turbidity, temperature, conductivity, and chlorophyll were also measured. Three acoustic doppler current profilers were located between the river mouth and the beach to measure current movements. The data were analyzed using modeling infrastructure technologies (FRAMES, D4EM and SuperMUSE) coupled with hydrodynamic and water quality models (HSPF, WASP, HEC-RAS, FVCOM and MRA-IT) and the Virtual Beach 3.0 statistical

  11. Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  12. Spatiotemporal assessment of water chemistry in intermittently open/closed coastal lakes of Southern Baltic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astel, Aleksander M.; Bigus, Katarzyna; Obolewski, Krystian; Glińska-Lewczuk, Katarzyna

    2016-12-01

    Ionic profile, pH, electrolytic conductivity, chemical oxygen demand and concentration of selected heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Zn, Fe and Mn) were determined in water of 11 intermittently closed and open lakes and lagoons (ICOLLs) located in Polish coastline. Multidimensional data set was explored by the use of the self-organizing map (SOM) technique to avoid supervised and predictable division for fully isolated, partially and fully connected lakes. Water quality assessment based on single parameter's mean value allowed classification of majority of lakes to first or second class of purity according to regulation presenting classification approach applicable to uniform parts of surface waters. The SOM-based grouping revealed seven clusters comprising water samples of similar physico-chemical profile. Fully connected lakes were characterized by the highest concentration of components characteristic for sea salts (NaCl, MgCl2, MgSO4, CaSO4, K2SO4 and MgBr2), however spring samples from Łebsko were shifted to another cluster suggesting that intensive surface run-off and fresh-water inflow through Łupawa river decreases an impact of sea water intrusions. Forecasted characteristic of water collected in Resko Przymorskie lake was disturbed by high contamination by nitrites indicating accidental and local contamination due to usage of sodium nitrite for the curing of meat. Some unexpected sources of contamination was discovered in intermittently open and closed lakes. Presumably Zn contamination is due to use of wood preservatives to protect small wooden playgrounds or camping places spread around one of the lake, while increased concentration of Ni could be connected with grass and vegetation burning. Waters of Jamno lake are under the strongest anthropogenic impact due to inefficient removal of phosphates by waste water treatment plant and contamination by Fe and Mn caused by backwashing of absorption filters. Generally, the quality of ICOLLs' water was diversified, while

  13. Bathymetry and selected perspective views of 6 reef and coastal areas in Northern Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Peter; Fleisher, Guy; Gardner, James V.; Lee, Kristen

    2003-01-01

    We apply state of the art laser technology and derivative imagery to map the detailed morphology and of principal lake trout spawning sites on reefs in Northern Lake Michigan and to provide a geologic interpretation. We sought to identify the presence of ideal spawning substrate: shallow, "clean" gravel/cobble substrate, adjacent to deeper water. This study is a pilot collaborative effort with the US Army Corps of Engineers SHOALS (Scanning Hydrographic Operational Airborne Lidar Survey) program. The high-definition maps are integrated with known and developing data on fisheries, as well as limited substrate sedimentologic information and underlying Paleozoic carbonate rocks.

  14. Developing Remote Sensing Products for Monitoring and Modeling Great Lakes Coastal Wetland Vulnerability to Climate Change and Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeau-Chavez, L. L.; Miller, M. E.; Battaglia, M.; Banda, E.; Endres, S.; Currie, W. S.; Elgersma, K. J.; French, N. H. F.; Goldberg, D. E.; Hyndman, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Spread of invasive plant species in the coastal wetlands of the Great Lakes is degrading wetland habitat, decreasing biodiversity, and decreasing ecosystem services. An understanding of the mechanisms of invasion is crucial to gaining control of this growing threat. To better understand the effects of land use and climatic drivers on the vulnerability of coastal zones to invasion, as well as to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of invasion, research is being conducted that integrates field studies, process-based ecosystem and hydrological models, and remote sensing. Spatial data from remote sensing is needed to parameterize the hydrological model and to test the outputs of the linked models. We will present several new remote sensing products that are providing important physiological, biochemical, and landscape information to parameterize and verify models. This includes a novel hybrid radar-optical technique to delineate stands of invasives, as well as natural wetland cover types; using radar to map seasonally inundated areas not hydrologically connected; and developing new algorithms to estimate leaf area index (LAI) using Landsat. A coastal map delineating wetland types including monocultures of the invaders (Typha spp. and Phragmites austrailis) was created using satellite radar (ALOS PALSAR, 20 m resolution) and optical data (Landsat 5, 30 m resolution) fusion from multiple dates in a Random Forests classifier. These maps provide verification of the integrated model showing areas at high risk of invasion. For parameterizing the hydrological model, maps of seasonal wetness are being developed using spring (wet) imagery and differencing that with summer (dry) imagery to detect the seasonally wet areas. Finally, development of LAI remote sensing high resolution algorithms for uplands and wetlands is underway. LAI algorithms for wetlands have not been previously developed due to the difficulty of a water background. These products are being used to

  15. Baseline coastal oblique aerial photographs collected from Calcasieu Lake, Louisiana, to Brownsville, Texas, September 9-10, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Karen L. M.; Karen A. Westphal,

    2016-04-28

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project, conducts baseline and storm-response photography missions to document and understand the changes in vulnerability of the Nation's coasts to extreme storms (Morgan, 2009). On September 9-10, 2008, the USGS conducted an oblique aerial photographic survey from Calcasieu Lake, Louisiana, to Brownsville, Texas, aboard a Cessna C-210 (aircraft) at an altitude of 500 feet (ft) and approximately 1,000 ft offshore. This mission was flown to collect baseline data for assessing incremental changes of the beach and nearshore area, and the data can be used in the assessment of future coastal change.The photographs provided in this report are Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) images. ExifTool was used to add the following to the header of each photo: time of collection, Global Positioning System (GPS) latitude, GPS longitude, keywords, credit, artist (photographer), caption, copyright, and contact information. The photograph locations are an estimate of the position of the aircraft at the time the photograph was taken and do not indicate the location of any feature in the images (see the Navigation Data page). These photographs document the state of the barrier islands and other coastal features at the time of the survey. Pages containing thumbnail images of the photographs, referred to as contact sheets, were created in 5-minute segments of flight time. These segments can be found on the Photos and Maps page. Photographs can be opened directly with any JPEG-compatible image viewer by clicking on a thumbnail on the contact sheet.In addition to the photographs, a Google Earth Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file is provided and can be used to view the images by clicking on the marker and then clicking on either the thumbnail or the link above the thumbnail. The KML file was created using the photographic navigation files. The KML file can be found in the kml folder.

  16. Geophysical, isotopic, and hydrogeochemical tools to identify potential impacts on coastal groundwater resources from Urmia hypersaline Lake, NW Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Vahab; Nakhaei, Mohammad; Lak, Razyeh; Kholghi, Majid

    2016-08-01

    Measurements of major ions, trace elements, water-stable isotopes, and geophysical soundings were made to examine the interaction between Urmia Aquifer (UA) and Urmia Lake (UL), northwest Iran. The poor correlation between sampling depth and Cl(-) concentrations indicated that the position of freshwater-saltwater interface is not uniformly distributed in the study area, and this was attributed to aquifer heterogeneities. The targeted coastal wells showed B/Cl and Br/Cl molar ratios in the range of 0.0022-2.43 and 0.00032-0.28, respectively. The base-exchange index (BEI) and saturation index (SI) calculations showed that the salinization process followed by cation-exchange reactions mainly controls changes in the chemical composition of groundwater. All groundwater samples are depleted with respect to δ(18)O (-11.71 to -9.4 ‰) and δD (-66.26 to -48.41 ‰). The δ(18)O and δD isotope ratios for surface and groundwater had a similar range and showed high deuterium excess (d-excess) (21.11 to 31.16 ‰). The high d-excess in water samples is because of incoming vapors from the UL mixed with an evaporated moisture flux from the Urmia mainland and incoming vapors from the west (i.e., Mediterranean Sea). Some saline samples with low B/Cl and Br/Cl ratios had depleted δ(18)O and δD. In this case, due to freshwater flushing, the drilled wells in the coastal playas and salty sediments could have more depleted isotopes, more Cl(-), and consequently smaller B/Cl and Br/Cl ratios. Moreover, the results of hydrochemical facies evolution (HFE) diagram showed that because of the existence fine-grained sediments saturated with high density saltwater in the coastal areas that act as a natural barrier, increasing the groundwater exploitation leads to movement of freshwaters from recharge zones in the western mountains not saltwater from UL. The highly permeable sediments at the junction of the rivers to the lake are characterized by low hydraulic gradient and high

  17. Coastal processes along the shorefront of Chilka Lake, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, P.; SanilKumar, V.; Nayak, B.U.

    Chilka Lake (Orissa, India) inlet mouth is exposed to high annual littoral drift of about 1 x 10 super(6) m super(3). The inlet mouth was observed to migrate about 500 m northward during the period of one year study. Measurement on daily longshore...

  18. Distribution of Gull Specific Molecular Marker in Coastal Areas of Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulls have been implicated as primary sources of fecal contamination in the Great Lakes, a fact that may have health implications due to the potential spread of microbial pathogens by waterfowl. To better understand the spatial variability of gull fecal contamination, a gull-spe...

  19. Late-Holocene to recent evolution of Lake Patria, South Italy: An example of a coastal lagoon within a Mediterranean delta system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, M.; Molisso, F.; Pacifico, A.; Vigliotti, M.; Sabbarese, C.; Ruberti, D.

    2014-06-01

    Lake Patria is a mesoaline coastal lagoon that develops along the coastal zone of the Volturno River plain (Campania, South Italy). The lagoon is a saline to brackish water body, ca. 2.0 long, and 1.5 km wide, with an average water depth of 1.5 m, reaching a maximum of ca. 3.0 m. The freshwater input into the lagoon is provided by a series of fresh to brackish water channels and small springs, landwards, while a permanent connection with the Tyrrhenian Sea is provided by a channel, 1.5 km long and a few meters wide. Drilling data from 12 boreholes acquired in the study area indicate that Lake Patria is a man-modified remnant of a larger lagoonal area that developed during the last millennia along the Campania coastal zone within an alluvial delta system at the mouth of the paleo-Volturno River. Sedimentological and stratigraphic analyses of drill cores suggest that the lower Volturno delta plain developed in the last 6000 years. Depositional conditions during this period were dominated by flood-plain and alluvial plain settings, with transition to coastal bars and associated back-barrier coastal lagoons. Lake Patria started evolving at an early stage of the Volturno delta plain formation as a consequence of foreshore deposits damming-up by littoral drift. The first marine layers display a radiocarbon age of ca. 4.8 ka BP and overlie a substrate represented by volcaniclastic deposits, originated by the Campi Flegrei, and associated paleosols. The lagoonal succession cored at Lake Patria may be interpreted as the result of a dynamic equilibrium between marine influence and riverine input into the lagoonal system through time, and has been tentatively correlated with the major climatic changes that occurred during Mid-Late Holocene. Insights into the recentmost evolution of the coastal lagoon of Lake Patria are provided by the GIS-based analysis of the physiographic changes of the region conducted on a series of historical topographic maps dating back to the early

  20. [Content of natural uranium in the lichens and distribution of forms in the soil at the coastal area of Lakes Itkul and Sinara of Chelyabinsk region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyudina, A L; Deryagin, V V; Levina, S G

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of natural uranium in soils superaquatic and transeluvial positions of the coastal landscape of lakes Itkul and Sinara, and liches on this site.The necessity of analysis of the content item in accordance with its form of occurrence in the natural environment. The peculiarities of the migration, accumulation and distribution of uranium in soils of the mountain areas of the watersheds of lakes Itkul and Sinara are found. Identified of specificity species lichens on the content of uranium in the substrate.

  1. Factors affecting the distribution of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides in the coastal Burullus Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Reefy, H I; Badran, H M; Sharshar, T; Hilal, M A; Elnimr, T

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, measurements of naturally occurring radioactive materials and (137)Cs activity in sediment were conducted for locations covering the entire Burullus Lake in order to gather information about radionuclides mobility and distribution. Low-background γ-spectrometry was employed to determine the activity concentrations of water and sediment samples. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra and (232)Th are close to uniform distribution in the lake environment. Among the different physical and chemical characteristics measured for water and sediment, only salinity and total organic matter content have the potential to affect the mobility of (137)Cs and (40)K. The results suggest that these two radionuclides are attached to different mobile particulates. Increasing salinity tends to strengthen the adsorption of (137)Cs and solubilization of (40)K in sediment. On the other hand, sediment with high organic matter content traps (137)Cs and (40)K associated particulates to bottom sediment.

  2. Spatial variability in chromophoric dissolved organic matter for an artificial coastal lake (Shiwha) and the upstream catchments at two different seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phong, Diep Dinh; Lee, Yeonjung; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Hur, Jin

    2014-06-01

    Selected water quality parameters and spectroscopic characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were examined during two different seasons for an artificial coastal lake (Shiwha Lake in South Korea), which are affected by seawater exchange due to the operation of a tidal power plant and external organic loadings from the upstream catchments. The coastal lake exhibited much lower concentrations of organic matter and nutrients than the upstream sources. The spectroscopic properties of the lake DOM were easily distinguished from those of the catchment sources as revealed by a lower absorption coefficient, lower degree of humification, and higher spectral slopes. The observed DOM properties suggest that the lake DOM may be dominated by smaller molecular size and less condensed structures. For the lake and the upper streams, higher absorption coefficients and fluorescence peak intensities but lower spectral slopes and humification index were found for the premonsoon versus the monsoon season. However, such seasonal differences were less pronounced for the industrial channels in the upper catchments. Three distinctive fluorophore groups including microbial humic-like, tryptophan-like, and terrestrial humic-like fluorescence were decomposed from the fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) of the DOM samples by parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modeling. The microbial humic-like component was the most abundant for the industrial channels, suggesting that the component may be associated with anthropogenic organic pollution. The terrestrial humic-like component was predominant for the upper streams, and its relative abundance was higher for the rainy season. Our principal component analysis (PCA) results demonstrated that exchange of seawater and seasonally variable input of allochthonous DOM plays important roles in determining the characteristics of DOM in the lake.

  3. Hydrochemical investigations for delineating salt-water intrusion into the coastal aquifer of Maharlou Lake, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshahi, Reza; Zare, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    Groundwater quality depends on different factors such as geology, lithology, properties of aquifer, land use, the physical condition of boundaries etc. Studying these factors can help users to manage groundwater quality. This study deals with the groundwater quality of an aquifer located in the southeastern part of Maharlou salt lake, Iran. This lake is located in the southeast of Shiraz and is the outlet of Shiraz sewages. Due to overexploitation of groundwater from the aquifer, the gradient of water table is from the lake towards the aquifer and therefore, saline water migrates to the aquifer. The phenomenon of salt water intrusion contributes to the deterioration of groundwater. In this research, groundwater types, maps of iso EC and iso ions, ion exchange in the mixing of fresh and salt water, salinity variation of the groundwater in the profile of well water column, and the salinity-time variation of the groundwater were studied. The gradual increase of the salinity of groundwater with depth from top to down in the aquifer indicates that salt water is located under fresh water. The time variation of physical and chemical parameters in the groundwater discharged from a well shows that the saline water in the bottom of the aquifer moves upward and destroys the quality of groundwater in the study area. Furthermore, Sachoun geological formation formed by evaporate deposits and evaporation from shallow groundwater are two other factors which decrease the groundwater quality.

  4. ERIS: preliminary design phase overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntschner, Harald; Jochum, Lieselotte; Amico, Paola; Dekker, Johannes K.; Kerber, Florian; Marchetti, Enrico; Accardo, Matteo; Brast, Roland; Brinkmann, Martin; Conzelmann, Ralf D.; Delabre, Bernard A.; Duchateau, Michel; Fedrigo, Enrico; Finger, Gert; Frank, Christoph; Rodriguez, Fernando G.; Klein, Barbara; Knudstrup, Jens; Le Louarn, Miska; Lundin, Lars; Modigliani, Andrea; Müller, Michael; Neeser, Mark; Tordo, Sebastien; Valenti, Elena; Eisenhauer, Frank; Sturm, Eckhard; Feuchtgruber, Helmut; George, Elisabeth M.; Hartl, Michael; Hofmann, Reiner; Huber, Heinrich; Plattner, Markus P.; Schubert, Josef; Tarantik, Karl; Wiezorrek, Erich; Meyer, Michael R.; Quanz, Sascha P.; Glauser, Adrian M.; Weisz, Harald; Esposito, Simone; Xompero, Marco; Agapito, Guido; Antichi, Jacopo; Biliotti, Valdemaro; Bonaglia, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Carbonaro, Luca; Cresci, Giovanni; Fini, Luca; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio T.; Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Riccardi, Armando; Di Rico, Gianluca; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Dolci, Mauro

    2014-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the next-generation adaptive optics near-IR imager and spectrograph for the Cassegrain focus of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) Unit Telescope 4, which will soon make full use of the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). It is a high-Strehl AO-assisted instrument that will use the Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF). The project has been approved for construction and has entered its preliminary design phase. ERIS will be constructed in a collaboration including the Max- Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich and the Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri and will offer 1 - 5 μm imaging and 1 - 2.5 μm integral field spectroscopic capabilities with a high Strehl performance. Wavefront sensing can be carried out with an optical high-order NGS Pyramid wavefront sensor, or with a single laser in either an optical low-order NGS mode, or with a near-IR low-order mode sensor. Due to its highly sensitive visible wavefront sensor, and separate near-IR low-order mode, ERIS provides a large sky coverage with its 1' patrol field radius that can even include AO stars embedded in dust-enshrouded environments. As such it will replace, with a much improved single conjugated AO correction, the most scientifically important imaging modes offered by NACO (diffraction limited imaging in the J to M bands, Sparse Aperture Masking and Apodizing Phase Plate (APP) coronagraphy) and the integral field spectroscopy modes of SINFONI, whose instrumental module, SPIFFI, will be upgraded and re-used in ERIS. As part of the SPIFFI upgrade a new higher resolution grating and a science detector replacement are envisaged, as well as PLC driven motors. To accommodate ERIS at the Cassegrain focus, an extension of the telescope back focal length is required, with modifications of the guider arm assembly. In this paper we report on the status of the

  5. Lake whitefish diet, condition, and energy density in Lake Champlain and the lower four Great Lakes following dreissenid invasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Seth J.; Marsden, J. Ellen; Lantry, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Lake Whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis support some of the most valuable commercial freshwater fisheries in North America. Recent growth and condition decreases in Lake Whitefish populations in the Great Lakes have been attributed to the invasion of the dreissenid mussels, zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha and quagga mussels D. bugensis, and the subsequent collapse of the amphipod, Diporeia, a once-abundant high energy prey source. Since 1993, Lake Champlain has also experienced the invasion and proliferation of zebra mussels, but in contrast to the Great Lakes, Diporeia were not historically abundant. We compared the diet, condition, and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain after the dreissenid mussel invasion to values for those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario. Lake Whitefish were collected using gill nets and bottom trawls, and their diets were quantified seasonally. Condition was estimated using Fulton's condition factor (K) and by determining energy density. In contrast to Lake Whitefish from some of the Great Lakes, those from Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish did not show a dietary shift towards dreissenid mussels, but instead fed primarily on fish eggs in spring, Mysis diluviana in summer, and gastropods and sphaeriids in fall and winter. Along with these dietary differences, the condition and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain were high compared with those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario after the dreissenid invasion, and were similar to Lake Whitefish from Lake Erie; fish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario consumed dreissenids, whereas fish from Lake Erie did not. Our comparisons of Lake Whitefish populations in Lake Champlain to those in the Great Lakes indicate that diet and condition of Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish were not negatively affected by the dreissenid mussel invasion.

  6. Immune factors and fatty acid composition in human milk from river/lake, coastal and inland regions of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urwin, Heidi J; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Yixiong; Wang, Chunrong; Li, Lixiang; Song, Pengkun; Man, Qingqing; Meng, Liping; Frøyland, Livar; Miles, Elizabeth A; Calder, Philip C; Yaqoob, Parveen

    2013-06-01

    Breast milk fatty acid composition may be affected by the maternal diet during gestation and lactation. The influence of dietary and breastmilk fatty acids on breast milk immune factors is poorly defined. We determined the fatty acid composition and immune factor concentrations of breast milk from women residing in river/lake, coastal and inland regions of China, which differ in their consumption of lean fish and oily fish. Breast milk samples were collected on days 3–5 (colostrum), 14 and 28 post-partum (PP) and analysed for soluble CD14 (sCD14), transforming growth factor (TGF)-b1, TGF-b2, secretory IgA (sIgA) and fatty acids. The fatty acid composition of breast milk differed between the regions and with time PP. The concentrations of all four immune factors in breast milk decreased over time, with sCD14, sIgA and TGF-b1 being highest in the colostrum in the river and lake region. Breast milk DHA and arachidonic acid (AA) were positively associated, and g-linolenic acid and EPA negatively associated, with the concentrations of each of the four immune factors. In conclusion, breast milk fatty acids and immune factors differ between the regions in China characterised by different patterns of fish consumption and change during the course of lactation. A higher breast milk DHA and AA concentration is associated with higher concentrations of immune factors in breast milk, suggesting a role for these fatty acids in promoting gastrointestinal and immune maturation of the infant.

  7. Environmental quality evaluation of lakes in the Rio Grande do Sul coastal plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina da Silva Pedrozo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the environmental quality of Marcelino, Pinguela, Peixoto, Palmital, Malvas and Do Passo lakes, interconnected by canals and located in the district of Osório, RS. In this context, 29 physical and chemical variables were analyzed with sampling carried out in January, May, July and October 1997 to verify the environmental quality of the system and the existence of a gradient of quality. Canonical Analysis was applied to the data of all environmental variables measured, and showed that the lakes had different characteristics as a consequence of the organic pollution received. Marcelino lake received continuous input of organic matter from the sewage treatment works in the town of Osório, whereas Peixoto, Pinguela, Palmital, Malvas and Do Passo lakes resembled other water bodies described in the region, not showing, so far, signs of degradation caused by the input of effluents. Principal Component Analysis selected environmental element were directly linked to organic pollution, that reflected sequential non-recent effects of contamination.O propósito do presente estudo foi avaliar a qualidade ambiental das lagoas Marcelino, Pinguela, Peixoto, Palmital, Malvas e Lagoa do Passo, ecossistemas interligados nesta seqüência por canais e localizados próximos a cidade de Osório, Rio Grande do Sul. Foram analisadas vinte e nove variáveis ambientais físicas e químicas no período de janeiro, maio, julho e outubro de 1997. Constatou-se, através de uma análise de discriminantes canônicos utilizando-se as variáveis ambientais, que as lagoas apresentaram características limnológicas diferenciadas em função do aporte dos efluentes urbanos: a lagoa Marcelino mostrou contaminação orgânica e foi separada das demais lagoas evidenciando um gradiente de qualidade ambiental. Posteriormente, uma análise de componentes principais diferenciou as estações amostrais selecionando descritores ambientais

  8. Controls on groundwater dynamics and root zone aeration of a coastal fluvial delta island, Wax Lake, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, M.; Hardison, A. K.; Moffett, K. B.

    2013-12-01

    Louisiana coastal wetlands are thought to function as buffers, filtering nutrient-rich terrestrial runoff as it travels to the Gulf of Mexico. While surface water filtration by these wetlands is a large and active area of research, flow through subsurface portions of the wetlands and possible nutrient cycling in the root zone has been largely overlooked. Specifically for Louisiana's coastal deltas, the physics and chemistry of island groundwater systems is unknown.To characterize these subsurface hydraulic dynamics at Pintail Island in the Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana, we collected sediment core samples and penetrometer measurements, monitored surface water and groundwater levels and chemistry, and analyzed meteorological, tidal, and river discharge data. As a first step, we focused on identifying wetland sediment properties and the relative influence of the major hydrologic controls, tides, delta outlet discharge, rainfall, and evapotranspiration, on water table dynamics. Pintail Island is a two-layer system with fine sediments and organic matter overlying sandy deltaic deposits. The sediment layer interface occurs approximately 60 cm below ground surface, around the mean surface water level. The vegetation root zone is concentrated in the surficial layer, although willow roots can extend into the deeper, higher-permeability sandy layer. Groundwater data from the upper portion of this sandy layer (~1m deep) is most strongly influenced by tides but also responds to long-term changes in discharge. While the tides are damped as they propagate into the island sediments, they also flood interior island lagoons, setting up groundwater gradients to potentially drive fluid and nutrient fluxes through the islands. Although the tidally oscillating water table causes significant temporal variation in root zone fluid potentials, evapotranspiration dynamics do not appear to strongly influence groundwater dynamics at depth, consistent with the shallow concentration of roots

  9. Spatial variation in landscape-level CO2 and CH4 fluxes from arctic coastal tundra: influence from vegetation, wetness, and the thaw lake cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturtevant, Cove S; Oechel, Walter C

    2013-09-01

    Regional quantification of arctic CO2 and CH4 fluxes remains difficult due to high landscape heterogeneity coupled with a sparse measurement network. Most of the arctic coastal tundra near Barrow, Alaska is part of the thaw lake cycle, which includes current thaw lakes and a 5500-year chronosequence of vegetated thaw lake basins. However, spatial variability in carbon fluxes from these features remains grossly understudied. Here, we present an analysis of whole-ecosystem CO2 and CH4 fluxes from 20 thaw lake cycle features during the 2011 growing season. We found that the thaw lake cycle was largely responsible for spatial variation in CO2 flux, mostly due to its control on gross primary productivity (GPP). Current lakes were significant CO2 sources that varied little. Vegetated basins showed declining GPP and CO2 sink with age (R(2) = 67% and 57%, respectively). CH4 fluxes measured from a subset of 12 vegetated basins showed no relationship with age or CO2 flux components. Instead, higher CH4 fluxes were related to greater landscape wetness (R(2) = 57%) and thaw depth (additional R(2) = 28%). Spatial variation in CO2 and CH4 fluxes had good satellite remote sensing indicators, and we estimated the region to be a small CO2 sink of -4.9 ± 2.4 (SE) g C m(-2) between 11 June and 25 August, which was countered by a CH4 source of 2.1 ± 0.2 (SE) g C m(-2) . Results from our scaling exercise showed that developing or validating regional estimates based on single tower sites can result in significant bias, on average by a factor 4 for CO2 flux and 30% for CH4 flux. Although our results are specific to the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska, the degree of landscape-scale variability, large-scale controls on carbon exchange, and implications for regional estimation seen here likely have wide relevance to other arctic landscapes.

  10. Bulinus globosus (Planorbidae; Gastropoda) populations in the Lake Victoria basin and coastal Kenya show extreme nuclear genetic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyakaana, Silvester; Stothard, J Russell; Nalugwa, Allen; Webster, Bonnie L; Lange, Charles N; Jørgensen, Aslak; Rollinson, David; Kristensen, Thomas K

    2013-11-01

    Bulinus globosus, a key intermediate host for Schistosoma haematobium that causes urinary schistosomiasis, is a hermaphroditic freshwater Planorbid snail species that inhabits patchy and transient water bodies prone to large seasonal variations in water availability. Although capable of self-fertilizing, this species has been reported to be preferentially out crossing. In this study, we characterized the population genetic structure of 19 B. globosus populations sampled across the Lake Victoria basin and coastal Kenya using four polymorphic microsatellite loci. Population genetic structure was characterized and quantified using FST statistics and Bayesian clustering algorithms. The four loci used in this study contained sufficient statistical power to detect low levels of population genetic differentiation and were highly polymorphic with the number of alleles per locus across populations ranging from 16 to 22. Average observed and expected heterozygosities across loci in each population ranged from 0.13 to 0.69 and from 0.39 to 0.79, respectively. Twenty-five of the seventy-six possible population-locus comparisons significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium proportions after Bonferroni corrections, mostly due to the deficiency of heterozygotes. Significant genetic differentiation was observed between populations and Bayesian inferences identified 15 genetic clusters. The excess homozygosity, significant inbreeding and population genetic differentiation observed in B. globosus populations are likely to be due to the habitat patchiness, mating system and the proneness to cyclic extinction and recolonization in transient habitats.

  11. Dynamics of planktonic prokaryotes and dissolved carbon in a subtropical coastal lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza eSchmitz Fontes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available To understand the dynamics of planktonic prokaryotes in a subtropical lake and its relationship with carbon, we conducted water sampling through four 48 h periods in Peri Lake for one year. Planktonic prokaryotes were characterized by the abundance and biomass of heterotrophic bacteria and of cyanobacteria (coccoid and filamentous cells. During all experiments, we measured wind speed, water temperature (WT, pH, dissolved oxygen (DO, precipitation, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, and carbon dioxide (CO2. DOC was higher in the summer experiment (average = 465 μM - WT = 27°C and lower in the winter experiment (average = 235 μM – WT = 17°C, with no significant variability throughout the daily cycles. CO2 concentrations presented a different pattern, with a minimum in the warm waters of the summer period (8.31 μM and a maximum in the spring (37.13 μM. Daily trends were observed for pH, DO, WT, and CO2. At an annual scale, both biological and physical-chemical controls were important regulators of CO2. Heterotrophic bacteria abundance and biomass were higher in the winter experiment (5.60 x 109 cells L-1 and 20.83 μmol C L-1 and lower in the summer (1.87 x 109 cells L-1 and 3.95 μmol C L-1. Filamentous cyanobacteria (0.23 x 108 – 0.68 x 108 filaments L-1 produced up to 167.16 μmol C L-1 as biomass (during the warmer period, whereas coccoid cyanobacteria contributed only 0.38 μmol C L-1. Precipitation, temperature, and the biomass of heterotrophic bacteria were the main regulators of CO2 concentrations. Temperature had a negative effect on the concentration of CO2, which may be indirectly attributed to high heterotroph activity in the autumn and winter periods. DOC was positively correlated with the abundance of total cyanobacteria and negatively with heterotrophic bacteria. Thus, planktonic prokaryotes have played an important role in the dynamics of both dissolved inorganic and organic carbon in the lake.

  12. Dynamics of planktonic prokaryotes and dissolved carbon in a subtropical coastal lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Maria Luiza S; Tonetta, Denise; Dalpaz, Larissa; Antônio, Regina V; Petrucio, Maurício M

    2013-01-01

    To understand the dynamics of planktonic prokaryotes in a subtropical lake and its relationship with carbon, we conducted water sampling through four 48-h periods in Peri Lake for 1 year. Planktonic prokaryotes were characterized by the abundance and biomass of heterotrophic bacteria (HB) and of cyanobacteria (coccoid and filamentous cells). During all samplings, we measured wind speed, water temperature (WT), pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), precipitation, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and carbon dioxide (CO2). DOC was higher in the summer (average = 465 μM - WT = 27°C) and lower in the winter (average = 235 μM - WT = 17°C), with no significant variability throughout the daily cycles. CO2 concentrations presented a different pattern, with a minimum in the warm waters of the summer period (8.31 μM) and a maximum in the spring (37.13 μM). Daily trends were observed for pH, DO, WT, and CO2. At an annual scale, both biological and physical-chemical controls were important regulators of CO2. HB abundance and biomass were higher in the winter sampling (5.60 × 10(9) cells L(-1) and 20.83 μmol C L(-1)) and lower in the summer (1.87 × 10(9) cells L(-1) and 3.95 μmol C L(-1)). Filamentous cyanobacteria (0.23 × 10(8)-0.68 × 10(8) filaments L(-1)) produced up to 167.16 μmol C L(-1) as biomass (during the warmer period), whereas coccoid cyanobacteria contributed only 0.38 μmol C L(-1). Precipitation, temperature, and the biomass of HB were the main regulators of CO2 concentrations. Temperature had a negative effect on the concentration of CO2, which may be indirectly attributed to high heterotroph activity in the autumn and winter periods. DOC was positively correlated with the abundance of total cyanobacteria and negatively with HB. Thus, planktonic prokaryotes have played an important role in the dynamics of both dissolved inorganic and organic carbon in

  13. Bacterioplankton abundance, biomass and production in a Brazilian coastal lagoon and in two German lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRÉ L. S. FURTADO

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The bacterioplanktonic abundance, biomass, and production within a tropical lagoon (Cabiúnas, Brazil and two temperate lakes (Stechlin and Dagow, Germany were compared. Bacterial abundance and production were significantly different among the three water bodies. The lowest bacterial production ( 0.8mug C l-1 d-1 was observed in the tropical Cabiúnas Lagoon despite its higher mean temperature and dissolved organic carbon concentration. Highest bacterioplankton abundance ( 2.6 x 10(9 cells l-1 and production ( 68.5mug C l-1 d-1 were measured in eutrophic Lake Dagow. In oligotrophic Lake Stechlin, the lowest bacterial biomass ( 48.05mug C l-1 was observed because of lower bacterial biovolume ( 0.248mum³ and lower bacterial abundance. Bacterial populations in the temperate lakes show higher activity (production/biomass ratio than in the tropical lagoon. The meaning of isotopic dilution and leucine incorporation by non-bacterial micro-organisms were evaluated in the oligotrophic temperate system. Leucine uptake by non-bacterial micro-organisms did not have significant influence on bacterial production.A abundância, biomassa e produção bacterioplanctônica em uma lagoa tropical (lagoa Cabiúnas, Brasil e em dois lagos temperados (lago Stechlin e lago Dagow, Alemanha foram comparadas. A abundância e a produção bacteriana foram significativamente diferente entre os três ecossistemas aquáticos. A menor produção bacteriana ( 0.8mig C l-1 d-1 foi observada na lagoa Cabiúnas, apesar da alta temperatura da água e concentração de carbono orgânico dissolvido. A maior abundância ( 2.6 x 10(9 células l-1 e produção bacterioplanctônica ( 68.5mig C l-1 d-1 foram medidas no eutrófico lago Dagow. No oligotrófico lago Stechlin, foi observada a menor biomassa bacteriana ( 48.05mig C l-1, refletindo o menor volume ( 0.248mim³ e abundância bacteriana. Populações bacterianas nos lagos temperados mostraram maior atividade (razão produ

  14. Updating coastal and navigational charts using ERTS-1 data. [Lake Michigan and Little Bahama Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcyn, F. C.; Lyzenga, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    A successful processing algorithm for extracting water depth information from ERTS data has been developed. Depth charts for two geographical areas have been constructed representing different solar illumination and water transparency conditions. Absolute depth calculations for water depth to 4.5 fathoms have been demonstrated for the Little Bahama Bank. Depth Charts also were constructed using data in Band 4 and 5 of the ERTS-1 MSS for areas in Lake Michigan. This data represented a low sun angle, poor light transmission in water conditions and gave useful results to 200 meters. In both cases, the ERTS map represented an update in shallow water detail in comparison with available navigation charts for the areas tested. Present processing costs to provide MSS depth charts are estimated to be on the order of $1.50 per sq. mile. The updating of navigation charts for areas hazardous to shipping is an achievable direct application.

  15. Updating coastal and navigational charts using ERTS-1 data. [Lake Michigan and Little Bahama Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcyn, F. C.; Lyzenga, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    A successful processing algorithm for extracting water depth information from ERTS data has been developed. Depth charts for two geographical areas have been constructed representing different solar illumination and water transparency conditions. Absolute depth calculations for water depth to 4.5 fathoms have been demonstrated for the Little Bahama Bank. Depth Charts also were constructed using data in Band 4 and 5 of the ERTS-1 MSS for areas in Lake Michigan. This data represented a low sun angle, poor light transmission in water conditions and gave useful results to 200 meters. In both cases, the ERTS map represented an update in shallow water detail in comparison with available navigation charts for the areas tested. Present processing costs to provide MSS depth charts are estimated to be on the order of $1.50 per sq. mile. The updating of navigation charts for areas hazardous to shipping is an achievable direct application.

  16. 75 FR 1373 - Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... for exposure to disease-causing microorganisms in coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes...) to mean the Great Lakes and marine coastal waters (including coastal estuaries) that are...

  17. Modeling to Predict Escherichia coli at Presque Isle Beach 2, City of Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Tammy M.

    2008-01-01

    The Lake Erie beaches in Pennsylvania are a valuable recreational resource for Erie County. Concentrations of Escherichia coli (E. coli) at monitored beaches in Presque Isle State Park in Erie, Pa., occasionally exceed the single-sample bathing-water standard of 235 colonies per 100 milliliters resulting in potentially unsafe swimming conditions and prompting beach managers to post public advisories or to close beaches to recreation. To supplement the current method for assessing recreational water quality (E. coli concentrations from the previous day), a predictive regression model for E. coli concentrations at Presque Isle Beach 2 was developed from data collected during the 2004 and 2005 recreational seasons. Model output included predicted E. coli concentrations and exceedance probabilities--the probability that E. coli concentrations would exceed the standard. For this study, E. coli concentrations and other water-quality and environmental data were collected during the 2006 recreational season at Presque Isle Beach 2. The data from 2006, an independent year, were used to test (validate) the 2004-2005 predictive regression model and compare the model performance to the current method. Using 2006 data, the 2004-2005 model yielded more correct responses and better predicted exceedances of the standard than the use of E. coli concentrations from the previous day. The differences were not pronounced, however, and more data are needed. For example, the model correctly predicted exceedances of the standard 11 percent of the time (1 out of 9 exceedances that occurred in 2006) whereas using the E. coli concentrations from the previous day did not result in any correctly predicted exceedances. After validation, new models were developed by adding the 2006 data to the 2004-2005 dataset and by analyzing the data in 2- and 3-year combinations. Results showed that excluding the 2004 data (using 2005 and 2006 data only) yielded the best model. Explanatory variables in the

  18. ERIS adaptive optics system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Le Louarn, Miska; Soenke, Christian; Fedrigo, Enrico; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Hubin, Norbert

    2012-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the next-generation instrument planned for the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Adaptive Optics facility (AOF). It is an AO assisted instrument that will make use of the Deformable Secondary Mirror and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF), and it is planned for the Cassegrain focus of the telescope UT4. The project is currently in its Phase A awaiting for approval to continue to the next phases. The Adaptive Optics system of ERIS will include two wavefront sensors (WFS) to maximize the coverage of the proposed sciences cases. The first is a high order 40x40 Pyramid WFS (PWFS) for on axis Natural Guide Star (NGS) observations. The second is a high order 40x40 Shack-Hartmann WFS for single Laser Guide Stars (LGS) observations. The PWFS, with appropriate sub-aperture binning, will serve also as low order NGS WFS in support to the LGS mode with a field of view patrolling capability of 2 arcmin diameter. Both WFSs will be equipped with the very low read-out noise CCD220 based camera developed for the AOF. The real-time reconstruction and control is provided by a SPARTA real-time platform adapted to support both WFS modes. In this paper we will present the ERIS AO system in all its main aspects: opto-mechanical design, real-time computer design, control and calibrations strategy. Particular emphasis will be given to the system performance obtained via dedicated numerical simulations.

  19. A 9000-Year Record of Centennial-to-Multi Centennial Scale Pluvial Events From Lower Bear Lake Sediments (San Bernardino Mtns., Coastal Southwestern North America)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, J. J.; Kirby, M. E.; Zimmerman, S. R.; Starratt, S.; Patterson, W. P.; Hiner, C.; Monarrez, P.

    2011-12-01

    Lower Bear Lake is located in the San Bernardino Mountains of coastal southwestern North America (CSWNA). This lake is the natural, pre-dam lake where present day Big Bear Reservoir is located. A single drive, 4.8 m-long sediment core was extracted from Lower Bear Lake in 2005. We present a 9000 calendar years before present (cal yr BP) paleohydrologic reconstruction. This new multi-proxy record (LOI 550°C, 950°C; C:N ratios, microfossils counts, grain size) is well-dated (22 AMS 14C dates on discrete organic material) and is characterized by variable sedimentology. Our results indicate two major features: 1) a long-term Holocene drying trend as observed elsewhere in CSWNA with an abrupt shift from wetter to drier conditions about 6200; and, 2) nine centennial-to-multi-centennial pluvial events over the past 9000 cal yr BP superimposed on the long term drying trend. Of these nine inferred pluvial intervals, five are considered major based on their combined proxy interpretations: 9300?-8250, 7000-6400, 3350-3000, 850-700, and 500-??? cal yr BP. To assess our results in terms of broader, regional paleoclimate records, we compare the timing of the major pluvial intervals at Lower Bear Lake to those identified previously at Lake Elsinore and Tulare Lake. This comparison reveals a similar timing between the three sites and the major pluvials. This temporally and spatially coherent signal indicates that a similar climate forcing acted to increase regional wetness at various times during the past 9000 cal yr BP. As a working hypothesis, we contend that small changes in the dominant patterns of Pacific SSTs modulated atmospheric circulation, thus favoring periods of enhanced atmospheric river storm activity across CSWNA.

  20. Abiotic variables affect STX concentration in a meso-oligotrophic subtropical coastal lake dominated by Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Cyanophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brentano, Débora Monteiro; Giehl, Eduardo L Hettwer; Petrucio, Maurício Mello

    2016-06-01

    The cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii is capable of producing toxins including saxitoxin (STX). Few studies have verified the influence of environmental variables on the production of STX and most have only been studied in the laboratory. The goal of this work was to identify the abiotic variables related to STX concentration in situ. The relationship among STX concentration and the physical variables, nutrients and chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentration was examined in a meso-oligotrophic subtropical coastal lake dominated by C. raciborskii. A generalized linear model was developed, incorporating all variables measured monthly over a 45-month monitoring period. Conductivity and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentration provided the greatest explanatory power for STX concentration in situ. Previous studies suggested that C. raciborskii cells exposed to stress associated with higher ionic concentrations appear to activate the biosynthesis of STX suggesting that STX can elicit changes cell permeability and may contribute to the homeostasis of this organism. An increase of DIN concentration results in a higher concentration of STX which may be related to a reduced metabolic demand, since the uptake of inorganic nitrogen requires less energy than N2-fixation. Thus, increased DIN can favor the growth of C. raciborskii population or improve cellular homeostasis, both potentially increasing STX concentration in the aquatic system, which was observed through a delayed response pattern. The developed model, while providing only a moderate predictive power, can assist in the understanding of the environmental variables associated with increases in STX concentration, and in monitoring and minimizing the risks of toxic blooms.

  1. A toxic cyanobacterial bloom in an urban coastal lake, Rio Grande do Sul state, Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Retz de Carvalho

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Reports of cyanobacterial blooms developing worldwide have considerably increased, and, in most cases, the predominant toxins are microcystins. The present study reports a cyanobacterial bloom in Lake Violão, Torres, Rio Grande do Sul State, in January 2005. Samples collected on January 13, 2005, were submitted to taxonomical, toxicological, and chemical studies. The taxonomical analysis showed many different species of cyanobacteria, and that Microcystis protocystis and Sphaerocavum cf. brasiliense were dominant. Besides these, Microcystis panniformis, Anabaena oumiana,Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, and Anabaenopsis elenkinii f. circularis were also present. The toxicity of the bloom was confirmed through intraperitoneal tests in mice, and chemical analyses of bloom extracts showed that the major substance was anabaenopeptin F, followed by anabaenopeptin B, microcystin-LR, and microcystin-RR.O número de relatos de ocorrências de florações de cianobactérias em todo o mundo vem aumentando consideravelmente e na maioria desses episódios, as toxinas dominantes são as microcistinas. O presente estudo relata a ocorrência de floração na Lagoa do Violão, município de Torres, RS, em janeiro de 2005. As amostras coletadas em 13/01/2005 foram submetidas a estudos taxonômicos, toxicológicos e químicos. O exame microscópico do fitoplancton mostrou a dominância das espécies Microcystis protocystis e Sphaerocavum cf. brasiliense; foram observadas, também, Microcystis panniformis, Anabaena oumiana,Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii e Anabaenopsis elenkinii f. circularis. A toxicidade da floração foi confirmada através de ensaio intraperitonial em camundongos e a análise química de extratos obtidos da biomassa liofilizada mostrou que a substância majoritária era a anabaenopeptina F, seguida por anabaenopeptina B, microcistina-LR e microcistina-RR.

  2. Linking a Large-Watershed Hydrogeochemical Model to a Wetland Community-Ecosystem Model to Estimate Plant Invasion Risk in the Coastal Great Lakes Region, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, W. S.; Bourgeau-Chavez, L. L.; Elgersma, K. J.; French, N. H. F.; Goldberg, D. E.; Hart, S.; Hyndman, D. W.; Kendall, A. D.; Martin, S. L.; Martina, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    In the Laurentian Great Lakes region of the Upper Midwest, USA, agricultural and urban land uses together with high N deposition are contributing to elevated flows of N in rivers and groundwater to coastal wetlands. The functioning of coastal wetlands, which provide a vital link between land and water, are imperative to maintaining the health of the entire Great Lakes Basin. Elevated N inflows are believed to facilitate the spread of large-stature invasive plants (cattails and Phragmites) that reduce biodiversity and have complex effects on other ecosystem services including wetland N retention and C accretion. We enhanced the ILHM (Integrated Landscape Hydrology Model) to simulate the effects of land use on N flows in streams, rivers, and groundwater throughout the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. We used the hydroperiods and N loading rates simulated by ILHM as inputs to the Mondrian model of wetland community-ecosystem processes to estimate invasion risk and other ecosystem services in coastal wetlands around the Michigan coast. Our linked models produced threshold behavior in the success of invasive plants in response to N loading, with the threshold ranging from ca. 8 to 12 g N/m2 y, depending on hydroperiod. Plant invasions increased wetland productivity 3-fold over historically oligotrophic native communities, decreased biodiversity but slightly increased wetland N retention. Regardless of invasion, elevated N loading resulted in significantly enhanced rates of C accretion, providing an important region-wide mechanism of C storage. The linked models predicted a general pattern of greater invasion risk in the southern basins of lakes Michigan and Huron relative to northern areas. The basic mechanisms of invasion have been partially validated in our field mesocosms constructed for this project. The general regional patterns of increased invasion risk have been validated through our field campaigns and remote sensing conducted for this project.

  3. Sabellidae (Annelida from the Faro coastal lake (Messina, Ionian Sea, with the first record of the invasive species Branchiomma bairdi along the Italian coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. GIANGRANDE

    2012-10-01

    Megalomma lanigera and Myxicola sp., collected from the coastal lake of Faro (Messina, Ionian Sea (26-36 psu, are reported. Megalomma lanigera, Myxicola sp. and B. luctuosum were collected from the soft bottom in shallow water and B. bairdi from the hard bottom of an internal channel. The presence of the latter is remarkable, as there is no previous record of this species along the Italian coast, and it confirms the lake of Faro as a very favourable environment for the introduction of alien species, which has occurred frequently as a result of aquaculture. High intraspecific variation was observed for M. lanigera, whilst more extensive analysis is required to ascertain the taxonomic status of the Myxicola specimens, including a review of all Mediterranean data currently attributed to M. infundibulum.

  4. Sabellidae (Annelida from the Faro coastal lake (Messina, Ionian Sea, with the first record of the invasive species Branchiomma bairdi along the Italian coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. GIANGRANDE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, morphological and ecological observations on 4 sabellid taxa, Branchiomma bairdi, B. luctuosum,Megalomma lanigera and Myxicola sp., collected from the coastal lake of Faro (Messina, Ionian Sea (26-36 psu, are reported. Megalomma lanigera, Myxicola sp. and B. luctuosum were collected from the soft bottom in shallow water and B. bairdi from the hard bottom of an internal channel. The presence of the latter is remarkable, as there is no previous record of this species along the Italian coast, and it confirms the lake of Faro as a very favourable environment for the introduction of alien species, which has occurred frequently as a result of aquaculture. High intraspecific variation was observed for M. lanigera, whilst more extensive analysis is required to ascertain the taxonomic status of the Myxicola specimens, including a review of all Mediterranean data currently attributed to M. infundibulum.

  5. Eutrophication of the St. Lawrence Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeton, Alfred M.

    1965-01-01

    Lakes Huron, Michigan, and Superior are classified as oligotrophic lakes on the basis of their biological, chemical, and physical characteristics. Lake Ontario, although rich in nutrients, is morphometrically oligotrophic or mesotrophic because of its large area of deep water. Lake Erie, the most productive of the lakes and the shallowest, is eutrophic. Several changes commonly associated with eutrophication in small lakes have been observed in the Great Lakes. These changes apparently reflect accelerated eutrophication in the Great Lakes due to man's activity. Chemical data compiled from a number of sources, dating as early as 1854, indicate a progressive increase in the concentrations of various major ions and total dissolved solids in all of the lakes except Lake Superior. The plankton has changed somewhat in Lake Michigan and the plankton, benthos, and fish populations of Lake Erie are greatly different today from those of the past. An extensive area of hypolimnetic water of Lake Erie has developed low dissolved oxygen concentrations in late summer within recent years.

  6. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack

  7. Design of the ERIS calibration unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, Mauro; Valentini, Angelo; Di Rico, Gianluca; Esposito, Simone; Ferruzzi, Debora; Riccardi, Armando; Spanò, Paolo; Antichi, Jacopo

    2016-08-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is a new-generation instrument for the Cassegrain focus of the ESO UT4/VLT, aimed at performing AO-assisted imaging and medium resolution spectroscopy in the 1-5 micron wavelength range. ERIS consists of the 1-5 micron imaging camera NIX, the 1-2.5 micron integral field spectrograph SPIFFIER (a modified version of SPIFFI, currently operating on SINFONI), the AO module and the internal Calibration Unit (ERIS CU). The purpose of this unit is to provide facilities to calibrate the scientific instruments in the 1-2.5 micron and to perform troubleshooting and periodic maintenance tests of the AO module (e.g. NGS and LGS WFS internal calibrations and functionalities, ERIS differential flexures) in the 0.5 - 1 μm range. The ERIS CU must therefore be designed in order to provide, over the full 0.5 - 2.5 μm range, the following capabilities: 1) illumination of both the telescope focal plane and the telescope pupil with a high-degree of uniformity; 2) artificial point-like and extended sources onto the telescope focal plane, with high accuracy in both positioning and FWHM; 3) wavelength calibration; 4) high stability of these characteristics. In this paper the design of the ERIS CU, and the solutions adopted to fulfill all these requirements, is described. The ERIS CU construction is foreseen to start at the end of 2016.

  8. Monitoring and modeling to predict Escherichia coli at Presque Isle Beach 2, City of Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Tammy M.

    2006-01-01

    The Lake Erie shoreline in Pennsylvania spans nearly 40 miles and is a valuable recreational resource for Erie County. Nearly 7 miles of the Lake Erie shoreline lies within Presque Isle State Park in Erie, Pa. Concentrations of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria at permitted Presque Isle beaches occasionally exceed the single-sample bathing-water standard, resulting in unsafe swimming conditions and closure of the beaches. E. coli concentrations and other water-quality and environmental data collected at Presque Isle Beach 2 during the 2004 and 2005 recreational seasons were used to develop models using tobit regression analyses to predict E. coli concentrations. All variables statistically related to E. coli concentrations were included in the initial regression analyses, and after several iterations, only those explanatory variables that made the models significantly better at predicting E. coli concentrations were included in the final models. Regression models were developed using data from 2004, 2005, and the combined 2-year dataset. Variables in the 2004 model and the combined 2004-2005 model were log10 turbidity, rain weight, wave height (calculated), and wind direction. Variables in the 2005 model were log10 turbidity and wind direction. Explanatory variables not included in the final models were water temperature, streamflow, wind speed, and current speed; model results indicated these variables did not meet significance criteria at the 95-percent confidence level (probabilities were greater than 0.05). The predicted E. coli concentrations produced by the models were used to develop probabilities that concentrations would exceed the single-sample bathing-water standard for E. coli of 235 colonies per 100 milliliters. Analysis of the exceedence probabilities helped determine a threshold probability for each model, chosen such that the correct number of exceedences and nonexceedences was maximized and the number of false positives and false negatives was

  9. Lake-level variability and water availability in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Douglas A.; Thompson, Todd A.; Booth, Robert K.; Nicholas, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    In this report, we present recorded and reconstructed (pre-historical) changes in water levels in the Great Lakes, relate them to climate changes of the past, and highlight major water-availability implications for storage, coastal ecosystems, and human activities. 'Water availability,' as conceptualized herein, includes a recognition that water must be available for human and natural uses, but the balancing of how much should be set aside for which use is not discussed. The Great Lakes Basin covers a large area of North America. The lakes capture and store great volumes of water that are critical in maintaining human activities and natural ecosystems. Water enters the lakes mostly in the form of precipitation and streamflow. Although flow through the connecting channels is a primary output from the lakes, evaporation is also a major output. Water levels in the lakes vary naturally on timescales that range from hours to millennia; storage of water in the lakes changes at the seasonal to millennial scales in response to lake-level changes. Short-term changes result from storm surges and seiches and do not affect storage. Seasonal changes are driven by differences in net basin supply during the year related to snowmelt, precipitation, and evaporation. Annual to millennial changes are driven by subtle to major climatic changes affecting both precipitation (and resulting streamflow) and evaporation. Rebounding of the Earth's surface in response to loss of the weight of melted glaciers has differentially affected water levels. Rebound rates have not been uniform across the basin, causing the hydrologic outlet of each lake to rise in elevation more rapidly than some parts of the coastlines. The result is a long-term change in lake level with respect to shoreline features that differs from site to site. The reconstructed water-level history of Lake Michigan-Huron over the past 4,700 years shows three major high phases from 2,300 to 3,300, 1,100 to 2,000, and 0 to 800

  10. A comparative study on the parasite fauna of perch, Perca fluviatilis L., collected from a freshwater coastal lake, brackish-water Baltic Sea, and the interconnecting canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicka, Jadwiga; Wierzbicki, Krystyn; Piasecki, Wojciech; Smietana, Przemysław

    2005-01-01

    Parasitological surveys of freshwater fishes rarely include comparisons between two ecologically different bodies of water. Such studies might help to understand processes of establishment of parasite faunas in estuary areas. The results obtained could also provide useful tools for discriminating various fish populations based on the composition of their parasite faunas. The present authors attempted to study such data from Resko Lake-a freshwater coastal lagoon (6 km2 surface area), and the adjacent areas of the Baltic Sea. Resko Lake, located 12 km west of the city of Kołobrzeg, is shallow (1.5 m) and is connected to the sea through a small canal (1.3 km long, 30 m wide). The material was collected from April 1969 and July 1970. A total of 159 perch were collected, in this number 104 fish from the lake, 43 from the sea, and 12 from the canal. A total of 32 parasite species were recovered from the fish necropsied. The parasites represented 7 higher taxa: Protozoa (3 species), Cestoda (4), Digenea (13), Nematoda (5), Acanthocephala (3), Mollusca (1), and Crustacea (3). The parasite fauna of perch from the sea was definitely more abundant (31 species) compared to that of the lake (21), and the canal (12 species). Infection parameters of 13 parasite species demonstrated significant differences between the locations studied. The infection level of 6 parasite species was significantly higher in perch from the sea: Bothriocephalus scorpii, Ligula sp., Brachyphallus crenatus, Camallanus truncatus, Hysterothylacium aduncum, and Echinorhynchus gadi. On the other hand, infection levels of 7 other species were higher at the lake: Triaenophorus nodulosus, Bucephalus polymorphus, Azygia lucii, Tylodelphys clavata, Camallanus lacustris, Acanthocephalus lucii, and Achtheres percarum. The infection parameters of the fish from canal were similar to those from the lake. Interesting observations were made on the seasonality of certain parasites of both lake- and Baltic perch. The

  11. The role of vegetation in the development and resiliency of the coastal freshwater deltaic system of Wax Lake Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olliver, E. A.; Edmonds, D. A.; Jiang, Z.; Bevington, A. E.; Nardin, W.; Twilley, R.

    2014-12-01

    The world's coastal deltaic wetlands are threatened by relative sea level rise. Protecting these ecosystems requires understanding deltaic growth and few studies have focused on how vegetation influences this growth. Here we explore the ecogeomorphic evolution of Wax Lake Delta (WLD) using a remote sensing database consisting of 1083 Landsat 5 and 7 images (30 m resolution) from 1983 to 2012 and 23 high-resolution images (1.5 m resolution) from 2001 to 2012. We calculate each Landsat image to the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which indicates the relative above ground vegetation biomass. We also use the high-resolution images and spectral signatures from Landsat images to classify land cover into vegetation, sediment, and water. Only imagery from peak biomass season, August and September for this subtropical ecosystem, was analyzed to control for the effects of interannual variability in growing season and growth rates on the estimates of vegetated areas. Additional analyses of extreme events and fluctuating water levels is needed to correctly estimate land area and areal vegetation coverage. Our results show from 1984 to ~1995 WLD experiences a period of emergence where total delta area and the vegetated percent (at peak biomass) increases rapidly. After 1995, the vegetated percent of WLD levels off, but fluctuates from 70% to 90%. During winter months this value drops to ~10%. Accordingly, the bare sediment percent decreases as one minus the vegetated percent. At individual island scale vegetated percent at peak biomass levels off at different times and values. Proximal (or older) islands level off as soon as 1995, fluctuating from 80% to nearly 100% vegetated, while distal (or younger) islands do so at 2000 ranging from 20% to 80%. It is unclear why this difference occurs, but we conjecture it is caused by the lower elevation of the distal islands or their aggrading slower than proximal ones as the incoming sediment volume spreads over a larger

  12. Erie National Wildife Refuge Annual Narrative 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines activities and accomplishments during the 2003 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  13. Erie National Wildife Refuge Annual Narrative 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines activities and accomplishments during the 2004 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  14. Erie National Wildife Refuge Annual Narrative 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines activities and accomplishments during the 2002 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  15. Hunting Management Plan Erie NWR 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides guidelines for the administration of hunting activity and for the development, maintenance, and enforcement of regulations and guidelines on Erie...

  16. Determining the high variability of pCO2 and pO2 in the littoral zone of a subtropical coastal lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Tonetta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aquatic metabolism comprises production and mineralization of organic matter through biological processes, such as primary production and respiration that can be estimated by gases concentration in the water column. AIM: The study aimed to assess the temporal variability of pCO2 and pO2 in the littoral zone of a subtropical coastal lake. Our hypotheses are i high variability in meteorological conditions, such as temperature and light, drive the high variability in pCO2 and pO2, and ii the lake is permanently heterotrophic due to the low phosphorus concentration. METHODS: We estimated pCO2 from pH-alkalinity method, and pO2 from dissolved oxygen concentration and water temperature measured in free-water during 24 hours in the autumn, winter, spring and summer. RESULTS: Our findings showed that limnological variables had low temporal variability, while the meteorological variables and pCO2 presented a high coefficient of variation, which is representative of each climatic season. In autumn and winter, it was recorded that the lake was supersaturated in CO2 relative to the atmosphere, while in spring and summer CO2 concentration was below the concentration found in the atmosphere. Over 24 hours, pCO2 also showed high variability, with autumn presenting higher concentration during the night when compared to daytime. Water temperature and chlorophyll a were negatively correlated with pCO2, while pO2 was positively correlated with wind and light. CONCLUSION: Agreeing with our first hypothesis, pCO2 showed an expressive temporal variation in a subtropical lake associated to the high variability in meteorological conditions. On the other hand, our second hypothesis was not confirmed, since Peri Lake exported CO2 to the atmosphere in some periods and in others, CO2 was removed from the atmosphere.

  17. Hydroclimatic Changes in Coastal Southern California at the Last Glacial Termination (~33 to 10 Ka): Pollen and Macrofossil Evidence from Lake Elsinore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, L. E.; Kirby, M. E.; Feakins, S. J.; Peteet, D. M.; Wu, M.; Pavia, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    High-resolution (1 cm ≈ 14 yrs) pollen analyses from a well-dated sediment core from Lake Elsinore record changes in coastal southern California upland and lowland vegetation at the end of the last glacial (~33 to 10 ka). Montane (>2200m) conifer forests expanded to lower elevations in the full glacial, with peak abundances at ~33ka near the beginning of the first wetland episode when aquatic macrofossils such as Potomogeton and Zannichellia seeds were present. In the Holocene, conifers were replaced by mid-elevation (1400-2100 m) oak woodlands and chaparral. Early Holocene abundance of algae and microcharcoal, absence of macrosfossils, and high total carbonate imply warmer epilimnion, eutrophication, and lower precipitation. Three general climate modes are reconstructed from the Lake Elsinore pollen data based on modern California pollen/vegetation/ hydroclimate relationships. First, beginning ~33ka, the record is characterized by a 10 kyr-long interval of high frequency changes in precipitation during which two expanded wetland episodes bracket repeated expansions of saline/alkaline vegetation. Second, low-amplitude variations in effective moisture characterize the last Glacial Maximum (23 to 15 kyrs). Third, rapid, abrupt high-amplitude changes in water availability occur during the Bølling, Allerod and Younger Dryas chronozones. Patterns of hydroclimatic change inferred from the pollen data are consistent with hydrologic variability reconstructed from lithologic and biochemical analyses of coeval samples from the Lake Elsinore core. The timing and character of the response of coastal southern California ecosystems at the termination of the last glacial is correlative with northeast Pacific Ocean climate events and with general patterns of global climate change.

  18. Water and chemical budgets of gravel pit lakes: Case studies of fluvial gravel pit lakes along the Meuse River (The Netherlands) and coastal gravel pit lakes along the Adriatic Sea (Ravenna, Italy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollema, P.N.

    2016-01-01

    Gravel pit lakes form when gravel is excavated from below the water table of a phreatic or shallow confined aquifer. Typically many of these lakes are concentrated along naturally occurring sedimentary gravel deposits in areas where gravel is needed for construction. Most gravel pit lakes are relati

  19. Can MODIS Data Calibrate and Validate Coastal Sediment Transport Models? Rapid Prototyping Using 250 m Data and the ECOMSED Model for Lake Pontchartrain, LA USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard L.; Georgiou, Ioannis; Glorioso, Mark V.; McCorquodale, J. Alex; Crowder, Keely

    2006-01-01

    Field measurements from small boats and sparse arrays of instrumented buoys often do not provide sufficient data to capture the dynamic nature of biogeophysical parameters in may coastal aquatic environments. Several investigators have shown the MODIS 250 m images can provide daily synoptic views of suspended sediment concentration in coastal waters to determine sediment transport and fate. However, the use of MODIS for coastal environments can be limited due to a lack of cloud-free images. Sediment transport models are not constrained by sky conditions but often suffer from a lack of in situ observations for model calibration or validation. We demonstrate here the utility of MODIS 250 m to calibrate (set model parameters), validate output, and set or reset initial conditions of a hydrodynamic and sediment transport model (ECOMSED) developed for Lake Pontchartrain, LA USA. We present our approach in the context of how to quickly assess of 'prototype' an application of NASA data to support environmental managers and decision makers. The combination of daily MODIS imagery and model simulations offer a more robust monitoring and prediction system of suspended sediments than available from either system alone.

  20. 2006 US Army Corps of Engineers(USACE) National Coastal Mapping Program, Great Lakes Topo/Bathy LiDAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers collects and maintains LiDAR data including orthophotos in coastal areas of the United States and its territories. The Corps...

  1. The use of Ground Penetrating Radar in coastal research, archeaological investigations, lake studies, peat layer measurments and applied research in Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilumaa, Kadri; Tõnisson, Hannes; Orviku, Kaarel

    2014-05-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is mainly used for scientific research in coastal geology in the Institute of Ecology at Tallinn University. We currently use SIR-3000 radar with 100, 270 , 300 and 500 MHz antennae. Our main targets have been detecting the thickness of soil and sand layers and finding out the layers in coastal sediments which reflect extreme storm events. Our GPR studies in various settings have suggested that the internal structures of the ridge-dune complexes are dominated by numerous layers dipping in various directions. Such information helps us to reconstruct and understand prevailing processes during their formation (e.g. seaward dipping lamination in coastal ridge-dune complexes indicating cross-shore and wave-induced transport of the sediments). Currently, we are trying to elaborate methodology for distinguishing the differences between aeolian and wave transported sediments by using GPR. However, paludified landscapes (often covered by water), very rough surface (numerous bushes and soft surface), moderate micro topography has slowed this process significantly. Moreover, we have been able to use GPR during the winter period (applied on ice or snow) and compare the quality of our results with the measurements taken during the summer period. We have found that smooth surface (in winter) helps detecting very strong signal differences (border between different sediment types - sand, peat, silt, etc.) but reduces the quality of the signal to the level where the detection of sedimentation patterns within one material (e.g. tilted layers in sand) is difficult. We have carried out several other science-related studies using GPR. These studies include determining the thickness of peat layer in bogs (to calculate the volume of accumulated peat or to find most suitable locations for coring), measuring the thickness of mud and gyttja layer in lakes (to find most suitable locations for coring, reconstructing initial water level of the lake or calculating

  2. Statistical Analysis and Storm Sampling Approach for Lakes Michigan and St. Clair, Great Lakes Coastal Flood Study, 2012 Federal Inter-Agency Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    3. Fit GPD to the extremal events using the Maximum Likelihood Method ( MLM ). 4. After a preliminary GPD fitting, higher thresholds are evaluated...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Statistical Analysis and Storm Sampling Approach for Lakes Michigan and St. Clair 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  3. Studies on the analysis of pesticide residues in foods (XL) PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) residues in imported smelt fished from the Canadian Great Lakes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sekita, H; Sasaki, K; Kawamura, Y; Takeda, M; Uchiyama, M

    1987-01-01

    The inspection of PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) residues in pond smelt samples imported from Canada in June, 1983, fished from Lake Erie, one of the Great Lakes, was performed by gas chromatography with ECD...

  4. 2007 US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP) Topobathy Lidar - Michigan (Lake Huron shoreline)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a bare earth data set. The data contained in these files contain hydrographic and topographic data collected by the CHARTS system along the Lake Huron coast...

  5. 2008 US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP) Topobathy Lidar - Illinois (Lake Michigan shoreline)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data contained in these files contain hydrographic and topographic data collected by the CHARTS system along the Lake Michigan coast of Illinois from September...

  6. Coastal Cover Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) Great Lakes 2001-era land cover change analysis (NODC Accession 0038694)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data is the 2001 era or late-date classification of the Great Lakes. This data set consists of about 74 partial Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper scenes which were...

  7. 2008 US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP) Topobathy Lidar - Indiana (Lake Michigan shoreline)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data contained in these files contain topographic data collected by the CHARTS system along Lake Michigan, Indiana. The data are broken into boxes. The box...

  8. An Exploration on the Origin of Erie Canal’s Construction in the United States%美国开凿伊利运河缘起探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕畅

    2016-01-01

    In early years, the New Yorkers with the favorable geographical position expect to open the waterway connection be-tween the coastal area of the Atlantic and the Great Lakes region in order to facilitate trade and transport. The development of the Western Inland Lock Navigation Company of the state is the earliest company who began to put it into practice. Although people were not satisfied with the results, it gave birth to a brand new canal project. In addition, in the intricate and complex balance of benefits , the“Erie Canal route” which has more comprehensive advantages became the trend of the canal and the Erie Canal was thus born from then on.%美国早期,为了便于东西部贸易和交通,坐拥地利的纽约州人希望打通大西洋沿海地区和五大湖地区之间的水路联系。该州的西部内陆航运开发公司最早开始付诸实践,其结果虽不尽如人意,却催生出一个全新的运河工程。另外,在错综复杂的利益权衡下,优势更全面的“伊利线位”成为运河开凿的走向,伊利运河由此诞生。

  9. The design of ERIS for the VLT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amico, P.; Marchetti, E.; Pedichini, F.; Baruffolo, A.; Delabre, B.; Duchateau, M.; Ekinci, M.; Fantinel, D.; Fedrigo, E.; Finger, G.; Frank, C.; Hofmann, R.; Jolley, P.; Lizon, J. L.; Le Louarn, M.; Madec, P.-Y.; Soenke, C.; Weisz, H.

    2012-09-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the next-generation instrument planned for the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF)1. It is an AO assisted instrument that will make use of the Deformable Secondary Mirror and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF), and it is designed for the Cassegrain focus of the telescope UT4. The project just concluded its conceptual design phase and is awaiting formal approval to continue to the next phase. ERIS will offer 1-5 μm imaging and 1-2.5 μm integral field spectroscopic capabilities with high Strehl performance. As such it will replace, with much improved single conjugated AO correction, the most scientifically important and popular observing capabilities currently offered by NACO2 (diffraction limited imaging in JM band, Sparse Aperture Masking and APP coronagraphy) and by SINFONI3, whose instrumental module, SPIFFI, will be re-used in ERIS. The Cassegrain location and the performance requirements impose challenging demands on the project, from opto-mechanical design to cryogenics to the operational concept. In this paper we describe the baseline design proposed for ERIS and discuss these technical challenges, with particular emphasis on the trade-offs and the novel solutions proposed for building ERIS.

  10. Polarimetry of the dwarf planet (136199) Eris

    CERN Document Server

    Belskaya, I; Muinonen, K; Barucci, M A; Tozzi, G P; Fornasier, S; Kolokolova, L

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the surface characteristics of the large dwarf planet (136199) Eris. With the FORS1 instrument of the ESO VLT, we have obtained Bessell broadband R linear polarimetry and broadband V and I photometry. We have modelled the observations in terms of the coherent-backscattering mechanism to constrain the surface properties of the object. Polarimetric observations of Eris show a small negative linear polarization without opposition surge in the phase angle range of 0.15-0.5 degrees. The photometric data allow us to suppose a brightness opposition peak at phase angles below 0.2-0.3 degrees. The data obtained suggest possible similarity to the polarimetric and photometric phase curves of Pluto. The measured absolute magnitude and broadband colors of Eris are H_V=-1.15, V-R=0.41, and V-I=0.75.

  11. The mass of dwarf planet Eris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael E; Schaller, Emily L

    2007-06-15

    The discovery of dwarf planet Eris was followed shortly by the discovery of its satellite, Dysnomia, but the satellite orbit, and thus the system mass, was not known. New observations with the Keck Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescopes show that Dysnomia has a circular orbit with a radius of 37,350 +/- 140 (1-sigma) kilometers and a 15.774 +/- 0.002 day orbital period around Eris. These orbital parameters agree with expectations for a satellite formed out of the orbiting debris left from a giant impact. The mass of Eris from these orbital parameters is 1.67 x 10(22) +/- 0.02 x 10(22) kilograms, or 1.27 +/- 0.02 that of Pluto.

  12. The NGS Pyramid wavefront sensor for ERIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, A.; Antichi, J.; Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Esposito, S.; Carbonaro, L.; Agapito, G.; Biliotti, V.; Briguglio, R.; Di Rico, G.; Dolci, M.; Ferruzzi, D.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Xompero, M.; Marchetti, E.; Fedrigo, E.; Le Louarn, M.; Conzelmann, R.; Delabre, B.; Amico, P.; Hubin, N.

    2014-07-01

    ERIS is the new Single Conjugate Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for VLT in construction at ESO with the collaboration of Max-Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, ETH-Institute for Astronomy and INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri. The ERIS AO system relies on a 40×40 sub-aperture Pyramid Wavefront Sensor (PWFS) for two operating modes: a pure Natural Guide Star high-order sensing for high Strehl and contrast correction and a low-order visible sensing in support of the Laser Guide Star AO mode. In this paper we present in detail the preliminary design of the ERIS PWFS that is developed under the responsibility of INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri in collaboration with ESO.

  13. Polycyclic Musks in the Air and Water of the Lower Great Lakes: Spatial Distribution and Volatilization from Surface Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Carrie A; Helm, Paul A; Muir, Derek; Puggioni, Gavino; Lohmann, Rainer

    2016-11-01

    Polycyclic musks (PCMs) are synthetic fragrance compounds used in personal care products and household cleaners. Previous studies have indicated that PCMs are introduced to aquatic environments via wastewater and river discharge. Polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were deployed in air and water during winter 2011 and summer 2012 to investigate the role of population centers as sources of these contaminants to the Great Lakes and determine whether the lakes were acting as sources of PCMs via volatilization. Average gaseous Σ5PCM ranged from below detection limits (Lake Erie in Toledo. Average dissolved Σ5PCM ranged from Lake Ontario near the mouth of the Oswego River. Significant correlations were observed between population density and Σ5PCM in both air and water, with strongest correlations within a 25 and 40 km radius, respectively. At sites where HHCB was detected it was generally volatilizing, while the direction of AHTN air-water exchange was variable. Volatilization fluxes of HHCB ranged from 11 ± 6 to 341 ± 127 ng/m(2)/day, while air-water exchange fluxes of AHTN ranged from -3 ± 2 to 28 ± 10 ng/m(2)/day. Extrapolation of average air-water exchange flux values over the surface area of the lakes' coastal boundary zone suggested volatilization may be responsible for the loss of 64-213 kg/year of dissolved Σ5PCM from the lakes.

  14. Distribution of NORM in the Threatened Wadi Maryut Lake: A Comparative Case for South Mediterranean Coastal Water Bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badran, H. [Taif University (Saudi Arabia); Hassan, M. [Tanta University (Egypt)

    2014-07-01

    Wadi Maryut Lake is one of the remaining two parts of the ancient Lake Mareotis and is hardly mentioned in the scientific literature. It has a very long history and a doubtful and uncertain future. The lake is in its way to disappearances because of salt refining, agricultural and land reclamation projects. Compared with other North African water bodies, it is stable because it is relatively far from any possible effect of Nile sediments for few centuries and it has not been subject to discharge of industrial wastewater and very little urban activities. Therefore, this lake represents a good reference site that could be used in the evaluation of the pollution of other water bodies. This study includes sediment, water, wild vegetation and soil samples. Generally, locations in the southwestern part of the lake have the highest activity concentrations in sediment and soil. The concentrations of {sup 232}Th in different plant species are higher than that of {sup 226}Ra. The mean soil-to-plant transfer factor for {sup 40}K is higher than that of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th, which are in principle the same. Gamma-radiation hazard indices of soil and sediment in some locations are larger than unity which suggests possible health concerns when used as construction materials. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  15. The "one-out, all-out" principle entails the risk of imposing unnecessary restoration costs: a study case in two Mediterranean coastal lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, S; La Valle, P; De Luca, E; Lattanzi, L; Migliore, G; Morgana, J G; Munari, C; Nicoletti, L; Izzo, G; Mistri, M

    2014-03-15

    The Water Framework Directive uses the "one-out, all-out" principle in assessing water bodies (i.e., the worst status of the elements used in the assessment determines the final status of the water body). In this study, we assessed the ecological status of two coastal lakes in Italy. Indices for all biological quality elements used in transitional waters from the Italian legislation and other European countries were employed and compared. Based on our analyses, the two lakes require restoration, despite the lush harbor seagrass beds, articulated macrobenthic communities and rich fish fauna. The "one-out, all-out" principle tends to inflate Type I errors, i.e., concludes that a water body is below the "good" status even if the water body actually has a "good" status. This may cause additional restoration costs where they are not necessarily needed. The results from this study strongly support the need for alternative approaches to the "one-out, all-out" principle.

  16. Assessing the chemical behavior and spatial distribution of yttrium and rare earth elements (YREEs) in a coastal aquifer adjacent to the Urmia Hypersaline Lake, NW Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Nassim; Kalantari, Nasrollah; Amiri, Vahab; Nakhaei, Mohammad

    2017-07-15

    This study aims to shed light on the seasonal behavior of yttrium and rare earth elements (YREEs) in the Urmia Aquifer (UA), in the immediate vicinity of Urmia Lake (UL) in Iran. Samples of groundwater, collected under dry and wet conditions in coastal wells of UA, suggest a large degree of variability in both YREE abundance and normalized patterns. Although weathering or water-rock interactions (between the surface/groundwater and rock samples) were predicted to be the most probable source in explaining YREEs in groundwater samples, results to the contrary indicate that the groundwater do not inherit aquifer rock-like YREE signatures in the study area; this might be due to the relative stability of YREEs during the process of water-rock interactions, which suggest that methods based on YREEs can be beneficial in discrimination of water sources. Furthermore, findings demonstrated no significant relationship between Ce/Ce* and salinity (0.08 and 0.05 in wet and dry seasons, respectively), and between Eu/Eu* and salinity (0.1 and -0.04 in wet and dry seasons, respectively). Dissimilarity of patterns of YREEs in rock and water samples reveals YREEs as no conservative tracers in determining the UL saltwater intrusion into coastal groundwater. Therefore, the groundwater YREE concentrations and fractionation patterns in UA warrant controlling by coastal aquifer need to be controlled by other chemical weathering, adsorption, desorption, and solution complexation reactions. Finally, comparison of REE concentration values in groundwater samples with corresponding indicative admissible drinking water concentrations (IAC) demonstrated their suitability for drinking purposes.

  17. Influence of the Wax Lake Delta sediment diversion on aboveground plant productivity and carbon storage in deltaic island and mainland coastal marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaune, R. D.; Sasser, C. E.; Evers-Hebert, E.; White, J. R.; Roberts, H. H.

    2016-08-01

    Coastal Louisiana is experiencing a significant loss of coastal wetland area due to increasing sea level rise, subsidence, sediment starvation and marsh collapse. The construction of large scale Mississippi River sediment diversions is currently being planned in an effort to help combat coastal wetlands losses at a rate of >50 km-2 y-1. The Wax Lake Delta (WLD) is currently being used as a model for evaluating potential land gain from large scale diversions of Mississippi River water and sediment. In this study, we determine the impact of the WLD diversion on plant production at newly formed islands within the delta and adjacent, mainland freshwater marshes. Plant aboveground productivity, sediment nutrient status and short term accretion were measured at three locations on a transect at each of three fresh water marsh sites along Hog Bayou and at six newly formed emerging island sites in the delta. Spring flooding has resulted in a greater increase in plant production and consequently, greater carbon sequestration potential in adjacent mainland marshes compared to the newly formed island sites, which contain less total carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) in the sediment. While sediment diversions are predicted to create land, as seen in island formation in the WLD, the greatest benefit of river sediment diversions from a carbon credit perspective might be to the adjacent freshwater mainland marshes for several reasons. Both greater plant production and sediment C accumulation are two important factors for marsh stability, while perhaps even more critical, is the prevention of the loss of stored sediment C in the marsh profile. This stored C would be lost without the introduction of freshwater, nutrients and sediment through river sediment diversion efforts.

  18. The potential of coastal lakes in the Winter-Rainfall-Zone of South Africa for paleoenvironmental reconstructions - an example from Verlorenvlei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Thomas; Haberzettl, Torsten; Lederer, Martin; Wündsch, Michael; Frenzel, Peter; Zabel, Matthias; Kirsten, Kelly; Carr, Andrew; Daut, Gerhard; Cawthra, Hayley; Baade, Jussi; Meadows, Michael; Quick, Lynne; Mäusbcher, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Verlorenvlei is a coastal lake in the winter rainfall zone of the Western Cape Province of South Africa. Up to now, several attempts have been made to recover sediment cores from this lake. However, no continuous high-resolution record covering the entire Holocene has been acquired. Within the project RAiN (Regional Archives for Integrated iNvestigations) a 14.2 m paired parallel core from the central part of Verlorenvlei was recovered. Based on analyses of surface sediment samples, recent elemental and grain size distributions indicate that this sediment core is well suited for paleoenvironmental reconstructions. Using a set of 23 radiocarbon ages, a chronology was established for the past 9,400 cal BP suggesting continuous sediment deposition throughout the entire period. Preliminary lithological and geochemical investigations show that this record can be used for sea level reconstructions as the lake was periodically inundated by the ocean during the past 9,400 cal BP. This is recorded in distinctly elevated Ca and Sr contents as well as the occurrence of marine indicator species (gastropods) in parts of the sediment core. Thin, pale grey layers of fine sediment occurring at various sediment depths seem to reflect event-related deposits, but do not showing erosional structures. In terms of lithology, geochemical and magnetic composition, the upper 50 cm (ca. 100 cal BP) clearly differ from the rest of the record indicating increased sediment supply from the catchment, which is likely linked to anthropogenic activities. The presented sediment record from Verlorenvlei offers excellent potential for a detailed, high-resolution reconstruction of sea level changes, climate variations and anthropogenic impact during the past 9,400 cal BP in an area in which natural archives are very scarce or poorly dated.

  19. 78 FR 54574 - Safety Zone; Tall Ships Erie 2013 Fireworks Show, Holland Street Pier, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ..., Holland Street Pier, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule... of Holland Street Pier, Presque Isle Bay in Erie, PA. The Captain of the Port Buffalo has determined... all waters off Holland Street Pier, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA within a 420-foot radius of position...

  20. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL DYNAMICS OF THE BAIKAL COASTAL LINE CAUSED BY CONTROL OF THE LAKE LEVEL REGIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Tulokhonov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a study on changes in the coastal line of the Yarki islands (North Baikal using remote sensing data of the Earth. Vector shape files were generated from the automated classification of the multi-temporal Landsat data. The analysis suggests a systematic decrease in the Yarki’s sandbar area

  1. The MTA UXO Survey and Target Recovery on Lake Erie at the Former Erie Army Depot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    wearing permeable clothing (e.g., standard cotton or synthetic work clothes), follow recommendations for monitoring requirements and suggested work...actual clothing worn differs from the ACGIH standard ensemble in insulation value and/or wind and vapor permeability , change the monitoring requirements...cigarette, nail polish or any other type of chemical to “coax” the tick out. • Be sure to remove all parts of the tick’s body, and disinfect the area

  2. When a habitat freezes solid: Microorganisms over-winter within the ice column of a coastal Antarctic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, C.M.; Dieser, M.; Greenwood, M.; Cory, R.M.; Laybourn-Parry, J.; Lisle, J.T.; Jaros, C.; Miller, P.L.; Chin, Y.-P.; McKnight, Diane M.

    2011-01-01

    A major impediment to understanding the biology of microorganisms inhabiting Antarctic environments is the logistical constraint of conducting field work primarily during the summer season. However, organisms that persist throughout the year encounter severe environmental changes between seasons. In an attempt to bridge this gap, we collected ice core samples from Pony Lake in early November 2004 when the lake was frozen solid to its base, providing an archive for the biological and chemical processes that occurred during winter freezeup. The ice contained bacteria and virus-like particles, while flagellated algae and ciliates over-wintered in the form of inactive cysts and spores. Both bacteria and algae were metabolically active in the ice core melt water. Bacterial production ranged from 1.8 to 37.9??gCL-1day-1. Upon encountering favorable growth conditions in the melt water, primary production ranged from 51 to 931??gCL-1day-1. Because of the strong H2S odor and the presence of closely related anaerobic organisms assigned to Pony Lake bacterial 16S rRNA gene clones, we hypothesize that the microbial assemblage was strongly affected by oxygen gradients, which ultimately restricted the majority of phylotypes to distinct strata within the ice column. This study provides evidence that the microbial community over-winters in the ice column of Pony Lake and returns to a highly active metabolic state when spring melt is initiated. ?? 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  3. When a habitat freezes solid: microorganisms over-winter within the ice column of a coastal Antarctic lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Christine M; Dieser, Markus; Greenwood, Mark; Cory, Rose M; Laybourn-Parry, Johanna; Lisle, John T; Jaros, Christopher; Miller, Penney L; Chin, Yu-Ping; McKnight, Diane M

    2011-06-01

    A major impediment to understanding the biology of microorganisms inhabiting Antarctic environments is the logistical constraint of conducting field work primarily during the summer season. However, organisms that persist throughout the year encounter severe environmental changes between seasons. In an attempt to bridge this gap, we collected ice core samples from Pony Lake in early November 2004 when the lake was frozen solid to its base, providing an archive for the biological and chemical processes that occurred during winter freezeup. The ice contained bacteria and virus-like particles, while flagellated algae and ciliates over-wintered in the form of inactive cysts and spores. Both bacteria and algae were metabolically active in the ice core melt water. Bacterial production ranged from 1.8 to 37.9 μg CL(-1) day(-1). Upon encountering favorable growth conditions in the melt water, primary production ranged from 51 to 931 μg CL(-1) day(-1). Because of the strong H(2) S odor and the presence of closely related anaerobic organisms assigned to Pony Lake bacterial 16S rRNA gene clones, we hypothesize that the microbial assemblage was strongly affected by oxygen gradients, which ultimately restricted the majority of phylotypes to distinct strata within the ice column. This study provides evidence that the microbial community over-winters in the ice column of Pony Lake and returns to a highly active metabolic state when spring melt is initiated.

  4. Physical constraints and the comparative ecology of coastal ecosystems across the US Great Lakes, with a coda, presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of my favorite papers by Scott Nixon (1988) was the story he build around the observation that marine fisheries yields were higher per unit area or per unit primary production than temperate lakes. The story, and the putative agent for the freshwater/marine difference, involv...

  5. Physical constraints and the comparative ecology of coastal ecosystems across the US Great Lakes, with a coda

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of my favorite papers by Scott Nixon (1988) was the story he build around the observation that marine fisheries yields were higher than temperate lakes. The putative agent for the freshwater/marine difference, involved a higher energy of mixing due to tides in marine environm...

  6. Impoundment Report Erie National Wildlife Refuge 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a report that is based on a tour of the Erie National Wildlife Refuge’s impoundments by a Moist Soil Consultant. It provides the firm’s observations,...

  7. Pandora and the Good Eris in Hesiod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P. Zarecki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The "good eris" in Works and Days is so presented as to parallel Pandora, who is seen as bringing about evils but who yet was the stimulus to labor that is an ethical imperative.

  8. Rapid optical variations in KT Eri

    CERN Document Server

    Ilkiewicz, K; Galan, C; Cikala, M; Tomov, T

    2014-01-01

    We present optical photometric monitoring of KT Eri (Nova Eridani 2009), a He/N very fast nova which oubursted in November 2009. Our observations include BVRcIc brightness estimations as well as monitoring of the rapid brightness variations in V band. The characteristic times of these rapid changes are studied and compared with the observed in other novae.

  9. Contrasting effects of managed opening regimes on water quality in two intermittently closed and open coastal lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallenberg, M.; Larned, S. T.; Hayward, S.; Arbuckle, C.

    2010-03-01

    Intermittently closed and open lakes and lagoons (ICOLLs) are shallow barrier lakes which are intermittently connected to the sea and experience saline intrusions. Many ICOLLs are mechanically opened to prevent flooding of surrounding agricultural and urban land and to flush water of poor quality. In this study, the effects of modified opening regimes (frequency and duration of barrier openings and closures) on water quality and phytoplankton in two New Zealand ICOLLs were investigated over a number of opening/closure cycles. Water quality in Lake Ellesmere (Te Waihora) responded weakly to both opening and closing events, indicating that sea-ICOLL exchange did not markedly improve water quality. Conversely, water quality in Waituna Lagoon responded rapidly to barrier openings; water level decreased to near sea level within days of opening and subsequent seawater exchange resulted in rapid decreases in nitrate and chlorophyll a concentrations. The closure of Waituna Lagoon resulted in rapid rise in water level and a pulse of nitrate and phosphorus in the water column and phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations increased with increasing closed-period duration. Based on data on the underwater light climate and nutrient dynamics, phytoplankton in Lake Ellesmere was probably light-limited, whereas phytoplankton in Waituna Lagoon was rarely light-limited, and appeared to be predominately P-limited. The marked differences in responses of Lake Ellesmere and Waituna Lagoon to barrier openings and closures reflected differences in ICOLL water levels and morphological characteristics, which dictated the degree of tidal flushing when the barriers were open. The inter-ICOLL differences observed in this study indicate that unless the effects of ICOLL openings/closures on phytoplankton and nutrient dynamics are understood, changes to ICOLL opening regimes may have unintended consequences for the water quality and ecology of these systems.

  10. Heavy metals accumulation in crab and shrimps from Pulicat lake, north Chennai coastal region, southeast coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batvari, B Prabhu Dass; Sivakumar, S; Shanthi, K; Lee, Kui-Jae; Oh, Byung-Taek; Krishnamoorthy, R R; Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of heavy metals such as lead (Pb), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), and chromium (Cr) was examined in crab (Scylla serrata) and shrimps (Penaeus semisulcatus, Penaeus indicus, and Penaeus monodon) collected from Pulicat lake that receives effluents from industries located in north Chennai, southeast coast of India. The results showed limited difference between crab and prawns as well as significant variations between the organs. Pb is the highly accumulated metal in both crab and shrimps, except P. monodon. The highest metal concentration was mostly found in the liver followed by other organs. The concentration of metals in edible parts (muscle) was within the permissible level and safe for consumption. However, the results of the study clearly indicate the biomagnification of metals in Pulicat lake.

  11. Paleolimnological record as an indication of incipient eutrophication in an oligotrophic subtropical coastal lake in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennemann, Mariana Coutinho; Simonassi, José Carlos; Petrucio, Mauricio Mello

    2015-08-01

    Paleolimnology of lake sediments can be a powerful tool to assess various aspects of lake history and catchment change through elemental, isotopic and molecular analysis of the sedimented organic matter (OM). In this sense, the objective of the present study was to investigate the source, depositional history and preservation of OM in the sediments of two different sites in Peri Lake (southern Brazil) to better understand the nature and direction of environmental changes. Therefore, two sediment cores were sampled and analysed for total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations and elemental ratios, and stable isotope ratios of C and N (δ(13)C and δ(15)N). Both cores showed similar general tendencies, with increasing amounts of OM (range 1-35%), TOC (2.55-258.40 mg g(-1)), TN (0.30-25.97 mg g(-1)) and TP (0.03-4.72 mg g(-1)) from the bottom toward the top more recent layers. TOC:TN ratios (range 8.1-14.7) showed a slight decrease in recent times and indicated a mixture of allochthonous and autochthonous contribution to the OM, with predominance of the last source. TN:TP (range 0.2-51.3) indicated a condition of potential limitation by P in general. Both δ(13)C (range -25.58 to -20.85) and δ(15)N (range 2.6 to 7.1) showed a decreasing pattern toward the top of the cores, in opposition to macronutrient concentration. Differences in the depth variation pattern between the two cores were associated to the marginal location of one of the cores. The results suggest that nutrients and primary production are increasing in the lake.

  12. An ecological basis for future fish habitat restoration efforts in the Huron-Erie Corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondorp, Darryl W.; Roseman, Edward F.; Manny, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    This perspective describes the major natural and anthropogenic forces driving change in the abundance and quality of fish habitats in the Huron-Erie Corridor (HEC), the Great Lakes connecting channel comprised of the St. Clair River, the Lake St. Clair, and the Detroit River. Channels connecting the Laurentian Great Lakes discharge large volumes of water equal to or greater than most other large rivers in the world that is of consistent high quality and volume, all year. Owing to creation of the St. Lawrence Seaway through the Great Lakes, the connecting channels have been modified by dredging over 200 km of deep-draft shipping lanes with a maintained depth of no less than 8.2 m. Combined with modification of their shorelines for housing and industries, use of the connecting channels for discharges of industrial and municipal wastes and shipping has resulted in numerous beneficial use impairments, such as restrictions on fish and wildlife consumption, degradation of fish and wildlife populations, and losses of fish and wildlife habitat. Various options for remediation of native fish populations and their habitats in the Great Lakes connecting channels, including construction of spawning habitat for threatened and high-value food fishes, such as lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), walleye (Sander vitreus), and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), have been implemented successfully in two of the channels, and form the basis for further recommended research described in this article.

  13. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Oblique, Digital photos taken of PA's Lake Erie shoreline and Presque Isle at an oblique angle at about 1,500-2,000' altitude., Published in 2017, Not Applicable scale, Pennsylvania Coastal Resources Management Program.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aerial Photography and Imagery, Oblique dataset, published at Not Applicable scale, was produced all or in part from Uncorrected Imagery information as of 2017....

  14. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Oblique, Digital photos taken of PA's Lake Erie shoreline and Presque Isle at an oblique angle at about 1,500-2,000' altitude., Published in 2015, Not Applicable scale, Pennsylvania Coastal Resources Management Program.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aerial Photography and Imagery, Oblique dataset, published at Not Applicable scale, was produced all or in part from Uncorrected Imagery information as of 2015....

  15. Sediment Types, PA Lake Erie bottom substrate and sediment type acquired through ponar bottom grab samples and underwater video., Published in 2014, Not Applicable scale, Pennsylvania Coastal Resources Management Program.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Sediment Types dataset, published at Not Applicable scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2014. It is described as 'PA...

  16. Use destination of a coastal lake and its impact on biological communities. A multi sectional approach; Come cambia l'uso di un lago costiero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzaro, M. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Messina (Italy). Ist. Talassografico; Caroti, L. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Florence (Italy). Ist. di Ricerca sulle Onde Elettromagnetiche Nello Carrara; Cavacini, P. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Biologia Vegetale; Creo, C.; Giordano, P. [ENEA-Casaccia, Anguillara, RM (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; De Marchi, M. [Padua Univ., Padua (Italy). Dipt di Geografia; Duchini, T. [Siena Univ., Siena (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Informatica; Gambardella, C. [Naples Univ. Federico 2., Naples (Italy). Dipt. di Genetica Biol. Gen. Molecolare

    2000-02-01

    This work does not focus on a specific case, but it is a sort of research path which can be followed whenever one has to tackle problems related to water environments holding special ecological and social importance. The aim of the study is to observe and anticipate the consequences different use destinations of a coastal lake can have on the ecosystem itself. It is, in other words, a question of indicating an assessment of social and environmental sustainability of each of the different options of the use of the territory. Different kinds of anthropical impact have been taken into account: 1) light impact: using the lake as an integrated reserve; 2) middle impact: using it for recreational activities, such as nautical sports, sport fishing, etc.; 3) strong impact: using it for aquaculture. [Italian] Il lavoro che e' ivi proposto non e' contestualizzato su un caso specifico, ma vuole essere piuttosto un percorso di ricerca da attuare quando ci si trovi ad affrontare problematiche relative ad ambienti acquatici di particolare rilevanza socio-ecosistemica. Lo studio in oggetto si prefigge di osservare e prevedere le conseguenze che una differente destinazione d'uso di un lago costiero puo' avere sull'ecosistema stesso, in altri termini si tratta di esprimere una valutazione sulla sostenibilita' socio-ambientale delle differenti opzioni d'uso del territorio. Gli impatti antropici considerati possono essere di vario tipo: 1) impatto leggero: utilizzo quale riserva integrata; 2) impatto intermedio: utilizzo per attivita' ricreative, quali sport nautici, pesca sportiva, ecc.; 3) impatto forte: utilizzo per attivita' di acquacoltura.

  17. National Dam Inspection Program. Converse Lake Dam (CT 00044). Connecticut Coastal Basin, Greenwich, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    Rosenstiel Estate. S-: f. Operator - Mr. Fredrick Jansen (Estate Superintendent) (203)661-9168 -’ .g. Purpose of Dam - Recreational - The dam was originally...cut from the downstream slope of the dam by Mr. Jansen , the estate superintendent. N 4.3 MAINTENANCE OF OPERATING FACILITIES ft There is no known...a bre in the blooi’pn.Ts cn o esosn ,71 ncut drainn theo lake or e;: v.atng7 oac C" t J C n o -2 alor A’J 1 Ian toWld that a considerable flow

  18. Annotated Bibliography for Lake Erie. Volume III. Engineering,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    redistributing the heat gained through the surface. Benninghoff, W. S. - See: A. L. Stevenson , No. 527. Berg, D. W. - See: J. H. Balsillie, No. 79. 93. Berg, D. W...discharges on the water uses are discussed together with control measures required to protect the uses. 527. Stevenson , A. L. and W. S. Benninghoff...amorphous muck. Mesic site conditions with mull humus are indicated. The forest bed is overlain successively by fibrous (marsh?) peat, pond ooze, and

  19. Lake Erie Water Level Study. Appendix F. Environmental Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    T5v’PHYSICAL CONFIGURATION DATAv /PT5 1~ ***2*W************’ 12 FORMAT (T14g*HARBOUR AREA =m vF12.O,* METRES**2𔄃/, lTl1v*DEAD VOLUME =%PF12.O.* METRES**3...34CONSTRICTION FACTOR =OPF12.39/v 6T5,’ROUGHNE6S COEFFICIENT =*vF12.3p/) 13 FORMAT CTSO*INITIAL CONDITION DATAv /p I.14 FORMAT (T50INITIAL HARBOUR CONCENTRATION

  20. Annotated Bibliography for Lake Erie. Volume II. Chemical,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    317, 319, 322, 323, 324, 327, 329, 333, 336, 345, 348, 368, 369, 371, 376, 378 Sulphur (S-Total) - 107, 182, 189, 233, 238, 246, 325, 326 TDE - 85...a streptomycete, (2) solid proteinaceous substrates and (3) the extracellular enzyme of the streptomycete. We have demonstrated adherence of kaolin ...to cell and substrate surfaces. We assayed kaolin - adsorbed enzyme by its ability to release azo dye conjugated to collagen, and to degrade collagen

  1. Annotated Bibliography for Lake Erie. Volume IV. Physical,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    chlorine and alka- lis, and organic mercury compounds. The latter are as slimi- cides used in the pulping industry. Mercury is incorporated and...livestock and poultry production is concentrated are also potential sources of serious pollution. In Ohio, animal-waste pollu- tion problems are being...bridge between Huron and Ontario. (BU) 235. Farwell, Oliver A. 1925. Botanical gleanings in Michigan. Am. Mid. Nat. 9(7):259. 102 Brief account of

  2. Lake Erie walleyes--again on the upswing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Charles P.; Van Meter, Harry D.

    1960-01-01

    SUMMARY The effect of DDT dust on wildlife was studied at Camp Bullis, Bexar County, Texas, in the summer of 1947. Studies were made on a 206.6 acre plot that was treated with DDT for experimental control of the Lone Star tick (Amblyomrna americanum). A dust consisting of one part of DDT to nine parts of pyrophyllite was applied at an average rate of 4.4 pounds of DDT per acre. The limits of DDT concentration that affected wildlife cannot be stated exactly because of a heavy rain that fell near the end of the dusting, and because of irregularity in DDT deposition. Since absolute uniformity of dusting could not be expected in any large scale DDT application, the effects observed in these trials were probably fairly representative. However, continued dry weather would have permitted longer exposure to DDT, possibly with more severe effects than those found in this study. The vegetation of the experimental area was roughly 70 percent ungrazed tall-grass prairie and 30 percent trees and shrubs. Ground and bush feeding birds were severely affected. Cardinals, lark sparrows, field sparrows, Bewick's wrens, Carolina wrens, Kentucky warblers, yellow-breasted chats, blue grosbeaks, and painted buntings were nearly or entirely eliminated from the treated area. Birds affected, but less drastically reduced in numbers, were yellow-billed cuckoo, black and white warbler, yellow-throated vireo, and white-eyed vireo. Birds found dead in the DDT area were 9 cardinals, 2 painted buntings, 2 lark sparrows, 1 yellow-breasted chat, and 1 white-eyed vireo. Bird mortality had begun by the day after dusting and was largely over by the end of the fifth day. Census of deer in DDT and check areas before and after treatment showed no reduction in deer numbers and no diminution in use of the DDT area. No deer or fawns were found dead or affected. Box-trapping of raccoons in DDT and check areas before and after treatment showed no effects that could be attributed to DDT. Limited observations on armadillos, striped skunks, and rabbits gave no indication of pronounced damage to these forms. No mammals of any kind were found dead or affected in or near the DDT area. Four rough green snakes and one Texan spiny lizard were found dead in the DDT area. Mortality was probably high among insectivorous reptiles.

  3. Lake Erie Water Level Study. Appendix E. Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    cfa , Qm - Estimated navigation flow requirement in cfs, and 2000 - Spill through compensating works in cfs. 2.2.3 United States Plants (1) The...5.5 5.5 5.5 1999- 2018 5.0 5.0 5.0 Source: Economics Division, Ontario Hydro E - 69 generation will cause a corresponding change in O&M costs. For this...or used at the Cascade plants, which have a lower economy factor (kW/ cfa ) than the high head SAB plants. Plan 15S would result in an annual loss of

  4. Lake Erie Water Level Study. Appendix B. Regulatory Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    footbridge would be constructed over the alternative S2 gate bay to permit maintenance access from the Black Rock Lock side. A similar enclosed... footbridge would be provided over the alternative S3 gate bays to allow public access to the Bird Island Pier for recreational fishing. In addition to the...with connecting footbridges across the entrance to the proposed alternative S2 diversion channel; 6. A temporary ice boom across the Black Rock Canal

  5. The new diatom training set from the Polish Baltic coast and diatom-based transfer functions as a tool for understanding past changes in the southern Baltic coastal lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutyńska, Monika; Szpikowska, Grażyna; Woszczyk, Michał; Suchińska, Anita; Burchardt, Lubomira; Messyasz, Beata

    2014-05-01

    The transfer function method has been developed as a useful tool for reconstruction of the past environmental changes. It is based on the assumption that the modern species, which ecological requirements are known, can be used to quantitative reconstructions of the past changes. The aim of the study was to gather test sets and to build diatom-based transfer function, which can be used to reconstruct changes in the trophic state and salinity in the coastal lakes on the Polish Baltic coast. In the previous years there were several attempts made to reconstruct these parameters in lagoonal waters on the Baltic coasts in Germany, Denmark, Finland, Netherland, Sweden and Norway. But so far there is no diatom test set and transfer function was built for the Polish coastal lakes. We sample diatoms form 12 lakes located along the polish Baltic coast. At the same time we monitor the physical-chemical conditions in the lakes, which includes lake water chemical composition (chlorides, phosphorous and sulphur), pH, salinity, conductivity, temperature, dissolved oxygen. We collect samples form the lakes as well as from the Baltic Sea and we analyse the whole phytoplankton composition, however the special focus in put on diatoms. The results of the analysis show seasonal changes in the chemical and physical water properties. The diatom assemblage composition and species frequency also changed significantly. This study is a contribution to the projects: NN 306 064 640 financed by National Science Centre, Poland and Virtual Institute ICLEA (Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis) funded by the Helmholtz Association.

  6. Hydrology and environmental aspects of Erie Canal (1817-99)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, Walter Basil

    1976-01-01

    As the first major water project in the United States, the old Erie Canal provides an example of the hydrological and environmental consequences of water development. The available record shows that the project aroused environmental fears that the canal might be impaired by the adverse hydrologic effects of land development induced by the canal. Water requirements proved greater than anticipated, and problems of floods and hydraulic inefficiencies beset navigation throughout its history. The Erie Canal proved the practicality of major hydraulic works to the extent that operations and maintenance could cope with the burdens of deficiencies in design. The weight of prior experience that upland streams, such as the Potomac and Mohawk Rivers, had proved unsatisfactory for dependable navigation, led to a decision to build an independent canal which freed the location from the constraints of river channels and made possible a cross-country water route directly to Lake Erie. The decision on dimensioning the canal prism--chiefly width and depth-involved balance between a fear of building too small and thus not achieving the economic potentials, and a fear of building too expensively. The constraints proved effective, and for the first part of its history the revenues collected were sufficient to repay all costs. So great was the economic advantage of the canal that the rising trend in traffic soon induced an enlargement of the canal cross section, based upon a new but riskier objective-build as large as the projected trend in toll revenues would finance. The increased revenues did not materialize. Water supplies were a primary concern for both the planners and the operators of the canal. Water required for lockage, although the most obvious to the planners, proved to be a relatively minor item compared with the amounts of water that were required to compensate for leakage through the bed and banks of the canal. Leakage amounted to about 8 inches of depth per day. The total

  7. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, Joseph H.; O'Gorman, Robert; Schneider, Clifford P.; Eckert, Thomas H.; Schaner, Ted; Bowlby, James N.; Schleen, Larry P.

    1995-01-01

    Attempts to maintain the native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) population in Lake Ontario by stocking fry failed and the species was extirpated by the 1950s. Hatchery fish stocked in the 1960s did not live to maturity because of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) predation and incidental commercial harvest. Suppression of sea lampreys began with larvicide treatments of Lake Ontario tributaries in 1971 and was enhanced when the tributaries of Oneida Lake and Lake Erie were treated in the 1980s. Annual stocking of hatchery fish was resumed with the 1972 year class and peaked at about 1.8 million yearlings and 0.3 million fingerlings from the 1985–1990 year classes. Survival of stocked yearlings declined over 50% in the 1980 s and was negatively correlated with the abundance of lake trout > 550 mm long (r = −0.91, P < 0.01, n = 12). A slot length limit imposed by the State of New York for the 1988 fishing season reduced angler harvest. Angler harvest in Canadian waters was 3 times higher in eastern Lake Ontario than in western Lake Ontario. For the 1977–1984 year classes, mean annual survival rate of lake trout age 6 and older was 0.45 (range: 0.35–0.56). In U.S. waters during 1985–1992, the total number of lake trout harvested by anglers was about 2.4 times greater than that killed by sea lampreys. The number of unmarked lake trout < 250 mm long in trawl catches in 1978–1992 was not different from that expected due to loss of marks and failure to apply marks at the hatchery, and suggested that recruitment of naturally-produced fish was nil. However, many of the obstacles which may have impeded lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario during the 1980s are slowly being removed, and there are signs of a general ecosystem recovery. Significant recruitment of naturally produced lake trout by the year 2000, one interim objective of the rehabilitation plan for the Lake, may be achieved.

  8. Phytoplankton and physical-chemical conditions in selected rivers and the coastal zone of Lake Michigan, 1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelske, C.L.; Feldt, L.E.; Simmons, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    A very large data set was obtained on the nearshore environment of Lake Michigan during 1972. The data set is probably unique in that samples were collected and analyzed for a number of physical-chemical parameters and for phytoplankton standing crop and species composition. Phytoplankton identified during the study totaled 431 taxa of which 306 were diatoms, which serves to illustrate the magnitude of available data. Results are presented for eleven different transects sampled in April and for three of these transects which were sampled in September. In addition, transects for the St. Joseph, Kalamazoo, and Grand Rivers were sampled four or five times and each of these rivers were sampled from seven to eleven times in July. Data collected with depth presented in this report include water temperature. Secchi disc transparency, pH, specific conductance, dissolved reactive silica, nitrate nitrogen, and total phosphorus as physical-chemical variables. On transects samples with depth were obtained at stations 0, .2, .8, 1.6, 3.2, 6.4, 13, 26, and 52 km from shore, although the stations from 13 to 52 km were not sampled on every transect. Data related to phytoplankton include species composition and abundance, species diversity, chlorophyll a, and rates of carbon fixation. All these data were obtained only at 2 meters.

  9. Coastal strategies to predict Escherichia coli concentrations for beaches along a 35 km stretch of Southern Lake Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevers, Meredith B; Whitman, Richard L

    2008-06-15

    To understand the fate and movement of Escherichia coli in beach water, numerous modeling studies have been undertaken including mechanistic predictions of currents and plumes and empirical modeling based on hydrometeorological variables. Most approaches are limited in scope by nearshore currents or physical obstacles and data limitations; few examine the issue from a larger spatial scale. Given the similarities between variables typically included in these models, we attempted to take a broader view of E. coli fluctuations by simultaneously examining twelve beaches along 35 km of Indiana's Lake Michigan coastline that includes five point-source outfalls. The beaches had similar E. coli fluctuations, and a best-fit empirical model included two variables: wave height and an interactive term comprised of wind direction and creekturbidity. Individual beach R2 was 0.32--0.50. Data training-set results were comparable to validation results (R2 = 0.48). Amount of variation explained by the model was similar to previous reports for individual beaches. By extending the modeling approach to include more coastline distance, broader-scale spatial and temporal changes in bacteria concentrations and the influencing factors can be characterized.

  10. Characterization of Coastal Drift-Cell Sediment Processes Effecting the Restoration of the Southern Lake Michigan Shoreline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Thomas P; Morris, Charles C; Argyilan, Erin P

    2016-12-01

    Hard structures along the southern shore of Lake Michigan restrict natural longshore sediment transport, destabilizing the shoreline, and dissecting the coast into localized shoreline reaches. A geometric design was used to sample (n = 590 nodes) at nine shoreline reaches near the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore to characterize existing sediment in the offshore and onshore zones. Cluster Analysis grouped shoreline sites into two clusters. Factor Analysis showed that 35 % of the sand fractionation's cumulative variance across all sites was explained by an increased loading on medium sand (0.250 mm) with a corresponding decrease loading on small pebbles (4.750 mm), and an additional 30 % of the cumulative variance was explained by a negative loading on very fine sand (0.075 mm). Individual clusters showed that 43 % of the cumulative variance within cluster one could be explained by increased loadings on fine and medium sand (0.149-0.250 mm) with a corresponding negative loading on small pebbles (4.75 mm). An additional 22 % of the cumulative variance was explained by the positive loading on coarse sand (0.850 mm). Cluster two was explained by a single factor (62 % cumulative variance) highlighting an increased loading on small pebbles and coarse sand, and decreased loadings on medium to very fine sand. Principal component analysis showed that sediment characterization of the swash zone provided the best explanation of between site variance.

  11. Characterization of Coastal Drift-Cell Sediment Processes Effecting the Restoration of the Southern Lake Michigan Shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Thomas P.; Morris, Charles C.; Argyilan, Erin P.

    2016-12-01

    Hard structures along the southern shore of Lake Michigan restrict natural longshore sediment transport, destabilizing the shoreline, and dissecting the coast into localized shoreline reaches. A geometric design was used to sample ( n = 590 nodes) at nine shoreline reaches near the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore to characterize existing sediment in the offshore and onshore zones. Cluster Analysis grouped shoreline sites into two clusters. Factor Analysis showed that 35 % of the sand fractionation's cumulative variance across all sites was explained by an increased loading on medium sand (0.250 mm) with a corresponding decrease loading on small pebbles (4.750 mm), and an additional 30 % of the cumulative variance was explained by a negative loading on very fine sand (0.075 mm). Individual clusters showed that 43 % of the cumulative variance within cluster one could be explained by increased loadings on fine and medium sand (0.149-0.250 mm) with a corresponding negative loading on small pebbles (4.75 mm). An additional 22 % of the cumulative variance was explained by the positive loading on coarse sand (0.850 mm). Cluster two was explained by a single factor (62 % cumulative variance) highlighting an increased loading on small pebbles and coarse sand, and decreased loadings on medium to very fine sand. Principal component analysis showed that sediment characterization of the swash zone provided the best explanation of between site variance.

  12. The potential for a fish ladder to mitigate against the loss of marine-estuarine-freshwater connectivity in a subtropical coastal lake

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Weerts, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing water demand in coastal regions has resulted in the construction of weirs and barrages in coastal freshwaters. These form barriers to migrations of estuarine and euryhaline marine fishes and crustaceans. This study assessed the impact...

  13. Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Regional Transportation Study; Great Lakes Area Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    in either vertical or horizontal rotary kilns . Most states have limestone deposits, but much of that used by the steel industry comes from Michigan...Others Amoco 3 National Gypsum 6 Cement Transit Company 7 Erie Sand 3 Subtotal 19 TOTAL 140 * I Source: Lake Carriers Association. I I III-21 I

  14. 75 FR 43145 - Evaluation of State Coastal Management Programs and National Estuarine Research Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... Ridge Environmental Center at Presque Isle, Room 112, 301 Peninsula Drive, Erie, Pennsylvania. ADDRESSES.../Winyah Bay (South Carolina) National Estuarine Research Reserve and the Pennsylvania Coastal Resources... Discovery Center, 22 Hobcaw Road, Georgetown, South Carolina. The Pennsylvania Coastal Resources Management...

  15. Phylogenies of microcystin-producing cyanobacteria in the lower Laurentian Great Lakes suggest extensive genetic connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy W Davis

    Full Text Available Lake St. Clair is the smallest lake in the Laurentian Great Lakes system. MODIS satellite imagery suggests that high algal biomass events have occurred annually along the southern shore during late summer. In this study, we evaluated these events and tested the hypothesis that summer bloom material derived from Lake St. Clair may enter Lake Erie via the Detroit River and represent an overlooked source of potentially toxic Microcystis biomass to the western basin of Lake Erie. We conducted a seasonally and spatially resolved study carried out in the summer of 2013. Our goals were to: 1 track the development of the 2013 summer south-east shore bloom 2 conduct a spatial survey to characterize the extent of toxicity, taxonomic diversity of the total phytoplankton population and the phylogenetic diversity of potential MC-producing cyanobacteria (Microcystis, Planktothrix and Anabaena during a high biomass event, and 3 compare the strains of potential MC-producers in Lake St. Clair with strains from Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. Our results demonstrated a clear predominance of cyanobacteria during a late August bloom event, primarily dominated by Microcystis, which we traced along the Lake St. Clair coastline downstream to the Detroit River's outflow at Lake Erie. Microcystin levels exceeded the Province of Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standard (1.5 µg L(-1 for safe drinking water at most sites, reaching up to five times this level in some areas. Microcystis was the predominant microcystin producer, and all toxic Microcystis strains found in Lake St. Clair were genetically similar to toxic Microcystis strains found in lakes Erie and Ontario. These findings suggest extensive genetic connectivity among the three systems.

  16. The Golgi associated ERI3 is a Flavivirus host factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Alex Michael; Calvert, Meredith E. K.; Read, Leah R.; Kang, Seokyoung; Levitt, Brandt E.; Dimopoulos, George; Bradrick, Shelton S.; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus classified into four serotypes (DENV-1-4) that causes Dengue fever (DF), Dengue hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) or Dengue shock syndrome (DSS). An estimated 390 million people are at risk for infection with DENV and there are no effective vaccines or therapeutics. We utilized RNA chromatography coupled with quantitative mass spectrometry (qMS) to identify host RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that interact with DENV-2 RNA. We identified ERI3 (also PRNPIP and PINT1), a putative 3′–5′ RNA exonuclease, which preferentially associates with DENV-2 genomic RNA via interactions with dumbbell structures in the 3′ UTR. ERI3 is required for accumulation of DENV-2 genomic RNA and production of infectious particles. Furthermore, the mosquito homologue of ERI3 is required for DENV-2 replication in adult Aedes aegypti mosquitos implying that the requirement for ERI3 is conserved in both DENV hosts. In human cells ERI3 localizes to the Golgi in uninfected cells, but relocalizes near sites of DENV-2 replication in infected cells. ERI3 is not required for maintaining DENV-2 RNA stability or translation of the viral polyprotein, but is required for viral RNA synthesis. Our results define a specific role for ERI3 and highlight the importance of Golgi proteins in DENV-2 replication. PMID:27682269

  17. Forecasting Lake-Effect Precipitation in the Great Lakes Region Using NASA Enhanced-Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipullo, Michelle; Molthan, Andrew; Shafer, Jackie; Case, Jonathan; Jedlovec, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Lake-effect precipitation is common in the Great Lakes region, particularly during the late fall and winter. The synoptic processes of lake-effect precipitation are well understood by operational forecasters, but individual forecast events still present a challenge. Locally run, high resolution models can assist the forecaster in identifying the onset and duration of precipitation, but model results are sensitive to initial conditions, particularly the assumed surface temperature of the Great Lakes. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has created a Great Lakes Surface Temperature (GLST) composite, which uses infrared estimates of water temperatures obtained from the MODIS instrument aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites, other coarser resolution infrared data when MODIS is not available, and ice cover maps produced by the NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab (GLERL). This product has been implemented into the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model Environmental Modeling System (WRF-EMS), used within forecast offices to run local, high resolution forecasts. The sensitivity of the model forecast to the GLST product was analyzed with a case study of the Lake Effect Storm Echinacea, which produced 10 to 12 inches of snowfall downwind of Lake Erie, and 8 to 18 inches downwind of Lake Ontario from 27-29 January 2010. This research compares a forecast using the default Great Lakes surface temperatures from the Real Time Global sea surface temperature (RTG SST), in the WRF-EMS model to the enhanced NASA SPoRT GLST product to study forecast impacts. Results from this case study show that the SPoRT GLST contained less ice cover over Lake Erie and generally cooler water temperatures over Lakes Erie and Ontario. Latent and sensible heat fluxes over Lake Ontario were decreased in the GLST product. The GLST product decreased the quantitative precipitation forecast (QPF), which can be correlated to the decrease in temperatures and heat

  18. Tentative Detection of the Rotation of Eris

    CERN Document Server

    Roe, H G; Brown, M E

    2008-01-01

    We report a multi-week sequence of B-band photometric measurements of the dwarf planet Eris using the {\\it Swift} satellite. The use of an observatory in low-Earth orbit provides better temporal sampling than is available with a ground-based telescope. We find no compelling evidence for an unusually slow rotation period of multiple days, as has been suggested previously. A $\\sim$1.08 day rotation period is marginally detected at a modest level of statistical confidence ($\\sim$97%). Analysis of the combination of the $Swift$ data with the ground-based B-band measurements of \\citet{2007AJ....133...26R} returns the same period ($\\sim$1.08 day) at a slightly higher statistical confidence ($\\sim$99%).

  19. Expression and regulation of the ery operon of Brucella melitensis in human trophoblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Dou, Xiaoxia; Li, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Jing; Guo, Fei; Wang, Yuanzhi; Wang, Zhen; Li, Tiansen; Gu, Xinli; Chen, Chuangfu

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is primarily a disease of domestic animals in which the bacteria localizes to fetal tissues such as embryonic trophoblast cells and fluids containing erythritol, which stimulates Brucella spp. growth. The utilization of erythritol is a characteristic of the genus Brucella. The ery operon contains four genes (eryA, eryB, eryC and eryD) for the utilization of erythritol, and plays a major role in the survival and multiplication of Brucella spp. The objective of the present study was to conduct a preliminary characterization of differential genes expression of the ery operon at several time points after Brucella infected embryonic trophoblast cells (HPT-8 cells). The result showed that the ery operon expression was higher in HPT-8 cells compared with the medium. The relative expression of eryA, eryB and eryC peaked at 2 h post-infection in HPT-8 cells, and eryD expression peaked at 3 h post-infection. The expression of eryA, eryB and eryC may be inhibited by increased eryD expression. However, the expression of the ery operon was stable in the presence of erythritol in cells. 2308Δery and 027Δery mutants of the ery operon were successfully constructed by homologous recombination, which were attenuated in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. The characterization of the ery operon genes and their expression profiles in response to Brucella infection further contributes to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of infection and the pathogenesis of brucellosis. PMID:27698777

  20. Larval dispersal underlies demographically important inter-system connectivity in a Great Lakes yellow perch (Perca flavescens) population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodnik, Reed M.; Fraker, Michael E.; Anderson, Eric J.; Carreon-Martinez, Lucia; DeVanna, Kristen M.; Heath, Dan D.; Reichert, Julie M.; Roseman, Edward F.; Ludsin, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Ability to quantify connectivity among spawning subpopulations and their relative contribution of recruits to the broader population is a critical fisheries management need. By combining microsatellite and age information from larval yellow perch (Perca flavescens) collected in the Lake St. Clair – Detroit River system (SC-DRS) and western Lake Erie with a hydrodynamic backtracking approach, we quantified subpopulation structure, connectivity, and contributions of recruits to the juvenile stage in western Lake Erie during 2006-2007. After finding weak (yet stable) genetic structure between the SC-DRS and two western Lake Erie subpopulations, microsatellites also revealed measurable recruitment of SC-DRS larvae to the juvenile stage in western Lake Erie (17-21% during 2006-2007). Consideration of pre-collection larval dispersal trajectories, using hydrodynamic backtracking, increased estimated contributions to 65% in 2006 and 57% in 2007. Our findings highlight the value of complementing subpopulation discrimination methods with hydrodynamic predictions of larval dispersal by revealing the SC-DRS as a source of recruits to western Lake Erie and also showing that connectivity through larval dispersal can affect the structure and dynamics of large-lake fish populations.

  1. Michigan 2008 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the MI coasts of Lake Superior, Lake Michigan and...

  2. Michigan 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the MI coasts of Lake Superior, Lake St. Clair and...

  3. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NOAA-GLERL and its partners conduct innovative research on the dynamic environments and ecosystems of the Great Lakes and coastal regions to provide information for...

  4. Erie National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1996 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  5. Erie National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1989 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  6. Erie National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1997 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  7. Grassland Management Plan Erie National Wildlife Refuge 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This management plan provides well defined guidelines to accomplish the following goals at Erie National Wildlife Refuge : 1) to manage existing grasslands, 2)...

  8. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1984 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  9. Erie National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1995 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  10. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1986 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  11. Narrative report January - April, 1963 Erie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  12. Narrative report September - December, 1961 Erie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. Narrative report May - August, 1962 Erie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  14. Narrative report January - April, 1961 Erie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  15. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1988 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  16. Narrative report calendar year - 1964 Erie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  17. Erie National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 2001 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year’s...

  18. Narrative report January - April, 1962 Erie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  19. Narrative report September - December, 1963 Erie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar Year 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1994 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the...

  1. Waterfowl Count over Pool 9 Erie National Wildlife Refuge 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This presents the observations of waterfowl flying over Pool 9 at Erie National Wildlife Refuge from late-August through early October, 1970.

  2. A Survey Of Vegetation for The Erie Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report contains the results of an inventory conducted on the vegetation present at the Erie Wildlife Refuge. Its intent is to provide base information for later...

  3. Beaver Census in the Erie National Wildlife Refuge: Seneca Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The main objective of this internship project was to approximately determine the population of beaver ( castor canadensis) in the Seneca division of the Erie...

  4. Erie National Wildlife Refuge (Seneca Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Erie National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  5. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1976

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1976 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  6. Narrative report Erie National Wildlife Refuge calendar year - 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. Narrative report Erie National Wildlife Refuge calendar year - 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  8. Narrative report calendar year - 1965 Erie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  9. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1972

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  10. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1979 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  11. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1980 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  12. Erie National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1998 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  13. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1982 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  14. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1983 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  15. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1978 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  16. Initial narrative report September - December, 1960 Erie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the...

  17. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Fiscal year 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1975 fiscal year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  18. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Fiscal year 1974

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1974 fiscal year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  19. Narrative report May - August, 1963 Erie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  20. Narrative report Erie National Wildlife Refuge calendar year - 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  1. Narrative report Erie National Wildlife Refuge calendar year - 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  2. Forest Management Plan Area 1 Erie National Wildlife Refuge 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The management objective on Area l at Erie National Wildlife Refuge is to increase forest diversity in order to benefit all indigenous species with primary...

  3. Narrative report September - December, 1962 Erie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  4. Narrative report May - August, 1961 Erie National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  5. Narrative report Erie National Wildlife Refuge calendar year - 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1971 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  6. Erie National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1990 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  7. Erie National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1992 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  8. Erie National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1993 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  9. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1987 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  10. Erie National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Erie National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1991 calendar year. The report begins by giving a brief introduction...

  11. Temporal and spatial dynamics of large lake hypoxia: Integrating statistical and three-dimensional dynamic models to enhance lake management criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocaniov, Serghei A.; Scavia, Donald

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxia or low bottom water dissolved oxygen (DO) is a world-wide problem of management concern requiring an understanding and ability to monitor and predict its spatial and temporal dynamics. However, this is often made difficult in large lakes and coastal oceans because of limited spatial and temporal coverage of field observations. We used a calibrated and validated three-dimensional ecological model of Lake Erie to extend a statistical relationship between hypoxic extent and bottom water DO concentrations to explore implications of the broader temporal and spatial development and dissipation of hypoxia. We provide the first numerical demonstration that hypoxia initiates in the nearshore, not the deep portion of the basin, and that the threshold used to define hypoxia matters in both spatial and temporal dynamics and in its sensitivity to climate. We show that existing monitoring programs likely underestimate both maximum hypoxic extent and the importance of low oxygen in the nearshore, discuss implications for ecosystem and drinking water protection, and recommend how these results could be used to efficiently and economically extend monitoring programs.

  12. Changes in Rates of Shore Retreat, Lake Michigan, 1967-1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    D.C., Apr. 1946. BERG, D.W., "Factors Affecting Beach Nourishment at Presque Isle Peninsula, Erie , Pennsylvania ," Proceedings of the Ninth Conference on...concern the behavior of beach fill at Presque Isle Peninsula on Lake Erie . Guidelines for moni- toring the effect of shore protection works in the Great...NTIS AD 631 520). BERG, D.W., and DUANE, D.B., "Effects of Particle Size and Distribution on Stability of Artificially Filled Beach, Presque Isle

  13. Age, growth, spawning season, and fecundity of the trout-perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus) in southeastern Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Robert; Wells, LaRue

    1973-01-01

    Growth of trout-perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus) in the first 2 years of life was somewhat slower in southeastern Lake Michigan (average length at end of second year, 83 mm) than in Lower Red Lake, Minnesota (90 mm), but considerably faster than in Lake Superior (58 mm); size differences in later years were slightly less pronounced. Young fish began growing earlier in the year (some before June 20) than older ones (as late as August). Females tended to live longer than males, as they do in Lower Red Lake and Lake Superior. Trout-perch spawned from late June or early July until late September, somewhat later than in Lower Red Lake (May to August) or Lake Erie (June to August). Fecundity was similar to that in Lake Erie; mature females 94-146 mm long contained from 126 to 1329 yolked eggs.

  14. Geohydrology and water quality of the unconsolidated deposits in Erie County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckwalter, T.F.; Schreffler, C.L.; Gleichsner, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Water in unconsolidated deposits is used for the water supplies of homes, farms, municipalities, and industries in Erie County. The unconsolidated deposits cover most of the bedrock of Erie County. Thickness of the unconsolidated deposits ranged from 60 to 400 feet at 30 sites surveyed by seismic refraction and reflection methods. Water wells, mostly in the unconsolidated deposits, provide adequate domestic supplies. Wells in fractured bedrock can generally provide small domestic supplies; however, droughts can affect some of the domestic water wells. Ground-water withdrawals accounted for 10 million gallons per day of the water used in Erie County in 1984. Mean annual precipitation ranged from 42 to 47 inches per year in Erie County from 1961 through 1990; the southeastern region of the county generally receives more precipitation than the lake shore region to the north. Overland runoff to three segments of the French Creek watershed in the upland area ranged from about 13 to 19 in. per year and base flow ranged from 14 to about 18 in. per year from 1975 to 1992. Evapotranspiration ranged from about 13 to 16 in. per year for those segments. Beach and outwash deposits generally provide the largest supplies of water to wells in Erie County. A median specific capacity of 17 (gal/min)/ft (gallons per minute per foot) of drawdown was determined from records of nondomestic wells in beach deposits and 9 (gal/min)/ft of drawdown in outwash. Mean specific capacity for wells in till deposits was 1.5 (gal/min)/ft. The range in yield and specific capacity, however, was great for the unconsolidated deposits and high yielding outwash deposits are sometimes difficult to locate beneath till and valley-fill deposits. Hydraulic conductivities from three aquifer tests of outwash deposits (sand and gravel) at separate sites ranged from 110 to 2,030 ft/d (feet per day). Hydraulic conductivities from another aquifer test of sand and silt in the water table at Presque Isle ranged from

  15. Premature Trigger of ERI in Medtronic EnRhythm Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middeldorp, Melissa E; Mahajan, Rajiv; Elliott, Adrian D; Pathak, Rajeev K; Twomey, Darragh; Wilson, Lauren; Stolcman, Simon; Munawar, Dian A; Kumar, Sharath; Lau, Dennis H; Sanders, Prashanthan

    2017-06-01

    Medical technology has made significant advances over the last few decades with smaller and more dynamic pacemakers. However, technical failures leading to premature replacement is a cause of concern. We present a series of Medtronic EnRhythm devices that reached premature elective replacement indicator (ERI). The database of Centre of Heart Rhythm Disorders was searched for EnRhythm device implantation from 2006 to 2011. Battery depletion <8.5 years was considered premature considering the projected average longevity to be 8.5-10.5 years. An unexpected premature ERI was defined when it was reached within 3 months of last normal check. Device follow-up was conducted every 3 months after advisory. A total of 88 EnRhythm pacemakers were implanted. Over a median follow-up of 6.2 years (range: 0.3-9.2), 39 (44.3%) EnRhythm devices reached premature ERI. In 11 (28%), ERI was not recognized and patients were being investigated for other causes of unsteadiness or dyspnea prior to device check. Notably, three (7%) patients had premature ERI < 3.5 years. Ten (25.6%) had sudden and unexpected premature ERI. While asynchronous pacing was observed, there were no cases of absence of pacing. The rate of premature ERI for EnRhythm devices was 44.3%, significantly higher than reported by the manufacturer. Of concern, a sizeable proportion occurred unexpectedly, warranting more frequent reviews and empirical replacement in some patients. With the experience of the EnRhythm, appropriate monitoring strategies are recommended for future advisories. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Factors of ecologic succession in oligotrophic fish communities of the Laurentian Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stanford H.

    1972-01-01

    Oligotrophic fish communities of the Great Lakes have undergone successive disruptions since the mid-1800s. Major contributing factors have been intensive selective fisheries, extreme modification of the drainage, invasion of marine species, and progressive physical–chemical changes of the lake environments. Lake Ontario was the first to be affected as its basin was settled and industrialized earliest, and it was the first to be connected by canals to the mid-Atlantic where the alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) which ultimately became established in the Great Lakes were abundant. Oligotrophic fish communities were successively disrupted in Lakes Erie, Huron, Michigan, and Superior as the affects of population growth, industrialization, and marine invaders spread upward in the Laurentian drainage.The degree and sequence of response of families offish and species within families differed for each factor, but the sequence of change among families and species has been the same in response to each factor as it affected various lakes at different times. The ultimate result of the disruption of fish communities has been a reduction of productivity of oligotrophic species that ranges from extreme in Lake Ontario to moderate in Lake Superior, and which has reached a state of instability and rapid change in the upper three Great Lakes by the rnid-1900s similar to the situation in Lake Ontario in the mid-1800s. Since oligotrophic species (primarily salmonines, coregonines, and deepwater cottids) are the only kinds of fish that fully occupied the entire volume of the deepwater Great Lakes (Ontario, Huron, Michigan, and Superior), the fish biomass of these lakes has been reduced as various species declined or disappeared. In Lake Erie, which is shallow, and in the shallow bays of the deep lakes, oligotrophic species were replaced by mesotrophic species, primarily percids, which have successively increased and declined. All oligotrophic

  17. NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) infrared (IR) orthorectified mosaic image tiles, Lake Charles, Louisiana 2009-2010 (NODC Accession 0100232)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains infrared (IR) ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The...

  18. Coastal Cover Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) Great Lakes 1996-era and 2001-era land cover change analysis (NODC Accession 0042437)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains the 1996-era and 2001-era classifications of Great lakes and can be used to analyze change. This imagery was collected as part of the...

  19. Extraction of lakes from an IfSAR DSM and a GIS-based analysis of drainage potential, Western Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — More than 35,000 lakes larger than 0.01 sq. km. were extracted from an airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IfSAR) derived digital surface model...

  20. Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) U.S. Great Lakes 1996-2001-era land cover change analysis (NODC Accession 0038725)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains the 1996-era and 2001-era classifications of US Great Lakes can be used to analyze change. This imagery was collected as part of the...

  1. Influences on Bythotrephes longimanus life-history characteristics in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothoven, Steven A.; Vanderploeg, Henry A.; Warner, David M.; Schaeffer, Jeffrey S.; Ludsin, Stuart A.; Claramunt, Randall M.; Nalepa, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    We compared Bythotrephes population demographics and dynamics to predator (planktivorous fish) and prey (small-bodied crustacean zooplankton) densities at a site sampled through the growing season in Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Erie. Although seasonal average densities of Bythotrephes were similar across lakes (222/m2 Erie, 247/m2 Huron, 162/m2 Michigan), temporal trends in abundance differed among lakes. In central Lake Erie where Bythotrephes' prey assemblage was dominated by small individuals (60%), where planktivorous fish densities were high (14,317/ha), and where a shallow water column limited availability of a deepwater refuge, the Bythotrephes population was characterized by a small mean body size, large broods with small neonates, allocation of length increases mainly to the spine rather than to the body, and a late summer population decline. By contrast, in Lake Michigan where Bythotrephes' prey assemblage was dominated by large individuals (72%) and planktivorous fish densities were lower (5052/ha), the Bythotrephes population was characterized by a large mean body size (i.e., 37–55% higher than in Erie), small broods with large neonates, nearly all growth in body length occurring between instars 1 and 2, and population persistence into fall. Life-history characteristics in Lake Huron tended to be intermediate to those found in Lakes Michigan and Erie, reflecting lower overall prey and predator densities (1224/ha) relative to the other lakes. Because plasticity in life history can affect interactions with other species, our findings point to the need to understand life-history variation among Great Lakes populations to improve our ability to model the dynamics of these ecosystems.

  2. 33 CFR 162.132 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; communications rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) English language. Reports required by this section shall be made in the English language. (d) Traffic... Report. Stag Island Upper Light Report. Report Marine City Salt Dock Light Report. Report Grande...

  3. 76 FR 12103 - Erie Boulevard Hydropower, L.P; Notice of Settlement Agreement and Soliciting Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Erie Boulevard Hydropower, L.P; Notice of Settlement Agreement and.... Date Filed: February 18, 2011. d. Applicant: Erie Boulevard Hydropower, L.P. e. Location: The existing... Daoust, Erie Boulevard Hydropower, 33 West 1st Street, South, Fulton, NY, 13069; (315) 598-6131. i. FERC...

  4. Determination of polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters, perfluoroalkyl phosphonic acids, perfluoroalkyl phosphinic acids, perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids, and perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids in lake trout from the Great Lakes region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Reiner, Eric J; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Helm, Paul A; Mabury, Scott A; Braekevelt, Eric; Tittlemier, Sheryl A

    2012-11-01

    A comprehensive method to extract perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids, perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids, perfluoroalkyl phosphonic acids, perfluoroalkyl phosphinic acids, and polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters simultaneously from fish samples has been developed. The recoveries of target compounds ranged from 78 % to 121 %. The new method was used to analyze lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from the Great Lakes region. The results showed that the total perfluoroalkane sulfonate concentrations ranged from 0.1 to 145 ng/g (wet weight) with perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) as the dominant contaminant. Concentrations in fish between lakes were in the order of Lakes Ontario ≈ Erie > Huron > Superior ≈ Nipigon. The total perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 18.2 ng/g wet weight. The aggregate mean perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) concentration in fish across all lakes was 0.045 ± 0.023 ng/g. Mean concentrations of PFOA were not significantly different (p > 0.1) among the five lakes. Perfluoroalkyl phosphinic acids were detected in lake trout from Lake Ontario, Lake Erie, and Lake Huron with concentration ranging from non-detect (ND) to 0.032 ng/g. Polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters were detected only in lake trout from Lake Huron, at levels similar to perfluorooctanoic acid.

  5. Designing coastal conservation to deliver ecosystem and human well-being benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearsall, Douglas R.; Kahl, Katherine J.; Washburn, Erika L.; May, Christopher A.; Franks Taylor, Rachael; Cole, James B.; Ewert, David N.; Game, Edward T.; Doran, Patrick J.

    2017-01-01

    Conservation scientists increasingly recognize that incorporating human values into conservation planning increases the chances for success by garnering broader project acceptance. However, methods for defining quantitative targets for the spatial representation of human well-being priorities are less developed. In this study we employ an approach for identifying regionally important human values and establishing specific spatial targets for their representation based on stakeholder outreach. Our primary objective was to develop a spatially-explicit conservation plan that identifies the most efficient locations for conservation actions to meet ecological goals while sustaining or enhancing human well-being values within the coastal and nearshore areas of the western Lake Erie basin (WLEB). We conducted an optimization analysis using 26 features representing ecological and human well-being priorities (13 of each), and included seven cost layers. The influence that including human well-being had on project results was tested by running five scenarios and setting targets for human well-being at different levels in each scenario. The most important areas for conservation to achieve multiple goals are clustered along the coast, reflecting a concentration of existing or potentially restorable coastal wetlands, coastal landbird stopover habitat and terrestrial biodiversity, as well as important recreational activities. Inland important areas tended to cluster around trails and high quality inland landbird stopover habitat. Most concentrated areas of importance also are centered on lands that are already conserved, reflecting the lower costs and higher benefits of enlarging these conserved areas rather than conserving isolated, dispersed areas. Including human well-being features in the analysis only influenced the solution at the highest target levels. PMID:28241018

  6. Coastal Morphology and Coastal Protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Graaff, J.

    2009-01-01

    Lecture notes ct5309. Tides, currents and water; coastal problems; sediment transport processes; coastal transport modes; longshore transport; cross-shore transport; fundamentals of mud; channels and trenches; coastal protection; application of structures; application of nourishments.

  7. Sedimentological and geochemical support for a large flood ca. 4400 cy BP in the coastal southwest United States (Lake Elsinore, CA): Evidence for a Drought Buster Atmospheric River Storm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, M. E.; Patterson, W. P.

    2015-12-01

    As serious a threat drought is to the coastal southwest United States (US), floods represent an equally formidable threat. So significant is this risk that the USGS has created the ARkStorm Project. This project aims to prepare California for a future storm(s) on the scale of the disastrous 1861-1862 A.D. events. Unfortunately, our knowledge of pre-measurement floods in the coastal southwest US is not well known, excepting seven identified flood layers in the Santa Barbara Basin, which span the past 2000 years. As an alternative to marine archives, the lakes of the coastal southwest US represent untapped resources for pre-measurement flood reconstructions. Here, we present evidence for a flood ca. 4400 cal yrs BP using sediments from Lake Elsinore. Core LEGC03-4 was collected in 4.0 m water depth using a push core with a hollow stemmed augur; the core is 994 cm in length. The core is predominantly clayey silt with occasional sandy silt units of variable cm-scale thickness. Here we focus on a specific core section between 315 and 350 cm where a ~11 cm thick "unusual" sediment unit (319-330 cm) is well preserved and complete. The core section was digitally photographed, described, and sampled at 1 cm contiguous intervals for a variety of physical and chemical properties including: magnetic susceptibility, loss-on-Ignition (LOI) 550 and 950 °C, grain size, CN ratios, and d13Cbulk organics. The data suggest rapid deposition of sediment with classic "Bouma" sequence preservation. The unit is characterized by an erosional basal contact and flame structures. It is normally graded with laminae occurring in the upper section of the unit. It contains predominantly terrestrial organic matter and the upper boundary is gradational. The cause of this event unit is speculative but potentially associated with San Jacinto River flooding in response to a large atmospheric river storm. Curiously, the 1861-1862 A.D. events are not observed in the sediment core suggesting that this

  8. Seasonal and spatial patterns in coupled nitrification-denitrification rates in a large Great Lakes coastal system: The St. Louis River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthropogenic inputs of excess nitrogen (N) to aquatic systems are detrimental, but aquatic plants and sediments have the potential to mitigate N-loading. Sediment processes are driven by microbially mediated N-cycling. Coastal embayments purportedly play a significant role in N-...

  9. Exploiting Habitat and Gear Patterns for Efficient Detection of Rare and Non-native Benthos and Fish in Great Lakes Coastal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is at present no comprehensive early-detection monitoring for exotic species in the Great Lakes, despite their continued arrival and impacts and recognition that early detection is key to effective management. We evaluated strategies for efficient early-detection monitorin...

  10. Influence of net ecosystem metabolism in transferring riverine organic carbon to atmospheric CO2 in a tropical coastal lagoon (Chilka Lake, India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, G.V.M.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Robin, R.S.; Raman, A.V.; JaiKumar, M.; Rakesh, M.; Subramanian, B.R.

    in monsoon was contributed by its supply from rivers and the rest was contributed by in situ heterotrophic activity. Based on oxygen and total carbon mass balance, net ecosystem production (NEP) of lake (- 308 mmolC m sup(-2) d sup(-1) approx. equal to - 3...

  11. Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) Great Lakes; Michigan 1996-2001 era land cover change analysis (NODC Accession 0042189)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is a change analysis of 1996-era C-CAP land cover and 2001-era C-CAP land cover for the State of Michigan, in the Great Lakes Region of the U.S. This...

  12. First record of Daphnia lumholtzi Sars in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzinic, Christopher J.

    2000-01-01

    Adults of the cladoceran Daphnia lumholtzi, native to Australia, Africa, and parts of Asia, were first collected in August 1999 in Lake Erie. Individuals were collected near East Harbor State Park, Lakeside, Ohio from vertical plankton net tows. The average number of D. lumholtzi that were found (0.03/L) indicate that D. lumholtzi is beginning to establish itself in Lake Erie. The morphology of this Daphnia differs greatly from native species because of its elongated head and tail spine. This sighting is important because it acknowledges yet another exotic invader into the Great Lakes basin and it also shows that this, normally, warm water species continues to expand its range northward.

  13. Avian Distribution and Habitat, Migratory bird use areas of Lake Erie coastal and offshore areas from 1) Pelagic waterfowl offshore aerial surveys 2) land raptor migration counts 3) NEXRAD and marine radar records for migrating land birds, Published in 2014, Not Applicable scale, Pennsylvania Coastal Resources Management Program.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Avian Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at Not Applicable scale, was produced all or in part from RADAR information as of 2014. It is described as...

  14. ERIS, an endoplasmic reticulum IFN stimulator, activates innate immune signaling through dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenxiang; Li, Yang; Chen, Lu; Chen, Huihui; You, Fuping; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yi; Zhai, Zhonghe; Chen, Danying; Jiang, Zhengfan

    2009-05-26

    We report here the identification and characterization of a protein, ERIS, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) IFN stimulator, which is a strong type I IFN stimulator and plays a pivotal role in response to both non-self-cytosolic RNA and dsDNA. ERIS (also known as STING or MITA) resided exclusively on ER membrane. The ER retention/retrieval sequence RIR was found to be critical to retain the protein on ER membrane and to maintain its integrity. ERIS was dimerized on innate immune challenges. Coumermycin-induced ERIS dimerization led to strong and fast IFN induction, suggesting that dimerization of ERIS was critical for self-activation and subsequent downstream signaling.

  15. The Teacher-Teacher Reliability of the CRI and ERI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine, Charles T.; And Others

    Thirty-two children aged 7 to 12 participated in a study to determine the reliability of the Ekwall Reading Inventory (ERI) and the Classroom Reading Inventory (CRI). The children were randomly assigned to take one of the two inventories, which were administered by four different specially trained teachers. The study used a test-retest design, in…

  16. Forensic Assessment on Ground Instability Using Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Fauzan, S. M. S. A.; Ikhwan, J. M.; Aishah, M. A. N.

    2017-02-01

    Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) was used to evaluate the ground settlement in local scale at housing areas. ERI and Borehole results were used to interpret the condition of the problematic subsurface profile due to its differential stiffness. Electrical resistivity of the subsurface profile was measured using ABEM SAS4000 equipment set. ERI results using electrical resistivity anomaly on subsurface materials resistivity shows the subsurface profile exhibited low (1 - 100 Ωm) and medium (> 100 Ωm) value (ERV) representing weak to firm materials. The occurrences of soft to medium cohesive material (SPT N value = 2 - 7) and stiff cohesive material (SPT N ≥ 8) in local scale has created inconsistency of the ground stability condition. Moreover, it was found that a layer of organic decayed wood (ERV = 43 ˜ 29 Ωm & SPT N = 15 ˜ 9) has been buried within the subsurface profile thus weaken the ground structure and finally promoting to the ground settlement. The heterogeneous of the subsurface material presented using integrated analysis of ERI and borehole data enabled ground settlement in this area to be evaluated. This is the major factor evaluating ground instability in the local scale. The result was applicable to assist in planning a strategy for sustainable ground improvement of local scale in fast, low cost, and large data coverage.

  17. Methane and Nitrogen Abundances On Pluto and Eris

    CERN Document Server

    Tegler, S C; Grundy, W M; Romanishin, W; Abernathy, M R; Bovyn, M J; Burt, J A; Evans, D E; Maleszewski, C K; Thompson, Z; Vilas, F

    2010-01-01

    We present spectra of Eris from the MMT 6.5 meter telescope and Red Channel Spectrograph (5700-9800 angstroms; 5 angstroms per pix) on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and of Pluto from the Steward Observatory 2.3 meter telescope and Boller and Chivens spectrograph (7100-9400 angstroms; 2 angstroms per pix) on Kitt Peak, AZ. In addition, we present laboratory transmission spectra of methane-nitrogen and methane-argon ice mixtures. By anchoring our analysis in methane and nitrogen solubilities in one another as expressed in the phase diagram of Prokhvatilov and Yantsevich (1983), and comparing methane bands in our Eris and Pluto spectra and methane bands in our laboratory spectra of methane and nitrogen ice mixtures, we find Eris' bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are about 10% and about 90%, and Pluto's bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are about 3% and about 97%. Such abundances for Pluto are consistent with values reported in the literature. It appears that the bulk volatile composition of Eris is similar to the bulk...

  18. Health assessment for Presque Isle National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980508865. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-08-04

    An abandoned gas well on the Presque Isle peninsula in Lake Erie released black contaminated materials during the 1970s and early 1980s. The well has since been returned to service and is being monitored. There was concern for contaminants on the peninsula and concern that the many gas/oil wells on the mainland might release similar contaminants and affect the area's potable water supply. Analyses of material discharged by the well indicated many organic and inorganic contaminants. Specifically, ammonia, antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, chloride, strontium, nickel, selenium, silver, titanium, zinc, benzene and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Soils at the gas well were subjected to leachate tests (EP Toxicity Tests) that gave a qualitative indication that heavy metals occur in those materials. No definite link was established between the contaminants and gas/oil wells. Based on the available data, there currently is no known human contact with contaminants that were previously discharged from the gas well at Beach Number 7. Therefore, adverse impact on public health from these releases is considered to be unlikely. There are unresolved public health-related issues concerning groundwater at the beach, soils at the gas well, other gas wells on the peninsula, and mainland groundwater.

  19. National Dam Inspection Program. Lake Housatonic Dam and Dike (CT 00026 and CT 01714). Connecticut Coastal Basin, Housatonic River, Derby-Shelton, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    8217;’,.-+-.-. ""’"" . .•• "•;. - NATIONAL DAM INSPECTION PROGRAM PHASE I INSPECTION REPORT Identification No.: CT 00026, CT 01714 N *~ Name of Dam: Lake Housatonic Dam and Dike " Town...approach was used between 1868 and 1870 to strengthen the Holyoke dam. The dam that existed there at the time was a timber crib dam, 1,017 feet long and 30

  20. Mercury levels in herring gulls and fish: 42 years of spatio-temporal trends in the Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blukacz-Richards, E Agnes; Visha, Ariola; Graham, Matthew L; McGoldrick, Daryl L; de Solla, Shane R; Moore, David J; Arhonditsis, George B

    2017-04-01

    Total mercury levels in aquatic birds and fish communities have been monitored across the Canadian Great Lakes by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) for the past 42 years (1974-2015). These data (22 sites) were used to examine spatio-temporal variability of mercury levels in herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs, lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), walleye (Sander vitreus), and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax). Trends were quantified with dynamic linear models, which provided time-variant rates of change of mercury concentrations. Lipid content (in both fish and eggs) and length in fish were used as covariates in all models. For the first three decades, mercury levels in gull eggs and fish declined at all stations. In the 2000s, trends for herring gull eggs reversed at two sites in Lake Erie and two sites in Lake Ontario. Similar trend reversals in the 2000s were observed for lake trout in Lake Superior and at a single station in Lake Ontario. Mercury levels in lake trout continued to slowly decline at all of the remaining stations, except for Lake Huron, where the levels remained stable. A post-hoc Bayesian regression analysis suggests strong trophic interactions between herring gulls and rainbow smelt in Lake Superior and Lake Ontario, but also pinpoints the likelihood of a trophic decoupling in Lake Huron and Lake Erie. Continued monitoring of mercury levels in herring gulls and fish is required to consolidate these trophic shifts and further evaluate their broader implications.

  1. Coastal Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Velden, E.T.J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Introduction, waves, sediment transport, littoral transport, lonshore sediment transport, onshore-offshore sediment transport, coastal changes, dune erosion and storm surges, sedimentation in channels and trenches, coastal engineering in practice.

  2. Digging Into the Surface of the Icy Dwarf Planet Eris

    CERN Document Server

    Abernathy, M R; Grundy, W M; Licandro, J; Romanishin, W; Cornelison, D; Vilas, F

    2008-01-01

    We describe optical spectroscopic observations of the icy dwarf planet Eris with the 6.5 meter MMT telescope and the Red Channel Spectrograph. We report a correlation, that is at the edge of statistical significance, between blue shift and albedo at maximum absorption for five methane ice bands. We interpret the correlation as an increasing dilution of methane ice with another ice component, probably nitrogen, with increasing depth into the surface. We suggest a mechanism to explain the apparent increase in nitrogen with depth. Specifically, if we are seeing Eris 50 degrees from pole-on (Brown and Schaller, 2008), the pole we are seeing now at aphelion was in winter darkness at perihelion. Near perihelion, sublimation could have built up atmospheric pressure on the sunlit (summer) hemisphere sufficient to drive winds toward the dark (winter) hemisphere, where the winds would condense. Because nitrogen is more volatile and scarcer than methane, it sublimated from the sunlit hemisphere relatively early in the s...

  3. Great Lakes Simulation Studies. Volume 2. Lake Erie-Lake Ontario Navigation: A Simulation Study of Alternative Subsystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-11-01

    improvements Isuper locks 1200’ x 110’ 80’ 40 min. (expected) Eisenhower-Snell 860’ x 80’ 38’-49’ 37 min. (for large vessels) 44 x .4 0 00 0 Q coJ Iq- _00 U0...H., and Blok, S.I.E., (Untitled), XXII Interna- tional Navigation Congress, Paris , 1969, Permanent International Association of Navigation Congresses

  4. Lake Borgne Surge Barrier Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Savant , and Darla C. McVan September 2010 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CHL TR-10-10 September 2010 Lake...Borgne Surge Barrier Study S. Keith Martin, Gaurav Savant , and Darla C. McVan Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer Research and...conducted by Keith Martin, Dr. Gaurav Savant , and Darla C. McVan. This work was conducted at the Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CHL) of the

  5. 78 FR 42452 - Safety Zone; Kentucky Air National Guard Vessel for Parachute Rescue Jumpmaster Training, Lake...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Kentucky Air National Guard Vessel for... personnel, transient watercraft and potential spectator vessels during the 2013 Kentucky Air National Guard... vessel on Lake Erie near Dunkirk, NY. This moving safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a...

  6. ERIS: the exoplanet high-resolution image simulator for CHARIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbach, Mary Anne; Groff, Tyler D.; Kasdin, N. J.; Brandt, Timothy; Mede, Kyle; Loomis, Craig; Hayashi, Masahiko; Takato, Naruhisa

    2014-07-01

    ERIS is an image simulator for CHARIS, the high-contrast exoplanet integral field spectrograph (IFS) being built at Princeton University for the Subaru telescope. We present here the software design and implementation of the ERIS code. ERIS simulates CHARIS FITS images and data cubes that are used for developing the data reduction pipeline and verifying the expected CHARIS performance. Components of the software include detailed models of the light source (such as a star or exoplanet), atmosphere, telescope, adaptive optics systems (AO188 and SCExAO), CHARIS IFS and the Hawaii2-RG infrared detector. Code includes novel details such as the phase errors at the lenslet array, optical wavefront error maps and pinholes for reducing crosstalk, just to list a few. The details of the code as well as several simulated images are presented in this paper. This IFS simulator is critical for the CHARIS data analysis pipeline development, minimizing troubleshooting in the lab and on-sky and the characterization of crosstalk.

  7. Photolytic Hazes in the Atmosphere of 51 Eri b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K.; Marley, M. S.; Morley, C. V.; Moses, J. I.

    2016-01-01

    We use a 1D model to address photochemistry and possible haze formation in the irradiated warm Jupiter 51 Eridani b. The intended focus was to be carbon, but sulfur photochemistry turns out to be important. The case for organic photochemical hazes is intriguing but falls short of being compelling. If they form, they are likeliest to do so if vertical mixing in 51 Eri b is weaker than in Jupiter, and they would be found below the regions where methane and water are photolyzed. The more novel result is that photochemistry turns H2S into elemental sulfur, here treated as S8. In the cooler models, S8 is predicted to condense in optically thick clouds of solid sulfur particles, whilst in the warmer models S8 remains a vapor along with several other sulfur allotropes that are both visually striking and potentially observable. For 51 Eri b, the division between models with and without condensed sulfur is at an effective temperature of 700 K, which is within error its actual effective temperature; the local temperature where sulfur condenses is between 280 and 320 K. The sulfur photochemistry we have discussed is quite general and ought to be found in a wide variety of worlds over a broad temperature range, both colder and hotter than the 650-750 K range studied here, and we show that products of sulfur photochemistry will be nearly as abundant on planets where the UV irradiation is orders of magnitude weaker than it is on 51 Eri b.

  8. Orkestrid lõpetasid hooaja : Kristjan Manhattanilt, Viktor Venemaalt ja Eesti Eri / Toomas Velmet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Velmet, Toomas, 1942-

    2009-01-01

    23. mail Metodisti kirikus toimunud Tallinna Filharmoonia hooaja lõppkontserdist "Klaveripalavikulised virtuoosid", solistid Kristjan Randalu (klaver), Viktor Sõtš (marimba), Tallinna Kammerorkester, dirigent Eri Klas

  9. From meadow to shallow lake: Monitoring secondary succession in a coastal fen after rewetting by flooding based on aerial imagery and plot data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Koch

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Year-round flooding can be a cost-effective measure for rewetting highly degraded fens, and is gaining popularity for lowland fen restoration in Europe. We investigated the short-term effects of such permanent inundation on species composition and spatial distribution of the vegetation of a formerly drained coastal fen, and addressed the question of whether re-establishment of peat-forming reed vegetation is foreseeable. For vegetation mapping and monitoring we combined permanent plot data acquired during four years following shallow flooding, high-resolution aerial imagery and an elevation model. Five vegetation types were distinguished, and we analysed their spatial distribution and succession patterns throughout the years. Pre-existing vegetation, its spatial arrangement and the water level played major roles in secondary succession. Existing patches of Phragmites australis showed high stability, but their growth was not consistent through the years and at all inundation depths. Existing stands of Bolboschoenus maritimus were outcompeted by Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani or vanished and formed relatively stable ponds of open water with hydrophytic species. We concluded that the expansion of reed as peat-forming vegetation is likely to proceed slowly, but fluctuations in water level and edge effects will probably maintain a persistent mosaic of vegetation and open water in the near future.

  10. Water Resources Research Program. Transport of oily pollutants in the coastal waters of Lake Michigan. An application of rare earth tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCown, D. L.; Saunders, K. D.; Allender, J. H.; Ditmars, J. D.; Harrison, W.

    1978-11-01

    An experimental method was developed to tag and to trace oily pollutants in fresh water environments. The use of two rare earth element tags (Dy and Sm) permitted simultaneous tracing of small oil spills at the water surface and of the underlying water. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine the tracer concentrations in numerous, small water samples collected from a moving boat. The method was applied in two field experiments with simulated oily pollutants in the Indiana Harbor Canal (IHC). Tagged oily pollutants and IHC waters were traced under both floating- and sinking-plume conditions. Floating-plume results indicated that oily waste artificially mixed downward by a ship did not resurface, no differences were seen in the movement of the oily waste and the underlying water, and mixing coefficients for tagged oil and water were similar to those measured by others on the Great Lakes. Sinking-plume results gave unequivocal evidence of the intake of IHC effluent at Chicago's South Water Filtration Plant and indicated partitioning of the oily wastes and water. Simple dilution estimates for the sinking plume were supported by the tracer data and similar estimates indicated plume center-line dilution ratios for the entire IHC effluent at the water intakes could be as low as 2.8.

  11. EPA Releases Scientific Report Showing U.S. Coastal Waters a Mix of Good and Fair Health/Contaminants Post Threat to Fish, Birds, and Wildlife in Most Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today released the 2010 National Coastal Condition Assessment showing that more than half of the nation's coastal and Great Lakes nearshore waters are rated good for biological and sediment

  12. Dreissenid mussels are not a "dead end" in Great Lakes food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenijan, Charles P.; Pothoven, Steven A.; Schneeberger, Philip J.; Ebener, Mark P.; Mohr, Lloyd C.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Bence, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Dreissenid mussels have been regarded as a “dead end” in Great Lakes food webs because the degree of predation on dreissenid mussels, on a lakewide basis, is believed to be low. Waterfowl predation on dreissenid mussels in the Great Lakes has primarily been confined to bays, and therefore its effects on the dreissenid mussel population have been localized rather than operating on a lakewide level. Based on results from a previous study, annual consumption of dreissenid mussels by the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) population in central Lake Erie averaged only 6 kilotonnes (kt; 1 kt = one thousand metric tons) during 1995–2002. In contrast, our coupling of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) population models with a lake whitefish bioenergetics model revealed that lake whitefish populations in Lakes Michigan and Huron consumed 109 and 820 kt, respectively, of dreissenid mussels each year. Our results indicated that lake whitefish can be an important predator on dreissenid mussels in the Great Lakes, and that dreissenid mussels do not represent a “dead end” in Great Lakes food webs. The Lake Michigan dreissenid mussel population has been estimated to be growing more than three times faster than the Lake Huron dreissenid mussel population during the 2000s. One plausible explanation for the higher population growth rate in Lake Michigan would be the substantially higher predation rate by lake whitefish on dreissenid mussels in Lake Huron.

  13. Michigan 2011 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the MI coast of Lake Superior in 2011. The data...

  14. Indiana 2006 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Michigan coastline in the summer of 2006....

  15. Illinois 2008 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along Lake Michigan in the summer of 2008. The data types...

  16. Michigan 2009 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the MI coast of Lake Superior in 2009. The data...

  17. Minnesota 2009 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Superior coast of MN in 2009. The data...

  18. Wisconsin 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Superior coast of WI in 2007. The data...

  19. Wisconsin 2009 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Superior coast of WI in 2009. The data...

  20. Indiana 2008 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along Lake Michigan in the summer of 2008. The data types...

  1. Wisconsin 2008 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Michigan coast of WI in 2008. The data...

  2. The influence of hydrodynamics on the spatial and temporal variation of phytoplankton pigments in a large, sub-tropical coastal lake (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana de Souza Cardoso

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the spatial and temporal distribution of phytoplankton pigments in Itapeva Lake and its relationship with hydrodynamic aspects. Regarding spatial distribution, a decreasing N®S gradient was generally observed for the pigments, except in summer. This inversion observed during the summer was influenced by the predominant fetch (N-E. The horizontal heterogeneity was proved (ANOVA for all seasons of the year, except spring. Spatially in spring, the vertical variance was much more significant (pEste estudo avalia a distribuição espaço-temporal dos pigmentos fitoplanctônicos na Lagoa Itapeva e sua relação com aspectos hidrodinâmicos. Com relação à distribuição espacial, geralmente um gradiente decrescente no sentido N®S foi observado para os pigmentos, com exceção do verão. Esta inversão observada durante o verão foi influenciada pelo fetch predominante (N-E. Excetuando a primavera, ficou comprovada a existência de heterogeneidade horizontal (ANOVA nas demais estações do ano. Espacialmente, na primavera a variância vertical foi muito mais significativa (p<0,05 que a horizontal. Os turnos de amostragem sempre exibiram um grau de variabilidade entre as estações do ano, mostrando a existência de um ciclo diurno com relação à concentração de clorofila a. Este comportamento esteve relacionado com o fetch principalmente dos quadrantes NE-SW, perturbando o sistema por ser uma lagoa rasa. Com isso, ficou constatada a influência do regime hidrodinâmico da Lagoa Itapeva na distribuição espaço-temporal dos pigmentos fitoplanctônicos.

  3. The synchronous rotations of Eris/Dysnomia and Orcus/Vanth binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, David L.; Owainati, Yasi

    2014-11-01

    We have measured the rotation periods of the Eris/Dysnomia and Orcus/Vanth binary systems using long-term observations obtained with the SMARTS 1.3m telescope at Cerro Tololo, combined with incidental observations obtained by the La Silla - QUEST survey on the ESO 1.0-m Schmidt at La Silla, and using historical observations of Eris published by others. We find that both binary systems are synchronous, with the dominant periodicity in their light curves matching their mutual orbit periods (9.54 and 15.774 days, respectively). For Orcus/Vanth, the reflected light from both bodies contributes to the signal. The measured periodicity could be due to the rotation of Orcus or Vanth separately, but it is most likely the system is doubly synchronous. For Eris/Dysnomia, only Eris is bright enough to contribute significantly to the observations. The conclusion is therefore unambiguous that Eris is synchronously rotating with the orbit of Dysnomia. This is surprising given that Eris is 500 times brighter than Dysnomia, and likely to be 100 to 10000 times more massive (assuming an albedo > 5% for Dysnomia). If Dysnomia has migrated outward from Eris owing to long-term tidal interactions, the time for Eris to slow from an initially fast rotation (period < 1 day) to a synchronous one is longer than the age of the solar system. We discuss the constraints these observations place on the relative albedos, masses, and internal composition of the two binary systems.

  4. 77 FR 35860 - Safety Zone; Bay Swim V, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ..., Erie, PA in the Federal Register (77 FR 18739). We received no letters commenting on the proposed rule... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bay Swim V, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA... restrict vessels from a portion of the Presque Island Bay during the Bay Swim V swimming event. The...

  5. Erie National Wildlife Refuge Mohawk Run Shrub Fen Complex Invasive Plant Species Management Plan For Erie National Wildlife Refuge 2003-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The recovery plan for Drooping Bluegrass, Thin Leaved Cotton Grass, Slender Spikerush, and Swampfly Honeysuckle on Erie National Wildlife Refuge discusses the...

  6. Ribosomal DNA identification of Nosema/Vairimorpha in freshwater polychaete, Manayunkia speciosa, from Oregon/California and the Laurentian Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakauskas, David M; Altman, Emory C; Malakauskas, Sarah J; Thiem, Suzanne M; Schloesser, Donald W

    2015-11-01

    We examined Manayunkia speciosa individuals from the Klamath River, Oregon/California and Lake Erie, Michigan, USA for the presence of Microsporidia. We identified microsporidian spores and sequenced their SSU, ITS, and part of the LSU rDNA. Phylogenetic analysis of SSU rDNA indicated spores from both populations belonged to the Nosema/Vairimorpha clade. PCR showed an infection prevalence in Lake Erie M. speciosa of 0.6% (95% CI=0.5%, 0.7%). This represents the first known example of molecularly characterized Nosema/Vairimorpha isolates infecting a non-arthropod host. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Southern California Coastal Processes Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    F. DATE : 09/01/51 TITLE s The Sediments of Lake Elsinore , Riverside County, California CITATION ’ Journal of Sediment Petrology, Vol. 2l, No. 3, pp...151-161 DESCRIPTION : About one hundred samples of beach and bottom sediments of Lake Elsinore were taken. Histograms of grain size frequency were...xenon or gold . The RIST system can provide data useful in understanding the effect of shore structures on sediment transport. CATEGORIES Coastal

  8. Coastal Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, W.T.

    1998-01-01

    This book deals on "Coastal Dynamics", which will be defined in a narrow sense as a mathematical theory, which starts from given equations of motion for the sediment, which leads with the continuity equation and given boundary conditions to a calculated (eventually schematized) coastal topography,

  9. Bioacoustic monitoring of nocturnal songbird migration in a southern great lakes ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Claire Elizabeth

    Many species of birds produce short vocalizations during nocturnal migration. My thesis uses bioacoustic monitoring of these night flight calls to study bird migration through a southern Great Lakes ecosystem. I deployed recording devices around western Lake Erie during spring and fall migrations. Analysis of thousands of hours of recordings revealed that night flight calls accurately predicted both the magnitude of migration, as well as the timing of migrant passage, as assessed by banding. The first arrival dates for 48 species of migratory birds were significantly earlier on Pelee Island than on mainland Ontario in the spring. More flight calls were detected over Pelee Island than over mainland comparison sites. These results suggest that many birds cross Lake Erie in spring and fall, and that islands are important for migratory birds. This research provides insight into the use of acoustics for monitoring birds in active migration.

  10. Photolytic Hazes in the Atmosphere of 51 Eri b

    CERN Document Server

    Zahnle, Kevin J; Morley, Caroline V; Moses, Julianne I

    2016-01-01

    We use a 1D model to address photochemistry and possible haze formation in the irradiated warm Jupiter, 51 Eridani b. The intended focus was to be carbon, but sulfur photochemistry turns out to be important. The case for organic photochemical hazes is intriguing but falls short of being compelling. If organic hazes form, they are likeliest to do so if vertical mixing in 51 Eri b is weaker than in Jupiter, and they would be found below the altitudes where methane and water are photolyzed. The more novel result is that photochemistry turns H$_2$S into elemental sulfur, here treated as S$_8$. In the cooler models, S$_8$ is predicted to condense in optically thick clouds of solid sulfur particles, whilst in the warmer models S$_8$ remains a vapor along with several other sulfur allotropes that are both visually striking and potentially observable. For 51 Eri b, the division between models with and without condensed sulfur is at an effective temperature of 700 K, which is within error its actual effective temperat...

  11. Surface seiches in Flathead Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kirillin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Standing surface waves or seiches are inherent hydrodynamic features of enclosed water bodies. Their two-dimensional structure is important for estimating flood risk, coastal erosion and bottom sediment transport and for understanding shoreline habitats and lake ecology in general. In this work, we present analysis of two-dimensional seiche characteristics in Flathead Lake, Montana, USA, a large intermountain lake known to have high seiche amplitudes. To examine spatial characteristics of different seiche modes we used the original procedure of determining the seiche frequencies from the primitive equation model output with subsequent derivation of the spatial seiche structure at fixed frequencies akin the tidal harmonic analysis. The proposed procedure revealed specific seiche oscillation features in Flathead Lake including maximum surface level amplitudes of the first fundamental mode in straights around the largest island; several higher modes appearing locally in the vicinity of the river inflow; the "Helmholtz" open harbor mode, with the period approximately twice that of the longest seiche mode, generated by a large shallow bay connected to the main lake basin; and several rotating seiche modes potentially affecting the lake-wide circulation. We discuss the lake management problems related to of the spatial seiche distribution, such as shoreline erosion, floods and transport of sediments and invasive species in Flathead Lake.

  12. Shallow Water Offshore Wind Optimization for the Great Lakes (DE-FOA-0000415) Final Report: A Conceptual Design for Wind Energy in the Great Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissemann, Chris [Freshwater Wind I, LLC; White, Stanley M [Stanley White Engineering LLC

    2014-02-28

    The primary objective of the project was to develop a innovative Gravity Base Foundation (GBF) concepts, including fabrication yards, launching systems and installation equipment, for a 500MW utility scale project in the Great Lakes (Lake Erie). The goal was to lower the LCOE by 25%. The project was the first to investigate an offshore wind project in the Great Lakes and it has furthered the body of knowledge for foundations and installation methods within Lake Erie. The project collected historical geotechnical information for Lake Erie and also used recently obtained data from the LEEDCo Icebreaker Project (FOA DE-EE0005989) geotechnical program to develop the conceptual designs. Using these data-sets, the project developed design wind and wave conditions from actual buoy data in order to develop a concept that would de-risk a project using a GBF. These wind and wave conditions were then utilized to create reference designs for various foundations specific to installation in Lake Erie. A project partner on the project (Weeks Marine) provided input for construction and costing the GBF fabrication and installation. By having a marine contractor with experience with large marine projects as part of the team provides credibility to the LCOE developed by NREL. NREL then utilized the design and construction costing information as part of the LCOE model. The report summarizes the findings of the project. • Developed a cost model and “baseline” LCOE • Documented Site Conditions within Lake Erie • Developed Fabrication, Installation and Foundations Innovative Concept Designs • Evaluated LCOE Impact of Innovations • Developed Assembly line “Rail System” for GBF Construction and Staging • Developed Transit-Inspired Foundation Designs which incorporated: Semi-Floating Transit with Supplemental Pontoons Barge mounted Winch System • Developed GBF with “Penetration Skirt” • Developed Integrated GBF with Turbine Tower • Developed Turbine, Plant

  13. Modeling of temporal patterns and sources of atmospherically transported and deposited pesticides in ecosystems of concern: A case study of toxaphene in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Jin, Jiming

    2013-10-01

    have adverse effects on human health and the environment and can be transported through the atmosphere from application sites and deposited to sensitive ecosystems. This study applies a comprehensive multimedia regional pesticide fate and chemical transport modeling system that we developed to investigate the atmospheric transport and deposition of toxaphene to the Great Lakes. Simulated results predict a significant amount of toxaphene (~350 kg) being transported through the atmosphere and deposited into the Great Lakes in the simulation year. Results also show that U.S. residues and global background are major sources to toxaphene deposition into the Great Lakes and atmospheric concentrations in the region. While the U.S. residues are the dominant source in warm months, the background dominates during winter months. In addition, different sources have different influences on the individual Great Lakes due to their proximity and relative geographical positions to the sources; U.S. residues are the dominant source to Lakes Ontario, Erie, Huron, and Michigan, but they are a much less important source to Lake Superior. These results shed light on the mystery that observed toxaphene concentrations in Great Lakes' lake trout and smelt declined between 1982 and 1992 in four of the Great Lakes except Lake Superior. While monthly total depositions to Lakes Ontario, Erie, Huron, and Michigan have clear seasonal variability with much greater values in April, May, and June, monthly total depositions to Lake Superior are more uniformly distributed over the year with comparatively greater levels in cold months.

  14. ERIS, an endoplasmic reticulum IFN stimulator, activates innate immune signaling through dimerization

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We report here the identification and characterization of a protein, ERIS, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) IFN stimulator, which is a strong type I IFN stimulator and plays a pivotal role in response to both non–self-cytosolic RNA and dsDNA. ERIS (also known as STING or MITA) resided exclusively on ER membrane. The ER retention/retrieval sequence RIR was found to be critical to retain the protein on ER membrane and to maintain its integrity. ERIS was dimerized on innate immune challenges. Coume...

  15. 2001 USACE LRE Topobathy Lidar: Lake Ontario (NY)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Office for Coastal Management received the 2001 Lake Ontario dataset with 2 separate metadata records in 2013 on a hard-drive device from the USGS Center for...

  16. ROV dives under Great Lakes ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsenga, S.J.; Gannon, John E.; Kennedy, Gregory; Norton, D.C.; Herdendorf, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of the underside of ice have a wide variety of applications. Severe under-ice roughness can affect ice movements, rough under-ice surfaces can scour the bottom disturbing biota and man-made structures such as pipelines, and the flow rate of rivers is often affected by under-ice roughness. A few reported observations of the underside of an ice cover have been made, usually by cutting a large block of ice and overturning it, by extensive boring, or by remote sensing. Such operations are extremely labor-intensive and, in some cases, prone to inaccuracies. Remotely operated vehicles (ROV) can partially solve these problems. In this note, we describe the use, performance in a hostile environment, and results of a study in which a ROV was deployed under the ice in Lake Erie (North American Great Lakes).

  17. Unionid bivalves (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) of Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masteller, E.C.; Maleski, K.R.; Schloesser, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine species composition and relative abundance of unionid bivalves (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) in Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania 1990-1992. This information was compared with data from the only other extensive survey of unionids in the bay conducted in 1909-1911 (Ortmann 1919) to assess changes over the 80 years preceding the present study. A total of 1,540 individuals representing 18 species were collected in 1990-1992. Five relatively common species (between 7 and 42% of total individuals), six uncommon species (2 and 6%), and seven rare species (<1%) were found. The rare species were Anodontoides ferussacianus, Lasmigona costata, Ligumia recta, Ptychobranchus fasciolaris, Quadrula pustulosa pustulosa, Strophitus undaulatus, and Truncilla donaciformis. Five of the species found in Presque Isle Bay (Leptodea fragilis, Ligumia nasuta, Potamilus alatus, Quadrula quadrula, and Truncilla donaciformis) are listed as critically imperiled and one species (Truncilla truncata) as extirpated in the State of Pennsylvania by the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. Comparisons between unionid populations in 1909-1911 and 1990-1992 indicate few substantial changes occurred during the past 80 years. A total of 22 species were found; 21 in 1909-1911 and 18 in 1990-1992. Seventeen species were found in both studies, an additional four in 1909-1911 and one in 1990-1992. The relative abundance of 11 of the 17 species found in both studies remained stable (i.e., common or uncommon) over the past 80 years. Only four species listed as uncommon in 1909-1911 were listed as rare in 1990-1992. However, the invasion of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) is considered a threat to the continued existence of the entire Unionidae fauna in Presque Isle Bay, a unique habitat of the Great Lakes.

  18. Deep Search for Small Satellites of Eris and Makemake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buie, Marc

    2014-10-01

    Recent HST observations searching deeper than ever before have discovered a very distinct family of small, faint, circumbinary satellites around Pluto and Charon. Pluto has looked like the oddball of the Solar System many times in the past, with its inclined and eccentric transneptunian orbit, its enormous satellite Charon, and its volatile ice rich surface composition. But in each of these matters, subsequent discoveries revealed that Pluto was not unique, merely the first of an entirely new class of objects. This proposal aims to determine if Pluto's family of small faint satellites is also non-unique, through unprecedentedly deep imaging of Eris and Makemake, the two other most Pluto-like bodies in the Kuiper belt.

  19. Eri musiikkityylisuuntien mukaiset sähkökitarasoundit

    OpenAIRE

    Rinne, Joona

    2012-01-01

    Opinnäytetyö käsittelee sähkökitarasoundeja ja niiden taltioimista. Sähkökitara on tärkeä ja monikäyttöinen elementti pop-musiikissa. Sähkökitarasoundeja voidaan lokeroida eri musiikkityylisuuntien mukaan. Opinnäytetyö perehtyy näiden tyylisuuntien mukaisten sähkökitarasoundien ominaispiirteisiin äänikirjaston ja havainnollistavien kuvien avulla sekä esittelee hieman sähkökitaran historiaa ja kehitystä. Opinnäytetyön tärkein sisältö koostuu yleisimpien äänitteillä kuultavien sähkökitarama...

  20. Polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations of burbot Lota lota from Great Slave Lake are very low but vary by sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Stapanian, Martin A.; Cott, Peter A.; Rediske, Richard R.; O'Keefe, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Total polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations (ΣPCBs) in whole fish were determined for 18 ripe female burbot Lota lota and 14 ripe male burbot from Great Slave Lake, a lake with no known point sources of PCBs. In addition, ΣPCBs were determined both in the somatic tissue and in the gonads for a randomly selected subset of five females and five males. Mean ΣPCBs for females and males were 2.89 and 3.76 ng/g, respectively. Thus, males were 30 % greater in ΣPCB than females. Based on ΣPCB determinations for somatic tissue and gonads, ΣPCBs of females and males would be expected to decrease by 18 % and increase by 6 %, respectively, immediately after spawning due to release of gametes. Results from a previous study in eastern Lake Erie indicated that males were 28 and 71 % greater in ΣPCB than females from populations of younger (ages 6-13) and older (ages 14-17) burbot, respectively. Thus, although younger burbot from Lake Erie were about 50 times greater in ΣPCB than Great Slave Lake burbot, the relative difference in ΣPCBs between the sexes was remarkably similar across both populations. Our results supported the contention that the widening of the difference in ΣPCBs between the sexes in older burbot from Lake Erie was attributable to a “hot spot” effect operating on older burbot, as Lake Erie has received PCB point source loadings. Our results also supported the contention that male fish expend energy at a rate between 15 and 30 % greater than that of females. Eventually, these results will be useful in developing sex-specific bioenergetics models for fish.