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Sample records for lactobacillus johnsonii ncc

  1. Oxygen relieves the CO2 and acetate dependency of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertzberger, R.Y.; Pridmore, R.D.; Gysler, C.; Kleerebezem, M.; Teixeira de Mattos, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen relieves the CO2 and acetate dependency of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533. The probiotic Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 is relatively sensitive to oxidative stress; the presence of oxygen causes a lower biomass yield due to early growth stagnation. We show however that oxygen can also be

  2. Hydrogen peroxide production by Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 and its role in anti-Salmonella activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridmore, Raymond David; Pittet, Anne-Cécile; Praplan, Fabienne; Cavadini, Christoph

    2008-06-01

    The human intestinal isolate Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 (La1) is a probiotic strain with well-documented antimicrobial properties. Previous research has identified the production of lactic acid and bacteriocins as important factors, but that other unidentified factors are also involved. We used the recently published genome sequence of L. johnsonii NCC 533 to search for novel antipathogen factors and identified three potential gene products that may catalyze the synthesis of the known antimicrobial factor hydrogen peroxide, H(2)O(2). In this work, we confirmed the ability of NCC 533 as well as eight different L. johnsonii strains and Lactobacillus gasseri to produce H(2)O(2) when resting cells were incubated in the presence of oxygen, and that culture supernatant containing NCC 533-produced H(2)O(2) was effective in killing the model pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344 in vitro.

  3. Oxygen relieves the CO2 and acetate dependency of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberger, Rosanne Y; Pridmore, R David; Gysler, Christof; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Teixeira de Mattos, M Joost

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen relieves the CO2 and acetate dependency of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533. The probiotic Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 is relatively sensitive to oxidative stress; the presence of oxygen causes a lower biomass yield due to early growth stagnation. We show however that oxygen can also be beneficial to this organism as it relieves the requirement for acetate and CO2 during growth. Both on agar- and liquid-media, anaerobic growth of L. johnsonii NCC 533 requires CO2 supplementation of the gas phase. Switching off the CO2 supply induces growth arrest and cell death. The presence of molecular oxygen overcomes the CO2 dependency. Analogously, L. johnsonii NCC 533 strictly requires media with acetate to sustain anaerobic growth, although supplementation at a level that is 100-fold lower (120 microM) than the concentration in regular growth medium for lactobacilli already suffices for normal growth. Analogous to the CO2 requirement, oxygen supply relieves this acetate-dependency for growth. The L. johnsonii NCC 533 genome indicates that this organism lacks genes coding for pyruvate formate lyase (PFL) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), both CO2 and acetyl-CoA producing systems. Therefore, C1- and C2- compound production is predicted to largely depend on pyruvate oxidase activity (POX). This proposed role of POX in C2/C1-generation is corroborated by the observation that in a POX deficient mutant of L. johnsonii NCC 533, oxygen is not able to overcome acetate dependency nor does it relieve the CO2 dependency.

  4. Biotransformation of caffeoyl quinic acids from green coffee extracts by Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533.

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    Bel-Rhlid, Rachid; Thapa, Dinesh; Kraehenbuehl, Karin; Hansen, Carl Erik; Fischer, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    The potential of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 to metabolize chlorogenic acids from green coffee extract was investigated. Two enzymes, an esterase and a hydroxycinnamate decarboxylase (HCD), were involved in this biotransformation. The complete hydrolysis of 5-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA) into caffeic acid (CA) by L. johnsonii esterase occurred during the first 16 h of reaction time. No dihydrocaffeic acid was identified in the reaction mixture. The decarboxylation of CA into 4-vinylcatechol (4-VC) started only when the maximum concentration of CA was reached (10 μmol/ml). CA was completely transformed into 4-VC after 48 h of incubation. No 4-vinylphenol or other derivatives could be identified in the reaction media. In this study we demonstrate the capability of L. johnsonii to transform chlorogenic acids from green coffee extract into 4-VC in two steps one pot reaction. Thus, the enzymatic potential of certain lactobacilli might be explored to generate flavor compounds from plant polyphenols.

  5. The Probiotic Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 produces high-molecular-mass inulin from sucrose by using an inulosucrase enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anwar, Munir A.; Kralj, Slavko; van der Maarel, Marc J. E. C.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    Fructansucrase enzymes polymerize the fructose moiety of sucrose into levan or inulin fructans, with beta(2-6) and beta(2-1) linkages, respectively. The probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus johnsonii strain NCC 533 possesses a single fructansucrase gene (open reading frame AAS08734) annotated as a

  6. Modification of the technical properties of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 by supplementing the growth medium with unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J A; Ross, R P; Sybesma, W F H; Fitzgerald, G F; Stanton, C

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of supplementing growth medium with unsaturated fatty acids on the technical properties of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533, such as heat and acid tolerance, and inhibition of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection. Our results showed that the membrane composition and morphology of L. johnsonii NCC 533 were significantly changed by supplementing a minimal Lactobacillus medium with oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids. The ratio of saturated to unsaturated plus cyclic fatty acids in the bacterial membrane decreased by almost 2-fold when minimal medium was supplemented with unsaturated fatty acids (10 μg/ml). The subsequent acid and heat tolerance of L. johnsonii decreased by 6- and 20-fold when the strain was grown in the presence of linoleic and linolenic acids, respectively, compared with growth in oleic acid (all at 10 μg/ml). Following acid exposure, significantly higher (P < 0.05) oleic acid content was detected in the membrane when growth medium was supplemented with linoleic or linolenic acid, indicating that saturation of the membrane fatty acids occurred during acid stress. Cell integrity was determined in real time during stressed conditions using a fluorescent viability kit in combination with flow cytometric analysis. Following heat shock (at 62.5°C for 5 min), L. johnsonii was unable to form colonies; however, 60% of the bacteria showed no cell integrity loss, which could indicate that the elevated heat inactivated vital processes within the cell, rendering it incapable of replication. Furthermore, L. johnsonii grown in fatty acid-enriched minimal medium had different adhesion properties and caused a 2-fold decrease in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium UK1-lux invasion of HT-29 epithelial cells compared with bacteria grown in minimal medium alone. This could be related to changes in the hydrophobicity and fluidity of the membrane. Our study shows that technical

  7. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 (La1) (CNCM I-1225) and improving immune defence against pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms (ID 896), and protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claims in relation to Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 (La1) (CNCM I-1225) and improving immune defence against pathogenic gastro-intestinal microorganisms, and protection of the skin from UV-induced damage. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member States...... in the consolidated list of Article 13 health claims and references that EFSA has received from Member States or directly from stakeholders. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim is Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 (La1) (CNCM I-1225). The Panel considers that Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 (La...

  8. Effect of a lotion containing the heat-treated probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 on Staphylococcus aureus colonization in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet-Réthoré, Sandrine; Bourdès, Valérie; Mercenier, Annick; Haddar, Cyrille H; Verhoeven, Paul O; Andres, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus dominates the skin microbiota in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), with bacterial loads correlating with disease severity. The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the effect of a cosmetic lotion containing heat-treated Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 (HT La1) on S. aureus colonization in AD patients. This open-label, multicenter study was performed in AD patients in Germany. First, detection of S. aureus was performed in all patients using the swab or scrub-wash method of sampling, followed by quantitative culture or quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Repeatability and reproducibility of all method combinations were evaluated to select the best combination of sampling and quantification. Second, a lotion containing HT La1 was applied to lesional skin twice daily for 3 weeks. Scoring using local objective SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD), measurement of S. aureus load, and lesional microbiome analysis were performed before and after the 3-week treatment period. Thirty-one patients with AD were included in the study. All sampling and quantification methods were found to be robust, reproducible, and repeatable for assessing S. aureus load. For simplicity, a combination of swab and quantitative polymerase chain reaction was chosen to assess the efficacy of HT La1. Following application of a lotion containing HT La1 to AD lesions for 3 weeks, a reduction in S. aureus load was observed in patients, which correlated with a decrease in local objective SCORAD. Interestingly, high baseline skin concentrations of S. aureus were associated with good responses to the lotion. This study demonstrated that the application of a lotion containing HT La1 to the lesional skin of patients with AD for 3 weeks controlled S. aureus colonization and was associated with local clinical improvement (SCORAD). These findings support further development of topical treatments containing heat-treated nonreplicating beneficial bacteria for patients with

  9. Primary administration of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC533 in weaning period suppresses the elevation of proinflammatory cytokines and CD86 gene expressions in skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

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    Inoue, Ryo; Otsuka, Mai; Nishio, Ayako; Ushida, Kazunari

    2007-06-01

    The administration of probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been studied for its potential to prevent atopic dermatitis (AD). The objective of this study was to assess the inhibitory mechanism of a skin lesion by LAB using an experimental model that we previously demonstrated in NC/Nga mice. Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC533 (La1) was administered orally to the La1 group from 20 to 22 days after birth, while phosphate-buffered saline was given to the control group. After the induction of skin lesions in 6-week-old mice, the expression of genes supposedly involved in AD was evaluated. Gene expression of the proinflammatory cytokines [interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-12 and IL-23] was significantly enhanced in the lesional skin of the control group by the induction of the lesion, whereas gene expression of those in the La1 group was not elevated. Interestingly, expression of the costimulatory molecule CD86 showed a pattern similar to the expression of the cytokines in the lesional skin. Moreover, the La1 group showed a significantly lower gene expression of CD86 in Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes than the control group. The suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and CD86 by primary administration of La1 may significantly contribute to the inhibitory effect on the skin lesion.

  10. Characterization of a novel Lactobacillus species closely related to Lactobacillus johnsonii using a combination of molecular and comparative genomics methods

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    Pérez-Martínez Gaspar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH constitutes a powerful tool for identification and characterization of bacterial strains. In this study we have applied this technique for the characterization of a number of Lactobacillus strains isolated from the intestinal content of rats fed with a diet supplemented with sorbitol. Results Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene, recA, pheS, pyrG and tuf sequences identified five bacterial strains isolated from the intestinal content of rats as belonging to the recently described Lactobacillus taiwanensis species. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments confirmed that these five strains are distinct but closely related to Lactobacillus johnsonii and Lactobacillus gasseri. A whole genome DNA microarray designed for the probiotic L. johnsonii strain NCC533 was used for CGH analysis of L. johnsonii ATCC 33200T, L. johnsonii BL261, L. gasseri ATCC 33323T and L. taiwanensis BL263. In these experiments, the fluorescence ratio distributions obtained with L. taiwanensis and L. gasseri showed characteristic inter-species profiles. The percentage of conserved L. johnsonii NCC533 genes was about 83% in the L. johnsonii strains comparisons and decreased to 51% and 47% for L. taiwanensis and L. gasseri, respectively. These results confirmed the separate status of L. taiwanensis from L. johnsonii at the level of species, and also that L. taiwanensis is closer to L. johnsonii than L. gasseri is to L. johnsonii. Conclusion Conventional taxonomic analyses and microarray-based CGH analysis have been used for the identification and characterization of the newly species L. taiwanensis. The microarray-based CGH technology has been shown as a remarkable tool for the identification and fine discrimination between phylogenetically close species, and additionally provided insight into the adaptation of the strain L. taiwanensis BL263 to its ecological niche.

  11. Host specific diversity in Lactobacillus johnsonii as evidenced by a major chromosomal inversion and phage resistance mechanisms.

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    Caitriona M Guinane

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity and genomic rearrangements are a driving force in bacterial evolution and niche adaptation. We sequenced and annotated the genome of Lactobacillus johnsonii DPC6026, a strain isolated from the porcine intestinal tract. Although the genome of DPC6026 is similar in size (1.97 mbp and GC content (34.8% to the sequenced human isolate L. johnsonii NCC 533, a large symmetrical inversion of approximately 750 kb differentiated the two strains. Comparative analysis among 12 other strains of L. johnsonii including 8 porcine, 3 human and 1 poultry isolate indicated that the genome architecture found in DPC6026 is more common within the species than that of NCC 533. Furthermore a number of unique features were annotated in DPC6026, some of which are likely to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT and contribute to protection against phage infection. A putative type III restriction-modification system was identified, as were novel Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR elements. Interestingly, these particular elements are not widely distributed among L. johnsonii strains. Taken together these data suggest intra-species genomic rearrangements and significant genetic diversity within the L. johnsonii species and indicate towards a host-specific divergence of L. johnsonii strains with respect to genome inversion and phage exposure.

  12. Mosaic tetracycline Genes and their Flanking Regions in Bifidobacterium thermophilum and lactobacillus johnsonii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Mayrhofer, S.; Domig, K.J.; Flórez, A.B.; Ammor, M.S.; Mayo, B.; Aarts, H.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    For the first time, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes were identified in Lactobacillus johnsonii and in Bifidobacterium thermophilum strains. The L. johnsonii strain investigated contains a complex hybrid gene, tet(O/W/32/O/W/O), whereas the five bifidobacterial strains possess two different

  13. Indication for Co-evolution of Lactobacillus johnsonii with its hosts

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    Buhnik-Rosenblau Keren

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intestinal microbiota, composed of complex bacterial populations, is host-specific and affected by environmental factors as well as host genetics. One important bacterial group is the lactic acid bacteria (LAB, which include many health-promoting strains. Here, we studied the genetic variation within a potentially probiotic LAB species, Lactobacillus johnsonii, isolated from various hosts. Results A wide survey of 104 fecal samples was carried out for the isolation of L. johnsonii. As part of the isolation procedure, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (tRFLP was performed to identify L. johnsonii within a selected narrow spectrum of fecal LAB. The tRFLP results showed host specificity of two bacterial species, the Enterococcus faecium species cluster and Lactobacillus intestinalis, to different host taxonomic groups while the appearance of L. johnsonii and E. faecalis was not correlated with any taxonomic group. The survey ultimately resulted in the isolation of L. johnsonii from few host species. The genetic variation among the 47 L. johnsonii strains isolated from the various hosts was analyzed based on variation at simple sequence repeats (SSR loci and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST of conserved hypothetical genes. The genetic relationships among the strains inferred by each of the methods were similar, revealing three different clusters of L. johnsonii strains, each cluster consisting of strains from a different host, i.e. chickens, humans or mice. Conclusions Our typing results support phylogenetic separation of L. johnsonii strains isolated from different animal hosts, suggesting specificity of L. johnsonii strains to their hosts. Taken together with the tRFLP results, that indicated the association of specific LAB species with the host taxonomy, our study supports co-evolution of the host and its intestinal lactic acid bacteria.

  14. Potential probiotic of Lactobacillus johnsonii LT171 for chicken ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... ISSN 1684–5315 © 2009 Academic Journals. Full Length ... chicken nutrition. Hamidreza ... probiotic properties of L. johnsonii LT171 for chicken nutrition. Hence this ..... resistance to pathogens and performance in animals.

  15. Improved bioavailability of dietary phenolic acids in whole grain barley and oat groat following fermentation with probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus , Lactobacillus johnsonii , and Lactobacillus reuteri.

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    Hole, Anastasia S; Rud, Ida; Grimmer, Stine; Sigl, Stefanie; Narvhus, Judith; Sahlstrøm, Stefan

    2012-06-27

    The aim of this study was to improve the bioavailability of the dietary phenolic acids in flours from whole grain barley and oat groat following fermentation with lactic acid bacteria (LAB) exhibiting high feruloyl esterase activity (FAE). The highest increase of free phenolic acids was observed after fermentation with three probiotic strains, Lactobacillus johnsonii LA1, Lactobacillus reuteri SD2112, and Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5, with maximum increases from 2.55 to 69.91 μg g(-1) DM and from 4.13 to 109.42 μg g(-1) DM in whole grain barley and oat groat, respectively. Interestingly, higher amounts of bound phenolic acids were detected after both water treatment and LAB fermentation in whole grain barley, indicating higher bioaccessibility, whereas some decrease was detected in oat groat. To conclude, cereal fermentation with specific probiotic strains can lead to significant increase of free phenolic acids, thereby improving their bioavailability.

  16. Lactobacillus johnsonii N6.2 mitigates the development of type 1 diabetes in BB-DP rats.

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    Ricardo Valladares

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intestinal epithelium is a barrier that composes one of the most immunologically active surfaces of the body due to constant exposure to microorganisms as well as an infinite diversity of food antigens. Disruption of intestinal barrier function and aberrant mucosal immune activation have been implicated in a variety of diseases within and outside of the gastrointestinal tract. With this model in mind, recent studies have shown a link between diet, composition of intestinal microbiota, and type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. In the BioBreeding rat model of type 1 diabetes, comparison of the intestinal microbial composition of diabetes prone and diabetes resistant animals found Lactobacillus species were negatively correlated with type 1 diabetes development. Two species, Lactobacillus johnsonii and L. reuteri, were isolated from diabetes resistant rats. In this study diabetes prone rats were administered pure cultures of L. johnsonii or L. reuteri isolated from diabetes resistant rats to determine the effect on type 1 diabetes development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL: Findings Results Rats administered L. johnsonii, but not L. reuteri, post-weaning developed type 1 diabetes at a protracted rate. Analysis of the intestinal ileum showed administration of L. johnsonii induced changes in the native microbiota, host mucosal proteins, and host oxidative stress response. A decreased oxidative intestinal environment was evidenced by decreased expression of several oxidative response proteins in the intestinal mucosa (Gpx1, GR, Cat. In L. johnsonii fed animals low levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFNgamma were correlated with low levels of iNOS and high levels of Cox2. The administration of L. johnsonii also resulted in higher levels of the tight junction protein claudin. CONCLUSIONS: It was determined that the administration of L. johnsonii isolated from BioBreeding diabetes resistant rats delays or inhibits the onset of type 1 diabetes in Bio

  17. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of non-living, heat-killed form of lactobacilli including Lactobacillus johnsonii No.1088.

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    Aiba, Yuji; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2017-06-15

    Some strains of lactic acid bacteria are reported to inhibit the growth of Helicobacter pylori and proposed to be useful to support so-called triple therapy for H. pylori. Although most strains must be alive to exert their anti-H. pylori activity, some lactobacilli strains are effective even when dead. One possible underlying mechanism of such an activity of non-living lactobacilli is reportedly co-aggregation with H. pylori. In this study, we found that a non-living heat-killed form of Lactobacillus johnsonii No.1088 (HK-LJ88) and also that of some other lactobacilli inhibited the growth of H. pylori in vitro. Furthermore, the number of H. pylori in the infected stomach of germ-free mice was significantly decreased by the repeated oral administration of HK-LJ88. Observation by scanning electron microscopy revealed that no co-aggregation had occurred between H. pylori and HK-LJ88; instead, deformations of H. pylori (e.g. disappearance of spiral, bending of cell body, coccoid formation, degradations, etc.) appeared after incubation for 24 h with HK-LJ88. These results suggest that HK-LJ88 inhibited H. pylori activity probably not by co-aggregation but by some unknown mechanism involving HK-LJ88's cell surface molecules and that even non-living lactobacilli are possibly useful to support H. pylori eradication therapy. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Effects of Lactobacillus Johnsonii AJ5 Metabolites on Nutrition, Nosema Ceranae Development and Performance of Apis Mellifera L.

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    Piano Fiorella G. De

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The European honey bee (Apis mellifera L. is known to be affected by such stress factors as pathogen load, poor nutrition and depressed immunity. Nosema ceranae is one of the main parasites that affect colony populations. The relationship between the stress factors and honey bee-bacteria symbiosis appears as an alternative to enhance bee health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the oral administration of bacterial metabolites produced by Lactobacillus johnsonii AJ5 on nutritional parameters, the N. ceranae development and the performance of A. mellifera colonies. Laboratory assays were performed and demonstrated that the bacterial metabolites did not have a toxic effect on bees. Field trial showed an increase of colonies population over time. Also, a decreasing trend of fat bodies per bee was detected in all colonies but there were no evident changes on abdomen protein content at the end of the assay. Lastly, N. ceranae prevalence showed a tendency to reduce with the organic acids. Future studies should be performed to increase our knowledge of the physiological effects of bacterial metabolites on the health of bee colonies.

  19. H2O2 production rate in Lactobacillus johnsonii is modulated via the interplay of a heterodimeric flavin oxidoreductase with a soluble 28 Kd PAS domain containing protein.

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    Ricardo B Valladares

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Host and commensals crosstalk, mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS, has triggered a growing scientific interest to understand the mechanisms governing such interaction. However, the majority of the scientific studies published do not evaluate the ROS production by commensals bacteria. In this context we recently showed that Lactobacillus johnsonii N6.2, a strain of probiotic value, modulates the activity of the critical enzymes 2,3-indoleamine dioxygenase via H2O2 production. L. johnsonii N6.2 by decreasing IDO activity, is able to modify the tryptophan/kynurenine ratio in the host blood with further systemic consequences. Understanding the mechanisms of H2O2 production is critical to predict the probiotic value of these strains and to optimize bacterial biomass production in industrial processes. We performed a transcriptome analysis to identify genes differentially expressed in L. johnsonii N6.2 cells collected from cultures grown under different aeration conditions. Herein we described the biochemical characteristics of a heterodimeric FMN reductase (FRedA/B whose in vitro activity is controlled by LjPAS protein with a typical Per-Arnst-Sim (PAS sensor domain. Interestingly, LjPAS is fused to the FMN reductase domains in other lactobacillaceae. In L. johnsonii, LjPAS is encoded by an independent gene which expression is repressed under anaerobic conditions (>3 fold. Purified LjPAS was able to slow down the FRedA/B initial activity rate when the holoenzyme precursors (FredA, FredB and FMN were mixed in vitro. Altogether the results obtained suggest that LjPAS module regulates the H2O2 production helping the cells to minimize oxidative stress in response to environmental conditions.

  20. Deconjugated Bile Salts Produced by Extracellular Bile-Salt Hydrolase-Like Activities from the Probiotic Lactobacillus johnsonii La1 Inhibit Giardia duodenalis In vitro Growth

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    Travers, Marie-Agnès; Sow, Cissé; Zirah, Séverine; Deregnaucourt, Christiane; Chaouch, Soraya; Queiroz, Rayner M. L.; Charneau, Sébastien; Allain, Thibault; Florent, Isabelle; Grellier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Giardiasis, currently considered a neglected disease, is caused by the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis and is widely spread in human as well as domestic and wild animals. The lack of appropriate medications and the spread of resistant parasite strains urgently call for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Host microbiota or certain probiotic strains have the capacity to provide some protection against giardiasis. By combining biological and biochemical approaches, we have been able to decipher a molecular mechanism used by the probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii La1 to prevent Giardia growth in vitro. We provide evidence that the supernatant of this strain contains active principle(s) not directly toxic to Giardia but able to convert non-toxic components of bile into components highly toxic to Giardia. By using bile acid profiling, these components were identified as deconjugated bile-salts. A bacterial bile-salt-hydrolase of commercial origin was able to mimic the properties of the supernatant. Mass spectrometric analysis of the bacterial supernatant identified two of the three bile-salt-hydrolases encoded in the genome of this probiotic strain. These observations document a possible mechanism by which L. johnsonii La1, by secreting, or releasing BSH-like activity(ies) in the vicinity of replicating Giardia in an environment where bile is present and abundant, can fight this parasite. This discovery has both fundamental and applied outcomes to fight giardiasis, based on local delivery of deconjugated bile salts, enzyme deconjugation of bile components, or natural or recombinant probiotic strains that secrete or release such deconjugating activities in a compartment where both bile salts and Giardia are present. PMID:27729900

  1. Perinatal maternal administration of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 prevents allergic inflammation in a mouse model of birch pollen allergy.

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    Schabussova, Irma; Hufnagl, Karin; Tang, Mimi L K; Hoflehner, Elisabeth; Wagner, Angelika; Loupal, Gerhard; Nutten, Sophie; Zuercher, Adrian; Mercenier, Annick; Wiedermann, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    The hygiene hypothesis implies that microbial agents including probiotic bacteria may modulate foetal/neonatal immune programming and hence offer effective strategies for primary allergy prevention; however their mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We investigated whether oral administration of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 to mothers during gestation/lactation can protect against airway inflammation in offspring in a mouse model of birch pollen allergy, and examined the immune mechanisms involved. BALB/c mice were treated daily with L. paracasei in drinking water or drinking water alone in the last week of gestation and during lactation. Their offspring were sensitized with recombinant Bet v 1, followed by aerosol challenge with birch pollen extract. Maternal exposure to L. paracasei prevented the development of airway inflammation in offspring, as demonstrated by attenuation of eosinophil influx in the lungs; reduction of IL-5 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage, and in lung and mediastinal lymph node cell cultures; and reduced peribronchial inflammatory infiltrate and mucus hypersecretion. While allergen-specific IgE and IgG antibody levels remained unchanged by the treatment, IL-4 and IL-5 production in spleen cell cultures were significantly reduced upon allergen stimulation in offspring of L. paracasei treated mice. Offspring of L. paracasei supplemented mothers had significantly reduced Bet v 1-specific as well as Concanavalin A-induced responses in spleen and mesenteric lymph node cell cultures, suggesting the modulation of both antigen-specific and mitogen-induced immune responses in offspring. These effects were associated with increased Foxp3 mRNA expression in the lungs and increased TGF-beta in serum. Our data show that in a mouse model of birch pollen allergy, perinatal administration of L. paracasei NCC 2461 to pregnant/lactating mothers protects against the development of airway inflammation in offspring by activating regulatory pathways

  2. Perinatal maternal administration of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 prevents allergic inflammation in a mouse model of birch pollen allergy.

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    Irma Schabussova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hygiene hypothesis implies that microbial agents including probiotic bacteria may modulate foetal/neonatal immune programming and hence offer effective strategies for primary allergy prevention; however their mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We investigated whether oral administration of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 to mothers during gestation/lactation can protect against airway inflammation in offspring in a mouse model of birch pollen allergy, and examined the immune mechanisms involved. METHODS: BALB/c mice were treated daily with L. paracasei in drinking water or drinking water alone in the last week of gestation and during lactation. Their offspring were sensitized with recombinant Bet v 1, followed by aerosol challenge with birch pollen extract. RESULTS: Maternal exposure to L. paracasei prevented the development of airway inflammation in offspring, as demonstrated by attenuation of eosinophil influx in the lungs; reduction of IL-5 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage, and in lung and mediastinal lymph node cell cultures; and reduced peribronchial inflammatory infiltrate and mucus hypersecretion. While allergen-specific IgE and IgG antibody levels remained unchanged by the treatment, IL-4 and IL-5 production in spleen cell cultures were significantly reduced upon allergen stimulation in offspring of L. paracasei treated mice. Offspring of L. paracasei supplemented mothers had significantly reduced Bet v 1-specific as well as Concanavalin A-induced responses in spleen and mesenteric lymph node cell cultures, suggesting the modulation of both antigen-specific and mitogen-induced immune responses in offspring. These effects were associated with increased Foxp3 mRNA expression in the lungs and increased TGF-beta in serum. CONCLUSION: Our data show that in a mouse model of birch pollen allergy, perinatal administration of L. paracasei NCC 2461 to pregnant/lactating mothers protects against the development of airway

  3. Oral administration of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 for the modulation of grass pollen allergic rhinitis: a randomized, placebo-controlled study during the pollen season.

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    Nembrini, Chiara; Singh, Anurag; De Castro, Carlos Antonio; Mercenier, Annick; Nutten, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 in modulating allergic rhinitis was previously evaluated in two exploratory clinical studies. Oral administration with NCC 2461 reduced specific subjective symptoms following nasal provocation tests with controlled grass pollen allergen concentrations. Our aim was to confirm the anti-allergic effect of NCC 2461 in grass pollen allergic subjects exposed to natural doses of allergens during the pollen season. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel study was conducted with 131 grass pollen allergic subjects from May to July 2012 in concomitance with the pollen season in Berlin. NCC 2461 or placebo was administered daily for an 8-week period to adult subjects with clinical history of allergic rhinitis to grass pollen, positive skin prick test and IgE to grass pollen. During the 8 weeks, symptoms and quality of life questionnaires were filled out, and plasma was collected for IgE analysis at screening and at the end of the intervention. All subjects were included within a 5-day interval, ensuring exposure to similar air pollen counts for each individual during the trial period. The results obtained show that symptoms increased with pollen loads, confirming a natural exposure to the allergen and presence of pollen-induced allergic rhinitis in the subjects. However, no significant differences were observed in allergic rhinitis symptoms scores, quality of life, or specific IgE levels between subjects receiving NCC 2461 as compared to placebo administration. In contrast to previous findings, oral administration of NCC 2461 did not show a beneficial effect on allergic rhinitis in a field trial. The influence of study design, allergen exposure and intervention window on the efficacy of NCC 2461 in modulating respiratory allergy should be further evaluated.

  4. Randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study of the effect of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 on skin reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueniche, A; Philippe, D; Bastien, P; Reuteler, G; Blum, S; Castiel-Higounenc, I; Breton, L; Benyacoub, J

    2014-06-01

    In recent decades, the prevalence of subjects with reactive skin has considerably increased in industrialised countries. 50% of women and 30% of men report cutaneous discomfort classified under reactive/sensitive skin. Several topical approaches have been proposed, in particular through improvement of galenic forms or protection of epidermal surface. We propose to act differently, deeply from inside the body via an innovative nutritional approach. To this purpose, Lactobacillus paracasei NCC 2461 (ST11) was selected because of its specific beneficial skin properties discovered in in vitro studies, i.e. diminution of neurogenic inflammation and promotion of the recovery of skin barrier function. We designed a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical study with a two-month supplementation in two female treatment groups (n=32 per group). A capsaicin test was performed to monitor the time course of skin sensitivity. Moreover, transepidermal water loss was assessed to analyse the rate of skin barrier function recovery; dryness of the leg and roughness of the cheeks was investigated by a dermatologist as well as by self-assessment. The results of the present clinical trial show that oral supplementation with the probiotic decreases skin sensitivity and increases the rate of barrier function recovery. Thus, the data provide evidence that daily intake of ST11 could improve reactive skin condition.

  5. Controlling of growth performance, lipid deposits and fatty acid composition of chicken meat through a probiotic, Lactobacillus johnsonii during subclinical Clostridium perfringens infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hesong; Ni, Xueqin; Liu, Lei; Zeng, Dong; Lai, Jing; Qing, Xiaodan; Li, Guangyao; Pan, Kangcheng; Jing, Bo

    2017-02-10

    Meat is considered as a major source of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) which is essential for humans, therefore its lipid level and fatty acid composition have drawn great attention. As no clinical sign can be found in chicks subclinically infected by Clostridium perfringens (CP), the meat may be purchased and eaten. The objective of the present study was to determine whether Lactobacillus johnsonii (LJ) can control the CP-caused impact on growth, lipid levels, fatty acid composition and other flavor or nutritional quality in the meat. 480 one-day-old chicks were divided into four groups and fed with basal diet (control and CP group). Supplemented with 1 × 10(5) (L-LJ) and 1 × 10(6) (H-LJ) colony-forming unit (cfu), CP diet was fed for 42 days. From day 19 to 22, birds of CP and LJ groups were administered with CP twice per day and the control was administered with liver broth. LJ-treated chickens were free from negative influences on growth performance and significant decrease of abdominal fat deposit., LJ inhibited CP-caused shearing force and drip loss increase and pH 40 min and 24 h decrease after sacrifice. In addition, LJ exhibited a positive effect on muscle lipid peroxidation by significantly increasing SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activity and decreasing MDA level. Besides, LJ attenuated the decrease of intramuscular fat, total cholesterol and triglyceride contents caused by CP infection. However, levels of total protein and most of amino acids were not changed. CP infection decreased C18:3n-3 (α-LA), C20:4n-6, C20:5n-3(EPA), C22:4n-6, C22:5n-3, C22:6n-3(DHA), total PUFA, n-3 PUFA and PUFA:SFA ratio and increased C14:0, total SFA and n-6:n-3 ratio. LJ was found to protect the muscle from these changes. Meanwhile, the 28-day gut permeability level was higher in CP group. These findings suggest that CP may affect the growth performance of chicks and negatively influence lipid content and fatty acid composition in chicken meat. Meanwhile, LJ

  6. The effect of calcium ions on adhesion and competitive exclusion of Lactobacillus ssp. and E. coli O138

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nadja; Nissen, Peter; Willats, William G.T.

    2007-01-01

    The adhesion abilities of 11 strains of Lactobacillus were determined in vitro using the IPEC-J2 cell line as a model system. Bacteria cultures included the probiotic strains L. rhamnosus GG, L. reuteri ATCC 55730, L. johnsonii NCC 533 and L. reuteri DSM 12246, and new isolates of Lactobacillus ssp....... Adhesion was quantified by scintillation counting of radiolabelled bound bacteria. The highest adhesion of 38%, was determined for L. reuteri DSM 12246 followed by L. plantarum Q47 with an adhesion level of 24%. Other strains showed moderate to low binding of less than 16%. Competitive adhesion experiments...... on IPEC-J2 cells demonstrated that strongly adhesive strains, as L. reuteri DSM 12246 and L. plantarum Q47, significantly reduced the attachment of the less adhesive strains, such as L. rhamnosus GG and L. johnsonii NCC 533, both under condition of co-incubation and in displacement assays, indicating...

  7. Kinetic studies of the action of Lactacin F, a bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus johnsonii that forms poration complexes in the cytoplasmic membrane.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abee, T.; Klaenhammer, T.R.; Letellier, L.

    1994-01-01

    The bacteriocin lactacin F is bactericidal against Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus helveticus, and Enterococcus faecalis. Activity against L. delbrueckii was recently shown to be dependent on two peptides, LafA and LafX, which are encoded within the lactacin F operon (T. R. Klaenhammer, FEM

  8. Lactobacillus johnsonii N6.2 stimulates the innate immune response through Toll-like receptor 9 in Caco-2 cells and increases intestinal crypt Paneth cell number in biobreeding diabetes-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingma, Sandra D K; Li, Nan; Sun, Frank; Valladares, Ricardo B; Neu, Joe; Lorca, Graciela L

    2011-06-01

    Lactobacillus johnsonii (Ljo) N6.2 has been shown to mitigate the development of type 1 diabetes when administered to diabetes-prone rats. The specific mechanisms underlying this observed response remain under investigation. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Ljo N6.2 on mucosal inflammatory response using differentiated Caco-2 monolayers. The mRNA expression levels of CCL20, CXCL8, and CXCL10 chemokines were determined by qRT-PCR. Ljo at 10(11) CFU/L induced a strong response in all chemokines examined. To assess the specific host-signaling pathways involved, we performed RT-PCR amplification of Toll-like receptors (TLR) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors. TLR7 and TLR9 expression levels were induced 4.2- and 9-fold, respectively, whereas other TLR and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain receptors were not modified. A similar effect was observed in Caco-2 monolayers treated with Ljo cell-free extract or purified nucleic acids (NA). Increased levels of IFN type 1 and IFN regulators Stat1 and IRF7 followed the upregulation of TLR9. Activation of TLR9 was also evidenced by increased Frizzled 5 expression in Ljo-treated Caco-2 cells and an increase in the number of Paneth cells in Ljo-fed, diabetes-prone rats. These results are in agreement with the polarizing-tolerizing mechanism recently described in which the apical stimulation of TLR9 in intestinal epithelial cells leads to a higher state of immunologic alertness. Furthermore, these results suggest that live probiotics could be, in the future, replaced with select cellular components.

  9. Lactobacillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lactobacillus plantarum, and a combination of freeze-dried Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus reuteri also seem to reduce eczema ... to reduce the risk. A specific strain of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus GG (Culturelle), taken by mouth 2-4 ...

  10. Mining novel starch-converting Glycoside Hydrolase 70 enzymes from the Nestlé Culture Collection genome database: The Lactobacillus reuteri NCC 2613 GtfB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangoiti, Joana; van Leeuwen, Sander S; Meng, Xiangfeng; Duboux, Stéphane; Vafiadi, Christina; Pijning, Tjaard; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2017-08-30

    The Glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 70 originally was established for glucansucrases of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) converting sucrose into α-glucan polymers. In recent years we have identified 3 subfamilies of GH70 enzymes (designated GtfB, GtfC and GtfD) as 4,6-α-glucanotransferases, cleaving (α1 → 4)-linkages in maltodextrins/starch and synthesizing new (α1 → 6)-linkages. In this work, 106 putative GtfBs were identified in the Nestlé Culture Collection genome database with ~2700 genomes, and the L. reuteri NCC 2613 one was selected for further characterization based on variations in its conserved motifs. Using amylose the L. reuteri NCC 2613 GtfB synthesizes a low-molecular-mass reuteran-like polymer consisting of linear (α1 → 4) sequences interspersed with (α1 → 6) linkages, and (α1 → 4,6) branching points. This product specificity is novel within the GtfB subfamily, mostly comprising 4,6-α-glucanotransferases synthesizing consecutive (α1 → 6)-linkages. Instead, its activity resembles that of the GtfD 4,6-α-glucanotransferases identified in non-LAB strains. This study demonstrates the potential of large-scale genome sequence data for the discovery of enzymes of interest for the food industry. The L. reuteri NCC 2613 GtfB is a valuable addition to the starch-converting GH70 enzyme toolbox. It represents a new evolutionary intermediate between families GH13 and GH70, and provides further insights into the structure-function relationships of the GtfB subfamily enzymes.

  11. NCC kujundas kontori koduks

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    25. XI 2005 pidas NCC Ehituse AS Tallinnas Kalamaja t. 4 Kodupoe avapidu. Kodupoes müüakse NCC arendatud ja ehitatud kortereid. Elamispindade müügibüroo kujundas koduna Kadri Pärtelpoeg. 3 värv. ill

  12. NCC kujundas kontori koduks

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    25. XI 2005 pidas NCC Ehituse AS Tallinnas Kalamaja t. 4 Kodupoe avapidu. Kodupoes müüakse NCC arendatud ja ehitatud kortereid. Elamispindade müügibüroo kujundas koduna Kadri Pärtelpoeg. 3 värv. ill

  13. Overview of the NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey

    2001-01-01

    A multi-disciplinary design/analysis tool for combustion systems is critical for optimizing the low-emission, high-performance combustor design process. Based on discussions between then NASA Lewis Research Center and the jet engine companies, an industry-government team was formed in early 1995 to develop the National Combustion Code (NCC), which is an integrated system of computer codes for the design and analysis of combustion systems. NCC has advanced features that address the need to meet designer's requirements such as "assured accuracy", "fast turnaround", and "acceptable cost". The NCC development team is comprised of Allison Engine Company (Allison), CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC), GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE), NASA Glenn Research Center (LeRC), and Pratt & Whitney (P&W). The "unstructured mesh" capability and "parallel computing" are fundamental features of NCC from its inception. The NCC system is composed of a set of "elements" which includes grid generator, main flow solver, turbulence module, turbulence and chemistry interaction module, chemistry module, spray module, radiation heat transfer module, data visualization module, and a post-processor for evaluating engine performance parameters. Each element may have contributions from several team members. Such a multi-source multi-element system needs to be integrated in a way that facilitates inter-module data communication, flexibility in module selection, and ease of integration. The development of the NCC beta version was essentially completed in June 1998. Technical details of the NCC elements are given in the Reference List. Elements such as the baseline flow solver, turbulence module, and the chemistry module, have been extensively validated; and their parallel performance on large-scale parallel systems has been evaluated and optimized. However the scalar PDF module and the Spray module, as well as their coupling with the baseline flow solver, were developed in a small-scale distributed

  14. Anti-infective activities of lactobacillus strains in the human intestinal microbiota: from probiotics to gastrointestinal anti-infectious biotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Servin, Alain L

    2014-04-01

    A vast and diverse array of microbial species displaying great phylogenic, genomic, and metabolic diversity have colonized the gastrointestinal tract. Resident microbes play a beneficial role by regulating the intestinal immune system, stimulating the maturation of host tissues, and playing a variety of roles in nutrition and in host resistance to gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens. The mechanisms by which the resident microbial species combat gastrointestinal pathogens are complex and include competitive metabolic interactions and the production of antimicrobial molecules. The human intestinal microbiota is a source from which Lactobacillus probiotic strains have often been isolated. Only six probiotic Lactobacillus strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, i.e., L. rhamnosus GG, L. casei Shirota YIT9029, L. casei DN-114 001, L. johnsonii NCC 533, L. acidophilus LB, and L. reuteri DSM 17938, have been well characterized with regard to their potential antimicrobial effects against the major gastric and enteric bacterial pathogens and rotavirus. In this review, we describe the current knowledge concerning the experimental antibacterial activities, including antibiotic-like and cell-regulating activities, and therapeutic effects demonstrated in well-conducted, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of these probiotic Lactobacillus strains. What is known about the antimicrobial activities supported by the molecules secreted by such probiotic Lactobacillus strains suggests that they constitute a promising new source for the development of innovative anti-infectious agents that act luminally and intracellularly in the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MEUG-01-0785 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MEUG-01-0785 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 6e-50 39% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-07-0074 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-07-0074 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 4e-14 39% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-11-0038 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-11-0038 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 4e-24 45% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-04-0060 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-04-0060 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 5e-19 45% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0035 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 4e-27 35% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0289 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0289 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 3e-19 36% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-06-0114 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-06-0114 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 4e-22 38% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0833 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0833 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 8e-27 37% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-05-0010 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-05-0010 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 5e-42 31% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-13-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-13-0002 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 4e-12 49% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1804 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1804 ref|NP_965427.1| hypothetical protein LJ1621 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS09393.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1621 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965427.1 0.12 24% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-10-0049 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-10-0049 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 8e-26 39% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-13-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-13-0016 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 2e-14 32% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-1166 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-1166 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-26 45% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-0077 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-0077 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 2e-24 39% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-11-0038 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-11-0038 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 8e-23 45% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-20-0090 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-20-0090 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-23 38% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-11-0133 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-11-0133 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 4e-29 45% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-2889 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-2889 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-48 49% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-20-0015 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-20-0015 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-24 43% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-09-0184 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-09-0184 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-40 47% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OCUN-01-0722 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OCUN-01-0722 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-28 43% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-0061 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-0061 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-18 44% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-16-0021 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-16-0021 ref|NP_964548.1| hypothetical protein LJ0696 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08514.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0696 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964548.1 1.4 26% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-14-0058 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-14-0058 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-18 40% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-14-0076 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-14-0076 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 2e-32 42% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-2559 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-2559 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 6e-12 35% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-07-0074 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-07-0074 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 4e-15 40% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-08-0082 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-08-0082 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 2e-36 41% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-1076 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-1076 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 4e-28 40% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-21-0227 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-21-0227 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 2e-19 40% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-1154 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-1154 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 7e-27 39% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0836 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0836 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 3e-30 43% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-13-0092 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-13-0092 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 4e-20 44% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-17-0106 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-17-0106 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 2e-33 38% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0035 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 2e-26 34% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1856 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-1856 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 3e-12 36% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-0085 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-0085 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 2e-28 43% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-0064 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-0064 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 3e-22 40% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-2563 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-2563 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-18 44% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0350 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-0350 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 7e-10 38% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-11-0086 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-11-0086 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 3e-42 48% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-01-0780 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-01-0780 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 6e-17 43% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0869 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0869 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 4e-17 41% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-24-0012 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-24-0012 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 8e-31 37% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-10-0046 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-10-0046 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 2e-04 32% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MEUG-01-0785 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MEUG-01-0785 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-55 36% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-23-0216 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-23-0216 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-19 50% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-1255 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-1255 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 7e-27 41% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-0509 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-0509 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 3e-15 40% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-14-0058 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-14-0058 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 3e-20 41% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-3266 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-3266 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 3e-20 28% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1529 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-1529 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 8e-15 34% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-20-0090 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-20-0090 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 2e-25 38% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-27-0352 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-27-0352 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 4e-30 35% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-12-0011 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-12-0011 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 2e-16 43% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-01-0247 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-01-0247 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 5e-32 50% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1173 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-1173 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 8e-26 33% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-1200 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-1200 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 4e-28 39% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-10-0037 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-10-0037 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-14 45% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-STRI-01-0677 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-STRI-01-0677 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-05 33% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-02-0031 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-02-0031 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-30 53% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-0202 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-0202 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-19 38% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0289 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0289 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 3e-18 35% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1173 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-1173 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 3e-24 31% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-06-0137 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-06-0137 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 5e-47 32% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-20-0131 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-20-0131 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 6e-19 43% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0048 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0048 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-17 39% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0466 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0466 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 2e-18 41% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-1205 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-1205 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 5e-20 42% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-16-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-16-0017 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 6e-33 38% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0531 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0531 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 5e-23 50% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-0077 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-0077 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-26 39% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-0400 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-0400 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 8e-30 39% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-27-0014 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-27-0014 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 7e-21 36% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-05-0010 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-05-0010 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-34 44% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-20-0011 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-20-0011 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 8e-19 40% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-13-0087 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-13-0087 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 3e-17 43% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FRUB-02-0140 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FRUB-02-0140 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-35 47% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-13-0087 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-13-0087 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 3e-16 41% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-04-0146 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-04-0146 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-39 42% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-03-0000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-03-0000 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 5e-15 41% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0308 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0308 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 2e-21 37% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-02-0011 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-02-0011 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 6e-35 44% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FRUB-02-0140 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FRUB-02-0140 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-35 46% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1856 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-1856 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 2e-13 35% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DMEL-08-0100 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DMEL-08-0100 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 2e-13 31% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OGAR-01-0941 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OGAR-01-0941 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 3e-23 44% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-25-0005 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-25-0005 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 2e-27 42% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0510 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0510 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 3e-46 45% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-1198 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-1198 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-20 38% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-19-0004 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-19-0004 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 4e-39 30% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0048 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0048 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 2e-19 38% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-09-0184 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-09-0184 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-38 48% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-0345 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-0345 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 7e-23 38% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-1113 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-1113 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 7e-28 43% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-3063 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-3063 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 8e-20 44% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0835 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-0835 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 4e-26 41% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-3129 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-3129 ref|NP_965614.1| hypothetical protein LJ0641 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09580.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0641 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965614.1 3e-40 40% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-23-0215 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-23-0215 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 7e-21 48% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0468 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-0468 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-18 40% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-1907 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-1907 ref|NP_964891.1| hypothetical protein LJ1035 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08857.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1035 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964891.1 0.030 25% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1898 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-1898 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 7e-09 34% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-24-0003 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-24-0003 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 4e-20 28% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CPOR-01-1900 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CPOR-01-1900 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 2e-30 52% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-08-0054 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-08-0054 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 9e-15 27% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0836 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0836 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 5e-31 45% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-1168 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-1168 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-25 41% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-19-0015 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-19-0015 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 5e-43 38% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-3606 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-3606 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-12 40% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0228 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0228 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 8e-28 43% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-03-0073 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-03-0073 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-27 44% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-1000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-1000 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 4e-46 50% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-0064 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-0064 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 2e-24 41% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-06-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-06-0002 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 3e-36 42% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-25-0005 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-25-0005 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 3e-26 42% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-08-0082 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-08-0082 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 9e-39 40% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0033 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0033 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 2e-21 39% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-20-0131 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-20-0131 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 3e-19 44% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-06-0114 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-06-0114 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 2e-20 36% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0835 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-0835 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 3e-28 41% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CELE-05-0919 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CELE-05-0919 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 2e-34 52% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-1205 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-1205 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-21 41% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-23-0027 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-23-0027 ref|NP_964548.1| hypothetical protein LJ0696 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08514.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0696 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964548.1 2.3 29% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-2563 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-2563 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 8e-18 43% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0086 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0086 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 4e-19 47% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-0170 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-0170 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 3e-25 36% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-0170 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-0170 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 4e-28 37% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0350 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-0350 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 3e-10 38% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-06-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-06-0002 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-38 42% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0308 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0308 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-20 36% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-3606 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-3606 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 9e-13 41% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0642 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0642 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 3e-14 36% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-14-0076 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-14-0076 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 3e-35 43% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-12-0011 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-12-0011 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-16 42% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-1255 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-1255 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 4e-26 40% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CPOR-01-1900 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CPOR-01-1900 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 5e-32 52% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-12-0006 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-12-0006 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-25 34% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0466 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0466 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-18 40% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-27-0373 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-27-0373 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-31 39% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-2154 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-2154 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 9e-30 38% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0642 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0642 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 2e-16 35% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0147 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0147 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 8e-26 40% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0480 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0480 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 8e-16 48% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0869 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0869 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 3e-16 41% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0228 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0228 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-27 41% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0049 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0049 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 4e-39 50% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-1166 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-1166 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 5e-28 42% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-1000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-1000 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 2e-46 47% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0050 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 3e-35 42% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-27-0373 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-27-0373 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-28 38% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0904 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0904 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 7e-15 34% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-3027 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-3027 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 7e-20 41% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0147 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0147 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 3e-29 42% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-16-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-16-0017 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 5e-35 38% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-STRI-01-0677 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-STRI-01-0677 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 5e-06 33% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-02-0078 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-02-0078 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 1e-12 23% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-12-0021 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-12-0021 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 1e-37 44% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-26-0400 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-26-0400 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 2e-28 38% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0566 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0566 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 6e-13 39% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0480 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0480 ref|NP_964415.1| hypothetical protein LJ0391 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS08381.1| hypothetical protein LJ_0391 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_964415.1 5e-15 47% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-3027 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-3027 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 5e-21 43% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TNIG-22-0080 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TNIG-22-0080 ref|NP_965518.1| hypothetical protein LJ1711 [Lactobacillus johns...onii NCC 533] gb|AAS09484.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1711 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965518.1 5e-19 42% ...

  18. NCC and Computers in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ron L.

    1982-01-01

    This introduction to the work of the National Computing Centre (NCC), looks at industry/education links, the development of case studies, the use of computers in training, work in the Department of Industry - Micros in Schools Scheme, and at the Department of Education and Science-Micro-Electronics in Education Programme. (MP)

  19. An ecotoxicological characterization of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Tibor; Naish, Valerie; O'Connor, Brian; Blaise, Christian; Gagné, Francois; Hall, Lauren; Trudeau, Vance; Martel, Pierre

    2010-09-01

    The pulp and paper industry in Canada is developing technology for the production and use of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC). A key component of the developmental work is an assessment of potential environmental risks. Towards this goal, NCC samples as well as carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC), a surrogate of the parent cellulosic material, were subjected to an ecotoxicological evaluation. This involved toxicity tests with rainbow trout hepatocytes and nine aquatic species. The hepatocytes were most sensitive (EC20s between 10 and 200 mg/l) to NCC, although neither NCC nor CMC caused genotoxicity. In tests with the nine species, NCC affected the reproduction of the fathead minnow at (IC25) 0.29 g/l, but no other effects on endpoints such as survival and growth occurred in the other species at concentrations below 1 g/l, which was comparable to CMC. Based on this ecotoxicological characterization, NCC was found to have low toxicity potential and environmental risk.

  20. The NCC project: A quality management perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond H.

    1993-01-01

    The Network Control Center (NCC) Project introduced the concept of total quality management (TQM) in mid-1990. The CSC project team established a program which focused on continuous process improvement in software development methodology and consistent deliveries of high quality software products for the NCC. The vision of the TQM program was to produce error free software. Specific goals were established to allow continuing assessment of the progress toward meeting the overall quality objectives. The total quality environment, now a part of the NCC Project culture, has become the foundation for continuous process improvement and has resulted in the consistent delivery of quality software products over the last three years.

  1. Phosphorylation regulates NCC stability and transporter activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sung-Sen; Fang, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Min-Hua; Chu, Pei-Yi; Yu, I-Shing; Wu, Han-Chung; Lin, Shu-Wha; Chau, Tom; Uchida, Shinichi; Sasaki, Sei; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2013-10-01

    A T60M mutation in the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) is common in patients with Gitelman's syndrome (GS). This mutation prevents Ste20-related proline and alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)/oxidative stress responsive kinase-1 (OSR1)-mediated phosphorylation of NCC and alters NCC transporter activity in vitro. Here, we examined the physiologic effects of NCC phosphorylation in vivo using a novel Ncc T58M (human T60M) knock-in mouse model. Ncc(T58M/T58M) mice exhibited typical features of GS with a blunted response to thiazide diuretics. Despite expressing normal levels of Ncc mRNA, these mice had lower levels of total Ncc and p-Ncc protein that did not change with a low-salt diet that increased p-Spak. In contrast to wild-type Ncc, which localized to the apical membrane of distal convoluted tubule cells, T58M Ncc localized primarily to the cytosolic region and caused an increase in late distal convoluted tubule volume. In MDCK cells, exogenous expression of phosphorylation-defective NCC mutants reduced total protein expression levels and membrane stability. Furthermore, our analysis found diminished total urine NCC excretion in a cohort of GS patients with homozygous NCC T60M mutations. When Wnk4(D561A/+) mice, a model of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II expressing an activated Spak/Osr1-Ncc, were crossed with Ncc(T58M/T58M) mice, total Ncc and p-Ncc protein levels decreased and the GS phenotype persisted over the hypertensive phenotype. Overall, these data suggest that SPAK-mediated phosphorylation of NCC at T60 regulates NCC stability and function, and defective phosphorylation at this residue corrects the phenotype of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II.

  2. Identification of Lactobacillus strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer PCR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, Marta; Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Gnat, Sebastian; Puchalski, Andrzej; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2014-04-01

    The objective of our study was to identify Lactobacillus sp. strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP. All three techniques proved to be valuable tools for identification of avian lactobacilli and produced comparable classification results. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from 100% of geese aged 3 weeks to 4 years, but from only 25% of chicks aged 1-10 days. Among the 104 strains isolated, we distinguished 14 Lactobacillus species. The dominant species was Lactobacillus salivarius (35.6%), followed by Lactobacillus johnsonii (18.3%), Lactobacillus ingluviei (11.5%) and Lactobacillus agilis (7.7%). The intact-cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry enabled rapid species identification of the lactobacilli with minimal pretreatment. However, it produced more than one identification result for 11.5% examined strains (mainly of the species L. johnsonii). ITS-PCR distinguished 12 genotypes among the isolates, but was not able to differentiate closely related strains, i.e. between Lactobacillus amylovorus and Lactobacillus kitasatonis and between Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus zeae. These species were differentiated by ITS-PCR/RFLP using the restriction enzymes TaqI and MseI. The results obtained indicate that ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP assays could be used not only for interspecific, but also for intraspecific, typing.

  3. Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) reinforced alginate based biodegradable nanocomposite film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, Tanzina; Salmieri, Stephane; Khan, Avik; Khan, Ruhul A; Le Tien, Canh; Riedl, Bernard; Fraschini, Carole; Bouchard, Jean; Uribe-Calderon, Jorge; Kamal, Musa R; Lacroix, Monique

    2012-11-06

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) reinforced alginate-based nanocomposite film was prepared by solution casting. The NCC content in the matrix was varied from 1 to 8% ((w/w) % dry matrix). It was found that the nanocomposite reinforced with 5 wt% NCC content exhibits the highest tensile strength which was increased by 37% compared to the control. Incorporation of NCC also significantly improved water vapor permeability (WVP) of the nanocomposite showing a 31% decrease due to 5 wt% NCC loading. Molecular interactions between alginate and NCC were supported by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction studies also confirmed the appearance of crystalline peaks due to the presence of NCC inside the films. Thermal stability of alginate-based nanocomposite films was improved after incorporation of NCC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Encounters with oxygen: Aerobic physiology and H₂O₂ production of Lactobacillus johnsonii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertzberger, R.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are intimately entwined with human life. They ferment several key food products in our diets and they reside on the mucosal surfaces of the mouth, intestine and vagina. Administration of adequate amounts of certain LAB species has been shown to provide health benefits, suc

  5. NESREA AND NCC REGULATIONS ON TELECOMMUNICATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    munication masts are injurious to human health and the environment. The ... contended further that the MTN base station had met NCC's regulation of five metres set ..... food is to the body', yet there are claims that these electromagnetic radia- ... are so low that the temperature increases are insignificant and do not affect.

  6. Isolation and Identification and Probiotic Characteristics Study of a New Feeding Lactobacillus%一株新饲用乳杆菌的分离鉴定及益生性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓雯; 刘庆; 闫轶洁; 王安如; 汪攀

    2011-01-01

    从猪粪便中分离得到一株新饲用乳杆菌,对其16S rDN基因进行了测序,该段基因序列已提交GenBank,登录号为HQ641209.将该菌株16S rDN基因序列进行在线BLST比对并与其他乳杆菌属菌株的16S rDN序列建立系统发育树,结果显示该菌16S rDN序列与NCBI公布的约氏乳杆菌Lactobacillus johnsonii(B295648)的同源性为99.7%,因此该菌鉴定为约氏乳杆菌(Lactobacillus johnsonii),将其命名为“Lactobacillus johnsonii Sun001”.经测试,该菌株对E.coli K88、K99菌株的生长有抑制作用,在pH为2.5的模拟胃液中处理3h存活率为68.8%,在0.3%胆盐浓度的模拟肠液中处理3h存活率为21.4%.%A new Lactobacillus was isolated from a faecal sample of pig. The 16S rDNA gene was sequenced, and it was submitted to GenBank, the accession number was HQ641209. Online BLAST with other Lactobacillus and phylogenetic analysis based on the fragment of 16S rDNA reveal that its sequence homology was 97. 9% comparing with Lactobacillus johnsonii strain (AB295648). The isolated strain was identified as Lactobacillus johnsonii and named Lactobacillus johnsonii SunOOl. L. Johnsonii had high level tolerance to the simulated gastric juice (pH 2. 5, 3 h of incubation, survival rate was 68. 8%) and simulated gastric juice (bile salt concentration 3% ,3 h of incubation, survival rate was 21. 4%) and high antibacterial activity ti E. Coli K88, K99.

  7. A case of community-acquired Acinetobacter junii-johnsonii cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henao-Martínez, Andrés F; González-Fontal, Guido R; Johnson, Steven

    2012-06-01

    Acinetobacter skin and soft tissue infection outside of the traumatic wound setting are rare occurrences. The majority of cases occur in the presence of significant comorbilities and by Acinetobacter baumanii. Herein a case is reported of community-onset, health-care-associated, non-traumatic cellulitis caused by Acinetobacter, species junii-johnsonii with bacteremia. This is the first reported case of Acinetobacter junii-johnsonii skin and soft tissue infection. Hemorrhagic bullae might be one of the clinical features of Acinetobacter cellulitis.

  8. Network Control Center User Planning System (NCC UPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dealy, Brian

    1991-01-01

    NCC UPS is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: UPS overview; NCC UPS role; major NCC UPS functional requirements; interactive user access levels; UPS interfaces; interactive user subsystem; interface navigation; scheduling screen hierarchy; interactive scheduling input panels; autogenerated schedule request panel; schedule data tabular display panel; schedule data graphic display panel; graphic scheduling aid design; and schedule data graphic display.

  9. NCC toodab korruselamuid tehases / tõlk. Mait Eelrand

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Komplett-ehituskontseptsioonist. Komplett-tehnoloogia alusel on alustatud korruselamute tööstuslikku tootmist Rootsis Hallstahammaris paiknevas tehases. Soome NCC juhataja Timo U. Korhonen Komplett-majade arvatavast jõudmisest Soome. NCC Ehitus AS-i juhatuse liige Jaan Lehtsaar uuest kontseptsioonist

  10. NCC toodab korruselamuid tehases / tõlk. Mait Eelrand

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Komplett-ehituskontseptsioonist. Komplett-tehnoloogia alusel on alustatud korruselamute tööstuslikku tootmist Rootsis Hallstahammaris paiknevas tehases. Soome NCC juhataja Timo U. Korhonen Komplett-majade arvatavast jõudmisest Soome. NCC Ehitus AS-i juhatuse liige Jaan Lehtsaar uuest kontseptsioonist

  11. NCC simulation model. Phase 2: Simulating the operations of the Network Control Center and NCC message manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Norman M.; Gill, Tepper; Charles, Mary

    1994-01-01

    The network control center (NCC) provides scheduling, monitoring, and control of services to the NASA space network. The space network provides tracking and data acquisition services to many low-earth orbiting spacecraft. This report describes the second phase in the development of simulation models for the FCC. Phase one concentrated on the computer systems and interconnecting network.Phase two focuses on the implementation of the network message dialogs and the resources controlled by the NCC. Performance measures were developed along with selected indicators of the NCC's operational effectiveness.The NCC performance indicators were defined in terms of the following: (1) transfer rate, (2) network delay, (3) channel establishment time, (4) line turn around time, (5) availability, (6) reliability, (7) accuracy, (8) maintainability, and (9) security. An NCC internal and external message manual is appended to this report.

  12. Phosphorylation decreases ubiquitylation of the thiazide-sensitive cotransporter NCC and subsequent clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaek, Lena L; Kortenoeven, Marleen L A; Aroankins, Takwa S; Fenton, Robert A

    2014-05-09

    The thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter, NCC, is the major NaCl transport protein in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT). The transport activity of NCC can be regulated by phosphorylation, but knowledge of modulation of NCC trafficking by phosphorylation is limited. In this study, we generated novel tetracycline-inducible Madin-Darby canine kidney type I (MDCKI) cell lines expressing NCC to examine the role of NCC phosphorylation and ubiquitylation on NCC endocytosis. In MDCKI-NCC cells, NCC was highly glycosylated at molecular weights consistent with NCC monomers and dimers. NCC constitutively cycles to the apical plasma membrane of MDCKI-NCC cells, with 20-30% of the membrane pool of NCC internalized within 30 min. The use of dynasore, PitStop2, methyl-β-cyclodextrin, nystatin, and filipin (specific inhibitors of either clathrin-dependent or -independent endocytosis) demonstrated that NCC is internalized via a clathrin-mediated pathway. Reduction of endocytosis resulted in greater levels of NCC in the plasma membrane. Immunogold electron microscopy confirmed the association of NCC with the clathrin-mediated internalization pathway in rat DCT cells. Compared with controls, inducing phosphorylation of NCC via low chloride treatment or mimicking phosphorylation by replacing Thr-53, Thr-58, and Ser-71 residues with Asp resulted in increased membrane abundance and reduced rates of NCC internalization. NCC ubiquitylation was lowest in the conditions with greatest NCC phosphorylation, thus providing a mechanism for the reduced endocytosis. In conclusion, our data support a model where NCC is constitutively cycled to the plasma membrane, and upon stimulation, it can be phosphorylated to both increase NCC activity and decrease NCC endocytosis, together increasing NaCl transport in the DCT.

  13. Phosphorylation Decreases Ubiquitylation of the Thiazide-sensitive Cotransporter NCC and Subsequent Clathrin-mediated Endocytosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaek, Lena L.; Kortenoeven, Marleen L. A.; Aroankins, Takwa S.; Fenton, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter, NCC, is the major NaCl transport protein in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT). The transport activity of NCC can be regulated by phosphorylation, but knowledge of modulation of NCC trafficking by phosphorylation is limited. In this study, we generated novel tetracycline-inducible Madin-Darby canine kidney type I (MDCKI) cell lines expressing NCC to examine the role of NCC phosphorylation and ubiquitylation on NCC endocytosis. In MDCKI-NCC cells, NCC was highly glycosylated at molecular weights consistent with NCC monomers and dimers. NCC constitutively cycles to the apical plasma membrane of MDCKI-NCC cells, with 20–30% of the membrane pool of NCC internalized within 30 min. The use of dynasore, PitStop2, methyl-β-cyclodextrin, nystatin, and filipin (specific inhibitors of either clathrin-dependent or -independent endocytosis) demonstrated that NCC is internalized via a clathrin-mediated pathway. Reduction of endocytosis resulted in greater levels of NCC in the plasma membrane. Immunogold electron microscopy confirmed the association of NCC with the clathrin-mediated internalization pathway in rat DCT cells. Compared with controls, inducing phosphorylation of NCC via low chloride treatment or mimicking phosphorylation by replacing Thr-53, Thr-58, and Ser-71 residues with Asp resulted in increased membrane abundance and reduced rates of NCC internalization. NCC ubiquitylation was lowest in the conditions with greatest NCC phosphorylation, thus providing a mechanism for the reduced endocytosis. In conclusion, our data support a model where NCC is constitutively cycled to the plasma membrane, and upon stimulation, it can be phosphorylated to both increase NCC activity and decrease NCC endocytosis, together increasing NaCl transport in the DCT. PMID:24668812

  14. Characterization of a novel phosphorylation site in the sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaek, L L; Assentoft, M; Pedersen, N B

    2012-01-01

    DAVP significantly increased pS124-NCC abundance, with no changes in total NCC plasma membrane abundance. pS124-NCC levels also increased in abundance in rats after stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system by dietary low sodium intake. In contrast to other NCC phosphorylation sites, the STE20/SPS1......The sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC, is essential for renal electrolyte balance. NCC function can be modulated by protein phosphorylation. In this study, we characterized the role and physiological regulation of a novel phosphorylation site in NCC at Ser124 (S124). Novel phospho...

  15. Neuro-endoscopic management of intraventricular neurocysticercosis (NCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, M; Jha, D K; Rastogi, M; Husain, N; Gupta, R K

    2007-01-01

    Various approaches including endoscopy have been used for the treatment of intraventricular and cisternal NCC. We present our technique of Neuro-endoscopic management of intraventricular NCC. Twenty-one cases, 13 females and 8 males (age range 12-50 years; mean, 25.7 years), of intraventricular NCC [lateral (n = 6), third (n = 6), fourth (n = 10) ventricles including a patient with both lateral and third ventricular cysts] producing obstructive hydrocephalus formed the group of study. Gaab Universal Endoscope System along with 4 mm 0 degrees and 30 degrees rigid telescopes were used through a frontal burr-hole for removal of intraventricular including intra-fourth ventricular (n = 10) NCC. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) was done for internal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion. Average follow up was 18 months. Complete (n = 18) or partial (n = 2) removal of NCC was done in 20 patients, while a cyst located at foramen of Monro slipped and migrated to occipital or temporal horn in 1 patient. Thirty-degree 4-mm rigid telescope provided excellent image quality with ability to address even intra-fourth ventricular NCC through the dilated aqueduct using a curved tip catheter. No patient required further surgery for their hydrocephalus. There was no operative complication and post-operative ventriculitis was not seen in any case despite partial removal of NCC. Neuro-endoscopic surgery is an effective treatment modality for patients with intraventricular NCC. It effectively restores CSF flow and is capable of removing cysts completely or partially from accessible locations causing mass effect. Partial removal or rupture of the cyst does not affect the clinical outcome of the patients.

  16. NCC: A Multidisciplinary Design/Analysis Tool for Combustion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Quealy, Angela

    1999-01-01

    A multi-disciplinary design/analysis tool for combustion systems is critical for optimizing the low-emission, high-performance combustor design process. Based on discussions between NASA Lewis Research Center and the jet engine companies, an industry-government team was formed in early 1995 to develop the National Combustion Code (NCC), which is an integrated system of computer codes for the design and analysis of combustion systems. NCC has advanced features that address the need to meet designer's requirements such as "assured accuracy", "fast turnaround", and "acceptable cost". The NCC development team is comprised of Allison Engine Company (Allison), CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC), GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE), NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC), and Pratt & Whitney (P&W). This development team operates under the guidance of the NCC steering committee. The "unstructured mesh" capability and "parallel computing" are fundamental features of NCC from its inception. The NCC system is composed of a set of "elements" which includes grid generator, main flow solver, turbulence module, turbulence and chemistry interaction module, chemistry module, spray module, radiation heat transfer module, data visualization module, and a post-processor for evaluating engine performance parameters. Each element may have contributions from several team members. Such a multi-source multi-element system needs to be integrated in a way that facilitates inter-module data communication, flexibility in module selection, and ease of integration.

  17. NCC: A Multidisciplinary Design/Analysis Tool for Combustion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Quealy, Angela

    1999-01-01

    A multi-disciplinary design/analysis tool for combustion systems is critical for optimizing the low-emission, high-performance combustor design process. Based on discussions between NASA Lewis Research Center and the jet engine companies, an industry-government team was formed in early 1995 to develop the National Combustion Code (NCC), which is an integrated system of computer codes for the design and analysis of combustion systems. NCC has advanced features that address the need to meet designer's requirements such as "assured accuracy", "fast turnaround", and "acceptable cost". The NCC development team is comprised of Allison Engine Company (Allison), CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC), GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE), NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC), and Pratt & Whitney (P&W). This development team operates under the guidance of the NCC steering committee. The "unstructured mesh" capability and "parallel computing" are fundamental features of NCC from its inception. The NCC system is composed of a set of "elements" which includes grid generator, main flow solver, turbulence module, turbulence and chemistry interaction module, chemistry module, spray module, radiation heat transfer module, data visualization module, and a post-processor for evaluating engine performance parameters. Each element may have contributions from several team members. Such a multi-source multi-element system needs to be integrated in a way that facilitates inter-module data communication, flexibility in module selection, and ease of integration.

  18. Aldosterone Modulates the Association between NCC and ENaC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, Brandi M; Mistry, Abinash C; Al-Khalili, Otor; Mallick, Rickta; Theilig, Franziska; Eaton, Douglas C; Hoover, Robert S

    2017-06-23

    Distal sodium transport is a final step in the regulation of blood pressure. As such, understanding how the two main sodium transport proteins, the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), are regulated is paramount. Both are expressed in the late distal nephron; however, no evidence has suggested that these two sodium transport proteins interact. Recently, we established that these two sodium transport proteins functionally interact in the second part of the distal nephron (DCT2). Given their co-localization within the DCT2, we hypothesized that NCC and ENaC interactions might be modulated by aldosterone (Aldo). Aldo treatment increased NCC and αENaC colocalization (electron microscopy) and interaction (coimmunoprecipitation). Finally, with co-expression of the Aldo-induced protein serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1), NCC and αENaC interactions were increased. These data demonstrate that Aldo promotes increased interaction of NCC and ENaC, within the DCT2 revealing a novel method of regulation for distal sodium reabsorption.

  19. Biodegradation of malathion by Acinetobacter johnsonii MA19 and optimization of cometabolism substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Shan; LIU Junxin; LI Lin; QIAO Chuanling

    2009-01-01

    To enhance the removal efficiency of malathion in the wastewater from organophosphate pesticide mill, a bacterium, Acinetobacter johnsonii MA19, that could degrade malathion with cometabolism was isolated from malathion-polluted soil samples using enrichment culture techniques. Four kinds of additional compounds, sodium succinate, sodium acetate, glucose, and fructose were tested to choose a favorite carbon source for the cometabolism of strain MA19. The results showed that sodium succinate and sodium acetate could promote malathion biodegradation and cell growth. The investigation results of effects of sodium succinate concentrations on the malathion biodegradation indicated that the more sodium succinate supplied resulted in quick degradation ofmalathion and fast cells multiplied. Zero-order kinetic model was appropriate to describe the malathion biodegradation when the concentration of sodium succinate was more than 0.5144 g/L. The degradation rate constant (K) reached the maximum value of 3.5837 mg/(L·h) when the mass ratio of sodium succinate to malathion was 128.6 mg/mg. The aquatic toxicity of the malathion was evaluated using the test organism, Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri. The data obtained suggested that the toxicity of malathion could be ignored after 84 h biodegradation. Our result demonstrates the potential for using bacterium A. Johnsonii MA19 for malathion biodegradation and environmental bioremediation when some suitable conventional carbon sources are supplied.

  20. Screening of Lactobacillus strains of domestic goose origin against bacterial poultry pathogens for use as probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, Marta; Puchalski, Andrzej; Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2014-10-01

    Lactobacilli are natural inhabitants of human and animal mucous membranes, including the avian gastrointestinal tract. Recently, increasing attention has been given to their probiotic, health-promoting capacities, among which their antagonistic potential against pathogens plays a key role. A study was conducted to evaluate probiotic properties of Lactobacillus strains isolated from feces or cloacae of domestic geese. Among the 104 examined isolates, previously identified to the species level by whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and analysis of 16S-23S regions of rDNA, dominated Lactobacillus salivarius (35%), followed by Lactobacillus johnsonii (18%) and Lactobacillus ingluviei (11%). All lactobacilli were screened for antimicrobial activity toward Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Pasteurella multocida, and Riemerella anatipestifer using the agar slab method and the well diffusion method. Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus plantarum exhibited particularly strong antagonism toward all of the indicator strains. In the agar slab method, the highest sensitivity to Lactobacillus was observed in R. anatipestifer and P. multocida, and the lowest in E. coli and S. aureus. The ability to produce H₂O₂was exhibited by 92% of isolates, but there was no correlation between the rate of production of this reactive oxygen species and the antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus sp. All lactobacilli showed resistance to pH 3.0 and 3.5 and to 2% bile. The data demonstrate that Lactobacillus isolates from geese may have probiotic potential in reducing bacterial infections. The antibacterial activity of the selected lactobacilli is mainly due to lactic acid production by these bacteria. The selected Lactobacillus strains that strongly inhibited the growth of pathogenic bacteria, and were also resistant to low pH and bile salts, can potentially restore the balance

  1. Characterization of the Culturable Subpopulations of Lactobacillus in the Chicken Intestinal Tract as a Resource for Probiotic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu Adhikari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To gain better understanding of the distributions of the culturable Lactobacillus species in the chicken intestinal tract, we collected ceca, and distal ileum from 10 3-weeks-old broiler chickens. Lactobacillus strains from cecal lumen contents (M-CL, and those associated with mucosa of ceca (M-CM and ileum (M-IM were recovered on de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS agar plates, and used for microbiota analysis. The total cecal content (T-CL was also used directly for microbiota analysis. We purposefully focused on MRS-recovered populations to gain understanding of the culturable subpopulations of Lactobacillus, since the culturability is an important phenotype in order to exploit the chicken gut microbiota as a resource for development of probiotics. The V1–V3 regions of 16S rRNA gene was amplified from genomic DNA samples, and the pooled amplicons were analyzed by MiSeq sequencing with paired-end read 300 cycle option. Among MRS groups, Firmicutes were significantly higher in M-IM and M-CL as compared to M-CM, whereas Proteobacteria were significantly higher in M-CM as compared to M-IM and M-CL at p < 0.05. Among Lactobacillus, L. salivarius (36% and L. johnsonii (21% were higher in M-IM as compared to M-CL (L. salivarius, 28%; L. johnsonii, 15%, and M-CM (L. salivarius, 20%; L. johnsonii, 11%. L. crispatus was found significantly higher in M-CL as compared to M-IM (p < 0.01 whereas L. gasseri was found significantly higher in M-IM as compared to M-CM (p < 0.05. L. aviarius, and L. fornicalis were only observed in T-CL. In summary, Lactobacillus populations recovered on MRS vary with different regions and locations in chicken GIT, which might indicate their distinct functional roles in different gastrointestinal tract (GIT niches, and some species of Lactobacillus are not culturable on MRS agar media. This study is the first attempt to define culturable Lactobacillus subpopulations in the chicken intestinal tract comprehensively using 16S r

  2. Transformation kinetics of fermented milk using Lactobacillus casei (Lc1) and Streptococcus thermophilus: comparison of results with other Inocula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Susana Vargas; Guerrero, Francisco Quintanilla; Torres, Maykel González; Castro, Ma Del Pilar Carreón; Talavera, Rogelio Rodríguez

    2017-02-01

    Probiotic-based starter cultures are generally used to produce fermented milks with improved characteristics in the final product. In this study, Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus thermophilus (Lc1-St) were used as the starter inoculum. The transformation kinetics and properties of the final product were compared with systems produced with other inocula. The Lc1-St inoculum delayed the production of lactic acid from 40 to 70 min (depending on temperature and concentration) when compared to Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus (Lb-St) and Lactobacillus johnsonii and Streptococcus thermophilus (La1-St). The Lc1-St inoculum reached the aggregation system faster (30-80 min) than Lb-St (120-210 min) and La1-St (160-220 min), however, the production of exopolysaccharides and organic phosphates was delayed as a consequence of the lack of synergy between Lc1 and St.

  3. Lactobacillus agilis is an important component of the pigeon crop flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baele, M; Devriese, L A; Haesebrouck, F

    2001-09-01

    To examine the presence of lactic acid bacteria (LAB: enterococci, streptococci and lactobacilli) in the pigeon crop. The crops of 10 pigeons were sampled and inoculated on agar plates for isolation of streptococci, enterococci and lactobacilli. The isolates were identified using tDNA-PCR. Lactobacillus agilis, a species described in 1981 from municipal sewage, was the dominant component in eight of these pigeon crop sacs. A Lactobacillus species related to L. fermentum and L. mucosae but probably not belonging to one of these species was isolated from five birds. Three pigeons carried Enterococcus cecorum. Minor species found were E. columbae, E. faecalis, E. hirae, L. johnsonii, L. salivarius, and Streptococcus gallolyticus. A description is given of the phenotypic characteristics of the L. agilis pigeon strains. L. agilis is found to be the main component of the LAB flora in the pigeon crop.

  4. National Counterdrug Center (NCC) Simulation System Operational Requirements Document (ORD) Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holter, Gregory M.

    2001-01-26

    This Operational Requirements Document (ORD) describes the capabilities that need to be incorporated in the NCC interactive simulation system being developed under the auspices of the NCC development program. The ORD addresses the necessary capabilities (i.e. what the system needs to be able to do); it defines the envelope of situations and circumstances that the NCC system must be able to represent and operate within. The NCC system will be developed in modules over a period of several years. This ORD, Version 2, supersedes the previous version. Future updates of this ORD are anticipated to be issued as needed to guide the development of later versions of the NCC system.

  5. National Counterdrug Center (NCC) Simulation System Operational Requirements Document (ORD) Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holter, Gregory M

    2001-01-26

    This Operational Requirements Document (ORD) describes the capabilities that need to be incorporated in the NCC interactive simulation system being developed under the auspices of the NCC development program. The ORD addresses the necessary capabilities (i.e. what the system needs to be able to do); it defines the envelope of situations and circumstances that the NCC system must be able to represent and operate within. The NCC system will be developed in modules over a period of several years. This ORD, Version 2, supersedes the previous version. Future updates of this ORD are anticipated to be issued as needed to guide the development of later versions of the NCC system.

  6. Resource partitioning in relation to cohabitation of Lactobacillus species in the mouse forestomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannock, Gerald W; Wilson, Charlotte M; Loach, Diane; Cook, Gregory M; Eason, Jocelyn; O'Toole, Paul W; Holtrop, Grietje; Lawley, Blair

    2012-05-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of gut communities of vertebrates is advanced, but the relationships, especially at the trophic level, between commensals that share gut habitats of monogastric animals have not been investigated to any extent. Lactobacillus reuteri strain 100-23 and Lactobacillus johnsonii strain 100-33 cohabit in the forestomach of mice. According to the niche exclusion principle, this should not be possible because both strains can utilise the two main fermentable carbohydrates present in the stomach digesta: glucose and maltose. We show, based on gene transcription analysis, in vitro physiological assays, and in vivo experiments that the two strains can co-exist in the forestomach habitat because 100-23 grows more rapidly using maltose, whereas 100-33 preferentially utilises glucose. Mutation of the maltose phosphorylase gene (malA) of strain 100-23 prevented its growth on maltose-containing culture medium, and resulted in the numerical dominance of 100-33 in the forestomach. The fundamental niche of L. reuteri 100-23 in the mouse forestomach can be defined in terms of 'glucose and maltose trophism'. However, its realised niche when L. johnsonii 100-33 is present is 'maltose trophism'. Hence, nutritional adaptations provide niche differentiation that assists cohabitation by the two strains through resource partitioning in the mouse forestomach. This real life, trophic phenomenon conforms to a mathematical model based on in vitro bacterial doubling times, in vitro transport rates, and concentrations of maltose and glucose in mouse stomach digesta.

  7. A one-step reaction for the rapid identification of Lactobacillus mindensis, Lactobacillus panis, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, Lactobacillus pontis and Lactobacillus frumenti using oligonucleotide primers designed from the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic sequences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferchichi, M; Valcheva, R; Prévost, H; Onno, B; Dousset, X

    2008-01-01

    ...) were designed to rapidly discriminate between Lactobacillus mindensis, Lactobacillus panis, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, Lactobacillus pontis and Lactobacillus frumenti species recently isolated from French sourdough...

  8. Aldosterone acutely stimulates NCC activity via a SPAK-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Benjamin; Mistry, Abinash C; Hanson, Lauren; Mallick, Rickta; Wynne, Brandi M; Thai, Tiffany L; Bailey, James L; Klein, Janet D; Hoover, Robert S

    2013-09-01

    Hypertension is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and disordered sodium balance has long been implicated in its pathogenesis. Aldosterone is perhaps the key regulator of sodium balance and thus blood pressure. The sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) in the distal convoluted tubule of the kidney is a major site of sodium reabsorption and plays a key role in blood pressure regulation. Chronic exposure to aldosterone increases NCC protein expression and function. However, more acute effects of aldosterone on NCC are unknown. In our salt-abundant modern society where chronic salt deprivation is rare, understanding the acute effects of aldosterone is critical. Here, we examined the acute effects (12-36 h) of aldosterone on NCC in the rodent kidney and in a mouse distal convoluted tubule cell line. Studies demonstrated that aldosterone acutely stimulated NCC activity and phosphorylation without affecting total NCC abundance or surface expression. This effect was dependent upon the presence of the mineralocorticoid receptor and serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1). Furthermore, STE20/SPS-1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) phosphorylation also increased, and gene silencing of SPAK eliminated the effect of aldosterone on NCC activity. Aldosterone administration via a minipump in adrenalectomized rodents confirmed an increase in NCC phosphorylation without a change in NCC total protein. These data indicate that acute aldosterone-induced SPAK-dependent phosphorylation of NCC increases individual transporter activity.

  9. Functionomics of NCC mutations in Gitelman syndrome using a novel mammalian cell-based activity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez-Flores, Marco A; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Verkaart, Sjoerd; Tutakhel, Omar A Z; Valdez-Ortiz, Angel; Blanchard, Anne; Treard, Cyrielle; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M; Jeleń, Sabina

    2016-12-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS) is an autosomal recessive salt-wasting tubular disorder resulting from loss-of-function mutations in the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC). Functional analysis of these mutations has been limited to the use of Xenopus laevis oocytes. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to analyze the functional consequences of NCC mutations in a mammalian cell-based assay, followed by analysis of mutated NCC protein expression as well as glycosylation and phosphorylation profiles using human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. NCC activity was assessed with a novel assay based on thiazide-sensitive iodide uptake in HEK293 cells expressing wild-type or mutant NCC (N59I, R83W, I360T, C421Y, G463R, G731R, L859P, or R861C). All mutations caused a significantly lower NCC activity. Immunoblot analysis of the HEK293 cells revealed that 1) all NCC mutants have decreased NCC protein expression; 2) mutant N59I, R83W, I360T, C421Y, G463R, and L859P have decreased NCC abundance at the plasma membrane; 3) mutants C421Y and L859P display impaired NCC glycosylation; and 4) mutants N59I, R83W, C421Y, C731R, and L859P show affected NCC phosphorylation. In conclusion, we developed a mammalian cell-based assay in which NCC activity assessment together with a profiling of mutated protein processing aid our understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of the NCC mutations. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Inorganic impurity removal from waste oil and wash-down water by Acinetobacter johnsonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Qi, Hui; Zhang, Xianming; Chen, Guoxu

    2012-11-15

    The removal of the abundant inorganic impurities in waste oil has been one of the most significant issues in waste oil reclamation. Acinetobacter johnsonii isolated from waste oil in aerobic process was employed to remove the inorganic impurities in waste oil and wash-down water. The biological process was developed through the primary mechanism research on the impurity removal and the optimization of the various parameters, such as inoculum type, inoculum volume and disposal temperature and time. The results showed that waste oil and wash-down water were effectively cleansed under the optimized conditions, with inorganic impurity and turbidity below 0.5% and 100 NTU from the initial values of 2% and 300 NTU, respectively. Sulfide, the main hazardous matter during waste oil reclamation, was also reduced within 1mg/L. After the biotreatment, the oil-water interface was clear in favor of its separation to benefit the smooth reclamation of waste oil and wash-down water. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Spherical nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) from oil palm empty fruit bunch pulp via ultrasound assisted hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zianor Azrina, Z A; Beg, M Dalour H; Rosli, M Y; Ramli, Ridzuan; Junadi, Norhafzan; Alam, A K M Moshiul

    2017-04-15

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) was isolated from oil palm empty fruit bunch pulp (EFBP) using ultrasound assisted acid hydrolysis. The obtained NCC was analysed using FESEM, XRD, FTIR, and TGA, and compared with raw empty fruit bunch fibre (REFB), empty fruit bunch pulp (EFBP), and treated empty fruit bunch pulp (TEFBP). Based on FESEM analysis, it was found that NCC has a spherical shaped after acid hydrolysis with the assistance of ultrasound. This situation was different compared to previous studies that obtained rod-like shaped of NCC. Furthermore, the crystallinity of NCC is higher compared to REFB and EFBP. According to thermal stability, the NCC obtained shows remarkable sign of high thermal stability compared to REFB and EFBP.

  12. Exploring the intricate regulatory network controlling the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimke, Henrik

    2011-12-01

    The thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) plays key roles in renal electrolyte transport and blood pressure maintenance. Regulation of this cotransporter has received increased attention recently, prompted by the discovery that mutations in the with-no-lysine (WNK) kinases are the molecular explanation for pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII). Studies suggest that WNK4 regulates NCC via two distinct pathways, depending on its state of activation. Furthermore, an intact STE20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)/oxidative stress response 1 kinase (OSR1) pathway was found to be necessary for a WNK4 PHAII mutation to increase NCC phosphorylation and blood pressure in mice. The mouse protein 25α is a novel regulator of the SPAK/OSR1 kinase family, which greatly increases their activity. The phosphorylation status of NCC and the WNK is regulated by the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1, suggesting novel mechanisms whereby aldosterone modulates NCC activity. Dephosphorylation of NCC by protein phosphatase 4 strongly influences the activity of the cotransporter, confirming an important role for NCC phosphorylation. Finally, γ-adducin increases NCC activity. This stimulatory effect is dependent on the phosphorylation status of the cotransporter. γ-Adducin only binds the dephosphorylated cotransporter, suggesting that phosphorylation of NCC causes the dissociation of γ-adducin. Since γ-adducin is not a kinase, it is tempting to speculate that the protein exerts its function by acting as a scaffold between the dephosphorylated cotransporter and the regulatory kinase. As more molecular regulators of NCC are identified, the system-controlling NCC activity is becoming increasingly complex. This intricacy confers an ability to integrate a variety of stimuli, thereby regulating NCC transport activity and ultimately blood pressure.

  13. Functional assessment of sodium chloride cotransporter NCC mutants in polarized mammalian epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaek, Lena L; Rizzo, Federica; MacAulay, Nanna; Staub, Olivier; Fenton, Robert A

    2017-08-01

    The thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter NCC is important for maintaining serum sodium (Na(+)) and, indirectly, serum potassium (K(+)) levels. Functional studies on NCC have used cell lines with native NCC expression, transiently transfected nonpolarized cell lines, or Xenopus laevis oocytes. Here, we developed the use of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney type I (MDCKI) mammalian epithelial cell lines with tetracycline-inducible human NCC expression to study NCC activity and membrane abundance in the same system. In radiotracer assays, induced cells grown on filters had robust thiazide-sensitive and chloride dependent sodium-22 ((22)Na) uptake from the apical side. To minimize cost and maximize throughput, assays were modified to use cells grown on plastic. On plastic, cells had similar thiazide-sensitive (22)Na uptakes that increased following preincubation of cells in chloride-free solutions. NCC was detected in the plasma membrane, and both membrane abundance and phosphorylation of NCC were increased by incubation in chloride-free solutions. Furthermore, in cells exposed for 15 min to low or high extracellular K(+), the levels of phosphorylated NCC increased and decreased, respectively. To demonstrate that the system allows rapid and systematic assessment of mutated NCC, three phosphorylation sites in NCC were mutated, and NCC activity was examined. (22)Na fluxes in phosphorylation-deficient mutants were reduced to baseline levels, whereas phosphorylation-mimicking mutants were constitutively active, even without chloride-free stimulation. In conclusion, this system allows the activity, cellular localization, and abundance of wild-type or mutant NCC to be examined in the same polarized mammalian expression system in a rapid, easy, and low-cost fashion. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Exploring the intricate regulatory network controlling the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimke, Henrik Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) plays key roles in renal electrolyte transport and blood pressure maintenance. Regulation of this cotransporter has received increased attention recently, prompted by the discovery that mutations in the with-no-lysine (WNK) kinases are the molecular...... by acting as a scaffold between the dephosphorylated cotransporter and the regulatory kinase. As more molecular regulators of NCC are identified, the system-controlling NCC activity is becoming increasingly complex. This intricacy confers an ability to integrate a variety of stimuli, thereby regulating NCC...

  15. WNK4 enhances the degradation of NCC through a sortilin-mediated lysosomal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Zhuang, Jieqiu; Gu, Dingying; Wang, Hua; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Guggino, William B; Cai, Hui

    2010-01-01

    WNK kinase is a serine/threonine kinase that plays an important role in electrolyte homeostasis. WNK4 significantly inhibits the surface expression of the sodium chloride co-transporter (NCC) by enhancing the degradation of NCC through a lysosomal pathway, but the mechanisms underlying this trafficking are unknown. Here, we investigated the effect of the lysosomal targeting receptor sortilin on NCC expression and degradation. In Cos-7 cells, we observed that the presence of WNK4 reduced the steady-state amount of NCC by approximately half. Co-transfection with truncated sortilin (a dominant negative mutant) prevented this WNK4-induced reduction in NCC. NCC immunoprecipitated with both wild-type sortilin and, to a lesser extent, truncated sortilin. Immunostaining revealed that WNK4 increased the co-localization of NCC with the lysosomal marker cathepsin D, and NCC co-localized with wild-type sortilin, truncated sortilin, and WNK4 in the perinuclear region. These findings suggest that WNK4 promotes NCC targeting to the lysosome for degradation via a mechanism involving sortilin.

  16. WNK4 is the major WNK positively regulating NCC in the mouse kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Daiei; Mori, Takayasu; Nomura, Naohiro; Khan, Muhammad Zakir Hossain; Araki, Yuya; Zeniya, Moko; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2014-05-09

    By analysing the pathogenesis of a hereditary hypertensive disease, PHAII (pseudohypoaldosteronism type II), we previously discovered that WNK (with-no-lysine kinase)-OSR1/SPAK (oxidative stress-responsive 1/Ste20-like proline/alanine-rich kinase) cascade regulates NCC (Na-Cl co-transporter) in the DCT (distal convoluted tubules) of the kidney. However, the role of WNK4 in the regulation of NCC remains controversial. To address this, we generated and analysed WNK4-/- mice. Although a moderate decrease in SPAK phosphorylation and a marked increase in WNK1 expression were evident in the kidneys of WNK4-/- mice, the amount of phosphorylated and total NCC decreased to almost undetectable levels, indicating that WNK4 is the major WNK positively regulating NCC, and that WNK1 cannot compensate for WNK4 deficiency in the DCT. Insulin- and low-potassium diet-induced NCC phosphorylation were abolished in WNK4-/- mice, establishing that both signals to NCC were mediated by WNK4. As shown previously, a high-salt diet decreases phosphorylated and total NCC in WNK4+/+ mice via AngII (angiotensin II) and aldosterone suppression. This was not ameliorated by WNK4 knock out, excluding the negative regulation of WNK4 on NCC postulated to be active in the absence of AngII stimulation. Thus, WNK4 is the major positive regulator of NCC in the kidneys.

  17. Characterization of a novel phosphorylation site in the sodium–chloride cotransporter, NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaek, L L; Assentoft, M; Pedersen, N B; MacAulay, N; Fenton, R A

    2012-01-01

    The sodium–chloride cotransporter, NCC, is essential for renal electrolyte balance. NCC function can be modulated by protein phosphorylation. In this study, we characterized the role and physiological regulation of a novel phosphorylation site in NCC at Ser124 (S124). Novel phospho-specific antibodies targeting pS124-NCC demonstrated a band of 160 kDa in the kidney cortex, but not medulla, which was preabsorbed by a corresponding phosphorylated peptide. Confocal microscopy with kidney tubule segment-specific markers localized pS124-NCC to all distal convoluted tubule cells. Double immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that pS124-NCC co-localized with total NCC in the apical plasma membrane of distal convoluted tubule cells and intracellular vesicles. Acute treatment of Munich–Wistar rats or vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro rats with the vasopressin type 2 receptor-specific agonist dDAVP significantly increased pS124-NCC abundance, with no changes in total NCC plasma membrane abundance. pS124-NCC levels also increased in abundance in rats after stimulation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system by dietary low sodium intake. In contrast to other NCC phosphorylation sites, the STE20/SPS1-related proline–alanine-rich kinase and oxidative stress-response kinases (SPAK and OSR1) were not able to phosphorylate NCC at S124. Protein kinase arrays identified multiple kinases that were able to bind to the region surrounding S124. Four of these kinases (IRAK2, CDK6/Cyclin D1, NLK and mTOR/FRAP) showed weak but significant phosphorylation activity at S124. In oocytes, 36Cl uptake studies combined with biochemical analysis showed decreased activity of plasma membrane-associated NCC when replacing S124 with alanine (A) or aspartic acid (D). In novel tetracycline-inducible MDCKII-NCC cell lines, S124A and S124D mutants were able to traffic to the plasma membrane similarly to wildtype NCC. PMID:22966159

  18. Characterization of a novel phosphorylation site in the sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaek, L L; Assentoft, M; Pedersen, N B; MacAulay, N; Fenton, R A

    2012-12-01

    The sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC, is essential for renal electrolyte balance. NCC function can be modulated by protein phosphorylation. In this study, we characterized the role and physiological regulation of a novel phosphorylation site in NCC at Ser124 (S124). Novel phospho-specific antibodies targeting pS124-NCC demonstrated a band of 160 kDa in the kidney cortex, but not medulla, which was preabsorbed by a corresponding phosphorylated peptide. Confocal microscopy with kidney tubule segment-specific markers localized pS124-NCC to all distal convoluted tubule cells. Double immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that pS124-NCC co-localized with total NCC in the apical plasma membrane of distal convoluted tubule cells and intracellular vesicles. Acute treatment of Munich-Wistar rats or vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro rats with the vasopressin type 2 receptor-specific agonist dDAVP significantly increased pS124-NCC abundance, with no changes in total NCC plasma membrane abundance. pS124-NCC levels also increased in abundance in rats after stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system by dietary low sodium intake. In contrast to other NCC phosphorylation sites, the STE20/SPS1-related proline-alanine-rich kinase and oxidative stress-response kinases (SPAK and OSR1) were not able to phosphorylate NCC at S124. Protein kinase arrays identified multiple kinases that were able to bind to the region surrounding S124. Four of these kinases (IRAK2, CDK6/Cyclin D1, NLK and mTOR/FRAP) showed weak but significant phosphorylation activity at S124. In oocytes, (36)Cl uptake studies combined with biochemical analysis showed decreased activity of plasma membrane-associated NCC when replacing S124 with alanine (A) or aspartic acid (D). In novel tetracycline-inducible MDCKII-NCC cell lines, S124A and S124D mutants were able to traffic to the plasma membrane similarly to wildtype NCC.

  19. Characterization of the most abundant Lactobacillus species in chicken gastrointestinal tract and potential use as probiotics for genetic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Fang, Mingjian; Hu, Yanping; Yang, Yuxin; Yang, Mingming; Chen, Yulin

    2014-07-01

    The count and diffusion of Lactobacilli species in the different gastrointestinal tract (GI) regions of broilers were investigated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the probiotic characteristics of six L. reuteri species isolated from broilers' GI tract were also investigated to obtain the potential target for genetic engineering. Lactobacilli had the highest diversity in the crop and the lowest one in the cecum. Compared with the lower GI tract, more Lactobacilli were found in the upper GI tract. Lactobacillus reuteri, L. johnsonii, L. acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. salivarius, and L. aviarius were the predominant Lactobacillus species and present throughout the GI tract of chickens. Lactobacillus reuteri was the most abundant Lactobacillus species. Lactobacillus reuteri XC1 had good probiotic characteristics that would be a potential and desirable target for genetic engineering. © The Author 2014. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. NCC izgotavlivajet na zavode mnogo-etazhnõje doma / tõlk. Mait Eelrand

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Komplett-ehituskontseptsioonist. Komplett-tehnoloogia alusel on alustatud korruselamute tööstuslikku tootmist Rootsis Hallstahammaris paiknevas tehases. Soome NCC juhataja Timo U. Korhonen Komplett-majade arvatavast jõudmisest Soome. NCC Ehitus AS-i juhatuse liige Jaan Lehtsaar uuest kontseptsioonist

  1. Functional assessment of sodium chloride cotransporter NCC mutants in polarized mammalian epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaek, Lena L; Rizzo, Federica; MacAulay, Nanna

    2017-01-01

    oocytes. Here, we developed the use of polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney type I (MDCKI) mammalian epithelial cell lines with tetracycline-inducible human NCC expression to study NCC activity and membrane abundance in the same system. In radiotracer assays, induced cells grown on filters had robust...

  2. NCC izgotavlivajet na zavode mnogo-etazhnõje doma / tõlk. Mait Eelrand

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Komplett-ehituskontseptsioonist. Komplett-tehnoloogia alusel on alustatud korruselamute tööstuslikku tootmist Rootsis Hallstahammaris paiknevas tehases. Soome NCC juhataja Timo U. Korhonen Komplett-majade arvatavast jõudmisest Soome. NCC Ehitus AS-i juhatuse liige Jaan Lehtsaar uuest kontseptsioonist

  3. Inhibition of germ tube's formation of Candida albicans by lactobacillus spp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Huan; WEI Hong

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of 6 strains of lactobacilli and their main culture metabolites on the morphogenesis of Candida albicans (C. albicans) so as to screen medicinal strains as antifungal agents. Methods: Spent culture supernatant (SCS) at different culture time points, live lactobacilli, heatkilled bacteria and bacterial short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) with different molarities were incubated with C. albicans respectively. Crystal violet-based germ tube assay was used to detect the germination of C. albicans and the inhibitory efficiency of each addition was tested by germination rate. Results: SCS of lactobacillus spp. decreased the germination significantly and live bacteria of L. rhamnosus. GG, L. acidophilus L050103-12 as well as L. johnsonii JCM1022 could partially inhibit the conversion, however, all the heatkilled bacteria failed to control the germ tube formation. In addition, only butyric acid blocked the conversion of yeast to hypha among all the SCFA. Conclusion: The excellent fungistasis activities make L.rhamnosus. GG, L. acidophilus L050103-12 and L. johnsonii JCM1022 potential strains as antifungal drugs and the inhibition seems to have direct correlation to the metabolites.

  4. Modulation of NCC activity by low and high K+ intake: insights into the signaling pathways involved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Bueno, María; Cervantes-Perez, Luz Graciela; Rojas-Vega, Lorena; Arroyo-Garza, Isidora; Vázquez, Norma; Moreno, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of Na+-Cl− cotransporter (NCC) activity is essential to adjust K+ excretion in the face of changes in dietary K+ intake. We used previously characterized genetic mouse models to assess the role of Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and with-no-lysine kinase (WNK)4 in the modulation of NCC by K+ diets. SPAK knockin and WNK4 knockout mice were placed on normal-, low-, or high-K+-citrate diets for 4 days. The low-K+ diet decreased and high-K+ diet increased plasma aldosterone levels, but both diets were associated with increased phosphorylation of NCC (phospho-NCC, Thr44/Thr48/Thr53) and phosphorylation of SPAK/oxidative stress responsive kinase 1 (phospho-SPAK/OSR1, Ser383/Ser325). The effect of the low-K+ diet on SPAK phosphorylation persisted in WNK4 knockout and SPAK knockin mice, whereas the effects of ANG II on NCC and SPAK were lost in both mouse colonies. This suggests that for NCC activation by ANG II, integrity of the WNK4/SPAK pathway is required, whereas for the low-K+ diet, SPAK phosphorylation occurred despite the absence of WNK4, suggesting the involvement of another WNK (WNK1 or WNK3). Additionally, because NCC activation also occurred in SPAK knockin mice, it is possible that loss of SPAK was compensated by OSR1. The positive effect of the high-K+ diet was observed when the accompanying anion was citrate, whereas the high-KCl diet reduced NCC phosphorylation. However, the effect of the high-K+-citrate diet was aldosterone dependent, and neither metabolic alkalosis induced by bicarbonate, nor citrate administration in the absence of K+ increased NCC phosphorylation, suggesting that it was not due to citrate-induced metabolic alkalosis. Thus, the accompanying anion might modulate the NCC response to the high-K+ diet. PMID:24761002

  5. Modulation of NCC activity by low and high K(+) intake: insights into the signaling pathways involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Bueno, María; Cervantes-Perez, Luz Graciela; Rojas-Vega, Lorena; Arroyo-Garza, Isidora; Vázquez, Norma; Moreno, Erika; Gamba, Gerardo

    2014-06-15

    Modulation of Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) activity is essential to adjust K(+) excretion in the face of changes in dietary K(+) intake. We used previously characterized genetic mouse models to assess the role of Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and with-no-lysine kinase (WNK)4 in the modulation of NCC by K(+) diets. SPAK knockin and WNK4 knockout mice were placed on normal-, low-, or high-K(+)-citrate diets for 4 days. The low-K(+) diet decreased and high-K(+) diet increased plasma aldosterone levels, but both diets were associated with increased phosphorylation of NCC (phospho-NCC, Thr(44)/Thr(48)/Thr(53)) and phosphorylation of SPAK/oxidative stress responsive kinase 1 (phospho-SPAK/OSR1, Ser(383)/Ser(325)). The effect of the low-K(+) diet on SPAK phosphorylation persisted in WNK4 knockout and SPAK knockin mice, whereas the effects of ANG II on NCC and SPAK were lost in both mouse colonies. This suggests that for NCC activation by ANG II, integrity of the WNK4/SPAK pathway is required, whereas for the low-K(+) diet, SPAK phosphorylation occurred despite the absence of WNK4, suggesting the involvement of another WNK (WNK1 or WNK3). Additionally, because NCC activation also occurred in SPAK knockin mice, it is possible that loss of SPAK was compensated by OSR1. The positive effect of the high-K(+) diet was observed when the accompanying anion was citrate, whereas the high-KCl diet reduced NCC phosphorylation. However, the effect of the high-K(+)-citrate diet was aldosterone dependent, and neither metabolic alkalosis induced by bicarbonate, nor citrate administration in the absence of K(+) increased NCC phosphorylation, suggesting that it was not due to citrate-induced metabolic alkalosis. Thus, the accompanying anion might modulate the NCC response to the high-K(+) diet. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Mechanisms of angiotensin II stimulation of NCC are time-dependent in mDCT15 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Benjamin; Mistry, Abinash; Hanson, Lauren; Mallick, Rickta; Hoover, Robert S

    2015-04-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) increases thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) activity both acutely and chronically. ANG II has been implicated as a switch that turns WNK4 from an inhibitor of NCC into an activator of NCC, and ANG II's effect on NCC appears to require WNK4. Chronically, ANG II stimulation of NCC results in an increase in total and phosphorylated NCC, but the role of NCC phosphorylation in acute ANG II actions is unclear. Here, using a mammalian cell model with robust native NCC activity, we corroborate the role that ANG II plays in WNK4 regulation and clarify the role of Ste20-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)-induced NCC phosphorylation in ANG II action. ANG II was noted to have a biphasic effect on NCC, with a peak increase in NCC activity in the physiologic range of 10(-11) M ANG II. This effect was apparent as early as 15 min and remained sustained through 120 min. These changes correlated with significant increases in NCC surface protein expression. Knockdown of WNK4 expression sharply attenuated the effect of ANG II. SPAK knockdown did not affect ANG II action at early time points (15 and 30 min), but it did attenuate the response at 60 min. Correspondingly, NCC phosphorylation did not increase at 15 or 30 min, but increased significantly at 60 min. We therefore conclude that within minutes of an increase in ANG II, NCC is rapidly trafficked to the cell surface in a phosphorylation-independent but WNK4-dependent manner. Then, after 60 min, ANG II induces SPAK-dependent phosphorylation of NCC.

  7. SPAK-mediated NCC regulation in response to low-K+ diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, James B; Liu, Jie; Coleman, Richard; Grimm, P Richard; Delpire, Eric; Welling, Paul A

    2015-04-15

    The NaCl cotransporter (NCC) of the renal distal convoluted tubule is stimulated by low-K(+) diet by an unknown mechanism. Since recent work has shown that the STE20/SPS-1-related proline-alanine-rich protein kinase (SPAK) can function to stimulate NCC by phosphorylation of specific N-terminal sites, we investigated whether the NCC response to low-K(+) diet is mediated by SPAK. Using phospho-specific antibodies in Western blot and immunolocalization studies of wild-type and SPAK knockout (SPAK(-/-)) mice fed a low-K(+) or control diet for 4 days, we found that low-K(+) diet strongly increased total NCC expression and phosphorylation of NCC. This was associated with an increase in total SPAK expression in cortical homogenates and an increase in phosphorylation of SPAK at the S383 activation site. The increased pNCC in response to low-K(+) diet was blunted but not completely inhibited in SPAK(-/-) mice. These findings reveal that SPAK is an important mediator of the increased NCC activation by phosphorylation that occurs in the distal convoluted tubule in response to a low-K(+) diet, but other low-potassium-activated kinases are likely to be involved. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. GENERATION OF A PROTON MOTIVE FORCE BY THE EXCRETION OF METAL-PHOSPHATE IN THE POLYPHOSPHATE-ACCUMULATING ACINETOBACTER-JOHNSONII STRAIN 210A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANVEEN, HW; ABEE, T; KORTSTEE, GJJ; PEREIRA, H; KONINGS, WN; ZEHNDER, AJB

    1994-01-01

    The strictly aerobic, polyphosphate-accumulating Acinetobacter johnsonii strain 210A degrades its polyphosphate when oxidative phosphorylation is impaired. The endproducts of this degradation, divalent metal ions and inorganic phosphate, are excreted as a neutral metal-phosphate (MeHPO(4)) chelate v

  9. ENERGETICS OF ALANINE, LYSINE, AND PROLINE TRANSPORT IN CYTOPLASMIC MEMBRANES OF THE POLYPHOSPHATE-ACCUMULATING ACINETOBACTER-JOHNSONII STRAIN 210A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANVEEN, HW; ABEE, T; KLEEFSMAN, AWF; MELGERS, B; KORTSTEE, GJJ; KONINGS, WN; ZEHNDER, AJB

    1994-01-01

    Amino acid transport in right-side-out membrane vesicles of Acinetobacter johnsonii 210A was studied. L-Alanine, L-lysine, and L-proline were actively transported when a proton motive force of -76 mV tvas generated by the oxidation of glucose via the membrane-bound glucose dehydrogenase. Kinetic ana

  10. Carbohydrate-binding specificities of potential probiotic Lactobacillus strains in porcine jejunal (IPEC-J2) cells and porcine mucin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriano, Valerie Diane; Bagon, Bernadette B; Balolong, Marilen P; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial lectins are carbohydrate-binding adhesins that recognize glycoreceptors in the gut mucus and epithelium of hosts. In this study, the contribution of lectin-like activities to adhesion of Lactobacillus mucosae LM1 and Lactobacillus johnsonii PF01, which were isolated from swine intestine, were compared to those of the commercial probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Both LM1 and PF01 strains have been reported to have good adhesion ability to crude intestinal mucus of pigs. To confirm this, we quantified their adhesion to porcine gastric mucin and intestinal porcine enterocytes isolated from the jejunum of piglets (IPEC-J2). In addition, we examined their carbohydrate-binding specificities by suspending bacterial cells in carbohydrate solutions prior to adhesion assays. We found that the selected carbohydrates affected the adherences of LM1 to IPEC-J2 cells and of LGG to mucin. In addition, compared to adhesion to IPEC-J2 cells, adhesion to mucin by both LM1 and LGG was characterized by enhanced specific recognition of glycoreceptor components such as galactose, mannose, and N-acetylglucosamine. Hydrophobic interactions might make a greater contribution to adhesion of PF01. A similar adhesin profile between a probiotic and a pathogen, suggest a correlation between shared pathogen-probiotic glycoreceptor recognition and the ability to exclude enteropathogens such as Escherichia coli K88 and Salmonella Typhimurium KCCM 40253. These findings extend our understanding of the mechanisms of the intestinal adhesion and pathogen-inhibition abilities of probiotic Lactobacillus strains.

  11. Cortisol regulates sodium homeostasis by stimulating the transcription of sodium-chloride transporter (NCC) in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Hu, Huei-Jyun; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2016-02-15

    In mammals, sodium/hydrogen exchanger (NHE) and sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) are expressed in renal tubules, and exhibit functional redundancy and mutual compensation in Na(+) uptake. In teleosts, the gills of the adult and skin of the embryonic stage function as external kidneys, and ionocytes are responsible for ionoregulation in these tissues. NHE- and NCC-expressing ionocytes mutually cooperate to adjust Na(+) uptake, which is analogous to the activity of the mammalian kidney. Cortisol is a hormone that controls Na(+) uptake through regulating NCC expression and activity in mammals; however, cortisol-mediated control of NCC expression is little understood in non-mammalian vertebrates, such as teleosts. It is essential for our understanding of the evolution of such regulation to determine whether cortisol has a conserved effect on NCC in vertebrates. In the present study, we treated zebrafish embryos with low Na(+) medium (LNa, 0.04 mM Na(+)) for 3 d to stimulate the mRNA expression of nhe3b, ncc, and cyp11b1 (a cortisol-synthesis enzyme) and whole body cortisol level. Exogenous cortisol treatment (20 mg/l, 3 d) resulted in an elevation of whole-body Na(+) content, ncc expression, and the density of ncc-expressing cells in zebrafish larvae. In loss-of-function experiments, microinjection of glucocorticoid receptor (gr) morpholino (MO) suppressed sodium content, ncc expression, and the density of ncc-expressing cells, but injection of mr MO had no such effects. In addition, exogenous cortisol treatment and gr MO injection also altered ncc expression and the density of ncc-expressing cells in gcm2 morphant larvae. Taken together, cortisol and GR appear to regulate Na(+) absorption through stimulating ncc expression and the differentiation of ncc-expressing ionocytes, providing new insights into the actions of cortisol on Na(+) uptake.

  12. Software metrics: The key to quality software on the NCC project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Patricia J.

    1993-01-01

    Network Control Center (NCC) Project metrics are captured during the implementation and testing phases of the NCCDS software development lifecycle. The metrics data collection and reporting function has interfaces with all elements of the NCC project. Close collaboration with all project elements has resulted in the development of a defined and repeatable set of metrics processes. The resulting data are used to plan and monitor release activities on a weekly basis. The use of graphical outputs facilitates the interpretation of progress and status. The successful application of metrics throughout the NCC project has been instrumental in the delivery of quality software. The use of metrics on the NCC Project supports the needs of the technical and managerial staff. This paper describes the project, the functions supported by metrics, the data that are collected and reported, how the data are used, and the improvements in the quality of deliverable software since the metrics processes and products have been in use.

  13. Liquid crystal behavior induced assembling fabrication of conductive chiral MWCNTs@NCC nanopaper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yumei; Wang, Tianjiao; Chen, Zhimin; Li, Jing; Tian, Qiuge; Yang, Hongxia; Xu, Qun

    2016-11-01

    The conductive chiral MWCNTs@NCC nanopapers obtained by the assembly of nanocrystalline cellulose liquid crystals (NCC LCs) host matrix along with one-dimensional (1-D) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been studied in this work. Circular dichroism (CD) studies show strong signals stemming from the chiral nematic structure. Notably, the introduction of the MWCNTs has a pronounced effect on the chiral structure of the as-prepared nanopaper. Our experimental results indicate the multiple weak molecular interactions existing between MWCNTs and NCC are responsible for the effective dispersion and stabilization of MWCNTs. Moreover it also confirms the resulting nanopaper has an increased conductivity of 4.2 S/m at 1.96 wt% MWCNTs. So the co-assembly of the nanocomposite herein opens a gateway for preparing functional materials combining the photonic properties of the NCC LCs matrix with other building blocks that can supply other advantageous functions.

  14. Celulitis por Acinetobacter junii-johnsonii adquirida en la comunidad: una presentación de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés F. Henao-Martínez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available La infección de piel y tejidos blandos por Acinetobacter no relacionada con trauma es una presentación inusual. La mayoría de los casos descritos presentan enfermedades concomitantes y son causados por Acinetobacter baumanii. Se describe un caso de celulitis no traumática por A. junii-johnsonii con bacteriemia, de inicio en la comunidad y asociado con el tratamiento médico. De acuerdo con nuestro conocimiento, éste sería el primer caso reportado de infección de tejidos blandos y piel por A. juniijohnsonii.La vesícula hemorrágica podría ser una característica clínica de celulitis por Acinetobacter.   doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7705/biomedica.v32i2.652

  15. Validation of the NCC Code for Staged Transverse Injection and Computations for a RBCC Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2005-01-01

    The NCC code was validated for a case involving staged transverse injection into Mach 2 flow behind a rearward facing step. Comparisons with experimental data and with solutions from the FPVortex code was then used to perform computations to study fuel-air mixing for the combustor of a candidate rocket based combined cycle engine geometry. Comparisons with a one-dimensional analysis and a three-dimensional code (VULCAN) were performed to assess the qualitative and quantitative performance of the NCC solver.

  16. Neurocysticercosis (NCC) with Hydrocephalus, Optic Atrophy and Vision Loss: A Rare Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nagendra; Mahato, Shyam Kumar; Khan, Salamat; Pathak, Santosh; Bhatia, B D

    2015-02-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is one of the most common parasitic infestations (Taenia solium) of central nervous system (CNS) in children. Seizures are the common presenting symptoms. Hydrocephalus and optic atrophy are rare complications which may require neurosurgical interventions. We report a case of NCC with hydrocephalus and bilateral optic atrophy associated with vision loss in a Nepalese patient who improved with anti-parasitic therapy followed by ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunting.

  17. Current Status of Superheat Spray Modeling With NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, M. S.; Bulzan, Dan L.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of liquid fuel behavior at superheat conditions is identified to be a topic of importance in the design of modern supersonic engines. As a part of the NASA's supersonics project office initiative on high altitude emissions, we have undertaken an effort to assess the accuracy of various existing CFD models used in the modeling of superheated sprays. As a part of this investigation, we have completed the implementation of a modeling approach into the national combustion code (NCC), and then applied it to investigate the following three cases: (1) the validation of a flashing jet generated by the sudden release of pressurized R134A from a cylindrical nozzle, (2) the differences between two superheat vaporization models were studied based on both hot and cold flow calculations of a Parker-Hannifin pressure swirl atomizer, (3) the spray characteristics generated by a single-element LDI (Lean Direct Injector) experiment were studied to investigate the differences between superheat and non-superheat conditions. Further details can be found in the paper.

  18. Liquid crystal behavior induced assembling fabrication of conductive chiral MWCNTs@NCC nanopaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yumei; Wang, Tianjiao; Chen, Zhimin; Li, Jing; Tian, Qiuge; Yang, Hongxia; Xu, Qun, E-mail: qunxu@zzu.edu.cn

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • In this study conductive chiral MWCNTs@NCC nanopapers were prepared. • The introduction of the MWCNTs has a pronounced effect on the chiral structure of the as-prepared nanopaper. • The multiple weak molecular interactions existing between MWCNTs and NCC are responsible for the effective dispersion and stabilization of MWCNTs. • The resulting nanopaper has an increased conductivity. - Abstract: The conductive chiral MWCNTs@NCC nanopapers obtained by the assembly of nanocrystalline cellulose liquid crystals (NCC LCs) host matrix along with one-dimensional (1-D) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been studied in this work. Circular dichroism (CD) studies show strong signals stemming from the chiral nematic structure. Notably, the introduction of the MWCNTs has a pronounced effect on the chiral structure of the as-prepared nanopaper. Our experimental results indicate the multiple weak molecular interactions existing between MWCNTs and NCC are responsible for the effective dispersion and stabilization of MWCNTs. Moreover it also confirms the resulting nanopaper has an increased conductivity of 4.2 S/m at 1.96 wt% MWCNTs. So the co-assembly of the nanocomposite herein opens a gateway for preparing functional materials combining the photonic properties of the NCC LCs matrix with other building blocks that can supply other advantageous functions.

  19. CERA: Clerkships Need National Curricula on Care Delivery, Awareness of Their NCC Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochella, Susan; Liaw, Winston; Binienda, Juliann; Hustedde, Carol

    2016-06-01

    The Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's (STFM) National Clerkship Curriculum (NCC) was created to standardize and improve teaching of a minimum core curriculum in family medicine clerkships, promoting the Triple Aim of better care and population health at lower cost. It includes competencies all clerkships should teach and tools to support clerkship directors (CDs). This 2014 CERA survey of clerkship directors is one of several needs assessments that guide STFM's NCC Editorial Board in targeting improvements and peer-review processes. CERA's 2014 survey of CDs was sent to all 137 CDs at US and Canadian allopathic medical schools. Primary aims included: (1) Identify curricular topics of greatest need, (2) Inventory the percent of family medicine clerkships teaching each NCC topic, and (3) Determine if longitudinal or blended clerkship have unique needs. This survey also assessed use of NCC to advocate for teaching resources and collaborate with colleagues at other institutions. Ninety-one percent of CDs completed the survey. Sixty-four percent reported their clerkship covers all of the NCC minimum core, but on detailed analysis, only 1% teach all topics. CDs need curricula on care delivery topics (cost-effective approach to acute care, role of family medicine in the health care system, quality/safety, and comorbid substance abuse). Single-question assessments overestimate the percentage of clerkships teaching all of the NCC minimum core. Clerkships need national curricula on care delivery topics and tools to help them find their curricular gaps.

  20. WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC signal cascade has circadian rhythm dependent on aldosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susa, Koichiro; Sohara, Eisei; Isobe, Kiyoshi; Chiga, Motoko; Rai, Tatemitsu; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2012-11-02

    Blood pressure and renal salt excretion show circadian rhythms. Recently, it has been clarified that clock genes regulate circadian rhythms of renal transporter expression in the kidney. Since we discovered the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NaCl cotransporter (NCC) signal cascade, which is important for regulating salt balance and blood pressure, we have sought to determine whether NCC protein expression or phosphorylation shows diurnal rhythms in the mouse kidneys. Male C57BL/6J mice were sacrificed every 4h (at 20:00, 0:00, 4:00, 8:00, 12:00, and 16:00), and the expression and phosphorylation of WNK4, OSR1, SPAK, and NCC were determined by immunoblot. (Lights were turned on at 8:00, which was the start of the rest period, and turned off at 20:00, which was the start of the active period, since mice are nocturnal.) Although expression levels of each protein did not show diurnal rhythm, the phosphorylation levels of OSR1, SPAK, and NCC were increased around the start of the active period and decreased around the start of the rest period. Oral administration of eplerenone (10mg/day) attenuated the phosphorylation levels of these proteins and also diminished the diurnal rhythm of NCC phosphorylation. Thus, the activity of the WNK4-OSR1/SPAK-NCC cascade was shown to have a diurnal rhythm in the kidney that may be governed by aldosterone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel NCC mutants and functional analysis in a new cohort of patients with Gitelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaudemans, Bob; Yntema, Helger G; San-Cristobal, Pedro; Schoots, Jeroen; Pfundt, Rolph; Kamsteeg, Erik-J; Bindels, René J; Knoers, Nine V A M; Hoenderop, Joost G; Hoefsloot, Lies H

    2012-03-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in conjunction with significant hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. The GS phenotype is caused by mutations in the solute carrier family 12, member 3 (SLC12A3) gene that encodes the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC). We analyzed DNA samples of 163 patients with a clinical suspicion of GS by direct sequencing of all 26 exons of the SLC12A3 gene. In total, 114 different mutations were identified, 31 of which have not been reported before. These novel variants include 3 deletions, 18 missense, 6 splice site and 4 nonsense mutations. We selected seven missense mutations to investigate their effect on NCC activity and plasma membrane localization by using the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system. The Thr392Ile mutant did not display transport activity (probably class 2 mutation), while the Asn442Ser and Gln1030Arg NCC mutants showed decreased plasma membrane localization and consequently function, likely due to impaired trafficking (class 3 mutation). Even though the NaCl uptake was hampered for NCC mutants Glu121Asp, Pro751Leu, Ser475Cys and Tyr489His, the transporters reached the plasma membrane (class 4 mutation), suggesting an effect on NCC regulation or ion affinity. The present study shows the identification of 38 novel mutations in the SLC12A3 gene and provides insight into the mechanisms that regulate NCC.

  2. PTH modulation of NCC activity regulates TRPV5 Ca2+ reabsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Robert S; Tomilin, Viktor; Hanson, Lauren; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Ko, Benjamin

    2016-01-15

    Since parathyroid hormone (PTH) is known to increase transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)5 activity and decrease Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) activity, we hypothesized that decreased NCC-mediated Na(+) reabsorption contributes to the enhanced TRPV5 Ca(2+) reabsorption seen with PTH. To test this, we used mDCT15 cells expressing functional TRPV5 and ruthenium red-sensitive (45)Ca(2+) uptake. PTH increased (45)Ca(2+) uptake to 8.8 ± 0.7 nmol·mg(-1)·min(-1) (n = 4, P NCC activity from 75.4 ± 2.7 to 20.3 ± 1.3 nmol·mg(-1)·min(-1) (n = 4, P NCC is required for RasGRP1 knockdown to impact the PTH effect on TRPV5 activity. Knockdown of with no lysine kinase (WNK)4 resulted in an attenuation of the increase in PTH-mediated TRPV5 activity. TRPV5 activity increased by 36% compared with 45% in control (n = 4, P NCC activity contributes to the response to PTH, implying a role for hormonal modulation of NCC activity in distal Ca(2+) handling.

  3. Identification and characterization of the novel LysM domain-containing surface protein Sep from Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 and its use as a peptide fusion partner in Lactobacillus and Lactococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mark S; Hafner, Louise M; Walsh, Terry; Giffard, Philip M

    2004-06-01

    Examination of supernatant fractions from broth cultures of Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 revealed the presence of a number of proteins, including a 27-kDa protein termed Sep. The amino-terminal sequence of Sep was determined, and the gene encoding it was cloned and sequenced. Sep is a 205-amino-acid protein and contains a 30-amino-acid secretion signal and has overall homology (between 39 and 92% identity) with similarly sized proteins of Lactobacillus reuteri, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Lactobacillus plantarum. The carboxy-terminal 81 amino acids of Sep also have strong homology (86% identity) to the carboxy termini of the aggregation-promoting factor (APF) surface proteins of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus johnsonii. The mature amino terminus of Sep contains a putative peptidoglycan-binding LysM domain, thereby making it distinct from APF proteins. We have identified a common motif within LysM domains that is shared with carbohydrate binding YG motifs which are found in streptococcal glucan-binding proteins and glucosyltransferases. Sep was investigated as a heterologous peptide expression vector in L. fermentum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactococcus lactis MG1363. Modified Sep containing an amino-terminal six-histidine epitope was found associated with the cells but was largely present in the supernatant in the L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus, and L. lactis hosts. Sep as well as the previously described surface protein BspA were used to express and secrete in L. fermentum or L. rhamnosus a fragment of human E-cadherin, which contains the receptor region for Listeria monocytogenes. This study demonstrates that Sep has potential for heterologous protein expression and export in lactic acid bacteria.

  4. Identification and Characterization of the Novel LysM Domain-Containing Surface Protein Sep from Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 and Its Use as a Peptide Fusion Partner in Lactobacillus and Lactococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mark S.; Hafner, Louise M.; Walsh, Terry; Giffard, Philip M.

    2004-01-01

    Examination of supernatant fractions from broth cultures of Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 revealed the presence of a number of proteins, including a 27-kDa protein termed Sep. The amino-terminal sequence of Sep was determined, and the gene encoding it was cloned and sequenced. Sep is a 205-amino-acid protein and contains a 30-amino-acid secretion signal and has overall homology (between 39 and 92% identity) with similarly sized proteins of Lactobacillus reuteri, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Lactobacillus plantarum. The carboxy-terminal 81 amino acids of Sep also have strong homology (86% identity) to the carboxy termini of the aggregation-promoting factor (APF) surface proteins of Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus johnsonii. The mature amino terminus of Sep contains a putative peptidoglycan-binding LysM domain, thereby making it distinct from APF proteins. We have identified a common motif within LysM domains that is shared with carbohydrate binding YG motifs which are found in streptococcal glucan-binding proteins and glucosyltransferases. Sep was investigated as a heterologous peptide expression vector in L. fermentum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactococcus lactis MG1363. Modified Sep containing an amino-terminal six-histidine epitope was found associated with the cells but was largely present in the supernatant in the L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus, and L. lactis hosts. Sep as well as the previously described surface protein BspA were used to express and secrete in L. fermentum or L. rhamnosus a fragment of human E-cadherin, which contains the receptor region for Listeria monocytogenes. This study demonstrates that Sep has potential for heterologous protein expression and export in lactic acid bacteria. PMID:15184172

  5. Research of antagonistic characteristics in Lactobacillus strains

    OpenAIRE

    Girdauskaitė, Jolanta

    2013-01-01

    Šio darbo tikslas – nustatyti skirtingų laktobacilų antagonistines savybes ir atsparumą antibiotikams. Darbo tikslo įgyvendinimui iškelti sekantys uždaviniai: Išgryninti jogurtuose esančias laktobacilas – Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus. Ištirti laktobacilų Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus plantarum ir Lactobacillus fermentum antagonistines savybes Salmonella enteritidis, Staphyloc...

  6. Research of antagonistic characteristics in Lactobacillus strains

    OpenAIRE

    Girdauskaitė, Jolanta

    2013-01-01

    Šio darbo tikslas – nustatyti skirtingų laktobacilų antagonistines savybes ir atsparumą antibiotikams. Darbo tikslo įgyvendinimui iškelti sekantys uždaviniai: Išgryninti jogurtuose esančias laktobacilas – Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus. Ištirti laktobacilų Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus plantarum ir Lactobacillus fermentum antagonistines savybes Salmonella enteritidis, Staphyloc...

  7. Human milk and mucosal lacto- and galacto-N-biose synthesis by transgalactosylation and their prebiotic potential in Lactobacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidart, Gonzalo N; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Palomino-Schätzlein, Martina; Monedero, Vicente; Yebra, María J

    2017-01-01

    Lacto-N-biose (LNB) and galacto-N-biose (GNB) are major building blocks of free oligosaccharides and glycan moieties of glyco-complexes present in human milk and gastrointestinal mucosa. We have previously characterized the phospho-β-galactosidase GnbG from Lactobacillus casei BL23 that is involved in the metabolism of LNB and GNB. GnbG has been used here in transglycosylation reactions, and it showed the production of LNB and GNB with N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine as acceptors, respectively. The reaction kinetics demonstrated that GnbG can convert 69 ± 4 and 71 ± 1 % of o-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside into LNB and GNB, respectively. Those reactions were performed in a semi-preparative scale, and the synthesized disaccharides were purified. The maximum yield obtained for LNB was 10.7 ± 0.2 g/l and for GNB was 10.8 ± 0.3 g/l. NMR spectroscopy confirmed the molecular structures of both carbohydrates and the absence of reaction byproducts, which also supports that GnbG is specific for β1,3-glycosidic linkages. The purified sugars were subsequently tested for their potential prebiotic properties using Lactobacillus species. The results showed that LNB and GNB were fermented by the tested strains of L. casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus (except L. rhamnosus strain ATCC 53103), Lactobacillus zeae, Lactobacillus gasseri, and Lactobacillus johnsonii. DNA hybridization experiments suggested that the metabolism of those disaccharides in 9 out of 10 L. casei strains, all L. rhamnosus strains and all L. zeae strains tested relies upon a phospho-β-galactosidase homologous to GnbG. The results presented here support the putative role of human milk oligosaccharides for selective enrichment of beneficial intestinal microbiota in breast-fed infants.

  8. Construction of nanometer cisplatin core-ferritin (NCC-F) and proteomic analysis of gastric cancer cell apoptosis induced with cisplatin released from the NCC-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xue-Tao; Huang, Lin; Huang, He-Qing

    2012-06-18

    Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and fluorescence spectrometry were used to reveal the characteristics of both subunit disassociation and recombination in apo-pig pancreas ferritin (apoPPF) in an alkaline medium ranging reversibly from pH 7.0 to 13.0. The experimental results indicated that apoPPF could be completely disassociated into 24 free subunits at pH 13.0, and then these subunits could be quickly reassembled into the original apoPPF once the pH of the reactive medium was returned to pH7.0. This novel and simple method could be used to effectively construct a novel nanometer cisplatin core-PPF (NCC-PPF). The major characteristics of NCC-PPF were investigated using various analytical methods such as ultraviolet-spectrometry, circular dichroism spectrometry and TEM, which indicated that its molecular structure was still similar to that of the original apoPPF. Results from the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) method showed that 11.26 cisplatin (CDDP) molecules were successfully packaged within the NCC-PPF shell, indicating that each molecule of apoPPF had the ability to enwrap 11.26 CDDP molecules for constructing the NCC-PPF. Flow cytometry showed that NCC-PPF also had the ability to release CDDP for inducing the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells BGC823 (GCC), but this phenomenon could scarcely be observed using apoPPF. A differential proteomic technique using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels selected and identified the differential proteins from cell apoptosis in order to reveal the molecular pathway of GCC apoptosis by both NCC-PPF and free CDDP, giving 13 differential expression proteins. These differential proteins could be further classified into six groups, which were described as being involved in the regulation of apoptosis, RNA transcription, oxidative stress response, signal transduction, cell metabolism, and cytoskeleton changes. In addition, a real-time PCR method was used to prove the expression level of

  9. Increasing plasma [K+] by intravenous potassium infusion reduces NCC phosphorylation and drives kaliuresis and natriuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Srinivas; Lee, Donna H; Oh, Young Taek; Delpire, Eric; Youn, Jang H; McDonough, Alicia A

    2014-05-01

    Dietary potassium loading results in rapid kaliuresis, natriuresis, and diuresis associated with reduced phosphorylation (p) of the distal tubule Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC). Decreased NCC-p inhibits NCC-mediated Na(+) reabsorption and shifts Na(+) downstream for reabsorption by epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC), which can drive K(+) secretion. Whether the signal is initiated by ingesting potassium or a rise in plasma K(+) concentration ([K(+)]) is not understood. We tested the hypothesis, in male rats, that an increase in plasma [K(+)] is sufficient to reduce NCC-p and drive kaliuresis. After an overnight fast, a single 3-h 2% potassium (2%K) containing meal increased plasma [K(+)] from 4.0 ± 0.1 to 5.2 ± 0.2 mM; increased urinary K(+), Na(+), and volume excretion; decreased NCC-p by 60%; and marginally reduced cortical Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) phosphorylation 25% (P = 0.055). When plasma [K(+)] was increased by tail vein infusion of KCl to 5.5 ± 0.1 mM over 3 h, significant kaliuresis and natriuresis ensued, NCC-p decreased by 60%, and STE20/SPS1-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) phosphorylation was marginally reduced 35% (P = 0.052). The following were unchanged at 3 h by either the potassium-rich meal or KCl infusion: Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3), NHE3-p, NKCC, ENaC subunits, and renal outer medullary K(+) channel. In summary, raising plasma [K(+)] by intravenous infusion to a level equivalent to that observed after a single potassium-rich meal triggers renal kaliuretic and natriuretic responses, independent of K(+) ingestion, likely driven by decreased NCC-p and activity sufficient to shift sodium reabsorption downstream to where Na(+) reabsorption and flow drive K(+) secretion.

  10. NCC: A Physics-Based Design and Analysis Tool for Combustion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Quealy, Angela

    2000-01-01

    The National Combustion Code (NCC) is an integrated system of computer codes for physics-based design and analysis of combustion systems. It uses unstructured meshes and runs on parallel computing platforms. The NCC is composed of a set of distinct yet closely related modules. They are: (1) a gaseous flow module solving 3-D Navier-Stokes equations; (2) a turbulence module containing the non-linear k-epsilon models; (3) a chemistry module using either the conventional reduced kinetics approach of solving species equations or the Intrinsic Low Dimensional Manifold (ILDM) kinetics approach of table looking up in conjunction with solving the equations of the progressive variables; (4) a turbulence-chemistry interaction module including the option of solving the joint probability density function (PDF) for species and enthalpy; and (5) a spray module for solving the liquid phase equations. In early 1995, an industry-government team was formed to develop the NCC. In July 1998, the baseline beta version was completed and presented in two NCC sessions at the 34th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference & Exhibit, July 1998. An overview of this baseline beta version was presented at the NASA HPCCP/CAS Workshop 98, August 1998. Since then, the effort has been focused on the streamlining, validation, and enhancement of the th baseline beta version. The progress is presented in two NCC sessions at the AIAA 38 Aerospace Sciences Meeting & Exhibit, January 2000. At this NASA HPCCP/CAS Workshop 2000, an overview of the NCC papers presented at the AIAA 38 th Aerospace Sciences Meeting & Exhibit is presented, with emphasis on the reduction of analysis time of simulating the (gaseous) reacting flows in full combustors. In addition, results of NCC simulation of a modern turbofan combustor will also be reported.

  11. NCC: A Physics-Based Design and Analysis Tool for Combustion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Quealy, Angela

    2000-01-01

    The National Combustion Code (NCC) is an integrated system of computer codes for physics-based design and analysis of combustion systems. It uses unstructured meshes and runs on parallel computing platforms. The NCC is composed of a set of distinct yet closely related modules. They are: (1) a gaseous flow module solving 3-D Navier-Stokes equations; (2) a turbulence module containing the non-linear k-epsilon models; (3) a chemistry module using either the conventional reduced kinetics approach of solving species equations or the Intrinsic Low Dimensional Manifold (ILDM) kinetics approach of table looking up in conjunction with solving the equations of the progressive variables; (4) a turbulence-chemistry interaction module including the option of solving the joint probability density function (PDF) for species and enthalpy; and (5) a spray module for solving the liquid phase equations. In early 1995, an industry-government team was formed to develop the NCC. In July 1998, the baseline beta version was completed and presented in two NCC sessions at the 34th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference & Exhibit, July 1998. An overview of this baseline beta version was presented at the NASA HPCCP/CAS Workshop 98, August 1998. Since then, the effort has been focused on the streamlining, validation, and enhancement of the th baseline beta version. The progress is presented in two NCC sessions at the AIAA 38 Aerospace Sciences Meeting & Exhibit, January 2000. At this NASA HPCCP/CAS Workshop 2000, an overview of the NCC papers presented at the AIAA 38 th Aerospace Sciences Meeting & Exhibit is presented, with emphasis on the reduction of analysis time of simulating the (gaseous) reacting flows in full combustors. In addition, results of NCC simulation of a modern turbofan combustor will also be reported.

  12. WNK4 inhibits NCC protein expression through MAPK ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Wang, Dexuan; Feng, Xiuyan; Zhang, Yiqian; Wang, Yanhui; Zhuang, Jieqiu; Zhang, Xuemei; Chen, Guangping; Delpire, Eric; Gu, Dingying; Cai, Hui

    2012-03-01

    WNK [with no lysine (K)] kinase is a subfamily of serine/threonine kinases. Mutations in two members of this family (WNK1 and WNK4) cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II featuring hypertension, hyperkalemia, and metabolic acidosis. WNK1 and WNK4 were shown to regulate sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) activity through phosphorylating SPAK and OSR1. Previous studies including ours have also shown that WNK4 inhibits NCC function and its protein expression. A recent study reported that a phorbol ester inhibits NCC function via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 kinase. In the current study, we investigated whether WNK4 affects NCC via the MAPK ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that WNK4 increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner in mouse distal convoluted tubule (mDCT) cells, whereas WNK4 mutants with the PHA II mutations (E562K and R1185C) lost the ability to increase the ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Hypertonicity significantly increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in mDCT cells. Knock-down of WNK4 expression by siRNA resulted in a decrease of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We further showed that WNK4 knock-down significantly increases the cell surface and total NCC protein expressions and ERK1/2 knock-down also significantly increases cell surface and total NCC expression. These data suggest that WNK4 inhibits NCC through activating the MAPK ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  13. Towards Accurate Prediction of Turbulent, Three-Dimensional, Recirculating Flows with the NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, A.; Tacina, R.; Jeng, S.-M.; Cai, J.

    2001-01-01

    The National Combustion Code (NCC) was used to calculate the steady state, nonreacting flow field of a prototype Lean Direct Injection (LDI) swirler. This configuration used nine groups of eight holes drilled at a thirty-five degree angle to induce swirl. These nine groups created swirl in the same direction, or a corotating pattern. The static pressure drop across the holes was fixed at approximately four percent. Computations were performed on one quarter of the geometry, because the geometry is considered rotationally periodic every ninety degrees. The final computational grid used was approximately 2.26 million tetrahedral cells, and a cubic nonlinear k - epsilon model was used to model turbulence. The NCC results were then compared to time averaged Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) data. The LDV measurements were performed on the full geometry, but four ninths of the geometry was measured. One-, two-, and three-dimensional representations of both flow fields are presented. The NCC computations compare both qualitatively and quantitatively well to the LDV data, but differences exist downstream. The comparison is encouraging, and shows that NCC can be used for future injector design studies. To improve the flow prediction accuracy of turbulent, three-dimensional, recirculating flow fields with the NCC, recommendations are given.

  14. The sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) associate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Abinash C; Wynne, Brandi M; Yu, Ling; Tomilin, Viktor; Yue, Qiang; Zhou, Yiqun; Al-Khalili, Otor; Mallick, Rickta; Cai, Hui; Alli, Abdel A; Ko, Benjamin; Mattheyses, Alexa; Bao, Hui-Fang; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Theilig, Franziska; Eaton, Douglas C; Hoover, Robert S

    2016-10-01

    The thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) are two of the most important determinants of salt balance and thus systemic blood pressure. Abnormalities in either result in profound changes in blood pressure. There is one segment of the nephron where these two sodium transporters are coexpressed, the second part of the distal convoluted tubule. This is a key part of the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron, the final regulator of salt handling in the kidney. Aldosterone is the key hormonal regulator for both of these proteins. Despite these shared regulators and coexpression in a key nephron segment, associations between these proteins have not been investigated. After confirming apical localization of these proteins, we demonstrated the presence of functional transport proteins and native association by blue native PAGE. Extensive coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated a consistent interaction of NCC with α- and γ-ENaC. Mammalian two-hybrid studies demonstrated direct binding of NCC to ENaC subunits. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and immunogold EM studies confirmed that these transport proteins are within appropriate proximity for direct binding. Additionally, we demonstrate that there are functional consequences of this interaction, with inhibition of NCC affecting the function of ENaC. This novel finding of an association between ENaC and NCC could alter our understanding of salt transport in the distal tubule. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov., isolated from the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera

    OpenAIRE

    Olofsson, Tobias; Alsterfjord, Magnus; Nilson, Bo; Butler, Éile; Vasquez, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    We discovered a symbiotic lactic acid bacterial (LAB) microbiota in the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera. The microbiota was composed of several phylotypes of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) gene analyses and phenotypic and genetic characteristics revealed that the Lactobacillus phylotypes isolated represent seven novel species. One is grouped with Lactobacillus kunkeei and the others belong to the Lactobacillus buchneri and Lactobacillus d...

  16. Renal NCC is unchanged in the midpregnant rat and decreased in the late pregnant rat despite avid renal Na+ retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Crystal A; McDonough, Alicia A; Masilamani, Shyama M E; Verlander, Jill W; Baylis, Chris

    2015-07-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by plasma volume expansion due to Na(+) retention, driven by aldosterone. The aldosterone-responsive epithelial Na(+) channel is activated in the kidney in pregnancy. In the present study, we investigated the aldosterone-responsive Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) in mid- and late pregnant rats compared with virgin rats. We determined the abundance of total NCC, phosphorylated NCC (pNCC; pT53, pS71 and pS89), phosphorylated STE20/SPS-1-related proline-alanine-rich protein kinase (pSPAK; pS373), and phosphorylated oxidative stress-related kinase (pOSR1; pS325) in the kidney cortex. We also measured mRNA expression of NCC and members of the SPAK/NCC regulatory kinase network, serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK)1, total with no lysine kinase (WNK)1, WNK3, and WNK4. Additionally, we performed immunohistochemistry for NCC kidneys from virgin and pregnant rats. Total NCC, pNCC, and pSPAK/OSR1 abundance were unchanged in midpregnant versus virgin rats. In late pregnant versus virgin rats, total NCC and pNCC were decreased; however, pSPAK/OSR1 was unchanged. We detected no differences in mRNA expression of NCC, SGK1, total WNK1, WNK3, and WNK4. By immunohistochemistry, NCC was mainly localized to the apical region in virgin rats, and density in the apical region was reduced in late pregnancy. Therefore, despite high circulating aldosterone levels in pregnancy, the aldosterone-responsive transporter NCC is not increased in total or activated (phosphorylated) abundance or in apical localization in midpregnant rats, and all are reduced in late pregnancy. This contrasts to the mineralocorticoid-mediated activation of the epithelial Na(+) channel, which we have previously reported. Why and how NCC escapes aldosterone activation in pregnancy is not clear but may relate to regional differences in aldosterone sensitivity the increased K(+) intake or other undefined mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Acute hypertension provokes acute trafficking of distal tubule Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) to subapical cytoplasmic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donna H; Riquier, Anne D M; Yang, Li E; Leong, Patrick K K; Maunsbach, Arvid B; McDonough, Alicia A

    2009-04-01

    When blood pressure (BP) is elevated above baseline, a pressure natriuresis-diuresis response ensues, critical to volume and BP homeostasis. Distal convoluted tubule Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) is regulated by trafficking between the apical plasma membrane (APM) and subapical cytoplasmic vesicles (SCV). We aimed to determine whether NCC trafficking contributes to pressure diuresis by decreasing APM NCC or compensates for increased volume flow to the DCT by increasing APM NCC. BP was raised 50 mmHg (high BP) in rats by arterial constriction for 5 or 20-30 min, provoking a 10-fold diuresis at both times. Kidneys were excised, and NCC subcellular distribution was analyzed by 1) sorbitol density gradient fractionation and immunoblotting and 2) immunoelectron microscopy (immuno-EM). NCC distribution did not change after 5-min high BP. After 20-30 min of high BP, 20% of NCC redistributed from low-density, APM-enriched fractions to higher density, endosome-enriched fractions, and, by quantitative immuno-EM, pool size of APM NCC decreased 14% and SCV pool size increased. Because of the time lag of the response, we tested the hypothesis that internalization of NCC was secondary to the decrease in ANG II that accompanies high BP. Clamping ANG II at a nonpressor level by coinfusion of captopril (12 microg/min) and ANG II (20 ng.kg(-1).min(-1)) during 30-min high BP reduced diuresis to eightfold and prevented redistribution of NCC from APM- to SCV-enriched fractions. We conclude that DCT NCC may participate in pressure natriuresis-diuresis by retraction out of apical plasma membranes and that the retraction is, at least in part, driven by the fall in ANG II that accompanies acute hypertension.

  18. Albuminuria enhances NHE3 and NCC via stimulation of mitochondrial oxidative stress/angiotensin II axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhanjun; Zhuang, Yibo; Hu, Caiyu; Zhang, Xintong; Ding, Guixia; Zhang, Yue; Rohatgi, Rajeev; Hua, Hu; Huang, Songming; He, John Ci-Jiang; Zhang, Aihua

    2016-07-26

    Imbalance of salt and water is a frequent and challenging complication of kidney disease, whose pathogenic mechanisms remain elusive. Employing an albumin overload mouse model, we discovered that albuminuria enhanced the expression of NHE3 and NCC but not other transporters in murine kidney in line with the stimulation of angiotensinogen (AGT)/angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin (Ang) II cascade. In primary cultures of renal tubular cells, albumin directly stimulated AGT/ACE/Ang II and upregulated NHE3 and NCC expression. Blocking Ang II production with an ACE inhibitor normalized the upregulation of NHE3 and NCC in cells. Interestingly, albumin overload significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2), and administration of a SOD2 mimic (MnTBAP) normalized the expression of NHE3, NCC, and the components of AGT/ACE pathway affected by albuminuria, indicating a key role of mitochondria-derived oxidative stress in modulating renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and renal sodium transporters. In addition, the functional data showing the reduced urinary excretion of Na and Cl and enhanced response to specific NCC inhibitor further supported the regulatory results of sodium transporters following albumin overload. More importantly, the upregulation of NHE3 and NCC and activation of ACE/Ang II signaling pathway were also observed in albuminuric patient kidneys, suggesting that our animal model accurately replicates the human condition. Taken together, these novel findings demonstrated that albuminuria is of importance in resetting renal salt handling via mitochondrial oxidative stress-initiated stimulation of ACE/Ang II cascade. This may also offer novel, effective therapeutic targets for dealing with salt and water imbalance in proteinuric renal diseases.

  19. NCC Simulation Model: Simulating the operations of the network control center, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Norman M.; Paul, Arthur S.; Gill, Tepper L.

    1992-01-01

    The simulation of the network control center (NCC) is in the second phase of development. This phase seeks to further develop the work performed in phase one. Phase one concentrated on the computer systems and interconnecting network. The focus of phase two will be the implementation of the network message dialogues and the resources controlled by the NCC. These resources are requested, initiated, monitored and analyzed via network messages. In the NCC network messages are presented in the form of packets that are routed across the network. These packets are generated, encoded, decoded and processed by the network host processors that generate and service the message traffic on the network that connects these hosts. As a result, the message traffic is used to characterize the work done by the NCC and the connected network. Phase one of the model development represented the NCC as a network of bi-directional single server queues and message generating sources. The generators represented the external segment processors. The served based queues represented the host processors. The NCC model consists of the internal and external processors which generate message traffic on the network that links these hosts. To fully realize the objective of phase two it is necessary to identify and model the processes in each internal processor. These processes live in the operating system of the internal host computers and handle tasks such as high speed message exchanging, ISN and NFE interface, event monitoring, network monitoring, and message logging. Inter process communication is achieved through the operating system facilities. The overall performance of the host is determined by its ability to service messages generated by both internal and external processors.

  20. Beneficial effect of Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 in a murine model of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holvoet, S; Doucet-Ladevèze, R; Perrot, M; Barretto, C; Nutten, S; Blanchard, C

    2016-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a severe inflammatory disease of the esophagus which is characterized histologically by an eosinophilic infiltration into the esophageal tissue. The efficacy of probiotics in the context of atopic diseases has been well investigated but, to date, there has been no study which has evaluated probiotic effects on EoE inflammation. This study sought to identify a probiotic which improves esophageal inflammation in experimental EoE. Two candidate probiotics, Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 and Bifidobacterium lactis NCC 2818, were tested in a murine model of EoE elicited by epicutaneous sensitization with Aspergillus fumigatus protein extract. Administration of bacterial strains in drinking water was used, respectively, as a preventive or treatment measure, or continuously throughout the study. Inflammatory parameters were assessed in the esophagus, skin, and lungs after allergen challenge. In this EoE model, supplementation with L. lactis NCC 2287 significantly decreased esophageal and bronchoalveolar eosinophilia but only when given as a therapeutic treatment. No significant effect on eosinophilia was observed when NCC 2287 was given as a preventive or a continuous intervention. NCC 2287 supplementation had no significant effect on immunoglobulin levels, skin symptom scores, or on transepidermal water loss. Supplementation with another probiotic, B. lactis NCC 2818, had no significant effect on esophageal eosinophilia. We identified a L. lactis strain, able to attenuate esophageal eosinophilic inflammation in a preclinical model of EoE. This effect is strain specific and depends on the timing and duration of bacterial supplementation. Confirmation of these observations in human clinical trials is warranted. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Constitutively Active SPAK Causes Hyperkalemia by Activating NCC and Remodeling Distal Tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, P Richard; Coleman, Richard; Delpire, Eric; Welling, Paul A

    2017-09-01

    Aberrant activation of with no lysine (WNK) kinases causes familial hyperkalemic hypertension (FHHt). Thiazide diuretics treat the disease, fostering the view that hyperactivation of the thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) is solely responsible. However, aberrant signaling in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN) and inhibition of the potassium-excretory renal outer medullary potassium (ROMK) channel have also been implicated. To test these ideas, we introduced kinase-activating mutations after Lox-P sites in the mouse Stk39 gene, which encodes the terminal kinase in the WNK signaling pathway, Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK). Renal expression of the constitutively active (CA)-SPAK mutant was specifically targeted to the early DCT using a DCT-driven Cre recombinase. CA-SPAK mice displayed thiazide-treatable hypertension and hyperkalemia, concurrent with NCC hyperphosphorylation. However, thiazide-mediated inhibition of NCC and consequent restoration of sodium excretion did not immediately restore urinary potassium excretion in CA-SPAK mice. Notably, CA-SPAK mice exhibited ASDN remodeling, involving a reduction in connecting tubule mass and attenuation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and ROMK expression and apical localization. Blocking hyperactive NCC in the DCT gradually restored ASDN structure and ENaC and ROMK expression, concurrent with the restoration of urinary potassium excretion. These findings verify that NCC hyperactivity underlies FHHt but also reveal that NCC-dependent changes in the driving force for potassium secretion are not sufficient to explain hyperkalemia. Instead, a DCT-ASDN coupling process controls potassium balance in health and becomes aberrantly activated in FHHt. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  2. Aldosterone does not require angiotensin II to activate NCC through a WNK4-SPAK-dependent pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van der Lubbe (Nils); C.H. Lim (Christina); M.E. Meima (Marcel); R. van Veghel (Richard); L.L. Rosenbaek (Lena Lindtoft); K. Mutig (Kerim); A.H.J. Danser (Jan); R.A. Fenton (Robert); R. Zietse (Robert); E.J. Hoorn (Ewout)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe and others have recently shown that angiotensin II can activate the sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) through a WNK4-SPAK-dependent pathway. Because WNK4 was previously shown to be a negative regulator of NCC, it has been postulated that angiotensin II converts WNK4 to a positive re

  3. Aldosterone does not require angiotensin II to activate NCC through a WNK4-SPAK-dependent pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van der Lubbe (Nils); C.H. Lim (Christina); M.E. Meima (Marcel); R. van Veghel (Richard); L.L. Rosenbaek (Lena Lindtoft); K. Mutig (Kerim); A.H.J. Danser (Jan); R.A. Fenton (Robert); R. Zietse (Bob); E.J. Hoorn (Ewout)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe and others have recently shown that angiotensin II can activate the sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) through a WNK4-SPAK-dependent pathway. Because WNK4 was previously shown to be a negative regulator of NCC, it has been postulated that angiotensin II converts WNK4 to a positive

  4. Double knockout of carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) and Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) causes salt wasting and volume depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Barone, Sharon; Brooks, Mary-Beth; Soleimani, Manoocher

    2013-01-01

    The thiazide-sensitive Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter NCC and the Cl(-)/HCO3(-)exchanger pendrin are expressed on apical membranes of distal cortical nephron segments and mediate salt absorption, with pendrin working in tandem with the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) and the Na(+)-dependent chloride/bicarbonate exchanger (NDCBE), whereas NCC is working by itself. A recent study showed that NCC and pendrin compensate for loss of each other under basal conditions, therefore masking the role that each plays in salt reabsorption. Carbonic anhydrase II (CAII, CA2 or CAR2) plays an important role in acid-base transport and salt reabsorption in the proximal convoluted tubule and acid-base transport in the collecting duct. Animals with CAII deletion show remodeling of intercalated cells along with the downregulation of pendrin. NCC KO mice on the other hand show significant upregulation of pendrin and ENaC. Neither model shows any significant salt wasting under baseline conditions. We hypothesized that the up-regulation of pendrin is essential for the prevention of salt wasting in NCC KO mice. To test this hypothesis, we generated NCC/CAII double KO (dKO) mice by crossing mice with single deletion of NCC and CAII. The NCC/CAII dKO mice displayed significant downregulation of pendrin, along with polyuria and salt wasting. As a result, the dKO mice developed volume depletion, which was associated with the inability to concentrate urine. We conclude that the upregulation of pendrin is essential for the prevention of salt and water wasting in NCC deficient animals and its downregulation or inactivation will result in salt wasting, impaired water conservation and volume depletion in the setting of NCC inactivation or inhibition. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Lactobacillus gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, for growth in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, K; Matsunaga, K; Takihiro, S; Moritoki, A; Ryuto, S; Kawai, Y; Masuda, T; Miyamoto, T

    2015-03-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri is a widespread commensal lactic acid bacterium inhabiting human mucosal niches and has many beneficial effects as a probiotic. However, L. gasseri is difficult to grow in milk, which hurts usability for the food industry. It had been previously reported that supplementation with yeast extract or proteose peptone, including peptides, enables L. gasseri to grow well in milk. In this study, our objective was to confirm peptide requirement of L. gasseri and evaluate efficacy of peptide release by enzymatic proteolysis on growth of L. gassei in milk. Three strains of L. gasseri did not grow well in modified DeMan, Rogosa, Sharpe broth without any nitrogen sources (MRS-N), but addition of a casein-derived peptide mixture, tryptone, promoted growth. In contrast, little effect was observed after adding casein or a casein-derived amino acid mixture, casamino acids. These results indicate that L. gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, among milk-derived nitrogen sources for growth. Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T hardly had growth capacity in 6 kinds of milk-based media: bovine milk, human milk, skim milk, cheese whey, modified MRS-N (MRSL-N) supplemented with acid whey, and MRSL-N supplemented with casein. Moreover, treatment with digestive proteases, particularly pepsin, to release peptides made it grow well in each milk-based medium. The pepsin treatment was the most effective for growth of strain JCM 1131T in skim milk among the tested food-grade proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, calf rennet, ficin, bromelain, and papain. As well as strain JCM 1131T, pepsinolysis of milk improved growth of other L. gasseri strains and some strains of enteric lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus reuteri. These results suggest that some relatives of L. gasseri also use peptides as desirable nitrogen sources, and that milk may be a good supplier of nutritious

  6. Prolactin regulates transcription of the ion uptake Na+/Cl- cotransporter (ncc) gene in zebrafish gill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breves, Jason P.; Serizier, Sandy B.; Goffin, Vincent; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a well-known regulator of ion and water transport within osmoregulatory tissues across vertebrate species, yet how PRL acts on some of its target tissues remains poorly understood. Using zebrafish as a model, we show that ionocytes in the gill directly respond to systemic PRL to regulate mechanisms of ion uptake. Ion-poor conditions led to increases in the expression of PRL receptor (prlra), Na+/Cl− cotransporter (ncc; slc12a10.2), Na+/H+ exchanger (nhe3b; slc9a3.2), and epithelial Ca2+ channel (ecac; trpv6) transcripts within the gill. Intraperitoneal injection of ovine PRL (oPRL) increased ncc and prlra transcripts, but did not affect nhe3b or ecac. Consistent with direct PRL action in the gill, addition of oPRL to cultured gill filaments stimulated ncc in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect blocked by a pure human PRL receptor antagonist (Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL). These results suggest that PRL signaling through PRL receptors in the gill regulates the expression of ncc, thereby linking this pituitary hormone with an effector of Cl− uptake in zebrafish for the first time.

  7. Prolactin regulates transcription of the ion uptake Na+/Cl- cotransporter (ncc) gene in zebrafish gill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breves, Jason P; Serizier, Sandy B; Goffin, Vincent; McCormick, Stephen D; Karlstrom, Rolf O

    2013-04-30

    Prolactin (PRL) is a well-known regulator of ion and water transport within osmoregulatory tissues across vertebrate species, yet how PRL acts on some of its target tissues remains poorly understood. Using zebrafish as a model, we show that ionocytes in the gill directly respond to systemic PRL to regulate mechanisms of ion uptake. Ion-poor conditions led to increases in the expression of PRL receptor (prlra), Na(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter (ncc; slc12a10.2), Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (nhe3b; slc9a3.2), and epithelial Ca(2+) channel (ecac; trpv6) transcripts within the gill. Intraperitoneal injection of ovine PRL (oPRL) increased ncc and prlra transcripts, but did not affect nhe3b or ecac. Consistent with direct PRL action in the gill, addition of oPRL to cultured gill filaments stimulated ncc in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect blocked by a pure human PRL receptor antagonist (Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL). These results suggest that PRL signaling through PRL receptors in the gill regulates the expression of ncc, thereby linking this pituitary hormone with an effector of Cl(-) uptake in zebrafish for the first time. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. FUNCTIONOMICS OF NCC MUTATIONS IN GITELMAN SYNDROME USING A NOVEL MAMMALIAN CELL-BASED ACTIVITY ASSAY.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valdez-Flores, M.A.; Vargas-Poussou, R.; Verkaart, S.; Tutakhel, O.A.Z.; Valdez-Ortiz, A.; Blanchard, A.; Treard, C.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Jelen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS) is an autosomal recessive salt-wasting tubular disorder resulting from loss-of-function mutations in the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC). Functional analysis of these mutations has been limited to the use of Xenopus laevis oocytes. The aim of the present study was,

  9. Preparation and Characterization of NCC/Modified Nano-silica/PVA Blend Membrane%NCC/改性纳米SiO2/PVA共混膜的制备及表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystalline cellulose(NCC)/modified nano-silica(SiO2)/polyvinyl alcohol(PVA) blend membrane was prepared by blending method. The results of fourier transform infrared(FTIR) spectroscopy analysis showed that blending mode of NCC/modified nano-SiO2/PVA blend membrane was simple physical blending of hydrogen bonding interactions. The results of mechanical performance analysis showed that tensile strength of NCC/modified nano-SiO2/PVA blend membrane was higher than that of PVA membrane, the average tensile strength of NCC/modified nano-SiO2/PVA blend membrane was 128.41MPa. The results of thermal performance analysis showed that the thermal stability of NCC/modified nano-SiO2/PVA blend membrane was better than that of PVA membrane, the maximum thermal weight loss temperature of NCC/modified nano-SiO2/PVA blend membrane was 238 ℃.The results of scanning electron microscopy(SEM) analysis showed that surface morphology and cross-section morphology of NCC/modified nano-SiO2/PVA blend membrane was more structured.%  采用共混法制备了纳米纤维素(NCC)/改性纳米二氧化硅(SiO2)/聚乙烯醇(PVA)共混膜。傅里叶变换红外(FTIR)光谱分析结果表明NCC/改性纳米SiO2/PVA共混膜的共混模式为存在氢键作用力的简单物理共混。力学性能分析结果表明NCC/改性纳米SiO2/PVA共混膜较PVA膜具有较高的拉伸强度,其拉伸强度平均值为128.41 MPa。热学性能分析结果表明NCC/改性纳米SiO2/PVA共混膜较PVA膜具有较好的热稳定性,其最大热失重温度为238℃。扫描电子显微镜(SEM)图分析结果表明NCC/改性纳米SiO2/PVA共混膜样品的表面和断面形貌较规整。

  10. Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov., isolated from the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Tobias C; Alsterfjord, Magnus; Nilson, Bo; Butler, Eile; Vásquez, Alejandra

    2014-09-01

    We previously discovered a symbiotic lactic acid bacterial (LAB) microbiota in the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera. The microbiota was composed of several phylotypes of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and phenotypic and genetic characteristics revealed that the phylotypes isolated represent seven novel species. One grouped with Lactobacillus kunkeei and the others belong to the Lactobacillus buchneri and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subgroups of Lactobacillus. We propose the names Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov. for these novel species, with the respective type strains being Fhon13N(T) ( = DSM 26257(T) = CCUG 63287(T)), Bin4N(T) ( = DSM 26254(T) = CCUG 63291(T)), Hon2N(T) ( = DSM 26255(T) = CCUG 63289(T)), Hma8N(T) ( = DSM 26256(T) = CCUG 63629(T)), Hma2N(T) ( = DSM 26263(T) = CCUG 63633(T)), Bma5N(T) ( = DSM 26265(T) = CCUG 63301(T)) and Biut2N(T) ( = DSM 26262(T) = CCUG 63631(T)).

  11. Double knockout of pendrin and Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) causes severe salt wasting, volume depletion, and renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Manoocher; Barone, Sharon; Xu, Jie; Shull, Gary E; Siddiqui, Faraz; Zahedi, Kamyar; Amlal, Hassane

    2012-08-14

    The Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC), which is the target of inhibition by thiazides, is located in close proximity to the chloride-absorbing transporter pendrin in the kidney distal nephron. Single deletion of pendrin or NCC does not cause salt wasting or excessive diuresis under basal conditions, raising the possibility that these transporters are predominantly active during salt depletion or in response to excess aldosterone. We hypothesized that pendrin and NCC compensate for loss of function of the other under basal conditions, thereby masking the role that each plays in salt absorption. To test our hypothesis, we generated pendrin/NCC double knockout (KO) mice by crossing pendrin KO mice with NCC KO mice. Pendrin/NCC double KO mice displayed severe salt wasting and sharp increase in urine output under basal conditions. As a result, animals developed profound volume depletion, renal failure, and metabolic alkalosis without hypokalemia, which were all corrected with salt replacement. We propose that the combined inhibition of pendrin and NCC can provide a strong diuretic regimen without causing hypokalemia for patients with fluid overload, including patients with congestive heart failure, nephrotic syndrome, diuretic resistance, or generalized edema.

  12. Circadian exosomal expression of renal thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) and prostasin in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Annalisa; Pizzolo, Francesca; Chiecchi, Laura; Morandini, Francesca; Channavajjhala, Sarath Kiran; Guarini, Patrizia; Salvagno, Gianluca; Olivieri, Oliviero

    2015-06-01

    A circadian timing system is involved in the maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance and blood pressure control. Aldosterone and vasopressin modulate ion transporters and channels crucial in sodium (Na) and water reabsorption such as the epithelium Na channel and the renal thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC). We analyzed in urinary exosomes the intraday variations of NCC and prostasin expression and the association with electrolytes and water balance parameters. Blood and urine samples were collected at five time points during the day from five healthy subjects. Blood renin, aldosterone, cortisol, ACTH, and plasmatic and urinary Na, potassium, creatinine, adiuretin (ADH), NCC, and prostasin were evaluated. ACTH and cortisol showed a circadian pattern, similarly to aldosterone, while exosomal NCC and prostasin pattern were similar to urinary ADH, decreased in the morning and subsequently increased in the afternoon and evening. In urinary exosomes, NCC and prostasin had a diurnal pattern parallel to ADH and aquaporin 2, confirming that, in healthy subjects, both prostasin and NCC relate to water balance. These results provide suggestions for a possible chronotherapeutic approach in patients treated with thiazides, diuretic drugs acting as specific inhibitors of NCC-mediated Na reabsorption. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Influences of Feeding Lactobacillus on Colonization of the Lactobacillus in Chicks'Digestible Tracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    It was carried out with culture solution of Lactobacillus fed to the newborn chicks to observe the influences on colonization of the Lactobacillus in chicks′ digestible tracts. The results showed that after the chicks were fed Lactobacillus, the amount of the Lactobacillus in chicks′ digestible tracts significantly increased (P<0.01) and the Lactobacillus colonized 36h ahead of schedule

  14. Inactivation of the Na-Cl co-transporter (NCC) gene is associated with high BMD through both renal and bone mechanisms: analysis of patients with Gitelman syndrome and Ncc null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolet-Barousse, Laurence; Blanchard, Anne; Roux, Christian; Pietri, Laurence; Bloch-Faure, May; Kolta, Sami; Chappard, Christine; Geoffroy, Valérie; Morieux, Caroline; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Shull, Gary E; Meneton, Pierre; Paillard, Michel; Houillier, Pascal; De Vernejoul, Marie-Christine

    2005-05-01

    Chronic thiazide treatment is associated with high BMD. We report that patients and mice with null mutations in the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) have higher renal tubular Ca reabsorption, higher BMD, and lower bone remodeling than controls, as well as abnormalities in Ca metabolism, mainly caused by Mg depletion. Chronic thiazide treatment decreases urinary Ca excretion (UVCa) and increases BMD. To understand the underlying mechanisms, Ca and bone metabolism were studied in two models of genetic inactivation of the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC): patients with Gitelman syndrome (GS) and Ncc knockout (Ncc(-/-)) mice. Ca metabolism was analyzed in GS patients and Ncc(-/-) mice under conditions of low dietary Ca. BMD was measured by DXA in patients and mice, and bone histomorphometry was analyzed in mice. GS patients had low plasma Mg. They exhibited reduced UVCa, but similar serum Ca and GFR as control subjects, suggesting increased renal Ca reabsorption. Blood PTH was lower despite lower serum ionized Ca, and Mg repletion almost corrected both relative hypoparathyroidism and low UVCa. BMD was significantly increased in GS patients at both lumbar (+7%) and femoral (+16%) sites, and osteocalcin was reduced. In Ncc(-/-) mice, serum Ca and GFR were unchanged, but UVCa was reduced and PTH was elevated; Mg repletion largely corrected both abnormalities. Trabecular and cortical BMD were higher than in Ncc(+/+) mice (+4% and +5%, respectively), and despite elevated PTH, were associated with higher cortical thickness and lower endosteal osteoclastic surface. Higher BMD is observed in GS patients and Ncc(-/-) mice. Relative hypoparathyroidism (human) and bone resistance to PTH (mice), mainly caused by Mg depletion, can explain the low bone remodeling and normal/low serum Ca despite increased renal Ca reabsorption.

  15. PVA/NCC-金胺O/PVA复合荧光膜的制备和表征%Preparation and characterization of PVA/NCC-auramine O/PVA composite fluorescent membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志明; 杨少丽

    2013-01-01

    以金胺O为荧光染色剂,纳米纤维素(NCC)为增强相,氢键为驱动力,层层自组装PVA/NCC-金胺O/PVA复合荧光膜.NCC的性能表征结果为NCC为纤维素Ⅰ型,结晶度为65.55%,平均尺寸为477.2nm,呈棒状.PVA/NCC-金胺O/PVA复合荧光膜的性能表征结果为PVA/NCC-金胺O/PVA复合荧光膜具有优良的拉伸强度,其拉伸强度较纯PVA膜相比,横向拉伸增加了66.8%,纵向拉伸增加了230.9%.PVA/NCC-金胺O/PVA复合荧光膜具有良好的荧光效应,且PVA/NCC-金胺O/PVA复合荧光膜的荧光发射波长为520nm.

  16. Assessment of Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction Models in the National Combustion Code (NCC) - Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Thomas Changju; Liu, Nan-suey

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the implementations of the linear-eddy model (LEM) and an Eulerian FDF/PDF model in the National Combustion Code (NCC) for the simulation of turbulent combustion. The impacts of these two models, along with the so called laminar chemistry model, are then illustrated via the preliminary results from two combustion systems: a nine-element gas fueled combustor and a single-element liquid fueled combustor.

  17. Acute inhibition of NCC does not activate distal electrogenic Na+ reabsorption or kaliuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Robert W; Craigie, Eilidh; Homer, Natalie Z M; Mullins, John J; Bailey, Matthew A

    2014-02-15

    Na(+) reabsorption from the distal renal tubule involves electroneutral and electrogenic pathways, with the latter promoting K(+) excretion. The relative activities of these two pathways are tightly controlled, participating in the minute-to-minute regulation of systemic K(+) balance. The pathways are interdependent: the activity of the NaCl cotransporter (NCC) in the distal convoluted tubule influences the activity of the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) downstream. This effect might be mediated by changes in distal Na(+) delivery per se or by molecular and structural adaptations in the connecting tubule and collecting ducts. We hypothesized that acute inhibition of NCC activity would cause an immediate increase in Na(+) flux through ENaC, with a concomitant increase in renal K(+) excretion. We tested this using renal clearance methodology in anesthetized mice, by the administration of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) and/or benzamil (BZM) to exert specific blockade of NCC and ENaC, respectively. Bolus HCTZ elicited a natriuresis that was sustained for up to 110 min; urinary K(+) excretion was not affected. Furthermore, the magnitude of the natriuresis was no greater during concomitant BZM administration. This suggests that ENaC-mediated Na(+) reabsorption was not normally limited by Na(+) delivery, accounting for the absence of thiazide-induced kaliuresis. After dietary Na(+) restriction, HCTZ elicited a kaliuresis, but the natiuretic effect of HCTZ was not enhanced by BZM. Our findings support a model in which inhibition of NCC activity does not increase Na(+) reabsorption through ENaC solely by increasing distal Na(+) delivery but rather by inducing a molecular and structural adaptation in downstream nephron segments.

  18. Aldosterone does not require angiotensin II to activate NCC through a WNK4-SPAK-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lubbe, Nils; Lim, Christina H; Meima, Marcel E; van Veghel, Richard; Rosenbaek, Lena Lindtoft; Mutig, Kerim; Danser, Alexander H J; Fenton, Robert A; Zietse, Robert; Hoorn, Ewout J

    2012-06-01

    We and others have recently shown that angiotensin II can activate the sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) through a WNK4-SPAK-dependent pathway. Because WNK4 was previously shown to be a negative regulator of NCC, it has been postulated that angiotensin II converts WNK4 to a positive regulator. Here, we ask whether aldosterone requires angiotensin II to activate NCC and if their effects are additive. To do so, we infused vehicle or aldosterone in adrenalectomized rats that also received the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. In the presence of losartan, aldosterone was still capable of increasing total and phosphorylated NCC twofold to threefold. The kinases WNK4 and SPAK also increased with aldosterone and losartan. A dose-dependent relationship between aldosterone and NCC, SPAK, and WNK4 was identified, suggesting that these are aldosterone-sensitive proteins. As more functional evidence of increased NCC activity, we showed that rats receiving aldosterone and losartan had a significantly greater natriuretic response to hydrochlorothiazide than rats receiving losartan only. To study whether angiotensin II could have an additive effect, rats receiving aldosterone with losartan were compared with rats receiving aldosterone only. Rats receiving aldosterone only retained more sodium and had twofold to fourfold increase in phosphorylated NCC. Together, our results demonstrate that aldosterone does not require angiotensin II to activate NCC and that WNK4 appears to act as a positive regulator in this pathway. The additive effect of angiotensin II may favor electroneutral sodium reabsorption during hypovolemia and may contribute to hypertension in diseases with an activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

  19. Lactobacillus Adhesion to Mucus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell L. Van Tassell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mucus provides protective functions in the gastrointestinal tract and plays an important role in the adhesion of microorganisms to host surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins polymerize, forming a framework to which certain microbial populations can adhere, including probiotic Lactobacillus species. Numerous mechanisms for adhesion to mucus have been discovered in lactobacilli, including partially characterized mucus binding proteins. These mechanisms vary in importance with the in vitro models studied, which could significantly affect the perceived probiotic potential of the organisms. Understanding the nature of mucus-microbe interactions could be the key to elucidating the mechanisms of probiotic adhesion within the host.

  20. The Application of ARGO Data to the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Operational System of NCC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yimin; ZHANG Renhe; YIN Yonghong; NIU Tao

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we have preliminarily studied the application of ARGO (Array for Real-time Geostrophic Oceanography) data to the Global Ocean Data Assimilation System of National Climate Center of China (NCC-GODAS), which mainly contains 4 sub-systems such as data preprocessing, real-time wind stress calculating, variational analysis and interpolating, and ocean dynamic model. For the sake of using ARGO data, the relevant adjustment and improvement have been made at the corresponding aspects in the subsystems.Using the observation data from 1981 to 2003 including the ARGO data of 2001 to July. 2003, we have performed a series of numerical experiments on this system. Comparing with the corresponding results of NCEP, It is illustrated that using ARGO data can improve the results of NCC-GODAS in the region of the Middle Pacific, for instance SST, SSTA (SST anomalies), Nino index, sea sub-surface temperature,etc. Furthermore, it is obtained that NCC-GODAS benefits from ARGO data in the other regions such as Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean, and extratropical Pacific Ocean much more than in the tropical Pacific.

  1. 2014 KLCSG-NCC Korea Practice Guidelines for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma: HCC diagnostic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Park, Joong-Won; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most commonly occurring cancer in Korea and typically has a poor prognosis with a 5-year survival rate of only 28.6%. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to achieve the earliest possible diagnosis of HCC and to recommend the most up-to-date optimal treatment strategy in order to increase the survival rate of patients who develop this disease. After the establishment of the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group (KLCSG) and the National Cancer Center (NCC), Korea jointly produced for the first time the Clinical Practice Guidelines for HCC in 2003, revised them in 2009, and published the newest revision of the guidelines in 2014, including changes in the diagnostic criteria of HCC and incorporating the most recent medical advances over the past 5 years. In this review, we will address the noninvasive diagnostic criteria and diagnostic algorithm of HCC included in the newly established KLCSG-NCC guidelines in 2014, and review the differences in the criteria for a diagnosis of HCC between the KLCSG-NCC guidelines and the most recent imaging guidelines endorsed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), the Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System (LI-RADS), the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) system, the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver (APASL) and the Japan Society of Hepatology (JSH).

  2. Chromatin Dynamics During DNA Replication and Uncharacterized Replication Factors determined by Nascent Chromatin Capture (NCC) Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Bau; Kustatscher, Georg; Nakamura, Kyosuke; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Menard, Patrice; Mejlvang, Jakob; Rappsilber, Juri; Groth, Anja

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To maintain genome function and stability, DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin must be duplicated during cell division. Understanding how entire chromosomes are copied remains a major challenge. Here, we use Nascent Chromatin Capture (NCC) to profile chromatin proteome dynamics during replication in human cells. NCC relies on biotin-dUTP labelling of replicating DNA, affinity-purification and quantitative proteomics. Comparing nascent chromatin with mature post-replicative chromatin, we provide association dynamics for 3995 proteins. The replication machinery and 485 chromatin factors like CAF-1, DNMT1, SUV39h1 are enriched in nascent chromatin, whereas 170 factors including histone H1, DNMT3, MBD1-3 and PRC1 show delayed association. This correlates with H4K5K12diAc removal and H3K9me1 accumulation, while H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 remain unchanged. Finally, we combine NCC enrichment with experimentally derived chromatin probabilities to predict a function in nascent chromatin for 93 uncharacterized proteins and identify FAM111A as a replication factor required for PCNA loading. Together, this provides an extensive resource to understand genome and epigenome maintenance. PMID:24561620

  3. Pituitary control of branchial NCC, NKCC and Na(+), K (+)-ATPase α-subunit gene expression in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breves, Jason P; Seale, Andre P; Moorman, Benjamin P; Lerner, Darren T; Moriyama, Shunsuke; Hopkins, Kevin D; Grau, E Gordon

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated endocrine control of branchial ionoregulatory function in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) by prolactin (Prl188 and Prl177), growth hormone (Gh) and cortisol. Branchial expression of Na(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter (ncc) and Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter (nkcc) genes were employed as specific markers for freshwater- and seawater-type ionocytes, respectively. We further investigated whether Prl, Gh and cortisol direct expression of two Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (nka)-α1 subunit genes, denoted nka-α1a and nka-α1b. Tilapia transferred to fresh water following hypophysectomy failed to adequately activate gill ncc expression; ncc expression was subsequently restored by Prl replacement. Prl188 and Prl177 stimulated ncc expression in cultured gill filaments in a concentration-related manner, suggesting that ncc is regulated by Prl in a gill-autonomous fashion. Tilapia transferred to brackish water (23 ‰) following hypophysectomy exhibited a reduced capacity to up-regulate nka-α1b expression. However, Gh and cortisol failed to affect nka-α1b expression in vivo. Similarly, we found no clear effects of Gh or cortisol on nkcc expression both in vivo and in vitro. When considered with patterns previously described in euryhaline Mozambique tilapia (O. mossambicus), the current study suggests that ncc is a conserved target of Prl in tilapiine cichlids. In addition, we revealed contrasting dependencies upon the pituitary to direct nka-α1b expression in hyperosmotic environments between Nile and Mozambique tilapia.

  4. Probiotic properties of Lactobacillus strains isolated from Tibetan kefir grains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zheng, Yongchen; Lu, Yingli; Wang, Jinfeng; Yang, Longfei; Pan, Chenyu; Huang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    ...) isolated from Tibetan kefir grains. Three Lactobacillus isolates identified as Lactobacillus acidophilus LA15, Lactobacillus plantarum B23 and Lactobacillus kefiri D17 that showed resistance to acid and bile salts were selected...

  5. Embedding the Ni-SOD mimetic Ni-NCC within a polypeptide sequence alters the specificity of the reaction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Mary E; Glass, Amanda M; Jackson, Timothy A; Laurence, Jennifer S

    2013-01-07

    The unique metal abstracting peptide asparagine-cysteine-cysteine (NCC) binds nickel in a square planar 2N:2S geometry and acts as a mimic of the enzyme nickel superoxide dismutase (Ni-SOD). The Ni-NCC tripeptide complex undergoes rapid, site-specific chiral inversion to dld-NCC in the presence of oxygen. Superoxide scavenging activity increases proportionally with the degree of chiral inversion. Characterization of the NCC sequence within longer peptides with absorption, circular dichroism (CD), and magnetic CD (MCD) spectroscopies and mass spectrometry (MS) shows that the geometry of metal coordination is maintained, though the electronic properties of the complex are varied to a small extent because of bis-amide, rather than amine/amide, coordination. In addition, both Ni-tripeptide and Ni-pentapeptide complexes have charges of -2. This study demonstrates that the chiral inversion chemistry does not occur when NCC is embedded in a longer polypeptide sequence. Nonetheless, the superoxide scavenging reactivity of the embedded Ni-NCC module is similar to that of the chirally inverted tripeptide complex, which is consistent with a minor change in the reduction potential for the Ni-pentapeptide complex. Together, this suggests that the charge of the complex could affect the SOD activity as much as a change in the primary coordination sphere. In Ni-NCC and other Ni-SOD mimics, changes in chirality, superoxide scavenging activity, and oxidation of the peptide itself all depend on the presence of dioxygen or its reduced derivatives (e.g., superoxide), and the extent to which each of these distinct reactions occurs is ruled by electronic and steric effects that emenate from the organization of ligands around the metal center.

  6. Development of a tiered multilocus sequence typing scheme for members of the Lactobacillus acidophilus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Padmini; Lacher, David W; Pfeiler, Erika A; Elkins, Christopher A

    2013-12-01

    Members of the Lactobacillus acidophilus complex are associated with functional foods and dietary supplements because of purported health benefits they impart to the consumer. Many characteristics of these microorganisms are reported to be strain specific. Therefore, proper strain typing is essential for safety assessment and product labeling, and also for monitoring strain integrity for industrial production purposes. Fifty-two strains of the L. acidophilus complex (L. acidophilus, L. amylovorus, L. crispatus, L. gallinarum, L. gasseri, and L. johnsonii) were genotyped using two established methods and compared to a novel multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of the hsp60 gene with AluI and TaqI successfully clustered 51 of the 52 strains into the six species examined, but it lacked strain-level discrimination. Random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR (RAPD-PCR) targeting the M13 sequence resulted in highly discriminatory profiles but lacked reproducibility. In this study, an MLST scheme was developed using the conserved housekeeping genes fusA, gpmA, gyrA, gyrB, lepA, pyrG, and recA, which identified 40 sequence types that successfully clustered all of the strains into the six species. Analysis of the observed alleles suggests that nucleotide substitutions within five of the seven MLST loci have reached saturation, a finding that emphasizes the highly diverse nature of the L. acidophilus complex and our unconventional application of a typically intraspecies molecular typing tool. Our MLST results indicate that this method could be useful for characterization and strain discrimination of a multispecies complex, with the potential for taxonomic expansion to a broader collection of Lactobacillus species.

  7. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. (Nestle Research Centre, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  8. Expression and phosphorylation of the Na+-Cl- cotransporter NCC in vivo is regulated by dietary salt, potassium, and SGK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallon, Volker; Schroth, Jana; Lang, Florian; Kuhl, Dietmar; Uchida, Shinichi

    2009-09-01

    The Na-Cl cotransporter NCC is expressed in the distal convoluted tubule, activated by phosphorylation, and has been implicated in renal NaCl and K(+) homeostasis. The serum and glucocorticoid inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) contributes to renal NaCl retention and K(+) excretion, at least in part, by stimulating the epithelial Na(+) channel and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in the downstream segments of aldosterone-sensitive Na(+)/K(+) exchange. In this study we confirmed in wild-type mice (WT) that dietary NaCl restriction increases renal NCC expression and its phosphorylation at Thr(53), Thr(58), and Ser(71), respectively. This response, however, was attenuated in mice lacking SGK1 (Sgk1(-/-)), which may contribute to impaired NaCl retention in those mice. Total renal NCC expression and phosphorylation at Thr(53), Thr(58), and Ser(71) in WT were greater under low- compared with high-K(+) diet. This finding is consistent with a regulation of NCC to modulate Na(+) delivery to downstream segments of Na(+)/K(+) exchange, thereby modulating K(+) excretion. Dietary K(+)-dependent variation in renal expression of total NCC and phosphorylated NCC were not attenuated in Sgk1(-/-) mice. In fact, high-K(+) diet-induced NCC suppression was enhanced in Sgk1(-/-) mice. The hyperkalemia induced in Sgk1(-/-) mice by a high-K(+) diet may have augmented NCC suppression, thereby increasing Na(+) delivery and facilitating K(+) excretion in downstream segments of impaired Na(+)/K(+) exchange. In summary, changes in NaCl and K(+) intake altered NCC expression and phosphorylation, an observation consistent with a role of NCC in NaCl and K(+) homeostasis. The two maneuvers dissociated plasma aldosterone levels from NCC expression and phosphorylation, implicating additional regulators. Regulation of NCC expression and phosphorylation by dietary NaCl restriction appears to involve SGK1.

  9. WNK-SPAK-NCC cascade revisited: WNK1 stimulates the activity of the Na-Cl cotransporter via SPAK, an effect antagonized by WNK4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Canales, María; Zhang, Chong; Soukaseum, Christelle; Moreno, Erika; Pacheco-Alvarez, Diana; Vidal-Petiot, Emmanuelle; Castañeda-Bueno, María; Vázquez, Norma; Rojas-Vega, Lorena; Meermeier, Nicholas P; Rogers, Shaunessy; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Yang, Chao-Ling; Ellison, David H; Gamba, Gerardo; Hadchouel, Juliette

    2014-11-01

    The with-no-lysine (K) kinases, WNK1 and WNK4, are key regulators of blood pressure. Their mutations lead to familial hyperkalemic hypertension (FHHt), associated with an activation of the Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC). Although it is clear that WNK4 mutants activate NCC via Ste20 proline-alanine-rich kinase, the mechanisms responsible for WNK1-related FHHt and alterations in NCC activity are not as clear. We tested whether WNK1 modulates NCC through WNK4, as predicted by some models, by crossing our recently developed WNK1-FHHt mice (WNK1(+/FHHt)) with WNK4(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, the activated NCC, hypertension, and hyperkalemia of WNK1(+/FHHt) mice remain in the absence of WNK4. We demonstrate that WNK1 powerfully stimulates NCC in a WNK4-independent and Ste20 proline-alanine-rich kinase-dependent manner. Moreover, WNK4 decreases the WNK1 and WNK3-mediated activation of NCC. Finally, the formation of oligomers of WNK kinases through their C-terminal coiled-coil domain is essential for their activity toward NCC. In conclusion, WNK kinases form a network in which WNK4 associates with WNK1 and WNK3 to regulate NCC. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Effect of angiotensin II on the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC phosphorylation cascade in cultured mpkDCT cells and in vivo mouse kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talati, Gulibaha; Ohta, Akihito; Rai, Tatemitsu; Sohara, Eisei; Naito, Shotaro; Vandewalle, Alain; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2010-03-19

    In our recent study using Wnk4(D561A/+) knockin mice, we determined that the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NaCl cotransporter (NCC) phosphorylation cascade is important for regulating NCC function in vivo. Phosphorylation of NCC was necessary for its plasma membrane localization. Previously, angiotensin II infusion was shown to increase apical membrane expression of NCC in rats. Therefore, we investigated whether angiotensin II was an upstream regulator for the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC cascade in cultured cells and in vivo kidney. In mpkDCT cells, the phosphorylation of OSR1 and NCC was increased 30 min after the addition of angiotensin II (10(-9)-10(-7)M) but returned to baseline after 18 h. In mice, a 5-min infusion of angiotensin II (5 ng/g/min) increased NCC phosphorylation in the kidney at 30 min and 2h after the injection but returned to baseline 24h later. This increase was inhibited by angiotensin II receptor blocker (valsartan) but not by aldosterone receptor blocker (eplerenone). Ten-day infusions of angiotensin II (720 ng/day) also increased phosphorylation of OSR1 and NCC in the mouse kidney, and both valsartan and eplerenone inhibited the increased phosphorylation. Although angiotensin II is identified as an upstream regulator for the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC cascade in vivo, aldosterone appears to be the major regulator of this signal cascade in the long-term regulation by angiotensin II. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. WNK4 inhibits plasma membrane targeting of NCC through regulation of syntaxin13 SNARE formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woo Young; Park, Hyun Woo; Han, Jung Woo; Lee, Min Goo; Kim, Joo Young

    2013-12-01

    WNK4, a serine/threonine kinase, plays a critical role in the expression of membrane proteins in the cell surface; however, the underlying mechanism of WNK4 is not clear. Here, we demonstrate that WNK4 inhibits the fusion of plasma membrane delivering vesicle with sorting/recycling endosome through disrupting SNARE formation of syntaxin13, an endosomal t-SNARE and VAMP2, the v-SNARE in plasma membrane delivering vesicle. Their interaction and co-localization were enhanced by hyperosmotic stimulation which is known for WNK4 activation. The kinase domain of WNK4 interacts with the transmembrane domain (TM) of syntaxin13 and this interaction was abolished when the TM was replaced with that of syntaxin16. Interestingly, cell fractionation using sucrose gradients revealed that WNK4 inhibited the formation of the syntaxin13/VAMP2 SNARE complex in the endosomal compartment, but not syntaxin16/VAMP2 or syntaxin13/VAMP7. Syntaxin13 was not phosphorylated by WNK4 and WNK4KI also showed the same binding strength and similar inhibitory regulation on SNARE formation of syntaxin13. Physiological relevance of this mechanism was proved with the expression of NCC (Na(+) C1(-) co-transporter) in the cell surface. The inhibiting activity of WNK4 on surface expression of NCC was abolished by syntaxin13 siRNA transfection. These results suggest that WNK4 attenuates PM targeting of NCC proteins through regulation of syntaxin13 SNARE complex formation with VAMP2 in recycling and sorting endosome. © 2013.

  12. TECHNICAL DESIGN REPORT FOR A NOSECONE CALORIMETER (NCC) FOR THE PHENIX EXPERIMENT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PHENIX EXPERIMENT; OBRIEN,E.; BOOSE, S.; CHIU, M.; JOHNSON, B.M.; KISTENEV, E.P.; LYNCH, D.; NOUICER, R.; PAK, R.; PISANI, R.; STOLL, S.P.; SUKHANOV, A.; WOODY, C.L.; LI, Z.; RADEKA, V.; RESCIA, S.; (PHENIX EXPERIMENT COLLABORATORS)

    2007-08-01

    A remarkable result has emerged from the first several years of data taking at RHIC--the high temperature and density phase of QCD matter created in heavy ion collisions at RHIC is best described as a near perfect fluid--the strongly interacting Quark-Gluon-Plasma (sQGP). This state is characterized by a small viscosity to entropy ratio, and a high density of color charges which induces huge energy losses of partons transversing the medium. The task for the future is to understand the characteristics of the sQGP, and perhaps more importantly--to gain some insight into how and why such a medium is created. The PHENIX detector has been one of the primary experimental tools at RHIC; in particular the electromagnetic calorimeter has been a critical component of many of the measurements leading to this discovery. The coverage of the present PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeter is rather limited, covering half the azimuth and -0.35< {eta} <0.35 Further progress requires larger coverage of electromagnetic calorimetry, both to increase the rate for low cross section phenomena, and to cover a broader range of pseudorapidity to study the rapidity dependence of the medium. A pair of Nosecone Calorimeters (NCC) has been designed covering both positive and negative rapidity regions 1< |{eta}| <3 of the PHENIX detector. The NCC will make it possible to perform tomographic studies of the jet energy dependence of energy loss and medium response, by using direct photons as trigger particles over a large rapidity range. The technique of correlating trigger hadrons with low momentum hadrons has been powerfully exploited at RHIC to study the evolution of back to back jets [1, 2] and hence the response of the medium. The NCC will make it possible to do such studies using direct photons as the trigger particles. The direct photon in such ''photon-jet'' events tags the transverse momentum of outgoing parton which then fragments into lower energy particles. Together with

  13. RESEARCH NOTE Static dielectric constant of the polarizable NCC water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millot, Jean-Christophe Soetens Marilia T. C. Martins Costa Claude

    The static dielectric constant epsilon0 of the ab initio water model NCC including polarizability (Niesar, U., Corongiu, G., Clementi, E., Kneller, G. R., and Bhattacharya, D. K., 1990, J. phys. Chem., 94, 7949) has been computed by molecular dynamics simulation at 25oC and a density of 1gcm-3. The long range electrostatic interactions are taken into account by the reaction field method. Values of 100 8 and 8ps are found for the static dielectric constant and dielectric relaxation time, respectively.

  14. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 Alleviates Food Allergic Manifestations in Sensitized Mice by Reducing IL-13 Expression Specifically in the Ileum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian W. Zuercher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Utilizing a food allergy murine model, we have investigated the intrinsic antiallergic potential of the Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 strain. Methods. BALB/c mice were sensitized at weekly intervals with ovalbumin (OVA plus cholera toxin (CT by the oral route for 7 weeks. In this model, an oral challenge with a high dose of OVA at the end of the sensitization period leads to clinical symptoms. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 was given to mice via the drinking water during sensitization (prevention phase or after sensitization (management phase. Results. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 administration to sensitized mice strikingly reduced allergic manifestations in the management phase upon challenge, when compared to control mice. No preventive effect was observed with the strain. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 significantly decreased relative expression levels of the Th-2 cytokine, IL-13, and associated chemokines CCL11 (eotaxin-1 and CCL17 (TARC in the ileum. No effect was observed in the jejunum. Conclusion/Significance. These results taken together designate Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 as a candidate probiotic strain appropriate in the management of allergic symptoms.

  15. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 Alleviates Food Allergic Manifestations in Sensitized Mice by Reducing IL-13 Expression Specifically in the Ileum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuercher, Adrian W.; Weiss, Marietta; Holvoet, Sébastien; Moser, Mireille; Moussu, Hélène; van Overtvelt, Laurence; Horiot, Stéphane; Moingeon, Philippe; Nutten, Sophie; Prioult, Guénolée; Singh, Anurag; Mercenier, Annick

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Utilizing a food allergy murine model, we have investigated the intrinsic antiallergic potential of the Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 strain. Methods. BALB/c mice were sensitized at weekly intervals with ovalbumin (OVA) plus cholera toxin (CT) by the oral route for 7 weeks. In this model, an oral challenge with a high dose of OVA at the end of the sensitization period leads to clinical symptoms. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 was given to mice via the drinking water during sensitization (prevention phase) or after sensitization (management phase). Results. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 administration to sensitized mice strikingly reduced allergic manifestations in the management phase upon challenge, when compared to control mice. No preventive effect was observed with the strain. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 significantly decreased relative expression levels of the Th-2 cytokine, IL-13, and associated chemokines CCL11 (eotaxin-1) and CCL17 (TARC) in the ileum. No effect was observed in the jejunum. Conclusion/Significance. These results taken together designate Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 as a candidate probiotic strain appropriate in the management of allergic symptoms. PMID:21961022

  16. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 alleviates food allergic manifestations in sensitized mice by reducing IL-13 expression specifically in the ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuercher, Adrian W; Weiss, Marietta; Holvoet, Sébastien; Moser, Mireille; Moussu, Hélène; van Overtvelt, Laurence; Horiot, Stéphane; Moingeon, Philippe; Nutten, Sophie; Prioult, Guénolée; Singh, Anurag; Mercenier, Annick

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing a food allergy murine model, we have investigated the intrinsic antiallergic potential of the Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 strain. BALB/c mice were sensitized at weekly intervals with ovalbumin (OVA) plus cholera toxin (CT) by the oral route for 7 weeks. In this model, an oral challenge with a high dose of OVA at the end of the sensitization period leads to clinical symptoms. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 was given to mice via the drinking water during sensitization (prevention phase) or after sensitization (management phase). Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 administration to sensitized mice strikingly reduced allergic manifestations in the management phase upon challenge, when compared to control mice. No preventive effect was observed with the strain. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 significantly decreased relative expression levels of the Th-2 cytokine, IL-13, and associated chemokines CCL11 (eotaxin-1) and CCL17 (TARC) in the ileum. No effect was observed in the jejunum. These results taken together designate Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 as a candidate probiotic strain appropriate in the management of allergic symptoms.

  17. Identification of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus fermentum from honey stomach of honeybee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajabadi, Naser; Mardan, Makhdzir; Saari, Nazamid; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Bahreini, Rasoul; Manap, Mohd Yazid Abdul

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to isolate and identify Lactobacillus in the honey stomach of honeybee Apis dorsata. Samples of honeybee were collected from A. dorsata colonies in different bee trees and Lactobacillus bacteria isolated from honey stomachs. Ninety two isolates were Gram-stained and tested for catalase reaction. By using bacterial universal primers, the 16S rDNA gene from DNA of bacterial colonies amplified with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Forty-nine bacterial 16S rDNA gene were sequenced and entrusted in GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis showed they were different phylotypes of Lactobacillus. Two of them were most closely relevant to the previously described species Lactobacillus plantarum. Other two phylotypes were identified to be closely related to Lactobacillus pentosus. However, only one phylotype was found to be distantly linked to the Lactobacillus fermentum. The outcomes of the present study indicated that L. plantarum, L. pentosus, and L. fermentum were the dominant lactobacilli in the honey stomach of honeybee A. dorsata collected during the dry season from Malaysia forest area - specifically "Melaleuca in Terengganu".

  18. Geochemistry of khondalites from the central portion of North China craton (NCC): implications for the continental cratonization in the Neoarchean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Within the high-grade metamorphic basement, the central portion of North China Craton (NCC), a group of Neoarchean khondalites (KS) is identified. They are characterized by large ion lithophile elements (LILE) enrichment, lower abundances of Zr, Hf and Sr. Their rare earth element (REE) distribution has significant LREE enrichment and negative Eu anomalies. The protoliths of KS are interpreted as feldspathic quartzite, shale or pelite and carbonite, deposited in a shallow sea upon cratonic shelf distant from the land. KS's source region might be dominated by granitic rocks, with a minor amount of TTG, underwent comparatively severe chemical weathering. Considering relevent tectonic constraints, we suggest that khondalites from central portion of NCC, an important metamophosed sedimentary cover, are the most significant exogenetic marker of Neoarchean continental cratonization for NCC.

  19. Regulation of blood pressure and renal function by NCC and ENaC: lessons from genetically engineered mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verouti, Sophia N; Boscardin, Emilie; Hummler, Edith; Frateschi, Simona

    2015-04-01

    The activity of the thiazide-sensitive Na(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) and of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) is pivotal for blood pressure regulation. NCC is responsible for Na(+) reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) of the nephron, while ENaC reabsorbs the filtered Na(+) in the late DCT and in the cortical collecting ducts (CCD) providing the final renal adjustment to Na(+) balance. Here, we aim to highlight the recent advances made using transgenic mouse models towards the understanding of the regulation of NCC and ENaC function relevant to the control of sodium balance and blood pressure. We thus like to pave the way for common mechanisms regulating these two sodium-transporting proteins and their potential implication in structural remodeling of the nephron segments and Na(+) and Cl(-) reabsorption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. ENaC activity in collecting ducts modulates NCC in cirrhotic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordasini, David; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Loffing, Johannes; Beatrice, Rohrbach; Maillard, Marc P; Hummler, Edith; Burnier, Michel; Escher, Geneviève; Vogt, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Cirrhosis is a frequent and severe disease, complicated by renal sodium retention leading to ascites and oedema. A better understanding of the complex mechanisms responsible for renal sodium handling could improve clinical management of sodium retention. Our aim was to determine the importance of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in collecting ducts in compensate and decompensate cirrhosis. Bile duct ligation was performed in control mice (CTL) and collecting duct-specific αENaC knockout (KO) mice, and ascites development, aldosterone plasma concentration, urinary sodium/potassium ratio and sodium transporter expression were compared. Disruption of ENaC in collecting ducts (CDs) did not alter ascites development, urinary sodium/potassium ratio, plasma aldosterone concentrations or Na,K-ATPase abundance in CCDs. Total αENaC abundance in whole kidney increased in cirrhotic mice of both genotypes and cleaved forms of α and γ ENaC increased only in ascitic mice of both genotypes. The sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) abundance was lower in non-ascitic KO, compared to non-ascitic CTL, and increased when ascites appeared. In ascitic mice, the lack of αENaC in CDs induced an upregulation of total ENaC and NCC and correlated with the cleavage of ENaC subunits. This revealed compensatory mechanisms which could also take place when treating the patients with diuretics. These compensatory mechanisms should be considered for future development of therapeutic strategies.

  1. Catalytic conversion of carbohydrates to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural from the waste liquid of acid hydrolysis NCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yonghui; Liu, Pengtao; Liu, Zhong

    2016-05-20

    The principal goal of this work was to reuse the carbohydrates and recycle sulfuric acid in the waste liquid of acid hydrolysis nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC). Therefore, in this work, the optimizations of further hydrolysis of waste liquid of acid hydrolysis NCC and catalytic conversion of L4 to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) were studied. Sulfuric acid was separated by spiral wound diffusion dialysis (SWDD). The results revealed that cellulose can be hydrolyze to glucose absolutely under the condition of temperature 35 °C, 3 h, and sulfuric acid's concentration 62 wt%. And 78.3% sulfuric acid was recovered by SWDD. The yield of 5-HMF was highest in aqueous solution under the optimal condition was as follows, temperature 160 °C, 3 h, and sulfuric acid's concentration 12 wt%. Then the effect of biphasic solvent systems catalytic conversion and inorganic salt as additives were still examined. The results showed that both of them contributed to prepare 5-HMF. The yield and selectivity of 5-HMF was up to 21.0% and 31.4%, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Vibration extraction based on fast NCC algorithm and high-speed camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiujun; Jin, Yi; Guo, Jie; Zhu, Chang'an

    2015-09-20

    In this study, a high-speed camera system is developed to complete the vibration measurement in real time and to overcome the mass introduced by conventional contact measurements. The proposed system consists of a notebook computer and a high-speed camera which can capture the images as many as 1000 frames per second. In order to process the captured images in the computer, the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) template tracking algorithm with subpixel accuracy is introduced. Additionally, a modified local search algorithm based on the NCC is proposed to reduce the computation time and to increase efficiency significantly. The modified algorithm can rapidly accomplish one displacement extraction 10 times faster than the traditional template matching without installing any target panel onto the structures. Two experiments were carried out under laboratory and outdoor conditions to validate the accuracy and efficiency of the system performance in practice. The results demonstrated the high accuracy and efficiency of the camera system in extracting vibrating signals.

  3. Analysis of functional properties of Lactobacillus acidophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, R.X.; Sun, J.L.; Mo, H.Z.; Yang Zhu, Yang

    2007-01-01

    Metabolites from Lactobacillus acidophilus were analysed. The results showed that Lactobacillus acidophilus Ind-1 and Lactobacillus acidophilus Lakcid produced respectively 12.73 g and 13.33 g lactic acid l¿1 after incubating in skim milk at 37 °C for 36 h; and 2.229 unit and 1.808 unit

  4. Analysis of functional properties of Lactobacillus acidophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, R.X.; Sun, J.L.; Mo, H.Z.; Yang Zhu, Yang

    2007-01-01

    Metabolites from Lactobacillus acidophilus were analysed. The results showed that Lactobacillus acidophilus Ind-1 and Lactobacillus acidophilus Lakcid produced respectively 12.73 g and 13.33 g lactic acid l¿1 after incubating in skim milk at 37 °C for 36 h; and 2.229 unit and 1.808 unit ß-galactosid

  5. Extensive horizontal transfer of core genome genes between two Lactobacillus species found in the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maguin Emmanuelle

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While genes that are conserved between related bacterial species are usually thought to have evolved along with the species, phylogenetic trees reconstructed for individual genes may contradict this picture and indicate horizontal gene transfer. Individual trees are often not resolved with high confidence, however, and in that case alternative trees are generally not considered as contradicting the species tree, although not confirming it either. Here we conduct an in-depth analysis of 401 protein phylogenetic trees inferred with varying levels of confidence for three lactobacilli from the acidophilus complex. At present the relationship between these bacteria, isolated from environments as diverse as the gastrointestinal tract (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus johnsonii and yogurt (Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, is ambiguous due to contradictory phenotypical and 16S rRNA based classifications. Results Among the 401 phylogenetic trees, those that could be reconstructed with high confidence support the 16S-rRNA tree or one alternative topology in an astonishing 3:2 ratio, while the third possible topology is practically absent. Lowering the confidence threshold for trees to be taken into consideration does not significantly affect this ratio, and therefore suggests that gene transfer may have affected as much as 40% of the core genome genes. Gene function bias suggests that the 16S rRNA phylogeny of the acidophilus complex, which indicates that L. acidophilus and L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus are the closest related of these three species, is correct. A novel approach of comparison of interspecies protein divergence data employed in this study allowed to determine that gene transfer most likely took place between the lineages of the two species found in the gastrointestinal tract. Conclusion This case-study reports an unprecedented level of phylogenetic incongruence, presumably resulting from extensive

  6. Analysis of host-inducing proteome changes in bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 grown in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Wang, Bin; Sun, Zhongke; Bo, Xin; Yuan, Xitong; He, Xiang; Zhao, Hongqing; Du, Xinying; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Zheng; Zhang, Ling; Jia, Leili; Wang, Yufei; Wei, Kaihua; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Xuemin; Sun, Yansong; Huang, Liuyu; Zeng, Ming

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the adaptation of Bifidobacterium longum to the intestinal tract, we utilized a new model for rabbit intestinal culture of B. longum and reported the changes in proteomic profiles after incubation in the in vivo environment. By 2D-PAGE coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and/or electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) analyses, proteomic profiles of B. longum strain NCC2705 grown in the in vivo and in vitro environments were compared. Confirmed by semiquantitative RT-PCR, which exhibited at least a 3-fold change or greater, 19 up-regulated proteins, 14 down-regulated proteins, and 4 proteins with mobility changes were identified during intestinal growth. These identified proteins include key stress proteins, metabolism-related proteins, and proteins related to translation. Our results indicate that some useful proteins are expressed at higher levels in cells during intestinal growth. These proteins reflected the adaptation of B. longum NCC2705 to the intestine, such as EF-Tu which contributes to the retention or attachment as a Bifidobacterium adhesin-like factor, bile salt hydrolase (BSH) which might play an important role in the molecular mechanisms for the initial interaction of probiotic with the intestinal environment, and stress proteins which defend B. longum against the action of bile salts and other harmful ingredients of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The most striking fact of our observation was that four proteins GlnA1, PurC, LuxS, and Pgk exhibit clear post-translational modification. Western blot (WB) analysis and Pro-Q Diamond staining revealed that substances of the GIT trigger Pgk and LuxS phosphorylation at Ser/Thr residues for bacteria grown in vivo. These proteins were identified for the first time as bifidobacterial phosphoproteins. Our data suggest that the phosphorylated autoinducer-2 production

  7. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway activates the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC phosphorylation cascade in hyperinsulinemic db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Hidenori; Sohara, Eisei; Nomura, Naohiro; Chiga, Motoko; Alessi, Dario R; Rai, Tatemitsu; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2012-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome patients have insulin resistance, which causes hyperinsulinemia, which in turn causes aberrant increased renal sodium reabsorption. The precise mechanisms underlying this greater salt sensitivity of hyperinsulinemic patients remain unclear. Abnormal activation of the recently identified with-no-lysine kinase (WNK)-oxidative stress-responsive kinase 1 (OSR1)/STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)-NaCl cotransporter (NCC) phosphorylation cascade results in the salt-sensitive hypertension of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II. Here, we report a study of renal WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC cascade activation in the db/db mouse model of hyperinsulinemic metabolic syndrome. Thiazide sensitivity was increased, suggesting greater activity of NCC in db/db mice. In fact, increased phosphorylation of OSR1/SPAK and NCC was observed. In both SpakT243A/+ and Osr1T185A/+ knock-in db/db mice, which carry mutations that disrupt the signal from WNK kinases, increased phosphorylation of NCC and elevated blood pressure were completely corrected, indicating that phosphorylation of SPAK and OSR1 by WNK kinases is required for the increased activation and phosphorylation of NCC in this model. Renal phosphorylated Akt was increased in db/db mice, suggesting that increased NCC phosphorylation is regulated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling cascade in the kidney in response to hyperinsulinemia. A phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor (NVP-BEZ235) corrected the increased OSR1/SPAK-NCC phosphorylation. Another more specific phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor (GDC-0941) and an Akt inhibitor (MK-2206) also inhibited increased NCC phosphorylation. These results indicate that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway activates the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC phosphorylation cascade in db/db mice. This mechanism may play a role in the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension in human hyperinsulinemic conditions, such as the metabolic syndrome.

  8. PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway Activates the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC Phosphorylation Cascade in Hyperinsulinemic db/db Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Hidenori; Sohara, Eisei; Nomura, Naohiro; Chiga, Motoko; Alessi, Dario R; Rai, Tatemitsu; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome patients have insulin resistance, which causes hyperinsulinemia, which in turn causes aberrant increased renal sodium reabsorption. The precise mechanisms underlying this greater salt-sensitivity of hyperinsulinemic patients remain unclear. Abnormal activation of the recently-identified WNK kinase-OSR1/SPAK kinases-NCC transporter phosphorylation cascade results in the salt-sensitive hypertension of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II. Here, we report a study of renal WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC cascade activation in the db/db mouse model of hyperinsulinemic metabolic syndrome. Thiazide sensitivity was increased, suggesting greater activity of NCC in db/db mice. In fact, increased phosphorylation of OSR1/SPAK and NCC was observed. In both SpakT243A/+ and Osr1T185A/+ knock-in db/db mice, which carry mutations that disrupt the signal from WNK kinases, increased phosphorylation of NCC and elevated blood pressure were completely corrected, indicating that phosphorylation of SPAK and OSR1 by WNK kinases is required for the increased activation and phosphorylation of NCC in this model. Renal phosphorylated Akt was increased in db/db mice, suggesting that increased NCC phosphorylation is regulated by the PI3K/Akt signaling cascade in the kidney in response to hyperinsulinemia. A PI3K inhibitor (NVP-BEZ235) corrected the increased OSR1/SPAK-NCC phosphorylation. Another more specific PI3K inhibitor (GDC-0941) and an Akt inhibitor (MK-2206) also inhibited increased NCC phosphorylation. These results indicate that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway activates the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC phosphorylation cascade in db/db mice. This mechanism may play a role in the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension in human hyperinsulinemic conditions such as the metabolic syndrome. PMID:22949526

  9. Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov., isolated from the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olofsson, Tobias C; Alsterfjord, Magnus; Nilson, Bo; Butler, Eile; Vásquez, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    .... The microbiota was composed of several phylotypes of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and phenotypic and genetic characteristics revealed that the phylotypes isolated represent seven novel species...

  10. The Assessment Supplement: A Faculty-Designed Addition to NCC's Manual, "Concepts & Procedures for Academic Assessment." First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassau Community Coll., Garden City, NY.

    This document is the first in a series of annual, faculty-designed supplements to Nassau Community College's (NCC's) (New York) manual, "Concepts & Procedures for Academic Assessment." The supplements are intended to provide faculty a forum through which they can communicate assessment designs and the impacts of those designs on…

  11. Using CLIPS in a distributed system: The Network Control Center (NCC) expert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannemacher, Tom

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes an intelligent troubleshooting system for the Help Desk domain. It was developed on an IBM-compatible 80286 PC using Microsoft C and CLIPS and an AT&T 3B2 minicomputer using the UNIFY database and a combination of shell script, C programs and SQL queries. The two computers are linked by a lan. The functions of this system are to help non-technical NCC personnel handle trouble calls, to keep a log of problem calls with complete, concise information, and to keep a historical database of problems. The database helps identify hardware and software problem areas and provides a source of new rules for the troubleshooting knowledge base.

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korhonen, J.M.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Saarela, M.; Huys, G.; Tosi, L.; Mayrhofer, S.; Wright, A.

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of Lactobacillus rhamnosus (n=75) strains, to study their antibiotic resistance genes with microarray, and to assess the microbiological cut-off values of tested antimicrobial agents. L. rhamnosus strains were tested with agar

  13. Renal tubular NEDD4-2 deficiency causes NCC-mediated salt-dependent hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzaud, Caroline; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Hausel, Pierrette; Debonneville, Anne; Malsure, Sumedha Ram; Fowler-Jaeger, Nicole; Boase, Natasha A; Perrier, Romain; Maillard, Marc; Yang, Baoli; Stokes, John B; Koesters, Robert; Kumar, Sharad; Hummler, Edith; Loffing, Johannes; Staub, Olivier

    2013-02-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4-2 (encoded by the Nedd4L gene) regulates the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC/SCNN1) to mediate Na+ homeostasis. Mutations in the human β/γENaC subunits that block NEDD4-2 binding or constitutive ablation of exons 6-8 of Nedd4L in mice both result in salt-sensitive hypertension and elevated ENaC activity (Liddle syndrome). To determine the role of renal tubular NEDD4-2 in adult mice, we generated tetracycline-inducible, nephron-specific Nedd4L KO mice. Under standard and high-Na+ diets, conditional KO mice displayed decreased plasma aldosterone but normal Na+/K+ balance. Under a high-Na+ diet, KO mice exhibited hypercalciuria and increased blood pressure, which were reversed by thiazide treatment. Protein expression of βENaC, γENaC, the renal outer medullary K+ channel (ROMK), and total and phosphorylated thiazide-sensitive Na+Cl- cotransporter (NCC) levels were increased in KO kidneys. Unexpectedly, Scnn1a mRNA, which encodes the αENaC subunit, was reduced and proteolytic cleavage of αENaC decreased. Taken together, these results demonstrate that loss of NEDD4-2 in adult renal tubules causes a new form of mild, salt-sensitive hypertension without hyperkalemia that is characterized by upregulation of NCC, elevation of β/γENaC, but not αENaC, and a normal Na+/K+ balance maintained by downregulation of ENaC activity and upregulation of ROMK.

  14. NCC-RANSAC: a fast plane extraction method for 3-D range data segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiangfei; Ye, Cang

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a new plane extraction (PE) method based on the random sample consensus (RANSAC) approach. The generic RANSAC-based PE algorithm may over-extract a plane, and it may fail in case of a multistep scene where the RANSAC procedure results in multiple inlier patches that form a slant plane straddling the steps. The CC-RANSAC PE algorithm successfully overcomes the latter limitation if the inlier patches are separate. However, it fails if the inlier patches are connected. A typical scenario is a stairway with a stair wall where the RANSAC plane-fitting procedure results in inliers patches in the tread, riser, and stair wall planes. They connect together and form a plane. The proposed method, called normal-coherence CC-RANSAC (NCC-RANSAC), performs a normal coherence check to all data points of the inlier patches and removes the data points whose normal directions are contradictory to that of the fitted plane. This process results in separate inlier patches, each of which is treated as a candidate plane. A recursive plane clustering process is then executed to grow each of the candidate planes until all planes are extracted in their entireties. The RANSAC plane-fitting and the recursive plane clustering processes are repeated until no more planes are found. A probabilistic model is introduced to predict the success probability of the NCC-RANSAC algorithm and validated with real data of a 3-D time-of-flight camera-SwissRanger SR4000. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method extracts more accurate planes with less computational time than the existing RANSAC-based methods.

  15. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) regulates ENaC but not NCC in mice with random MR deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czogalla, Jan; Vohra, Twinkle; Penton, David; Kirschmann, Moritz; Craigie, Eilidh; Loffing, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Aldosterone binds to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and increases renal Na(+) reabsorption via up-regulation of the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) and the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in the collecting system (CS) and possibly also via the NaCl cotransporter (NCC) in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT). However, whether aldosterone directly regulates NCC via MR or indirectly through systemic alterations remains controversial. We used mice with deletion of MR in ∼20 % of renal tubule cells (MR/X mice), in which MR-positive (MR(wt)) and -negative (MR(ko)) cells can be studied side-by-side in the same physiological context. Adult MR/X mice showed similar mRNA and protein levels of renal ion transport proteins to control mice. In MR/X mice, no differences in NCC abundance and phosphorylation was seen between MR(wt) and MR(ko) cells and dietary Na(+) restriction up-regulated NCC to similar extent in both groups of cells. In contrast, MR(ko) cells in the CS did not show any detectable alpha-ENaC abundance or apical targeting of ENaC neither on control diet nor in response to dietary Na(+) restriction. Furthermore, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase expression was unaffected in MR(ko) cells of the DCT, while it was lost in MR(ko) cells of the CS. In conclusion, MR is crucial for ENaC and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase regulation in the CS, but is dispensable for NCC and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase regulation in the DCT.

  16. WNK3-SPAK interaction is required for the modulation of NCC and other members of the SLC12 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Alvarez, Diana; Vázquez, Norma; Castañeda-Bueno, María; de-Los-Heros, Paola; Cortes-González, César; Moreno, Erika; Meade, Patricia; Bobadilla, Norma A; Gamba, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    The serine/threonine with no lysine kinase 3 (WNK3) modulates the activity of the electroneutral cation-coupled chloride cotransporters (CCC) to promote Cl(-) influx and prevent Cl(-) efflux, thus fitting the profile for a putative "Cl(-)-sensing kinase". The Ste20-type kinases, SPAK/OSR1, become phosphorylated in response to reduction in intracellular chloride concentration and regulate the activity of NKCC1. Several studies have now shown that WNKs function upstream of SPAK/OSR1. This study was designed to analyze the role of WNK3-SPAK interaction in the regulation of CCCs with particular emphasis on NCC. In this study we used the functional expression system of Xenopus laevis oocytes to show that different SPAK binding sites in WNK3 ((241, 872, 1336)RFxV) are required for the kinase to have effects on CCCs. WNK3-F1337A no longer activated NKCC2, but the effects on NCC, NKCC1, and KCC4 were preserved. In contrast, the effects of WNK3 on these cotransporters were prevented in WNK3-F242A. The elimination of F873 had no consequence on WNK3 effects. WNK3 promoted NCC phosphorylation at threonine 58, even in the absence of the unique SPAK binding site of NCC, but this effect was abolished in the mutant WNK3-F242A. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that the effects of WNK3 upon NCC and other CCCs require the interaction and activation of the SPAK kinase. The effect is dependent on one of the three binding sites for SPAK that are present in WNK3, but not on the SPAK binding sites on the CCCs, which suggests that WNK3 is capable of binding both SPAK and CCCs to promote their phosphorylation. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Adenylyl cyclase 6 enhances NKCC2 expression and mediates vasopressin-induced phosphorylation of NKCC2 and NCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieg, Timo; Tang, Tong; Uchida, Shinichi; Hammond, H Kirk; Fenton, Robert A; Vallon, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) affects kidney function via vasopressin V2 receptors that are linked to activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) and an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate formation. AVP/cyclic adenosine monophosphate enhance the phosphorylation of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) at serine residue 126 (pS126 NKCC2) and of the Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) at threonine 58 (pT58 NCC). The isoform(s) of AC involved in these responses, however, were unknown. Phosphorylation of S126 NKCC2 and T58 NCC, induced by the V2 receptor agonist (1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin) in wild-type mice, is lacking in knockout mice for AC isoform 6 (AC6). With regard to NKCC2 phosphorylation, the stimulatory effect of 1-desamino-8-D-AVP and the defect in AC6(-/-) mice seem to be restricted to the medullary portion of the thick ascending limb. AC6 is also a stimulator of total renal NKCC2 protein abundance in medullary and cortical thick ascending limb. Consequently, mice lacking AC6 have lower NKCC2 expression and a mild Bartter syndrome-like phenotype, including lower plasma concentrations of K+ and H+ and compensatory upregulation of NCC. Increased AC6-independent phosphorylation of NKCC2 at S126 might help to stabilize NKCC2 activity in the absence of AC6. Renal AC6 determines total NKCC2 expression and mediates vasopressin-induced NKCC2/NCC phosphorylation. These regulatory mechanisms, which are defective in AC knockout mice, are likely responsible for the observed mild Bartter syndrome. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Induction of Diverse Bioactive Secondary Metabolites from the Mangrove Endophytic Fungus Trichoderma sp. (Strain 307 by Co-Cultivation with Acinetobacter johnsonii (Strain B2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuhong Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Two new sesquiterpenes, microsphaeropsisin B (1 and C (2, and two new de-O-methyllasiodiplodins, (3R, 7R-7-hydroxy-de-O-methyllasiodiplodin (4 and (3R-5-oxo-de-O-methyllasiodiplodin (5, together with one new natural product (6 and twelve known compounds (3, 7–17, were isolated from the co-cultivation of mangrove endophytic fungus Trichoderma sp. 307 and aquatic pathogenic bacterium Acinetobacter johnsonii B2. Their structures, including absolute configurations, were elucidated by extensive analysis of spectroscopic data, electronic circular dichroism, Mo2(AcO4-induced circular dichroism, and comparison with reported data. All of the isolated compounds were tested for their α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and cytotoxicity. New compounds 4 and 5 exhibited potent α-glucosidase inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 25.8 and 54.6 µM, respectively, which were more potent than the positive control (acarbose, IC50 = 703.8 µM. The good results of the tested bioactivity allowed us to explore α-glucosidase inhibitors in lasiodiplodins.

  19. P2Y2 receptor activation inhibits the expression of the sodium-chloride cotransporter NCC in distal convoluted tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailly, P; Szutkowska, M; Olinger, E; Debaix, H; Seghers, F; Janas, S; Vallon, V; Devuyst, O

    2014-11-01

    Luminal nucleotide stimulation is known to reduce Na(+) transport in the distal nephron. Previous studies suggest that this mechanism may involve the thiazide-sensitive Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC), which plays an essential role in NaCl reabsorption in the cells lining the distal convoluted tubule (DCT). Here we show that stimulation of mouse DCT (mDCT) cells with ATP or UTP promoted Ca(2+) transients and decreased the expression of NCC at both mRNA and protein levels. Specific siRNA-mediated silencing of P2Y2 receptors almost completely abolished ATP/UTP-induced Ca(2+) transients and significantly reduced ATP/UTP-induced decrease of NCC expression. To test whether local variations in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) may control NCC transcription, we overexpressed the Ca(2+)-binding protein parvalbumin selectively in the cytosol or in the nucleus of mDCT cells. The decrease in NCC mRNA upon nucleotide stimulation was abolished in cells overexpressing cytosolic PV but not in cells overexpressing either a nuclear-targeted PV or a mutated PV unable to bind Ca(2+). Using a firefly luciferase reporter gene strategy, we observed that the activity of NCC promoter region from -1 to -2,200 bp was not regulated by changes in [Ca(2+)]i. In contrast, high cytosolic calcium level induced instability of NCC mRNA. We conclude that in mDCT cells: (1) P2Y2 receptor is essential for the intracellular Ca(2+) signaling induced by ATP/UTP stimulation; (2) P2Y2-mediated increase of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration down-regulates the expression of NCC; (3) the decrease of NCC expression occurs, at least in part, via destabilization of its mRNA.

  20. Activation of nonspecific cytotoxic cells (NCC) with synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides and bacterial genomic DNA: binding, specificity and identification of unique immunostimulatory motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumouna, M; Jaso-Friedmann, L; Evans, D L

    2002-04-01

    We have analyzed the effects of synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (sODNs) and bacterial DNA (bDNA) on the in vitro activation of NCC. Teleost NCC recognition of DNA appeared to differ from that which occurs in higher vertebrates. NCC contain at least two different receptor specificities for DNA. Both oligodeoxyguanosine 20-mers (dG20) and 5'-TGCTGCTTGTGCTTGTGCTT-3' (4GC-2T) bound specifically to NCC. The existence of different receptor specificities was indicated by reciprocal cold target inhibition experiments. dG20 competed with 4GC-2T binding but sODNs composed of GpC or CpG nests did not compete with recognition by NCC of the dG20. ODN binding by NCC primarily depended on the presence of GpC or CpG nests with a preference for -G- serving as the anchor nucleotide. Secondarily, and similar to models of ODN activation in mammals, palindrome sequences of pu-pu-CpG-py-py activated NCC cytotoxicity. Additional analysis of the requirements for ODN activation indicated that guanosine could not substitute for adenosine as a purine spacer and that CpG motifs containing flanking thymidine (i.e.-GTCpGTT-) augmented the activity of the sODN containing this flanking base. Other evidence for the participation of both G and C in the recognition of specific nucleotides by NCC was that poly-dC20, dA20 or dT20 had no activating properties. Methylation of all cytosine nucleotides within an ODN abrogated activation. A canonical ODN motif of 5'-C/AT/AGCTT-3' can now be suggested for teleosts. Additional studies were done to examine the effects of in vitro treatment of NCC with bDNA. bDNA from three different disease isolates of Streptococcus iniae activated NCC cytotoxicity. Treatment of the bDNA with DNase abrogated the enhancement of cytotoxicity. Also, treatment of NCC with eukaryotic DNA had no effects on cytotoxicity. These studies suggested that NCC recognize bacterial nonmethylated DNA. The consequences of these interactions may be increased innate and acquired anti

  1. Assessment of Microphysical Models in the National Combustion Code (NCC) for Aircraft Particulate Emissions: Particle Loss in Sampling Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Thomas; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2008-01-01

    This paper at first describes the fluid network approach recently implemented into the National Combustion Code (NCC) for the simulation of transport of aerosols (volatile particles and soot) in the particulate sampling systems. This network-based approach complements the other two approaches already in the NCC, namely, the lower-order temporal approach and the CFD-based approach. The accuracy and the computational costs of these three approaches are then investigated in terms of their application to the prediction of particle losses through sample transmission and distribution lines. Their predictive capabilities are assessed by comparing the computed results with the experimental data. The present work will help establish standard methodologies for measuring the size and concentration of particles in high-temperature, high-velocity jet engine exhaust. Furthermore, the present work also represents the first step of a long term effort of validating physics-based tools for the prediction of aircraft particulate emissions.

  2. 基于约氏不动杆菌的萘生物降解特性%Naphthalene biodegradation byAcinetobacter johnsonii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜岩; 张晓华; 杨颖; 张贤明

    2016-01-01

    萘是典型的多环芳烃,毒害大、难降解,既是重要的环境污染物,又是代表性的石油烃成分,成为各类油污染场地生物修复的难点。碍于其水溶性差而制约了相关研究。利用一株从废油中分离得到的兼具石油烃降解能力和润湿反转无机杂质能力的约氏不动杆菌开展了萘的生物降解特性研究。通过研究降解因素优化出基础的降解条件;在此基础上,在50~2000 mg·L−1范围内研究了该菌对萘的生物降解特性;并利用Monod模型和Haldane模型对比研究了该菌降解萘的动力学行为。结果表明,该菌在以2000 mg·L−1萘为唯一碳源的特定条件下,以5%的接种量可以在146 h左右实现萘的全降解;Haldane模型适合于描述菌株的生长和底物降解行为,而Monod模型只适合于描述低浓度下萘的生物降解特性。%Naphthalene, typical of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, is highly poisonous and hardly degradable. As the typical petroleum hydrocarbon composition, it is a severe environmental pollutant, and therefore there exists great difficulty in the bioremediation of oil-contaminated sites. Due to its poor water solubility, researches on naphthalene degradation are hindered seriously. In this paper, the strain ofAcinetobacter johnsonii isolated from waste oil is employed to study naphthalene biodegradation with the ability both to degrade petroleum hydrocarbon and to wet inorganic impurities. The reaction conditions are optimized based on the researches on degradation factors and the biodegradation characteristics of naphthalene are manifested in the range of 50 to 2000 mg·L−1. The dynamics behavior ofA. johnsonii is studied on the degradation of naphthalene through the comparison of the Monod model and the Haldane model. The results indicated that the strain could utilize naphthalene as sole carbon and energy source to metabolize and 2000 mg·L−1 naphthalene could be entirely

  3. A minor role of WNK3 in regulating phosphorylation of renal NKCC2 and NCC co-transporters in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, Katsuyuki; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Misawa, Moko; Chiga, Motoko; Alessi, Dario R; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2012-02-15

    Mutations in WNK1 and WNK4 kinase genes have been shown to cause a human hereditary hypertensive disease, pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII). We previously discovered that WNK kinases phosphorylate and activate OSR1/SPAK kinases that regulate renal SLC12A family transporters such as NKCC2 and NCC, and clarified that the constitutive activation of this cascade causes PHAII. WNK3, another member of the WNK kinase family, was reported to be a strong activator of NCC/NKCC2 when assayed in Xenopus oocytes, suggesting that WNK3 also plays a major role in regulating blood pressure and sodium reabsorption in the kidney. However, it remains to be determined whether WNK3 is in fact involved in the regulation of these transporters in vivo. To clarify this issue, we generated and analyzed WNK3 knockout mice. Surprisingly, phosphorylation and expression of OSR1, SPAK, NKCC2 and NCC did not decrease in knockout mouse kidney under normal and low-salt diets. Similarly, expression of epithelial Na channel and Na/H exchanger 3 were not affected in knockout mice. Na(+) and K(+) excretion in urine in WNK3 knockout mice was not affected under different salt diets. Blood pressure in WNK3 knockout mice was not lower under normal diet. However, lower blood pressure was observed in WNK3 knockout mice fed low-salt diet. WNK4 and WNK1 expression was slightly elevated in the knockout mice under low-salt diet, suggesting compensation for WNK3 knockout by these WNKs. Thus, WNK3 may have some role in the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC/NKCC2 signal cascade in the kidney, but its contribution to total WNK kinase activity may be minimal.

  4. Chronic candesartan alters expression and activity of NKCC2, NCC, and ENaC in the obese Zucker rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madala Halagappa, Veerendra K; Tiwari, Swasti; Riazi, Shahla; Hu, Xinqun; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M

    2008-05-01

    The obese Zucker rat reportedly has increased activity of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which conceptually could contribute to elevated salt sensitivity and blood pressure (BP). Our aim was to determine whether there was increased angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R)-mediated upregulation of expression or activity of the bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-2Cl cotransporter, the thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC), and/or the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in obese vs. lean Zucker rats. Male obese and lean Zucker rats (10-wk old) were fed either 1) control chow (1% NaCl) or 2) chow with candesartan (CAN), an AT(1)R antagonist (25 mg/kg.diet) for 14 wk (n = 8/treatment/body type). BP measured by radiotelemetry, was markedly reduced by CAN ( approximately 20-25 mmHg) in both lean and obese rats with no body-type differences. Obese rats had significantly greater net natriuretic response to single injections of hydrochlorothiazide and benzamil, suggesting increased activity of NCC and ENaC, respectively; however, only the response to benzamil was reduced by CAN. CAN led to a significant reduction in whole kidney levels of NCC and gamma-ENaC (70-kDa band) in both lean and obese rats. However, it significantly increased alpha-ENaC and Na-K-2Cl cotransporter levels, and these increases were greater in obese rats. These studies suggest that relatively increased ENaC, but not NCC activity, in obese rats is due to enhanced AT(1)R activity. CAN attenuated the reduction of several renal transporters in the obese rat kidney. Finally, differences in intrarenal AT(1)R activity do not seem directly responsible for BP differences between lean and obese rats.

  5. A minor role of WNK3 in regulating phosphorylation of renal NKCC2 and NCC co-transporters in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Oi

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in WNK1 and WNK4 kinase genes have been shown to cause a human hereditary hypertensive disease, pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII. We previously discovered that WNK kinases phosphorylate and activate OSR1/SPAK kinases that regulate renal SLC12A family transporters such as NKCC2 and NCC, and clarified that the constitutive activation of this cascade causes PHAII. WNK3, another member of the WNK kinase family, was reported to be a strong activator of NCC/NKCC2 when assayed in Xenopus oocytes, suggesting that WNK3 also plays a major role in regulating blood pressure and sodium reabsorption in the kidney. However, it remains to be determined whether WNK3 is in fact involved in the regulation of these transporters in vivo. To clarify this issue, we generated and analyzed WNK3 knockout mice. Surprisingly, phosphorylation and expression of OSR1, SPAK, NKCC2 and NCC did not decrease in knockout mouse kidney under normal and low-salt diets. Similarly, expression of epithelial Na channel and Na/H exchanger 3 were not affected in knockout mice. Na+ and K+ excretion in urine in WNK3 knockout mice was not affected under different salt diets. Blood pressure in WNK3 knockout mice was not lower under normal diet. However, lower blood pressure was observed in WNK3 knockout mice fed low-salt diet. WNK4 and WNK1 expression was slightly elevated in the knockout mice under low-salt diet, suggesting compensation for WNK3 knockout by these WNKs. Thus, WNK3 may have some role in the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC/NKCC2 signal cascade in the kidney, but its contribution to total WNK kinase activity may be minimal.

  6. Implementation of a Surface Runoff Model with Horton and Dunne Mechanisms into the Regional Climate Model RegCM_NCC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xueli; XIE Zhenghui; LIU Yiming; YANG Hongwei

    2007-01-01

    A surface runoff parameterization scheme that dynamically represents both Horton and Dunne runoff generation mechanisms within a model grid cell together with a consideration of the subgrid-scale soil heterogeneity, is implemented into the National Climate Center regional climate model (RegCM_NCC). The effects of the modified surface runoff scheme on RegCM_NCC performance are tested with an abnormal heavy rainfall process which occurred in summer 1998. Simulated results show that the model with the original surface runoff scheme (noted as CTL) basically captures the spatial pattern of precipitation, circulation and land surface variables, but generally overestimates rainfall compared to observations. The model with the new surface runoff scheme (noted as NRM) reasonably reproduces the distribution pattern of various variables and effectively diminishes the excessive precipitation in the CTL. The processes involved in the improvement of NRM-simulated rainfall may be as follows: with the new surface runoff scheme, simulated surface runoff is larger, soil moisture and evaporation (latent heat flux) are decreased, the available water into the atmosphere is decreased; correspondingly, the atmosphere is drier and rainfall is decreased through various processes. Therefore, the implementation of the new runoff scheme into the RegCM_NCC has a significant effect on results at not only the land surface, but also the overlying atmosphere.

  7. Oral health knowledge, attitude and practice among NCC Navy Cadets and their correlation with oral hygiene in south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhinav

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine oral health knowledge, attitude and practice among National Cadet Corps (NCC) Navy Cadets and their correlation with oral hygiene in South India. A questionnaire study was conducted among 412 high school students who were voluntary participants of an NCC unit in South India. Knowledge, attitude and practice scores were calculated, and then were correlated with Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S) values. Spearman's correlation test was used to measure the correlation. The significance value was set at P NCC Cadets' knowledge about gum diseases and the use of fluoride-containing dentifrice was found to be low, dental visits were infrequent and the consumption of sweets was found to be high. There was no correlation between knowledge and attitude scores with that of OHI-S, but a significant correlation was seen between practice and OHI-S scores. Most of the cadets did not have knowledge about the causes and the prevention of dental diseases. A significant number of participants sought further information, hence it can be said that the cadets had a positive attitude towards oral health. There was no correlation seen between knowledge and attitude scores with that of OHI-S measured, but a significant correlation was noted between practice and OHI-S scores.

  8. Functional and probiotic attributes of an indigenous isolate of Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai K Kaushik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Probiotic microorganisms favorably alter the intestinal microflora balance, promote intestinal integrity and mobility, inhibit the growth of harmful bacteria and increase resistance to infection. Probiotics are increasingly used in nutraceuticals, functional foods or in microbial interference treatment. However, the effectiveness of probiotic organism is considered to be population-specific due to variation in gut microflora, food habits and specific host-microbial interactions. Most of the probiotic strains available in the market are of western or European origin, and a strong need for exploring new indigenous probiotic organisms is felt. METHODS AND FINDINGS: An indigenous isolate Lp9 identified as Lactobacillus plantarum by molecular-typing methods was studied extensively for its functional and probiotic attributes, viz., acid and bile salt tolerance, cell surface hydrophobicity, autoaggregation and Caco-2 cell-binding as well as antibacterial and antioxidative activities. Lp9 isolate could survive 2 h incubation at pH 1.5-2.0 and toxicity of 1.5-2.0% oxgall bile. Lp9 could deconjugate major bile salts like glycocholate and deoxytaurocholate, indicating its potential to cause hypocholesterolemia. The isolate exhibited cell-surface hydrophobicity of approximately 37% and autoaggregation of approximately 31%. Presence of putative probiotic marker genes like mucus-binding protein (mub, fibronectin-binding protein (fbp and bile salt hydrolase (bsh were confirmed by PCR. Presence of these genes suggested the possibility of specific interaction and colonization potential of Lp9 isolate in the gut, which was also suggested by a good adhesion ratio of 7.4+/-1.3% with Caco-2 cell line. The isolate demonstrated higher free radical scavenging activity than standard probiotics L. johnsonii LA1 and L. acidophilus LA7. Lp9 also exhibited antibacterial activity against E. coli, L. monocytogenes, S. typhi, S. aureus and B. cereus. CONCLUSION

  9. Characterization of Rhamnosidases from Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekwilder, Jules; Marcozzi, Daniela; Vecchi, Samuele; de Vos, Ric; Janssen, Patrick; Francke, Christof; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Hall, Robert D

    2009-06-01

    Lactobacilli are known to use plant materials as a food source. Many such materials are rich in rhamnose-containing polyphenols, and thus it can be anticipated that lactobacilli will contain rhamnosidases. Therefore, genome sequences of food-grade lactobacilli were screened for putative rhamnosidases. In the genome of Lactobacillus plantarum, two putative rhamnosidase genes (ram1(Lp) and ram2(Lp)) were identified, while in Lactobacillus acidophilus, one rhamnosidase gene was found (ramA(La)). Gene products from all three genes were produced after introduction into Escherichia coli and were then tested for their enzymatic properties. Ram1(Lp), Ram2(Lp), and RamA(La) were able to efficiently hydrolyze rutin and other rutinosides, while RamA(La) was, in addition, able to cleave naringin, a neohesperidoside. Subsequently, the potential application of Lactobacillus rhamnosidases in food processing was investigated using a single matrix, tomato pulp. Recombinant Ram1(Lp) and RamA(La) enzymes were shown to remove the rhamnose from rutinosides in this material, but efficient conversion required adjustment of the tomato pulp to pH 6. The potential of Ram1(Lp) for fermentation of plant flavonoids was further investigated by expression in the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis. This system was used for fermentation of tomato pulp, with the aim of improving the bioavailability of flavonoids in processed tomato products. While import of flavonoids into L. lactis appeared to be a limiting factor, rhamnose removal was confirmed, indicating that rhamnosidase-producing bacteria may find commercial application, depending on the technological properties of the strains and enzymes.

  10. Proteogenomic analysis of NCC-S1M, a gastric cancer stem cell-like cell line that responds to anti-PD-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Won; Um, Hyejin; Yang, Hanna; Ko, Woori; Kim, Dae-Yong; Kim, Hark Kyun

    2017-03-11

    To elucidate signaling pathways that regulate gastric cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotypes and immune checkpoint, we performed a proteogenomic analysis of NCC-S1M, which is a gastric cancer cell line with CSC-like characteristics and is the only syngeneic gastric tumor cell line transplant model created in the scientific community. We found that the NCC-S1M allograft was responsive to anti-PD-1 treatment, and overexpressed Cd274 encoding PD-L1. PD-L1 was transcriptionally activated by loss of the TGF-β signaling. Il1rl1 protein was overexpressed in NCC-S1M cells compared with NCC-S1 cells that are less tumorigenic and less chemoresistant. Il1rl1 knockdown in NCC-S1M cells reduced tumorigenic potential and in vivo chemoresistance. Our proteogenomic analysis demonstrates a role of Smad4 loss in the PD-L1 immune evasion, as well as Il1rl1's role in CSC-like properties of NCC-S1M. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genome sequence of Lactobacillus farciminis KCTC 3681.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Seong-Hyeuk; Choi, Sang-Haeng; Kang, Aram; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Ryong Nam; Kim, Aeri; Kim, Dae-Soo; Park, Hong-Seog

    2011-04-01

    Lactobacillus farciminis is one of the most prevalent lactic acid bacterial species present during the manufacturing process of kimchi, the best-known traditional Korean dish. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the type strain Lactobacillus farciminis KCTC 3681 (2,498,309 bp, with a G+C content of 36.4%), which consists of 5 scaffolds.

  12. Exopolysaccharides production in Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Lactobacillus casei exploiting microfiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiraldi, C; Valli, V; Molinaro, A; Cartenì, M; De Rosa, M

    2006-05-01

    The physiology of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Lactobacillus casei, extensively used in the dairy industry, was studied in order to evaluate key parameters in the synthesis of exopolysaccharides and to improve their production through novel fermentation processes. Selected strains were studied in shake flasks and in fermentor experiments using glucose and lactose as main carbon sources and bacto casitone as the only complex component, in a temperature range between 35 and 42 degrees C. The production of exopolysaccharides was monitored and correlated to the growth conditions using both a colorimetric assay and chromatographic methods. Fermentor experiments in batch mode yielded 100 mg l(-1) of EPS from L. bulgaricus and 350 mg l(-1) from L. casei. Moreover, the use of a microfiltration (MF) bioreactor resulted in exopolysaccharides (EPS) concentrations threefold and sixfold those of batch experiments, respectively. The monosaccharidic composition of the two analyzed polymers differed from those previously reported. The optimization of the production of EPSs using the MF fermentation strategy could permit the use of these molecules produced by generally recognised as safe (GRAS) microorganisms in the place of other polysaccharides in the food industry.

  13. Expression of the sodium potassium chloride cotransporter (NKCC1) and sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and their effects on rat lens transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, K N; Vorontsova, I; Lim, J C; Kistler, J; Donaldson, P J

    2010-05-04

    To characterize the expression patterns of the Na+-K+-Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC) 1 and NKCC2, and the Na+-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) in the rat lens and to determine if they play a role in regulating lens volume and transparency. RT-PCR was performed on RNA extracted from fiber cells to identify sodium dependent cotransporters expressed in the rat lens. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, using NKCC1, NKCC2, and NCC antibodies, were used to verify expression at the protein level and to localize transporter expression. Organ cultured rat lenses were incubated in Artificial Aqueous Humor (AAH) of varying osmolarities or isotonic AAH that contained either the NKCC specific inhibitor bumetanide, or the NCC specific inhibitor thiazide for up to 18 h. Lens transparency was monitored with dark field microscopy, while tissue morphology and antibody labeling patterns were recorded using a confocal microscope. Molecular experiments showed that NKCC1 and NCC were expressed in the lens at both the transcript and protein levels, but NKCC2 was not. Immunohistochemistry showed that both NKCC1 and NCC were expressed in the lens cortex, but NCC expression was also found in the lens core. In the lens cortex the majority of labeling for both transporters was cytoplasmic in nature, while in the lens core, NCC labeling was associated with the membrane. Exposure of lenses to either hypotonic or hypertonic AAH had no noticeable effects on the predominantly cytoplasmic location of either transporter in the lens cortex. Incubation of lenses in isotonic AAH plus the NKCC inhibitor bumetanide for 18 h induced a cortical opacity that was initiated by a shrinkage of peripheral fiber cells and the dilation of the extracellular space between fiber cells in a deeper zone located some approximately 150 microm in from the capsule. In contrast, lenses incubated in isotonic AAH and the NCC inhibitor thiazide maintained both their transparency and their regular fiber cell morphology. We have

  14. Integrated compensatory network is activated in the absence of NCC phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, P Richard; Lazo-Fernandez, Yoskaly; Delpire, Eric; Wall, Susan M; Dorsey, Susan G; Weinman, Edward J; Coleman, Richard; Wade, James B; Welling, Paul A

    2015-05-01

    Thiazide diuretics are used to treat hypertension; however, compensatory processes in the kidney can limit antihypertensive responses to this class of drugs. Here, we evaluated compensatory pathways in SPAK kinase-deficient mice, which are unable to activate the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter NCC (encoded by Slc12a3). Global transcriptional profiling, combined with biochemical, cell biological, and physiological phenotyping, identified the gene expression signature of the response and revealed how it establishes an adaptive physiology. Salt reabsorption pathways were created by the coordinate induction of a multigene transport system, involving solute carriers (encoded by Slc26a4, Slc4a8, and Slc4a9), carbonic anhydrase isoforms, and V-type H⁺-ATPase subunits in pendrin-positive intercalated cells (PP-ICs) and ENaC subunits in principal cells (PCs). A distal nephron remodeling process and induction of jagged 1/NOTCH signaling, which expands the cortical connecting tubule with PCs and replaces acid-secreting α-ICs with PP-ICs, were partly responsible for the compensation. Salt reabsorption was also activated by induction of an α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) paracrine signaling system. Coordinate regulation of a multigene α-KG synthesis and transport pathway resulted in α-KG secretion into pro-urine, as the α-KG-activated GPCR (Oxgr1) increased on the PP-IC apical surface, allowing paracrine delivery of α-KG to stimulate salt transport. Identification of the integrated compensatory NaCl reabsorption mechanisms provides insight into thiazide diuretic efficacy.

  15. Pembuatan Minuman Probiotik dari Susu Kedelai dengan Inokulum Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, dan Lactobacillus acidophilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARI SUSILOWATI

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan mengkaji kualitas hasil pembuatan minuman probiotiksusu kedelai berupa: jumlah sel bakteri viabel, kadar asam laktat, pH, kadar protein, kadar lemak, viskositas, serta uji organoleptik dengan menggunakan inokulum Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum dan Lactobacillus acidophilus. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan (i minuman probiotik yang berisi L. casei konsentrasi 2% menghasilkan jumlah sel bakteri viabel (4,423×109 cfu/mL, asam laktat (1,53%, protein (5,359%, lemak (1,4675%, dan viskositas (92,833 mPa.s tertinggi serta pH (3,9367 terendah pada konsentrasi 2%. Minuman probiotik yang berisi L. acidophilus menghasilkan jumlah sel bakteri viabel (7,467×109 cfu/mL, asam laktat (1,32%, protein (4,367%, lemak (1,2555% tertinggi dan pH (3,6567 terendah pada konsentrasi 2%, sedangkan untuk ketiga konsentrasi (1%, 2%, 3% mempunyai viskositas sama yaitu berturut-turut (29,224 mPa.s; 34,741 mPa.s; 32,113 mPa.s; (ii minuman probiotik yang berisi L. plantarum menghasilkan jumlah sel bakteri viabel (3,040×109 cfu/mL, asam laktat (1,50%, protein (4,775%, lemak (0,4285% lebih tinggi serta pH (3,4967 lebih rendah pada konsentrasi 3%, sedangkan nilai viskositas sama untuk ketiga konsentrasi yaitu (65,790 mPa.s; 67,155 mPa.s; 68,300 mPa.s, (iii uji organoleptik keasaman, rasa dan bau menunjukkan bahwa penerimaan panelis/ tingkat kesukaan terhadap minuman probiotik yang dihasilkan dalam skala biasa.

  16. Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc volatilomes in cheese conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogačić, Tomislav; Maillard, Marie-Bernadette; Leclerc, Aurélie; Hervé, Christophe; Chuat, Victoria; Valence, Florence; Thierry, Anne

    2016-03-01

    New strains are desirable to diversify flavour of fermented dairy products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. in the production of aroma compounds by metabolic fingerprints of volatiles. Eighteen strains, including five Lactobacillus species (Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus sakei) and three Leuconostoc species (Leuconostoc citreum, Leuconostoc lactis, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides) were incubated for 5 weeks in a curd-based slurry medium under conditions mimicking cheese ripening. Populations were enumerated and volatile compounds were analysed by headspace trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A metabolomics approach followed by multivariate statistical analysis was applied for data processing and analysis. In total, 12 alcohols, 10 aldehydes, 7 esters, 11 ketones, 5 acids and 2 sulphur compounds were identified. Very large differences in concentration of volatile compounds between the highest producing strains and the control medium were observed in particular for diacetyl, 2-butanol, ethyl acetate, 3-methylbutanol, 3-methylbutanoic acid and 2-methylbutanoic acid. Some of the characterized strains demonstrated an interesting aromatizing potential to be used as adjunct culture.

  17. Thiazide-sensitive Na+ -Cl- cotransporter (NCC) gene inactivation results in increased duodenal Ca2+ absorption, enhanced osteoblast differentiation and elevated bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Juei; Yang, Sung-Sen; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Liu, Shu-Ting; Huang, Shih-Ming; Chau, Tom; Chu, Pauling; Salter, Donald M; Lee, Herng-Sheng; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) due to genetic mutations in Gitelman's syndrome (GS) or pharmacological inhibition with thiazide diuretics causes hypocalciuria and increased bone mineral density (BMD) with unclear extrarenal calcium (Ca(2+) ) regulation. We investigated intestinal Ca(2+) absorption and bone Ca(2+) metabolism in nonsense Ncc Ser707X (S707X) homozygous knockin mice (Ncc(S707X/S707X) mice). Compared to wild-type and heterozygous knockin littermates, Ncc(S707X/S707X) mice had increased intestinal absorption of (45) Ca(2+) and expression of the active Ca(2+) transport machinery (transient receptor potential vanilloid 6, calbindin-D9K , and plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase isoform 1b). Ncc(S707X/S707X) mice had also significantly increased Ca(2+) content accompanied by greater mineral apposition rate (MAR) in their femurs and higher trabecular bone volume, cortical bone thickness, and BMD determined by μCT. Their osteoblast differentiation markers, such as bone alkaline phosphatase, procollagen I, osteocalcin, and osterix, were also significantly increased while osteoclast activity was unaffected. Analysis of marrow-derived bone cells, either treated with thiazide or directly cultured from Ncc S707X knockin mice, showed that the differentiation of osteoblasts was associated with increased phosphorylation of mechanical stress-induced focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In conclusion, NCC inhibition stimulates duodenal Ca(2+) absorption as well as osteoblast differentiation and bone Ca(2+) storage, possibly through a FAK/ERK dependent mechanism. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  18. Treatment of textile dyeing wastewater by biomass of Lactobacillus: Lactobacillus 12 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayilgan, Emine; Cakmakci, Ozgur

    2013-03-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of Lactobacillus 12 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus as both cells and biomasses for the removal of dye from real textile dyeing wastewater. The removal experiments were conducted according to the Box-Behnken experimental design, and the regression equations for the removal of dye were determined by the Minitab 14 program. The optimum variables were found to be 10 g/L biomass concentration for biomasses, 3 for initial pH of the solution, and 20 °C for temperature with an observed dye removal efficiency of about 60 and 80 % with L. 12 and L. rhamnosus biomasses, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy images also showed that the biomass characteristics studied were favored by the sorption of the dye from the textile industry wastewater. Consequently, these biomasses may be considered as good biosorbents due to their effective yields and the lower cost of the removal of dyes from the effluents of the textile dyeing house.

  19. NCC-AUC: an AUC optimization method to identify multi-biomarker panel for cancer prognosis from genomic and clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Meng; Liu, Zhaoqi; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Wang, Yong

    2015-10-15

    In prognosis and survival studies, an important goal is to identify multi-biomarker panels with predictive power using molecular characteristics or clinical observations. Such analysis is often challenged by censored, small-sample-size, but high-dimensional genomic profiles or clinical data. Therefore, sophisticated models and algorithms are in pressing need. In this study, we propose a novel Area Under Curve (AUC) optimization method for multi-biomarker panel identification named Nearest Centroid Classifier for AUC optimization (NCC-AUC). Our method is motived by the connection between AUC score for classification accuracy evaluation and Harrell's concordance index in survival analysis. This connection allows us to convert the survival time regression problem to a binary classification problem. Then an optimization model is formulated to directly maximize AUC and meanwhile minimize the number of selected features to construct a predictor in the nearest centroid classifier framework. NCC-AUC shows its great performance by validating both in genomic data of breast cancer and clinical data of stage IB Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). For the genomic data, NCC-AUC outperforms Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Support Vector Machine-based Recursive Feature Elimination (SVM-RFE) in classification accuracy. It tends to select a multi-biomarker panel with low average redundancy and enriched biological meanings. Also NCC-AUC is more significant in separation of low and high risk cohorts than widely used Cox model (Cox proportional-hazards regression model) and L1-Cox model (L1 penalized in Cox model). These performance gains of NCC-AUC are quite robust across 5 subtypes of breast cancer. Further in an independent clinical data, NCC-AUC outperforms SVM and SVM-RFE in predictive accuracy and is consistently better than Cox model and L1-Cox model in grouping patients into high and low risk categories. In summary, NCC-AUC provides a rigorous optimization framework to

  20. Eruca sativa Might Influence the Growth, Survival under Simulated Gastrointestinal Conditions and Some Biological Features of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Florinda Fratianni; Selenia Pepe; Federica Cardinale; Tiziana Granese; Autilia Cozzolino; Raffaele Coppola; Filomena Nazzaro

    2014-01-01

    The growth and viability of three Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, after their passage through simulated gastric and pancreatic juices were studied as a function of their presence in the growth medium of rocket salad (Eruca sativa). The presence of E. sativa affected some of the biological properties of the strains. For example, L. acidophilus and L. plantarum worked more efficiently in the presence of E. sativa, increasing...

  1. Increased renal alpha-ENaC and NCC abundance and elevated blood pressure are independent of hyperaldosteronism in vasopressin escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Swasti; Packer, Randall K; Hu, Xinqun; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Verbalis, Joseph G; Ecelbarger, Carolyn A

    2006-07-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that rats undergoing vasopressin escape had increased mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), plasma and urine aldosterone, and increased renal protein abundance of the alpha-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), the thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC), and the 70-kDa band of gamma-ENaC (Song J, Hu X, Khan O, Tian Y, Verbalis JG, and Ecelbarger CA. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 287: F1076-F1083, 2004; Ecelbarger CA, Knepper MA, and Verbalis JG. J Am Soc Nephrol 12: 207-217, 2001). Here, we determine whether changes in these renal proteins and MAP require elevated aldosterone levels. We performed adrenalectomies (ADX) or sham surgeries on male Sprague-Dawley rats. Corticosterone and aldosterone were replaced to clamp these hormone levels. MAP was monitored by radiotelemetry. Rats were infused with 1-deamino-[8-D-arginine]-vasopressin (dDAVP) via osmotic minipumps (5 ng/h). At day 3 of dDAVP infusion, seven rats in each group were offered a liquid diet [water load (WL)] or continued on a solid diet (SD). Plasma aldosterone and corticosterone and urine aldosterone were increased by WL in sham rats. ADX-WL rats escaped, as assessed by early natriuresis followed by diuresis; however, urine volume and natriuresis were somewhat blunted. WL did not reduce the abundance or activity of 11-beta-hydroxsteroid dehydrogenase type 2. Furthermore, the previously observed increase in renal aldosterone-sensitive proteins and escape-associated increased MAP persisted in clamped rats. The densitometry of immunoblots for NCC, alpha- and gamma-70 kDa ENaC, respectively, were (% sham-SD): sham-WL, 159, 278, 233; ADX-SD, 69, 212, 171; ADX-WL, 116, 302, 161. However, clamping corticosteroids blunted the rise at least for NCC and gamma-ENaC (70 kDa). Overall, the increase in aldosterone observed in vasopressin escape is not necessary for the increased expression of NCC, alpha- or gamma-ENaC or increased MAP associated with "escape."

  2. Generation and analysis of the thiazide-sensitive Na+ -Cl- cotransporter (Ncc/Slc12a3) Ser707X knockin mouse as a model of Gitelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sung-Sen; Lo, Yi-Fen; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Shu-Wha; Chang, Tai-Hsiang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Chao, Tai-Kuang; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Uchida, Shinichi; Sasaki, Sei; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2010-12-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS) is characterized by salt-losing hypotension, hypomagnesemia, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypocalciuria. To better model human GS caused by a specific mutation in the thiazide-sensitive Na(+) -Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) gene SLC12A3, we generated a nonsense Ncc Ser707X knockin mouse corresponding to human p.Ser710X (c.2135C>A), a recurrent mutation with severe phenotypes in Chinese GS patients. Compared with wild-type or heterozygous littermates, homozygous (Hom) knockin mice fully recapitulated the phenotype of human GS. The markedly reduced Ncc mRNA and virtually absent Ncc protein expression in kidneys of Hom mice was primarily due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) surveillance mechanisms. Expression of epithelial Na(+) channel (Enac), Ca(2+) channels (Trpv5 and Trpv6), and K(+) channels (Romk1 and maxi-K) were significantly increased. Late distal convoluted tubules (DCT) volume was increased and DCT cell ultrastructure appeared intact. High K(+) intake could not correct hypokalemia but caused a further increase in maxi-K but not Romk1 expression. Renal tissue from a patient with GS also showed the enhanced TRPV5 and ROMK1 expression in distal tubules. We suggest that the upregulation of TRPV5/6 and of ROMK1 and Maxi-K may contribute to hypocalciuria and hypokalemia in Ncc Ser707X knockin mice and human GS, respectively. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Comparing Spray Characteristics from Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) National Combustion Code (NCC) Calculations Against Experimental Data for a Turbulent Reacting Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, Anthony C.; Moder, Jeffery P.

    2010-01-01

    Developing physics-based tools to aid in reducing harmful combustion emissions, like Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Unburnt Hydrocarbons (UHC s), and Sulfur Dioxides (SOx), is an important goal of aeronautics research at NASA. As part of that effort, NASA Glenn Research Center is performing a detailed assessment and validation of an in-house combustion CFD code known as the National Combustion Code (NCC) for turbulent reacting flows. To assess the current capabilities of NCC for simulating turbulent reacting flows with liquid jet fuel injection, a set of Single Swirler Lean Direct Injection (LDI) experiments performed at the University of Cincinnati was chosen as an initial validation data set. This Jet-A/air combustion experiment operates at a lean equivalence ratio of 0.75 at atmospheric pressure and has a 4 percent static pressure drop across the swirler. Detailed comparisons of NCC predictions for gas temperature and gaseous emissions (CO and NOx) against this experiment are considered in a previous work. The current paper is focused on detailed comparisons of the spray characteristics (radial profiles of drop size distribution and at several radial rakes) from NCC simulations against the experimental data. Comparisons against experimental data show that the use of the correlation for primary spray break-up implemented by Raju in the NCC produces most realistic results, but this result needs to be improved. Given the single or ten step chemical kinetics models, use of a spray size correlation gives similar, acceptable results

  4. Numerical Study of Outlet Boundary Conditions for Unsteady Turbulent Internal Flows Using the NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of studies on the outlet boundary conditions for turbulent internal flow simulations. Several outlet boundary conditions have been investigated by applying the National Combustion Code (NCC) to the configuration of a LM6000 single injector flame tube. First of all, very large eddy simulations (VLES) have been performed using the partially resolved numerical simulation (PRNS) approach, in which both the nonlinear and linear dynamic subscale models were employed. Secondly, unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier- Stokes (URANS) simulations have also been performed for the same configuration to investigate the effects of different outlet boundary conditions in the context of URANS. Thirdly, the possible role of the initial condition is inspected by using three different initial flow fields for both the PRNS/VLES simulation and the URANS simulation. The same grid is used for all the simulations and the number of mesh element is about 0.5 million. The main purpose of this study is to examine the long-time behavior of the solution as determined by the imposed outlet boundary conditions. For a particular simulation to be considered as successful under the given initial and boundary conditions, the solution must be sustainable in a physically meaningful manner over a sufficiently long period of time. The commonly used outlet boundary condition for steady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation is a fixed pressure at the outlet with all the other dependent variables being extrapolated from the interior. The results of the present study suggest that this is also workable for the URANS simulation of the LM6000 injector flame tube. However, it does not work for the PRNS/VLES simulation due to the unphysical reflections of the pressure disturbances at the outlet boundary. This undesirable situation can be practically alleviated by applying a simple unsteady convection equation for the pressure disturbances at the outlet boundary. The

  5. Study of Lactobacillus as Probiotic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    J Nowroozi; M Mirzaii; M. Norouzi

    2004-01-01

    Because of inhibitory effect, selected probiotic lactobacilli may be used as biological preservative, so, the aim of this study was to present some data on lactobacillus as probiotic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from sausage. Each isolate of lactobacillus species was identified by biochemical tests and comparing their sugar fermentation pattern. Antibacterial activities were done by an agar spot, well diffusion and blank disk method. Enzyme sensitivity of supernatant fluid and...

  6. An Exopolysaccharide-Deficient Mutant of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Efficiently Displays a Protective Llama Antibody Fragment against Rotavirus on Its Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Beatriz; Krogh-Andersen, Kasper; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Martínez, Noelia; Günaydın, Gökçe; Lin, Yin; Martín, M Cruz; Álvarez, Miguel A; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2015-09-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries, where it causes a high number of deaths among infants. Two vaccines are available, being highly effective in developed countries although markedly less efficient in developing countries. As a complementary treatment to the vaccines, a Lactobacillus strain producing an anti-rotavirus antibody fragment in the gastrointestinal tract could potentially be used. In order to develop such an alternative therapy, the effectiveness of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG to produce and display a VHH antibody fragment (referred to as anti-rotavirus protein 1 [ARP1]) on the surface was investigated. L. rhamnosus GG is one of the best-characterized probiotic bacteria and has intrinsic antirotavirus activity. Among four L. rhamnosus GG strains [GG (CMC), GG (ATCC 53103), GG (NCC 3003), and GG (UT)] originating from different sources, only GG (UT) was able to display ARP1 on the bacterial surface. The genomic analysis of strain GG (UT) showed that the genes welE and welF of the EPS cluster are inactivated, which causes a defect in exopolysaccharide (EPS) production, allowing efficient display of ARP1 on its surface. Finally, GG (UT) seemed to confer a level of protection against rotavirus-induced diarrhea similar to that of wild-type GG (NCC 3003) in a mouse pup model, indicating that the EPS may not be involved in the intrinsic antirotavirus activity. Most important, GG (EM233), a derivative of GG (UT) producing ARP1, was significantly more protective than the control strain L. casei BL23. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Functional proteomics within the genus Lactobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Maria; Calasso, Maria; Cavallo, Noemi; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Lactobacillus are mainly used for the manufacture of fermented dairy, sourdough, meat, and vegetable foods or used as probiotics. Under optimal processing conditions, Lactobacillus strains contribute to food functionality through their enzyme portfolio and the release of metabolites. An extensive genomic diversity analysis was conducted to elucidate the core features of the genus Lactobacillus, and to provide a better comprehension of niche adaptation of the strains. However, proteomics is an indispensable "omics" science to elucidate the proteome diversity, and the mechanisms of regulation and adaptation of Lactobacillus strains. This review focuses on the novel and comprehensive knowledge of functional proteomics and metaproteomics of Lactobacillus species. A large list of proteomic case studies of different Lactobacillus species is provided to illustrate the adaptability of the main metabolic pathways (e.g., carbohydrate transport and metabolism, pyruvate metabolism, proteolytic system, amino acid metabolism, and protein synthesis) to various life conditions. These investigations have highlighted that lactobacilli modulate the level of a complex panel of proteins to growth/survive in different ecological niches. In addition to the general regulation and stress response, specific metabolic pathways can be switched on and off, modifying the behavior of the strains.

  8. Genotypic diversity of stress response in Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paraplantarum and Lactobacillus pentosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Annamaria; Parente, Eugenio; Guidone, Angela; Ianniello, Rocco Gerardo; Zotta, Teresa; Abu Sayem, S M; Varcamonti, Mario

    2012-07-02

    Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus paraplantarum are three closely related species which are widespread in food and non-food environments, and are important as starter bacteria or probiotics. In order to evaluate the phenotypic diversity of stress tolerance in the L. plantarum group and the ability to mount an adaptive heat shock response, the survival of exponential and stationary phase and of heat adapted exponential phase cells of six L. plantarum subsp. plantarum, one L. plantarum subsp. argentoratensis, one L. pentosus and two L. paraplantarum strains selected in a previous work upon exposure to oxidative, heat, detergent, starvation and acid stresses was compared to that of the L. plantarum WCFS1 strain. Furthermore, to evaluate the genotypic diversity in stress response genes, ten genes (encoding for chaperones DnaK, GroES and GroEL, regulators CtsR, HrcA and CcpA, ATPases/proteases ClpL, ClpP, ClpX and protease FtsH) were amplified using primers derived from the WCFS1 genome sequence and submitted to restriction with one or two endonucleases. The results were compared by univariate and multivariate statistical methods. In addition, the amplicons for hrcA and ctsR were sequenced and compared by multiple sequence alignment and polymorphism analysis. Although there was evidence of a generalized stress response in the stationary phase, with increase of oxidative, heat, and, to a lesser extent, starvation stress tolerance, and for adaptive heat stress response, with increased tolerance to heat, acid and detergent, different growth phases and adaptation patterns were found. Principal component analysis showed that while heat, acid and detergent stresses respond similarly to growth phase and adaptation, tolerance to oxidative and starvation stresses implies completely unrelated mechanisms. A dendrogram obtained using the data from multilocus restriction typing (MLRT) of stress response genes clearly separated two groups of L

  9. Expression of Bacillus subtilis levanase gene in Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus casei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanker, E.; Leer, R.J.; Pouwels, P.H.; Schwab, H.

    1995-01-01

    Two Lactobacillus-Escherichia coli shuttle vectors, harbouring the levanase gene from Bacillus subtilis under the control of its own promoter (pLPEW1) or behind the E. coli tac promoter (pE-SIEW2), were constructed. Lactobacillus plantarum showed the same growth characteristics on selective plates

  10. Functional expression in Lactobacillus plantarum of xylP encoding the isoprimeverose transporter of Lactobacillus pentosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaillou, S.; Postma, P.W.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    The xylP gene of Lactobacillus pentosus, the first gene of the xylPQR operon, was recently found to be involved in isoprimeverose metabolism. By expression of xylP on a multicopy plasmid in Lactobacillus plantarum 80, a strain which lacks active isoprimeverose and D-xylose transport activities, it

  11. Functional expression in Lactobacillus plantarum of xylP encoding the isoprimeverose transporter of Lactobacillus pentosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaillou, S.; Postma, P.W.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    The xylP gene of Lactobacillus pentosus, the first gene of the xylPQR operon, was recently found to be involved in isoprimeverose metabolism. By expression of xylP on a multicopy plasmid in Lactobacillus plantarum 80, a strain which lacks active isoprimeverose and D-xylose transport activities, it w

  12. Safety assessment of two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus coryniformis CECT5711 and Lactobacillus Gasseri CECT5714

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lara-Villoslada, F.; Sierra, S.; Martin, R.; Delgado, S.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Olivares, M.; Xaus, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: The object of the present study was to evaluate the oral toxicity of the recently isolated probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus coryniformis CECT5711 and Lactobacillus gasseri CECT5714. Methods and Results: Enzymatic activity and antibiotic resistance profile were evaluated in vitro. Then, the ora

  13. Safety assessment of two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus coryniformis CECT5711 and Lactobacillus Gasseri CECT5714

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lara-Villoslada, F.; Sierra, S.; Martin, R.; Delgado, S.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Olivares, M.; Xaus, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: The object of the present study was to evaluate the oral toxicity of the recently isolated probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus coryniformis CECT5711 and Lactobacillus gasseri CECT5714. Methods and Results: Enzymatic activity and antibiotic resistance profile were evaluated in vitro. Then, the ora

  14. Expression of Bacillus subtilis levanase gene in Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus casei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanker, E.; Leer, R.J.; Pouwels, P.H.; Schwab, H.

    1995-01-01

    Two Lactobacillus-Escherichia coli shuttle vectors, harbouring the levanase gene from Bacillus subtilis under the control of its own promoter (pLPEW1) or behind the E. coli tac promoter (pE-SIEW2), were constructed. Lactobacillus plantarum showed the same growth characteristics on selective plates a

  15. Geochemistry of khondalites from the central portion of North China craton (NCC):implications for the continental cratonization in the Neoarchean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李江海; 钱祥麟; 刘树文

    2000-01-01

    Within the high-grade metamorphic basement, the central portion of North China Craton (NCC), a group of Neoarchean khondalites (KS) is identified. They are characterized by large ion lithophile elements (LILE) enrichment, lower abundances of Zr, Hf and Sr. Their rare earth element (REE) distribution has significant LREE enrichment and negative Eu anomalies. The protoliths of KS are interpreted as feldspathic quartzite, shale or petite and carbonite, deposited in a shallow sea upon cratonic shelf distant from the land. KS’s source region might be dominated by granitic rocks, with a minor amount of TTG, underwent comparatively severe chemical weathering. Considering relevent tectonic constraints, we suggest that khondalites from central portion of NCC, an important metamophosed sedimentary cover, are the most significant exogenetic marker of Neoarchean continental cratonization for NCC.

  16. Lactobacillus for Vaginal Microflora Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saule Saduakhasova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Despite the significant progress made in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, there is still a high rate of vaginal dysbiosis in Kazakh women. The use of antibiotics in the treatment of vaginal dysbiosis contributes to the elimination of pathogens as well as microflora, which can lead to a decrease in local immunity and more favorable conditions for infection spread. The most physiologically safe and promising method for the restoration of vaginal biocenosis is the use of probiotics administered by a vaginal route.Methods. We have allocated 64 of cultures of Lactobacillus from the vaginal epithelium of healthy women of reproductive age and women with diagnosed bacterial vaginosis (BV. Identification of cultures was performed by PCR analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA.  Evaluation of biological significance was determined by the following criteria: high antagonistic activity against Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella ozaenae, and Staphylococcus aureus; and production of hydrogen peroxide, resistance to antibiotics, adhesive activity. We studied the symbiotic relationship of selected biologically active of cultures to each other and received options for consortiums with  properties of  probiotics through co-cultivation.Results. Results of genotyping  showed that the isolated lactobacilli belong to the seven species: L. fermentum, L. salivarius, L. gasseri, L. crispatus, L. jensenii, L. plantarum, and L. delbrueskii. L. fermentum, L. salivarius, L. gasseri, and L. jensenii occur in women with suspected BV. The highest percentage of occurrence in the vagina of healthy women was L. fermentum (28%. Most strains of lactobacilli possess high inhibitory activity for all test-strains, except Candida albicans (37.5%. 56% of studied cultures revealed high adhesion to human erythrocytes. All lactobacillus strains were resistant to metronidazole, 80% to kanamycin, 57%  to vancomycin, and

  17. Strain-specific probiotics properties of Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus brevis isolates from Brazilian food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos, Cintia Lacerda; Thorsen, Line; Schwan, Rosane Freitas;

    2013-01-01

    fermentum (34 isolates), Lactobacillus plantarum (10) and Lactobacillus brevis (7). Based on being either highly tolerant to bile, showing an ability for auto-aggregation and/or hydrophobic properties, one L. fermentum (CH58), three L. plantarum (CH3, CH41 and SAU96) and two L. brevis (SAU105 and FFC199......A total of 234 LAB isolates from Brazilian food products were initially screened for their ability to survive at pH 2.0. Fifty one of the isolates survived and were selected. They were characterized by phenotypic methods, rep-PCR and identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Lactobacillus......) were selected. The highest co-aggregation ability with Escherichia coil was observed to L. plantarum CH41. L. brevis SAU105 and FFC199 and L. fermentum CH58 exhibited antagonistic activity towards the pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. L. plantarum CH3 and CH41 and L. brevis...

  18. Physicochemical and biochemical characterization of biosurfactants released by Lactobacillus strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velraeds, MMC; vanderMei, HC; Reid, G; Busscher, HJ

    1996-01-01

    Biosurfactants from Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus 36 and ATCC 7469, Lactobacillus fermentum B54 and Lactobacillus acidophilus RC14 were isolated from bacteria in their mid-exponential (4-5 h) and stationary growth phases (18 h) and physicochemical and biochemical properties of the freeze-drie

  19. Lactobacillus heilongjiangensis sp. nov., isolated from Chinese pickle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chun Tao; Li, Chun Yan; Yang, Li Jie; Huo, Gui Cheng

    2013-11-01

    A Gram-stain-positive bacterial strain, S4-3(T), was isolated from traditional pickle in Heilongjiang Province, China. The bacterium was characterized by a polyphasic approach, including 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, pheS gene sequence analysis, rpoA gene sequence analysis, dnaK gene sequence analysis, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis, determination of DNA G+C content, DNA-DNA hybridization and an analysis of phenotypic features. Strain S4-3(T) showed 97.9-98.7 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, 84.4-94.1 % pheS gene sequence similarities and 94.4-96.9 % rpoA gene sequence similarities to the type strains of Lactobacillus nantensis, Lactobacillus mindensis, Lactobacillus crustorum, Lactobacillus futsaii, Lactobacillus farciminis and Lactobacillus kimchiensis. dnaK gene sequence similarities between S4-3(T) and Lactobacillus nantensis LMG 23510(T), Lactobacillus mindensis LMG 21932(T), Lactobacillus crustorum LMG 23699(T), Lactobacillus futsaii JCM 17355(T) and Lactobacillus farciminis LMG 9200(T) were 95.4, 91.5, 90.4, 91.7 and 93.1 %, respectively. Based upon the data obtained in the present study, a novel species, Lactobacillus heilongjiangensis sp. nov., is proposed and the type strain is S4-3(T) ( = LMG 26166(T) = NCIMB 14701(T)).

  20. Lactobacillus helveticus: the proteolytic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansel W Griffiths

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus helveticus is one of the species of lactic acid bacteria most commonly used in the production of fermented milk beverages and some types of hard cheese. The versatile nature of this bacterium is based on its highly efficient proteolytic system consisting of cell-envelope proteinases, transport system and intracellular peptidases. Besides the traditional use of L. helveticus in the manufacture of hard cheeses, the production of fermented milk preparations with health promoting properties has become an important industrial application. Studies have shown that fermented dairy products are able to decrease blood pressure, stimulate the immune system, promote calcium absorption, and exert an anti-virulent effect against pathogens. These beneficial effects are produced by a variety of peptides released during the hydrolysis of milk proteins by the proteolytic system of L. helveticus, which provides the bacterium with its nutritional requirements for growth. In recent years, studies have focused on understanding the factors that affect the kinetics of milk protein hydrolysis by specific strains and have concentrated on the effect of pH, temperature, growth phase, and matrix composition on the bacterial enzymatic system. This review focuses on the role of the proteolytic system of L. helveticus in the production of bioactive compounds formed during fermentation of dairy products. Taking advantage of the powerful proteolytic system of this bacterium opens up future opportunities to search for novel food-derived compounds with potential health promoting properties

  1. Lactobacillus herbarum sp. nov., a species related to Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuejian; Chen, Meng; Horvath, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Strain TCF032-E4 was isolated from a traditional Chinese fermented radish. It shares >99% 16S rRNA sequence identity with L. plantarum, L. pentosus and L. paraplantarum. This strain can ferment ribose, galactose, glucose, fructose, mannose, mannitol, N-acetylglucosamine, amygdalin, arbutin, salicin, cellobiose, maltose, lactose, melibiose, trehalose and gentiobiose. It cannot ferment sucrose, which can be used by L. pentosus, L. paraplantarum, L. fabifermentans, L. xiangfangensis and L. mudanjiangensis, as well as most of the L. plantarum strains (88.7%). TCF032-E4 cannot grow at temperature above 32 °C. This strain shares 78.2-83.6% pheS (phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase alpha subunit) and 89.5-94.9% rpoA (RNA polymerase alpha subunit) sequence identity with L. plantarum, L. pentosus, L. paraplantarum, L. fabifermentans, L. xiangfangensis and L. mudanjiangensis. These results indicate that TCF032-E4 represents a distinct species. This hypothesis was further confirmed by whole-genome sequencing and comparison with available genomes of related species. The draft genome size of TCF032-E4 is approximately 2.9 Mb, with a DNA G+C content of 43.5 mol%. The average nucleotide identity (ANI) between TCF032-E4 and related species ranges from 79.0 to 81.1%, the highest ANI value being observed with L. plantarum subsp. plantarum ATCC 14917T. A novel species, Lactobacillus herbarum sp. nov., is proposed with TCF032-E4T ( = CCTCC AB2015090T = DSM 100358T) as the type strain.

  2. Identification of Lactobacillus species isolated from traditional cheeses of west Azerbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ehsani

    2014-06-01

    Results: In present study, from a total of 118 isolates of lactobacilli were determined. Lactobacillus plantarum (24%, Lactobacillus casei (20% and Lactobacillus agillis (18% from facultative heterofermentative Lactobacilli and Lactobacillus delbrueckii (21%, Lactobacillus helveticus (14% and Lactobacillus salvariu s (3% from obligative homofermentative Lactobacilli were found to be more dominant species.Conclusions: So for achievement to organoleptic characteristics of traditional cheeses in industrial productions, mixed starters including dominant Lactobacillus species identified in cheeses can be employed.

  3. CD8(+) T cells stimulate Na-Cl co-transporter NCC in distal convoluted tubules leading to salt-sensitive hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunmeng; Rafferty, Tonya M; Rhee, Sung W; Webber, Jessica S; Song, Li; Ko, Benjamin; Hoover, Robert S; He, Beixiang; Mu, Shengyu

    2017-01-09

    Recent studies suggest a role for T lymphocytes in hypertension. However, whether T cells contribute to renal sodium retention and salt-sensitive hypertension is unknown. Here we demonstrate that T cells infiltrate into the kidney of salt-sensitive hypertensive animals. In particular, CD8(+) T cells directly contact the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) in the kidneys of DOCA-salt mice and CD8(+) T cell-injected mice, leading to up-regulation of the Na-Cl co-transporter NCC, p-NCC and the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. Co-culture with CD8(+) T cells upregulates NCC in mouse DCT cells via ROS-induced activation of Src kinase, up-regulation of the K(+) channel Kir4.1, and stimulation of the Cl(-) channel ClC-K. The last event increases chloride efflux, leading to compensatory chloride influx via NCC activation at the cost of increasing sodium retention. Collectively, these findings provide a mechanism for adaptive immunity involvement in the kidney defect in sodium handling and the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension.

  4. Addition by subtraction in coupled-cluster theory: a reconsideration of the CC and CI interface and the nCC hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Rodney J; Musiał, Monika

    2006-11-28

    The nCC hierarchy of coupled-cluster approximations, where n guarantees exactness for n electrons and all products of n electrons are derived and applied to several illustrative problems. The condition of exactness for n=2 defines nCCSD=2CC, with nCCSDT=3CC and nCCSDTQ=4CC being exact for three and four electrons. To achieve this, the minimum number of diagrams is evaluated, which is less than in the corresponding CC model. For all practical purposes, nCC is also the proper definition of a size-extensive CI. 2CC is also an orbitally invariant coupled electron pair approximation. The numerical results of nCC are close to those for the full CC variant, and in some cases are closer to the full CI reference result. As 2CC is exact for separated electron pairs, it is the natural zeroth-order approximation for the correlation problem in molecules with other effects introduced as these units start to interact. The nCC hierarchy of approximations has all the attractive features of CC including its size extensivity, orbital invariance, and orbital insensitivity, but in a conceptually appealing form suited to bond breaking, while being computationally less demanding. Excited states from the equation of motion (EOM-2CC) are also reported, which show results frequently approaching those of EOM-CCSDT.

  5. CD8+ T cells stimulate Na-Cl co-transporter NCC in distal convoluted tubules leading to salt-sensitive hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunmeng; Rafferty, Tonya M.; Rhee, Sung W.; Webber, Jessica S.; Song, Li; Ko, Benjamin; Hoover, Robert S.; He, Beixiang; Mu, Shengyu

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a role for T lymphocytes in hypertension. However, whether T cells contribute to renal sodium retention and salt-sensitive hypertension is unknown. Here we demonstrate that T cells infiltrate into the kidney of salt-sensitive hypertensive animals. In particular, CD8+ T cells directly contact the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) in the kidneys of DOCA-salt mice and CD8+ T cell-injected mice, leading to up-regulation of the Na-Cl co-transporter NCC, p-NCC and the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. Co-culture with CD8+ T cells upregulates NCC in mouse DCT cells via ROS-induced activation of Src kinase, up-regulation of the K+ channel Kir4.1, and stimulation of the Cl− channel ClC-K. The last event increases chloride efflux, leading to compensatory chloride influx via NCC activation at the cost of increasing sodium retention. Collectively, these findings provide a mechanism for adaptive immunity involvement in the kidney defect in sodium handling and the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:28067240

  6. Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of the Novel Dithiadiazolyl Radical, p-NCC6F4C6F4CNSSN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy M. Rawson

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The dithiadiazolyl radical p-NCC6F4C6F4CNSSN• (4 retains its monomericnature in the solid state with molecules linked together into chains via supramolecularCN···S interactions. Variable temperature magnetic studies on 4 show that it behaves as anear-ideal Curie paramagnet (|θ| less than 0.1 K, indicating negligible intermolecularexchange. The effective magnetic moment (1.78 μB is temperature independent and inexcellent agreement with the value expected for an S = 1⁄2 paramagnet with g = 2.01(1.74μB. The lack of exchange coupling between radicals is attributed to the absence ofsignificant orbital overlap between radical centres.

  7. Numerical Simulations of Two-Phase Reacting Flow in a Single-Element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) Combustor Using NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Wey, C. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations of Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor have been conducted by using the National Combustion Code (NCC). The simulations have been carried out using the time filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) approach ranging from the steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), unsteady RANS (URANS), to the dynamic flow structure simulation (DFS). The sub-grid model employed for turbulent mixing and combustion includes the well-mixed model, the linear eddy mixing (LEM) model, and the filtered mass density function (FDF/PDF) model. The starting condition of the injected liquid spray is specified via empirical droplet size correlation, and a five-species single-step global reduced mechanism is employed for fuel chemistry. All the calculations use the same grid whose resolution is of the RANS type. Comparisons of results from various models are presented.

  8. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to a combination of Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C and defence against vaginal pathogens (ID 934, further

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    of Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C and defence against vaginal pathogens. The food constituent that is the subject of the claim, a combination of Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C, is sufficiently...... presented, the Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of Lactobacillus fermentum 57A, Lactobacillus plantarum 57B and Lactobacillus gasseri 57C and defence against vaginal pathogens....

  9. Regulation of NHE3, NKCC2, and NCC abundance in kidney during aldosterone escape phenomenon: role of NO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turban, Sharon; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Knepper, Mark A

    2003-11-01

    Escape from aldosterone-induced renal NaCl retention is an important homeostatic mechanism in pathophysiological states in which plasma aldosterone levels are inappropriately elevated, e.g., in primary aldosteronism. Our previous studies demonstrated that the escape process occurs largely as a result of a marked suppression of the abundance of the thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) of the distal convoluted tubule but have also demonstrated a paradoxical increase in the protein abundance of the apical Na/H exchanger of the proximal tubule (NHE3). In the present study, we confirmed the increase in NHE3 and also showed that a similar increase in NHE3 protein abundance occurs in escape from ANG II-mediated NaCl retention. To investigate the potential role of nitric oxide (NO) in the observed upregulation of NHE3, we repeated the aldosterone escape experiment with a superimposed infusion of a NO synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). l-NAME infusion abolished the increase in NHE3 protein abundance. Furthermore, in a different experiment, NO synthase inhibition uncovered an associated decrease in the abundance of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) of the thick ascending limb, not seen with simple aldosterone escape. However, NO synthase inhibition did not block the decrease in NCC abundance normally seen with aldosterone escape. Furthermore, l-NAME infusion in aldosterone-treated rats markedly decreased both NHE3 and NKCC2 protein abundance, without changes in the corresponding mRNA levels. We conclude that NHE3 and NKCC2 protein abundances in kidney are positively regulated by NO and that the increase in NHE3 abundance seen in the aldosterone escape phenomenon is NO dependent.

  10. Climate Change Projections for the 21st Century by the NCC/IAP T63 Model with SRES Scenarios

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ying; ZHAO Zongci; LUO Yong; GAO Xuejie

    2005-01-01

    The projections of climate change in the globe and East Asia by the NCC/IAP T63 model with the SRES A2 and A1B scenarios have been investigated in this paper. The results pointed out a global warming of 3.6℃/100 yr and 2.5℃/100 yr for A2 and A1B during the 21st century, respectively. The warming in high and middle latitudes will be more obvious than that in low latitudes, especially in the winter hemisphere.The warming of 5.1℃/100 yr for A2 and 3.6℃/100 yr for A1B over East Asia in the 21st century will be much higher than that in the globe. The global mean precipitation will increase by about 4.3%/100 yr for A2 and 3.4%/100 yr for A1B in the 21st century, respectively. The precipitation will increase in most parts of the low and high latitudes and decrease in some regions of the subtropical latitudes. The linear trends of the annual mean precipitation anomalies over East Asia will be 9.8%/100 yr for A2 and 5.2%/100 yr for A1B, respectively. The drier situations will occur over the northwestern and southeastern parts of East Asia.The changes of the annual mean temperature and precipitation in the globe for the 21st century by the NCC/IAP T63 model with SRES A2 and A1B scenarios are in agreement with a number of the model projections.

  11. Manganese acquisition by Lactobacillus plantarum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, F.S.; Duong, M.N.

    1984-04-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum has an unusually high Mn(II) requirement for growth and accumulated over 30 mM intracellular Mn(II). The acquisition of Mn(II) by L. plantarum occurred via a specific active transport system powered by the transmembrane proton gradient. The Mn(II) uptake system has a K/sub m/ of 0.2 ..mu..M and a V/sub max/ of 24 nmol mg/sup -1/ of protein min/sup -1/. Above a medium Mn(II) concentration of 200 ..mu..M, the intracellular Mn(II) level was independent of the medium Mn(II) and unresponsive to oxygen stresses but was reduced by phosphate limitation. At a pH of 5.5, citrate, isocitrate, and cis-aconitate effectively promoted MN(II) uptake, although measurable levels of 1,5-(/sup 14/C)citrate were not accumulated. When cells were presented with equimolar Mn(II) and Cd(II), Cd(II) was preferentially taken up by the Mn(II) transport system. Both Mn(II) and Cd(II) uptake were greatly increased by Mn(II) starvation. Mn(II) uptake by Mn(II)-starved cells was subject to a negative feedback regulatory mechanism functioning less than 1 min after exposure of the cells to Mn(II) and independent of protein synthesis. When presented with a relatively large amount of exogenous Mn(II), Mn(II)-starved cells exhibited a measurable efflux of their internal Mn(II), but the rate was only a small fraction of the maximal Mn(II) uptake rate.

  12. Downregulation of NCC and NKCC2 cotransporters by kidney-specific WNK1 revealed by gene disruption and transgenic mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Xie, Jian; Wu, Tao; Truong, Thao; Auchus, Richard J; Huang, Chou-Long

    2011-03-01

    WNK1 (with-no-lysine[K]-1) is a protein kinase of which mutations cause a familial hypertension and hyperkalemia syndrome known as pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2 (PHA2). Kidney-specific (KS) WNK1 is an alternatively spliced form of WNK1 kinase missing most of the kinase domain. KS-WNK1 downregulates the Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter NCC by antagonizing the effect of full-length WNK1 when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The physiological role of KS-WNK1 in the regulation of NCC and potentially other Na(+) transporters in vivo is unknown. Here, we report that mice overexpressing KS-WNK1 in the kidney exhibited renal Na(+) wasting, elevated plasma levels of angiotensin II and aldosterone yet lower blood pressure relative to wild-type littermates. Immunofluorescent staining revealed reduced surface expression of total and phosphorylated NCC and the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC2 in the distal convoluted tubule and the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop, respectively. Conversely, mice with targeted deletion of exon 4A (the first exon for KS-WNK1) exhibited Na(+) retention, elevated blood pressure on a high-Na(+) diet and increased surface expression of total and phosphorylated NCC and NKCC2 in respective nephron segments. Thus, KS-WNK1 is a negative regulator of NCC and NKCC2 in vivo and plays an important role in the control of Na(+) homeostasis and blood pressure. These results have important implications to the pathogenesis of PHA2 with WNK1 mutations.

  13. Expression of renal distal tubule transporters TRPM6 and NCC in a rat model of cyclosporine nephrotoxicity and effect of EGF treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledeganck, Kristien J; Boulet, Gaëlle A; Horvath, Caroline A; Vinckx, Marleen; Bogers, Johannes J; Van Den Bossche, Rita; Verpooten, Gert A; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2011-09-01

    Renal magnesium (Mg(2+)) and sodium (Na(+)) loss are well-known side effects of cyclosporine (CsA) treatment in humans, but the underlying mechanisms still remain unclear. Recently, it was shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates Mg(2+) reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) via TRPM6 (Thébault S, Alexander RT, Tiel Groenestege WM, Hoenderop JG, Bindels RJ. J Am Soc Nephrol 20: 78-85, 2009). In the DCT, the final adjustment of renal sodium excretion is regulated by the thiazide-sensitive Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC), which is activated by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the molecular mechanisms of CsA-induced hypomagnesemia and hyponatremia. Therefore, the renal expression of TRPM6, TRPM7, EGF, EGF receptor, claudin-16, claudin-19, and the NCC, and the effect of the RAAS on NCC expression, were analyzed in vivo in a rat model of CsA nephrotoxicity. Also, the effect of EGF administration on these parameters was studied. CsA significantly decreased the renal expression of TRPM6, TRPM7, NCC, and EGF, but not that of claudin-16 and claudin-19. Serum aldosterone was significantly lower in CsA-treated rats. In control rats treated with EGF, an increased renal expression of TRPM6 together with a decreased fractional excretion of Mg(2+) (FE Mg(2+)) was demonstrated. EGF did not show this beneficial effect on TRPM6 and FE Mg(2+) in CsA-treated rats. These data suggest that CsA treatment affects Mg(2+) homeostasis via the downregulation of TRPM6 in the DCT. Furthermore, CsA downregulates the NCC in the DCT, associated with an inactivation of the RAAS, resulting in renal sodium loss.

  14. Paradoxical activation of the sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) without hypertension in kidney deficient in a regulatory subunit of Na,K-ATPase, FXYD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arystarkhova, Elena; Ralph, Donna L; Liu, Yi Bessie; Bouley, Richard; McDonough, Alicia A; Sweadner, Kathleen J

    2014-12-01

    Na,K-ATPase generates the driving force for sodium reabsorption in the kidney. Na,K-ATPase functional properties are regulated by small proteins belonging to the FXYD family. In kidney FXYD2 is the most abundant: it is an inhibitory subunit expressed in almost every nephron segment. Its absence should increase sodium pump activity and promote Na(+) retention, however, no obvious renal phenotype was detected in mice with global deletion of FXYD2 (Arystarkhova et al. 2013). Here, increased total cortical Na,K-ATPase activity was documented in the Fxyd2(-/-) mouse, without increased α1β1 subunit expression. We tested the hypothesis that adaptations occur in distal convoluted tubule (DCT), a major site of sodium adjustments. Na,K-ATPase immunoreactivity in DCT was unchanged, and there was no DCT hypoplasia. There was a marked activation of thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC; Slc12a3) in DCT, predicted to increase Na(+) reabsorption in this segment. Specifically, NCC total increased 30% and NCC phosphorylated at T53 and S71, associated with activation, increased 4-6 fold. The phosphorylation of the closely related thick ascending limb (TAL) apical NKCC2 (Slc12a1) increased at least twofold. Abundance of the total and cleaved (activated) forms of ENaC α-subunit was not different between genotypes. Nonetheless, no elevation of blood pressure was evident despite the fact that NCC and NKCC2 are in states permissive for Na(+) retention. Activation of NCC and NKCC2 may reflect an intracellular linkage to elevated Na,K-ATPase activity or a compensatory response to Na(+) loss proximal to the TAL and DCT. © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  15. Lactobacillus nantensis sp. nov., isolated from French wheat sourdough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcheva, Rosica; Ferchichi, Mounir F; Korakli, Maher; Ivanova, Iskra; Gänzle, Michael G; Vogel, Rudi F; Prévost, Hervé; Onno, Bernard; Dousset, Xavier

    2006-03-01

    A polyphasic taxonomic study of the bacterial flora isolated from traditional French wheat sourdough, using phenotypic characterization and phylogenetic as well as genetic methods, revealed a consistent group of isolates that could not be assigned to any recognized species. These results were confirmed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting analyses. Cells were Gram-positive, homofermentative rods. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of the representative strain LP33T indicated that these strains belong to the genus Lactobacillus and that they formed a branch distinct from their closest relatives Lactobacillus farciminis, Lactobacillus alimentarius, Lactobacillus paralimentarius and Lactobacillus mindensis. DNA-DNA reassociation experiments with the three phylogenetically closest Lactobacillus species confirmed that LP33T (= DSM 16982T = CIP 108546T = TMW 1.1265T) represents the type strain of a novel species, for which the name Lactobacillus nantensis sp. nov. is proposed.

  16. Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus (Formerly Lactobacillus casei) LOCK900

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandrzak-Piekarczyk, Tamara; Koryszewska-Bagi?ska, Anna; Bardowski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus LOCK900 fulfills the criteria required for probiotic strains. In this study, we report a whole-genome sequence of this isolate and compare it with other L.?rhamnosus complete genome sequences already published.

  17. Strain-specific probiotics properties of Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus brevis isolates from Brazilian food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Cíntia Lacerda; Thorsen, Line; Schwan, Rosane Freitas; Jespersen, Lene

    2013-10-01

    A total of 234 LAB isolates from Brazilian food products were initially screened for their ability to survive at pH 2.0. Fifty one of the isolates survived and were selected. They were characterized by phenotypic methods, rep-PCR and identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Lactobacillus fermentum (34 isolates), Lactobacillus plantarum (10) and Lactobacillus brevis (7). Based on being either highly tolerant to bile, showing an ability for auto-aggregation and/or hydrophobic properties, one L. fermentum (CH58), three L. plantarum (CH3, CH41 and SAU96) and two L. brevis (SAU105 and FFC199) were selected. The highest co-aggregation ability with Escherichia coli was observed to L. plantarum CH41. L. brevis SAU105 and FFC199 and L. fermentum CH58 exhibited antagonistic activity towards the pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. L. plantarum CH3 and CH41 and L. brevis FFC199 showed adhesion ability to Caco-2 cells (1.6, 1.1 and 0.9%, respectively) similar to the commercial probiotic, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (1.5%). They were able to increase the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of Caco-2 cells over 24 h (p plantarum CH3 and CH41 (cocoa) and L. brevis FFC199 (cauim) exhibited potential probiotics properties.

  18. Lactobacillus plantarum- Bifidobacterium longum and Strept

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-08

    Mar 8, 2010 ... breakdown of only 1 to 2% of milk protein (Rasic and. Kurmann 1978), it is ... limited degradation of whey proteins may also occur. (Chandan et al., 1982; ..... Health Properties of Milk Fermented with Lactobacillus casei strain ...

  19. Storage features of Lactobacillus Brevis strain 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utemurat Sagyndykov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Current article presents the results of the research conducted on storing lactic bacteria. On the basis of results of experiments on liophilization of the culture of lactic bacteria Lactobacillus brevis strain №9, it has been concluded that the optimum way of storing the given culture is the method of liophilic drying with the vacuum soldering.

  20. Genome instability in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sybesma, W.; Molenaar, D.; IJcken, W. van; Venema, K.; Korta, R.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a comparative genome analysis of three dairy product isolates of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the ATCC 53103 reference strain to the published genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG. The analysis showed that in two of three isolates, major DNA segments were missing from the

  1. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 8530

    OpenAIRE

    Pittet, Vanessa; Ewen, Emily; Bushell, Barry R.; Ziola, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is found in the human gastrointestinal tract and is important for probiotics. We became interested in L. rhamnosus isolate ATCC 8530 in relation to beer spoilage and hops resistance. We report here the genome sequence of this isolate, along with a brief comparison to other available L. rhamnosus genome sequences.

  2. Lactobacillus rhamnosus Endocarditis After Upper Endoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron, Justin G.; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E.; Weiner, Shepard D.; Whittier, Susan; Lowy, Franklin D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lactobacillus rhamnosus is commonly found in gastrointestinal flora and used in probiotics but is a rare human pathogen. We report a case of L. rhamnosus endocarditis following upper endoscopy in a frequent consumer of yogurt containing the organism, who required aortic and mitral valve replacement for cure.

  3. Genome instability in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Sybesma (Wilbert); D. Molenaar (Douwe); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); K. Venema (Koen); R. Kort (Remco)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe describe here a comparative genome analysis of three dairy product isolates of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the ATCC 53103 reference strain to the published genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG. The analysis showed that in two of three isolates, major DNA segments were missing

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus 2166.

    OpenAIRE

    Karlyshev, Andrey V.; Melnikov, Vyacheslav G.; Kosarev, Igor V.; Abramov, Vyacheslav M.

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we present a draft sequence of the genome of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain 2166, a potential novel probiotic. Genome annotation and read mapping onto a reference genome of L. rhamnosus strain GG allowed for the identification of the differences and similarities in the genomic contents and gene arrangements of these strains.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus 2166.

    OpenAIRE

    Karlyshev, Andrey V.; Melnikov, Vyacheslav G.; Kosarev, Igor V.; Abramov, Vyacheslav M.

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we present a draft sequence of the genome of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain 2166, a potential novel probiotic. Genome annotation and read mapping onto a reference genome of L. rhamnosus strain GG allowed for the identification of the differences and similarities in the genomic contents and gene arrangements of these strains.

  6. Genome instability in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Sybesma (Wilbert); D. Molenaar (Douwe); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); K. Venema (Koen); R. Kort (Remco)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe describe here a comparative genome analysis of three dairy product isolates of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the ATCC 53103 reference strain to the published genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG. The analysis showed that in two of three isolates, major DNA segments were missing f

  7. Genome instability in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sybesma, W.; Molenaar, D.; IJcken, W. van; Venema, K.; Korta, R.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a comparative genome analysis of three dairy product isolates of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the ATCC 53103 reference strain to the published genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG. The analysis showed that in two of three isolates, major DNA segments were missing from the geno

  8. Lactobacillus assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, K.; Jha, Anal K.; Kulkarni, A. R.

    2007-05-01

    An eco-friendly lactobacillus sp. (microbe) assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40 60 nm are found.

  9. Maximum-biomass prediction of homofermentative Lactobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shumao; Zhao, Jianxin; Liu, Xiaoming; Chen, Yong Q; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Fed-batch and pH-controlled cultures have been widely used for industrial production of probiotics. The aim of this study was to systematically investigate the relationship between the maximum biomass of different homofermentative Lactobacillus and lactate accumulation, and to develop a prediction equation for the maximum biomass concentration in such cultures. The accumulation of the end products and the depletion of nutrients by various strains were evaluated. In addition, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of acid anions for various strains at pH 7.0 were examined. The lactate concentration at the point of complete inhibition was not significantly different from the MIC of lactate for all of the strains, although the inhibition mechanism of lactate and acetate on Lactobacillus rhamnosus was different from the other strains which were inhibited by the osmotic pressure caused by acid anions at pH 7.0. When the lactate concentration accumulated to the MIC, the strains stopped growing. The maximum biomass was closely related to the biomass yield per unit of lactate produced (YX/P) and the MIC (C) of lactate for different homofermentative Lactobacillus. Based on the experimental data obtained using different homofermentative Lactobacillus, a prediction equation was established as follows: Xmax - X0 = (0.59 ± 0.02)·YX/P·C.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF BACTERIOCIN FROM PROBIOTIC LACTOBACILLUS PLANTARUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jayachitra*, C.M. Sukanya and N. Krithiga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In our study, the sample (cheese was selected for isolation and identification of Lactobacillus species as local probiotic isolate. The strain was subjected to microscopic and macroscopic investigations for probiotic selection. The world health organization criteria (WHO were applied to all Lactobacillus species against E. coli, P. areoginosa, S. aerus, Chromobacterium, Serratia and A. flavus, antibiotic sensitivity test, acid and bile tolerance test, heamolytic activity. Antimicrobial compound called bacteriocin was partially purified. The Lactobacillus species was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and specific catalase gene was also amplified. Data showed that Lactobacillus plantarum has a high inhibitory activity, tolerant to bile and acid, highly resistant to many antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptide was partially purified, characterized and bacteriocin produced by L. plantarum remained constant activity after heating at 121oC for 10 min. L. plantarum may be an alternative and promising way for eradicating many diseases. L. plantarum produces antimicrobial metabolites can give reasonable assurance of the control of pathogenic microorganisms. Increase the number of food-poisoning patients, the inhibition of the bacterial growth or production of enterotoxin such as verotoxins by administrating Lactobacilli bacteriocins would be of great importance. Lactobacillus fulfills the basic criteria required for probiotic strains which survive in in-vitro condition. The experimental strain exhibited strong antibacterial and antifungal activities against the pathogens. L. plantarum has high probiotic potential for eradicating many diseases, mainly the suppression of A. flavus which produce Aflatoxin. Pharmaceutical and nutritional industries are exploring more natural treatments for health conscious consumers as natural treatments have been effective.

  11. Growth of probiotic bacteria and bifidobacteria in a soy yogurt formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnworth, E R; Mainville, I; Desjardins, M-P; Gardner, N; Fliss, I; Champagne, C

    2007-05-01

    Soy beverage and cows' milk yogurts were produced with Steptococcus thermophilus (ATCC 4356) and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (IM 025). The drop in pH during fermentation was faster in the soy beverage than in cows' milk, but the final pH values were similar. Yogurts were prepared with a yogurt starter in conjunction with either the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC533 (La-1), Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (GG) or human derived bifidobacteria. The presence of the probiotic bacteria did not affect the growth of the yogurt strains. Approximately 2 log increases in both L. rhamnosus GG and L. johnsonii La-1 were observed when each was added with the yogurt strains in both cows' milk and the soy beverage. Two of the five bifidobacteria strains grew well in the cows' milk and soy beverage during fermentation with the yogurt bacteria. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses showed that the probiotic bacteria and the bifidobacteria were using different sugars to support their growth, depending on whether the bacteria were growing in cows' milk or soy beverage.

  12. Genome-wide and Function Analysis of the Secretory Proteins of Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705%长双歧杆菌NCC2705分泌蛋白的全基因组预测和功能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱德全; 王茗悦; 栗金柳; 孟祥晨; 程广东; 岳丽红; 王长平; 薛勇

    2016-01-01

    With the genome proteins sequences of Bifidobacterium longum FNCC2705 as study objects,SignalP 4.0,LipoP,TMHMM 2.0 software were used to analyze the secretory proteins and types of signal peptide.Function of secretory proteins was also analyzed by COG ( Cluster of Or-thologous Groups of proteins) database.Results showed a total of 37 secretion proteins through Sec pathway which included 27 secreted proteins recognized by SPaseⅠand 10 secreted proteins recognized by SPaseⅡ.Maximum length of their signal peptide is 52 aa and minimum length is 10 aa respectively.The functions of Bifidobacterium secretory protein showed there were many hypothetical proteins.Secretory protein with annotation of COG functions were mainly involved in amino acid transport and metabolism,carbohydrate transport and metabolism,inorganic ion transport and metabolism,etc..The functions of these secretory proteins can help bifidobacterium adapt to its host environment.%以长双歧杆菌NCC2705基因组序列为研究对象,使用SignalP 4.0、LipoP、TMHMM 2.0软件分析该基因组中的分泌蛋白及其信号肽的类型,同时采用COG ( Cluster of Orthologous Groups of proteins)功能数据库对预测的分泌蛋白进行功能注释和聚类分析。结果表明,长双岐杆菌NCC2705中共有37个Sec途径分泌蛋白,其中Sec途径分泌蛋白包括27个被I型( SPaseⅠ)信号肽酶和10个Ⅱ型信号肽酶( SpaseII)识别的蛋白,Sec 途径分泌蛋白信号肽长度最多的有52个氨基酸,最少的有10个氨基酸。分泌蛋白的功能分析表明,该菌株分泌蛋白中含有大部分的假定蛋白,主要参与氨基酸代谢与转运、碳水化合物代谢转运,无机盐离子代谢转运,细胞壁和细胞膜生物合成的功能有关。

  13. Recombinant lactobacillus for fermentation of xylose to lactic acid and lactate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picataggio, Stephen K. (Golden, CO); Zhang, Min (Lakewood, CO); Franden, Mary Ann (Littleton, CO); Mc Millan, James D. (Boulder, CO); Finkelstein, Mark (Fort Collins, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A recombinant Lactobacillus MONT4 is provided which has been genetically engineered with xylose isomerase and xylulokinase genes from Lactobacillus pentosus to impart to the Lactobacillus MONT4 the ability to ferment lignocellulosic biomass containing xylose to lactic acid.

  14. Genetic analysis of acidocin B : a novel bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus acidophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leer, R.J.; Vossen, J.M.B.M. van der; Giezen, M. van; Noort, J.M. van; Pouwels, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    The genes encoding the production of acidocin B, a bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus acidophilus strain M46 which is active against Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium sporogenes, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, but inactive aga

  15. Lactobacillus versmoldensis sp. nov., isolated from raw fermented sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröckel, L; Schillinger, U; Franz, C M A P; Bantleon, A; Ludwig, W

    2003-03-01

    Lactobacillus versmoldensis sp. nov. (KU-3T) was isolated from raw fermented sausages. The new species was present in high numbers, and frequently dominated the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) populations of the products. 16S rDNA sequence data revealed that the isolates are closely related to the species Lactobacillus kimchii DSM 13961T, Lactobacillus paralimentarius DSM 13238T, Lactobacillus alimentarius DSM 20249T and Lactobacillus farciminis DSM 20184T. DNA-DNA reassociation data, however, clearly distinguished the new isolates from these species; they showed a low degree of DNA relatedness with the type strains of this group of phylogenetically closely related lactobacilli. These results warrant separate species status for strain KU-3T, for which the name Lactobacillus versmoldensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is KU-3T (=DSM 14857T =NCCB 100034T =ATCC BAA-478T).

  16. Lactobacillus plajomi sp. nov. and Lactobacillus modestisalitolerans sp. nov., isolated from traditional fermented foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Mika; Yukphan, Pattaraporn; Chaipitakchonlatarn, Winai; Malimas, Taweesak; Sugimoto, Masako; Yoshino, Mayumi; Kamakura, Yuki; Potacharoen, Wanchern; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Tanaka, Naoto; Nakagawa, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro

    2015-08-01

    Three Lactobacillus-like strains, NB53T, NB446T and NB702, were isolated from traditional fermented food in Thailand. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that these strains belong to the Lactobacillus plantarum group. Phylogenetic analysis based on the dnaK, rpoA, pheS and recA gene sequences indicated that these three strains were distantly related to known species present in the L. plantarum group. DNA-DNA hybridization with closely related strains demonstrated that these strains represented two novel species; the novel strains could be differentiated based on chemotaxonomic and phenotypic characteristics. Therefore, two novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, Lactobacillus plajomi sp. nov. (NB53T) and Lactobacillus modestisalitolerans sp. nov. (NB446T and NB702), are proposed with the type strains NB53T ( = NBRC 107333T = BCC 38054T) and NB446T ( = NBRC 107235T = BCC 38191T), respectively.

  17. The Role of Epithelial Sodium Channel ENaC and the Apical Cl-/HCO3- Exchanger Pendrin in Compensatory Salt Reabsorption in the Setting of Na-Cl Cotransporter (NCC) Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-Chamberlin, Mina; Varasteh Kia, Mujan; Xu, Jie; Barone, Sharon; Zahedi, Kamyar; Soleimani, Manoocher

    2016-01-01

    The absence of NCC does not cause significant salt wasting in NCC deficient mice under basal conditions. We hypothesized that ENaC and pendrin play important roles in compensatory salt absorption in the setting of NCC inactivation, and their inhibition and/or downregulation can cause significant salt wasting in NCC KO mice. WT and NCC KO mice were treated with a daily injection of either amiloride, an inhibitor of ENaC, or acetazolamide (ACTZ), a blocker of salt and bicarbonate reabsorption in the proximal tubule and an inhibitor of carbonic anhydrases in proximal tubule and intercalated cells, or a combination of acetazolamide plus amiloride for defined durations. Animals were subjected to daily balance studies. At the end of treatment, kidneys were harvested and examined. Blood samples were collected for electrolytes and acid base analysis. Amiloride injection significantly increased the urine output (UO) in NCC KO mice (from 1.3 ml/day before to 2.5 ml/day after amiloride, p0.05). The increase in UO in NCC KO mice was associated with a significant increase in sodium excretion (from 0.25 mmol/24 hrs at baseline to 0.35 mmol/24 hrs after amiloride injection, p80% reduction of kidney pendrin expression in both WT and NCC KO mice. However, ACTZ treatment noticeably increased urine output and salt excretion only in NCC KO mice (with urine output increasing from a baseline of 1.1 ml/day to 2.3 ml/day and sodium excretion increasing from 0.22 mmole/day before to 0.31 mmole/day after ACTZ) in NCC KO mice; both parameters were significantly higher than in WT mice. Western blot analysis demonstrated significant enhancement in ENaC expression in medulla and cortex of NCC KO and WT mice in response to ACTZ injection for 6 days, and treatment with amiloride in ACTZ-pretreated mice caused a robust increase in salt excretion in both NCC KO and WT mice. Pendrin KO mice did not display a significant increase in urine output or salt excretion after treatment with amiloride or

  18. Lactobacillus ceti sp. nov., isolated from beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, A I; Fernandez, A; Espinosa de los Monteros, A; Goyache, J; Herraez, P; Tames, B; Cruz, F; Domínguez, L; Fernández-Garayzábal, J F

    2008-04-01

    Biochemical and molecular genetic studies were performed on three isolates of an unknown Gram-positive, catalase-negative and rod-shaped organism isolated from the lungs and liver of two beaked whales. The organisms were tentatively identified as Lactobacillus spp. based on cellular morphology and biochemical tests. 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies confirmed the provisional identification of the novel isolates as members of the genus Lactobacillus, but the isolates did not correspond to any recognized species of this genus. The novel strains shared the same phenotypic characteristics and exhibited 100 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The nearest phylogenetic relatives of the novel isolates were Lactobacillus satsumensis DSM 16230T (94.2 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Lactobacillus salivarius JCM 1047 (94.0 %), Lactobacillus nagelii ATCC 700692T (94.0 %) and Lactobacillus saerimneri DSM 16049T (93.8 %). The novel isolates could be distinguished from these species and other related species of the genus Lactobacillus by physiological and biochemical tests. On the basis of these phenotypic, physiological and phylogenetic findings, it is proposed that the new isolates from whales be classified as a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, Lactobacillus ceti sp. nov. The type strain is 142-2T (=CECT 7185T=CCUG 53626T).

  19. Comparative genomics of Lactobacillus and other LAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Lukjancenko, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    The genomes of 66 LABs, belonging to five different genera, were compared for genome size and gene content. The analyzed genomes included 37 Lactobacillus genomes of 17 species, six Lactococcus lactis genomes, four Leuconostoc genomes of three species, six Streptococcus genomes of two species......, twelve Enterococcus genomes of four species and a single Weissella genome. Genomes of pathogenic strains or species were not included. Since the gene density in these genomes is relatively constant, genome size is a measure of gene content. The genomes of Enterococcus were significantly larger than...... that of the others, with the two Streptococcus species having the shortest genomes. The widest distribution in genome content was observed for Lactobacillus. The number of tRNA and rRNA gene copies varied considerably, with exceptional high numbers observed for Lb. delbrueckii, while these numbers were relatively...

  20. Lactobacillus species: taxonomic complexity and controversial susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M

    2015-05-15

    The genus Lactobacillus is a taxonomically complex and is composed of over 170 species that cannot be easily differentiated phenotypically and often require molecular identification. Although they are part of the normal human gastrointestinal and vaginal flora, they can also be occasional human pathogens. They are extensively used in a variety of commercial products including probiotics. Their antimicrobial susceptibilities are poorly defined in part because of their taxonomic complexity and are compounded by the different methods recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute and International Dairy Foundation. Their use as probiotics for prevention of Clostridium difficile infection is prevalent among consumers worldwide but raises the question of will the use of any concurrent antibiotic effect their ability to survive. Lactobacillus species are generally acid resistant and are able to survive ingestion. They are generally resistant to metronidazole, aminoglycosides and ciprofloxacin with L. acidophilus being susceptible to penicillin and vancomycin, whereas L. rhamnosus and L. casei are resistant to metronidazole and vancomycin.

  1. KCNJ10 determines the expression of the apical Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) in the early distal convoluted tubule (DCT1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengbiao; Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Junhui; Su, Xiao-Tong; Lin, Dao-Hong; Scholl, Ute I; Giebisch, Gerhard; Lifton, Richard P; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2014-08-12

    The renal phenotype induced by loss-of-function mutations of inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir), Kcnj10 (Kir4.1), includes salt wasting, hypomagnesemia, metabolic alkalosis and hypokalemia. However, the mechanism by which Kir.4.1 mutations cause the tubulopathy is not completely understood. Here we demonstrate that Kcnj10 is a main contributor to the basolateral K conductance in the early distal convoluted tubule (DCT1) and determines the expression of the apical Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) in the DCT. Immunostaining demonstrated Kcnj10 and Kcnj16 were expressed in the basolateral membrane of DCT, and patch-clamp studies detected a 40-pS K channel in the basolateral membrane of the DCT1 of p8/p10 wild-type Kcnj10(+/+) mice (WT). This 40-pS K channel is absent in homozygous Kcnj10(-/-) (knockout) mice. The disruption of Kcnj10 almost completely eliminated the basolateral K conductance and decreased the negativity of the cell membrane potential in DCT1. Moreover, the lack of Kcnj10 decreased the basolateral Cl conductance, inhibited the expression of Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase and diminished the apical NCC expression in DCT. We conclude that Kcnj10 plays a dominant role in determining the basolateral K conductance and membrane potential of DCT1 and that the basolateral K channel activity in the DCT determines the apical NCC expression possibly through a Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase-dependent mechanism.

  2. Lactobacillus plantarum PADA FESES INDIVIDU DEWASA SEHAT YANG MENGONSUMSI Lactobacillus plantarum IS-10506 DARI DADIH [Lactobacillus plantarum in Stool of Apparently Healthy Adults Consuming Lactobacillus plantarum IS-10506 from Dadih

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmier Adib*

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A placebo double blind pre-post human study was conducted in apparently healthy adults. There were two treatment groups consisting of Group A and B representing probiotic and placebo group, respectively. Twenty four participants were randomly assigned, each supplemented with either placebo or probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum IS-10506. The micro encapsulated powder was given at a dose of 2.6x1010 CFU/day for 21 consecutive days. Stool samples were collected before and after the supplementation. The fresh stool samples were analyzed for the viability of Lactobacillus sp. by conventional plate count method in MRS agar. Some stool samples were kept frozen to be analyzed by using real time PCR to trace back the availability of Lactobacillus plantarum with species specific primer. The Lactobacillus sp. in stools of healthy adults given microencapsulated probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum IS-10506 powder was significantly more than those who consumed microencapsulated placebo powder. Molecular detection by qPCR confirmed the availability of Lactobacillus plantarum in fecal samples of the probiotic group after given the supplementation for 21 days. The molecular detection validation confirmed that probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum was available in the fecal samples of the probiotic group of healthy adults. However, the availability and viability of Lactobacillus plantarum were not consistently found in the intestinal tract.

  3. Bio-control of waterborne pathogens using Lactobacillus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Ghyandeep L; Gupta, Prateksha; Wate, Satish R

    2012-11-01

    Bacteria play a significant role in water contamination. Chemicals are mostly used for the treatment of bacteriologically contaminated water. The use of bacterial interactions is a new approach to limit the pathogens' growth. Detection of antimicrobial substances produced by lactic acid bacteria against the waterborne pathogens is the objective of this work. Microbiological and biochemical methods were used to identify lactic acid bacteria having an antimicrobial activity. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity with growth kinetic measurements was performed. Four isolates of lactic acid bacteria obtained from whey and curd were identified. The predominant species belonging to the Lactobacillus genera are: Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus sakei, Lactobacillus paracasei, and Lactobacillus paraplantarum. The present study revealed that the Lactobacillus consortium is able to inhibit Staphylococcus aureus's growth along with Escherichia coli and Vibrio species. In mixed culture, after 24 h, the Lactobacillus consortium reduces the growth of S. aureus by 2.03 log; moreover, the growth of the latter bacteria totally ceased after 72 h of incubation. The protein produced by the Lactobacillus consortium was responsible for arresting the growth of S. aureus.

  4. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus farciminis KCTC 3681▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Seong-Hyeuk; Choi, Sang-Haeng; Kang, Aram; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Ryong Nam; Kim, Aeri; Kim, Dae-Soo; Park, Hong-Seog

    2011-01-01

    Lactobacillus farciminis is one of the most prevalent lactic acid bacterial species present during the manufacturing process of kimchi, the best-known traditional Korean dish. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the type strain Lactobacillus farciminis KCTC 3681 (2,498,309 bp, with a G+C content of 36.4%), which consists of 5 scaffolds. PMID:21257766

  5. Mg(2+) improves the thermotolerance of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus casei Zhang and Lactobacillus plantarum P-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Huang, S; Wang, J; Jan, G; Jeantet, R; Chen, X D

    2017-04-01

    Food-related carbohydrates and proteins are often used as thermoprotectants for probiotic lactobacilli during industrial production and processing. However, the effect of inorganic salts is rarely reported. Magnesium is the second-most abundant cation in bacteria, and commonly found in various foods. Mg(2+) homeostasis is important in Salmonella and has been reported to play a critical role in their thermotolerance. However, the role of Mg(2+) in thermotolerance of other bacteria, in particular probiotic bacteria, still remains a hypothesis. In this study, the effect of Mg(2+) on thermotolerance of probiotic lactobacilli was investigated in three well-documented probiotic strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus casei Zhang and Lactobacillus plantarum P-8, in comparison with Zn(2+) and Na(+) . Concentrations of Mg(2+) between 10 and 50 mmol l(-1) were found to increase the bacterial survival upon heat challenge. Remarkably, Mg(2+) addition at 20 mmol l(-1) led to a 100-fold higher survival of L. rhamnosus GG upon heat challenge. This preliminary study also showed that Mg(2+) shortened the heat-induced extended lag time of bacteria, which indicated the improvement in bacterial recovery from thermal injury. In order to improve the productivity and stability of live probiotics, extensive investigations have been carried out to improve thermotolerance of probiotics. However, most of these studies focused on the effects of carbohydrates, proteins or amino acids. The roles of inorganic salts in various food materials, which have rarely been reported, should be considered when incorporating probiotics into these foods. In this study, Mg(2+) was found to play a significant role in the thermotolerance of probiotic lactobacilli. A novel strategy may be available in the near future by employing magnesium salts as protective agents of probiotics during manufacturing process. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Proteomic comparison of the cytosolic proteins of three Bifidobacterium longum human isolates and B. longum NCC2705

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Champomier-Vergès Marie-Christine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bifidobacteria are natural inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract. In full-term newborns, these bacteria are acquired from the mother during delivery and rapidly become the predominant organisms in the intestinal microbiota. Bifidobacteria contribute to the establishment of healthy intestinal ecology and can confer health benefits to their host. Consequently, there is growing interest in bifidobacteria, and various strains are currently used as probiotic components in functional food products. However, the probiotic effects have been reported to be strain-specific. There is thus a need to better understand the determinants of the observed benefits provided by these probiotics. Our objective was to compare three human B. longum isolates with the sequenced model strain B. longum NCC2705 at the chromosome and proteome levels. Results Pulsed field electrophoresis genotyping revealed genetic heterogeneity with low intraspecies strain relatedness among the four strains tested. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we analyzed qualitative differences in the cytosolic protein patterns. There were 45 spots that were present in some strains and absent in others. Spots were excised from the gels and subjected to peptide mass fingerprint analysis for identification. The 45 spots represented 37 proteins, most of which were involved in carbohydrate metabolism and cell wall or cell membrane synthesis. Notably, the protein patterns were correlated with differences in cell membrane properties like surface hydrophobicity and cell agglutination. Conclusion These results showed that proteomic analysis can be valuable for investigating differences in bifidobacterial species and may provide a better understanding of the diversity of bifidobacteria and their potential use as probiotics.

  7. Analysis of Power Laws, Shape Collapses, and Neural Complexity: New Techniques and MATLAB Support via the NCC Toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Najja; Timme, Nicholas M; Bennett, Nicholas; Ripp, Monica; Lautzenhiser, Edward; Beggs, John M

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems include interactions that occur across many scales. Two divergent methods for characterizing such interactions have drawn on the physical analysis of critical phenomena and the mathematical study of information. Inferring criticality in neural systems has traditionally rested on fitting power laws to the property distributions of "neural avalanches" (contiguous bursts of activity), but the fractal nature of avalanche shapes has recently emerged as another signature of criticality. On the other hand, neural complexity, an information theoretic measure, has been used to capture the interplay between the functional localization of brain regions and their integration for higher cognitive functions. Unfortunately, treatments of all three methods-power-law fitting, avalanche shape collapse, and neural complexity-have suffered from shortcomings. Empirical data often contain biases that introduce deviations from true power law in the tail and head of the distribution, but deviations in the tail have often been unconsidered; avalanche shape collapse has required manual parameter tuning; and the estimation of neural complexity has relied on small data sets or statistical assumptions for the sake of computational efficiency. In this paper we present technical advancements in the analysis of criticality and complexity in neural systems. We use maximum-likelihood estimation to automatically fit power laws with left and right cutoffs, present the first automated shape collapse algorithm, and describe new techniques to account for large numbers of neural variables and small data sets in the calculation of neural complexity. In order to facilitate future research in criticality and complexity, we have made the software utilized in this analysis freely available online in the MATLAB NCC (Neural Complexity and Criticality) Toolbox.

  8. Comparative Genomic and Functional Analysis of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strains Marketed as Probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douillard, F.P.; Ribbera, A.; Järvinen, H.M.; Kant, R.; Pietilä, T.E.; Randazzo, C.L.; Paulin, L.; Laine, P.K.; Caggia, C.; Ossowski, von I.; Reunanen, J.; Satokari, R.; Salminen, S.; Palva, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2013-01-01

    Four Lactobacillus strains were isolated from marketed probiotic products, including L. rhamnosus strains from Vifit (Friesland Campina) and Idoform (Ferrosan) and L. casei strains from Actimel (Danone) and Yakult (Yakult Honsa Co.). Their genomes and phenotypes were characterized and compared in de

  9. Comparative Genomic and Functional Analysis of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strains Marketed as Probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douillard, F.P.; Ribbera, A.; Järvinen, H.M.; Kant, R.; Pietilä, T.E.; Randazzo, C.L.; Paulin, L.; Laine, P.K.; Caggia, C.; Ossowski, von I.; Reunanen, J.; Satokari, R.; Salminen, S.; Palva, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2013-01-01

    Four Lactobacillus strains were isolated from marketed probiotic products, including L. rhamnosus strains from Vifit (Friesland Campina) and Idoform (Ferrosan) and L. casei strains from Actimel (Danone) and Yakult (Yakult Honsa Co.). Their genomes and phenotypes were characterized and compared in

  10. Comparative Genomic and Functional Analysis of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strains Marketed as Probiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douillard, F.P.; Ribbera, A.; Järvinen, H.M.; Kant, R.; Pietilä, T.E.; Randazzo, C.L.; Paulin, L.; Laine, P.K.; Caggia, C.; Ossowski, von I.; Reunanen, J.; Satokari, R.; Salminen, S.; Palva, A.; Vos, de W.M.

    2013-01-01

    Four Lactobacillus strains were isolated from marketed probiotic products, including L. rhamnosus strains from Vifit (Friesland Campina) and Idoform (Ferrosan) and L. casei strains from Actimel (Danone) and Yakult (Yakult Honsa Co.). Their genomes and phenotypes were characterized and compared in de

  11. Anaerobic conversion of lactic acid to acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol by Lactobacillus buchneri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, SJWHO; Krooneman, J; Gottschal, JC; Spoelstra, SF; Faber, F; Driehuis, F

    2001-01-01

    The degradation of lactic acid under anoxic conditions was studied in several strains of Lactobacillus buchneri and in close relatives such as Lactobacillus parabuchneri, Lactobacillus kefir, and Lactobacillus hilgardii. Of these lactobacilli, L. buchneri and L. parabuchneri were able to degrade lac

  12. Anaerobic conversion of lactic acid to acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol by Lactobacillus buchneri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, SJWHO; Krooneman, J; Gottschal, JC; Spoelstra, SF; Faber, F; Driehuis, F

    The degradation of lactic acid under anoxic conditions was studied in several strains of Lactobacillus buchneri and in close relatives such as Lactobacillus parabuchneri, Lactobacillus kefir, and Lactobacillus hilgardii. Of these lactobacilli, L. buchneri and L. parabuchneri were able to degrade

  13. Anaerobic conversion of lactic acid to acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol by Lactobacillus buchneri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.; Krooneman, J.; Gottschal, J.C.; Spoelstra, S.F.; Faber, F.; Driehuis, F.

    2001-01-01

    The degradation of lactic acid under anoxic conditions was studied in several strains of Lactobacillus buchneri and in close relatives such as Lactobacillus parabuchneri, Lactobacillus kefir, and Lactobacillus hilgardii. Of these lactobacilli, L. buchneri and L. parabuchneri were able to degrade

  14. Anaerobic conversion of lactic acid to acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol by Lactobacillus buchneri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, S.; Krooneman, J.; Gottschal, J.C.; Spoelstra, S.F.; Faber, F.; Driehuis, F.

    2001-01-01

    The degradation of lactic acid under anoxic conditions was studied in several strains of Lactobacillus buchneri and in close relatives such as Lactobacillus parabuchneri, Lactobacillus kefir, and Lactobacillus hilgardii. Of these lactobacilli, L. buchneri and L. parabuchneri were able to degrade lac

  15. Inhibition of initial adhesion of uropathogenic Enterococcus faecalis by biosurfactants from Lactobacillus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velraeds, MMC; vanderMei, HC; Reid, G; Busscher, HJ

    1996-01-01

    In this study, 15 Lactobacillus isolates were found to produce biosurfactants in the mid-exponential and stationary growth phases. The stationary-phase biosurfactants from Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus 36 and ATCC 7469, Lactobacillus fermentum B54, and Lactobacillus acidophilus RC14 were inve

  16. Aciduric Strains of Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Isolated from Human Feces, Have Strong Adhesion and Aggregation Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopper, Kyle B; Deane, Shelly M; Dicks, Leon M T

    2017-07-29

    Human feces were streaked onto MRS Agar adjusted to pH 2.5, 3.0, and 6.4, respectively, and medium supplemented with 1.0% (w/v) bile salts. Two aciduric strains, identified as Lactobacillus reuteri HFI-LD5 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HFI-K2 (based on 16S rDNA and recA sequences), were non-hemolytic and did not hydrolyze mucin. The surface of Lactobacillus reuteri HFI-LD5 cells has a weak negative charge, whereas Lactobacillus rhamnosus HFI-K2 has acidic and basic properties, and produces exopolysaccharides (EPS). None of the strains produce bacteriocins. Both strains are resistant to several antibiotics, including sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim and sulphonamides. The ability of Lactobacillus reuteri HFI-LD5 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HFI-K2 to grow at pH 2.5 suggests that they will survive passage through the stomach. EPS production may assist in binding to intestinal mucus, especially in the small intestinal tract, protect epithelial cells, and stimulate the immune system. Lactobacillus reuteri HFI-LD5 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HFI-K2 may be used as probiotics, especially in the treatment of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO).

  17. In vitro antagonistic growth effects of Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus salivarius and their fermentative broth on periodontal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Ju Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As lactobacilli possess an antagonistic growth property, these bacteria may be beneficial as bioprotective agents for infection control. However, whether the antagonistic growth effects are attributed to the lactobacilli themselves or their fermentative broth remains unclear. The antagonistic growth effects of Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus fermentum as well as their fermentative broth were thus tested using both disc agar diffusion test and broth dilution method, and their effects on periodontal pathogens, including Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Porphyromonas gingivalisin vitro at different concentrations and for different time periods were also compared. Both Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus fermentum and their concentrated fermentative broth were shown to inhibit significantly the growth of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, althoughdifferent inhibitory effects were observed for different pathogens. The higher the counts of lactobacilli and the higher the folds of concentrated fermentative broth, the stronger the inhibitory effects are observed. The inhibitory effect is demonstrated to be dose-dependent. Moreover, for the lactobacilli themselves, Lactobacillus fermentum showed stronger inhibitory effects than Lactobacillus salivarius. However, the fermentative broth of Lactobacillus fermentum showed weaker inhibitory effects than that of Lactobacillus salivarius. These data suggested that lactobacilli and their fermentative broth exhibit antagonistic growth activity, and consumption of probiotics or their broth containing lactobacilli may benefit oral health.

  18. In vitro antagonistic growth effects of Lactobacillus fermentum and lactobacillus salivarius and their fermentative broth on periodontal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling-Ju; Tsai, Hsiu-Ting; Chen, Wei-Jen; Hsieh, Chu-Yang; Wang, Pi-Chieh; Chen, Chung-Shih; Wang, Lina; Yang, Chi-Chiang

    2012-10-01

    As lactobacilli possess an antagonistic growth property, these bacteria may be beneficial as bioprotective agents for infection control. However, whether the antagonistic growth effects are attributed to the lactobacilli themselves or their fermentative broth remains unclear. The antagonistic growth effects of Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus fermentum as well as their fermentative broth were thus tested using both disc agar diffusion test and broth dilution method, and their effects on periodontal pathogens, including Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis in vitro at different concentrations and for different time periods were also compared. Both Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus fermentum and their concentrated fermentative broth were shown to inhibit significantly the growth of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, although different inhibitory effects were observed for different pathogens. The higher the counts of lactobacilli and the higher the folds of concentrated fermentative broth, the stronger the inhibitory effects are observed. The inhibitory effect is demonstrated to be dose-dependent. Moreover, for the lactobacilli themselves, Lactobacillus fermentum showed stronger inhibitory effects than Lactobacillus salivarius. However, the fermentative broth of Lactobacillus fermentum showed weaker inhibitory effects than that of Lactobacillus salivarius. These data suggested that lactobacilli and their fermentative broth exhibit antagonistic growth activity, and consumption of probiotics or their broth containing lactobacilli may benefit oral health.

  19. A role for the circadian clock protein Per1 in the regulation of the NaCl co-transporter (NCC) and the with-no-lysine kinase (WNK) cascade in mouse distal convoluted tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jacob; Ko, Benjamin; All, Sean; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Hoover, Robert S; Gumz, Michelle L

    2014-04-25

    It has been well established that blood pressure and renal function undergo circadian fluctuations. We have demonstrated that the circadian protein Per1 regulates multiple genes involved in sodium transport in the collecting duct of the kidney. However, the role of Per1 in other parts of the nephron has not been investigated. The distal convoluted tubule (DCT) plays a critical role in renal sodium reabsorption. Sodium is reabsorbed in this segment through the actions of the NaCl co-transporter (NCC), which is regulated by the with-no-lysine kinases (WNKs). The goal of this study was to test if Per1 regulates sodium transport in the DCT through modulation of NCC and the WNK kinases, WNK1 and WNK4. Pharmacological blockade of nuclear Per1 entry resulted in decreased mRNA expression of NCC and WNK1 but increased expression of WNK4 in the renal cortex of mice. These findings were confirmed by using Per1 siRNA and pharmacological blockade of Per1 nuclear entry in mDCT15 cells, a model of the mouse distal convoluted tubule. Transcriptional regulation was demonstrated by changes in short lived heterogeneous nuclear RNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated interaction of Per1 and CLOCK with the promoters of NCC, WNK1, and WNK4. This interaction was modulated by blockade of Per1 nuclear entry. Importantly, NCC protein expression and NCC activity, as measured by thiazide-sensitive, chloride-dependent (22)Na uptake, were decreased upon pharmacological inhibition of Per1 nuclear entry. Taken together, these data demonstrate a role for Per1 in the transcriptional regulation of NCC, WNK1, and WNK4.

  20. A Role for the Circadian Clock Protein Per1 in the Regulation of the NaCl Co-transporter (NCC) and the with-no-lysine Kinase (WNK) Cascade in Mouse Distal Convoluted Tubule Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jacob; Ko, Benjamin; All, Sean; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Hoover, Robert S.; Gumz, Michelle L.

    2014-01-01

    It has been well established that blood pressure and renal function undergo circadian fluctuations. We have demonstrated that the circadian protein Per1 regulates multiple genes involved in sodium transport in the collecting duct of the kidney. However, the role of Per1 in other parts of the nephron has not been investigated. The distal convoluted tubule (DCT) plays a critical role in renal sodium reabsorption. Sodium is reabsorbed in this segment through the actions of the NaCl co-transporter (NCC), which is regulated by the with-no-lysine kinases (WNKs). The goal of this study was to test if Per1 regulates sodium transport in the DCT through modulation of NCC and the WNK kinases, WNK1 and WNK4. Pharmacological blockade of nuclear Per1 entry resulted in decreased mRNA expression of NCC and WNK1 but increased expression of WNK4 in the renal cortex of mice. These findings were confirmed by using Per1 siRNA and pharmacological blockade of Per1 nuclear entry in mDCT15 cells, a model of the mouse distal convoluted tubule. Transcriptional regulation was demonstrated by changes in short lived heterogeneous nuclear RNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated interaction of Per1 and CLOCK with the promoters of NCC, WNK1, and WNK4. This interaction was modulated by blockade of Per1 nuclear entry. Importantly, NCC protein expression and NCC activity, as measured by thiazide-sensitive, chloride-dependent 22Na uptake, were decreased upon pharmacological inhibition of Per1 nuclear entry. Taken together, these data demonstrate a role for Per1 in the transcriptional regulation of NCC, WNK1, and WNK4. PMID:24610784

  1. Probiotic properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus paracasei isolated from human faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdenelli, Maria Cristina; Ghelfi, Francesca; Silvi, Stefania; Orpianesi, Carla; Cecchini, Cinzia; Cresci, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    The possibility of using microbes to maintain health, and to prevent or treat disease is a topic as old as microbiology. The research of novel probiotic strains is important in order to satisfy the increasing request of the market and to obtain functional products in which the probiotic cultures are more active and with better probiotic characteristics than those already present on the market. In this study, the probiotic potential of Lactobacillus strains isolated from Italian elderly human faeces was investigated. The Lactobacillus strains were identified and examined for resistance to gastric acidity and bile toxicity, adhesion to HT-29 cells, antimicrobial activities, antibiotic susceptibility and plasmid profile. Survival of the strains through human intestine was examined in a 3 months human feeding trial. Two strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501 and Lactobacillus paracasei IMC 502, tolerated well low pH and bile acids. In antimicrobial activity assays, both strains showed inhibitory properties towards selected potential harmful microorganisms, particularly against Candida albicans. The two selected strains expressed high in vitro adherence to HT-29 cells increasing this characteristic when they are used in combination and they were resistant to vamcomycin, colistin sulphate, gentamicin, oxolinic acid and kanamycin. Moreover, the two strains could be recovered from stools of volunteers after the feeding trials. Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501 and L. paracasei IMC 502 present favourable strain-specific properties for their utilisation as probiotics in functional foods and the high adhesion ability of the L. rhamnosus IMC 501 and L. paracasei IMC 502 used in combination, confirmed by both in vitro and in vivo study, indicate that the two bacterial strains could be used as health-promoting bacteria.

  2. Eruca sativa Might Influence the Growth, Survival under Simulated Gastrointestinal Conditions and Some Biological Features of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florinda Fratianni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The growth and viability of three Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, after their passage through simulated gastric and pancreatic juices were studied as a function of their presence in the growth medium of rocket salad (Eruca sativa. The presence of E. sativa affected some of the biological properties of the strains. For example, L. acidophilus and L. plantarum worked more efficiently in the presence of E. sativa, increasing not only the antioxidant activity of the medium, but also their own antioxidant power and antimicrobial activity; L. rhamnosus was not affected in the same manner. Overall, the presence of vegetables might help to boost, in specific cases, some of the characteristics of lactobacilli, including antioxidant and antimicrobial power.

  3. Eruca sativa might influence the growth, survival under simulated gastrointestinal conditions and some biological features of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratianni, Florinda; Pepe, Selenia; Cardinale, Federica; Granese, Tiziana; Cozzolino, Autilia; Coppola, Raffaele; Nazzaro, Filomena

    2014-10-01

    The growth and viability of three Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, after their passage through simulated gastric and pancreatic juices were studied as a function of their presence in the growth medium of rocket salad (Eruca sativa). The presence of E. sativa affected some of the biological properties of the strains. For example, L. acidophilus and L. plantarum worked more efficiently in the presence of E. sativa, increasing not only the antioxidant activity of the medium, but also their own antioxidant power and antimicrobial activity; L. rhamnosus was not affected in the same manner. Overall, the presence of vegetables might help to boost, in specific cases, some of the characteristics of lactobacilli, including antioxidant and antimicrobial power.

  4. Multi-year Simulations and Experimental Seasonal Predictions for Rainy Seasons in China by Using a Nested Regional Climate Model (RegCM_NCC). Part Ⅰ: Sensitivity Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yihui; SHI Xueli; LIU Yiming; LIU Yan; LI Qingquan; QIAN Yongfu; MIAO Manqian; ZHAI Guoqing; GAO Kun

    2006-01-01

    A modified version of the NCAR/RegCM2 has been developed at the National Climate Center (NCC), China Meteorological Administration, through a series of sensitivity experiments and multi-year simulations and hindcasts, with a special emphasis on the adequate choice of physical parameterization schemes suitable for the East Asian monsoon climate. This regional climate model is nested with the NCC/IAP (Institute of Atmospheric Physics) T63 coupled GCM to make an experimental seasonal prediction for China and East Asia. The four-year (2001 to 2004) prediction results are encouraging. This paper is the first part of a two-part paper, and it mainly describes the sensitivity study of the physical process parameterization represented in the model. The systematic errors produced by the different physical parameterization schemes such as the land surface processes, convective precipitation, cloud-radiation transfer process, boundary layer process and large-scale terrain features have been identified based on multi-year and extreme flooding event simulations. A number of comparative experiments has shown that the mass flux scheme (MFS) and Betts-Miller scheme (BM) for convective precipitation, the LPMI (land surface process model I) and LPMII (land surface process model Ⅱ) for the land surface process, the CCM3 radiation transfer scheme for cloud-radiation transfer processes, the TKE (turbulent kinetic energy) scheme for the boundary layer processes and the topography treatment schemes for the Tibetan Plateau are suitable for simulations and prediction of the East Asia monsoon climate in rainy seasons. Based on the above sensitivity study, a modified version of the RegCM2 (RegCM_NCC) has been set up for climate simulations and seasonal predictions.

  5. Decreased ENaC expression compensates the increased NCC activity following inactivation of the kidney-specific isoform of WNK1 and prevents hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadchouel, Juliette; Soukaseum, Christelle; Büsst, Cara; Zhou, Xiao-ou; Baudrie, Véronique; Zürrer, Tany; Cambillau, Michelle; Elghozi, Jean-Luc; Lifton, Richard P; Loffing, Johannes; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2010-10-19

    Mutations in WNK1 and WNK4 lead to familial hyperkalemic hypertension (FHHt). Because FHHt associates net positive Na(+) balance together with K(+) and H(+) renal retention, the identification of WNK1 and WNK4 led to a new paradigm to explain how aldosterone can promote either Na(+) reabsorption or K(+) secretion in a hypovolemic or hyperkalemic state, respectively. WNK1 gives rise to L-WNK1, an ubiquitous kinase, and KS-WNK1, a kinase-defective isoform expressed in the distal convoluted tubule. By inactivating KS-WNK1 in mice, we show here that this isoform is an important regulator of sodium transport. KS-WNK1(-/-) mice display an increased activity of the Na-Cl cotransporter NCC, expressed specifically in the distal convoluted tubule, where it participates in the fine tuning of sodium reabsorption. Moreover, the expression of the ROMK and BKCa potassium channels was modified in KS-WNK1(-/-) mice, indicating that KS-WNK1 is also a regulator of potassium transport in the distal nephron. Finally, we provide an alternative model for FHHt. Previous studies suggested that the activation of NCC plays a central role in the development of hypertension and hyperkalemia. Even though the increase in NCC activity in KS-WNK1(-/-) mice was less pronounced than in mice overexpressing a mutant form of WNK4, our study suggests that the activation of Na-Cl cotransporter is not sufficient by itself to induce a hyperkalemic hypertension and that the deregulation of other channels, such as the Epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), is probably required.

  6. Effect of heterozygous deletion of WNK1 on the WNK-OSR1/ SPAK-NCC/NKCC1/NKCC2 signal cascade in the kidney and blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susa, Koichiro; Kita, Satomi; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Yang, Sung-Sen; Lin, Shih-Hua; Ohta, Akihito; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Sasaki, Sei; Alessi, Dario R; Uchida, Shinichi

    2012-08-01

    We found that a mechanism of hypertension in pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) caused by a WNK4 missense mutation (D561A) was activation of the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC signal cascade. However, the pathogenic effect of intronic deletions in WNK1 genes also observed in PHAII patients remains unclear. To understand the pathophysiological roles of WNK1 in vivo, WNK1(+/-)mice have been analyzed, because homozygous WNK1 knockout is embryonic lethal. Although WNK1(+/-) mice have been reported to have hypotension, detailed analyses of the WNK signal cascade in the kidney and other organs of WNK1(+/-) mice have not been performed. We assess the effect of heterozygous deletion of WNK1 on the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC/NKCC1/NKCC2 signal cascade in the kidney and blood vessels. Contrary to the previous report, the blood pressure of WNK1(+/-) mice was not decreased, even under a low-salt diet. Under a WNK4(D561A/+) background, the heterozygous deletion of the WNK1 gene did not reduce the high blood pressure either. We then evaluated the phosphorylation status of OSR1, SPAK, NCC, NKCC1, and NKCC2 in the kidney, but no significant decrease in the phosphorylation was observed in WNK1(+/-) mice or WNK1(+/-)WNK4(D561A/+) mice. In contrast, a significant decrease in NKCC1 phosphorylation in the aorta and a decreased pressure-induced myogenic response in the mesenteric arteries were observed in WNK1(+/-) mice. The contribution of WNK1 to total WNK kinase activity in the kidney may be small, but that WNK1 may play a substantial role in the regulation of blood pressure in the arteries.

  7. Assessment of the Partially Resolved Numerical Simulation (PRNS) Approach in the National Combustion Code (NCC) for Turbulent Nonreacting and Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an approach which aims at bridging the gap between the traditional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach and the traditional large eddy simulation (LES) approach. It has the characteristics of the very large eddy simulation (VLES) and we call this approach the partially-resolved numerical simulation (PRNS). Systematic simulations using the National Combustion Code (NCC) have been carried out for fully developed turbulent pipe flows at different Reynolds numbers to evaluate the PRNS approach. Also presented are the sample results of two demonstration cases: nonreacting flow in a single injector flame tube and reacting flow in a Lean Direct Injection (LDI) hydrogen combustor.

  8. Lactobacillus kimchii sp. nov., a new species from kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, J H; Kang, S S; Mheen, T I; Ahn, J S; Lee, H J; Kim, T K; Park, C S; Kho, Y H; Kang, K H; Park, Y H

    2000-09-01

    A bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacterium, which was isolated from the Korean fermented-vegetable food kimchi, was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study using phenotypic characterization and phylogenetic and genetic methods. This organism (MT-1077T) has phenotypic properties that are consistent with the description characterizing the genus Lactobacillus. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences showed clearly that strain MT-1077T is a member of the genus Lactobacillus. The closest phylogenetic relatives are Lactobacillus alimentarius KCTC 3593T and Lactobacillus farciminis LMG 9200T, with levels of 16S rDNA similarity of 98.4 and 98.2%, respectively. Levels of 16S rDNA similarity between strain MT-1077T and other Lactobacillus species were less than 93.0%. Differences in some phenotypic characteristics and DNA-DNA relatedness data indicated that strain MT-1077T should be distinguished from L. alimentarius KCTC 3593T and L. farciminis LMG 9200T. On the basis of the data presented, it is proposed that strain MT-1077T should be placed in the genus Lactobacillus as a new species, Lactobacillus kimchii sp. nov. The type strain of the new species is strain MT-1077T (= KCTC 8903PT = JCM 10707T).

  9. Study of Lactobacillus as Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Nowroozi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of inhibitory effect, selected probiotic lactobacilli may be used as biological preservative, so, the aim of this study was to present some data on lactobacillus as probiotic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from sausage. Each isolate of lactobacillus species was identified by biochemical tests and comparing their sugar fermentation pattern. Antibacterial activities were done by an agar spot, well diffusion and blank disk method. Enzyme sensitivity of supernatant fluid and concentrated cell free culture after treatment with α-amylase, lysozyme and trypsin was determined. The isolated bacteria were Lacto. plantarum, Lacto delbruekii, Lacto. acidophilus, Lacto. brevis. The isolated bacteria had strong activity against indicator strains. The antibacterial activity was stable at 100ºC for 10 min and at 56ºC for 30 min, but activity was lost after autoclaving. The maximum production of plantaricin was obtained at 25 - 30ºC at pH 6.5. Because, lactobacilli that used to process sausage fermentation are producing antimicrobial activity with heat stability bacteriocin, so, these bacteria may be considered to be a healthy probiotic diet. Lactobacilli originally isolated from meat products are the best condidates as probiotic bacteria to improve the microbiological safety of these foods.

  10. Lactobacillus decelerates cervical epithelial cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Vielfort

    Full Text Available We investigated cell cycle progression in epithelial cervical ME-180 cells during colonization of three different Lactobacillus species utilizing live cell microscopy, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays, and flow cytometry. The colonization of these ME-180 cells by L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri, originating from human gastric epithelia and saliva, respectively, was shown to reduce cell cycle progression and to cause host cells to accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The G1 phase accumulation in L. rhamnosus-colonized cells was accompanied by the up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of p21. By contrast, the vaginal isolate L. crispatus did not affect cell cycle progression. Furthermore, both the supernatants from the lactic acid-producing L. rhamnosus colonies and lactic acid added to cell culture media were able to reduce the proliferation of ME-180 cells. In this study, we reveal the diversity of the Lactobacillus species to affect host cell cycle progression and demonstrate that L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri exert anti-proliferative effects on human cervical carcinoma cells.

  11. Characterization of amygdalin-degrading Lactobacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, R; Munjal, N; Sturino, J M

    2015-02-01

    Cyanogenic glycosides are phytotoxic secondary metabolites produced by some crop plants. The aim of this study was to identify lactic acid bacteria (LAB) capable of catabolizing amygdalin, a model cyanogenic glycoside, for use in the biodetoxification of amygdalin-containing foods and feeds. Amygdalin-catabolizing lactobacilli were characterized using a combination of cultivation-dependent and molecular assays. Lactobacillus paraplantarum and Lactobacillus plantarum grew robustly on amygdalin (Amg(+)), while other LAB species typically failed to catabolize amygdalin (Amg(-)). Interestingly, high concentrations of amygdalin and two of its metabolic derivatives (mandelonitrile and benzaldehyde) inhibited the growth of Lact. plantarum RENO 0093. The differential regulation of genes tentatively involved in cyanohydrin metabolism illustrated that the metabolism of amygdalin- and glucose-grown cultures also differed significantly. Amygdalin fermentation was a relatively uncommon phenotype among the LAB and generally limited to strains from the Lact. plantarum group. Phenotype microarrays (PM) enabled strain-level discrimination between closely related strains within a species and suggested that phenotypic differences might affect niche specialization. Amygdalin-degrading lactobacilli with practical application in the biodetoxification of amygdalin were characterized. These strains show potential for use as starter cultures to improve the safety of foods and feeds. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Epithelial cell adhesion and gastrointestinal colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Megan A; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Duong, Tri

    2014-11-01

    Administration of probiotic Lactobacillus cultures is an important alternative to the use of antibiotic growth promoters and has been demonstrated to improve animal health, growth performance, and preharvest food safety in poultry production. Whereas gastrointestinal colonization is thought to be critical to their probiotic functionality, factors important to Lactobacillus colonization in chickens are not well understood. In this study we investigate epithelial cell adhesion in vitro and colonization of Lactobacillusin vivo in broiler chickens. Adhesion of Lactobacillus cultures to epithelial cells was evaluated using the chicken LMH cell line. Lactobacillus cultures were able adhere effectively to LMH cells relative to Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Epithelial cell adhesion was similar for Lactobacillus crispatus TDCC 75, L. cristpatus TDCC 76, and Lactobacillus gallinarum TDCC 77, and all 3 were more adherent than L. gallinarum TDCC 78. However, when colonization was evaluated in the ileum and cecum of broiler chicks, L. crispatus TDCC 75 and L. gallinarum TDCC 77 were more persistent than L. crispatus TDCC 76 and L. gallinarum TDCC 78. The reduction of growth in medium supplemented with oxgal was greater for L. gallinarum TDCC 78 than L. gallinarum TDCC 77, suggesting that whereas adhesion was similar for the 2 strains, the difference in colonization between L. gallinarum strains may be due in part to their bile sensitivity. This study demonstrates that whereas adhesion to epithelial cells may be important in predicting gastrointestinal colonization, other factors including bile tolerance may also contribute to the colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry. Additionally, the chicken LMH cell line is expected to provide a platform for investigating mechanisms of Lactobacillus adhesion to epithelial tissue and evaluating the probiotic potential Lactobacillus in poultry.

  13. Lactobacillus mixtipabuli sp. nov. isolated from total mixed ration silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohno, Masanori; Kitahara, Maki; Irisawa, Tomohiro; Ohmori, Hideyuki; Masuda, Takaharu; Ohkuma, Moriya; Tajima, Kiyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Using a polyphasic taxonomic approach, we investigated three bacterial strains - IWT30T, IWT8 and IWT75 - isolated from total mixed ration silage prepared in Hachimantai, Iwate, Japan. The isolates comprised Gram-stain positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming, catalase-negative, rod-shaped bacteria. Good growth occurred at 15-45 °C and at pH 4.0-7.5. Their major cellular fatty acids were C18:1ω9c and C19:1 cyclo 9,10.The G+C content of genomic DNA of strain IWT30T was 44.6 mol%. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that these novel strains belonged to the genus Lactobacillus. These strains shared 100 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and were most closely related to the type strains of Lactobacillus silagei, Lactobacillus odoratitofui, Lactobacillus similis, Lactobacillus collinoides, Lactobacillus paracollinoides and Lactobacillus kimchicus, with sequence similarity values of 99.5, 98.8, 98.7, 97.8, 97.8 and 96.8 %, respectively. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between these strains and their closest phylogenetic neighbours was less than 30 %. On the basis of additional phylogenetic analysis of pheS and rpoA gene sequences and phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, we conclude that these three strains represent a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which we propose the name Lactobacillus mixtipabuli sp. nov. The type strain is IWT30T ( = JCM 19805T = DSM 28580T).

  14. Effect of probiotic Lactobacillus strains in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfeldt, Vibeke; Benfeldt, Eva; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest that oral bacteriotherapy with probiotics might be useful in the management of atopic dermatitis (AD). OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the clinical and anti-inflammatory effect of probiotic supplementation in children with AD. METHODS......: In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 2 probiotic Lactobacillus strains (lyophilized Lactobacillus rhamnosus 19070-2 and Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 122460) were given in combination for 6 weeks to 1- to 13-year-old children with AD. The patients' evaluations were registered after each...

  15. Lactic acid production by mixed cultures of Kluyveromyces marxianus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Lactobacillus helveticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessas, S; Bosnea, L; Psarianos, C; Koutinas, A A; Marchant, R; Banat, I M

    2008-09-01

    Lactic acid production using Kluyveromyces marxianus (IFO 288), Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus (ATCC 11842) and Lactobacillus helveticus (ATCC 15009) individually or as mixed culture on cheese whey in stirred or static fermentation conditions was evaluated. Lactic acid production, residual sugar and cell biomass were the main features examined. Increased lactic acid production was observed, when mixed cultures were used in comparison to individual ones. The highest lactic acid concentrations were achieved when K. marxianus yeast was combined with L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, and when all the strains were used revealing possible synergistic effects between the yeast and the two lactic acid bacteria. The same synergistic effects were further observed and verified when the mixed cultures were applied in sourdough fermentations, proving that the above microbiological system could be applied in the food fermentations where high lactic acid production is sought.

  16. Lactic acid production from wheat straw hemicellulose hydrolysate by Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus brevis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Arvid; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil; Schmidt, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid production by Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus pentosus on a hemicellulose hydrolysate (HH) of wet-oxidized wheat straw was evaluated. The potential of 11-12 g/l fermentable sugars was released from the HH through either enzymatic or acidic pretreatment. Fermentation of added...... xylose in untreated HH after wet-oxidation, showed no inhibition on the lactic acid production by either Lb. pentosus or Lb. brevis. Lb. pentosus produced lactate corresponding to 88% of the theoretical maximum yield regardless of the hydrolysis method, whereas Lb. brevis produced 51% and 61......% of the theoretical maximum yield after enzymatic, or acid treatment of HH, respectively. Individually, neither of the two strains were able to fully utilize the relatively broad spectra of sugars released by the acid and enzyme treatments; however, lactic acid production increased to 95% of the theoretical maximum...

  17. Lactic acid production from corn stover using mixed cultures of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Fengjie; Li, Yebo; Wan, Caixia

    2011-01-01

    Mixed cultures of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus brevis was studied for improving utilization of both cellulose- and hemicellulose-derived sugars from corn stover for lactic acid production. During simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of NaOH-treated corn stover by the mixed cultures, a lactic acid yield of 0.70 g/g was obtained, which was about 18.6% and 29.6% higher than that by single cultures of L. rhamnosus and L. brevis, respectively. Our results indicated that lactic acid yield from NaOH-pretreated corn stover by mixed cultures of L. rhamnosus and L. brevis was comparable to that from pure sugar mixtures (0.73 g/g of glucose/xylose mixture at 3:1 w/w). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lactobacillus alimentarius sp. nov., nom rev. and Lactobacillus farciminis sp. nov., nom. rev.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, G

    1983-01-01

    In 1970 two new species within the so-called subgenus "Streptobacterium" Orla-Jensen of the genus Lactobacillus were described (Reuter, 1970). They were named L. alimentarius with the type strain "R 13" (DSM 20249) and L. farciminis with the type strain "Rv 4na" (DSM 20184). Since these two names have so far not been included in the "Approved Lists of Bacterial Names" (Skerman et al., 1980) they are revived for the same organisms with the same type strains.

  19. Antigen-presenting cells exposed to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, Bifidobacterium bifidum BI-98, and BI-504 reduce regulatory T cell activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Jensen, Simon Skjøde

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: The effect in vitro of six different probiotic strains including Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei YS8866441, Lactobacillus plantarum Lp-115, Bifidobacterium bifidum BI-504 and BI-98 was studied on splenic...

  20. Amylolytic strains of Lactobacillus plantarum isolated from barley

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2015-01-28

    Jan 28, 2015 ... Key words: Lactobacillus plantarum, starch hydrolysis, barley, malting. ... especially in environments rich in glucose or disac- charides such as sucrose ..... numbers produce less lactic acid, which in turn is less stringent on ...

  1. Metabolic activities of Lactobacillus spp. strains isolated from kefir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksekdag, Zehra Nur; Beyath, Yavuz; Aslim, Belma

    2004-06-01

    A total of 21 strains of Lactobacillus species were isolated from Turkish kefir samples, in order to select the most suitable strains according to their metabolic activities including probiotic properties. As a result of the identification tests, 21 Lactobacillus isolates were identified as L. acidophilus (4%), L. helveticus (9%), L. brevis (9%), L. bulgaricus (14%), L. plantarum (14%), L. casei (19%) and L. lactis (28%). The amount of produced lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide, proteolytic activity, and acetaldehyde productions of Lactobacillus spp. were determined. Different amounts of lactic acid were produced by strains studies; however, lactic acid levels were 1.7-11.4 mg/mL. All strains produced hydrogen peroxide. L. bulgaricus Z14L strain showed no proteolytic activity, L. casei Z6L strain produced the maximum amount (0.16 mg/mL) of proteolytic activity. Acetaldehyde concentration produced in Lactobacillus strains ranged between 0.88-3.52 microg/mL.

  2. Efficient screening methods for glucosyltransferase genes in Lactobacillus strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kralj, S.; Geel van - Schutten, G.H.; Maarel, M.J.E.C. van der; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2003-01-01

    Limited information is available about homopolysaccharide synthesis in the genus Lactobacillus. Using efficient screening techniques, extracellular glucosyltransferase (GTF) enzyme activity, resulting in α-glucan synthesis from sucrose, was detected in various lactobacilli. PCR with degenerate

  3. Efficient screening methods for glucosyltransferase genes in Lactobacillus strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kralj, S; van Geel-schutten, GH; van der Maarel, MJEC; Dijkhuizen, L

    Limited information is available about homopolysaccharide synthesis in the genus Lactobacillus . Using efficient screening techniques, extracellular glucosyltransferase (GTF) enzyme activity, resulting in alpha-glucan synthesis from sucrose, was detected in various lactobacilli. PCR with degenerate

  4. Efficient screening methods for glucosyltransferase genes in Lactobacillus strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kralj, S.; Geel van - Schutten, G.H.; Maarel, M.J.E.C. van der; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2003-01-01

    Limited information is available about homopolysaccharide synthesis in the genus Lactobacillus. Using efficient screening techniques, extracellular glucosyltransferase (GTF) enzyme activity, resulting in α-glucan synthesis from sucrose, was detected in various lactobacilli. PCR with degenerate prime

  5. Exopolysaccharides produced by Lactobacillus sp. - biosynthesis and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksy, Magdalena; Klewicka, Elżbieta

    2016-05-31

    Lactobacillus sp. synthesize exopolysaccharides (EPS), including both homo- and heteropolysaccharides, which play an important role in the production of fermented foods, and especially in the dairy industry, improving the gustatory and rheological properties of the finished products. These polymers are generated by starter cultures in situ in fermented foods, and so they are treated as natural thickening agents. As some Lactobacillus strains are generally recognized as safe (GRAS) and have been shown to exhibit probiotic activity, EPS from those bacteria can be used as functional food ingredients, conferring both health and economic benefits to the consumers. However, their industrial applications are hindered by the low yield of EPS from Lactobacillus and by the fact that the health-related properties of the bacteria have not been fully elucidated to date. This review focuses on the latest reports concerning the biosynthesis and properties of Lactobacillus exopolysaccharides.

  6. High efficiency electrotransformation of Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, Dennis L; Hughes, Joanne E; Steele, James L; Broadbent, Jeff R

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether protocols allowing high efficiency electrotransformation of other lactic acid bacteria were applicable to five strains of Lactobacillus casei (12A, 32G, A2-362, ATCC 334 and BL23). Addition of 1% glycine or 0.9 M NaCl during cell growth, limitation of the growth of the cell cultures to OD600 0.6-0.8, pre-electroporation treatment of cells with water or with a lithium acetate (100 mM)/dithiothreitol (10 mM) solution and optimization of electroporation conditions all improved transformation efficiencies. However, the five strains varied in their responses to these treatments. Transformation efficiencies of 10(6) colony forming units μg(-1) pTRKH2 DNA and higher were obtained with three strains which is sufficient for construction of chromosomal gene knock-outs and gene replacements.

  7. Bioactivity characterization of Lactobacillus strains isolated from dairy products

    OpenAIRE

    Haghshenas, Babak; Nami, Yousef; Haghshenas, Minoo; Abdullah, Norhafizah; Rosli, Rozita; Radiah, Dayang; Yari Khosroushahi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to find candidate strains of Lactobacillus isolated from sheep dairy products (yogurt and ewe colostrum) with probiotic and anticancer activity. A total of 100 samples were randomly collected from yogurt and colostrum and 125 lactic acid bacteria were isolated. Of these, 17 Lactobacillus strains belonging to five species (L. delbrueckii, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus, L. paracasei, and L. casei) were identified. L. plantarum 17C and 13C, which isolated from colostrums, demonstra...

  8. Lactobacillus insicii sp. nov., isolated from fermented raw meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Matthias A; Kröckel, Lothar; Lick, Sonja; Radmann, Pia; Bantleon, Annegret; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the bacterial microbiota of retain samples of pork salami revealed an isolate (strain TMW 1.2011T) that could neither be assigned to typical genera of starter organisms nor to any other known meat-associated species. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, short, straight rods occurring singly, in pairs or short chains. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and specific phenotypic characteristics showed that strain TMW 1.2011T belonged to the phylogenetic Lactobacillus alimentarius group, and the closest neighbours were Lactobacillus nodensis JCM 14932T (97.8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Lactobacillus tucceti DSM 20183T (97.4 %), 'Lactobacillus ginsenosidimutans' EMML 3041 (97.3 %), Lactobacillus versmoldensis DSM 14857T (96.9 %) and Lactobacillus furfuricola JCM 18764T (97.2 %). Similarities using partial gene sequences of the alternative chronometers pheS, dnaK and rpoA also support these relationships. DNA-DNA relatedness between the novel isolate and L. nodensis JCM 14932T, L. versmoldensis DSM 14857T and L. tucceti DSM 20183T, L. furfuricola JCM 18764T and 'L. ginsenosidimutans' EMML 3041 were below 70 % and the DNA G+C content was 36.3 mol%. The cell-wall peptidoglycan type is l-Lys-Gly-d-Asp. Based on phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and physiological evidence, strain TMW 1.2011T represents a novel species of the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus insicii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TMW 1.2011T ( = CECT 8802T = DSM 29801T).

  9. Effects of feeding lactobacillus GG on lethal irradiation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, M.Y.; Chang, T.W.; Gorbach, S.L.

    1987-05-01

    Mice exposed to 1400 rads of total body irradiation experienced 80%-100% mortality in 2 wk. Bacteremia was demonstrated in all dead animals. Feeding Lactobacillus GG strain reduced Pseudomonas bacteremia and prolonged survival time in animals colonized with this organism. In animals not colonized with Pseudomonas, feeding Lactobacillus GG also produced some reduction in early deaths, and there was less Gram-negative bacteremia in these animals compared with controls.

  10. Bile resistance mechanisms in Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena eRuiz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Most of the probiotic bacteria currently available in the market belong to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, and specific health-promoting activities, such as treatment of diarrhea or amelioration of gastrointestinal discomfort, have been attributed to them. In order to be able to survive the gastrointestinal transit and transiently colonise our gut, these bacteria must be able to counteract the deleterious action of bile salts, which are the main components of bile. Bile salts are detergent-like biological substances synthesised in the liver from cholesterol. Host enzymes conjugate the newly synthesised free bile acids in the liver with the amino acids glycine or taurine, generating conjugated bile salts. These compounds are stored in the gall bladder and they are released into the duodenum during digestion to perform their physiological function, which is the solubilisation of fat coming from diet. These bile salts possess strong antimicrobial activity, since they are able to disorganize the structure of the cell membrane, as well as trigger DNA damage. This means that bacteria inhabiting our intestinal tract must have intrinsic resistance mechanisms to cope with bile salts. To do that, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium display a variety of proteins devoted to the efflux of bile salts or protons, to modify sugar metabolism or to prevent protein misfolding. In this manuscript, we review and discuss specific bile resistance mechanisms, as well as the processes responsible for the adaptation of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli to bile.

  11. Genomic adaptation of the Lactobacillus casei group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiro Toh

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus form a closely related taxonomic group (Lactobacillus casei group within the facultatively heterofermentative lactobacilli. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of L. paracasei JCM 8130 and L. casei ATCC 393, and the draft genome sequence of L. paracasei COM0101, all of which were isolated from daily products. Furthermore, we re-annotated the genome of L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (also known as L. rhamnosus GG, which we have previously reported. We confirmed that ATCC 393 is distinct from other strains previously described as L. paracasei. The core genome of 10 completely sequenced strains of the L. casei group comprised 1,682 protein-coding genes. Although extensive genome-wide synteny was found among the L. casei group, the genomes of ATCC 53103, JCM 8130, and ATCC 393 contained genomic islands compared with L. paracasei ATCC 334. Several genomic islands, including carbohydrate utilization gene clusters, were found at the same loci in the chromosomes of the L. casei group. The spaCBA pilus gene cluster, which was first identified in GG, was also found in other strains of the L. casei group, but several L. paracasei strains including COM0101 contained truncated spaC gene. ATCC 53103 encoded a higher number of proteins involved in carbohydrate utilization compared with intestinal lactobacilli, and extracellular adhesion proteins, several of which are absent in other strains of the L. casei group. In addition to previously fully sequenced L. rhamnosus and L. paracasei strains, the complete genome sequences of L. casei will provide valuable insights into the evolution of the L. casei group.

  12. Lactobacillus suntoryeus sp. nov., isolated from malt whisky distilleries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachat, Elise; Priest, Fergus G

    2005-01-01

    Eight strains of Lactobacillus with identical partial 16S rRNA gene sequences and similar randomly amplified polymorphic DNA patterns were isolated from fermentation samples from Japanese and Scottish malt whisky distilleries. Phylogenetic analysis of almost complete 16S rRNA gene sequences from three representative strains (two from Japan, one from Scotland) placed them in the genus Lactobacillus as members of the Lactobacillus acidophilus group. Lactobacillus helveticus and Lactobacillus gallinarum were the most closely related species, with 16S rRNA gene similarities of 99.3 and 98.1 %, respectively. A similar phylogeny was derived from partial sequences of elongation factor Tu (tuf) genes in which the alleles from the three distillery isolates were identical and shared 99.0 % similarity with L. helveticus and L. gallinarum tuf genes. S-layer (slp) gene sequences suggested different relationships among the strains and the distillery isolates no longer formed a monophyletic group. The alleles from the Japanese and Scottish strains shared only 54 % similarity. Chromosomal DNA from the distillery strains gave DNA-DNA hybridization values between 79 and 100 % but showed less than 43 and 22 % reassociation with L. helveticus and L. gallinarum DNA, respectively. The name Lactobacillus suntoryeus sp. nov. is proposed for this novel taxon; the type strain is strain SAT (=LMG 22464T=NCIMB 14005T).

  13. Effect of Lactobacillus species on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ayaz; Dachang, Wu; Lei, Zhou; Jianjun, Liu; Juanjuan, Qiu; Yi, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary pathogen responsible for initiating dental caries and decay. The presence of sucrose, stimulates S. mutans to produce insoluble glucans to form oral biofilm also known as dental plaque to initiate caries lesion. The GtfB and LuxS genes of S. mutans are responsible for formation and maturation of biofilm. Lactobacillus species as probiotic can reduces the count of S. mutans. In this study effect of different Lactobacillus species against the formation of S. mutans biofilm was observed. Growing biofilm in the presence of sucrose was detected using 96 well microtiter plate crystal violet assay and biofilm formation by S. mutans in the presence of Lactobacillus was detected. Gene expression of biofilm forming genes (GtfB and LuxS) was quantified through Real-time PCR. All strains of Lactobacillus potently reduced the formation of S. mutans biofilm whereas Lactobacillus acidophilus reduced the genetic expression by 60-80%. Therefore, probiotic Lactobacillus species can be used as an alternative instead of antibiotics to decrease the chance of dental caries by reducing the count of S. mutans and their gene expression to maintain good oral health.

  14. Cholesterol Assimilation by Lactobacillus Probiotic Bacteria: An In Vitro Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Tomaro-Duchesneau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excess cholesterol is associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD, an important cause of mortality worldwide. Current CVD therapeutic measures, lifestyle and dietary interventions, and pharmaceutical agents for regulating cholesterol levels are inadequate. Probiotic bacteria have demonstrated potential to lower cholesterol levels by different mechanisms, including bile salt hydrolase activity, production of compounds that inhibit enzymes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A, and cholesterol assimilation. This work investigates 11 Lactobacillus strains for cholesterol assimilation. Probiotic strains for investigation were selected from the literature: Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 11951, L. reuteri NCIMB 701359, L. reuteri NCIMB 702655, L. reuteri NCIMB 701089, L. reuteri NCIMB 702656, Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221, L. fermentum NCIMB 8829, L. fermentum NCIMB 2797, Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103 GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 314, and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917. Cholesterol assimilation was investigated in culture media and under simulated intestinal conditions. The best cholesterol assimilator was L. plantarum ATCC 14917 (15.18 ± 0.55 mg/1010 cfu in MRS broth. L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 assimilated over 67% (2254.70 ± 63.33 mg/1010 cfu of cholesterol, the most of all the strains, under intestinal conditions. This work demonstrates that probiotic bacteria can assimilate cholesterol under intestinal conditions, with L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 showing great potential as a CVD therapeutic.

  15. Testing of viscous anti-HIV microbicides using Lactobacillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncla, B.J.; Pryke, K.; Rohan, L. C.; Yang, H.

    2012-01-01

    The development of topical microbicides for intravaginal use to prevent HIV infection requires that the drugs and formulated products be nontoxic to the endogenous vaginal Lactobacillus. In 30 min exposure tests we found dapivirine, tenofovir and UC781 (reverse transcriptase inhibitor anti-HIV drugs) as pure drugs or formulated as film or gel products were not deleterious to Lactobacillus species; however, PSC-RANTES (a synthetic CCR5 antagonist) killed 2 strains of Lactobacillus jensenii. To demonstrate the toxicity of formulated products a new assay was developed for use with viscous and non-viscous samples that we have termed the Lactobacillus toxicity test. We found that the vortex mixing of vaginal Lactobacillus species can lead to reductions in bacterial viability. Lactobacillus can survive brief, about 2 sec, but viability declines with increased vortex mixing. The addition of heat inactivated serum or bovine serum albumin, but not glycerol, prevented the decrease in bacterial viability. Bacillus atrophaeus spores also demonstrated loss of viability upon extended mixing. We observed that many of the excipients used in film formulation and the films themselves also afford protection from the killing during vortex mixing. This method is of relevance for toxicity for cidal activities of viscous products. PMID:22226641

  16. Distinct immune response induced by peptidoglycan derived from Lactobacillus sp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sun; Yong-Hui Shi; Guo-Wei Le; Xi-Yi Ma

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the distinct immune responses induced by Lactobacillus peptidoglycan (PG).METHODS: BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with PG once a day for three consecutive days. Peritoneal macrophage and splenocyte mRNA was extracted and the gene expression profile was studied using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. Inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus PG on colon tumor tissue were studied in vitro and in vivo.RESULTS: The gene expression profiles revealed that the TLR-NF-κB and Jak-STAT signaling pathways were highly activated. An inflammatory phenotype was induced when peritoneal macrophages were initially exposed to Lactobacillus PG and switched to a more complex phenotype when BALB/c mice were treated with three doses of Lactobacillus PG. A protective physiological inflammatory response was induced after three consecutive days of PG treatment. It was tending toward Th1 dominant immune response. Lactobacillus PG also appeared to induce a significantin vivo anti-colon tumor effect.CONCLUSION: Lactobacillus PG is responsible for certain immune responses induced by Lactobacilli. Anti-tumor effects of Lactobacilli are likely to attribute to the activation of macrophages by PG expressed on the bacterial cell surface.

  17. Lactobacillus curtus sp. nov., isolated from beer in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Yuki; Takesue, Nobuchika; Asano, Shizuka; Shimotsu, Satoshi; Iijima, Kazumaru; Suzuki, Koji; Motoyama, Yasuo; Aizawa, Masayuki

    2017-09-12

    A Gram-stain-positive, catalase-negative and short-rod-shaped organism, designated VTT E-94560, was isolated from beer in Finland and deposited in the VTT culture collection as a strain of Lactobacillus rossiae. However, the results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that VTT E-94560 was only related to Lactobacillus rossiae JCM 16176T with 97.0 % sequence similarity, lower than the 98.7 % regarded as the boundary for the species differentiation. Additional phylogenetic studies on the pheS gene, rpoA gene and 16S-23S rRNA internally transcribed spacer region further reinforced the taxonomically independent status of VTT E-94560 and its related Lactobacillus species including L. rossiae and Lactobacillus siliginis. Strain VTT E-94560 also exhibited several differences in its carbohydrate fermentation profiles from those related Lactobacillus species. In addition, DNA-DNA relatedness between VTT E-94560 and these two type strains was 4 % (L. rossiae JCM 16176T) and 12 % (L. siliginins JCM 16155T), respectively, which were lower than the 70 % cut-off for general species delineation, indicating that these three strains are not taxonomically identical at the species level. These studies revealed that VTT E-94560 represents a novel species, for which the name Lactobacillus curtus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is VTT E-94560T (=JCM 31185T).

  18. PROBIOTIC POTENCY OF LACTOBACILLUS SPP. ISOLATED FROM SUMBAWA MARE MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nengah Sujaya

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This research was deigned to elucidate the potency of Lactobacillus spp. isolated from sumbawa mare milk to be developed as a probiotic. Sixteen lacobacilli were screened based on their resitancy to a model of gastric juice at pH 2, 3, and 4, then followed by their resistncy to small intestional fluid model containing deoxycholic. Three lactobacilli i.e. Lactobacillus sp. SKA13, Lactobacillus rhamnosus SKG34 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus SKG49 were found to be resistentent to gastric juice at pH 3 and 4. However, there were no lactobacilli resisted to pH 2. Lactobacillus rhamnosus SKG34 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus SKG49 were able to reach the colon even after being expossed to a model of intestinal fluid containing 0,4 mM deoxycholate and pancreatine. Therefore, these isolates have a potency to be developed as probiotic lactobacilli. Nevertherless, these lactobcailli could probably transform cholic acid into secondary bile acids, which were not expected to be found in the probiotic, and this capability is not appropriate for probiotic. This character is worthly to be studied since it has never been reported in lactobacilli.

  19. Cell-free supernatants from probiotic Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG decrease colon cancer cell invasion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Juanita; Lane, Michelle A; Maitin, Vatsala

    2012-08-01

    Probiotics have been shown to have a preventative role in colorectal carcinogenesis but research concerning their prophylactic potential in the later stages of colorectal cancer, specifically metastasis is limited. This study explored the potential of cell-free supernatants (CFS) from 2 probiotic Lactobacillus sp., Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, to inhibit colon cancer cell invasion by influencing matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity and levels of the tight junction protein zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) in cultured metastatic human colorectal carcinoma cells. HCT-116 cells were treated with CFS from L. casei, L. rhamnosus, or Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (a gut commensal); or with uninoculated bacterial growth media. Treatment with CFS from both Lactobacillus sp. decreased colorectal cell invasion but treatment with CFS from B. thetaiotaomicron did not. CFS from both Lactobacillus sp. decreased MMP-9 and increased ZO-1 protein levels. L. rhamnosus CFS also lowered MMP-9 activity. To begin elucidating the secreted bacterial factor conveying these responses, Lactobacillus sp. CFS were fractionated into defined molecular weight ranges and cell invasion assessed. Fractionation revealed that the inhibitory activity was contained primarily in the >100 kDa and 50-100 kDa fractions, suggesting the inhibitory compound may be a macromolecule such as a protein, nucleic acid, or a polysaccharide.

  20. Molecular identification of Lactobacillus spp. associated with puba, a Brazilian fermented cassava food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispim, S M; Nascimento, A M A; Costa, P S; Moreira, J L S; Nunes, A C; Nicoli, J R; Lima, F L; Mota, V T; Nardi, R M D

    2013-01-01

    Puba or carimã is a Brazilian staple food obtained by spontaneous submerged fermentation of cassava roots. A total of 116 lactobacilli and three cocci isolates from 20 commercial puba samples were recovered on de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe agar (MRS); they were characterized for their antagonistic activity against foodborne pathogens and identified taxonomically by classical and molecular methods. In all samples, lactic acid bacteria were recovered as the dominant microbiota (7.86 ± 0.41 log10 CFU/g). 16S-23S rRNA ARDRA pattern assigned 116 isolates to the Lactobacillus genus, represented by the species Lactobacillus fermentum (59 isolates), Lactobacillus delbrueckii (18 isolates), Lactobacillus casei (9 isolates), Lactobacillus reuteri (6 isolates), Lactobacillus brevis (3 isolates), Lactobacillus gasseri (2 isolates), Lactobacillus nagelii (1 isolate), and Lactobacillus plantarum group (18 isolates). recA gene-multiplex PCR analysis revealed that L. plantarum group isolates belonged to Lactobacillus plantarum (15 isolates) and Lactobacillus paraplantarum (3 isolates). Genomic diversity was investigated by molecular typing with rep (repetitive sequence)-based PCR using the primer ERIC2 (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus). The Lactobacillus isolates exhibited genetic heterogeneity and species-specific fingerprint patterns. All the isolates showed antagonistic activity against the foodborne pathogenic bacteria tested. This antibacterial effect was attributed to acid production, except in the cases of three isolates that apparently produced bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances. This study provides the first insight into the genetic diversity of Lactobacillus spp. of puba.

  1. Molecular identification of Lactobacillus spp. associated with puba, a Brazilian fermented cassava food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Crispim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Puba or carimã is a Brazilian staple food obtained by spontaneous submerged fermentation of cassava roots. A total of 116 lactobacilli and three cocci isolates from 20 commercial puba samples were recovered on de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe agar (MRS; they were characterized for their antagonistic activity against foodborne pathogens and identified taxonomically by classical and molecular methods. In all samples, lactic acid bacteria were recovered as the dominant microbiota (7.86 ± 0.41 log10 CFU/g. 16S-23S rRNA ARDRA pattern assigned 116 isolates to the Lactobacillus genus, represented by the species Lactobacillus fermentum (59 isolates, Lactobacillus delbrueckii (18 isolates, Lactobacillus casei (9 isolates, Lactobacillus reuteri (6 isolates, Lactobacillus brevis (3 isolates, Lactobacillus gasseri (2 isolates, Lactobacillus nagelii (1 isolate, and Lactobacillus plantarum group (18 isolates. recA gene-multiplex PCR analysis revealed that L. plantarum group isolates belonged to Lactobacillus plantarum (15 isolates and Lactobacillus paraplantarum (3 isolates. Genomic diversity was investigated by molecular typing with rep (repetitive sequence-based PCR using the primer ERIC2 (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus. The Lactobacillus isolates exhibited genetic heterogeneity and species-specific fingerprint patterns. All the isolates showed antagonistic activity against the foodborne pathogenic bacteria tested. This antibacterial effect was attributed to acid production, except in the cases of three isolates that apparently produced bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances. This study provides the first insight into the genetic diversity of Lactobacillus spp. of puba.

  2. Draft Whole-Genome Sequences of Three Lactobacillus plantarum Food Isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández Ramírez, Mónica D; Boekhorst, Jos; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja N

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a widespread member of the Lactobacillus genus and frequently isolated from spoiled acidified food products. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of three L. plantarum food isolates.

  3. Draft Whole-Genome Sequences of Three Lactobacillus plantarum Food Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Ramírez, Mónica D.; Boekhorst, Jos; de Jong, Anne; Oscar P. Kuipers; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja N.

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a widespread member of the Lactobacillus genus and frequently isolated from spoiled acidified food products. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of three L. plantarum food isolates.

  4. Draft Whole-Genome Sequences of Three Lactobacillus plantarum Food Isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández Ramírez, Mónica D; Boekhorst, Jos; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja N

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a widespread member of the Lactobacillus genus and frequently isolated from spoiled acidified food products. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of three L. plantarum food isolates.

  5. Northampton Community College Adult Learner Competencies Implementation. Final Report, 1998-1999 [and] Adult Learner Competencies Implementation Manual for Workshops #1 and #2 and NCC Competencies-Based Lesson Plan "Mini-Bank".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Judy

    A project provided training and guidance to Northampton Community College (NCC) staff in implementing the "new" adult learner skill competencies. Two workshops were held to serve 29 staff in Monroe, Wayne, and Pike counties in Pennsylvania. Among the topics covered were defining and introducing portfolios to adult learners, individualizing…

  6. Molecular insights from dysregulation of the thiazide-sensitive WNK/SPAK/NCC pathway in the kidney: Gordon syndrome and thiazide-induced hyponatraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Mark; O'Shaughnessy, Kevin M

    2013-12-01

    Human blood pressure is dependent on balancing dietary salt intake with its excretion by the kidney. Mendelian syndromes of altered blood pressure demonstrate the importance of the distal nephron in this process and of the thiazide-sensitive pathway in particular. Gordon syndrome (GS), the phenotypic inverse of the salt-wasting Gitelman syndrome, is a condition of hyperkalaemic hypertension that is reversed by low-dose thiazide diuretics or a low-salt diet. Variants within at least four genes [i.e. with-no-lysine(K) kinase 1 (WNK1), WNK4, kelch-like family member 3 (KLHL3) and cullin 3 (CUL3)] can cause the phenotype of GS. Details are still emerging for some of these genes, but it is likely that they all cause a gain-of-function in the thiazide-sensitive Na(+) -Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) and hence salt retention. Herein, we discuss the key role of STE20/sporulation-specific protein 1 (SPS1)-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK), which functions as an intermediary between the WNKs and NCC and for which a loss-of-function mutation produces a Gitelman-type phenotype in a mouse model. In addition to Mendelian blood pressure syndromes, the study of patients who develop thiazide-induced-hyponatraemia (TIH) may give further molecular insights into the role of the thiazide-sensitive pathway for salt reabsorption. In the present paper we discuss the key features of TIH, including its high degree of reproducibility on rechallenge, possible genetic predisposition and mechanisms involving excessive saliuresis and water retention. Together, studies of Gordon syndrome and TIH may increase our understanding of the molecular regulation of sodium trafficking via the thiazide-sensitive pathway and have important implications for hypertensive patients, both in the identification of new antihypertensive drug targets and avoidance of hyponatraemic side-effects. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Polyphosphate metabolism in Acinetobacter johnsonii 210A.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonting, C.F.C.

    1993-01-01

    Since the seventies, there is a growing interest in the process of biological phosphate removal in which microorganisms able to accumulate large amounts of phosphate play a central role. Over the years many bacteria have been isolated from sludge systems showing enhanced biological phosphate removal

  8. Polyphosphate metabolism in Acinetobacter johnsonii 210A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonting, C.F.C.

    1993-01-01

    Since the seventies, there is a growing interest in the process of biological phosphate removal in which microorganisms able to accumulate large amounts of phosphate play a central role. Over the years many bacteria have been isolated from sludge systems showing enhanced biological

  9. Transport of D-xylose in Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus plantarum: Evidence for a mechanism of facilitated diffusion via the phosphoenolpyruvate:mannose phosphotransferase system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaillou, S.; Pouwels, P.H.; Postma, P.W.

    1999-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the D-xylose transport system of Lactobacillus pentosus. Uptake of D-xylose was not driven by the proton motive force generated by malolactic fermentation and required D-xylose metabolism. The kinetics of D-xylose transport were indicative of a low- affinity

  10. Transport of D-xylose in Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus plantarum: Evidence for a mechanism of facilitated diffusion via the phosphoenolpyruvate:mannose phosphotransferase system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaillou, S.; Pouwels, P.H.; Postma, P.W.

    1999-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the D-xylose transport system of Lactobacillus pentosus. Uptake of D-xylose was not driven by the proton motive force generated by malolactic fermentation and required D-xylose metabolism. The kinetics of D-xylose transport were indicative of a low- affinity faci

  11. Two Lactobacillus strains, isolated from breast milk, differently modulate the immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz-Ropero, M.P.; Martin, R.; Sierra, S.; Lara-Villoslada, F.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Xaus, J.; Olivares, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: The ability of two different Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus salivarius CECT5713 and Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716), isolated from human breast milk, to modulate the immune response was examined. Methods and Results: In rodent bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), the presence of Lac

  12. Recombinant lactobacillus for fermentation of xylose to lactic acid and lactate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picataggio, S.K.; Zhang, M.; Franden, M.A.; McMillan, J.D.; Finkelstein, M.

    1998-08-25

    A recombinant Lactobacillus MONT4 is provided which has been genetically engineered with xylose isomerase and xylulokinase genes from Lactobacillus pentosus to impart to the Lactobacillus MONT4 the ability to ferment lignocellulosic biomass containing xylose to lactic acid. 4 figs.

  13. 21 CFR 184.1924 - Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Urease enzyme preparation from Lactobacillus... preparation from Lactobacillus fermentum. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the nonpathogenic, nontoxicogenic bacterium Lactobacillus fermentum. It contains the enzyme urease (CAS Reg. No. 9002-13-5),...

  14. AKTIFITAS ANTIHELICOBACTER DARI LACTOBACILLUS SP SECARA INVITRO : POTENSI SEBAGAI SUATU BAHAN BIOTERAPI TUKAK LAMBUNG

    OpenAIRE

    Zaraswati Dwyana

    2007-01-01

    Salah satu upaya yang dilakukan adalah mencari bahan bioterapi alami yang dapat digunakan dalam pengobatan terhadap infeksi Helicobacter pylori. Tujuan penelitian ini ingin mengetahui kemampuan Lactobacillus sebagai bahan bioterapi dengan mengetahui aktivitas antimikrobanya terhadap Helicobacter pylori yang kemudian dapat disebut antihelicobacter. Lactobacillus ditumbuhkan media tumbuh dan difermentasi lalu disentrifus sehingga diperoleh kultur lactobacillus cair lalu diliofilikasi untuk...

  15. Molecular characterization of Lactobacillus plantarum DMDL 9010, a strain with efficient nitrite degradation capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Yong-tao; Liu, Dong-mei; Luo, Tong-hui; Chen, Gu; Wu, Hui; Li, Li; Yu, Yi-gang

    2014-01-01

    Nitrites commonly found in food, especially in fermented vegetables, are potential carcinogens. Therefore, limiting nitrites in food is critically important for food safety. A Lactobacillus strain (Lactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010) was previously isolated from fermented vegetables by our group, and is not yet fully characterized. A number of phenotypical and genotypical approaches were employed to characterize Lactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010. Its nitrite degradation capacity was compared with four other Lactobacillus strains, including Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus 719, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricu 1.83, Streptococcus thermophilus 1.204, and lactobacillus plantarum 8140, on MRS medium. Compared to these four Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010 had a significantly higher nitrite degradation capacity (PLactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010 was identified as either Lactobacillus plantarum or Lactobacillus pentosus. To further identify this strain, the flanking regions (922 bp and 806 bp upstream and downstream, respectively) of the L-lactate dehydrogenase 1 (L-ldh1) gene were amplified and sequenced. Lactobacillus sp. DMDL 9010 had 98.92 and 76.98% sequence identity in the upstream region with L. plantarum WCFS1 and L. pentosus IG1, respectively, suggesting that Lactobacillu sp. DMDL 9010 is an L. plantarum strain. It was therefore named L. plantarum DMDL 9010. Our study provides a platform for genetic engineering of L. plantarum DMDL 9010, in order to further improve its nitrite degradation capacity.

  16. Two Lactobacillus strains, isolated from breast milk, differently modulate the immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz-Ropero, M.P.; Martin, R.; Sierra, S.; Lara-Villoslada, F.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Xaus, J.; Olivares, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: The ability of two different Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus salivarius CECT5713 and Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716), isolated from human breast milk, to modulate the immune response was examined. Methods and Results: In rodent bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), the presence of Lac

  17. Comparison of fructooligosaccharide utilization by Lactobacillus and Bacteroides species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Hiroya; Tamura, Kazuji; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Kanegae, Minoru; Koga, Jinichiro

    2012-01-01

    The utilization of 1-kestose (GF(2)) and nystose (GF(3)), the main components of fructooligosaccharides (FOS), by Lactobacillus and Bacteroides species was examined. Of seven Lactobacillus and five Bacteroides strains that utilized FOS, L. salivarius, L. rhamnosus, L. casei, and L. gasseri utilized only GF(2), whereas L. acidophilus and all the Bacteroides strains utilized both GF(2) and GF(3). Only the strains able to utilize both GF(2) and GF(3) had β-fructosidase activity in the culture supernatants. The culture supernatants of the Lactobacillus strains had higher β-fructosidase activity for GF(2) than for GF(3), whereas those of the Bacteroides strains had higher activity for GF(3) than for GF(2). Furthermore, β-fructosidase activity of the culture supernatants of the Lactobacillus cells grown in the GF(3) medium was much higher than that of the cells grown in the GF(2) medium, whereas the activity of the culture supernatants of the Bacteroides cells grown in the GF(3) medium was almost the same as that of the cells grown in the GF(2) medium. These results indicate that Lactobacillus species metabolize FOS in a different way from that of Bacteroides species.

  18. Molecular analysis of sourdough reveals Lactobacillus mindensis sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Matthias A; Müller, Martin R A; Vogel, Rudi F

    2003-01-01

    Genotypic fingerprinting to analyse the bacterial flora of an industrial sourdough revealed a coherent group of strains which could not be associated with a valid species. Comparative 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that these strains formed a homogeneous cluster distinct from their closest relatives, Lactobacillus farciminis, Lactobacillus alimentarius and Lactobacillus kimchii. To characterize them further, physiological (sugar fermentation, formation of DL-lactate, hydrolysis of arginine, growth temperature, CO2 production) and chemotaxonomic properties have been determined. The DNA G +C content was 37.5 0.2 mol%. The peptidoglycan was of the lysine-D-iso-asparagine (L-Lys-D-Asp) type. The strains were homofermentative, Gram-positive, catalase-negative, non-spore-forming, non-motile rods. They were found as a major stable component of a rye flour sourdough fermentation. Physiological, biochemical as well as genotypic data suggested them to be a new species of the genus Lactobacillus. This was confirmed by DNA-DNA hybridization of genomic DNA, and the name Lactobacillus mindensis is proposed. The type strain of this species is DSM 14500T (=LMG 21508T).

  19. 纳米纤维素/天然橡胶复合材料的制备及表征%Preparation and Characterization of Nano -crystalline Cellulose/Natural Rubber (NCC/NR) Composites *

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈红莲; 高天明; 黄茂芳; 廖建和

    2012-01-01

    Blended natural rubber (NR) with different amount of nano - cellulose cellulose ( NCC ) were usea to prepare nano -crystalline cellulose/natural rubber (NCC/NR) composites. The resulting products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy ( SEM), mechanical property testing, thermo - gravimetric analysis and dynamic mechanical analysis(DMA). Results showed that NCC were homogeneously distributed throughout NR matrix, which led to the en- hancement on mechanical properties. Moreover, the storage modulus ( E' ) of composites went up with the increment of NCC loadings and loss factor (tang) decreases, and the addition of NCC had less impact on the thermal stability of NR matrix.%采用共混法制备不同比率含量的纳米纤维素/天然橡胶(NCC/NR)复合材料,通过扫描电镜、力学性能、热稳定性以及动态力学性能的测定分析表明:纳米纤维素能较均匀分散在橡胶基质中,对天然橡胶起到较好的补强效果,复合材料的储能模量逐步增大,损耗因子逐步减小,纳米纤维素的加入对天然橡胶的热稳定性影响不大。

  20. Stress responses in probiotic Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Nezhad, Marzieh; Hussain, Malik Altaf; Britz, Margaret Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Survival in harsh environments is critical to both the industrial performance of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and their competitiveness in complex microbial ecologies. Among the LAB, members of the Lactobacillus casei group have industrial applications as acid-producing starter cultures for milk fermentations and as specialty cultures for the intensification and acceleration of flavor development in certain bacterial-ripened cheese varieties. They are amongst the most common organisms in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of humans and other animals, and have the potential to function as probiotics. Whether used in industrial or probiotic applications, environmental stresses will affect the physiological status and properties of cells, including altering their functionality and biochemistry. Understanding the mechanisms of how LAB cope with different environments is of great biotechnological importance, from both a fundamental and applied perspective: hence, interaction between these strains and their environment has gained increased interest in recent years. This paper presents an overview of the important features of stress responses in Lb. casei, and related proteomic or gene expression patterns that may improve their use as starter cultures and probiotics.