WorldWideScience

Sample records for laboratory flow loop

  1. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion

  2. Directed and Almost-Directed Flow Loops in Real Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Todinov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Directed flow loops are highly undesirable because they are associated with wastage of energy for maintaining them and entail big losses to the world economy. It is shown that directed flow loops may appear in networks even if the dispatched commodity does not physically travel along a closed contour. Consequently, a theorem giving the necessary and sufficient condition of a directed flow loop on randomly oriented straight-line flow paths has been formulated and a close-form expression has been derived for the probability of a directed flow loop. The results show that even for a relatively small number of intersecting flow paths, the probability of a directed flow loop is very large, which means that the existence of directed flow loops in real networks is practically inevitable. Consequently, a theorem and an efficient algorithm have been proposed related to discovering and removing directed flow loops in a network with feasible flows. The new concept ‘almost-directed flow loop’ has also been introduced for the first time. It is shown that the removal of an almost-directed flow loop also results in a significant decrease of the losses. It is also shown that if no directed flow loops exist in the network, the removal of an almost-directed flow loop cannot create a directed flow loop.

  3. Multiple Flow Loop SCADA System Implemented on the Production Prototype Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baily, Scott A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalmas, Dale Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wheat, Robert Mitchell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-16

    The following report covers FY 15 activities to develop supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system for the Northstar Moly99 production prototype gas flow loop. The goal of this effort is to expand the existing system to include a second flow loop with a larger production-sized blower. Besides testing the larger blower, this system will demonstrate the scalability of our solution to multiple flow loops.

  4. Design and Calibration of the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Closed Loop Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) Propagation Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    ARL-TR-7860 ● OCT 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Design and Calibration of the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Closed Loop...ARL-TR-7860 ● OCT 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Design and Calibration of the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Closed Loop Laboratory... Design and Calibration of the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Closed Loop Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) Propagation Section 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  5. Electronic Warfare Closed Loop Laboratory (EWCLL) Antenna Motor Software and Hardware Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    ARL-TN-0779 ● SEP 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Electronic Warfare Closed Loop Laboratory (EWCLL) Antenna Motor Software and...Electronic Warfare Closed Loop Laboratory (EWCLL) Antenna Motor Software and Hardware Development by Neal Tesny Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electronic Warfare Closed Loop Laboratory (EWCLL) Antenna Motor Software and Hardware Development 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  6. Stress Analysis and Calculation of Flow Interruption Capability Test Loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG; Bo; QI; Xiao-guang; CHENG; Dao-xi

    2012-01-01

    <正>A stress-analysis and calculation has been done for the flow interruption capability test loop (Fig. 1). In the design condition, the test loop is operated on 350 ℃ and 20MPa. By reasonably simplifying and modeling, a stress-analysis program named Triflex was used to analyze the piping stress and optimize the piping supports, which meet the compliance. The work will provide the necessary basis for the construction of the loop and operation security.

  7. Thermal-hydraulic instabilities in natural circulation flow loops under supercritical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rachna

    In recent years, a growing interest has been generated in investigating the thermal hydraulics and flow stability phenomenon in supercritical natural circulation loops. These flow conditions are relevant to some of the innovative passive safety designs proposed for the Gen-IV Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) concepts. A computational model has been developed at UW Madison which provides a good basic simulation tool for the steady state and transient analysis of one dimensional natural circulation flow, and can be applied to conduct stability analysis. Several modifications and improvements were incorporated in an earlier numerical scheme before applying it to investigate the transient behavior of two experimental loops, namely, the supercritical water loop at UW-Madison and the supercritical carbon-dioxide (SCCO2) loop at Argonne National Laboratories. Although the model predicted development of instabilities for both SCW and SCCO2 loop which agrees with some previous work, the experiments conducted at SCCO2 loop exhibited stable behavior under similar conditions. To distinguish between numerical effects and physical processes, a linear stability approach has also been developed to investigate the stability characteristics associated with the natural circulation loop systems for various inlet conditions, input powers and geometries. The linear stability results for the SCW and SCCO2 loops exhibited differences with the corresponding transient simulations. This linear model also predicted the presence of instability in the SCCO 2 loop for certain high input powers contradictory to the experimental findings. Dimensionless parameters were proposed which would generalize the stability characteristics of the natural circulation flow loops under supercritical conditions.

  8. Two tandem flexible loops in a viscous flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Huilin; Wei, Heng; Huang, Haibo; Lu, Xi-yun

    2017-02-01

    Interaction between two tandem flexible loops with tension and bending stiffness in a viscous flow is investigated by numerical simulations. In most cases, the heads of the loops facing the oncoming flow are fixed but flapping around the head is allowed. The effect of the gap distance between the two passive flapping loops (G) on the drag coefficient is investigated in detail. Here, for the first time, the sudden drag force reduction at a specific G, i.e., Gc for the downstream loop has been found in the two tandem flexible loops system. It is different from the drag "jump" behavior in the two tandem rigid cylinder system. Although the drag is partially associated with the flapping amplitude, the drag force reduction of the downstream loop may be mainly attributed to flow regimes transition or vortices merging mode transition. The vortices merging is also analysed from a Lagrangian viewpoint, which gives insight into the mechanism. The effects of Reynolds number (20 ≤ Re ≤100 ) , bending coefficient (10-4≤K ≤2 ×10-2 ) , and tension coefficient (10 ≤S ≤1000 ) are also investigated and the relevant mechanism is explored. If the head of the downstream loop is set free to move laterally, the critical distance (Gc) where the sudden drag reduction occurs would further decrease compared to the fixed case, which is due to the early shedding regime transition.

  9. Standing sausage modes in coronal loops with plasma flow

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic waves are important for diagnosing the physical parameters of coronal plasmas. Field-aligned flows appear frequently in coronal loops.We examine the effects of transverse density and plasma flow structuring on standing sausage modes trapped in coronal loops, and examine their observational implications. We model coronal loops as straight cold cylinders with plasma flow embedded in a static corona. An eigen-value problem governing propagating sausage waves is formulated, its solutions used to construct standing modes. Two transverse profiles are distinguished, one being the generalized Epstein distribution (profile E) and the other (N) proposed recently in Nakariakov et al.(2012). A parameter study is performed on the dependence of the maximum period $P_\\mathrm{max}$ and cutoff length-to-radius ratio $(L/a)_{\\mathrm{cutoff}}$ in the trapped regime on the density parameters ($\\rho_0/\\rho_\\infty$ and profile steepness $p$) and flow parameters (magnitude $U_0$ and profile steepness $u$). For e...

  10. Slow magnetosonic waves and fast flows in active region loops

    CERN Document Server

    Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    Recent EUV spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (~100-300 km/s) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux-tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magn...

  11. Closed Loop Control and Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    first described in some detail by Ingard [8], but re-discovered, developed, and applied to problems in flow control by Glezer and co-workers [19, 20... Ingard . On the theory and design of acoustic resonators. J. Acoustical Soc. of America, 25(6):1037-1060, 1953. [9] J. Kim, P. Moin, and R. Moser

  12. Standing sausage modes in coronal loops with plasma flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Chen, Shao-Xia; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2014-08-01

    Context. Magnetohydrodynamic waves are important for diagnosing the physical parameters of coronal plasmas. Field-aligned flows appear frequently in coronal loops. Aims: We examine the effects of transverse density and plasma flow structuring on standing sausage modes trapped in coronal loops, and examine their observational implications in the context of coronal seismology. Methods: We model coronal loops as straight cold cylinders with plasma flow embedded in a static corona. An eigen-value problem governing propagating sausage waves is formulated and its solutions are employed to construct standing modes. Two transverse profiles are distinguished, and are called profiles E and N. A parameter study is performed on the dependence of the maximum period Pmax and cutoff length-to-radius ratio (L/a)cutoff in the trapped regime on the density parameters (ρ0/ρ∞ and profile steepness p) and the flow parameters (its magnitude U0 and profile steepness u). Results: For either profile, introducing a flow reduces Pmax obtainable in the trapped regime relative to the static case. The value of Pmax is sensitive to p for profile N, but is insensitive to p for profile E. By far the most important effect a flow introduces is to reduce the capability for loops to trap standing sausage modes: (L/a)cutoff may be substantially reduced in the case with flow relative to the static one. In addition, (L/a)cutoff is smaller for a stronger flow, and for a steeper flow profile when the flow magnitude is fixed. Conclusions: If the density distribution can be described by profile N, then measuring the sausage mode period can help deduce the density profile steepness. However, this practice is not feasible if profile E more accurately describes the density distribution. Furthermore, even field-aligned flows with magnitudes substantially smaller than the ambient Alfvén speed can make coronal loops considerably less likely to support trapped standing sausage modes. Appendix A is available in

  13. Inverted annular flow heat transfer in a natural circulation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, M.; Umekawa, H.; Shiba, Y.; Yano, T. [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Gravity-feed reflooding experiment was conducted in a natural circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. The cooling curve of high temperature tube wall had a characteristic feature, i.e. initial rapid cooling with steam binding, relatively long-time plateau, gradual decrease with or without flow oscillation, and final drastic decrease during quenching process. Such phenomena had close relationship to the heated wall dynamics and heating power transient. To provide fundamental understanding on the present phenomena, the heat transfer data in inverted annular and dispersed flows were obtained under steady or oscillatory flow condition. The experimental data suggested that the heat transfer coefficient in the inverted annular or dispersed flow regimes is a slightly increasing function of heat flux but significantly depended on the tube diameter. The flow oscillation deteriorated heat transfer slightly in the inverted annular and dispersed flow regimes but significantly in the quenching process.

  14. Fluid Flow Experiment for Undergraduate Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilimpochapornkul, Viroj; Obot, Nsima T.

    1986-01-01

    The undergraduate fluid mechanics laboratory at Clarkson University consists of three experiments: mixing; drag measurements; and fluid flow and pressure drop measurements. The latter experiment is described, considering equipment needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained. (JN)

  15. The Phillips Laboratory capillary pumped loop test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, Donald F.; Kaylor, Marc C.

    1996-03-01

    An ammonia capillary pumped loop (CPL) test facility has been designed, fabricated, subject to acceptance tests, and assembled at Phillips Laboratory. Its intent is to support a wide range of Air Force programs, bringing CPL technology to flight readiness for operational systems. The facility provides a high degree of modularity and flexibility with several heating and cooling options, and capability for elevation (+/- 15 in.), tilt (+/-60°) and transport length variation. It has a 182 by 44 by 84 inch envelope, an expected heat load capability of 2500 W, and a temperature range of 0 to 50 °C. The evaporator section has two plates with four capillary pumps (CPs) each, with a starter pump on one plate. The CPs are 5/8 in., with TAG aluminum 6063-T6 casing and UHMW polyethylene wicks. The active lengths are 15 and 30 inch with both 10 and 15 micron wicks. The individual CPs have thermal and hydraulic isolation capability, and are removable. The transport section consists of stainless steel lines in a serpentine configuration, a 216 in3 free volume reservoir, and a mechanical pump. The vapor transport line contains a capillary device (which can be bypassed) for vapor blockage during startup. The condenser consists of two separately valved, parallel cold plates each with a downstream noncondensible gas trap. Cooling of up to 1500 W at -50 °C is provided by an FTS Systems chiller using Flourinert FC-72. An enclosure/exhaust system is provided for safety and emergency venting of ammonia. An ammonia charge station performs or supports the functions of proof pressure, flushing with ammonia, purging with gaseous nitrogen, evacuation of all or part of the CPL to 20 microns, and charging. Instrumentation consists of over 116 thermocouples, five of which are internal; one absolute and six differential pressure transducers; eleven watt transducers, and a reservoir load cell. The data acquisition system consists of a temperature scanner, Bernoulli drive, and two Macintosh

  16. A kinetic model for corrosion and precipitation in non-isothermal LBE flow loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, By Xiaoyi; Li, Ning; Mineev, Mark

    2001-08-01

    A kinetic model was developed to estimate the corrosion/precipitation rate in a non-isothermal liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) flow loop. The model was based on solving the mass transport equation with the assumptions that convective transport dominates in the longitudinal flow direction and diffusion dominates in the transverse direction. The species concentration at wall is assumed to be determined either by the solubility of species in LBE in the absence of oxygen or by the reduction reaction of the protective oxide film when active oxygen control is applied. Analyses show that the corrosion/precipitation rate depends on the flow velocity, the species diffusion rate, the oxygen concentration in LBE, as well as the temperature distribution along a loop. Active oxygen control can significantly reduce the corrosion/precipitation of the structural materials. It is shown that the highest corrosion/precipitation does not necessarily locate at places with the highest/lowest temperature. For a material testing loop being constructed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the highest corrosion occurs at the end of the heater zone, while the highest precipitation occurs in the return flow in the recuperator.

  17. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Certification Flow Loop Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Scott, Paul A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Wells, Beric E.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Denslow, Kayte M.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

    2010-01-01

    A future requirement of Hanford Tank Farm operations will involve transfer of wastes from double shell tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant. As the U.S. Department of Energy contractor for Tank Farm Operations, Washington River Protection Solutions anticipates the need to certify that waste transfers comply with contractual requirements. This test plan describes the approach for evaluating several instruments that have potential to detect the onset of flow stratification and critical suspension velocity. The testing will be conducted in an existing pipe loop in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s facility that is being modified to accommodate the testing of instruments over a range of simulated waste properties and flow conditions. The testing phases, test matrix and types of simulants needed and the range of testing conditions required to evaluate the instruments are described

  18. asymptotics for open-loop window flow control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur W. Berger

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available An open-loop window flow-control scheme regulates the flow into a system by allowing at most a specified window size W of flow in any interval of length L. The sliding window considers all subintervals of length L, while the jumping window considers consecutive disjoint intervals of length L. To better understand how these window control schemes perform for stationary sources, we describe for a large class of stochastic input processes the asymptotic behavior of the maximum flow in such window intervals over a time interval [0,T] as T and Lget large, with T substantially bigger than L. We use strong approximations to show that when T≫L≫logT an invariance principle holds, so that the asymptotic behavior depends on the stochastic input process only via its rate and asymptotic variability parameters. In considerable generality, the sliding and jumping windows are asymptotically equivalent. We also develop an approximate relation between the two maximum window sizes. We apply the asymptotic results to develop approximations for the means and standard deviations of the two maximum window contents. We apply computer simulation to evaluate and refine these approximations.

  19. Bodies in flowing plasmas - Laboratory studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review of early rudimentary laboratory studies of bodies in flowing, rarefied plasmas is presented (e.g., Birkeland, 1908), along with a discussion of more recent parametric studies conducted in steady plasma wind tunnels, which includes the study by Hall et al. (1964), in which a strong ion density enhancement in the center of the ion void created downstream from the body was observed. Good agreement was found between the experimental results and theoretical calculations which omit ion thermal motion. Examples in which in situ data on the interaction between satellites and the ionospheric plasma have been elucidated by the laboratory results are presented, and include evidence for a midwake axial ion peak, and ion current density in the near-wake region. The application of the ionospheric laboratory to basic space plasma physics is discussed, and its application to some types of solar system plasma phenomena is illustrated.

  20. Density Estimations in Laboratory Debris Flow Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz de Oliveira, Gustavo; Kulisch, Helmut; Malcherek, Andreas; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2016-04-01

    Bulk density and its variation is an important physical quantity to estimate the solid-liquid fractions in two-phase debris flows. Here we present mass and flow depth measurements for experiments performed in a large-scale laboratory set up. Once the mixture is released and it moves down the inclined channel, measurements allow us to determine the bulk density evolution throughout the debris flow. Flow depths are determined by ultrasonic pulse reflection, and the mass is measured with a total normal force sensor. The data were obtained at 50 Hz. The initial two phase material was composed of 350 kg debris with water content of 40%. A very fine pebble with mean particle diameter of 3 mm, particle density of 2760 kg/m³ and bulk density of 1400 kg/m³ in dry condition was chosen as the solid material. Measurements reveal that the debris bulk density remains high from the head to the middle of the debris body whereas it drops substantially at the tail. This indicates lower water content at the tail, compared to the head and the middle portion of the debris body. This means that the solid and fluid fractions are varying strongly in a non-linear manner along the flow path, and from the head to the tail of the debris mass. Importantly, this spatial-temporal density variation plays a crucial role in determining the impact forces associated with the dynamics of the flow. Our setup allows for investigating different two phase material compositions, including large fluid fractions, with high resolutions. The considered experimental set up may enable us to transfer the observed phenomena to natural large-scale events. Furthermore, the measurement data allows evaluating results of numerical two-phase mass flow simulations. These experiments are parts of the project avaflow.org that intends to develop a GIS-based open source computational tool to describe wide spectrum of rapid geophysical mass flows, including avalanches and real two-phase debris flows down complex natural

  1. Robust PCA-Based Abnormal Traffic Flow Pattern Isolation and Loop Detector Fault Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Xuexiang; ZHANG Yi; LI Li; HU Jianming

    2008-01-01

    One key function of intelligent transportation systems is to automatically detect abnormal traffic phenomena and to help further investigations of the cause of the abnormality. This paper describes a robust principal components analysis (RPCA)-based abnormal traffic flow pattern isolation and loop detector fault detection method. The results show that RPCA is a useful tool to distinguish regular traffic flow from abnor-mal traffic flow patterns caused by accidents and loop detector faults. This approach gives an effective traffic flow data pre-processing method to reduce the human effort in finding potential loop detector faults. The method can also be used to further investigate the causes of the abnormality.

  2. Can flow-volume loops be used to diagnose exercise induced laryngeal obstructions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Pernille M; Maltbæk, Niels; Jørgensen, Inger M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre- and post-exercise flow-volume loops are often recommended as an easy non-invasive method for diagnosing or excluding exercise-induced laryngeal obstructions in patients with exercise-related respiratory symptoms. However, at present there is no evidence for this recommendation....... AIMS: To compare physician evaluated pre- and post-exercise flow-volume loops and flow data with laryngoscopic findings during exercise. METHODS: Data from 100 consecutive exercise tests with continuous laryngoscopy during the test were analysed. Laryngoscopic images were compared...... with the corresponding pre- and post-exercise flow-volume loops assessed by four separate physicians and with data from the loops (forced inspiratory flow (FIF) at 25% vs. FIF at 75% of forced inspiratory vital capacity (FIVC), forced expiratory flow at 50% of forced expiratory volume vs. FIF at 50% of FIVC, and FIVC vs...

  3. Bifurcations of limit cycles in open and closed loop reverse flow reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Lucia; Crescitelli, Silvestro; Brasiello, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The present work analyses the bifurcations of limit cycles in open and loop reverse flow reactors. The open loop system consists of a reactor where the flow direction is periodically forced whereas in the closed loop system, the flow inversion is dictated by a control law which activates when the temperature at the edge of catalytic bed falls below the set-point value. We performed the bifurcation analysis of the open loop system as the switch time is varied and we constructed the solution diagram through the application of continuation technique. Many Naimark-Sacker bifurcations leading to quasi-periodic regimes have been found on the limit cycles branches. Finally, we compared these limit cycles with those of the closed loop system where the flow inversion is dictated by a control system which acts if the temperature measured at the edge of reactor falls below a set-point value.

  4. Turbulent flows and intermittency in laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmet, F.; Antonia, R. A.; Danaila, L.

    2001-10-01

    In turbulent flows, the transfer of energy from large to small scales is strongly intermittent, in contradiction with Kolmogorov's (Dokl. Akad. Nauk. SSSR 30 (1941) 299; hereafter K41) assumptions. The statistical properties associated with these energy transfer fluctuations at a given scale r have been widely studied theoretically, experimentally and numerically over the last 30 years or so. Such fluctuations are also encountered in various Planetary and Space Science domains. The present paper presents a review of laboratory experiments which clearly display the fractal nature of the (spatial or temporal) energy distribution at scale r, the departures from the K41 predictions being generally quantified through high-order moments of velocity increments.

  5. Three-Dimensional MHD Models of Waves and Flows in Coronal Active Region Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T.; Davila, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Recent observations show that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region loops, and are often associated with subsonic up-flows of coronal material. In order to study the relation between up-flows and waves we develop a 3D MHD model of an idealized bi-polar active region with flows in coronal loops. The model is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified isothermal atmosphere. To model the effects of flares, coronal material is injected in small-scale regions at the base of the model active region. The up-flows have sub-sonic speeds of ˜100 km/s and are steady or periodic, producing higher density loops by filling magnetic flux-tubes with injected material. We find that the up-flows produce fast and slow magnetosonic waves that propagate in the coronal loops. We perform a parametric study of up-flow magnitude and periodicity, and the relation with the resulting waves. As expected, we find that the up-flow speed decreases with loop height due to the diverge of the flux tubes, while the slow magnetosonic speed is independent of height. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased above the sound speed, we find that slow shocks are produced in the loops. Using the results of the 3D MHD model we show that observed slow magnetosonic waves in active region loops can be driven by impulsive flare-produced up-flows at the transition region/corona interface of active regions.

  6. Visualization of boiling flow structure in a natural circulation boiling loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmakar, Arnab; Paruya, Swapan, E-mail: swapanparuya@gmail.com

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Vapor–liquid jet flows in natural circulation boiling loop. • Flow patterns and their transitions during geysering instability in the loop. • Evaluation of the efficiency of the needle probe in detecting the vapor–liquid and boiling flow structure. - Abstract: The present study reports vapor–liquid jet flows, flow patterns and their transitions during geysering instability in a natural circulation boiling loop under varied inlet subcooling ΔT{sub sub} (30–50 °C) and heater power Q (4–5 kW). Video imaging, voltage measurement using impedance needle probe, measurement of local pressure and loop flow rate have been carried out in this study. Power spectra of the voltage, the pressure and the flow rate reveal that at a high ΔT{sub sub} the jet flows have long period (21.36–86.95 s) and they are very irregular with a number of harmonics. The period decreases and becomes regular with a decrease of ΔT{sub sub}. The periods of the jet flows at ΔT{sub sub} = 30–50 °C and Q = 4 kW are in close agreement with those obtained from the video imaging. The probe was found to be more efficient than the pressure sensor in detecting the jet flows within an uncertainty of 9.5% and in detecting a variety of bubble classes. Both the imaging and the probe consistently identify the bubbly flow/vapor-mushrooms transition or the bubbly flow/slug flow transition on decreasing ΔT{sub sub} or on increasing Q.

  7. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Closed-Type Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imura, Hideaki; Saito, Yuji; Fujimoto, Hiromitsu

    A closed-loop two-phase thermosyphon can transport a large amount of thermal energy with small temperature differences without any external power supply. A fundamental investigation of flow and heat transfer characteristics was performed experimentally and theoretically using water, ethanol and R113 as the working liquids. Heat transfer coefficients in an evaporator and a condenser, and circulation flow rates were measured experimentally. The effects of liquid fill charge, rotation angle, pressure in the loop and heat flux on the heat transfer coefficients were examined. The heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator and the condenser were correlated by the expressions for pool boiling and film condensation respectively. As a result, the heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator were correlated by the Stephan-Abdelsalam equations within a±40% error. Theoretically, the circulation flow rate was predicted by calculating pressure, temperature, quality and void fraction along the loop. And, the comparison between the calculated and experimental results was made.

  8. Laboratory Scale Study of Activated Sludge Process in Jet Loop Reactor for Waste WaterTreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Patil

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of Activated Sludge Process (ASP for the treatment of synthetic wastewater and to develop a simple design criteria under local conditions.A laboratory scale Compact jet loop reactor model comprising of an aeration tank and final clarifier was used for this purpose.Settled synthetic wastewater was used as influent to the aeration tank. The Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD of the influent and effluent was measured to find process efficiency at various mixed liquorvolatile suspended solids (MLVSS and hydraulic retention time (θ. The results of the studydemonstrated that an efficiency of above 95% could be obtained for COD if the ASP is operated atan MLVSS concentration of 3000 mg/L keeping an aeration time of 1 hour.In the present investigation the preliminary studies were carried out in a lab scale Jet loop reactor made of glass. Synthetic waste water having a composition of 1000 mg/L mixed with other nutrients such as Urea, Primary and secondary Potassium phosphates, Magnesium sulfate, Iron chloriderequired for the bacteria was prepared in the laboratory and reduction in COD and the increase inSuspended Solids (SSand the Sludge Volume Index (SVI were determined.

  9. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Feed Flow Loop Phase VI: PulseEcho System Performance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.

    2012-11-21

    This document presents the visual and ultrasonic PulseEcho critical velocity test results obtained from the System Performance test campaign that was completed in September 2012 with the Remote Sampler Demonstration (RSD)/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform located at the Monarch test facility in Pasco, Washington. This report is intended to complement and accompany the report that will be developed by WRPS on the design of the System Performance simulant matrix, the analysis of the slurry test sample concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) data, and the design and construction of the RSD/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform.

  10. Flow Through a Laboratory Sediment Sample by Computer Simulation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-07

    Flow through a laboratory sediment sample by computer simulation modeling R.B. Pandeya’b*, Allen H. Reeda, Edward Braithwaitea, Ray Seyfarth0, J.F...through a laboratory sediment sample by computer simulation modeling 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  11. Experimental Investigation on Flow-Induced Vibration of Fuel Rods in Supercritical Water Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licun Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR is one of the most promising Generation IV reactors. In order to make the fuel qualification test for SCWR, a research plan is proposed to test a small scale fuel assembly in a supercritical water loop. To ensure the structure safety of fuel assembly in the loop, a flow-induced vibration experiment was carried out to investigate the vibration behavior of fuel rods, especially the vibration caused by leakage flow. From the experiment result, it can be found that: the vibration of rods is mainly caused by turbulence when flow rate is low. However, the effects of leakage flow become obvious as flow rate increases, which could changes the distribution of vibrational energy in spectrum, increasing the vibrational energy in high-frequency band. That is detrimental to the structure safety of fuel rods. Therefore, it is more reasonable to improve the design by using the spacers with blind hole, which can eliminate the leakage flow, to assemble the fuel rods in supercritical water loop. On the other hand, the experimental result could provide a benchmark for the theoretical studies to validate the applicability of boundary condition set for the leakage-flow-induced vibration.

  12. MHD Modelling of Coronal Loops: Injection of High-Speed Chromospheric Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, A.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Observations reveal a correspondence between chromospheric type II spicules and bright upward-moving fronts in the corona observed in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) band. However, theoretical considerations suggest that these flows are probably not the main source of heating in coronal magnetic loops. Aims. We investigate the propagation of high-speed chromospheric flows into coronal magnetic flux tubes and the possible production of emission in the EUV band. Methods. We simulated the propagation of a dense 104 K chromospheric jet upward along a coronal loop by means of a 2D cylindrical MHD model that includes gravity, radiative losses, thermal conduction, and magnetic induction. The jet propagates in a complete atmosphere including the chromosphere and a tenuous cool (approximately 0.8 MK) corona, linked through a steep transition region. In our reference model, the jet initial speed is 70 km per second, its initial density is 10(exp 11) per cubic centimeter, and the ambient uniform magnetic field is 10 G. We also explored other values of jet speed and density in 1D and different magnetic field values in 2D, as well as the jet propagation in a hotter (approximately 1.5 MK) background loop. Results. While the initial speed of the jet does not allow it to reach the loop apex, a hot shock-front develops ahead of it and travels to the other extreme of the loop. The shock front compresses the coronal plasma and heats it to about 10(exp 6) K. As a result, a bright moving front becomes visible in the 171 Angstrom channel of the SDO/AIA mission. This result generally applies to all the other explored cases, except for the propagation in the hotter loop. Conclusions. For a cool, low-density initial coronal loop, the post-shock plasma ahead of upward chromospheric flows might explain at least part of the observed correspondence between type II spicules and EUV emission excess.

  13. Modeling and Simulation of Release of Radiation in Flow Blockage Accident for Two Loops PWR

    OpenAIRE

    Khurram Mehboob; Cao Xinrong; Majid Ali

    2012-01-01

    In this study modeling and simulation of release of radiation form two loops PWR has been carried out for flow blockage accident. For this purpose, a MATLAB based program “Source Term Evaluator for Flow Blockage Accident” (STEFBA) has been developed, which uses the core inventory as its primary input. The TMI-2 reactor is considered as the reference plant for this study. For 1100 reactor operation days, the core inventory has been evaluated under the core design constrains at average reactor ...

  14. Laboratory Investigations of Lava Flow Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagents, S. A.; Rumpf, M. E.; Hamilton, C. W.

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the effectiveness with which lava can heat substrates of different types, we conducted a suite of experiments in which molten basalt was poured onto solid or particulate materials, and the downward propagation of the heat pulse was measured. The motivation for this work lies in seeking to understand how lava flows on the Moon would have heated the underlying regolith, and thus to determine the depths at which solar wind particles implanted in the regolith would have been protected from the heat of the overlying flow. Extraction and analysis of ancient solar wind samples would provide a wealth of information on the evolution and fate of the Sun. Our experimental device consists of a box constructed from 1"-thick calcium silicate sheeting with interior dimensions of 20 x 20 x 25 cm. The substrate material (a particulate lunar regolith simulant or solid basalt) occupies the lower 15 cm of the box, which is embedded with an array of 8 thermocouples. Up to 6 kg of crushed basalt collected from the 2010 Kilauea lava flows is heated to supraliquidus temperatures and poured directly onto the substrate. The evolution of the temperature profile within the lava flow and substrate is recorded as the basalt cools, and the surface temperature distribution is recorded using a Forward Looking Infrared Radiometer (FLIR) video camera. We have been using the experimental data sets to validate a numerical model of substrate heating. If the physics is appropriately formulated, the model will accurately predict both surface and internal temperature distribution as a function of time. A key issue has been incorporation of valid temperature-dependent thermophysical properties, because particulate materials are not well characterized at elevated temperatures. Regolith thermal conductivity in particular exerts a strong control over the depth of penetration of the thermal wave, so its accurate description is essential for a robust model. Comparison of experimental vs. modeled

  15. Holographic flows and thermodynamics of Polyakov loop impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, S Prem

    2016-01-01

    We study holographic probes dual to heavy quark impurities interpolating between fundamental and symmetric/antisymmetric tensor representations in strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric gauge theory. These correspond to non-conformal D3- and D5-brane probe embeddings in AdS_5 x S^5 exhibiting flows on their world-volumes. By examining the asymptotic regimes of the embeddings and the one-point function of static fields sourced by the boundary impurity, we conclude that the D5-brane embedding describes the screening of fundamental quarks in the UV into an antisymmetric source in the IR, whilst the non-conformal, D3-brane solution interpolates between the symmetric representation in the UV and fundamental sources in the IR. The D5-brane embeddings exhibit nontrivial thermodynamics with multiple branches of solutions, whilst the thermal analogue of the interpolating D3-brane solution does not appear to exist.

  16. Distributed flow sensing for closed-loop speed control of a flexible fish robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feitian; Lagor, Francis D; Yeo, Derrick; Washington, Patrick; Paley, Derek A

    2015-10-23

    Flexibility plays an important role in fish behavior by enabling high maneuverability for predator avoidance and swimming in turbulent flow. This paper presents a novel flexible fish robot equipped with distributed pressure sensors for flow sensing. The body of the robot is molded from soft, hyperelastic material, which provides flexibility. Its Joukowski-foil shape is conducive to modeling the fluid analytically. A quasi-steady potential-flow model is adopted for real-time flow estimation, whereas a discrete-time vortex-shedding flow model is used for higher-fidelity simulation. The dynamics for the flexible fish robot yield a reduced model for one-dimensional swimming. A recursive Bayesian filter assimilates pressure measurements to estimate flow speed, angle of attack, and foil camber. The closed-loop speed-control strategy combines an inverse-mapping feedforward controller based on an average model derived for periodic actuation of angle-of-attack and a proportional-integral feedback controller utilizing the estimated flow information. Simulation and experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness of the estimation and control strategy. The paper provides a systematic approach to distributed flow sensing for closed-loop speed control of a flexible fish robot by regulating the flapping amplitude.

  17. Real-Time Hardware-in-the-Loop Laboratory Testing for Multisensor Sense and Avoid Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarmine Fasano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on a hardware-in-the-loop facility aimed at real-time testing of architectures and algorithms of multisensor sense and avoid systems. It was developed within a research project aimed at flight demonstration of autonomous non-cooperative collision avoidance for Unmanned Aircraft Systems. In this framework, an optionally piloted Very Light Aircraft was used as experimental platform. The flight system is based on multiple-sensor data integration and it includes a Ka-band radar, four electro-optical sensors, and two dedicated processing units. The laboratory test system was developed with the primary aim of prototype validation before multi-sensor tracking and collision avoidance flight tests. System concept, hardware/software components, and operating modes are described in the paper. The facility has been built with a modular approach including both flight hardware and simulated systems and can work on the basis of experimentally tested or synthetically generated scenarios. Indeed, hybrid operating modes are also foreseen which enable performance assessment also in the case of alternative sensing architectures and flight scenarios that are hardly reproducible during flight tests. Real-time multisensor tracking results based on flight data are reported, which demonstrate reliability of the laboratory simulation while also showing the effectiveness of radar/electro-optical fusion in a non-cooperative collision avoidance architecture.

  18. Experimental and computational analysis of pressure response in a multiphase flow loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Munzarin; Amin, Al; Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Imtiaz, Syed

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of multiphase fluid flow in pipes are useful to understand fluid mechanics encountered in the oil and gas industries. In the present day oil and gas exploration is successively inducing subsea operation in the deep sea and arctic condition. During the transport of petroleum products, understanding the fluid dynamics inside the pipe network is important for flow assurance. In this case the information regarding static and dynamic pressure response, pressure loss, optimum flow rate, pipe diameter etc. are the important parameter for flow assurance. The principal aim of this research is to represents computational analysis and experimental analysis of multi-phase (L/G) in a pipe network. This computational study considers a two-phase fluid flow through a horizontal flow loop with at different Reynolds number in order to determine the pressure distribution, frictional pressure loss profiles by volume of fluid (VOF) method. However, numerical simulations are validated with the experimental data. The experiment is conducted in 76.20 mm ID transparent circular pipe using water and air in the flow loop. Static pressure transducers are used to measure local pressure response in multiphase pipeline.

  19. Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas M. Gerstner

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 “flux traps” (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loop’s temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation.

  20. On integrating large eddy simulation and laboratory turbulent flow experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstein, Fernando F

    2009-07-28

    Critical issues involved in large eddy simulation (LES) experiments relate to the treatment of unresolved subgrid scale flow features and required initial and boundary condition supergrid scale modelling. The inherently intrusive nature of both LES and laboratory experiments is noted in this context. Flow characterization issues becomes very challenging ones in validation and computational laboratory studies, where potential sources of discrepancies between predictions and measurements need to be clearly evaluated and controlled. A special focus of the discussion is devoted to turbulent initial condition issues.

  1. Chronic upper airway obstruction: value of the flow volume loop examination in assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, G B; Fairfax, A J

    1982-06-01

    Chronic obstructive lesions of the upper airways such as post-traumatic strictures, bilateral vocal cord paralysis and chronic inflammatory foci are uncommon. The functional assessment of the severity and character of an obstruction is important both for diagnosis and management, and may also allow evaluation of the efficacy of medical and surgical treatment. There are limitations of simple spirometric pulmonary function tests, which are evident when assessing upper airways obstruction. The flow volume loop is a graphic recording of airflow during maximal respiration and expiration at different lung volumes, and may be affected in a characteristic way by alterations in the airway resistance. Three unusual cases of chronic upper airway obstruction are presented which illustrate the value of the flow volume loop examination in their management.

  2. Local Gas Phase Flow Characteristics of a Gas—Liquid—Solid Three—Phase Reversed Flow Jet Loop Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENJianping; ChenYunlin; 等

    2002-01-01

    The local gas-phase flow characteristics such as local gas holdup (εg), local bubble velocity (Vb) and local bubble mean diameter(db) at a specified point in a gas-liquid-solid three-phase reversed flow jet loop reactor was experimentally investigated by a five-point conductivity probe. The effects of gas jet flow rate, liquid jet flow rate, solid loading, nozzle diameter and axial position on the local εg,Vb and db profiles were discussed. The presence of solids at low solid concentrations not only increased the local εg and Vb, but also decreased the local db. The optimum solid olading for the maximum local εg and Vb together with the minimum local db was 0.16×10-3m3, corresponding to a solid volume fraction,εS=2.5%.

  3. Effects of field-aligned flows on standing kink and sausage modes supported by coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, S -X; Xia, L -D; Chen, Y -J; Yu, H

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental standing modes and their overtones play an important role in coronal seismology. We examine how a significant field-aligned flow affects standing modes supported by coronal loops, modeled here as cold magnetic slabs. Of particular interest are the period ratios of the fundamental to its $(n-1)$-th overtone ($P_1/nP_n$) for both kink and sausage modes, and the threshold half-width-to-length ratio for sausage modes. For standing kink modes, the flow significantly reduces $P_1/nP_n$ in general, the effect being particularly strong for larger $n$ and when the density contrast $\\rho_0/\\rho_e$ between loops and their surroundings is weak. That said, even when $\\rho_0/\\rho_e$ approaches infinity, this effect is still substantial, reducing the minimal $P_1/nP_n$ by up to 13.7% (24.5%) for $n=2$ ($n=4$) relative to the static case, when the Alfv\\'en Mach number $M_A$ reaches 0.8 where $M_A$ measures the loop flow speed in units of the internal Alfv\\'en speed. For standing sausage modes, though not negligib...

  4. Neutralization of Alkaline Wasterwater with CO{sub 2} in a continuous flow jet loop reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dae Yeop; Kim, Mi Ran; Lim, Jun Heok; Lee, Tae Yoon; Lee, Jea Keun [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    This paper investigates the feasibility of applying the jet loop reactor for the neutralization of alkaline wastewater using carbon dioxide (CO2). In this study, pH changes and CO2 removal characteristics were examined by changing influent flow rate of alkaline wastewater (initial pH=10.1) and influent CO2 flow rates. Influent flow rates of alkaline wastewater (QL,in) ranged between 0.9 and 6.6 L/min, and inlet gas flow rate (QG,in) of 1 and 6 L/min in a lab-scale continuous flow jet loop reactor. The outlet pH of wastewater was maintained at 7.2 when the ratio (QL,in/QG,in) of QL,in and QG,in was 1.1. However, the CO2 removal efficiency and the outlet pH of wastewater were increased when QL,in/QG,in ratio was higher than 1.1. Throughout the experiments, the maximum CO2 removal efficiency and the outlet pH of wastewater were 98.06% and 8.43 at the condition when QG,in and QL,in were 2 L/min and 4 L/min, respectively.

  5. Flow and Heat Transfer Tests in New Loop at 2757 kPa (400 psi)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-13

    A helium flow and heat transfer experiment has been designed for the new helium flow loop facility at LANL. This new facility is centered on an Aerzen GM 12.4 Root’s blower, selected for operation at higher pressure, up to 2757 kPa, and mass flow rate, up to 400 g/s. This replaces the previous Tuthill PD plus 3206 blower and loop limited to 2067 kPa (300 psi) and 100 g/s. The resistively heated test piece is comprised of 7 electric heaters with embedded thermocouples. The plant design for the Mo100 to Mo99 targets requires sharp bends and geometry changes in the helium flow tube immediately before and after the target. An idealized fully developed flow configuration with straight entry and exit will be tested and compared with an option that employs rectangular tubing to make the bend at a radius consistent with and practical for the actual plant design. The current plant design, with circular tubing and a sudden contraction to rectangular just prior to target entrance, will also be tested. This requires some modification of the test piece, as described in the report.

  6. Laboratory and field trials of Coriolis mass flow metering for three-phase flow measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feibiao; Henry, Manus; Tombs, Michael

    2014-04-01

    A new three-phase flow metering technology is discussed in this paper, which combines Coriolis mass flow and water cut readings and without applying any phase separation [1]. The system has undergone formal laboratory trials at TUV NEL (National Engineering Laboratory), UK and at VNIIR (National Flow Laboratory), Kazan, Russia; a number of field trials have taken place in Russia. Laboratory trial results from the TUV NEL will be described in detail. For the 50mm (2") metering system, the total liquid flow rate ranged from 2.4 kg/s up to 11 kg/s, the water cut ranged from 0% to 100%, and the gas volume fraction (GVF) from 0 to 50%. In a formally observed trial, 75 test points were taken at a temperature of approximately 40 °C and with a skid inlet pressure of approximately 350 kPa. Over 95% of the test results fell within the desired specification, defined as follows: the total (oil + water) liquid mass flow error should fall within ± 2.5%, and the gas mass flow error within ± 5.0%. The oil mass flow error limit is ± 6.0% for water cuts less than 70%, while for water cuts between 70% and 95% the oil mass flow error limit is ± 15.0%. These results demonstrate the potential for using Coriolis mass flow metering combined with water cut metering for three-phase (oil/water/gas) measurement.

  7. Microrelief-Controlled Overland Flow Generation: Laboratory and Field Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface microrelief affects overland flow generation and the related hydrologic processes. However, such influences vary depending on other factors such as rainfall characteristics, soil properties, and initial soil moisture conditions. Thus, in-depth research is needed to better understand and evaluate the combined effects of these factors on overland flow dynamics. The objective of this experimental study was to examine how surface microrelief, in conjunction with the factors of rainfall, soil, and initial moisture conditions, impacts overland flow generation and runoff processes in both laboratory and field settings. A series of overland flow experiments were conducted for rough and smooth surfaces that represented distinct microtopographic characteristics and the experimental data were analyzed and compared. Across different soil types and initial moisture conditions, both laboratory and field experiments demonstrated that a rough soil surface experienced a delayed initiation of runoff and featured a stepwise threshold flow pattern due to the microrelief-controlled puddle filling-spilling-merging dynamics. It was found from the field experiments that a smooth plot surface was more responsive to rainfall variations especially during an initial rainfall event. However, enhanced capability of overland flow generation and faster puddle connectivity of a rough field plot occurred during the subsequent rain events.

  8. Laboratory investigations of effective flow behavior in unsaturated heterogeneous sands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Dorthe; Høgh Jensen, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    such that on the average a uniform pressure profile was established and gravity flow applied. Solute breakthrough curves measured at discrete points in the tank using time domain reflectometry, as well as dye tracer paths, showed that flow and transport took place in a very tortuous pattern where several grid cells were...... controlled method. The heterogeneous sand systems were established in a laboratory tank for three realizations of random distributions of the homogeneous sands comprising a system of 207 grid cells. The water flux was controlled at the upper boundary, while a suction was applied at the lower boundary...

  9. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, T. P., E-mail: intrator@lanl.gov; Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M.S. E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Dorf, L. [Applied Materials, Inc., Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Sun, X. [University of Science and Technology, Hefei (China)

    2014-04-15

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow v{sub i}, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow v{sub e} can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×v{sub e}×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δB{sub z}. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  10. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, T. P.; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.; Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.

    2014-04-01

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow vi, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow ve can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J ×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×ve×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δBz. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  11. Improvement of Measurement Accuracy of Coolant Flow in a Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jintae; Kim, Jong-Bum; Joung, Chang-Young; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Heo, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seoyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, to improve the measurement accuracy of coolant flow in a coolant flow simulator, elimination of external noise are enhanced by adding ground pattern in the control panel and earth around signal cables. In addition, a heating unit is added to strengthen the fluctuation signal by heating the coolant because the source of signals are heat energy. Experimental results using the improved system shows good agreement with the reference flow rate. The measurement error is reduced dramatically compared with the previous measurement accuracy and it will help to analyze the performance of nuclear fuels. For further works, out of pile test will be carried out by fabricating a test rig mockup and inspect the feasibility of the developed system. To verify the performance of a newly developed nuclear fuel, irradiation test needs to be carried out in the research reactor and measure the irradiation behavior such as fuel temperature, fission gas release, neutron dose, coolant temperature, and coolant flow rate. In particular, the heat generation rate of nuclear fuels can be measured indirectly by measuring temperature variation of coolant which passes by the fuel rod and its flow rate. However, it is very difficult to measure the flow rate of coolant at the fuel rod owing to the narrow gap between components of the test rig. In nuclear fields, noise analysis using thermocouples in the test rig has been applied to measure the flow velocity of coolant which circulates through the test loop.

  12. Rheological aspects of dense lignite-water suspensions; structure development on consecutive flow loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudoulas, Thomas B.; Kastrinakis, Eleftherios G.; Nychas, Stavros G. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Chemical Engineering, Univ. Box 453, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2007-01-15

    Aspects of dense lignite-water slurries (LWS) rheology were investigated using controlled stress and controlled strain rheometers with parallel disks and Couette geometries. During the preparation of the slurries, the achieved solids volume fractions were up to 0.425 and the particle size distributions were polydispersed with sizes up to 300 {mu}m. In the ascending parts of consecutive flow loops, a slope transition of the flow curve was observed and studied in relation to the solids volume fraction. The obtained results with the different geometries and rheometers were qualitatively the same. By following the model proposed by Cheng (Rheol Acta 42:372-382, 2003) for thixotropic fluids, and taking into account the yield stress appearance, a suitable correlation for LWS is proposed, which is consistent with the experimental flow curves. (orig.)

  13. Traking of Laboratory Debris Flow Fronts with Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz de Oliveira, Gustavo; Kulisch, Helmut; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Scheidl, Christian; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2015-04-01

    Image analysis technique is applied to track the time evolution of rapid debris flow fronts and their velocities in laboratory experiments. These experiments are parts of the project avaflow.org that intends to develop a GIS-based open source computational tool to describe wide spectrum of rapid geophysical mass flows, including avalanches and real two-phase debris flows down complex natural slopes. The laboratory model consists of a large rectangular channel 1.4m wide and 10m long, with adjustable inclination and other flow configurations. The setup allows investigate different two phase material compositions including large fluid fractions. The large size enables to transfer the results to large-scale natural events providing increased measurement accuracy. The images are captured by a high speed camera, a standard digital camera. The fronts are tracked by the camera to obtain data in debris flow experiments. The reflectance analysis detects the debris front in every image frame; its presence changes the reflectance at a certain pixel location during the flow. The accuracy of the measurements was improved with a camera calibration procedure. As one of the great problems in imaging and analysis, the systematic distortions of the camera lens are contained in terms of radial and tangential parameters. The calibration procedure estimates the optimal values for these parameters. This allows us to obtain physically correct and undistorted image pixels. Then, we map the images onto a physical model geometry, which is the projective photogrammetry, in which the image coordinates are connected with the object space coordinates of the flow. Finally, the physical model geometry is rewritten in the direct linear transformation form, which allows for the conversion from one to another coordinate system. With our approach, the debris front position can then be estimated by combining the reflectance, calibration and the linear transformation. The consecutive debris front

  14. Two-Phase Flow Modeling in a Single Closed Loop Pulsating Heat Pipes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hong-hai; Sameer Khandekar; Sanka V. V. S. N. S. Manyam; Manfred Groll

    2007-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of pulsating heat pipes through 'first’ principles is a contemporary problem which remains quite elusive. Simplifications and assumptions made in all the modeling approaches developed so far render them unsuitable for engineering design. In this paper, a more realistic modeling scheme is presented which provides considerable try for thought toward the next progressive step. At high enough heat flux level, closed loop pulsating heat pipes experience a bulk internal unidirectional fluid circulation. Under such a condition, conventional two-phaseflow modeling in capillary tubes may be applied. This has been attempted for single-loop PHPs. A homogeneous model and a separated two-fluid flow model based on simultaneous conservation of mass, momentum and energy, have been developed for an equivalent 'open flow' system. The model allows prediction of two-phase flow parameters in each subsection of the device thereby providing important insights into its operation. The concept of 'void fraction constraint'in pulsating heat pipe operation is introduced and its relevance to future modeling attempts is outlined.

  15. Mineral carbonation: energy costs of pretreatment options and insights gained from flow loop reaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, Larry R.; O' Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Rush, Gilbert E.

    2004-01-01

    Sequestration of carbon as a stable mineral carbonate has been proposed to mitigate environmental concerns that carbon dioxide may with time escape from its sequestered matrix using alternative sequestration technologies. A method has been developed to prepare stable carbonate products by reacting CO2 with magnesium silicate minerals in aqueous bicarbonate/chloride media at high temperature and pressure. Because this approach is inherently expensive due to slow reaction rates and high capital costs, studies were conducted to improve the reaction rates through mineral pretreatment steps and to cut expenses through improved reactor technology. An overview is given for the estimated cost of the process including sensitivity to grinding and heating as pretreatment options for several mineral feedstocks. The energy costs are evaluated for each pretreatment in terms of net carbon avoided. New studies with a high-temperature, high-pressure flow-loop reactor have yielded information on overcoming kinetic barriers experienced with processing in stirred autoclave reactors. Repeated tests with the flow-loop reactor have yielded insights on wear and failure of system components, on challenges to maintain and measure flow, and for better understanding of the reaction mechanism.

  16. Assessment of the adequacy of bronchial stenting by flow-volume loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaren, Clare A.; Roebuck, Derek J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Pigott, Nick; Elliott, Martin J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Cardiothoracic Unit, London (United Kingdom); Dunne, Catherine [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Physiotherapy, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    Airway compression is a common problem in children with certain forms of congenital heart disease. Although various surgical approaches are available to overcome this form of airway obstruction, internal stenting is necessary in a minority of patients. It can be difficult to assess the success of stenting at the time of the procedure, and the interval to successful extubation is usually used as an outcome measure. Measurement of relevant parameters of respiratory physiology with flow-volume and volume-pressure loops permits immediate quantitative assessment of the adequacy of stenting. A 3-month-old infant who underwent bronchial stenting and physiological assessment at the time of the procedure is described. (orig.)

  17. Verification of the karst flow model under laboratory controlled conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotovac, Hrvoje; Andric, Ivo; Malenica, Luka; Srzic, Veljko

    2016-04-01

    Karst aquifers are very important groundwater resources around the world as well as in coastal part of Croatia. They consist of extremely complex structure defining by slow and laminar porous medium and small fissures and usually fast turbulent conduits/karst channels. Except simple lumped hydrological models that ignore high karst heterogeneity, full hydraulic (distributive) models have been developed exclusively by conventional finite element and finite volume elements considering complete karst heterogeneity structure that improves our understanding of complex processes in karst. Groundwater flow modeling in complex karst aquifers are faced by many difficulties such as a lack of heterogeneity knowledge (especially conduits), resolution of different spatial/temporal scales, connectivity between matrix and conduits, setting of appropriate boundary conditions and many others. Particular problem of karst flow modeling is verification of distributive models under real aquifer conditions due to lack of above-mentioned information. Therefore, we will show here possibility to verify karst flow models under the laboratory controlled conditions. Special 3-D karst flow model (5.6*2.6*2 m) consists of concrete construction, rainfall platform, 74 piezometers, 2 reservoirs and other supply equipment. Model is filled by fine sand (3-D porous matrix) and drainage plastic pipes (1-D conduits). This model enables knowledge of full heterogeneity structure including position of different sand layers as well as conduits location and geometry. Moreover, we know geometry of conduits perforation that enable analysis of interaction between matrix and conduits. In addition, pressure and precipitation distribution and discharge flow rates from both phases can be measured very accurately. These possibilities are not present in real sites what this model makes much more useful for karst flow modeling. Many experiments were performed under different controlled conditions such as different

  18. Real-time Doppler-based arterial vascular impedance and peripheral pressure-flow loops: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Robert H; Bartels, Karsten; Esper, Stephen; Ikeda, Keita; Gan, Tong-Joo

    2014-02-01

    Arterial pressure-flow loops and vascular impedance provide additional data that could be used to assess the hemodynamic effects of therapeutic interventions in anesthetized patients. To evaluate the utility of such an approach, the authors sought to design a device that combines flow waveforms from an esophageal Doppler probe and pressure waveforms from a peripheral artery to produce real-time pressure-flow loops and estimates of arterial vascular impedance. Prospective, cohort study. Single center, university-based teaching hospital. Patients undergoing surgery in whom the attending anesthesiologist had opted to place an esophageal Doppler probe and a peripheral arterial catheter for hemodynamic monitoring. This was a non-interventional study designed to record pressure-flow loops and arterial vascular impedance intraoperatively using a novel, noninvasive device. Pressure-flow loops and arterial vascular impedance were measured noninvasively using radial artery pressure and descending thoracic aorta flow waveforms in real time. Real-time arterial vascular impedance and peripheral pressure-volume loops can be determined using available monitoring devices. Technical feasibility of this technology in patients is a crucial first step to permit meaningful evaluation of the clinical value of this approach for accurate determination of complex hemodynamic indices and, eventually, improvement of outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Using thermal tracers to estimate flow velocities of shallow flows: laboratory and field experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Rui L.P. de

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of shallow flows is important for hydraulics, hydrology and water resources management. The objective of this paper is to discuss a technique for shallow flow and overland flow velocity estimation that uses infrared thermography. Laboratory flumes and different bare, vegetated and paved field surfaces were used to test the technique. Results show that shallow flow surface velocities estimated using thermal tracers and infrared technology are similar to estimates obtained using the Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter; similar results were also obtained for overland flow velocity estimates using thermography, here comparing with the dye tracer technique. The thermographic approach revealed some potential as a flow visualization technique, and leaves space for future studies and research.

  20. Nonlinear analysis of chaotic flow in a 3D closed-loop pulsating heat pipe

    CERN Document Server

    Pouryoussefi, S M

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulation has been conducted for the chaotic flow in a 3D closed-loop pulsating heat pipe (PHP). Heat flux and constant temperature boundary conditions were applied for evaporator and condenser sections, respectively. Water and ethanol were used as working fluids. Volume of Fluid (VOF) method has been employed for two-phase flow simulation. Spectral analysis of temperature time series was carried out using Power Spectrum Density (PSD) method. Existence of dominant peak in PSD diagram indicated periodic or quasi-periodic behavior in temperature oscillations at particular frequencies. Correlation dimension values for ethanol as working fluid was found to be higher than that for water under the same operating conditions. Similar range of Lyapunov exponent values for the PHP with water and ethanol as working fluids indicated strong dependency of Lyapunov exponent to the structure and dimensions of the PHP. An O-ring structure pattern was obtained for reconstructed 3D attractor at periodic or quasi-peri...

  1. MHD modeling of coronal loops: injection of high-speed chromospheric flows

    CERN Document Server

    Petralia, A; Orlando, S; Klimchuk, J A

    2014-01-01

    Observations reveal a correspondence between chromospheric type II spicules and bright upwardly moving fronts in the corona observed in the EUV band. However, theoretical considerations suggest that these flows are unlikely to be the main source of heating in coronal magnetic loops. We investigate the propagation of high-speed chromospheric flows into coronal magnetic flux tubes, and the possible production of emission in the EUV band. We simulate the propagation of a dense $10^4$ K chromospheric jet upwards along a coronal loop, by means of a 2-D cylindrical MHD model, including gravity, radiative losses, thermal conduction and magnetic induction. The jet propagates in a complete atmosphere including the chromosphere and a tenuous cool ($\\sim 0.8$ MK) corona, linked through a steep transition region. In our reference model, the jet's initial speed is 70 km/s, its initial density is $10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$, and the ambient uniform magnetic field is 10 G. We explore also other values of jet speed and density in 1-...

  2. Groundwater Parameters and Flow Systems Near Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, G.K.

    1989-01-01

    Precipitation near Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) averages 132 cm/yr. About 76 cm/yr of water is consumed by evapotranspiration. The natural streamflow, which averages 56 cm/yr of water, consists of overland flow (about 21 cm/yr) from water bodies, wetlands, and impervious areas of groundwater discharge (about 35 cm/yr of water). Groundwater occurs in a stormflow zone that extends from the land surface to a depth of 0.3-2 m and in shallow and deeper aquifers that extend from the water table to the base of fresh water. in the stormflow zone, most water flows through macropores and mesopores, which have a volumetric porosity of about 0.002. In the vadose zone and below the water table, water flows through fractures that have a volumetric porosity in the range 1 x 10{sup -5} to 0.02. Water inflow occurs by precipitation and infiltration. infiltration that exceeds the soil water deficit forms a perched water table in the stormflow zone at the level where infiltration rate exceeds vertical hydraulic conductivity. Some water percolates down to the water table but the majority flows downslope to the streams. Recharge of the shallow aquifer is only about 3.2 cm/yr of water or 5.7% of streamflow. Most of the water that recharges the shallow aquifer is discharged by evapotranspiration above the water table. The remainder is discharged at springs and streams where the water table is within the stormflow zone. Digital models that permit unsaturated conditions and transient flows may be more appropriate than steady-state models of saturated flow for the ORNL area.

  3. Blood flow response in small intestinal loops at different depths during negative pressure wound therapy of the open abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Hlebowicz, Joanna

    2013-08-01

    High closure rates of the open abdomen have been reported following negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). However, the method has occasionally been associated with increased development of intestinal fistulae. We have previously shown that the application of NPWT to the open abdomen causes a decrease in microvascular blood flow in the small intestinal loop and the omentum adjacent to the visceral protective layer of the dressing. In this study we investigate whether the negative pressure affects only small intestinal loops lying directly below the dressing or if it also affects small intestinal loops that are not in direct contact with the dressing. Six pigs underwent midline incision and application of NPWT to the open abdomen. The microvascular blood flow was measured in four intestinal loops at different depths from the visceral protective layer, at two different locations: beneath the dressing and at the anterior abdominal wall, before and after the application of NPWT of -50, -70, -100, -120, -150 and -170 mmHg, using laser Doppler velocimetry. Negative pressures between -50 and -170 mmHg caused a significant decrease in the microvascular blood flow in the intestinal loops in direct contact with the visceral protective layer. A slight, but significant, decrease in blood flow was also seen in the intestinal loops lying beneath these loops. The decrease in microvascular blood flow increased with the amount of negative pressure applied. No difference in blood flow was seen in the intestinal loops lying deeper in the abdominal cavity. A decrease in blood flow was seen in the upper two intestinal loops located apically and anteriorly, but not in the lower two, indicating that this is a local effect and that pressure decreases with distance from the source. A long-term decrease in blood flow in the intestinal wall may induce ischaemia and secondary necrosis in the intestinal wall, which could promote the development of intestinal fistulae. We believe that NPWT of

  4. Flow Induced Vibration Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has had a Flow Induced Vibration Program since 1967; the Program currently resides in the Laboratory's Components Technology Division. Throughout its existence, the overall objective of the program has been to develop and apply new and/or improved methods of analysis and testing for the design evaluation of nuclear reactor plant components and heat exchange equipment from the standpoint of flow induced vibration. Historically, the majority of the program activities have been funded by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), and Department of Energy (DOE). Current DOE funding is from the Breeder Mechanical Component Development Division, Office of Breeder Technology Projects; Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology (ECUT) Program, Office of Energy Systems Research; and Division of Engineering, Mathematical and Geosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Testing of Clinch River Breeder Reactor upper plenum components has been funded by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) Project Office. Work has also been performed under contract with Foster Wheeler, General Electric, Duke Power Company, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Westinghouse.

  5. Optic flow estimation on trajectories generated by bio-inspired closed-loop flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Patrick A; Hyslop, Andrew M; Humbert, J Sean

    2011-05-01

    We generated panoramic imagery by simulating a fly-like robot carrying an imaging sensor, moving in free flight through a virtual arena bounded by walls, and containing obstructions. Flight was conducted under closed-loop control by a bio-inspired algorithm for visual guidance with feedback signals corresponding to the true optic flow that would be induced on an imager (computed by known kinematics and position of the robot relative to the environment). The robot had dynamics representative of a housefly-sized organism, although simplified to two-degree-of-freedom flight to generate uniaxial (azimuthal) optic flow on the retina in the plane of travel. Surfaces in the environment contained images of natural and man-made scenes that were captured by the moving sensor. Two bio-inspired motion detection algorithms and two computational optic flow estimation algorithms were applied to sequences of image data, and their performance as optic flow estimators was evaluated by estimating the mutual information between outputs and true optic flow in an equatorial section of the visual field. Mutual information for individual estimators at particular locations within the visual field was surprisingly low (less than 1 bit in all cases) and considerably poorer for the bio-inspired algorithms that the man-made computational algorithms. However, mutual information between weighted sums of these signals and comparable sums of the true optic flow showed significant increases for the bio-inspired algorithms, whereas such improvement did not occur for the computational algorithms. Such summation is representative of the spatial integration performed by wide-field motion-sensitive neurons in the third optic ganglia of flies.

  6. Flow Components in a NaK Test Loop Designed to Simulate Conditions in a Nuclear Surface Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    A test loop using NaK as the working fluid is presently in use to study material compatibility effects on various components that comprise a possible nuclear reactor design for use on the lunar surface. A DC electromagnetic (EM) pump has been designed and implemented as a means of actively controlling the NaK flow rate through the system and an EM flow sensor is employed to monitor the developed flow rate. These components allow for the matching of the flow rate conditions in test loops with those that would be found in a full-scale surface-power reactor. The design and operating characteristics of the EM pump and flow sensor are presented. In the EM pump, current is applied to a set of electrodes to produce a Lorentz body force in the fluid. A measurement of the induced voltage (back-EMF) in the flow sensor provides the means of monitoring flow rate. Both components are compact, employing high magnetic field strength neodymium magnets thermally coupled to a water-cooled housing. A vacuum gap limits the heat transferred from the high temperature NaK tube to the magnets and a magnetically-permeable material completes the magnetic circuit. The pump is designed to produce a pressure rise of 5 psi, and the flow sensor's predicted output is roughly 20 mV at the loop's nominal flow rate of 0.5 GPM.

  7. Computer simulation of flow-dependent absorption in microperfused short Henle's loop of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, A D; Basmadjian, D; Wang, B C

    1979-01-01

    With computer simulation we examined the extent to which current theories and experimental data explain function of single microperfused superficial Henle's loops in rats. In the model standard phenomenological equations describe transport; two sets of transport parameters labeled rat and rabbit were taken from published experiments; Michaelis-Menten kinetics in the ascending thick limb were adjusted arbitrarily; tubular radius is either constant or depends on luminal pressure with compliance based on experimental observations; the interstitium is an infinite sink with salt and urea concentrations constant in the cortex and exponentially increasing in the outer medulla; concentrations resemble those found in hydropenic or saline diuretic rats. The following predictions were obtained. The model with rabbit parameters does not recirculate urea and will not operate with high medullary urea concentrations; with rat parameters too much urea recirculates an the results of perfusion with equilibrium solution are not reproduced. Using a compromise between rat and rabbit parameters, the model reproduces water absorption, salt reabsorption, and urea recirculation as observed in vivo in rat loops perfused at 5-40 nl/min. It also simulates perfusion with saline, equilibrium solution, saline plus furosemide, and 300 mM mannitol. When the model includes a short early distal segment, effluent salt concentration reaches a minimum at a 15 nl/min perfusion rate as observed in vivo; however, concentration at the macula densa is a monotonically increasing function of flow. When permeation rate is a function of wall surface area and thickness a better fit to experimental results is produced. However, the effect is small: water absorption alters by 4% or less and effluent salt concentration is reduced by up to 10% at low perfusion rates. Comparison of rigid and compliant loops shows no relationship between transit time per se and reabsorption. PMID:262377

  8. The simultaneous loop flow correction analysis in the water feed network of Minkok Edjombo (SOUTH –CAMEROON.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MENDOMO MEYE SERGES

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available With increasing population growth and industrial development, water flow rates and other hydraulic requirements associated with water distribution systems have been estimated to increase both national and local scale. Water shortage will cause inconvenience to people’s life and it will impact city function and industrial production. Hence to overcome this problem design and analysis of water distribution system is necessary to get optimal discharge. In this paper a water pipeline network analysis with a case study of a small city (MinkokEdjombo in the southern Cameroon system has been undertaken. What prompted this study is that the case study has a lot of fluctuations in its head loss. Also, the discharge is not proportional to the pipe diameter. The study therefore adopted simultaneous loop flow correction method because it computes simultaneous flows corrections for all loops, hence, the best since computational procedures takes into account the iterative influence of flow corrections between loops which have common pipes. After applying the simultaneous loop flow correction analyze in a twenty-four sampled pipeline network, a drastic reduction in head loss and regular line along the axis was observed. Besides, the rate at which the water flows was observed to be proportional to the pipe diameter. Hence, the method is a useful aid in planning, designing and operating of reticulated pipeline network for higher efficiency and improved economy.

  9. Flow Induced Microvascular Network Formation of Therapeutic Relevant Arteriovenous (AV) Loop-Based Constructs in Response to Ionizing Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Volker J; Covi, Jennifer M; Koepple, Christoph; Hilgert, Johannes G; Polykandriotis, Elias; Bigdeli, Amir K; Distel, Luitpold V; Horch, Raymund E; Kneser, Ulrich

    2017-02-15

    BACKGROUND The arteriovenous (AV) loop model enables axial vascularization to gain a functional microcirculatory system in tissue engineering constructs in vivo. These constructs might replace surgical flaps for the treatment of complex wounds in the future. Today, free flaps are often exposed to high-dose radiation after defect coverage, according to guideline-oriented treatment plans. Vascular response of AV loop-based constructs has not been evaluated after radiation, although it is of particular importance. It is further unclear whether the interposed venous AV loop graft is crucial for the induction of angiogenesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS We exposed the grafted vein to a single radiation dose of 2 Gy prior to loop construction to alter intrinsic and angio-inductive properties specifically within the graft. Vessel loops were embedded in a fibrin-filled chamber for 15 days and radiation-induced effects on flow-mediated vascularization were assessed by micro-CT and two-dimensional histological analysis. RESULTS Vessel amount was significantly impaired when an irradiated vein graft was used for AV loop construction. However, vessel growth and differentiation were still present. In contrast to vessel density, which was homogeneously diminished in constructs containing irradiated veins, vessel diameter was primarily decreased in the more peripheral regions. CONCLUSIONS Vascular luminal sprouts were significantly diminished in irradiated venous grafts, suggesting that the interposing vein constitutes a vital part of the AV loop model and is essential to initiate flow-mediate angiogenesis. These results add to the current understanding of AV loop-based neovascularization and suggest clinical implications for patients requiring combined AV loop-based tissue transfer and adjuvant radiotherapy.

  10. Flow Induced Microvascular Network Formation of Therapeutic Relevant Arteriovenous (AV) Loop-Based Constructs in Response to Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Volker J.; Covi, Jennifer M.; Koepple, Christoph; Hilgert, Johannes G.; Polykandriotis, Elias; Bigdeli, Amir K.; Distel, Luitpold V.; Horch, Raymund E.; Kneser, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Background The arteriovenous (AV) loop model enables axial vascularization to gain a functional microcirculatory system in tissue engineering constructs in vivo. These constructs might replace surgical flaps for the treatment of complex wounds in the future. Today, free flaps are often exposed to high-dose radiation after defect coverage, according to guideline-oriented treatment plans. Vascular response of AV loop-based constructs has not been evaluated after radiation, although it is of particular importance. It is further unclear whether the interposed venous AV loop graft is crucial for the induction of angiogenesis. Material/Methods We exposed the grafted vein to a single radiation dose of 2 Gy prior to loop construction to alter intrinsic and angio-inductive properties specifically within the graft. Vessel loops were embedded in a fibrin-filled chamber for 15 days and radiation-induced effects on flow-mediated vascularization were assessed by micro-CT and two-dimensional histological analysis. Results Vessel amount was significantly impaired when an irradiated vein graft was used for AV loop construction. However, vessel growth and differentiation were still present. In contrast to vessel density, which was homogeneously diminished in constructs containing irradiated veins, vessel diameter was primarily decreased in the more peripheral regions. Conclusions Vascular luminal sprouts were significantly diminished in irradiated venous grafts, suggesting that the interposing vein constitutes a vital part of the AV loop model and is essential to initiate flow-mediate angiogenesis. These results add to the current understanding of AV loop-based neovascularization and suggest clinical implications for patients requiring combined AV loop-based tissue transfer and adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:28199294

  11. ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, Z.V. (ed.); Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

    1989-02-01

    A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

  12. Comparison of laboratory batch and flow-through microcosm bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Bernard J P; Delhaye, Hélène L; Triffault-Bouchet, Gaëlle G

    2014-10-01

    Since 1997, we have been developing a protocol for ecotoxicological bioassays in 2-L laboratory microcosms and have applied it to the study of various pollutants and ecotoxicological risk assessment scenarios in the area of urban facilities and transport infrastructures. The effects on five different organisms (micro-algae, duckweeds, daphnids, amphipods, chironomids) are assessed using biological responses such as growth, emergence (chironomids), reproduction (daphnids) and survival, with a duration of exposure of 3 weeks. This bioassay has mainly been used as a batch bioassay, i.e., the water was not renewed during the test. A flow-through microcosm bioassay has been developed recently, with the assumption that conditions for the biota should be improved, variability reduced, and the range of exposure patterns enlarged (e.g., the possibility of maintaining constant exposure in the water column). This paper compares the results obtained in batch and flow-through microcosm bioassays, using cadmium as a model toxicant. As expected, the stabilization of physico-chemical parameters, increased organism fitness and reduced variability were observed in the flow-through microcosm bioassay.

  13. Dynamic Characterization of a Low Cost Microwave Water-Cut Sensor in a Flow Loop

    KAUST Repository

    Karimi, Muhammad Akram

    2017-03-31

    Inline precise measurement of water fraction in oil (i.e. water-cut [WC]) finds numerous applications in oil and gas industry. This paper presents the characterization of an extremely low cost, completely non-intrusive and full range microwave water-cut sensor based upon pipe conformable microwave T-resonator. A 10″ microwave stub based T-resonator has been implemented directly on the pipe surface whose resonance frequency changes in the frequency band of 90MHz–190MHz (111%) with changing water fraction in oil. The designed sensor is capable of detecting even small changes in WC with a resolution of 0.07% at low WC and 0.5% WC at high WC. The performance of the microwave WC sensor has been tested in an in-house flow loop. The proposed WC sensor has been characterized over full water-cut range (0%–100%) not only in vertical but also in horizontal orientation. The sensor has shown predictable response in both orientations with huge frequency shift. Moreover, flow rate effect has also been investigated on the proposed WC sensor’s performance and it has been found that the sensor’s repeatability is within 2.5% WC for variable flow rates.

  14. Perturbative Yukawa theory at finite density: the role of masses and renormalization group flow at two loops

    CERN Document Server

    Palhares, Letícia F

    2008-01-01

    Yukawa theory at vanishing temperature provides (one of the ingredients for) an effective description of the thermodynamics of a variety of cold and dense fermionic systems. We study the role of masses and the renormalization group flow in the calculation of the equation of state up to two loops within the MSbar scheme. Two-loop integrals are computed analytically for arbitrary fermion and scalar masses, and expressed in terms of well-known special functions. The dependence of the renormalization group flow on the number of fermion flavors is also discussed.

  15. A statistical learning strategy for closed-loop control of fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéniat, Florimond; Mathelin, Lionel; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    2016-12-01

    This work discusses a closed-loop control strategy for complex systems utilizing scarce and streaming data. A discrete embedding space is first built using hash functions applied to the sensor measurements from which a Markov process model is derived, approximating the complex system's dynamics. A control strategy is then learned using reinforcement learning once rewards relevant with respect to the control objective are identified. This method is designed for experimental configurations, requiring no computations nor prior knowledge of the system, and enjoys intrinsic robustness. It is illustrated on two systems: the control of the transitions of a Lorenz'63 dynamical system, and the control of the drag of a cylinder flow. The method is shown to perform well.

  16. A statistical learning strategy for closed-loop control of fluid flows

    CERN Document Server

    Guéniat, Florimond; Hussaini, M Yousuff

    2016-01-01

    This work discusses a closed-loop control strategy for complex systems utilizing scarce and streaming data. A discrete embedding space is first built using hash functions applied to the sensor measurements from which a Markov process model is derived, approximating the complex system's dynamics. A control strategy is then learned using reinforcement learning once rewards relevant with respect to the control objective are identified. This method is designed for experimental configurations, requiring no computations nor prior knowledge of the system, and enjoys intrinsic robustness. It is illustrated on two systems: the control of the transitions of a Lorenz 63 dynamical system, and the control of the drag of a cylinder flow. The method is shown to perform well.

  17. Using data assimilation in laboratory experiments of geophysical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Galmiche, M; Thivolle-Cazat, E; Verron, J; Galmiche, Martin; Sommeria, Joel; Thivolle-Cazat, Emmanuelle; Verron, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Data assimilation is used in numerical simulations of laboratory experiments in a stratified, rotating fluid. The experiments are performed on the large Coriolis turntable (Grenoble, France), which achieves a high degree of similarity with the ocean, and the simulations are performed with a two-layer shallow water model. Since the flow is measured with a high level of precision and resolution, a detailed analysis of a forecasting system is feasible. Such a task is much more difficult to undertake at the oceanic scale because of the paucity of observations and problems of accuracy and data sampling. This opens the way to an experimental test bed for operational oceanography. To illustrate this, some results on the baroclinic instability of a two-layer vortex are presented.

  18. Closing the loop on improvement: Packaging experience in the Software Engineering Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waligora, Sharon R.; Landis, Linda C.; Doland, Jerry T.

    1994-01-01

    As part of its award-winning software process improvement program, the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) has developed an effective method for packaging organizational best practices based on real project experience into useful handbooks and training courses. This paper shares the SEL's experience over the past 12 years creating and updating software process handbooks and training courses. It provides cost models and guidelines for successful experience packaging derived from SEL experience.

  19. Laboratory simulation of energetic flows of magnetospheric planetary plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Posukh, V. G.; Melekhov, A. V.; Boyarintsev, E. L.; Zakharov, Yu P.; Prokopov, P. A.; Ponomarenko, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic interaction of super-sonic counter-streaming plasmas moving in dipole magnetic dipole is studied in laboratory experiment. First, a quasi-stationary flow is produced by plasma gun which forms a magnetosphere around the magnetic dipole. Second, explosive plasma expanding from inner dipole region outward is launch by laser beams focused at the surface of the dipole cover. Laser plasma is energetic enough to disrupt magnetic field and to sweep through the background plasma for large distances. Probe measurements showed that far from the initially formed magnetosphere laser plasma carries within itself a magnetic field of the same direction but order of magnitude larger in value than the vacuum dipole field at considered distances. Because no compression of magnetic field at the front of laser plasma was observed, the realized interaction is different from previous experiments and theoretical models of laser plasma expansion into uniform magnetized background. It was deduced based on the obtained data that laser plasma while expanding through inner magnetosphere picks up a magnetized shell formed by background plasma and carries it for large distances beyond previously existing magnetosphere.

  20. Internal flow Patterns of the Horizontal Heat Mode Closed-Loop Oscillating Heat Pipe with Check Valves (HHMCLOHP/CV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sangiamsuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was to study the internal flow patterns on heat transfer rates of the Horizontal Heat Mode Closed Loop Oscillating Heat Pipe with Check Valves (HHMCLOHP/CV. The HHMCLOHP/CV was made from a Pyrex glass capillary tube with a 2.4 mm inside diameter. There were 10 meandering turns with 2 check valves. Ethanol and a silver nano-ethanol mixture were used as working fluid. Experimental results found that if working fluid varies from ethanol to a silver nano-ethanol mixture and the evaporator temperature increases the main flow patterns were Slug flow + Annular flow. The main regime of each flow pattern can be determined from the flow pattern map.

  1. FLOW BEHAVIOR AND MASS TRANSFER IN THREE-PHASE EXTERNAL-LOOP AIRLIFT REACTORS WITH LARGE PARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malin; Liu; Tongwang; Zhang; Tiefeng; Wang; Jinfu; Wang; Yong; Jin

    2006-01-01

    The flow behavior and mass transfer in a three-phase external-loop airlift reactor can be improved by adding large particles. The mass transfer and liquid dispersion behavior for a three-phase external-loop reactor with large particles are studied in terms of the effect of the diameter and loading of the large particles on the liquid dispersion coefficient and mass transfer coefficient. The results showed that increasing the diameter or loading of the large particles tend to decrease dispersion and intensify mass transfer, and that an increase in the diameter of the large particles remarkably decreases the particle loop rate, while the effect of fine particles is much less notable.

  2. Open-loop (feed-forward) and feedback control of coronary blood flow during exercise, cardiac pacing, and pressure changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Ranjan K; Feigl, Eric O; Gorman, Mark W; Brengelmann, George L; Beard, Daniel A

    2016-06-01

    A control system model was developed to analyze data on in vivo coronary blood flow regulation and to probe how different mechanisms work together to control coronary flow from rest to exercise, and under a variety of experimental conditions, including cardiac pacing and with changes in coronary arterial pressure (autoregulation). In the model coronary flow is determined by the combined action of a feedback pathway signal that is determined by the level of plasma ATP in coronary venous blood, an adrenergic open-loop (feed-forward) signal that increases with exercise, and a contribution of pressure-mediated myogenic control. The model was identified based on data from exercise experiments where myocardial oxygen extraction, coronary flow, cardiac interstitial norepinephrine concentration, and arterial and coronary venous plasma ATP concentrations were measured during control and during adrenergic and purinergic receptor blockade conditions. The identified model was used to quantify the relative contributions of open-loop and feedback pathways and to illustrate the degree of redundancy in the control of coronary flow. The results indicate that the adrenergic open-loop control component is responsible for most of the increase in coronary blood flow that occurs during high levels of exercise. However, the adenine nucleotide-mediated metabolic feedback control component is essential. The model was evaluated by predicting coronary flow in cardiac pacing and autoregulation experiments with reasonable fits to the data. The analysis shows that a model in which coronary venous plasma adenine nucleotides are a signal in local metabolic feedback control of coronary flow is consistent with the available data.

  3. Two-phase flow assessment and void fraction measurement of a pilot natural circulation loop using capacitance probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Marcelo S.; Cabral, Eduardo L.L., E-mail: msrocha@ipen.br, E-mail: elcabral@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This article focuses the project, construction and tests of a capacitance probe for void fraction measurement and two-phase flow assessment in a natural circulation loop. Two-phase flow patterns and the associated variables are very important in natural circulation circuits and it is used in the new generation of nuclear reactors for residual heat removal during shut-off and emergency events. The capacitance probe was calibrated to measure the instantaneous bulk void fraction in a vertical tube section of a natural circulation loop. Instantaneous signals generated by the capacitance probe allow the determination of the local bulk void fraction. The probe design is presented and discussed and void fraction data obtained by the probe are compared with theoretical void fraction calculated by analytical models from literature. (author)

  4. Validation of the generalized model of two-phase thermosyphon loop based on experimental measurements of volumetric flow rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieliński, Henryk

    2016-09-01

    The current paper presents the experimental validation of the generalized model of the two-phase thermosyphon loop. The generalized model is based on mass, momentum, and energy balances in the evaporators, rising tube, condensers and the falling tube. The theoretical analysis and the experimental data have been obtained for a new designed variant. The variant refers to a thermosyphon loop with both minichannels and conventional tubes. The thermosyphon loop consists of an evaporator on the lower vertical section and a condenser on the upper vertical section. The one-dimensional homogeneous and separated two-phase flow models were used in calculations. The latest minichannel heat transfer correlations available in literature were applied. A numerical analysis of the volumetric flow rate in the steady-state has been done. The experiment was conducted on a specially designed test apparatus. Ultrapure water was used as a working fluid. The results show that the theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the measured volumetric flow rate at steady-state.

  5. Measuring Plasma Flows in Transition Region Loops Using the MOSES Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Roy; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Bonham, Nick; Courrier, Hans

    2017-08-01

    While traditional slit spectrographs have been extremely valuable for observing coronal loops, the narrow slit of these instruments does not allow the properties and dynamic evolution of coronal loops to be measured simultaneously across their entire structure. The Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) is a rocket-borne slitless spectrograph capable of measuring doppler shifts simultaneously over a wide field of view. On August 27, 2015, we observed AR 12403 in Ne VII (46.5 nm) at T ~ 500,000 K. We present time dependent measurements of downflow velocities for loop footpoints, with physical interpretation based on 1D modeling.

  6. Understanding thermo-fluidic characteristics of a glass tube closed loop pulsating heat pipe: flow patterns and fluid oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, V. K.; Ramachandran, K.; Pillai, B. C.; Brusly Solomon, A.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental program has been carried out to understand the thermo-fluidic characterization of deionized (DI) water charged closed loop pulsating heat pipe (CLPHP) with flow patterns and fluid oscillations. The CLPHP is examined under vertical and horizontal heating modes with varying heat power. The flow patterns along with fluid oscillations are correlated with thermal performance of the CLPHP. Further, the CLPHP with copper oxide nanofluid study is carried out to understand operational behavior of the device. Fast Fourier frequencies, average frequency of the internal fluid temperature are investigated. Several important features of CLPHP operation are identified by the visual study.

  7. Valveless pumping mechanics of the embryonic heart during cardiac looping: Pressure and flow through micro-PIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bark, D L; Johnson, B; Garrity, D; Dasi, L P

    2017-01-04

    Cardiovascular development is influenced by the flow-induced stress environment originating from cardiac biomechanics. To characterize the stress environment, it is necessary to quantify flow and pressure. Here, we quantify the flow field in a developing zebrafish heart during the looping stage through micro-particle imaging velocimetry and by analyzing spatiotemporal plots. We further build upon previous methods to noninvasively quantify the pressure field at a low Reynolds number using flow field data for the first time, while also comparing the impact of viscosity models. Through this method, we show that the atrium builds up pressure to ~0.25mmHg relative to the ventricle during atrial systole and that atrial expansion creates a pressure difference of ~0.15mmHg across the atrium, resulting in efficient cardiac pumping. With these techniques, it is possible to noninvasively fully characterize hemodynamics during heart development.

  8. improving the implementation of pre-laboratory flow charts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    to the effectiveness of methods and improvement of cooperative learning in practical ... proven effective in a variety of instructional settings and post laboratory ..... active learning has been shown to produce numerous social and psychological ...

  9. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Laboratory Confirmation of Buruli Ulcer Disease-Towards a Point-of-Care Test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Beissner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available As the major burden of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD occurs in remote rural areas, development of point-of-care (POC tests is considered a research priority to bring diagnostic services closer to the patients. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP, a simple, robust and cost-effective technology, has been selected as a promising POC test candidate. Three BUD-specific LAMP assays are available to date, but various technical challenges still hamper decentralized application. To overcome the requirement of cold-chains for transport and storage of reagents, the aim of this study was to establish a dry-reagent-based LAMP assay (DRB-LAMP employing lyophilized reagents.Following the design of an IS2404 based conventional LAMP (cLAMP assay suitable to apply lyophilized reagents, a lyophylization protocol for the DRB-LAMP format was developed. Clinical performance of cLAMP was validated through testing of 140 clinical samples from 91 suspected BUD cases by routine assays, i.e. IS2404 dry-reagent-based (DRB PCR, conventional IS2404 PCR (cPCR, IS2404 qPCR, compared to cLAMP. Whereas qPCR rendered an additional 10% of confirmed cases and samples respectively, case confirmation and positivity rates of DRB-PCR or cPCR (64.84% and 56.43%; 100% concordant results in both assays and cLAMP (62.64% and 52.86% were comparable and there was no significant difference between the sensitivity of the assays (DRB PCR and cPCR, 86.76%; cLAMP, 83.82%. Likewise, sensitivity of cLAMP (95.83% and DRB-LAMP (91.67% were comparable as determined on a set of 24 samples tested positive in all routine assays.Both LAMP formats constitute equivalent alternatives to conventional PCR techniques. Provided the envisaged availability of field friendly DNA extraction formats, both assays are suitable for decentralized laboratory confirmation of BUD, whereby DRB-LAMP scores with the additional advantage of not requiring cold-chains. As validation of the assays was conducted in a third

  10. A Novel Laboratory Approach for the Demonstration of Hemodynamic Principles: The Arterial Blood Flow Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djelic, Marina; Mazic, Sanja; Zikic, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of a laboratory training course for medicine students, a new approach for laboratory exercises has been applied to teach the phenomena of circulation. The exercise program included measurements of radial artery blood flow waveform for different age groups using a noninvasive optical sensor. Arterial wave reflection was identified by…

  11. Liquid-Vapor Flow Regime Transitions for Spacecraft Heat Transfer Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    heavenly bodies, in spite of their astonishing distances, than in the investigations of the movement of flowing water before our very eyes" Galileo ... Galilei 1564-1642 Motivation to Study MicroQravity Flow Reuimes The study of microgravity vapor-liquid flow regimes is motivated by the benefits of heat

  12. Experiments and simulations of gas-solid flow in an airlift loop reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaoyu Yan; Chunxi Lu; Yiping Fan; Rui Cao; Yansheng Liu

    2011-01-01

    The hydrodynamics in a gas-solid airlift loop reactor was investigated systematically using experimental measurements and CFD simulation. In the experiments, the time averaged parameters, such as solid fraction and particle velocity, were measured by optical fiber probe. In the simulation, the modified Gidaspow drag model accounting for the interparticles clustering was incorporated into the Eulerian-Eulerian CFD model with particulate-phase kinetic theory. Predicted values of solid fraction and particle velocity were compared with experimental results, validating the drag model and the simulation. The results show that the profiles of particle velocity and solid fraction are uniform in annulus. However, the core-annulus structure appears in other three regions (draft tube region, bottom region and particle diffiuence region),which presents the similar heterogeneous feature of aggregative fiuidization usually occurred in normal fiuidized beds. Simulated profiles of panicle residence time distribution indicate that the airlift loop reactor should be characterized by near perfect mixing.

  13. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Using Noncorrosive Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigodich, Richard V.

    2014-01-01

    Stopped-flow kinetics techniques are important to the study of rapid chemical and biochemical reactions. Incorporation of a stopped-flow kinetics experiment into the physical chemistry laboratory curriculum would therefore be an instructive addition. However, the usual reactions studied in such exercises employ a corrosive reagent that can over…

  14. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Using Noncorrosive Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigodich, Richard V.

    2014-01-01

    Stopped-flow kinetics techniques are important to the study of rapid chemical and biochemical reactions. Incorporation of a stopped-flow kinetics experiment into the physical chemistry laboratory curriculum would therefore be an instructive addition. However, the usual reactions studied in such exercises employ a corrosive reagent that can over…

  15. Heat Transfer with Flow and Phase Change in an Evaporator of Miniature Flat Plate Capillary Pumped Loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongmin WAN; Wei LIU; Zhaoqing ZHENG; A. Nakayama

    2007-01-01

    An overall two-dimensional numerical model of the miniature flat plate capillary pumped loop (CPL) evaporator is developed to describe the liquid and vapor flow, heat transfer and phase change in the porous wick structure,liquid flow and heat transfer in the compensation cavity and heat transfer in the vapor grooves and metallic wall.The entire evaporator is solved with SIMPLE algorithm as a conjugate problem. The effect of heat conduction of metallic side wall on the performance of miniature flat plate CPL evaporator is analyzed, and side wall effect heat transfer limit is introduced to estimate the performance of evaporator. The shape and location of vapor-liquid interface inside the wick are calculated and the influences of applied heat flux, liquid subcooling, wick material and metallic wall material on the evaporator performance are investigated in detail. The numerical results obtained are useful for the miniature flat plate evaporator performance optimization and design of CPL.

  16. Limited gene flow and partial isolation phylogeography of Himalayan snowcock Tetraogallus himalayensis based on part mitochondrial D-loop sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoli WANG; Jiangyong QU; Naifa LIU; Xinkang BAO; Sen SONG

    2011-01-01

    Himalayan snowcock Tetraogallus himalayensis are distributed in alpine and subalpine areas in China.We used mitochondrial DNA control-region data to investigate the origin and past demographic change in sixty-seven Himalayan snowcock T.himalayensis.The fragments of 1155 nucleotides from the control region of mitochondrial DNA were sequenced,and 57 polymorphic positions defined 37 haplotypes.A high level of genetic diversity was detected in all populations sampled and may be associated isolation of the mountains and habitat fragmentation and deterioration from Quaternary glaciations.In the phylogenetic tree,all haplotypes grouped into four groups:clade A (Kunlun Mountains clade),clade B (Northern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau clade),clade C (Tianshan Mountains clade) and clade D (Kalakunlun Mountains clade).We found a low level of gene flow and significant genetic differentiation among all populations.Based on divergence time we suggest that the divergence of Himalayan snowcock occurred in the middle Pleistocene inter-glaciation,and expansion occurred in the glaciation.Analysis of mtDNA D-loop sequences confirmed demographic population expansion,as did our non-significant mismatch distribution analysis.In conclusion,limited gene flow and a pattern of partial isolation phylogeographic was found in geographic populations of T.himalayansis based on the analysis on mtDNA D-loop sequences [Current Zoology 57 (6):758-767,2011 ].

  17. A comparison of laboratory and field observations of superelevation in debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdell, Brian W.; Scheidl, Christian; Graf, Christoph; Rickenmann, Dieter

    2017-04-01

    Post-event estimation of debris-flow velocity is a central part of hazard analysis. Estimates of debris-flow velocity are useful for e.g. dimensioning mitigation measures, calibrating or testing debris-flow runout models, constructing intensity-based hazard maps, and designing warning systems. However independent field observations of velocity are rare and it is often necessary to indirectly estimate flow velocity. The difference in mud elevation on either side of a channel through a bend of a constant radius can be used to estimate the flow velocity using a vortex method developed for a Newtonian fluid. In 2015 we reported on the application of the vortex method to calculate the front velocity of debris flows in the laboratory (Scheidl et al., 2015). In the laboratory experiments, we found a statistically significant correction factor k for the application of the vortex equation to debris flows under supercritical flow conditions, with somewhat more scatter for subcritical flows. Nevertheless, it was possible to derive a forced-vortex equation, without a correction factor, after considering active and passive earth pressures within the flow. Herein, we compare the laboratory results with field data from the Illgraben and Schipfenbach torrents in Switzerland. Using video recordings and flow trajectory data for 17 debris flows at the Illgraben debris-flow observation station in Switzerland, we were able to independently test the application of the new forced vortex equation against field data. The general trend observed in the laboratory are confirmed using the field data: the correction factor k decreases with increasing Froude number of the flow. However the field data show a much larger degree of scatter in the vortex-equation correction factor in comparison with the laboratory data. The debris flows in the field differ from the laboratory channel in many ways. Although the observation section at the Illgraben was fairly uniform in terms of the surface width of

  18. Experimental Study of Single Phase Flow in a Closed-Loop Cooling System with Integrated Mini-Channel Heat Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The flow and heat transfer characteristics of a closed-loop cooling system with a mini-channel heat sink for thermal management of electronics is studied experimentally. The heat sink is designed with corrugated fins to improve its heat dissipation capability. The experiments are performed using variable coolant volumetric flow rates and input heating powers. The experimental results show a high and reliable thermal performance using the heat sink with corrugated fins. The heat transfer capability is improved up to 30 W/cm2 when the base temperature is kept at a stable and acceptable level. Besides the heat transfer capability enhancement, the capability of the system to transfer heat for a long distance is also studied and a fast thermal response time to reach steady state is observed once the input heating power or the volume flow rate are varied. Under different input heat source powers and volumetric flow rates, our results suggest potential applications of the designed mini-channel heat sink in cooling microelectronics.

  19. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-07-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent).

  20. Laboratory and numerical evaluation of borehole methods for subsurface horizontal flow characterization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedler, William H. (Radon Abatement Systems, Inc., Golden, CO); Jepsen, Richard Alan (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM)

    2003-08-01

    The requirement to accurately measure subsurface groundwater flow at contaminated sites, as part of a time and cost effective remediation program, has spawned a variety of flow evaluation technologies. Validation of the accuracy and knowledge regarding the limitations of these technologies are critical for data quality and application confidence. Leading the way in the effort to validate and better understand these methodologies, the US Army Environmental Center has funded a multi-year program to compare and evaluate all viable horizontal flow measurement technologies. This multi-year program has included a field comparison phase, an application of selected methods as part of an integrated site characterization program phase, and most recently, a laboratory and numerical simulator phase. As part of this most recent phase, numerical modeling predictions and laboratory measurements were made in a simulated fracture borehole set-up within a controlled flow simulator. The scanning colloidal borescope flowmeter (SCBFM) and advanced hydrophysical logging (NxHpL{trademark}) tool were used to measure velocities and flow rate in a simulated fractured borehole in the flow simulator. Particle tracking and mass flux measurements were observed and recorded under a range of flow conditions in the simulator. Numerical models were developed to aid in the design of the flow simulator and predict the flow conditions inside the borehole. Results demonstrated that the flow simulator allowed for predictable, easily controlled, and stable flow rates both inside and outside the well. The measurement tools agreed well with each other over a wide range of flow conditions. The model results demonstrate that the Scanning Colloidal Borescope did not interfere with the flow in the borehole in any of the tests. The model is capable of predicting flow conditions and agreed well with the measurements and observations in the flow simulator and borehole. Both laboratory and model results showed a

  1. Self-organizing maps applied to two-phase flow on natural circulation loop studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Leonardo F.; Cunha, Kelly de P.; Andrade, Delvonei A.; Sabundjian, Gaiane; Torres, Walmir M.; Macedo, Luiz A.; Rocha, Marcelo da S.; Masotti, Paulo H.F.; Mesquita, Roberto N. de, E-mail: rnavarro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Two-phase flow of liquid and gas is found in many closed circuits using natural circulation for cooling purposes. Natural circulation phenomenon is important on recent nuclear power plant projects for heat removal on 'loss of pump power' or 'plant shutdown' accidents. The accuracy of heat transfer estimation has been improved based on models that require precise prediction of pattern transitions of flow. Self-Organizing Maps are trained to digital images acquired on natural circulation flow instabilities. This technique will allow the selection of the more important characteristics associated with each flow pattern, enabling a better comprehension of each observed instability. This periodic flow oscillation behavior can be observed thoroughly in this facility due its glass-made tubes transparency. The Natural Circulation Facility (Circuito de Circulacao Natural - CCN) installed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN, is an experimental circuit designed to provide thermal hydraulic data related to one and two phase flow under natural circulation conditions. (author)

  2. Granular and particle-laden flows: from laboratory experiments to field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delannay, R.; Valance, A.; Mangeney, A.; Roche, O.; Richard, P.

    2017-02-01

    This review article provides an overview of dry granular flows and particle fluid mixtures, including experimental and numerical modeling at the laboratory scale, large scale hydrodynamics approaches and field observations. Over the past ten years, the theoretical and numerical approaches have made such significant progress that they are capable of providing qualitative and quantitative estimates of particle concentration and particle velocity profiles in steady and fully developed particulate flows. The next step which is currently developed is the extension of these approaches to unsteady and inhomogeneous flow configurations relevant to most of geophysical flows. We also emphasize that the up-scaling from laboratory experiments to large scale geophysical flows still poses some theoretical physical challenges. For example, the reduction of the dissipation that is responsible for the unexpected long run-out of large scale granular avalanches is not observed at the laboratory scale and its physical origin is still a matter of debate. However, we believe that the theoretical approaches have reached a mature state and that it is now reasonable to tackle complex particulate flows that incorporate more and more degrees of complexity of natural flows.

  3. Development and validation of a radial inflow turbine model for simulation of the SNL S-CO2 split-flow loop.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilim, R. B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-07-31

    A one-dimensional model for a radial inflow turbine has been developed for super-critical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle applications. The model accounts for the main phenomena present in the volute, nozzle, and impeller of a single-stage turbine. These phenomena include internal losses due to friction, blade loading, and angle of incidence and parasitic losses due to windage and blade-housing leakage. The model has been added as a component to the G-PASS plant systems code. The model was developed to support the analysis of S-CO{sub 2} cycles in conjunction with small-scale loop experiments. Such loops operate at less than a MWt thermal input. Their size permits components to be reconfigured in new arrangements relatively easily and economically. However, the small thermal input combined with the properties of carbon dioxide lead to turbomachines with impeller diameters of only one to two inches. At these sizes the dominant phenomena differ from those in larger more typical machines. There is almost no treatment in the literature of turbomachines at these sizes. The present work therefore is aimed at developing turbomachine models that support the task of S-CO{sub 2} cycle analysis using small-scale tests. Model predictions were compared against data from an experiment performed for Sandia National Laboratories in the split-flow Brayton cycle loop currently located at Barber-Nichols Inc. The split-flow loop incorporates two turbo-alternator-compressor (TAC) units each incorporating a radial inflow turbine and a radial flow compressor on a common shaft. The predicted thermodynamic conditions at the outlet of the turbine on the main compressor shaft were compared with measured values at different shaft speeds. Two modifications to the original model were needed to better match the experiment data. First, a representation of the heat loss from the volute downstream of the sensed inlet temperature was added. Second, an empirical multiplicative factor was

  4. Analysis of chaotic flow in a 2D multi-turn closed-loop pulsating heat pipe

    CERN Document Server

    Pouryoussefi, S M

    2016-01-01

    Numerical study has been conducted for the chaotic flow in a multi-turn closed-loop pulsating heat pipe (PHP). Heat flux and constant temperature boundary conditions have been applied for heating and cooling sections respectively. Water was used as working fluid. Volume of Fluid (VOF) method has been employed for two-phase flow simulation. Volume fraction results showed formation of perfect vapor and liquid plugs in the fluid flow of PHP. Non-linear time series analysis, power spectrum density, correlation dimension and autocorrelation function were used to investigate the chaos. Absence of dominating peaks in the power spectrum density was a signature of chaos in the pulsating heat pipe. It was found that by increasing the filling ratio and evaporator heating power the correlation dimension increases. Decreasing of the autocorrelation function with respect to time showed the prediction ability is finite as a result of chaotic state. An optimal filling ratio of 60% and minimum thermal resistance of 1.62 K/W w...

  5. Experimental Study on Hydrate Induction Time of Gas-Saturated Water-in-Oil Emulsion using a High-Pressure Flow Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv X.F.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrate is one of the critical precipitates which have to be controlled for subsea flow assurance. The induction time of hydrate is therefore a significant parameter. However, there have been few studies on the induction time of the natural gas hydrate formation in a flow loop system. Consequently, a series of experiments were firstly performed, including water, natural gas and Diesel oil, on the hydrate induction time under various conditions such as the supercooling and supersaturation degree, water cut, anti-agglomerant dosage, etc. The experiments were conducted in a high-pressure hydrate flow loop newly constructed in the China University of Petroleum (Beijing, and dedicated to flow assurance studies. Then, based on previous research, this study puts forward a method for induction time, which is characterized by clear definition, convenient measurement and good generality. Furthermore, we investigated the influences of the experimental parameters and analyzed the experimental phenomena for the hydrate induction time in a flowing system.

  6. Effect of steam quality on two—phase flow in a netural circulation loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾海军; 吴少融; 等

    1996-01-01

    Test pressures are 1.0-4.0MPa,heating powers 27-190kW,inlet subcoolings 5-80℃,water used as coolant,and steam quality at the outlet of test section is less than 0.05,These test conditions cover the parameters for a typical 200MW heating reactor.The experimental results show that the stema quality is the dominant factor in a natural circulation system with low pressure and low steam quality about the effect of system pressure,heating power and inlet subcooling on the flow rate,relative oscilatroy amplitude and oscilatory region of flow rate.

  7. Foamy oil flow : a laboratory curiosity or a real drive mechanism in field operations?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maini, B.B. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The exceptional performance of primary depletion in many Canadian and Venezuelan heavy oil reservoirs can be attributed to the mechanism of foamy oil flow. It is has been speculated that the solution gas released during depletion remains dispersed in the oil and flows towards the production well in the form of gas-in-oil dispersion. However, most laboratory studies of foamy-oil-flow reveal that the depletion rates required for generating dispersed flow are completely unrealistic in field operations. This study examined whether foamy oil flow is merely a laboratory aberration. The paper defines foamy oil flow and explains how it evolved. A brief review of Canadian field practices was presented along with observations from cold production of heavy oil. The pore-scale mechanisms involved and the interplay between capillary and viscous forces were also discussed along with the conditions under which dispersed flow is generated in field operations. The strengths and weaknesses of several mathematical models proposed for numerical simulation of foamy oil flow were described.

  8. Basal interstitial water pressure in laboratory debris flows over a rigid bed in an open channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hotta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the interstitial water pressure of debris flows under various conditions gives essential information on the flow stress structure. This study measured the basal interstitial water pressure during debris flow routing experiments in a laboratory flume. Because a sensitive pressure gauge is required to measure the interstitial water pressure in shallow laboratory debris flows, a differential gas pressure gauge with an attached diaphragm was used. Although this system required calibration before and after each experiment, it showed a linear behavior and a sufficiently high temporal resolution for measuring the interstitial water pressure of debris flows. The values of the interstitial water pressure were low. However, an excess of pressure beyond the hydrostatic pressure was observed with increasing sediment particle size. The measured excess pressure corresponded to the theoretical excess interstitial water pressure, derived as a Reynolds stress in the interstitial water of boulder debris flows. Turbulence was thought to induce a strong shear in the interstitial space of sediment particles. The interstitial water pressure in boulder debris flows should be affected by the fine sediment concentration and the phase transition from laminar to turbulent debris flow; this should be the subject of future studies.

  9. Flipping the analytical coin : closing the information flow loop in high speed (real time) analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.E. Shahroudi

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAnalysis modules tend to be set up as one way flow of information, i.e a clear distinction between cause and effect or input and output. However, as the speed of analysis approaches real time (or faster than movie rate), it becomes increasingly difficult for an external user to

  10. Flipping the analytical coin : closing the information flow loop in high speed (real time) analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahroudi, K.E.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis modules tend to be set up as one way flow of information, i.e a clear distinction between cause and effect or input and output. However, as the speed of analysis approaches real time (or faster than movie rate), it becomes increasingly difficult for an external user to distinguish between c

  11. Open-loop control of noise amplification in a separated boundary layer flow

    CERN Document Server

    Boujo, Edouard; Gallaire, François

    2014-01-01

    Linear optimal gains are computed for the subcritical two-dimensional separated boundary-layer flow past a bump. Very large optimal gain values are found, making it possible for small-amplitude noise to be strongly amplified and to destabilize the flow. The optimal forcing is located close to the summit of the bump, while the optimal response is the largest in the shear layer. The largest amplification occurs at frequencies corresponding to eigenvalues which first become unstable at higher Reynolds number. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations show that a low level of noise is indeed sufficient to trigger random flow unsteadiness, characterized here by large-scale vortex shedding. Next, a variational technique is used to compute efficiently the sensitivity of optimal gains to steady control (through source of momentum in the flow, or blowing/suction at the wall). A systematic analysis at several frequencies identifies the bump summit as the most sensitive region for control with wall actuation. Based on thes...

  12. Holocene Flows of the Cima Volcanic Field, Mojave Desert, Part 2: Flow Rheology from Laboratory Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, T.; Whittington, A. G.; Soldati, A.; Sehlke, A.; Beem, J. R.; Gomez, F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Lava flow morphology is often utilized as an indicator of rheological behavior during flow emplacement. Rheological behavior can be characterized by the viscosity and yield strength of lava, which in turn are dependent on physical and chemical properties including crystallinity, vesicularity, and bulk composition. We are studying the rheology of a basaltic lava flow from a monogenetic Holocene cinder cone in the Cima lava field (Mojave Desert, California). The flow is roughly 2.5 km long and up to 700m wide, with a well-developed central channel along much of its length. Samples were collected along seven different traverses across the flow, along with real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS profiles to allow levee heights and slopes to be measured. Surface textures change from pahoehoe ropes near the vent to predominantly jagged `a`a blocks over the majority of the flow, including all levees and the toe. Chemically the lava shows little variation, plotting on the trachybasalt-basanite boundary on the total alkali-silica diagram. Mineralogically the lava is dominated by plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine phenocrysts, with abundant flow-aligned plagioclase microcrystals. The total crystal fraction is ~50% near the vent, with higher percentages in the distal portion of the flow. Vesicularity varies between ~10 and more than ~60%. Levees are ~10-15m high with slopes typically ~25-35˚, suggesting a yield strength at final emplacement of ~150,000 Pa. The effective emplacement temperature and yield strength of lava samples will be determined using the parallel-plate technique. We will test the hypothesis that these physical and rheological properties of the lava during final emplacement correlate with spatial patterns in flow morphology, such as average slope and levee width, which have been determined using remote sensing observations (Beem et al. 2014).

  13. A laboratory investigation into the effects of slope on lava flow morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Tracy K. P.; Fink, Jonathan H.

    2000-03-01

    In an attempt to model the effect of slope on the dynamics of lava flow emplacement, four distinct morphologies were repeatedly produced in a series of laboratory simulations where polyethylene glycol (PEG) was extruded at a constant rate beneath cold sucrose solution onto a uniform slope which could be varied from 1° through 60°. The lowest extrusion rates and slopes, and highest cooling rates, produced flows that rapidly crusted over and advanced through bulbous toes, or pillows (similar to subaerial "toey" pahoehoe flows and to submarine pillowed flows). As extrusion rate and slope increased, and cooling rate decreased, pillowed flows gave way to rifted flows (linear zones of liquid wax separated by plates of solid crust, similar to what is observed on the surface of convecting lava lakes), then to folded flows with surface crusts buckled transversely to the flow direction, and, at the highest extrusion rates and slopes, and lowest cooling rates, to leveed flows, which solidified only at their margins. A dimensionless parameter, Ψ, primarily controlled by effusion rate, cooling rate and flow viscosity, quantifies these flow types. Increasing the underlying slope up to 30° allows the liquid wax to advance further before solidifying, with an effect similar to that of increasing the effusion rate. For example, conditions that produce rifted flows on a 10° slope result in folded flows on a 30° slope. For underlying slopes of 40°, however, this trend reverses, slightly owing to increased gravitational forces relative to the strength of the solid wax. Because of its significant influence on heat advection and the disruption of a solid crust, slope must be incorporated into any quantitative attempt to correlate eruption parameters and lava flow morphologies. These experiments and subsequent scaling incorporate key physical parameters of both an extrusion and its environment, allowing their results to be used to interpret lava flow morphologies on land, on the

  14. Visual detection of West Nile virus using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a vertical flow visualization strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengguo eCao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV causes a severe zoonosis, which can lead to a large number of casualties and considerable economic losses. A rapid and accurate identification methodfor WNV for use in field laboratories is urgently needed. Here, a method utilizing reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a vertical flow visualization strip (RT-LAMP-VF was developed to detect the envelope (E gene of WNV. The RT-LAMP-VF assay could detect 102 copies/μl ofan WNV RNA standard using a 40 min amplification reaction followed by a 2 min incubationof the amplification product on the visualization strip, and no cross-reaction with other closely related members of theFlavivirus genus was observed. The assay was further evaluated using cells and mouse brain tissues infected with a recombinant rabies virus expressing the E protein of WNV.The assay produced sensitivities of 101.5TCID50/ml and 101.33 TCID50/ml for detection of the recombinant virus in the cells and brain tissues, respectively. Overall, the RT-LAMP-VF assay developed in this study is rapid, simple and effective, and it is therefore suitable for clinical application in the field.

  15. Turbidity management during flushing-flows: A model for open-loop control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fovet, Ophelie; Litrico, Xavier; Belaud, Gilles

    2012-04-01

    Fixed algae developments induce strong constraints for the management of open-channel networks. They cause clogging issues on hydraulic devices and can sometimes lead to water quality alteration. An original strategy to limit the algal biomass is to carry out regular flushes. A flush is performed by increasing the hydraulic shear conditions using the hydraulic structures of the canal. Consequently to the shear stress increase, a part of the fixed algae is detached, then re-suspended into the water column, and finally transported into the canal network. This leads to a peak of turbidity that needs to be controlled. The present paper proposes a quasi-linear model of the turbidity response to a discharge increase, that can be used for automatic controller design. The model parameters are identified on a real network. The calibration is based on continuous monitoring of water turbidity. Flushes are simulated on the whole branch and on an intermediate reach in order to test the ability of the model to simulate the propagation of a turbidity peak. Then, the model is used to develop an open-loop controller of turbidity for flush design. The efficiency of a flush will depend on its amplitude and duration. The design objective consists in maximizing the algae detachment without exceeding a maximal turbidity level, and using as little water as possible. The designed flush is finally tested on a nonlinear model.

  16. Laboratory procedures and data reduction techniques to determine rheologic properties of mass flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, R.R.; Huizinga, R.J.; Brown, S.M.; Jobson, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    Determining the rheologic properties of coarse- grained mass flows is an important step to mathematically simulate potential inundation zones. Using the vertically rotating flume designed and built by the U.S. Geological Survey, laboratory procedures and subsequent data reduction have been developed to estimate shear stresses and strain rates of various flow materials. Although direct measurement of shear stress and strain rate currently (1992) are not possible in the vertically rotating flume, methods were derived to estimate these values from measurements of flow geometry, surface velocity, and flume velocity.

  17. Comparison of Mars Science Laboratory Reaction Control System Jet Computations With Flow Visualization and Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Johansen, Craig T.; Ashcraft, Scott W.; Novak, Luke A.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical predictions of the Mars Science Laboratory reaction control system jets interacting with a Mach 10 hypersonic flow are compared to experimental nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence data. The steady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations using the Baldwin-Barth one-equation turbulence model were solved using the OVERFLOW code. The experimental fluorescence data used for comparison consists of qualitative two-dimensional visualization images, qualitative reconstructed three-dimensional flow structures, and quantitative two-dimensional distributions of streamwise velocity. Through modeling of the fluorescence signal equation, computational flow images were produced and directly compared to the qualitative fluorescence data.

  18. Stability of quasi-Keplerian Shear Flow in a Laboratory Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schartman, Ethan; Ji, Hantao; Burin, Michael J.; Goodman, Jeremy

    2012-06-19

    Subcritical transition to turbulence has been proposed as a source of turbulent viscosity required for the associated angular momentum transport for fast accretion in Keplerian disks. Previously cited laboratory experiments in supporting this hypothesis were performed either in a di erent type of flow than Keplerian or without quantitative measurements of angular momentum transport and mean flow profile, and all of them appear to su er from Ekman e ects, secondary flows induced by nonoptimal axial boundary conditions. Such Ekman e ects are expected to be absent from astronomical disks, which probably have stress-free vertical boundaries unless strongly magnetized. Aims. To quantify angular momentum transport due to subcritical hydrodynamic turbulence, if exists, in a quasi-Keplerian flow with minimized Ekman e ects. Methods.We perform a local measurement of the azimuthal-radial component of the Reynolds stress tensor in a novel laboratory apparatus where Ekman e ects are minimized by flexible control of axial boundary conditions. Results.We find significant Ekman e ects on angular momentum transport due to nonoptimal axial boundary conditions in quasi-Keplerian flows. With the optimal control of Ekman e ects, no statistically meaningful angular momentum transport is detected in such flows at Reynolds number up to two millions. Conclusions. Either a subcritical transition does not occur, or, if a subcritical transition does occur, the associated radial transport of angular momentum in optimized quasi-Keplerian laboratory flows is too small to directly support the hypothesis that subcritical hydrodynamic turbulence is responsible for accretion in astrophysical disks. Possible limitations in applying laboratory results to astrophysical disks due to experimental geometry are discussed.

  19. Stability of quasi-Keplerian Shear Flow in a Laboratory Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schartman, Ethan; Ji, Hantao; Burin, Michael J.; Goodman, Jeremy

    2012-06-19

    Subcritical transition to turbulence has been proposed as a source of turbulent viscosity required for the associated angular momentum transport for fast accretion in Keplerian disks. Previously cited laboratory experiments in supporting this hypothesis were performed either in a di erent type of flow than Keplerian or without quantitative measurements of angular momentum transport and mean flow profile, and all of them appear to su er from Ekman e ects, secondary flows induced by nonoptimal axial boundary conditions. Such Ekman e ects are expected to be absent from astronomical disks, which probably have stress-free vertical boundaries unless strongly magnetized. Aims. To quantify angular momentum transport due to subcritical hydrodynamic turbulence, if exists, in a quasi-Keplerian flow with minimized Ekman e ects. Methods.We perform a local measurement of the azimuthal-radial component of the Reynolds stress tensor in a novel laboratory apparatus where Ekman e ects are minimized by flexible control of axial boundary conditions. Results.We find significant Ekman e ects on angular momentum transport due to nonoptimal axial boundary conditions in quasi-Keplerian flows. With the optimal control of Ekman e ects, no statistically meaningful angular momentum transport is detected in such flows at Reynolds number up to two millions. Conclusions. Either a subcritical transition does not occur, or, if a subcritical transition does occur, the associated radial transport of angular momentum in optimized quasi-Keplerian laboratory flows is too small to directly support the hypothesis that subcritical hydrodynamic turbulence is responsible for accretion in astrophysical disks. Possible limitations in applying laboratory results to astrophysical disks due to experimental geometry are discussed.

  20. Closed-loop biomass co-firing in a laboratory reactor and in a full-scale boiler.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Bryan M. (University of California, Davis, CA); Williams, Robert B. (University of California, Davis, CA); Turn, Scott Q. (Hawaii Natural Energy Institute.); Jakeway, Lee A. (Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Company); Blevins, Linda Gail

    2004-05-01

    Co-firing tests were conducted in a pilot-scale reactor at Sandia National Laboratories and in a boiler at the Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar factory at Puunene, Hawaii. Combustion tests were performed in the Sandia Multi-Fuel Combustor using Australian coal, whole fiber cane including tops and leaves processed at three different levels (milled only, milled and leached, and milled followed by leaching and subsequent milling), and fiber cane stripped of its tops and leaves and heavily processed through subsequent milling, leaching, and milling cycles. Testing was performed for pure fuels and for biomass co-firing with the coal at levels of 30% and 70% by mass. The laboratory tests revealed the following information: (1) The biomass fuels convert their native nitrogen into NO more efficiently than coal because of higher volatile content and more reactive nitrogen complexes. (2) Adding coal to whole fiber cane to reduce its tendency to form deposits should not adversely affect NO emissions. ( 3 ) Stripped cane does not offer a NO advantage over whole cane when co-fired with coal. During the field test, Sandia measured 0 2 , C02, CO, SO2, and NO concentrations in the stack and gas velocities near the superheater. Gas concentrations and velocities fluctuated more during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. The mean 0 2 concentration was lower and the mean C02 concentration was higher during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. When normalized to a constant exhaust 0 2 concentration, mean CO concentration was higher and mean NO concentration was lower for biomass co-firing than for coal. The SO2 concentration tracked the use of Bunker C fuel oil. When normalized by the amount of boiler energy input, the amounts of NO and SO2 formed were lower during biomass co-firing than during coal combustion. The difference between NOx trends in the lab and in the field are most likely a result of less effective heat and mass transfer in the boiler. Particles were

  1. 3D Laboratory Measurements of Forces, Flows, and Collimation in Arched Flux Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haw, Magnus; Bellan, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Fully 3D, vector MHD force measurements from an arched, current carrying flux tube (flux rope) are presented. The experiment consists of two arched plasma-filled flux ropes each powered by a capacitor bank. The two loops are partially overlapped, as in a Venn diagram, and collide and reconnect during their evolution. B-field data is taken on the lower plasma arch using a 54 channel B-dot probe. 3D volumetric data is acquired by placing the probe at 2700 locations and taking 5 plasma shots at each location. The resulting data set gives high resolution (2cm, 10ns) volumetric B-field data with high reproducibility (deviation of 3% between shots). Taking the curl of the measured 3D B-field gives current densities (J) in good agreement with measured capacitor bank current. The JxB forces calculated from the data have a strong axial component at the base of the current channel and are shown to scale linearly with axial gradients in current density. Assuming force balance in the flux tube minor radius direction, we infer near-Alfvenic axial flows from the footpoint regions which are consistent with the measured axial forces. Flux tube collimation is observed in conjunction with these axial flows. These dynamic processes are relevant to the stability and dynamics of coronal loops. Supported provided by NSF, AFOSR.

  2. Flow rate dictates permeability enhancement during fluid pressure oscillations in laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Thibault; Brodsky, Emily E.; Marone, Chris; Elsworth, Derek

    2015-04-01

    Seismic waves have been observed to increase the permeability in fractured aquifers. A detailed, predictive understanding of the process has been hampered by a lack of constraint on the primary physical controls. What aspect of the oscillatory forcing is most important in determining the magnitude of the permeability enhancement? Here we present laboratory results showing that flow rate is the primary control on permeability increases in the laboratory. We fractured Berea sandstone samples under triaxial stresses of tens of megapascals and applied dynamic fluid stresses via pore pressure oscillations. In each experiment, we varied either the amplitude or the frequency of the pressure changes. Amplitude and frequency each separately correlated with the resultant permeability increase. More importantly, the permeability changes correlate with the flow rate in each configuration, regardless of whether flow rate variations were driven by varying amplitude or frequency. We also track the permeability evolution during a single set of oscillations by measuring the phase lags (time delays) of successive oscillations. Interpreting the responses with a poroelastic model shows that 80% of the permeability enhancement is reached during the first oscillation and the final permeability enhancement scales exponentially with the imposed change in flow rate integrated over the rock volume. The establishment of flow rate as the primary control on permeability enhancement from seismic waves opens the door to quantitative studies of earthquake-hydrogeological coupling. The result also suggests that reservoir permeability could be engineered by imposing dynamic stresses and changes in flow rate.

  3. Flow in the Ebro Delta shelf, Numerical models and laboratory simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, A.; Fraunie, P.; Durand, N.

    2009-04-01

    This work presents the results of two laboratory and numerical experiments. The characteristic induced structures by stationer typical conditions from spring, summer, fall and winter. Laboratory experiences were developed on a five meters turntable (SINTEF facilities) obeys the Froude-Rossby similarities. While, the meso-escale numerical model was developed in the LSEET laboratory. This work evidences complementary results from the vortex sort characteristic by radius from both experimental and model methods. Additionally numerical model has a better representation from the conditions in the first 15km and the laboratory model represent the resolution between the large and the meso scale boundary. Physical variables that describe mixing are compared with experimental laboratory results from a large number of studies of mixing dynamics in environmental fluids to find habitat regimes for primary production. The work relates physical and biological variables, and emphasises the utility of laboratory studies. Several laboratory experiments that focused on turbulent mixing dynamics in stratified shear flows are used to describe (a) mixing in the estuary and (b) induced circulation in the river plume. Mixing descriptors as entrainment, Richardson number and Reynolds number and field data were employed, and advanced techniques of laboratory simulations, image processing and numerical modelling were used to match (a) to (b). Four kinds of experiments were used to describe the dynamics in the whole estuary. Mixing turbulence across a density interface generated by an oscillating grid inside a mixing-box. The horizontal advance of a turbulent front in a stratified system with a lateral current, inside a 1 m x 1 m square box. Induced circulation in the delta del Ebro slope and shelf that were performed with an experimental model in a 2 m x 4 m rectangular tank on a 5-m diameter turntable. Dispersion simulations in the river plume with the OCK3D code. Experiments were

  4. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns for New Instrument Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratton, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  5. The all-loop non-Abelian Thirring model and its RG flow

    CERN Document Server

    Itsios, G; Siampos, K

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the renormalization group flow in a recently constructed class of integrable sigma-models which interpolate between WZW current algebra models and the non-Abelian T-duals of PCM for a simple group G. They are characterized by the integer level k of the current algebra, a deformation parameter lambda and they exhibit a remarkable invariance involving the inversion of lambda. We compute the beta-function for lambda to leading order in 1/k. Based on agreement with previous results for the exact beta-function of the non-Abelian Thirring model and matching global symmetries, we state that our integrable models are the resummed version (capturing all counterterms in perturbation theory) of the non-Abelian Thirring model for a simple group G. Finally, we present an analogous treatment in a simple example of a closely related class of models interpolating between gauged WZW coset CFTs and the non-Abelian T-duals of PCM for the coset G/H.

  6. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF AIR FLOW MEASUREMENT METHODS FOR RESIDENTIAL HVAC RETURNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-02-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent). Because manufacturers’ accuracy estimates for their equipment do not include many of the sources of error found in actual field measurements (and replicated in the laboratory testing in this study) it is essential for a test method that could be used to determine the actual uncertainty in this specific application. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  7. Laboratory Tests of Multiplex Detection of PCR Amplicons Using the Luminex 100 Flow Analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkateswaran, K.S.; Nasarabadi, S.; Langlois, R.G.

    2000-05-05

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) demonstrated the power of flow cytometry in detecting the biological agents simulants at JFT III. LLNL pioneered in the development of advanced nucleic acid analyzer (ANM) for portable real time identification. Recent advances in flow cytometry provide a means for multiplexed nucleic acid detection and immunoassay of pathogenic microorganisms. We are presently developing multiplexed immunoassays for the simultaneous detection of different simulants. Our goal is to build an integrated instrument for both nucleic acid analysis and immuno detection. In this study we evaluated the Luminex LX 100 for concurrent identification of more than one PCR amplified product. ANAA has real-time Taqman fluorescent detection capability for rapid identification of field samples. However, its multiplexing ability is limited by the combination of available fluorescent labels. Hence integration of ANAA with flow cytometry can give the rapidity of ANAA amplification and the multiplex capability of flow cytometry. Multiplexed flow cytometric analysis is made possible using a set of fluorescent latex microsphere that are individually identified by their red and infrared fluorescence. A green fluorochrome is used as the assay signal. Methods were developed for the identification of specific nucleic acid sequences from Bacillus globigii (Bg), Bacillus thuringensis (Bt) and Erwinia herbicola (Eh). Detection sensitivity using different reporter fluorochromes was tested with the LX 100, and also different assay formats were evaluated for their suitability for rapid testing. A blind laboratory trial was carried out December 22-27, 1999 to evaluate bead assays for multiplex identification of Bg and Bt PCR products. This report summarizes the assay development, fluorochrome comparisons, and the results of the blind trial conducted at LLNL for the laboratory evaluation of the LX 100 flow analyzer.

  8. 含PV节点的配电网合环潮流算法%A loop closing power flow calculation algorithm of distribution network with PV nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡晓松; 张殷; 谢光彬; 肖先勇; 李长松

    2015-01-01

    Loop closing scenarios change with distributed generations connected to distribution network, which puts forward new requirement for the calculation of loop closing power flow. A loop closing power flow calculation algorithm of distribution network with PV nodes is proposed. For the weak ability of back-forward sweep method to deal with PV nodes and looped network, the improved sensitivity matrix is used to realize the processing of PV nodes with power correction, and based on the superposition principle, the calculation of loop closing power flow is realized with loop closing power flow compensation method. The algorithm performance is verified by IEEE 33-node test system, results show that the proposed algorithm can effectively solve the calculation problem of loop closing power flow in distribution network with PV nodes.%随着分布式电源(Distributed generation, DG)的接入,配电网合环场景发生改变,给配电网合环潮流计算提出了新的要求。以PV型DG为例,提出一种含PV节点的配电网合环潮流算法。针对前推回代法处理PV节点和环网能力弱的特点,利用改进灵敏度矩阵对PV 节点进行无功修正,实现对PV 节点的处理。依据叠加原理,用合环功率补偿法对合环端口节点进行功率补偿,从而实现配电网合环潮流计算。最后对IEEE 33节点测试系统进行仿真分析,结果表明该算法能够有效解决含PV节点的配电网合环潮流计算问题。

  9. Advanced Photovoltaic Inverter Functionality using 500 kW Power Hardware-in-Loop Complete System Laboratory Testing: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, B. A.; Kromer, M. A.; Casey, L.

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing penetration of distribution connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, more and more PV developers and utilities are interested in easing future PV interconnection concerns by mitigating some of the impacts of PV integration using advanced PV inverter controls and functions. This paper describes the testing of a 500 kW PV inverter using Power Hardware-in-Loop (PHIL) testing techniques. The test setup is described and the results from testing the inverter in advanced functionality modes, not commonly used in currently interconnected PV systems, are presented. PV inverter operation under PHIL evaluation that emulated both the DC PV array connection and the AC distribution level grid connection are shown for constant power factor (PF) and constant reactive power (VAr) control modes. The evaluation of these modes was completed under varying degrees of modeled PV variability.

  10. Spatial and temporal variations of microbial community in a mixed plug-flow loop reactor fed with dairy manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueh-Fen; Chen, Po-Hsu; Yu, Zhongtang

    2014-07-01

    Mixed plug-flow loop reactor (MPFLR) has been widely adopted by the US dairy farms to convert cattle manure to biogas. However, the microbiome in MPFLR digesters remains unexplored. In this study, the microbiome in a MPFLR digester operated on a mega-dairy farm was examined thrice over a 2 month period. Within 23 days of retention time, 55-70% of total manure solid was digested. Except for a few minor volatile fatty acids (VFAs), total VFA concentration and pH remained similar along the course of the digester and over time. Metagenomic analysis showed that although with some temporal variations, the bacterial community was rather stable spatially in the digester. The methanogenic community was also stable both spatially and temporally in the digester. Among methanogens, genus Methanosaeta dominated in the digester. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis and metagenomic analysis yielded different relative abundance of individual genera of methanogens, especially for Methanobacterium, which was predominant based on qPCR analysis but undetectable by metagenomics. Collectively, the results showed that only small microbial and chemical gradients existed within the digester, and the digestion process occurred similarly throughout the MPFLR digester. The findings of this study may help improve the operation and design of this type of manure digesters.

  11. Hydrodynamic analysis of a three-fluidized bed reactor cold flow model for chemical looping hydrogen generation. Pressure characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Zhipeng; Xiang, Wenguo; Chen, Shiyi; Wang, Dong [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment

    2013-07-01

    Chemical looping hydrogen generation (CLHG) can produce pure hydrogen with inherent separation of CO{sub 2} from fossils fuel. The process involves a metal oxide, as an oxygen carrier, such as iron oxide. The CLHG system consists of three reactors: a fuel reactor (FR), a steam reactor (SR) and an air reactor (AR). In the FR, the fuel gases react with iron oxides (hematite Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, wuestite FeO), generating reduced iron oxides (FeO or even Fe), and with full conversion of gaseous fuels, pure CO{sub 2} can be obtained after cooling the flue gas from the fuel reactor; in the SR, FeO and Fe reacts with steam to generate magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and H{sub 2}, the latter representing the final target product of the process; in the AR, the magnetite is oxidized back to hematite which is used in another cycle. A cold flow model of three-fluidized bed for CLHG corresponding to 50 KW hot units has been built. A major novelty of this facility is the compact fuel reactor, which integrates a bubble and a fast fluidized bed to avoid the incomplete conversion of the fuel gas caused by the thermodynamics equilibrium. In order to study the pressure characteristics and the solids concentration of the system, especially in the fuel reactor, the gas velocity of three reactors, gas flow of L-type value, total solids inventory (TSI) and the secondary air of fuel reactor were varied. Results show that the pressure and the solids concentration are strongly influenced by the fluidizing-gas velocity of three reactors. Moreover, the entrainment of the upper part of fuel reactor increases as the total solids inventory increases, and the operating range of the FR can be changed by introducing secondary air or increasing the total solids inventory.

  12. A laboratory demonstration of an LQG technique for correcting frozen flow turbulence in adaptive optics systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rudy, Alexander; Srinath, Srikar; Ammons, S Mark; Gavel, Donald

    2015-01-01

    We present the laboratory verification of a method for re- moving the effects of frozen-flow atmospheric turbulence using a Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller, also known as a Kalman Filter. This method, which we term "Predictive Fourier Control," can identify correlated atmospheric motions due to layers of frozen flow turbulence, and can predictively remove the effects of these correlated motions in real-time. Our laboratory verification suggests a factor of 3 improvement in the RMS residual wavefront error and a 10% improvement in measured Strehl of the system. We found that the RMS residual wavefront error was suppressed from 35.0 nm to 11.2 nm due to the use of Predictive Fourier Control, and that the far field Strehl improved from 0.479 to 0.520.

  13. Laboratory experiments on current flow between stationary and moving electrodes in magnetoplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Reiner L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed in order to investigate the basic physics of current flow between tethered electrodes in magnetoplasmas. The major findings are summarized. The experiments are performed in an effectively very large laboratory plasma in which not only the nonlinear current collection is addressed but also the propagation and spread of currents, the formation of current wings by moving electrodes, the current closure, and radiation from transmission lines. The laboratory plasma consists of a pulsed dc discharge whose Maxwellian afterglow provides a quiescent, current-free uniform background plasma. Electrodes consisting of collectors and electron emitters are inserted into the plasma and a pulsed voltage is applied between two floating electrodes via insulated transmission lines. Besides the applied current in the wire, the total current density in the plasma is obtained from space and time resolved magnetic probe measurements via Maxwell's law. Langmuir probes yield the plasma parameters.

  14. Laboratory Experiments of Sand Ripples with Bimodal Size Distributions Under Asymmetric Oscillatory Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calantoni, J.; Landry, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    The dynamics of sand ripples are vital to understanding numerous coastal processes such as sediment transport, wave attenuation, boundary layer development, and seafloor acoustic properties. Though significant laboratory research has been conducted to elucidate oscillatory flow morphodynamics under various constant and transient forcing conditions, the majority of the previous experiments were conducted only for beds with unimodal size distributions of sediment. Recent oscillatory flow experiments as well as past laboratory observations in uniform flows suggest that the presence of heterogeneous size sand compositions may significantly impact ripple morphology, resulting in a variety of observable effects (e.g., sediment sorting, bed armoring, and altered transport rates). Experimental work was conducted in a small oscillatory flow tunnel at the Sediment Dynamics Laboratory at the Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center. Three different monochromatic oscillatory forcings having velocity asymmetry were used to study sand ripple dynamics over five bimodal and two unimodal sediment beds. The seven different mixtures were composed using two unimodal sands of different colors (blue/white) and median grain diameters (d=0.31 mm / d=0.65 mm) combined into various mixtures by mass (i.e., 0/100; 10/90; 25/75; 50/50; 75/25; 90/10; and 100/0 which denotes mass percentage of blue/white sand, respectively, within each mixture). High-definition video of the sediment bed profile was acquired in conjunction with sediment trap measurements to resolve differences in ripple geometries, migration and evolution rates due to the different sediment mixtures and flow conditions. Observational findings clearly illustrate sediment stratification within ripple crests and the depth of the active mixing layer in addition to supporting sediment sorting in previous research on symmetric oscillatory flows in which the larger grains collect on top of ripple crests and smaller grains in the

  15. Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Subsurface Flow and Transport Resulting from Tank Leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2014-09-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct laboratory experiments and supporting numerical simulations to improve the understanding of water flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface between waste tanks and ancillary facilities at Waste Management Area C. The work scope included two separate sets of experiments: •Small flow cell experiments to investigate the occurrence of potential unstable fingering resulting from leaks and the limitations of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator to predict flow patterns and solute transport behavior under these conditions. Unstable infiltration may, under certain conditions, create vertically elongated fingers potentially transporting contaminants rapidly through the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The types of leak that may create deeply penetrating fingers include slow release, long duration leaks in relatively permeable porous media. Such leaks may have occurred below waste tanks at the Hanford Site. •Large flow experiments to investigate the behavior of two types of tank leaks in a simple layered system mimicking the Waste Management Area C. The investigated leaks include a relatively large leak with a short duration from a tank and a long duration leak with a relatively small leakage rate from a cascade line.

  16. Reactivity of iron oxide with methane in a laboratory fluidized bed : application of chemical-looping combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, P. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Inorganic and Environmental Chemistry; Mattisson, T.; Lyngfelt, A. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Conversion

    2002-07-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a promising method for separating carbon dioxide from flue gases during combustion. A study was conducted in which cyclic reduction-oxidation experiments were conducted with synthetic oxygen carrier particles under fluidized conditions. Two interconnected fluidized beds were used as reactors in which a metal oxide was used as an oxygen carrier providing oxygen from the combustion air to the fuel. In particular, this study examined the feasibility of using iron oxide as an oxygen carrier in repeated cycles of methane and air at 950 degrees C. The advantage of CLC compared to normal combustion is that carbon dioxide can be separated from the other components of the flue gas, nitrogen and unreacted oxygen. This avoids efficiency losses and the need for costly equipment for carbon dioxide separation. The reduction rates measured in this experiment were lower than in previous tests with fixed beds due to less efficient contact between gas and particles under fluidized bed conditions. High reactivities were still observed, suggesting that the particles should have sufficient reactivity for use in the proposed CLC system. 10 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  17. Experimental research on characteristic of start-up pressure wave propagation in gelled crude oil by large-scale flow loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔秀国; 艾慕阳; 姜保良; 霍连风; 张立新

    2008-01-01

    In order to research start-up pressure wave propagation mechanism and determine pressure wave speed in gelled crude oil pipelines accurately,experiment of Large-scale flow loop was carried out.In the experiment,start-up pressure wave speeds under various operation conditions were measured,and effects of correlative factors on pressure wave were analyzed.The experimental and theoretical analysis shows that thermal shrinkage and structural properties of gelled crude oils are key factors influencing on start-up pressure wave propagation.The quantitative analysis for these effects can be done by using volume expansion coefficient and structural property parameter of gelled crude oil.A new calculation model of pressure wave speed was developed on the basis of Large-scale flow loop experiment and theoretical analysis.

  18. Local Liquid Side Mass Transfer Model in Gas-Liquid-Solid Three-Phase Flow Airlift Loop Reactor for Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闻建平; 贾晓强; 毛国柱

    2004-01-01

    A small scale isotropic mass transfer model was developed for the local liquid side mass transfer coefficients in gas-liquid-solid three-phase flow airlift loop reactor for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. It is based on Higbie's penetration theory and Kolmogoroff's theory of isotropic turbulence with kl=3√2D∈11/3/π(η1-1/3-λf-1/3)where e1 is local rate of energy dissipation, Af is the local microscale, r/l is the local Kolmogoroff scale and D is the diffusion coefficient. The capability of the proposed model is discussed in the light of experimental data obtained from 12 L gas-liquid-solid three-phase flow airlift loop reactor using Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Good agreement with the experimental data was obtained over a wide range of conditions suggesting a general applicability of the proposed model.

  19. Experimental investigation of flow field in a laboratory-scale compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Ma

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The inner flow environment of turbomachinery presents strong three-dimensional, rotational, and unsteady characteristics. Consequently, a deep understanding of these flow phenomena will be the prerequisite to establish a state-of-the-art design system of turbomachinery. Currently the development of more accurate turbulence models and CFD tools is in urgent need for a high-quality database for validation, especially the advanced CFD tools, such as large eddy simulation (LES. Under this circumstance, this paper presents a detailed experimental investigation on the 3D unsteady flow field inside a laboratory-scale isolated-rotor with multiple advanced measurement techniques, including traditional aerodynamic probes, hotwire probes, unsteady endwall static pressure measurement, and stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV. The inlet boundary layer profile is measured with both hotwire probe and aerodynamic probe. The steady and unsteady flow fields at the outlet of the rotor are measured with a mini five-hole probe and a single-slanted hotwire probe. The instantaneous flow field in the rotor tip region inside the passage is captured with SPIV, and then a statistical analysis of the spatial distribution of the instantaneous tip leakage vortex/flow is performed to understand its dynamic characteristics. Besides these, the uncertainty analysis of each measurement technique is described. This database is quite sufficient to validate the advanced numerical simulation with LES. The identification process of the tip leakage vortex core in the instantaneous frames obtained from SPIV is performed deliberately. It is concluded that the ensemble-averaged flow field could not represent the tip leakage vortex strength and the trajectory trace. The development of the tip leakage vortex could be clearly cataloged into three phases according to their statistical spatial distribution. The streamwise velocity loss induced by the tip leakage flow increases until the

  20. Velocity fields and optical turbulence near the boundary in a strongly convective laboratory flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Goode, Wesley; Hellman, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Boundary layers around moving underwater vehicles or other platforms can be a limiting factor for optical communication. Turbulence in the boundary layer of a body moving through a stratified medium can lead to small variations in the index of refraction, which impede optical signals. As a first step towards investigating this boundary layer effect on underwater optics, we study the flow near the boundary in the Rayleigh-Bénard laboratory tank at the Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center. The tank is set up to generate temperature-driven, i.e., convective turbulence, and allows control of the turbulence intensity. This controlled turbulence environment is complemented by computational fluid dynamics simulations to visualize and quantify multi-scale flow patterns. The boundary layer dynamics in the laboratory tank are quantified using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system to examine the boundary layer velocities and turbulence parameters. The velocity fields and flow dynamics from the PIV are compared to the numerical model and show the model to accurately reproduce the velocity range and flow dynamics. The temperature variations and thus optical turbulence effects can then be inferred from the model temperature data. Optical turbulence is also visible in the raw data from the PIV system. The newly collected data are consistent with previously reported measurements from high-resolution Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter profilers (Nortek Vectrino), as well as fast thermistor probes and novel next-generation fiber-optics temperature sensors. This multi-level approach to studying optical turbulence near a boundary, combining in-situ measurements, optical techniques, and numerical simulations, can provide new insight and aid in mitigating turbulence impacts on underwater optical signal transmission.

  1. Quartz measurement in coal dust with high-flow rate samplers: laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taekhee; Lee, Eun Gyung; Kim, Seung Won; Chisholm, William P; Kashon, Michael; Harper, Martin

    2012-05-01

    A laboratory study was performed to measure quartz in coal dust using high-flow rate samplers (CIP10-R, GK2.69 cyclone, and FSP10 cyclone) and low-flow rate samplers [10-mm nylon and Higgins-Dewell type (BGI4L) cyclones] and to determine whether an increased mass collection from high-flow rate samplers would affect the subsequent quartz measurement by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analytical procedures. Two different sizes of coal dusts, mass median aerodynamic diameter 4.48 μm (Coal Dust A) and 2.33 μm (Coal Dust B), were aerosolized in a calm air chamber. The mass of coal dust collected by the samplers was measured gravimetrically, while the mass of quartz collected by the samplers was determined by FTIR (NIOSH Manual of Analytical Method 7603) and XRD (NIOSH Manual of Analytical Method 7500) after one of two different indirect preparations. Comparisons between high-flow rate samplers and low-flow rate samplers were made by calculating mass concentration ratios of coal dusts, net mass ratios of coal dusts, and quartz net mass. Mass concentrations of coal dust from the FSP10 cyclone were significantly higher than those from other samplers and mass concentrations of coal dust from 10-mm nylon cyclone were significantly lower than those from other samplers, while the CIP10-R, GK2.69, and BGI4L samplers did not show significant difference in the comparison of mass concentration of coal dusts. The BGI4L cyclone showed larger mass concentration of ∼9% compared to the 10-mm nylon cyclone. All cyclones provided dust mass concentrations that can be used in complying with the International Standard Organization standard for the determination of respirable dust concentration. The amount of coal dust collected from the high-flow rate samplers was found to be higher with a factor of 2-8 compared to the low-flow rate samplers but not in direct proportion of increased flow rates. The high-flow rate samplers collected more quartz compared to

  2. Impact of flow velocity on biochemical processes – a laboratory experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boisson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and predicting hydraulic and chemical properties of natural environments are current crucial challenges. It requires considering hydraulic, chemical and biological processes and evaluating how hydrodynamic properties impact on biochemical reactions. In this context, an original laboratory experiment to study the impact of flow velocity on biochemical reactions along a one-dimensional flow streamline has been developed. Based on the example of nitrate reduction, nitrate-rich water passes through plastic tubes at several flow velocities (from 6.2 to 35 mm min−1, while nitrate concentration at the tube outlet is monitored for more than 500 h. This experimental setup allows assessing the biologically controlled reaction between a mobile electron acceptor (nitrate and an electron donor (carbon coming from an immobile phase (tube that produces carbon during its degradation by microorganisms. It results in observing a dynamic of the nitrate transformation associated with biofilm development which is flow-velocity dependent. It is proposed that the main behaviors of the reaction rates are related to phases of biofilm development through a simple analytical model including assimilation. Experiment results and their interpretation demonstrate a significant impact of flow velocity on reaction performance and stability and highlight the relevance of dynamic experiments over static experiments for understanding biogeochemical processes.

  3. Morphodynamic Response of Laboratory Stream Beds to Unsteady Flow Events of Varying Magnitude and Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binns, A. D.; Gunsolus, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Natural processes and anthropogenic activities can cause short-term flow increases in rivers. These changes in flow, such as those caused by extreme rainfall events or seasonal variation in precipitation patterns, can result in substantial, and sometimes quite rapid, adjustments in sediment regime and alluvial stream morphology. Such morphological adjustments can pose short-term erosion hazards, increased risk of flooding, degradation to aquatic habitat, damage to in-stream engineering infrastructure, and re-mobilization of pollutants. Alterations in river hydraulics, sediment transport and stream morphology from specific unsteady events prove challenging to accurately predict and assess. This research quantifies the morphodynamic response of stream beds to unsteady flow events of varying magnitude and duration. For this purpose, a series of experimental runs is conducted in a 0.31 m-wide, 5.0 m-long laboratory sediment transport flume comprised of a well-sorted medium sand. All runs start from flat-bed initial conditions with a given longitudinal slope. The bed is allowed to develop under constant base-flow (antecedent) conditions until equilibrium conditions are reached. For each run a prescribed increase in flow rate for a pre-determined duration is applied to simulate the unsteady flow event. The magnitude of the increase in flow rate and the duration of the event are systematically varied from run to run. In each run measurements of bed morphology are conducted prior to the event (during antecedent flow conditions), at the conclusion of the event, and following a return base-flow (antecedent) conditions. Sediment transport rates are monitored throughout each run. The morphological response and the time-scale of the bed adjustments to unsteady events is quantified. The effect of the magnitude and duration of the flow increase on this increase is evaluated. This study contributes to the development of predictive tools for engineers and hydrologists to better

  4. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow over complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Steven G.; Snyder, William H.

    2017-02-01

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundary layer can have a strong influence on the concentration of pollutants within this layer. Deflections of streamlines at the height of the interface are primarily a function of hill Froude number (Fr), the ratio of mixed-layer height (zi) to terrain height (h), and the crosswind dimension of the terrain. The magnitude of the deflections increases as Fr increases and zi/h decreases. For mixing-height streamlines that are initially below the terrain top, the response is linear with Fr; for those initially above the terrain feature the response to Fr is more complex. Once Fr exceeds about 2, the terrain-related response of the mixed layer interface decreases somewhat with increasing Fr (toward more neutral flow). Deflections are also shown to increase as the crosswind dimensions of the terrain increase. Comparisons with numerical modeling, limited field data, and other laboratory measurements reported in the literature are favorable. Additionally, visual observations of dye streamers suggest that the flow structure exhibited for our elevated inversions passing over three dimensional hills is similar to that reported in the literature for continuously stratified flow over two-dimensional hills.

  5. Cross-flow turbines: progress report on physical and numerical model studies at large laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, Martin; Bachant, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Cross-flow turbines show potential in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) applications. A research focus is on accurately predicting device performance and wake evolution to improve turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction. Experiments were carried with large laboratory-scale cross-flow turbines D O (1 m) using a turbine test bed in a large cross-section tow tank, designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. Several turbines of varying solidity were employed, including the UNH Reference Vertical Axis Turbine (RVAT) and a 1:6 scale model of the DOE-Sandia Reference Model 2 (RM2) turbine. To improve parameterization in array simulations, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier-Stokes models. Results are presented for the simulation of performance and wake dynamics of cross-flow turbines and compared with experiments and body-fitted mesh, blade-resolving CFD. Supported by NSF-CBET Grant 1150797, Sandia National Laboratories.

  6. Electronic Circuit Experiments and SPICE Simulation of Double Covering Bifurcation of 2-Torus Quasi-Periodic Flow in Phase-Locked Loop Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Kyohei; Endo, Tetsuro; Imai, Isao; Komuro, Motomasa

    2016-06-01

    Double covering (DC) bifurcation of a 2-torus quasi-periodic flow in a phase-locked loop circuit was experimentally investigated using an electronic circuit and via SPICE simulation; in the circuit, the input radio-frequency signal was frequency modulated by the sum of two asynchronous sinusoidal baseband signals. We observed both DC and period-doubling bifurcations of a discrete map on two Poincaré sections, which were realized by changing the sample timing from one baseband sinusoidal signal to the other. The results confirm the DC bifurcation of the original flow.

  7. Treatment of laboratory wastewater in a tropical constructed wetland comparing surface and subsurface flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meutia, A A

    2001-01-01

    Wastewater treatment by constructed wetland is an appropriate technology for tropical developing countries like Indonesia because it is inexpensive, easily maintained, and has environmentally friendly and sustainable characteristics. The aim of the research is to examine the capability of constructed wetlands for treating laboratory wastewater at our Center, to investigate the suitable flow for treatment, namely vertical subsurface or horizontal surface flow, and to study the effect of the seasons. The constructed wetland is composed of three chambered unplanted sedimentation tanks followed by the first and second beds, containing gravel and sand, planted with Typha sp.; the third bed planted with floating plant Lemna sp.; and a clarifier with two chambers. The results showed that the subsurface flow in the dry season removed 95% organic carbon (COD) and total phosphorus (T-P) respectively, and 82% total nitrogen (T-N). In the transition period from the dry season to the rainy season, COD removal efficiency decreased to 73%, T-N increased to 89%, and T-P was almost the same as that in the dry season. In the rainy season COD and T-N removal efficiencies increased again to 95% respectively, while T-P remained unchanged. In the dry season, COD and T-P concentrations in the surface flow showed that the removal efficiencies were a bit lower than those in the subsurface flow. Moreover, T-N removal efficiency was only half as much as that in the subsurface flow. However, in the transition period, COD removal efficiency decreased to 29%, while T-N increased to 74% and T-P was still constant, around 93%. In the rainy season, COD and T-N removal efficiencies increased again to almost 95%. On the other hand, T-P decreased to 76%. The results show that the constructed wetland is capable of treating the laboratory wastewater. The subsurface flow is more suitable for treatment than the surface flow, and the seasonal changes have effects on the removal efficiency.

  8. Air flow and pollution in a real, heterogeneous urban street canyon: A field and laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karra, Styliani; Malki-Epshtein, Liora; Neophytou, Marina K.-A.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we investigate the influence of real world conditions, including heterogeneity and natural variability of background wind, on the air flow and pollutant concentrations in a heterogeneous urban street canyon using both a series of field measurements and controlled laboratory experiments. Field measurements of wind velocities and Carbon Monoxide (CO) concentrations were taken under field conditions in a heterogeneous street in a city centre at several cross-sections along the length of the street (each cross-section being of different aspect ratio). The real field background wind was in fact observed to be highly variable and thus different Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs) represented by a different mean wind velocity and different wind variability were defined. Observed pollution concentrations reveal high sensitivity to local parameters: there is a bias towards the side closer to the traffic lane; higher concentrations are found in the centre of the street as compared to cross-sections closer to the junctions; higher concentrations are found at 1.5 height from the ground than at 2.5 m height, all of which are of concern regarding pedestrian exposure to traffic-related pollution. A physical model of the same street was produced for the purpose of laboratory experiments, making some geometrical simplifications of complex volumes and extrusions. The physical model was tested in an Atmospheric Boundary Layer water channel, using simultaneously Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF), for flow visualisation as well as for quantitative measurement of concentrations and flow velocities. The wind field conditions were represented by a steady mean approach velocity in the laboratory simulation (essentially representing periods of near-zero wind variability). The laboratory investigations showed a clear sensitivity of the resulting flow field to the local geometry and substantial three-dimensional flow patterns were

  9. Nonlocal impacts of the Loop Current on cross-slope near-bottom flow in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Tam; Morey, Steven L.; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry S.; Chassignet, Eric P.

    2015-04-01

    Cross-slope near-bottom motions near De Soto Canyon in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico are analyzed from a multidecadal ocean model simulation to characterize upwelling and downwelling, important mechanisms for exchange between the deep ocean and shelf in the vicinity of the 2010 BP Macondo well oil spill. Across the continental slope, large-scale depression and offshore movement of isopycnals (downwelling) occur more frequently when the Loop Current impinges upon the West Florida Shelf slope farther south. Upwelling and onshore movement of isopycnals occurs with roughly the same likelihood regardless of Loop Current impingement on the slope. The remote influence of Loop Current on the De Soto Canyon region downwelling is a consequence of a high-pressure anomaly that extends along the continental slope emanating from the location of Loop Current impact.

  10. Evaluation of Variable Refrigerant Flow Systems Performance on Oak Ridge National Laboratory s Flexible Research Platform: Part 3 Simulation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Piljae [ORNL; Cho, Heejin [Mississippi State University (MSU); Kim, Dongsu [Mississippi State University (MSU); Cox, Sam [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2016-08-01

    This report provides second-year project simulation results for the multi-year project titled “Evaluation of Variable Refrigeration Flow (VRF) system on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)’s Flexible Research Platform (FRP).”

  11. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  12. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  13. Maintaining turbidity and current flow in laboratory aquarium studies, a case study using Sabellaria spinulosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Andrew J.; S. Last, Kim; Attard, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms rely on the suspension of particulate matter for food or for building materials, yet these conditions are difficult to replicate in laboratory mesocosms. Consequently, husbandry and experimental conditions may often be sub-optimal. The Vortex Resuspension Tank (Vo......RT) is a simple and reliable system for the resuspension of food or sediments using an enclosed airlift. The particle rain from the lift is mixed in the tank by two water inputs that provide directional current flow across the study organism(s). The vortex mixing creates a turbulent lateral water flow that allows...... whereas under intermediate and high sediment rates there was consistent cumulative growth throughout a 15 d experiment. This highlights the importance of suspended sediment for S. spinulosa and also the suitability of the VoRT system for maintaining organisms with suspended matter requirements....

  14. Laboratory and field observations of stress-wave induced changes in oil flow behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, P. M. (Peter M.); Majer, Ernest Luther; Wooden, W. (William); Daley, T. M. (Thomas M.)

    2001-01-01

    We present recent results of laboratory and field experiments designed to validate and quantify the phenomenon of seismically enhanced oil production in marginal reservoirs. Controlled laboratory experiments were performed where mechanical stress oscillations at 100 Hz or less were applied to sandstone cores while flowing oil and/or brine at constant flow rates. Steady-state flow and simulated flooding experiments indicated that stress stimulation causes significant changes in the ability of one fluid to displace the other and on the preference that the rock has for trapping one fluid over the other. For Berea sandstone, which is highly water wet, stress stimulation caused oil production to be impeded during water floods and caused the bulk fluid pressure drop across the core to increase during steady-state simultaneous flow of oil and brine. A possible explanation of these observations is that stimulation caused the core to become more oil wet. Field stimulation tests on producing reservoirs at Lost Hills, California were performed using a downhole fluid pressure pulsation device. Stimulation was applied in one well for 50 days total during July - November 2000. Two groups of producing wells were monitored for changes in oil cut and oil production during the test. A control group of 26 wells displayed an oil-cut increase of 29% and an oil production increase of 26% which are clearly correlated with the stimulation treatment. A larger group of 60 wells showed 11% oil-cut and 17v0 production increases. Similar increases were observed during the October 1999 Hector Mine earthquake, magnitude 7.1, in the Mojave Desert about 230 miles from Lost Hills. Downhole seismic monitoring of the stimulation wavefield is being used to help quantify the frequency range and energy threshold required for effective production enhancement.

  15. Laboratory experiments investigating magnetic field production via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Channing; Fiuza, Frederico; Ross, James Steven; Zylstra, Alex; Pollock, Brad; Drake, R. Paul; Froula, Dustin; Gregori, Gianluca; Kugland, Nathan; Kuranz, Carolyn; Levy, Matthew; Li, Chikang; Meinecke, Jena; Petrasso, Richard; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Sakawa, Youichi; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Takabe, Hideke; Turnbull, David; Park, Hye-Sook

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are often associated with the presence of strong magnetic fields in a plasma flow. The magnetic fields required for shock formation may either be initially present, for example in supernova remnants or young galaxies, or they may be self-generated in systems such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In the case of GRB outflows, the intense magnetic fields are greater than those seeded by the GRB progenitor or produced by misaligned density and temperature gradients in the plasma flow (the Biermann-battery effect). The Weibel instability is one candidate mechanism for the generation of sufficiently strong fields to create a collisionless shock. Despite their crucial role in astrophysical systems, observation of the magnetic fields produced by Weibel instabilities in experiments has been challenging. Using a proton probe to directly image electromagnetic fields, we present evidence of Weibel-generated magnetic fields that grow in opposing, initially unmagnetized plasma flows from laser-driven laboratory experiments. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that the instability efficiently extracts energy from the plasma flows, and that the self-generated magnetic energy reaches a few percent of the total energy in the system. This result demonstrates an experimental platform suitable for the investigation of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock formation in supernova remnants, large-scale magnetic field amplification, and the radiation signature from gamma-ray bursts.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, researchers study how chemical looping combustion (CLC) can be applied to fossil energy systems....

  17. 液压系统流量PID闭环控制实验研究%Study on Closed Loop Control Experiment of Hydraulic System Flow PID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永; 杨彬

    2016-01-01

    为了提高液压系统的流量控制精度,消除稳态误差,设计了流量PID闭环控制系统。通过在Labview软件中编制测控程序,将实测流量值与目标值的差值输入PID控制器,通过PID控制器输出的转速控制电压调整伺服电机转速,从而使实际输出流量达到目标设定值。实验结果表明:实际输出流量值能很好地跟随、响应目标流量值变化;流量闭环控制系统对阶跃、正弦、斜坡压力干扰信号的校正能力较强。%In order to improve the flow control precision of hydraulic system and eliminate the steady-state error, the flow PID closed loop control system was designed. Through the measurement and control program written in Labview software, the difference between flow measurement value and the target value was inputted the PID controller. The speed control voltage of servo motor PID controller was outputted through PID controller. By adjusting the rotational speed of servo motor, the actual output flow can reach the set value. The experimental results show that the actual flow value can follow and respond to the change of target flow. The flow closed loop control system has strong anti interference ability for the step, sine and slope pressure disturbance signal.

  18. Corrosion behaviour of steels and refractory metals and tensile features of steels exposed to flowing PbBi in the LECOR loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazio, C. E-mail: concetta.fazio@psf.fzk.de; Ricapito, I.; Scaddozzo, G.; Benamati, G

    2003-05-15

    An experimental activity has been started using the LECOR loop at the ENEA Brasimone centre to investigate the corrosion behaviour of steels and refractory metals as well as the tensile properties of steels exposed to flowing liquid lead bismuth with low oxygen activity. The oxygen content in the liquid metal was controlled and monitored by a dedicated system. The compatibility test was performed at 673 K and the corrosion and tensile results herein reported concern the first 1500-h run of the loop operation. All the materials tested suffered from liquid metal attack exhibiting a weight loss. The consequent evaluation of the corrosion rate showed that, under the given test conditions, the refractory metals are more resistant than the steels. The tensile properties of austenitic steel are not affected by the liquid metal corrosion, while the martensitic steel exhibited a mixed brittle-ductile fracture surface.

  19. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  20. Influence of flow velocity and experimental setup on denitrification processes at the laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisson, A.; Aquilina, L.; Bour, O.; De Ridder, J.

    2009-04-01

    In fractured media, physical heterogeneities lead to a large distribution of flow velocities that can partly control chemical reactions involving microbial activity. The aim of this project is to assess influence of fluid flow velocity on chemical reactivity at the laboratory scale. The experimental setup tries to reproduce autotrophic denitrification observed in a cristaline aquifer (Ploemeur; France) where denitrification seems to be enhanced by the exploitation of the aquifer. The experimental setup is based on a column filled with crushed granite from the Ploemeur site. Nitrate-rich water (C=40mg/l) is injected through the column under controlled flow conditions. Nitrate degradation is measured at the outlet and at different sampling plots along the column. These experiments use natural field water without treatment in order to use total available communities instead of one known bacterial community. Typically, the experiments are made during ten days at fluid flow velocities ranging from 0.5 to 5 cm/h. The first point is that the use of uncontrolled bacterial communities in experimental setup can lead to important evolution of the bacterial activity and competition. Results show that this competition is not only related to the experimental conditions but also to the experimental apparatus equipment. Batch experiments show that commonly used polymers (PVC, Tygon, Teflon) can react with nitrates via heterotrophic denitrification within the same time scale as the rock reactivity. Such reactions can even overwhelm the studied reaction. To assess the role of the experimental conditions, we control materials reactivity compared to the relevant time scale of the experiments. The first set of experiments exhibit autotrophic denitrification along the column with variations of the location of the reactive zone during the experiments. Reactivity arises all along the experiments in the first hours but becomes highly localized at the inlet of the column in the following

  1. Pressure-flow relationships for packed beds of compressible chromatography media at laboratory and production scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, J J; Fotopoulos, A

    2001-01-01

    Pressure drop across chromatography beds employing soft or semirigid media can be a significant problem in the operation of large-scale preparative chromatography columns. The shape or aspect ratio (length/diameter) of a packed bed has a significant effect on column pressure drop due to wall effects, which can result in unexpectedly high pressures in manufacturing. Two types of agarose-based media were packed in chromatography columns at various column aspect ratios, during which pressure drop, bed height, and flow rate were carefully monitored. Compression of the packed beds with increasing flow velocities was observed. An empirical model was developed to correlate pressure drop with the aspect ratio of the packed beds and the superficial velocity. Modeling employed the Blake-Kozeny equation in which empirical relationships were used to predict bed porosity as a function of aspect ratio and flow velocity. Model predictions were in good agreement with observed pressure drops of industrial scale chromatography columns. A protocol was developed to predict compression in industrial chromatography applications by a few laboratory experiments. The protocol is shown to be useful in the development of chromatographic methods and sizing of preparative columns.

  2. Laboratory measurements of large-scale carbon sequestration flows in saline reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backhaus, Scott N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Brine saturated with CO{sub 2} is slightly denser than the original brine causing it to sink to the bottom of a saline reservoir where the CO{sub 2} is safely sequestered. However, the buoyancy of pure CO{sub 2} relative to brine drives it to the top of the reservoir where it collects underneath the cap rock as a separate phase of supercritical fluid. Without additional processes to mix the brine and CO{sub 2}, diffusion in this geometry is slow and would require an unacceptably long time to consume the pure CO{sub 2}. However, gravity and diffusion-driven convective instabilities have been hypothesized that generate enhanced CO{sub 2}-brine mixing promoting dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the brine on time scale of a hundred years. These flows involve a class of hydrodynamic problems that are notoriously difficult to simulate; the simultaneous flow of mUltiple fluids (CO{sub 2} and brine) in porous media (rock or sediment). The hope for direct experimental confirmation of simulations is dim due to the difficulty of obtaining high resolution data from the subsurface and the high pressures ({approx}100 bar), long length scales ({approx}100 meters), and long time scales ({approx}100 years) that are characteristic of these flows. We have performed imaging and mass transfer measurements in similitude-scaled laboratory experiments that provide benchmarks to test reservoir simulation codes and enhance their predictive power.

  3. Performance of the Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loop Rover Heat Rejection System Used for Thermal Control of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover on the Surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana; Bame, David; Mastropietro, A. J.; Miller, Jennifer; Karlmann, Paul; Liu, Yuanming; Anderson, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The challenging range of landing sites for which the Mars Science Laboratory Rover was designed, required a rover thermal management system that is capable of keeping temperatures controlled across a wide variety of environmental conditions. On the Martian surface where temperatures can be as cold as -123 C and as warm as 38 C, the Rover relies upon a Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loop (MPFL) Rover Heat Rejection System (RHRS) and external radiators to maintain the temperature of sensitive electronics and science instruments within a -40 C to +50 C range. The RHRS harnesses some of the waste heat generated from the Rover power source, known as the Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), for use as survival heat for the rover during cold conditions. The MMRTG produces 110 Watts of electrical power while generating waste heat equivalent to approximately 2000 Watts. Heat exchanger plates (hot plates) positioned close to the MMRTG pick up this survival heat from it by radiative heat transfer and supply it to the rover. This design is the first instance of use of a RHRS for thermal control of a rover or lander on the surface of a planet. After an extremely successful landing on Mars (August 5), the rover and the RHRS have performed flawlessly for close to an earth year (half the nominal mission life). This paper will share the performance of the RHRS on the Martian surface as well as compare it to its predictions.

  4. Characterization of granular flows from seismic signal: insights from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, M.; Mangeney, A.; Toussaint, R.; de Rosny, J.

    2015-12-01

    Landslides, rock avalanche and debris flows represent a major natural hazard in steep landscapes. Recent studies showed that the seismic signal generated by these events can provide quantitative information on their location and amplitude. However, owing to the lack of visual observations, the dynamics of gravitational events is still not well understood. A burning challenge is to establish relations between the characteristics of the landslide (volume, speed, runout distance,...) and that of the emitted seismic signal (maximum amplitude, seismic energy, frequencies,...) Laboratory experiments of granular columns collapse are conducted on an inclined plane. The seismic signal generated by the collapse is recorded by piezoelectric accelerometers sensitive in a wide frequency range (1 Hz - 56 kHz). The granular column is constituted with steel beads of same diameter, between 1 mm and 3 mm that are initially contained in a cylinder. The column collapses when the cylinder is removed. A layer of steel beads is glued on the surface of the plane to provide basal roughness. For horizontal granular flows, we show that it is possible to distinguish the phases of acceleration and deceleration of the flow in the emitted seismic signal. Indeed, the signal envelope is symmetrical with respect to its maximum, separating the acceleration from the deceleration. When the slope angle increases, we observe that the signal envelope looses its symmetry: it stays unchanged during the acceleration but it is significantly extended during the deceleration. In addition, we propose a semi-empirical scaling law to describe the increase of the elastic energy radiated by a granular flow when the slope angle increases. The fit of this law with the seismic data allows us to retrieve the friction angle of the granular material, which is a crucial rheological parameter. Finally, we show that the ratio of the radiated elastic energy over the potential energy lost of granular flows, i.e. their seismic

  5. Multiphase Venturi Dual Energy Gamma Ray combination performance in NUEX flow loop; Desempenho no flowloop do NUEX da medicao multifasica Venturi Dual Energy Gamma Ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiros, Claudio; Taranto, Cleber; Costa, Alcemir [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pinguet, Bruno; Heluey, Vitor; Bessa, Fabiano; Loicq, Olivier [Schlumberger Servicos de Petroleo Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The Multiphase Venturi Dual Energy Gamma Ray Combination, Vx* technology, arrived in Brazil in 2000. PETROBRAS, Brazilian Oil Company, has been putting big efforts in its production business and also has demonstrated a large interest in having a multiphase meter approved by ANP for back allocation purposes. The oil industry was looking for ways to improve the back allocation process using an approved on line multiphase flow measurement device, thus replacing punctual test done today by a permanent monitoring device. Considering this scenario, a partnership project between PETROBRAS and Schlumberger was created in Brazil. The main objective of this project, which was held in NUEX flow loop, was to demonstrate to INMETRO (Brazilian Metrology Institute) that the Multiphase Venturi Dual Energy Gamma Ray Combination meter is able to be used for back allocation purpose. PETROBRAS and Schlumberger elaborated a complete methodology in the NUEX flow loop to demonstrate the results and benefits of the Multiphase Venturi Dual Energy Gamma Ray Combination meter. The test was witnessed by INMETRO and had a very good performance at the end. The results were within what was expected by Schlumberger, PETROBRAS and INMETRO. These results has been very useful to PETROBRAS in order to start using the Venturi Dual Energy Gamma Ray technology for well allocation purposes. (author)

  6. Laboratory investigations of the physics of steam flow in a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkelrath, W.N.; Moench, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in the laboratory to test a theory of transient flow of pure steam in a uniform porous medium. This theory is used extensively in modeling pressure-transient behavior in vapor-dominated geothermal systems. Transient, superheated steam-flow experiments were run by bringing a cylinder of porous material to a uniform initial pressure, and then making a step increase in pressure at one end of the sample, while monitoring the pressure-transient breakthrough at the other end. It was found in experiments run at 100?, 125?, and 146?C that the time required for steam-pressure transients to propagate through an unconsolidated material containing sand, silt, and clay was 10 to 25 times longer than predicted by theory. It is hypothesized that the delay in the steam-pressure transient was caused by adsorption of steam in the porous sample. In order to account for steam adsorption, a sink term was included in the conservation of mass equation. In addition, energy transfer in the system has to be considered because latent heat is released when steam adsorption occurs, increasing the sample temperature by as much as 10?C. Finally, it was recognized that the steam pressure was a function of both the temperature and the amount of adsorption in the sample. For simplicity, this function was assumed to be in equilibrium adsorption isotherm, which was determined by experiment. By solving the modified mass and energy equations numerically, subject to the empirical adsorption isotherm relationship, excellent theoretical simulation of the experiments was achieved. The experiments support the hypothesis that adsorption of steam can strongly influence steam pressure-transient behavior in porous media; the results suggest that the modified steam-flow theory, which includes steam adsorption terms, should be used in modeling steam flow in vapor-dominated geothermal systems.

  7. Observations of capillary barriers and preferential flow in layered snow during cold laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzi, Francesco; Hirashima, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Katsushima, Takafumi; De Michele, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Data of liquid water flow around a capillary barrier in snow are still limited. To gain insight into this process, we carried out observations of dyed water infiltration in layered snow at 0 °C during cold laboratory experiments. We considered three different finer-over-coarser textures and three different water input rates. By means of visual inspection, horizontal sectioning, and measurements of liquid water content (LWC), capillary barriers and associated preferential flow were characterized. The flow dynamics of each sample were also simulated solving the Richards equation within the 1-D multi-layer physically based snow cover model SNOWPACK. Results revealed that capillary barriers and preferential flow are relevant processes ruling the speed of water infiltration in stratified snow. Both are marked by a high degree of spatial variability at centimeter scale and complex 3-D patterns. During unsteady percolation of water, observed peaks in bulk volumetric LWC at the interface reached ˜ 33-36 vol % when the upper layer was composed by fine snow (grain size smaller than 0.5 mm). However, LWC might locally be greater due to the observed heterogeneity in the process. Spatial variability in water transmission increases with grain size, whereas we did not observe a systematic dependency on water input rate for samples containing fine snow. The comparison between observed and simulated LWC profiles revealed that the implementation of the Richards equation reproduces the existence of a capillary barrier for all observed cases and yields a good agreement with observed peaks in LWC at the interface between layers.

  8. Visual Detection of Canine Parvovirus Based on Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Combined with Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and with Lateral Flow Dipstick

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yu-Ling; Yen, Chon-Ho; Tu, Ching-Fu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) combined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (LAMP–ELISA) and with lateral flow dipstick (LAMP–LFD) are rapid, sensitive and specific methods for the visual detection of clinical pathogens. In this study, LAMP–ELISA and LAMP–LFD were developed for the visual detection of canine parvovirus (CPV). For LAMP, a set of four primers (biotin-labeled forward inner primers) was designed to specifically amplify a region of the VP2 gene of CPV. T...

  9. Hydraulic analysis of looped waster network on peak flow conditions; Analisis hidraulico de redes malladas de abastecimiento en condiciones de maxima demanda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez Solano, F. J.; Iglesias Rey, P. L.; Fuertes Miquel, V. S.; Lopez Jimenez, P. A.

    2007-07-01

    The models of a water supply network are classified in detailed models and strategic models depending on its characteristics. In the case of detailed model, the objective consists of studying the behaviour of the network when extreme situations occurs. Usually, billing data from customers are used to estimate the demands at the network nodes. This made that demand an average value of the flow. In other words, we are using true dat to obtain fictions situations. This is specially tru when the network is smaller. In this article, a methodology to load allocation in detailed models is presented. This load allocation will be valid for both branched and looped networks. (Author) 10 refs.

  10. Local overall volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients in gas-liquid-solid reversed flow jet loop bioreactor with a non-Newtonian fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianping; Ping; Lin; Yunlin

    2000-07-01

    The local overall volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients at the specified point in a gas-liquid-solid three-phase reversed flow jet loop bioreactor (JLB) with a non-Newtonian fluid was experimentally investigated by a transient gassing-in method. The effects of liquid jet flow rate, gas jet flow rate, particle density, particle diameter, solids loading, nozzle diameter and CMC concentration on the local overall volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient (K(L)a) profiles were discussed. It was observed that local overall K(L)a profiles in the three-phase reversed flow JLB with non-Newtonian fluid increased with the increase of gas jet flow rate, liquid jet flow rate, particle density and particle diameter, but decreased with the increase of the nozzle diameter and CMC concentration. The presence of solids at a low concentration increased the local overall K(L)a profiles, and the optimum of solids loading for a maximum profile of the local overall K(L)a was found to be 0.18x10(-3)m(3) corresponding to a solids volume fraction, varepsilon(S)=2.8%.

  11. Laboratory observations of saline and turbidity currents flowing in U-shaped flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagnaro, M.; Bolla Pittaluga, M.

    2013-12-01

    Saline and turbidity currents belong to the large family of gravity currents. Due to the difficulties to predict and observe these kinds of phenomena, especially turbidity currents, we developed an experimental apparatus able to reproduce these currents in our Marchi Environmental Laboratory (Genova, Italy). The experiments were performed in a large U-shaped flume, 30 m long, characterized by a constant curvature bend (radius of 2.5 m) joining two straight reaches approximately 12 m long. The flume has a rectangular cross section 0.6 m wide and 0.5 m deep. Inside the flume we made a uniform concrete bottom slope (0.005), which proceeds from the inlet section along the first straight track and finishes 3 m after the bend exit. For each experiment we have been able to measure density distribution and velocity profiles along the vertical in different cross section. Density measurements were obtained using two ranks of siphons that sample the currents at different heights. Velocity was acquired with the DOP2000 ultrasound velocimeter; we measured longitudinal component in the straight reach of the flume, and both longitudinal and transversal velocity in the curved reach. We performed 30 experiments by changing the inlet conditions: primary defining the nature of the currents, saline or sediment laden, then varying two of the main parameters governing the currents: the density of the mixture and the flow discharge. The former covered a range between 1003 and 1023 kg/m^3 and the flow discharge ranged between 0.5 to 4.0 l/s. Both of these parameters influence the densimetric Froude Number, and allowed us to reproduce both subcritical and supercritical flow. In each experiment water entrainment from above was negligible hence the current was able to attain a quasi-uniform configuration in the first straight reach, whereby the longitudinal velocity and the thickness of the current were approximately constant. By varying the inlet conditions, it was possible to observe the

  12. Local Gas Phase Flow Characteristics of a Gas-Liquid-Solid Three-Phase Reversed Flow Jet Loop Reactor%气-液-固三相下喷环流反应器局部气相流动特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闻建平; 周怀; 陈云琳

    2002-01-01

    The local gas-phase flow characteristics such as local gas holdup (εs), local bubble velocity (Vb) and local bubble mean diameter (db) at a specified point in a gas-liquid-solid three-phase reversed flow jet loop reactor was experimentally investigated by a five-point conductivity probe. The effects of gas jet flow rate, liquid jet flow rate, solid loading, nozzle dianeter and axial position on the local εg, Vb and db profiles were discussed. The presence of solids at low solid concentrations not only increased the local eg and Vb, but also decreased the local db. The optimum solid loading for the maximum local εg and Vb together with the minimum local db was 0.16 × 10-3 m3,corresponding to a solid volume fraction, εs = 2.5%.

  13. Practical way to develop 10-color flow cytometry protocols for the clinical laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárnok, Attila; Bocsi, Jozsef

    2010-02-01

    The latest development of commercial routine flow cytometers (FCM) is that they are equipped with three (blue, red, violet) or more lasers and many PMT detectors. Nowadays routine clinical instruments are capable of detecting 10 or more fluorescence colors simultaneously. Thereby, presenting opportunities for getting detailed information on the single cell level for cytomics and systems biology for improve diagnostics and monitoring of patients. The University Leipzig, Germany) recently started a cluster of excellence to study the molecular background of life style and environment associated diseases, enrolling 25000 individuals (LIFE). To this end the most comprehensive FCM protocol has to be developed for this study. We aimed to optimize fluorochrome and antibody combinations to the characteristics of the instrument for successful 10-color FCM. Systematic review of issues related to sampling, preparation, instrument settings, spillover and compensation matrix, reagent performance, and general principles of panel construction was performed. 10-color FCM enables for increased accuracy in cell subpopulation identification, the ability to obtain detailed information from blood specimens, improved laboratory efficiency, and the means to consistently detect major and rare cell populations. Careful attention to details of instrument and reagent performance allows for the development of panels suitable for screening of samples from healthy and diseased donors. The characteristics of this technique are particularly well suited for the analysis of broad human population cohorts and have the potential to reach the everyday practice in a standardized way for the clinical laboratory.

  14. Mapping mantle flow during retreating subduction: Laboratory models analyzed by feature tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funiciello, F.; Moroni, M.; Piromallo, C.; Faccenna, C.; Cenedese, A.; Bui, H. A.

    2006-03-01

    Three-dimensional dynamically consistent laboratory models are carried out to model the large-scale mantle circulation induced by subduction of a laterally migrating slab. A laboratory analogue of a slab-upper mantle system is set up with two linearly viscous layers of silicone putty and glucose syrup in a tank. The circulation pattern is continuously monitored and quantitatively estimated using a feature tracking image analysis technique. The effects of plate width and mantle viscosity/density on mantle circulation are systematically considered. The experiments show that rollback subduction generates a complex three-dimensional time-dependent mantle circulation pattern characterized by the presence of two distinct components: the poloidal and the toroidal circulation. The poloidal component is the answer to the viscous coupling between the slab motion and the mantle, while the toroidal one is produced by lateral slab migration. Spatial and temporal features of mantle circulation are carefully analyzed. These models show that (1) poloidal and toroidal mantle circulation are both active since the beginning of the subduction process, (2) mantle circulation is intermittent, (3) plate width affects the velocity and the dimension of subduction induced mantle circulation area, and (4) mantle flow in subduction zones cannot be correctly described by models assuming a two-dimensional steady state process. We show that the intermittent toroidal component of mantle circulation, missed in those models, plays a crucial role in modifying the geometry and the efficiency of the poloidal component.

  15. Laboratory and field tests on photo-electric probes and ultrasonic Doppler flow switch for remote control of turbidity and flowrate of a water-sand mixture flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, M.; Saccani, C.

    2017-08-01

    The paper describes the experimental apparatus and field tests carried on to remotely control through non-invasive and non-intrusive instruments turbidity and flowrate of a water-sand mixture flow conveyed by a pipeline. The mixture flow was produced by an innovative plant for seabed management. The turbidity was monitored by thru-beam infra-red photo-electric sensors, while flowrate was monitored by an ultrasonic Doppler flow switch. In a first phase, a couple of photo-electric sensors and a mechanical flow switch were preliminary tested in laboratory to verify installations concerns and measurement repeatability and precision. After preliminary test completion, photo-electric sensors and mechanical flow switch were installed in the real scale plant. Since the mechanical flow switch did not reach high reliability, an ultrasonic Doppler flow switch was identified and tested as alternative. Then, two couple of photo-electric sensors and ultrasonic Doppler flow switch were installed and tested on two pipelines of the plant. Turbidity and minimum flow signals produced by the instruments were integrated in the PLC logic for the automatic management of the plant. The paper also shows how ultrasonic Doppler flow switch measurement repeatability was negatively affected by the presence of the other ultrasonic Doppler flow switch working in a close pipeline and installed inside a steel casing.

  16. Laboratory astrophysical collisionless shock experiments with interpenetrating plasma flows on Omega and NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, James; Park, H.-S.; Huntington, C.; Ryutov, D.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D.; Gregori, G.; Levy, M.; Lamb, D.; Fiuza, F.; Petrasso, R.; Li, C.; Zylastra, A.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.

    2015-11-01

    Shock formation from high-Mach number plasma flows is observed in many astrophysical objects such as supernova remnants and gamma ray bursts. These are collisionless shocks as the ion-ion collision mean free path is much larger than the system size. It is believed that seed magnetic fields can be generated on a cosmologically fast timescale via the Weibel instability when such environments are initially unmagnetized. Here we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers whose ultimate goal is to investigate the dynamics of collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Particle-in-cell numerical simulations have confirmed that the strength and structure of the generated magnetic field are consistent with the Weibel mediated electromagnetic nature and that the inferred magnetization level could be as high as ~ 1%. This paper will review recent experimental results from various laser facilities as well as the simulation results and the theoretical understanding of these observations. Taken together, these results imply that electromagnetic instabilities can be significant in both inertial fusion and astrophysical conditions. We will present results from initial NIF experiments, where we observe the neutrons and x-rays generated from the hot plasmas at the center of weakly collisional, counterstreaming flows. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Mach Cones and Hydrodynamic Flow:. Probing Big Bang Matter in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Barbara; Rau, Philip; Stöcker, Horst

    A critical discussion of the present signals for the phase transition to quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is given. Since hadronic rescattering models predict much larger flow than observed from 1 to 50 A GeV laboratory bombarding energies, this observation is interpreted as potential evidence for a first-order phase transition at high baryon density. A detailed discussion of the collective flow as a barometer for the equation of state (EoS) of hot dense matter at RHIC follows. Here, hadronic rescattering models can explain 2 GeV/c. This is interpreted as an evidence for the production of superdense matter at RHIC. The connection of v2 to jet suppression is examined. A study of Mach shocks generated by fast partonic jets propagating through the QGP is given. The main goal is to take into account different types of collective motion during the formation and evolution of this matter. A significant deformation of Mach shocks in central Au+Au collisions at RHIC and LHC energies as compared to the case of jet propagation in a static medium is predicted. A new hydrodynamical study of jet energy loss is presented.

  18. International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) flow cytometry shared resource laboratory (SRL) best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Lora W; Black, Michele; Cochran, Matthew; Daniel, Benjamin J; Davies, Derek; DeLay, Monica; Gardner, Rui; Gregory, Michael; Kunkel, Desiree; Lannigan, Joanne; Marvin, James; Salomon, Robert; Torres, Carina; Walker, Rachael

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to define minimal standards for a flow cytometry shared resource laboratory (SRL) and provide guidance for best practices in several important areas. This effort is driven by the desire of International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) members in SRLs to define and maintain standards of excellence in flow cytometry, and act as a repository for key elements of this information (e.g. example SOPs/training material, etc.). These best practices are not intended to define specifically how to implement these recommendations, but rather to establish minimal goals for an SRL to address in order to achieve excellence. It is hoped that once these best practices are established and implemented they will serve as a template from which similar practices can be defined for other types of SRLs. Identification of the need for best practices first occurred through discussions at the CYTO 2013 SRL Forum, with the most important areas for which best practices should be defined identified through several surveys and SRL track workshops as part of CYTO 2014. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  19. Mach Cones and Hydrodynamic Flow Probing Big Bang Matter in the Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Betz, Barbara; Stöcker, Horst

    2007-01-01

    A critical discussion of the present signals for the phase transition to quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is given. Since hadronic rescattering models predict much larger flow than observed from 1 to 50 A GeV laboratory bombarding energies, this observation is interpreted as potential evidence for a first-order phase transition at high baryon density. A detailed discussion of the collective flow as a barometer for the equation of state (EoS) of hot dense matter at RHIC follows. Here, hadronic rescattering models can explain $ 2$ GeV/c. This is interpreted as an evidence for the production of superdense matter at RHIC. The connection of $v_2$ to jet suppression is examined. A study of Mach shocks generated by fast partonic jets propagating through the QGP is given. The main goal is to take into account different types of collective motion during the formation and evolution of this matter. A significant deformation of Mach shocks in central Au+Au collisions at RHIC and LHC energies as compared to the case of jet propag...

  20. Identifying ways of closing the metal flow loop in the global mobile phone product system : A system dynamics modeling approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Rajib; Laurenti, Rafael; Singh, Jagdeep; Malmström, Maria E.; Frostell, Björn

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, e-waste has emerged as one of the fastest growing and increasingly complex waste flows world-wide. Within e-waste, the life cycle of the mobile phone product system is particularly important because of: (1) the increasing quantities of mobile phones in this waste flow; and (2) the sustainability challenges associated with the emerging economies of reuse, refurbishment, and export of used mobile phones. This study examined the possibilities of closing the material flow...

  1. Impact of the new Beckman Coulter Cytomics FC 500 5-color flow cytometer on a regional flow cytometry clinical laboratory service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luider, J; Cyfra, M; Johnson, P; Auer, I

    2004-01-01

    Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS) in Alberta, Canada, is the regional reference laboratory providing flow cytometry services for southern Alberta and southeastern British Columbia. As a busy reference flow laboratory we provide flow cytometry immunophenotyping for investigation and diagnosis of acute and chronic leukemias, lymphomas, immunodeficiencies, neuroblastoma, platelet disorders, and interstitial lung disease (ILD). Because of increasing workload and the continual effort to improve the service to our health care providers, CLS invested in the new Beckman Coulter Cytomics FC 500 5-color flow cytometer. In addition to time and labor savings due to reduced maintenance and operating system design, this new flow cytometer automates many of the previous manual steps involved in quality control and flow cytometric analysis. It also incorporates 2 lasers and is capable of measuring 5-color antibody combinations in a single tube, enabling us to reduce the number of tubes and overall costs, giving us better gating options for minimal residual disease analysis. We present the first published evaluation, an assessment of the overall productivity and cost impact of the new state-of-the-art Cytomics FC 500 flow cytometer. Implementation of the Cytomics FC 500 has resulted in a 20% reduction in reagent costs and shorter turnaround time for analysis and diagnosis. This instrument has allowed us to reduce our acute leukemia panel from 17 to 13 tubes, our lymphoma panel from 13 to 7 tubes, and our ILD panel from 4 to 2 tubes. The availability of 2 lasers provides more flexibility in choosing antibodies and conjugates to customize immunophenotyping panels. It also allows us to use the DRAQ5 dye and simultaneously analyze the immunophenotype and DNA content of cells with very little compensation. Many of the arduous, time-consuming flow operator tasks often associated with previous generation flow cytometry instruments, such as color compensation, list mode analysis, sample

  2. Monitoring of surface velocity of hyper-concentrated flow in a laboratory flume by means of fully-digital PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termini, Donatella; Di Leonardo, Alice

    2016-04-01

    High flow conditions, which are generally characterized by high sediment concentrations, do not permit the use of traditional measurement equipment. Traditional techniques usually are based on the intrusive measure of the vertical profile of flow velocity and on the linking of water depth with the discharge through the rating curve. The major disadvantage of these measurement techniques is that they are difficult to use and not safe for operators especially in high flow conditions. The point is that, as literature shows (see as an example Moramarco and Termini, 2015), especially in such conditions, the measurement of surface velocity distribution is important to evaluate the mean flow velocity and, thus, the flow discharge. In the last decade, image-based techniques have been increasingly used for surface velocity measurements (among others Joeau et al., 2008). Experimental program has been recently conducted at the Hydraulic laboratory of the Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospatial and of Materials Engineering (DICAM) - University of Palermo (Italy) in order to analyze the propagation phenomenon of hyper-concentrated flow in a defense channel. The experimental apparatus includes a high-precision camera and a system allowing the images recording. This paper investigates the utility and the efficiency of the digital image-technique for remote monitoring of surface velocity in hyper-concentrated flow by the aid of data collected during experiments conducted in the laboratory flume. In particular the present paper attention is focused on the estimation procedure of the velocity vectors and on their sensitivity with parameters (number of images, spatial resolution of interrogation area,) of the images processing procedure. References Jodeau M., A. Hauet, A. Paquier, Le Coz J., Dramais G., Application and evaluation of LS-PIV technique for the monitoring of river surface in high flow conditions, Flow Measurements and Instrumentation, Vol.19, No.2, 2008, pp.117

  3. Power Flow Analysis Algorithm for Islanded LV Microgrids Including Distributed Generator Units with Droop Control and Virtual Impedance Loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Chendan; Chaudhary, Sanjay; Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    ) consideration of virtual impedance parameters and (ii) higher accuracy in reactive power flow calculation. The improved power flow analysis algorithm proposed in this paper is validated by comparing the calculation results with detailed time domain simulation results. Case studies have been carried out...

  4. In situ flow cell for combined X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mass spectrometry at high photon energies under solar thermochemical looping conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothensteiner, Matthäus; Jenni, Joel; Emerich, Hermann; Bonk, Alexander; Vogt, Ulrich F.; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-08-01

    An in situ/operando flow cell for transmission mode X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and combined XAS/XRD measurements in a single experiment under the extreme conditions of two-step solar thermochemical looping for the dissociation of water and/or carbon dioxide was developed. The apparatus exposes materials to relevant conditions of both the auto-reduction and the oxidation sub-steps of the thermochemical cycle at ambient temperature up to 1773 K and enables determination of the composition of the effluent gases by online quadrupole mass spectrometry. The cell is based on a tube-in-tube design and is heated by means of a focusing infrared furnace. It was tested successfully for carbon dioxide splitting. In combined XAS/XRD experiments with an unfocused beam, XAS measurements were performed at the Ce K edge (40.4 keV) and XRD measurements at 64.8 keV and 55.9 keV. Furthermore, XRD measurements with a focused beam at 41.5 keV were carried out. Equimolar ceria-hafnia was auto-reduced in a flow of argon and chemically reduced in a flow of hydrogen/helium. Under reducing conditions, all cerium(iv) was converted to cerium(iii) and a cation-ordered pyrochlore-type structure was formed, which was not stable upon oxidation in a flow of carbon dioxide.

  5. Numerical study of wave effects on groundwater flow and solute transport in a laboratory beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C.; Xia, Yuqiang; Li, Hailong; Zhao, Lin; Jackson, Nancy L.; Miller, Richard S.

    2014-09-01

    A numerical study was undertaken to investigate the effects of waves on groundwater flow and associated inland-released solute transport based on tracer experiments in a laboratory beach. The MARUN model was used to simulate the density-dependent groundwater flow and subsurface solute transport in the saturated and unsaturated regions of the beach subjected to waves. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software, Fluent, was used to simulate waves, which were the seaward boundary condition for MARUN. A no-wave case was also simulated for comparison. Simulation results matched the observed water table and concentration at numerous locations. The results revealed that waves generated seawater-groundwater circulations in the swash and surf zones of the beach, which induced a large seawater-groundwater exchange across the beach face. In comparison to the no-wave case, waves significantly increased the residence time and spreading of inland-applied solutes in the beach. Waves also altered solute pathways and shifted the solute discharge zone further seaward. Residence Time Maps (RTM) revealed that the wave-induced residence time of the inland-applied solutes was largest near the solute exit zone to the sea. Sensitivity analyses suggested that the change in the permeability in the beach altered solute transport properties in a nonlinear way. Due to the slow movement of solutes in the unsaturated zone, the mass of the solute in the unsaturated zone, which reached up to 10% of the total mass in some cases, constituted a continuous slow release of solutes to the saturated zone of the beach. This means of control was not addressed in prior studies.

  6. A laboratory-based characterization of capillary barriers and preferential flow in snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzi, Francesco; Hirashima, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Katsushima, Takafumi; De Michele, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Liquid water percolation in snow is a complex process, which is characterized by high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Several strategies have been considered in the past to simulate the vertical profile of liquid water content in snow, since this information has important impacts on runoff prediction and avalanche forecast. Examples are the use of Darcy's law and/or Richards Equation. In this context, a frequent assumption is that the effects of gravitational gradients on the flow are predominant over capillary gradients, which can be therefore neglected as a first approximation. As a result, the physical characterization of several capillary-related processes in snow is still low. An example are capillary barriers: their occurrence in snow is well known, but this knowledge is still mostly qualitative. An additional complication is that measuring liquid water content in snow is usually very difficult and this hampers a more comprehensive investigation on these processes. Here, we present and discuss the results of nine experiments in a cold laboratory where dyed water was supplied to layered snow samples. All samples were characterized by a finer-over-coarser transition between layers of different grain size. By means of visual inspection, liquid water content measurements and cross-sectioning, the properties of capillary barriers and associated preferential flow were investigated. Results show that both are relevant processes ruling the time of arrival of water at sample base. Peaks in liquid water content at the inter-layer boundary reach 33 - 36 vol%. We also observe that heterogeneity of flux increases with grain size, while no clear dependency on external supply rate is found. Finally, the dynamics of each sample were replicated using SNOWPACK and a water scheme that bases on van Genuchten formulation. Results of this comparison are discussed in view of existing theory.

  7. Mantle flow and dynamic topography associated with slab window opening: Insights from laboratory models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Moroni, Monica; Funiciello, Francesca; Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We present dynamically self-consistent mantle-scale laboratory models that have been conducted to improve our understanding of the influence of slab window opening on subduction dynamics, mantle flow and associated dynamic topography over geological time scales. The adopted setup consists of a two-layer linearly viscous system simulating the subduction of a fixed plate of silicone (lithosphere) under negative buoyancy in a viscous layer of glucose syrup (mantle). Our experimental setting is also characterized by a constant-width rectangular window located at the center of a laterally confined slab, modeling the case of the interaction of a trench-parallel spreading ridge with a wide subduction zone. We found that the opening of a slab window does not produce consistent changes of the geometry and the kinematics of the slab. On the contrary, slab-induced mantle circulation, quantified both in the vertical and horizontal sections using the Feature Tracking image analysis technique, is strongly modified. In particular, rollback subduction and the opening of the slab window generate a complex mantle circulation pattern characterized by the presence of poloidal and toroidal components, with the importance of each evolving according to kinematic stages. Mantle coming from the oceanic domain floods through the slab window, indenting the supra-slab mantle zone and producing its deformation without any mixing between mantle portions. The opening of the slab window and the upwelling of sub-slab mantle produce a regional-scale non-isostatic topographic uplift of the overriding plate that would correspond to values ranging between ca. 1 and 5 km in nature. Assuming that our modeling results can be representative of the natural behavior of subduction zones, we compared them to the tectonics and volcanism of the Patagonian subduction zone. We found that the anomalous backarc volcanism that has been developing since the middle Miocene could result from the lateral flow of sub

  8. Laboratory Validation of Passive Flow Focusing of Horizontal Wells for in Situ Groundwater Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, A.; Crimi, M.; Holsen, T.; Bellona, C.; Kumarage, P.; Divine, C.; O'Fallon, T.

    2014-12-01

    A new concept for in situgroundwater remediation was recently developed where drilled horizontal wells filled with granular treatment media are installed in the direction of groundwater flow. Due to the differences in hydraulic conductivity (K) of the media in the well and the surrounding aquifer, groundwater is "focused" into the well and treated (Figure 1). Initial computer simulations demonstrate that the horizontal well will have a substantial capture zone making this a viable and appealing remediation strategy. In this work, a laboratory scale model was constructed to validate the computer simulations and determine the expected capture zone of a horizontal well under a range of hydraulic conductivity differentials. We have built a physical model to replicate a horizontal well in a confined aquifer. The model is constructed inside a 55-gallon drum packed with sand and water is pumped into the bottom of the drum and flows upward through the system. Within the aquifer, we installed a 1" screened well packed with lime-soda beads. To define the capture zone, we placed manometers in the aquifer. Finally, a constant head is applied to the system (Figure 2 and 3). Initial tests have shown that the 1" well with a hydraulic conductivity 65 times greater than the surrounding aquifer (kwell= 1.3 cm/sec vs. kaquifer= 0.02cm/sec) will capture a significant percentage (over 80% in some configurations) of the water applied to the system. A tracer test has shown that the water velocity in the well is substantially higher than the aquifer. Manometer readings confirm the flowfield effects of the well and these data are being used to calibrate numerical models. The presentation will focus on the observed behavior of the physical model under varying applied head and hydraulic conductivities and discuss the potential design implications for full-scale application.

  9. Porphyrin Binding to Gun4 Protein, Facilitated by a Flexible Loop, Controls Metabolite Flow through the Chlorophyll Biosynthetic Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopečná, Jana; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Adams, Nathan B P; Davison, Paul A; Brindley, Amanda A; Hunter, C Neil; Guallar, Victor; Sobotka, Roman

    2015-11-20

    In oxygenic phototrophs, chlorophylls, hemes, and bilins are synthesized by a common branched pathway. Given the phototoxic nature of tetrapyrroles, this pathway must be tightly regulated, and an important regulatory role is attributed to magnesium chelatase enzyme at the branching between the heme and chlorophyll pathway. Gun4 is a porphyrin-binding protein known to stimulate in vitro the magnesium chelatase activity, but how the Gun4-porphyrin complex acts in the cell was unknown. To address this issue, we first performed simulations to determine the porphyrin-docking mechanism to the cyanobacterial Gun4 structure. After correcting crystallographic loop contacts, we determined the binding site for magnesium protoporphyrin IX. Molecular modeling revealed that the orientation of α6/α7 loop is critical for the binding, and the magnesium ion held within the porphyrin is coordinated by Asn-211 residue. We also identified the basis for stronger binding in the Gun4-1 variant and for weaker binding in the W192A mutant. The W192A-Gun4 was further characterized in magnesium chelatase assay showing that tight porphyrin binding in Gun4 facilitates its interaction with the magnesium chelatase ChlH subunit. Finally, we introduced the W192A mutation into cells and show that the Gun4-porphyrin complex is important for the accumulation of ChlH and for channeling metabolites into the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway.

  10. Clinical utility of the cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay in a diagnostic mycology laboratory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan J McMullan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening meningitis. A recently introduced lateral flow immunoassay (LFA to detect cryptococcal antigen (CRAG is reportedly more rapid and convenient than standard latex agglutination (LA, but has not yet been evaluated in a diagnostic laboratory setting. METHODS: One hundred and six serum, 42 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, and 20 urine samples from 92 patients with known or suspected cryptococcosis were tested by LA and LFA, and titres were compared. Results were correlated with laboratory-confirmed cryptococcosis. Serial samples were tested in nine treated patients. RESULTS: Twenty-five of 92 patients had confirmed cryptococcosis; all sera (n = 56 from these patients were positive by LFA (sensitivity 100%, 95% confidence interval (CI 93.6-100% compared with 51/56 positive by LA (sensitivity 91.1%, 95% CI 80.7-96.1%. Fifty sera from 67 patients without cryptococcosis tested negative in both assays. While LA yielded more false negative results (5/56 this did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.063. Nine CSF samples from patients with cryptococcal meningitis yielded positive results using both assays while 17/18 urine samples from patients with cryptococcosis were positive by the LFA. The LFA detected CRAG in C. gattii infection (n = 4 patients. Agreement between titres obtained by both methods (n = 38 samples was imperfect; correlation between log-transformed titres (r was 0.84. Turn-around-time was 20 minutes for the LFA and 2 h for LA. The cost per qualitative sample was 18USD and 91 USD, respectively and per quantitative sample was 38USD and 144USD, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Qualitative agreement between the LFA and LA assays performed on serum and CSF was good but agreement between titres was imperfect. Ease of performance of the LFA and the capacity for testing urine suggest it has a role in the routine laboratory as a rapid diagnostic test or point-of-care test.

  11. Fractal properties of isovelocity surfaces in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.; Foss, John F.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Karyakin, Mikhail Yu.

    1993-08-01

    The fractal properties of isovelocity surfaces are studied in three high Reynolds number (Rλ≊2.0×102-3.2×103) laboratory shear flows using the standard box-counting method. The fractal dimension D=-d(log Nr)/d(log r) was estimated within the range of box sizes r from several Kolmogorov scales up to several integral scales (Nr is the number of boxes with size r required to cover the line intersection of an isovelocity surface). The inertial subrange was of particular interest in this investigation. Measurements were carried out for external intermittency factors γ≊0.6-1.0. The data were processed using threshold levels U±2.5u' (U and u' denote mean and rms values of longitudinal velocity). Over the parameters studied, no wide range of constant fractal dimension was found. On the other hand, the accuracy of constant fractal dimension approximation with D≊0.4 over the inertial subranges was shown to be similar to that of the Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 30, 301 (1941)] ``two-thirds law.''

  12. Laboratory studies of magnetized collisionless flows and shocks using accelerated plasmoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T. E.; Smith, R. J.; Hsu, S. C.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetized collisionless shocks are thought to play a dominant role in the overall partition of energy throughout the universe, but have historically proven difficult to create in the laboratory. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) at LANL creates conditions similar to those found in both space and astrophysical shocks by accelerating hot (100s of eV during translation) dense (1022 - 1023 m-3) Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoids to high velocities (100s of km/s); resulting in β ~ 1, collisionless plasma flows with sonic and Alfvén Mach numbers of ~10. The FRC subsequently impacts a static target such as a strong parallel or anti-parallel (reconnection-wise) magnetic mirror, a solid obstacle, or neutral gas cloud to create shocks with characteristic length and time scales that are both large enough to observe yet small enough to fit within the experiment. This enables study of the complex interplay of kinetic and fluid processes that mediate cosmic shocks and can generate non-thermal distributions, produce density and magnetic field enhancements much greater than predicted by fluid theory, and accelerate particles. An overview of the experimental capabilities of MSX will be presented, including diagnostics, selected recent results, and future directions. Supported by the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under contract DE-AC52-06NA25369.

  13. Removal of PAHs from laboratory columns simulating the humus upper layer of vertical flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottin, N; Merlin, G

    2008-10-01

    Removal of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs (fluoranthene, pyrene and benzo(k)fluoranthene) from two types of PAH-contaminated effluents was investigated using four laboratory columns filled with two different organic media: a green compost and a layer coming from the first stage of vertical flow constructed wetlands. Synthetic runoff polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were fed through the columns during a period of two months. After a period of hydrodynamic stabilisation, the results showed a great adsorption of PAHs (>95%) on the solid media due to their large adsorption capacities. Leaching of these compounds by water was monitored. The concentrations of PAHs in leaching samples indicated that PAHs were strongly adsorbed on organic substrates and that lixiviation was limited. Fluoranthene metabolites were also investigated. Accumulation of metabolites was transitory and located in the first few cm of the media, as was observed for PAH concentrations. A toxicity test of leachates based on the inhibition of the bioluminescence of luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri indicated a low inhibition which can be enhanced by metal traces.

  14. Sensitivity and open-loop control of stochastic response in a noise amplifier flow: the backward-facing step

    CERN Document Server

    Boujo, Edouard

    2014-01-01

    The two-dimensional backward-facing step flow is a canonical example of noise amplifier flow: global linear stability analysis predicts that it is stable, but perturbations can undergo large amplification in space and time as a result of non-normal effects. This amplification potential is best captured by optimal transient growth analysis, optimal harmonic forcing, or the response to sustained noise. In view of reducing disturbance amplification in these globally stable open flows, a variational technique is proposed to evaluate the sensitivity of stochastic amplification to steady control. Existing sensitivity methods are extended in two ways to achieve a realistic representation of incoming noise: (i) perturbations are time-stochastic rather than time-harmonic, (ii) perturbations are localised at the inlet rather than distributed in space. This allows for the identification of regions where small-amplitude control is the most effective, without actually computing any controlled flows. In particular, passive...

  15. Resonant Loop-tube Coriolis Mass Flow Meter%谐振式环形管科里奥利质量流量计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡体菁; 唐国建

    2001-01-01

    A new resonant loop-tube coriolis mass flow meter(RLCMFM)is described.It is based on the equality of natural frequencies of the drive mode and the coriolis mode,continuous signal process technique and frequency tracking.When fluid flows in the loop-tube and under the condition of equality of natural frequencies of the drive mode and the coriolis mode,the loop-tube is in resonant state,therefore it has very high sensitivity to mass flow.Because output signal is continuous,using continuous signal process technique can be used to increase its measurement precision.Fluid density is measured by self-push resonant principle and frequency tracking method.The paper also presents the mathematical model and measurement principle of the mass flow meter in detail.%给出了一种建立在驱动模态与科里奥利(coriolis)模态固有频率相等、连续信号处理技术和频率跟踪法基础上的谐振式环形管coriolis质量流量计。在驱动模态与coriolis模态固有频率相等的条件下,当环形管有流体流过时环形管就处于谐振状态,因此具有较高的灵敏度;由于该质量流量计输出信号是连续的,所以可采用连续信号处理技术,得到较高的检测精度;流体密度的检测是采用自激振荡原理和频率跟踪法得到的。文章还详细给出了该质量流量计的数学模型和检测原理。

  16. Line Loss Minimization of Loop Distribution Systems Using UPFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Mahmoud A.; Inayoshi, Nobuyuki; Takeshita, Takaharu; Ueda, Fukashi

    This paper presents an elaborated mathematical analysis of the line loss minimum conditions of loop distribution systems. In order to achieve these conditions, the Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC), a typical Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS) device that is capable of instantaneous control of transmission and distribution power flow, is used. For minimizing the total line loss of the loop distribution system, the authors propose two control schemes, the Line Inductance Compensation control and the Line Voltage Compensation control. These control schemes can be applied for controlling the UPFC in the loop distribution system according to the line parameters. The effectiveness of the proposed control schemes has been verified experimentally using a laboratory prototype in a 200V, 6kVA system.

  17. Computational simulation of flow and heat transfer in single-phase natural circulation loops; Simulacao computacional de escoamento e transferencia de calor em circuitos de circulacao natural monofasica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, Larissa Cunha

    2017-07-01

    Passive decay heat removal systems based on natural circulation are essential assets for the new Gen III+ nuclear power reactors and nuclear spent fuel pools. The aim of the present work is to study both laminar and turbulent flow and heat transfer in single-phase natural circulation systems through computational fluid dynamics simulations. The working fluid is considered to be incompressible with constant properties. In the way, the Boussinesq Natural Convection Hypothesis was applied. The model chosen for the turbulence closure problem was the k -- εThe commercial computational fluid dynamics code ANSYS CFX 15.0 was used to obtain the numerical solution of the governing equations. Two single-phase natural circulation circuits were studied, a 2D toroidal loop and a 3D rectangular loop, both with the same boundary conditions of: prescribed heat flux at the heater and fixed wall temperature at the cooler. The validation and verification was performed with the numerical data provided by DESRAYAUD et al. [1] and the experimental data provided by MISALE et al. [2] and KUMAR et al. [3]. An excellent agreement between the Reynolds number (Re) and the modified Grashof number (Gr{sub m}), independently of Prandtl Pr number was observed. However, the convergence interval was observed to be variable with Pr, thus indicating that Pr is a stability governing parameter for natural circulation. Multiple steady states was obtained for Pr = 0,7. Finally, the effect of inclination was studied for the 3D circuit, both in-plane and out-of-plane inclinations were verified for the steady state laminar regime. As a conclusion, the Re for the out-of-plane inclination was in perfect agreement with the correlation found for the zero inclination system, while for the in-plane inclined system the results differ from that of the corresponding vertical loop. (author)

  18. Experimental investigation of the wake characteristics of flow-powered and motorized laboratory-scale wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Daniel; Dabiri, John

    2013-11-01

    We present experimental data that compares the wake characteristics of a laboratory-scale vertical-axis turbine while it is either powered by the flow or by a DC motor. This distinction is relevant for laboratory experiments in which scale turbine models are used that require the use of a motor to spin the turbine blades. Particle image velocimetry is used to measure the velocity field in a two-dimensional plane normal to the axis of rotation. This velocity field is then used to compare time-averaged streamwise velocity, turbulence kinetic energy, and power of the two configurations. The results give insight into the kinematic effect of adding energy to the flow by way of the motor, and they suggest limits on the extrapolation of laboratory results to full-scale performance. This work was supported by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to D.B.A and funding to J.O.D. from ONR N000141211047.

  19. Effects of Stratification and Flows on P1/P2 Ratios and Anti-Node Shifts within Closed Loop Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Erdélyi, R; Nelson, C J

    2013-01-01

    The solar atmosphere is a dynamic environment, constantly evolving to form a wide range of magnetically dominated structures (coronal loops, spicules, prominences, etc.) which cover a significant percentage of the surface at any one time. Oscillations and waves in many of these structures are now widely observed and have led to the new analytic technique of solar magneto-seismology, where inferences of the background conditions of the plasma can be deduced by studying magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) waves. Here, we generalise a novel magneto-seismological method designed to infer the density distribution of a bounded plasma structure from the relationship of its fundamental and first harmonics. Observations of the solar atmosphere have emphatically shown that stratification, leading to complex density profiles within plasma structures, is common thereby rendering this work instantly accessible to solar physics. We show, in a dynamic waveguide, how the period ratio differs from the idealised harmonic ratios prevale...

  20. [Rapid detection of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus isolated in China by a reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay combined with a lateral flow dipstick method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng; Liu, Li; Hao, Gui-Jie; Cao, Zheng; Sheng, Peng-Cheng; Wu, Ying-Lei; Shen, Jin-Yu

    2014-09-01

    White coloration of the muscle of the giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) is a serious problem in China. The Macrobrachium rosenbergii Nodavirus (MrNV) has been confirmed to be the pathogen that causes this disorder. To develop a rapid, sensitive and specific technology for the detection of Macrobrachium rosenbergii Nodavirus isolated from China (MrNV-China), a reverse-transcription loop- mediated isothermal amplification assay combined with a lateral flow dipstick (RT-LAMP-LFD) assay method is described. A set of four primers and a labeled probe were designed specifically to recognize six distinct regions of the MrNV RNA2 gene. Results showed the sensitivity of the RT-LAMP-LFD assay was ten-times higher than the reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay (RT-LAMP) with agarose gel electrophoresis. The assay was conducted with one-step amplification at 61°C in a single tube within 45 min. No product was generated from shrimps infected with other viruses, including DNA viruses (infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV); white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)) and RNA viruses (Taura syndrome virus (TSV); infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV); yellow head virus (YHV)). Results were visualized by the LFD method. Therefore, the described rapid and sensitive assay is potentially useful for MrNV detection.

  1. Computation of eigenvalue sensitivity to base flow modifications in a discrete framework: Application to open-loop control

    CERN Document Server

    Mettot, Clément; Sipp, Denis

    2014-01-01

    A fully discrete formalism is introduced to perform stability analysis of a turbulent compressible flow whom dynamics is modeled with the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The discrete equations are linearized using finite differences and the Jacobian is computed using repeated evaluation of the residuals. Stability of the flow is assessed solving an eigenvalue problem. The sensitivity gradients which indicate regions of the flow where a passive control device could stabilize the unstable eigenvalues are defined within this fully discrete framework. Second order finite differences are applied to the discrete residual to compute the gradients. In particular, the sensitivity gradients are shown to be linked to the Hessian of the RANS equations. The introduced formalism and linearization method are generic: the code used to evaluate the residual of the RANS equations can be used in a black box manner, and the complex linearization of the Hessian is avoided. The method is tested on a two dimension...

  2. Shaking of pyroclastic cones and the formation of granular flows on their flanks: Results from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnoli, B.; Romano, G. P.; Ventura, G.

    2015-11-01

    We have carried out laboratory experiments to study the generation of granular flows on the slopes of pyroclastic cones that are experiencing volcanic tremor or tectonic earthquakes. These experiments are inspired by the occurrence of granular flows on the flanks of Mount Vesuvius during its 1944 eruption. Our laboratory model consists of sand cones built around a vibrating tube which represents a volcanic conduit with erupting magma inside. A video camera allows the study of the granular flow inception, movement and deposition. Although the collapse of the entire cone is obtained at a specific resonance frequency, single granular flows can be generated by all the vibration frequencies (1-16 Hz) and all the vibration amplitudes (0.5-1.5 mm) that our experimental apparatus has allowed us to adopt. We believe that this is due to the fact that the energy threshold to trigger the flows is small in value. Therefore, if this is true in nature as well, shaken pyroclastic cones are always potentially dangerous because they can easily generate flows that can strike the surrounding areas.

  3. Insight from Laboratory Experiments on the Generation of Granular Flows on the Flanks of Vibrated Pyroclastic Cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnoli, B.; Romano, G. P.; Ventura, G.

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out laboratory experiments to study the generation of granular flows on the slopes of pyroclastic cones that are experiencing volcanic tremor or tectonic earthquakes. These experiments are inspired by the occurrence of granular flows on the flanks of Mount Vesuvius during its 1944 eruption. Our laboratory model consists of sand cones built around a vibrating tube which represents a volcanic conduit with erupting magma inside. A video camera allows the study of the granular flow inception, movement and deposition. Although the collapse of the entire cone is obtained at a specific resonance frequency, individual granular flows can be generated by all the vibration frequencies and all the vibration amplitudes that our experimental apparatus has allowed us to adopt. We believe that this is due to the fact that the energy threshold to generate the flows is small in value. Therefore, if this is true in nature as well, shaken pyroclastic cones are always potentially dangerous because they can easily generate flows that can strike the surrounding areas.

  4. Laboratory model study of the effect of aeration on axial velocity attenuation of turbulent jet flows in plunge pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓军; 张法星; 田忠; 许唯临; 刘斌; 卫望汝

    2015-01-01

    In the laboratory model experiment, the velocities of the jet flow along the axis are measured, using the CQY−Z8a velocity-meter. The velocity attenuations of the jet flow along the axis under different conditions are studied. The effects of the aeration concentration, the initial jet velocity at the entry and the thickness of the jet flow on the velocity attenuation of the jet flow are analyzed. It is seen that the velocity attenuation of the jet flow along the axis sees a regular variation. It is demonstrated by the test results that under the experimental conditions, the velocity along the axis decreases linearly. The higher the air concentration is, the faster the velocity will be decayed. The absolute value of the slopeK increases with the rise of the air concentration. The relationship can be defined as=a+bKACK. The coefficientA is 0.03 under the experimental conditions. With the low air concentration of the jet flow, the thinner the jet flow is, the faster the velocity will be decayed. With the increase of the air concentra- tion, the influence of the thickness of the jet flow on the velocity attenuation is reduced. When the air concentration is increased to a certain value, the thickness of the jet flow may not have any influence on the velocity attenuation. The initial jet velocity itself at the entry has no influence on the variation of the velocity attenuation as the curves of the velocity attenuation at different velocities at the entry are practically parallel, even coinciding one with another. Therefore, improving the air concentration of the jet flow and disper- sing the jet flow in the plunge pool could reduce the influence of the jet flow on the scour.

  5. Effect of adrenergic agonists on coronary blood flow: a laboratory study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Pelaez, Alvaro F; Gao, Zhaohui; Ahmad, Tariq A; Leuenberger, Urs A; Proctor, David N; Maman, Stephan R; Muller, Matthew D

    2016-05-01

    Myocardial oxygen supply and demand mismatch is fundamental to the pathophysiology of ischemia and infarction. The sympathetic nervous system, through α-adrenergic receptors and β-adrenergic receptors, influences both myocardial oxygen supply and demand. In animal models, mechanistic studies have established that adrenergic receptors contribute to coronary vascular tone. The purpose of this laboratory study was to noninvasively quantify coronary responses to adrenergic receptor stimulation in humans. Fourteen healthy volunteers (11 men and 3 women) performed isometric handgrip exercise to fatigue followed by intravenous infusion of isoproterenol. A subset of individuals also received infusions of phenylephrine (n = 6), terbutaline (n = 10), and epinephrine (n = 4); all dosages were based on fat-free mass and were infused slowly to achieve steady-state. The left anterior descending coronary artery was visualized using Doppler echocardiography. Beat-by-beat heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), peak diastolic coronary velocity (CBVpeak), and coronary velocity time integral were calculated. Data are presented as M ± SD Isometric handgrip elicited significant increases in BP, HR, and CBVpeak (from 23.3 ± 5.3 to 34.5 ± 9.9 cm/sec). Isoproterenol raised HR and CBVpeak (from 22.6 ± 4.8 to 43.9 ± 12.4 cm/sec). Terbutaline and epinephrine evoked coronary hyperemia whereas phenylephrine did not significantly alter CBVpeak. Different indices of coronary hyperemia (changes in CBVpeak and velocity time integral) were significantly correlated (R = 0.803). The current data indicate that coronary hyperemia occurs in healthy humans in response to isometric handgrip exercise and low-dose, steady-state infusions of isoproterenol, terbutaline, and epinephrine. The contribution of β1 versus β2 receptors to coronary hyperemia remains to be determined. In this echocardiographic study, we demonstrate that coronary blood flow increases when

  6. Laboratory flow experiments for visualizing carbon dioxide-induced, density-driven brine convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.; Pruess, K.

    2009-09-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers confined by low-permeability cap rock will result in a layer of CO{sub 2} overlying the brine. Dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the brine increases the brine density, resulting in an unstable situation in which more-dense brine overlies less-dense brine. This gravitational instability could give rise to density-driven convection of the fluid, which is a favorable process of practical interest for CO{sub 2} storage security because it accelerates the transfer of buoyant CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase, where it is no longer subject to an upward buoyant drive. Laboratory flow visualization tests in transparent Hele-Shaw cells have been performed to elucidate the processes and rates of this CO{sub 2} solute-driven convection (CSC). Upon introduction of CO{sub 2} into the system, a layer of CO{sub 2}-laden brine forms at the CO{sub 2}-water interface. Subsequently, small convective fingers form, which coalesce, broaden, and penetrate into the test cell. Images and time-series data of finger lengths and wavelengths are presented. Observed CO{sub 2} uptake of the convection system indicates that the CO{sub 2} dissolution rate is approximately constant for each test and is far greater than expected for a diffusion-only scenario. Numerical simulations of our system show good agreement with the experiments for onset time of convection and advancement of convective fingers. There are differences as well, the most prominent being the absence of cell-scale convection in the numerical simulations. This cell-scale convection observed in the experiments is probably initiated by a small temperature gradient induced by the cell illumination.

  7. Mercury Thermal Hydraulic Loop (MTHL) Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felde, David K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Crye, Jason Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wendel, Mark W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Farquharson, George [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jallouk, Philip A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McFee, Marshall T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pointer, William David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ruggles, Art E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high-power linear accelerator built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) which incorporates the use of a flowing liquid mercury target. The Mercury Thermal Hydraulic Loop (MTHL) was constructed to investigate and verify the heat transfer characteristics of liquid mercury in a rectangular channel. This report provides a compilation of previously reported results from the water-cooled and electrically heated straight and curved test sections that simulate the geometry of the window cooling channel in the target nose region.

  8. The influence of slope-angle ratio on the dynamics of granular flows: insights from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulpizio, R.; Castioni, D.; Rodriguez-Sedano, L. A.; Sarocchi, D.; Lucchi, F.

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory experiments on granular flows using natural material were carried out in order to investigate the behaviour of granular flows passing over a break in slope. Sensors in the depositional area recorded the flow kinematics, while video footage permitted reconstruction of the deposit formation, which allowed investigation of the deposit shape as a function of the change in slope. We defined the slope-angle ratio as the proportion between slope angle in the depositional area and that of the channel. When the granular flow encounters the break in slope part of the flow front forms a bouncing clast zone due to elastic impact with the expansion box floor. During this process, part of the kinetic energy of the dense granular flow is transferred to elutriating fine ash, which subsequently forms turbulent ash cloud accompanying the granular flow until it comes to rest. Morphometric analysis of the deposits shows that they are all elliptical, with an almost constant minor axis and a variable major axis. The almost constant value of the minor axis relates to the spreading angle of flow at the end of the channel, which resembles the basal friction angle of the material. The variation of the major axis is interpreted to relate to the effect of competing inertial and frictional forces. This effect also reflects the partitioning of centripetal and tangential velocities, which changes as the flow passes over the break in slope. After normalization, morphometric data provided empirical relationships that highlight the dependence of runout from the product of slope-angle ratio and the difference in height between granular material release and deposit. The empirical relationships were tested against the runouts of hot avalanches formed during the 1944 ad eruption at Vesuvius, with differences among actual and calculated values are between 1.7 and 15 %. Velocity measurements of laboratory granular flows record deceleration paths at different breaks in slope. When normalized

  9. Development of multiplex loop mediated isothermal amplification (m-LAMP) label-based gold nanoparticles lateral flow dipstick biosensor for detection of pathogenic Leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurul Najian, A B; Engku Nur Syafirah, E A R; Ismail, Nabilah; Mohamed, Maizan; Yean, Chan Yean

    2016-01-15

    In recent years extensive numbers of molecular diagnostic methods have been developed to meet the need of point-of-care devices. Efforts have been made towards producing rapid, simple and inexpensive DNA tests, especially in the diagnostics field. We report on the development of a label-based lateral flow dipstick for the rapid and simple detection of multiplex loop-mediated isothermal amplification (m-LAMP) amplicons. A label-based m-LAMP lateral flow dipstick assay was developed for the simultaneous detection of target DNA template and a LAMP internal control. This biosensor operates through a label based system, in which probe-hybridization and the additional incubation step are eliminated. We demonstrated this m-LAMP assay by detecting pathogenic Leptospira, which causes the re-emerging disease Leptospirosis. The lateral flow dipstick was developed to detect of three targets, the LAMP target amplicon, the LAMP internal control amplicon and a chromatography control. Three lines appeared on the dipstick, indicating positive results for all representative pathogenic Leptospira species, whereas two lines appeared, indicating negative results, for other bacterial species. The specificity of this biosensor assay was 100% when it was tested with 13 representative pathogenic Leptospira species, 2 intermediate Leptospira species, 1 non-pathogenic Leptospira species and 28 other bacteria species. This study found that this DNA biosensor was able to detect DNA at concentrations as low as 3.95 × 10(-1) genomic equivalent ml(-1). An integrated m-LAMP and label-based lateral flow dipstick was successfully developed, promising simple and rapid visual detection in clinical diagnostics and serving as a point-of-care device.

  10. Development of multiplex loop mediated isothermal amplification (m-LAMP) label-based gold nanoparticles lateral flow dipstick biosensor for detection of pathogenic Leptospira

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurul Najian, A.B.; Engku Nur Syafirah, E.A.R.; Ismail, Nabilah [Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, School of Medical Sciences, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia); Mohamed, Maizan [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Malaysia Kelantan, City Campus, Pengkalan Chepa, Locked Bag 36, 16100 Kota Bharu, Kelantan (Malaysia); Yean, Chan Yean, E-mail: yeancyn@yahoo.com [Department of Medical Microbiology & Parasitology, School of Medical Sciences, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia); Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine (INFORMM), Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia)

    2016-01-15

    In recent years extensive numbers of molecular diagnostic methods have been developed to meet the need of point-of-care devices. Efforts have been made towards producing rapid, simple and inexpensive DNA tests, especially in the diagnostics field. We report on the development of a label-based lateral flow dipstick for the rapid and simple detection of multiplex loop-mediated isothermal amplification (m-LAMP) amplicons. A label-based m-LAMP lateral flow dipstick assay was developed for the simultaneous detection of target DNA template and a LAMP internal control. This biosensor operates through a label based system, in which probe-hybridization and the additional incubation step are eliminated. We demonstrated this m-LAMP assay by detecting pathogenic Leptospira, which causes the re-emerging disease Leptospirosis. The lateral flow dipstick was developed to detect of three targets, the LAMP target amplicon, the LAMP internal control amplicon and a chromatography control. Three lines appeared on the dipstick, indicating positive results for all representative pathogenic Leptospira species, whereas two lines appeared, indicating negative results, for other bacterial species. The specificity of this biosensor assay was 100% when it was tested with 13 representative pathogenic Leptospira species, 2 intermediate Leptospira species, 1 non-pathogenic Leptospira species and 28 other bacteria species. This study found that this DNA biosensor was able to detect DNA at concentrations as low as 3.95 × 10{sup −1} genomic equivalent ml{sup −1}. An integrated m-LAMP and label-based lateral flow dipstick was successfully developed, promising simple and rapid visual detection in clinical diagnostics and serving as a point-of-care device. - Highlights: • We develop multiplex LAMP label-based lateral flow dipstick biosensor for detection of pathogenic Leptospira. • We design primers for multiplex LAMP targeting the conserved LipL32 gene of pathogenic Leptospira and LAMP

  11. Effects of debris flow composition on runout, depositional mechanisms, and deposit morphology in laboratory experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, Tjalling; Braat, Lisanne; Leuven, Jasper R F W; Lokhorst, Ivar R.; Kleinhans, Maarten G.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting debris flow runout is of major importance for hazard mitigation. Apart from topography and volume, runout distance and area depends on debris flow composition and rheology, but how is poorly understood. We experimentally investigated effects of composition on debris flow runout, depositio

  12. Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

    2009-01-07

    For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2

  13. Pooled comparison of regadenoson versus adenosine for measuring fractional flow reserve and coronary flow in the catheterization laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolker, Joshua M., E-mail: jstolker@yahoo.com [Mercy Heart and Vascular, 901 Patients First Drive, Washington, MO 63090 (United States); Saint Louis University, 3635 Vista Ave, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Lim, Michael J., E-mail: limmj@slu.edu [Saint Louis University, 3635 Vista Ave, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Shavelle, David M., E-mail: david.shavelle@med.usc.edu [University of Southern California, 1510 San Pablo St, Suite 322, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Morris, D. Lynn, E-mail: morrisdl@einstein.edu [Albert Einstein Medical Center, 5501 Old York Rd, Philadelphia, PA 19141 (United States); Angiolillo, Dominick J., E-mail: dominick.angiolillo@jax.ufl.edu [University of Florida Health-Jacksonville, 655 West 8th St, Jacksonville, FL 32209 (United States); Guzman, Luis A., E-mail: luis.guzman@jax.ufl.edu [University of Florida Health-Jacksonville, 655 West 8th St, Jacksonville, FL 32209 (United States); Kennedy, Kevin F., E-mail: kfkennedy@saint-lukes.org [Saint Luke' s Mid America Heart Institute, 4401 Wornall Road, Kansas City, MO 64111 (United States); Weber, Elizabeth, E-mail: eweber1@slu.edu [Saint Louis University, 3635 Vista Ave, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Zareh, Meena, E-mail: meena.zareh@med.usc.edu [University of Southern California, 1510 San Pablo St, Suite 322, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Neumayr, Robert H., E-mail: robneumayr@gmail.com [Mercy Heart and Vascular, 901 Patients First Drive, Washington, MO 63090 (United States); Saint Louis University, 3635 Vista Ave, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Zenni, Martin M., E-mail: martin.zenni@jax.ufl.edu [University of Florida Health-Jacksonville, 655 West 8th St, Jacksonville, FL 32209 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Background: Adenosine is the gold standard for augmenting coronary flow during fractional flow reserve (FFR) testing of intermediate coronary stenoses. However, intravenous infusion is time-consuming and intracoronary injection is subject to variability. Regadenoson is a newer adenosine alternative administered as a single intravenous bolus during nuclear stress testing, but its efficacy and safety during FFR testing have been evaluated only in small, single-center studies. Methods: We pooled data from 5 academic hospitals, in which patients undergoing clinically-indicated FFR prospectively underwent comparison of intravenous adenosine infusion (140–175 mcg/kg/min) versus regadenoson bolus (400 mcg). Hemodynamics and symptoms with adenosine were recorded until maximal hyperemia occurred, and after returning to baseline hemodynamics, regadenoson was administered and monitoring was repeated. In a subset of patients with coronary flow data, average peak velocity (APV) at the distal flow sensor was recorded. Results: Of 149 patients enrolled, mean age was 59 ± 9 years, 76% were male, and 54% underwent testing of the left anterior descending artery. Mean adenosine-FFR and regadenoson-FFR were identical (0.82 ± 0.10) with excellent correlation of individual values (r = 0.96, p < 0.001) and no difference in patient-reported symptoms. Four patients (2.6%) had discrepancies between the 2 drugs for the clinical decision-making cutoff of FFR ≤ 0.80. Coronary flow responses to adenosine and regadenoson were similar (APV at maximal hyperemia 36 cm/s for both, p = 0.81). Conclusions: Regadenoson single-bolus administration has comparable FFR, symptoms, and coronary flow augmentation when compared with standard intravenous adenosine infusion. With its greater ease of administration, regadenoson may be a more “user-friendly” option for invasive ischemic testing.

  14. Validation of computational fluid dynamics calculation using Rossendorf coolant mixing model flow measurements in primary loop of coolant in a pressurized water reactor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, Istvan; Hutli, Ezddin; Faekas, Tatiana; Takacs, Antal; Guba, Attila; Toth, Ivan [Dept. of Thermohydraulics, Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

    2016-08-15

    The aim of this work is to simulate the thermohydraulic consequences of a main steam line break and to compare the obtained results with Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model (ROCOM) 1.1 experimental results. The objective is to utilize data from steady-state mixing experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations to determine the flow distribution and the effect of thermal mixing phenomena in the primary loops for the improvement of normal operation conditions and structural integrity assessment of pressurized water reactors. The numerical model of ROCOM was developed using the FLUENT code. The positions of the inlet and outlet boundary conditions and the distribution of detailed velocity/turbulence parameters were determined by preliminary calculations. The temperature fields of transient calculation were averaged in time and compared with time-averaged experimental data. The perforated barrel under the core inlet homogenizes the flow, and therefore, a uniform temperature distribution is formed in the pressure vessel bottom. The calculated and measured values of lowest temperature were equal. The inlet temperature is an essential parameter for safety assessment. The calculation predicts precisely the experimental results at the core inlet central region. CFD results showed a good agreement (both qualitatively and quantitatively) with experimental results.

  15. An integrated rotary microfluidic system with DNA extraction, loop-mediated isothermal amplification, and lateral flow strip based detection for point-of-care pathogen diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byung Hyun; Oh, Seung Jun; Jung, Jae Hwan; Choi, Goro; Seo, Ji Hyun; Kim, Do Hyun; Lee, Eun Yeol; Seo, Tae Seok

    2017-05-15

    Point-of-care (POC) molecular diagnostics plays a pivotal role for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. In spite of recent advancement in microfluidic based POC devices, there are still rooms for development to realize rapid, automatic and cost-effective sample-to-result genetic analysis. In this study, we propose an integrated rotary microfluidic system that is capable of performing glass microbead based DNA extraction, loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), and colorimetric lateral flow strip based detection in a sequential manner with an optimized microfluidic design and a rotational speed control. Rotation direction-dependent coriolis force and siphon valving structures enable us to perform the fluidic control and metering, and the use of the lateral flow strip as a detection method renders all the analytical processes for nucleic acid test simplified and integrated without the need of expensive instruments or human intervention. As a proof of concept for point-of-care DNA diagnostics, we identified the food-borne bacterial pathogen which was contaminated in water or milk. Not only monoplex Salmonella Typhimurium but also multiplex Salmonella Typhimurium and Vibrio parahaemolyticus were analysed on the integrated rotary genetic analysis microsystem with a limit of detection of 50 CFU in 80min. In addition, three multiple samples were simultaneously analysed on a single device. The sample-to-result capability of the proposed microdevice provides great usefulness in the fields of clinical diagnostics, food safety and environment monitoring.

  16. MHD interaction in an Electromagnetic Pump for high flow rate loop of ASTRID Sodium Fast Reactor secondary circuit -performances

    OpenAIRE

    Letout, S; Duterrail, Y; Fautrelle, Y; Medina, M. , il.; Rey, F.; Laffont, G.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The present paper deals with the analysis of the performances of a very large Annular Linear Induction Pumps (ALIP) for liquid sodium. This pump is able to provide high flow rates (more than 7,000 m3.h-1 with a pressure discharge of about 3.7 bar). Dimensions of pumping channel under the active part are of an average diameter of 966 mm and a length of 4,500 mm. It’s a double sided inductor pump. On the base of an imposed 2D axisymmetric geometry, performances (discharg...

  17. MHD interaction in an Electromagnetic Pump for high flow rate loop of ASTRID Sodium Fast Reactor secondary circuit, behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Letout, S; Duterrail, Y; Fautrelle, Y; Medina, M. , il.; Rey, F.; Laffont, G.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The present paper deals with the analysis of the behaviour of a very large Annular Linear Induction Pumps (ALIP) for liquid sodium. This pump is able to provide high flow rates (more than 7,000 m3/h with a pressure discharge of about 3.7 bar). Dimensions of pumping channel under the active part are of an average diameter of 966 mm and a length of 4,500 mm. The global and local stability of the pump are analyzed. It is found that in the nominal conditions, stable operat...

  18. A Methodology for the Optimization of Flow Rate Injection to Looped Water Distribution Networks through Multiple Pumping Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian León-Celi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The optimal function of a water distribution network is reached when the consumer demands are satisfied using the lowest quantity of energy, maintaining the minimal pressure required at the same time. One way to achieve this is through optimization of flow rate injection based on the use of the setpoint curve concept. In order to obtain that, a methodology is proposed. It allows for the assessment of the flow rate and pressure head that each pumping station has to provide for the proper functioning of the network while the minimum power consumption is kept. The methodology can be addressed in two ways: the discrete method and the continuous method. In the first method, a finite set of combinations is evaluated between pumping stations. In the continuous method, the search for the optimal solution is performed using optimization algorithms. In this paper, Hooke–Jeeves and Nelder–Mead algorithms are used. Both the hydraulics and the objective function used by the optimization are solved through EPANET and its Toolkit. Two case studies are evaluated, and the results of the application of the different methods are discussed.

  19. Testing the limits of quasi-geostrophic theory: application to observed laboratory flows outside the quasi-geostrophic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paul; Read, Peter; Haine, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    We compare laboratory observations of equilibrated baroclinic waves in the rotating two-layer annulus, with numerical simulations from a quasi-geostrophic model. The laboratory experiments lie well outside the quasi-geostrophic regime: the Rossby number reaches unity; the depth-to-width aspect ratio is large; and the fluid contains ageostrophic inertia-gravity waves. Despite being formally inapplicable, the quasi-geostrophic model captures the laboratory flows reasonably well. The model displays several systematic biases, which are consequences of its treatment of boundary layers and neglect of interfacial surface tension, and which may be explained without invoking the dynamical effects of the moderate Rossby number, large aspect ratio or inertia-gravity waves. We conclude that quasi-geostrophic theory appears to continue to apply well outside its formal bounds. This is an unexpected and intriguing result that could not have been predicted from the existing literature. It is also potentially useful, for example by permitting the use of a low-order quasi-geostrophic model to easily map out the bifurcation structure - which would be very difficult with a primitive equations model - followed by the use of a primitive equations model for more quantitative agreement in specific cases. Reference Williams, PD, PL Read and TWN Haine (2010) Testing the limits of quasi-geostrophic theory: application to observed laboratory flows outside the quasi-geostrophic regime. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, in press.

  20. Thermal Interface Evaluation of Heat Transfer from a Pumped Loop to Titanium-Water Thermosyphons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Sanzi, James L.; Gibson, Marc A.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium-water thermosyphons are being considered for use in the heat rejection system for lunar outpost fission surface power. Key to their use is heat transfer between a closed loop heat source and the heat pipe evaporators. This work describes laboratory testing of several interfaces that were evaluated for their thermal performance characteristics, in the temperature range of 350 to 400 K, utilizing a water closed loop heat source and multiple thermosyphon evaporator geometries. A gas gap calorimeter was used to measure heat flow at steady state. Thermocouples in the closed loop heat source and on the evaporator were used to measure thermal conductance. The interfaces were in two generic categories, those immersed in the water closed loop heat source and those clamped to the water closed loop heat source with differing thermal conductive agents. In general, immersed evaporators showed better overall performance than their clamped counterparts. Selected clamped evaporator geometries offered promise.

  1. Neural network setpoint control of an advanced test reactor experiment loop simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, G.A.; Bryan, S.R.; Powell, R.H.; Chick, D.R.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the design, implementation, and application of artificial neural networks to achieve temperature and flow rate control for a simulation of a typical experiment loop in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The goal of the project was to research multivariate, nonlinear control using neural networks. A loop simulation code was adapted for the project and used to create a training set and test the neural network controller for comparison with the existing loop controllers. The results for three neural network designs are documented and compared with existing loop controller action. The neural network was shown to be as accurate at loop control as the classical controllers in the operating region represented by the training set. 9 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. CURRENT STATUS OF INSTRUMENTATION FOR A FLUORIDE SALT HEAT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION LOOP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    A small forced convection liquid fluoride salt loop is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to examine the heat transfer behavior of FLiNaK in a heated pebble bed. Loop operation serves several purposes: (1) reestablishing the infrastructure necessary for fluoride salt loop testing, (2) demonstrating a wireless heating technique for simulating pebble type fuel, (3) demonstration of the integration of silicon carbide (SiC) and metallic components into a liquid salt loop, and (4) demonstration of the functionality of distinctive instrumentation required for liquid fluoride salts. Loop operation requires measurement of a broad set of process variables including temperature, flow, pressure, and level. Coolant chemistry measurements (as a corrosion indicator) and component health monitoring are also important for longer-term operation. Two dominating factors in sensor and instrument selection are the high operating temperature of the salt and its chemical environment.

  3. Inlet throttling effect on the boiling two-phase flow stability in a natural circulation loop with a chimney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, M.; Inada, F.; Yasuo, A.

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate an effect of inlet restriction on the thermal-hydraulic stability. A Test facility used in this study was designed and constructed to have non-dimensional values that are nearly equal to those of natural circulation BWR. Experimental results showed that driving force of the natural circulation at the stability boundary was described as a function of heat flux and inlet subcooling independent of inlet restriction. In order to extend experimental database regarding thermal-hydraulic stability to different inlet restriction, numerical analysis was carried out based on the homogeneous flow model. Stability maps in reference to the core inlet subcooling and heat flux were presented for various inlet restrictions using the above-mentioned function. Instability region during the inlet subcooling shifted to the higher inlet subcooling with increasing inlet restriction and became larger with increasing heat flux.

  4. Laboratory analysis of fluid flow and solute transport through a variably saturated fracture embedded in porous tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Y.; Haldeman, W.R.; Rasmussen, T.C.; Evans, D.D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources

    1990-02-01

    Laboratory techniques are developed that allow concurrent measurement of unsaturated matrix hydraulic conductivity and fracture transmissivity of fractured rock blocks. Two Apache Leap tuff blocks with natural fractures were removed from near Superior, Arizona, shaped into rectangular prisms, and instrumented in the laboratory. Porous ceramic plates provided solution to block tops at regulated pressures. Infiltration tests were performed on both test blocks. Steady flow testing of the saturated first block provided estimates of matrix hydraulic conductivity and fracture transmissivity. Fifteen centimeters of suction applied to the second block top showed that fracture flow was minimal and matrix hydraulic conductivity was an order of magnitude less than the first block saturated matrix conductivity. Coated-wire ion-selective electrodes monitored aqueous chlorided breakthrough concentrations. Minute samples of tracer solution were collected with filter paper. The techniques worked well for studying transport behavior at near-saturated flow conditions and also appear to be promising for unsaturated conditions. Breakthrough curves in the fracture and matrix, and a concentration map of chloride concentrations within the fracture, suggest preferential flows paths in the fracture and substantial diffusion into the matrix. Average travel velocity, dispersion coefficient and longitudinal dispersivity in the fracture are obtained. 67 refs., 54 figs., 23 tabs.

  5. Density- and viscosity-stratified gravity currents: Insight from laboratory experiments and implications for submarine flow deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy, L. A.; Peakall, J.; Talling, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Vertical stratification of particle concentration is a common if not ubiquitous feature of submarine particulate gravity flows. To investigate the control of stratification on current behaviour, analogue stratified flows were studied using laboratory experiments. Stratified density currents were generated by releasing two-layer glycerol solutions into a tank of water. Flows were sustained for periods of tens of seconds and their velocity and concentration measured. In a set of experiments the strength of the initial density and viscosity stratification was increased by progressively varying the lower-layer concentration, CL. Two types of current were observed indicating two regimes of behaviour. Currents with a faster-moving high-concentration basal region that outran the upper layer were produced if CL < 75%. Above this critical value of CL, currents were formed with a relatively slow, high-concentration base that lagged behind the flow front. The observed transition in behaviour is interpreted to indicate a change from inertia- to viscosity-dominated flow with increasing concentration. The reduction in lower-layer velocity at high concentrations is explained by enhanced drag at low Reynolds numbers. Results show that vertical stratification produces longitudinal stratification in the currents. Furthermore, different vertical and temporal velocity and concentration profiles characterise the observed flow types. Implications for the deposit character of particle-laden currents are discussed and illustrated using examples from ancient turbidite systems.

  6. Dynamics of nitrogen transformation depending on different operational strategies in laboratory-scale tidal flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yongjiang; Wu, Shubiao; Zhang, Tao; Mazur, Robert; Pang, Changle; Dong, Renjie

    2014-07-15

    The influence of different flooded/drained (F/D) time ratios and different effluent flow rates on the dynamics of nitrogen transformations in three laboratory-scale tidal flow constructed wetland systems (TFCWs-A, B, and C) under varying NH4(+)-N and COD influent loadings was investigated in this study. Good organic matter removal performance up to 90% was achieved for all experimental TFCWs under inflow concentrations of 300 and 150 mg/L regardless of F/D and effluent flow rate. The ammonium removal efficiency of wetland with F/D=3h:3h (55%) was higher than that of the wetland with F/D=5h:1h (47%) under an ammonium inflow concentration of 60 mg/L, indicating the positive effect of longer drained and shorter flooded time on tidal-operated wetlands under nitrification. In addition, more uniform oxygen distribution and better nitrification capacity within the wetland might be achieved with a relatively slow effluent flow rate of 0.025 L/s. TFCWs were shown to be a robust and reliable option to achieve high TN removal of 70% due to its repeated cycle of "wet" and "dry" periods, particularly for the treatment of wastewater with high organic content. Moreover, F/D and effluent flow rates of tidal flow constructed wetlands exhibited no significant effect on phosphorus removal in this study. Other techniques, such as pretreatment or post treatment, require further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fingering in unsaturated zone flow: a qualitative review with laboratory experiments on heterogeneous systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sililo, OTN

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available of flow will be greatest where the fine-grained layer is thinnest; (5) surface depressions in an upper fine-grained layer will concentrate flow, with fingers forming below such areas; and (6) in systems where an upper fine-grained layer has macro pores...

  8. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed layer in flow over complex terrain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the...

  9. Investigations of pulsed heat loads on a forced flow supercritical helium loop. Part B: Simulation of the cryogenic circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallcorba, R.; Hitz, D.; Rousset, B.; Lagier, B.; Hoa, C.

    2012-07-01

    The VINCENTA software is applied to model the transient thermal-hydraulic flow of the HELIOS supercritical helium circuit. This cryogenic circuit is equipped with dedicated heating to simulate pulsed heat loads - See Part A for the description of the experimental set up. Currently, one of the main important problems to be solved is the control and smoothing of heat pulses in the cryogenic circuit to keep the refrigerator in stable operation. In this context, the aim of the present development is to get a predictive model for the experimental management of overall heat loads absorbed by the refrigerator as well as to better understand the associated physical phenomena. This preliminary model is validated with early experiments performed with the HELIOS test facility which is dedicated to simulate representative pulsed loads related to the Japanese tokamak JT60-SA. This article presents the first comparison between model and experiments for two JT60-SA relevant scaled down pulses: (20 s/600 s-1000 W) and (60 s/1800 s-750 W).

  10. FLOW RESISTANCE THROUGH HORIZONTAL ORIFICE OF LOOP SEAL WITH SIDE AERATION AIR%有侧吹风环流料封阀水平孔口流动阻力特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王擎; 孙东红; 孙键; 骆仲泱; 岑可法; 秦裕琨

    2000-01-01

    By using a cold CFB model, the effect of horizontal orifice areas of Loop Seal with side aeration air on operational property was studied in detail.The results showed that the horizontal orifice area had a great effect on its stable operation and regulation of the recirculation rate.Under a certain range of the horizontal orifice area,the stable flow of solid particles through Loop Seal could be obtained and recirculation rate of solid particles could be well regulated and controlled through changing external aeration.The flow resistance properties across the horizontal orifice were given and an empirical equation of the pressure drop of horizontal orifice and solid circulating flow rate was proposed and a new orifice discharge coefficient was defined.The expression's were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. A laboratory model of the aortic root flow including the coronary arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querzoli, Giorgio; Fortini, Stefania; Espa, Stefania; Melchionna, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular flows have been extensively investigated by means of in vitro models to assess the prosthetic valve performances and to provide insight into the fluid dynamics of the heart and proximal aorta. In particular, the models for the study of the flow past the aortic valve have been continuously improved by including, among other things, the compliance of the vessel and more realistic geometries. The flow within the sinuses of Valsalva is known to play a fundamental role in the dynamics of the aortic valve since they host a recirculation region that interacts with the leaflets. The coronary arteries originate from the ostia located within two of the three sinuses, and their presence may significantly affect the fluid dynamics of the aortic root. In spite of their importance, to the extent of the authors' knowledge, coronary arteries were not included so far when modeling in vitro the transvalvular aortic flow. We present a pulse duplicator consisting of a passively pulsing ventricle, a compliant proximal aorta, and coronary arteries connected to the sinuses of Valsalva. The coronary flow is modulated by a self-regulating device mimicking the physiological mechanism, which is based on the contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle during the cardiac cycle. Results show that the model reproduces satisfyingly the coronary flow. The analysis of the time evolution of the velocity and vorticity fields within the aortic root reveals the main characteristics of the backflow generated through the aorta in order to feed the coronaries during the diastole. Experiments without coronary flow have been run for comparison. Interestingly, the lifetime of the vortex forming in the sinus of Valsalva during the systole is reduced by the presence of the coronaries. As a matter of fact, at the end of the systole, that vortex is washed out because of the suction generated by the coronary flow. Correspondingly, the valve closure is delayed and faster compared to the case with

  12. Flow mixing model of liquid phase in an internal airlift loop reactor%气升式内环流反应器的液相流动混合模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂大仕; 沈文豪; 刘群姣; 张震宇; 王欣

    2006-01-01

    Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis of liquid phase was conducted in an internal airlift loop reactor (AL) and a bubble column (BC) with the tracer response technique. These data were simulated and compared through several flow mixing models. The modeling results of two-parameter model indicated that there were higher ratio of full mixing zones and lower ratio of bypass flow in AL than in BC. Then a completely mixed-plug flow parallel combined (four-parameter) model was established. Modeling results show that it is more precise and more obvious than two-parameter model.

  13. Formation of Al2O3/FeAl coatings on a 9Cr-1Mo steel, and corrosion evaluation in flowing Pb-17Li loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Sanjib; Paul, Bhaskar; Chakraborty, Poulami; Kishor, Jugal; Kain, Vivekanand; Dey, Gautam Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Iron aluminide coating layers were formed on a ferritic martensitic grade 9Cr-1Mo (P 91) steel using pack aluminizing process. The formation of different aluminide compositions such as orthorhombic-Fe2Al5, B2-FeAl and A2-Fe(Al) on the pack chemistry and heat treatment conditions have been established. About 4-6 μm thick Al2O3 scale was formed on the FeAl phase by controlled heat treatment. The corrosion tests were conducted using both the FeAl and Al2O3/FeAl coated specimens in an electro-magnetic pump driven Pb-17Li Loop at 500 °C for 5000 h maintaining a flow velocity of 1.5 m/s. The detailed characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy, back-scattered electron imaging and energy dispersive spectrometry revealed no deterioration of the coating layers after the corrosion tests. Self-healing oxides were formed at the cracks generated in the aluminide layers during thermal cycling and protected the base alloy (steel) from any kind of elemental dissolution or microstructural degradation.

  14. Rapid and simple detection of Japanese encephalitis virus by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a lateral flow dipstick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jieru; Pei, Jingjing; Gou, Hongchao; Ye, Zuodong; Liu, Cuicui; Chen, Jinding

    2015-03-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a major cause of viral encephalitis in geographical areas, such as Asia and Western Pacific, where it is a threat to human and animal health. To control this disease, it is necessary to develop a rapid, simple, accurate method for diagnosis. In this study, a method based on reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) coupled with a lateral flow dipstick (LFD) has been developed to detect JEV (JEV RT-LAMP-LFD). The entire assay can be completed within 70 min, and in this study, no false positive results were observed when other pathogens were tested, indicating that the assay is a highly specific method for the detection of JEV. Additionally, the sensitivity of the RT-LAMP-LFD assay for SA14-14-2 strain was 50 pg of RNA, which was similar to that of RT-PCR and RT-LAMP combined with gel electrophoresis, and was 10-fold more sensitive than RT-LAMP combined with calcein. The limit of detection for this assay was 5 pg of RNA. In addition, no false positive results were obtained with 14 serum samples. Our results indicate that this RT-LAMP-LFD assay will be of great value for JEV infection testing due to its rapid and highly specific and sensitive properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation of numerical model of a liquid flow in a tundish by laboratory measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Merder

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of physical and numerical modelling of steel flow through a tundish of continuous casting machine. In numerical calculations the influence of mesh density was tested and the correctness of the flow description in the near-wall region was checked using Standard Wall Function model. Obtained results were verified using experimental results of velocity field (PIV method coming from a water tundish model.

  16. Laboratory and Field Observations of Microcystis aeruginosa in nearly homogeneous turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Anne; Hondzo, Miki; Guala, Michele

    2015-11-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa is a single-celled cyanobacterium, forming large colonies on the surface of freshwater ecosystems during summer, and producing a toxin (microcystin) that in high concentration can be harmful to humans and animals. In addition to water temperature, light and nutrient abundance, fluid motion is also an abiotic environmental factor affecting the growth and metabolism of Microcystis. Systematic investigations in a laboratory bioreactor are paired with field measurements in the lacustrine photic zone from two sites in Lake Minnetonka (MN) to ensure that dissipation levels, water temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH are correctly reproduced under laboratory conditions. Laboratory results for biomass accrual and photosynthetic activity suggest that turbulence levels within the range observed in the field, mediates the metabolism, rather than the cell population growth, of Microcystis aeruginosa. This work was supported by the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and University of Minnesota start-up funding.

  17. Evidence of non-Darcy flow and non-Fickian transport in fractured media at laboratory scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cherubini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During a risk assessment procedure as well as when dealing with cleanup and monitoring strategies, accurate predictions of solute propagation in fractured rocks are of particular importance when assessing exposure pathways through which contaminants reach receptors. Experimental data obtained under controlled conditions such as in a laboratory allow to increase the understanding of the fundamental physics of fluid flow and solute transport in fractures. In this study, laboratory hydraulic and tracer tests have been carried out on an artificially created fractured rock sample. The tests regard the analysis of the hydraulic loss and the measurement of breakthrough curves for saline tracer pulse inside a rock sample of parallelepiped shape (0.60 × 0.40 × 0.08 m. The convolution theory has been applied in order to remove the effect of the acquisition apparatus on tracer experiments. The experimental results have shown evidence of a non-Darcy relationship between flow rate and hydraulic loss that is best described by Forchheimer's law. Furthermore, in the flow experiments both inertial and viscous flow terms are not negligible. The observed experimental breakthrough curves of solute transport have been modeled by the classical one-dimensional analytical solution for the advection–dispersion equation (ADE and the single rate mobile–immobile model (MIM. The former model does not properly fit the first arrival and the tail while the latter, which recognizes the existence of mobile and immobile domains for transport, provides a very decent fit. The carried out experiments show that there exists a pronounced mobile–immobile zone interaction that cannot be neglected and that leads to a non-equilibrium behavior of solute transport. The existence of a non-Darcian flow regime has showed to influence the velocity field in that it gives rise to a delay in solute migration with respect to the predicted value assuming linear flow. Furthermore, the

  18. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  19. Leaf Degradation, Macroinvertebrate Shredders & Energy Flow in Streams: A Laboratory-Based Exercise Examining Ecosystem Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, Timothy C.; Mills, Colleen M.; Volesky, Lisa; Talkington, Jennifer; Brooke, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    A laboratory-based exercise that demonstrates mechanisms underlying leaf degradation in streams. Students examine the effects of "leaf conditioning" on the feeding behavior of invertebrate shredders. The exercise is completed in two sessions and can be adapted to both high school and college levels.

  20. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow over complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundar...

  1. Preliminary validation of direct detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus within clinical samples using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification coupled with a simple lateral flow device for detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan A Waters

    Full Text Available Rapid, field-based diagnostic assays are desirable tools for the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD. Current approaches involve either; 1 Detection of FMD virus (FMDV with immuochromatographic antigen lateral flow devices (LFD, which have relatively low analytical sensitivity, or 2 portable RT-qPCR that has high analytical sensitivity but is expensive. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP may provide a platform upon which to develop field based assays without these drawbacks. The objective of this study was to modify an FMDV-specific reverse transcription-LAMP (RT-LAMP assay to enable detection of dual-labelled LAMP products with an LFD, and to evaluate simple sample processing protocols without nucleic acid extraction. The limit of detection of this assay was demonstrated to be equivalent to that of a laboratory based real-time RT-qPCR assay and to have a 10,000 fold higher analytical sensitivity than the FMDV-specific antigen LFD currently used in the field. Importantly, this study demonstrated that FMDV RNA could be detected from epithelial suspensions without the need for prior RNA extraction, utilising a rudimentary heat source for amplification. Once optimised, this RT-LAMP-LFD protocol was able to detect multiple serotypes from field epithelial samples, in addition to detecting FMDV in the air surrounding infected cattle, pigs and sheep, including pre-clinical detection. This study describes the development and evaluation of an assay format, which may be used as a future basis for rapid and low cost detection of FMDV. In addition it provides providing "proof of concept" for the future use of LAMP assays to tackle other challenging diagnostic scenarios encompassing veterinary and human health.

  2. Laboratory Studies of the Stratified Rotating Flow Passing over an Isolated Obstacle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高守亭; 平凡

    2003-01-01

    We study the flow of a density-stratified fluid passing over an isolated obstacle, using towing-tank experiments.Our special concern is the response of the flow with different Froude numbers passing over a three-dimensional obstacle. A series of experiments of the stratified rotating flow passing over an isolated obstacle was carried out with the towering-tank controlled by the similarity laws and dynamic non-dimension parameters. These experiments show that the Froude number is a very important parameter, and the lee wave and the eddy structure appear simultaneously under an appropriate conditions. The effect of rotation on the lee wave is mainly to change wave amplitude, particularly to restrain the development of the lee wave and to promote the formation of an eddy.

  3. The Projectile inside the Loop

    OpenAIRE

    Varieschi, Gabriele U.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe an alternative use of the loop-the-loop apparatus, which can be used to study an interesting case of projectile motion. We also present an effective way to perform and analyze these experiments, by using video capture software together with a digital video camera. These experiments can be integrated into classroom demonstrations for general physics courses, or become part of laboratory activities.

  4. Small scale laboratory studies of flow and transport phenomena in pores and fractures: Phase 2. Technical completion report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Pore level laboratory experiments using microscopy permit the in situ visualization of flow and transport phenomena, that can be recorded on film or videotape. One of the principal tools for visualization is the etched glass micromodel, which is composed of a transparent two dimensional network of three dimensional pores. The spatial scale of interest in these models extends from the individual pore, up to a network of pores, perhaps with small scale heterogeneities. Micromodels are best used to help validate concepts and assumptions, and to elucidate new, previously unrecognized phenomena for further study. They are not quantitative tools, but should be used in combination with quantitative tools such as column studies or mathematical models. There are three applications: multi-phase flow, colloid transport, and bacterial transport and colonization. Specifically the authors have examined behavior of relevance to liquid-liquid mass transfer (solubilization of capillary trapped organic liquids); liquid-gas mass transfer (in situ volatilization); mathematical models of multi-phase pressure-saturation relationships; colloid movement, attachment and detachment in the presence of fluid-fluid interfaces, clay interference with multi-phase flow; and heterogeneity effects on multi-phase flow and colloid movement.

  5. Tangential Flow Filtration of Colloidal Silver Nanoparticles: A "Green" Laboratory Experiment for Chemistry and Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, Kevin M.; Baker, Joshua D.; Edwards, Michelle L.; Kanel, Sushil R.; O'Malley, Matthew; Pavel Sizemore, Ioana E.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous nanoparticle (NP) fabrication methodologies employ "bottom-up" syntheses, which may result in heterogeneous mixtures of NPs or may require toxic capping agents to reduce NP polydispersity. Tangential flow filtration (TFF) is an alternative "green" technique for the purification, concentration, and size-selection of…

  6. Laboratory Investigation of Rill Erosion on Compost Blankets under Concentrated Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    A flume study was conducted using a soil, yard waste compost, and an erosion control compost to investigate the response to concentrated flow and determine if the shear stress model could be used to describe the response. Yard waste compost (YWC) and the bare Cecil soil (CS) cont...

  7. Tangential Flow Filtration of Colloidal Silver Nanoparticles: A "Green" Laboratory Experiment for Chemistry and Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, Kevin M.; Baker, Joshua D.; Edwards, Michelle L.; Kanel, Sushil R.; O'Malley, Matthew; Pavel Sizemore, Ioana E.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous nanoparticle (NP) fabrication methodologies employ "bottom-up" syntheses, which may result in heterogeneous mixtures of NPs or may require toxic capping agents to reduce NP polydispersity. Tangential flow filtration (TFF) is an alternative "green" technique for the purification, concentration, and size-selection of…

  8. Reversing tidal flow and estuarine morphodynamics in the Metronome laboratory flume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinhans, M.G.; Leuven, J.R.F.W.; Braat, L.; van der Vegt, M.; van Maarseveen, M.C.G.; Markies, H.; Roosendaal, C.; van Eijk, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Our objective is to test a novel experimental principle for creating reversing tidal flows of sufficient strength to cause estuarine morphodynamics. The study of estuarine morphodynamics has hitherto been limited to field observation and numerical modelling, whilst fluvial morphodynamics have additi

  9. Laboratory Investigation of Rill Erosion on Compost Blankets under Concentrated Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    A flume study was conducted using a soil, yard waste compost, and an erosion control compost to investigate the response to concentrated flow and determine if the shear stress model could be used to describe the response. Yard waste compost (YWC) and the bare Cecil soil (CS) cont...

  10. Laboratory Experiments and Modeling for Interpreting Field Studies of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Using an Oxidation Flow Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This grant was originally funded for deployment of a suite of aerosol instrumentation by our group in collaboration with other research groups and DOE/ARM to the Ganges Valley in India (GVAX) to study aerosols sources and processing. Much of the first year of this grant was focused on preparations for GVAX. That campaign was cancelled due to political reasons and with the consultation with our program manager, the research of this grant was refocused to study the applications of oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) for investigating secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and organic aerosol (OA) processing in the field and laboratory through a series of laboratory and modeling studies. We developed a gas-phase photochemical model of an OFR which was used to 1) explore the sensitivities of key output variables (e.g., OH exposure, O3, HO2/OH) to controlling factors (e.g., water vapor, external reactivity, UV irradiation), 2) develop simplified OH exposure estimation equations, 3) investigate under what conditions non-OH chemistry may be important, and 4) help guide design of future experiments to avoid conditions with undesired chemistry for a wide range of conditions applicable to the ambient, laboratory, and source studies. Uncertainties in the model were quantified and modeled OH exposure was compared to tracer decay measurements of OH exposure in the lab and field. Laboratory studies using OFRs were conducted to explore aerosol yields and composition from anthropogenic and biogenic VOC as well as crude oil evaporates. Various aspects of the modeling and laboratory results and tools were applied to interpretation of ambient and source measurements using OFR. Additionally, novel measurement methods were used to study gas/particle partitioning. The research conducted was highly successful and details of the key results are summarized in this report through narrative text, figures, and a complete list of publications acknowledging this grant.

  11. Laboratory experiments on dispersive transport across interfaces: The role of flow direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, B.; Cortis, A.; Dror, I.; Scher, H.

    2009-04-01

    We present experimental evidence of asymmetrical dispersive transport of a conservative tracer across interfaces between different porous materials. Breakthrough curves are measured for tracer pulses that migrate in a steady state flow field through a column that contains adjacent segments of coarse and fine porous media. The breakthrough curves show significant differences in behavior, with tracers migrating from fine medium to coarse medium arriving significantly faster than those from coarse medium to fine medium. As the flow rate increases, the differences between the breakthrough curves diminish. We argue that this behavior indicates the occurrence of significant, time-dependent tracer accumulation in the resident concentration profile across the heterogeneity interface. Conventional modeling using the advection-dispersion equation is demonstrated to be unable to capture this asymmetric behavior. However, tracer accumulation at the interface has been observed in particle-tracking simulations, which may be related to the asymmetry in the observed breakthrough curves.

  12. Laboratory setup and results of experiments on two-dimensional multiphase flow in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, J.F. (ed.) (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Graham, D.N. (ed.); Schiegg, H.O. (SIMULTEC Ltd., Meilen/Zurich (Switzerland))

    1990-10-01

    In the event of an accidental release into earth's subsurface of an immiscible organic liquid, such as a petroleum hydrocarbon or chlorinated organic solvent, the spatial and temporal distribution of the organic liquid is of great interest when considering efforts to prevent groundwater contamination or restore contaminated groundwater. An accurate prediction of immiscible organic liquid migration requires the incorporation of relevant physical principles in models of multiphase flow in porous media; these physical principles must be determined from physical experiments. This report presents a series of such experiments performed during the 1970s at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, Switzerland. The experiments were designed to study the transient, two-dimensional displacement of three immiscible fluids in a porous medium. This experimental study appears to be the most detailed published to date. The data obtained from these experiments are suitable for the validation and test calibration of multiphase flow codes. 73 refs., 140 figs.

  13. Effect of Evaporator Lengths and Ratio of Check Valves to Number of Turns on Internal Flow Patterns of a Closed-Loop Oscillating Heat-Pipe With Check Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rittidech

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A visualization study of the internal flow patterns of a closed–loop oscillating heat-pipe with check valves (CLOHP/CV at normal operating condition for several evaporator lengths (Le, and ratio of check valves to number of turns (Rcv has been conducted. This article describes the effects of varying Le, and Rcv on flow patterns. The CLOHP/CV used a Pyrex glass tube with inside diameter of 2.4 mm. The evaporator length of 50 and 150 mm. (the lengths of evaporator, adiabatic and condenser were equal were employed with 10 turns, with Rcv of 0.2 and 1. R123 was used as the working fluid with filling ratio of 50% of internal volume of tube. It was found that the internal flow patterns could be classified according to the Le and Rcv as follows: At the high heat source when the Le decreases the main flow changes from the bubble flow with slug flow to disperse bubble flow. The Rcv decreases the main flow changes from the disperse bubble flow with bubble flow to disperse bubble When the velocity of slug increases, the length of vapor bubbles rapidly decreases and the heat flux rapidly increases.

  14. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Label-Based Gold Nanoparticles Lateral Flow Biosensor for Detection of Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Li, Hui; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2017-01-01

    The report describes a simple, rapid and sensitive assay for visual and multiplex detection of Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus based on multiple loop-mediated isothermal amplification (mLAMP) and lateral flow biosensor (LFB). Detection and differentiation of the Ef0027 gene (E. faecalis-specific gene) and nuc gene (S. aureus-specific gene) were determined using fluorescein (FITC)-and digoxin-modified primers in the mLAMP process. In the presence of biotin- and FITC-/digoxin-modified primers, the mLAMP yielded numerous biotin- and FITC-/digoxin-attached duplex products, which were detected by LFB through biotin/streptavidin interaction (biotin on the duplex and streptavidin on the gold nanoparticle) and immunoreactions (FITC/digoxin on the duplex and anti-FITC/digoxin on the LFB test line). The accumulation of gold nanoparticles generated a characteristic red line, enabling visual and multiplex detection of target pathogens without instrumentation. The limit of detection (LoD), analytical specificity and feasibility of LAMP-LFB technique were successfully examined in pure culture and blood samples. The entire procedure, including specimen (blood samples) processing (30 min), isothermal reaction (40 min) and result reporting (within 2 min), could be completed within 75 min. Thus, this assay offers a simple, rapid, sensitive and specific test for multiplex detection of E. faecalis and S. aureus strains. Furthermore, the LAMP-LFB strategy is a universal technique, which can be extended to detect various target sequences by re-designing the specific LAMP primers. PMID:28239371

  15. Stopped-in-loop flow analysis system for successive determination of trace vanadium and iron in drinking water using their catalytic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala Quezada, Alejandro; Ohara, Keisuke; Ratanawimarnwong, Nuanlaor; Nacapricha, Duangjai; Murakami, Hiroya; Teshima, Norio; Sakai, Tadao

    2015-11-01

    An automated stopped-in-loop flow analysis (SILFA) system is proposed for the successive catalytic determination of vanadium and iron. The determination of vanadium was based on the p-anisidine oxidation by potassium bromate in the presence of Tiron as an activator to form a reddish dye, which has an absorption maximum at 510 nm. The selectivity of the vanadium determination was greatly improved by adding diphosphate as a masking agent of iron. For the iron determination, an iron-catalyzed oxidative reaction of p-anisidine by hydrogen peroxide with 1,10-phenanthroline as an activator to produce a reddish dye (510 nm) was employed. The SILFA system consisted of two peristaltic pumps, two six-port injection valves, a four-port selection valve, a heater device, a spectrophotometric detector and a data acquisition device. One six-port injection valve was used for the isolation of a mixed solution of standard/sample and reagent to promote each catalytic reaction, and another six-port injection valve was used for switching the reagent for vanadium or iron to achieve selective determination of each analyte. The above mentioned four-port selection valve was used to select standard solutions or sample. These three valves and the two peristaltic pumps were controlled by a built-in programmable logic controller in a touchscreen controller. The obtained results showed that the proposed SILFA monitoring system constituted an effective approach for the selective determination of vanadium and iron. The limits of detection, 0.052 and 0.55 µg L(-1), were obtained for vanadium and iron, respectively. The proposed system was successfully applied to drinking water samples without any preconcentration procedures.

  16. The 17-Meter Flume at the Coastal Research Laboratory. Part 2. Flow Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    h [i Coles parameter p Density r Shear stress (viscous stress plus Reynolds stress) rb Bottom shear stress Oil Spatial correlation function defined...classical analyses (e.g. Millikan , 1939; Clauser, 1956; Coles, 1956) and experimental studies (e.g. Nezu and Rodi, 1986). A detailed description of the...slope required to drive a uniform flow over a smooth bottom under these conditions (about 2 x 10- 5 , corresponding to a drop in elevation of about 0.04

  17. A Laboratory Model for the Flow in Urban Street Canyons Induced by Bottom Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘辉志; 梁彬; 朱凤荣; 张伯寅; 桑建国

    2003-01-01

    Water tank experiments are carried out to investigate the convection flow induced by bottom heating and the effects of the ambient wind on the flow in non-symmetrical urban street canyons based on the PIV (Particle Image Visualization) technique. Fluid experiments show that with calm ambient wind,the flows in the street canyon are completely driven by thermal force, and the convection can reach the upper atmosphere of the street canyon. Horizontal and vertical motions also appear above the roofs of the buildings. These are the conditions which favor the exchange of momentum and air mass between the street canyon and its environment. More than two vortices are induced by the convection, and the complex circulation pattern will vary with time in a wider street canyon. However, in a narrow street canyon, just one vortex appears. With a light ambient wind, the bottom heating and the associated convection result in just one main vortex. As the ambient wind speed increases, the vortex becomes more organized and its center shifts closer to the leeward building.

  18. Laboratory and field scale modelling of two-phase flow in fractured structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgaard, Hanne Foss [The Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark); Reffstrup, Jan [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Kaae Olsen, Niels [Danish Hydraulic Institute, Hoersholm (Denmark)

    1996-12-31

    The imbibition of water in matrix blocks plays a significant role in oil recovery from certain types of fractured reservoirs with a low permeable, porous matrix. These types of fractured reservoirs have a water-wet matrix, strong capillary forces and an inflow of water: either from an aquifer or as a result of forced water injection. Several chalk reservoirs in the North Sea correspond to this description. This paper presents a comparison between laboratory scale experiments, and numerical studies of water imbibition in a fractured porous media. Both the single and the double porosity/permeability approach have been used to simulate the experiments. (au) EFP-96. 11 refs.

  19. Investigations of Solar Prominence Dynamics Using Laboratory Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul M Bellan

    2008-05-28

    Laboratory experiments simulating many of the dynamical features of solar coronal loops have been carried out. These experiments manifest collimation, kinking, jet flows, and S-shapes. Diagnostics include high-speed photography and x-ray detectors. Two loops having opposite or the same magnetic helicity polarities have been merged and it is found that counter-helicity merging provides much greater x-ray emission. A non-MHD particle orbit instability has been discovered whereby ions going in the opposite direction of the current flow direction can be ejected from a magnetic flux tube.

  20. Salt weathering in Egyptian limestone after laboratory simulations with continuous flow of salt solutions at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Nevin; Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Hamed, Ayman; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica

    2013-04-01

    weathering in Egyptian limestone after laboratory simulations with continuous flow of salt solutions at different temperatures Nevin Aly Mohamed (1), Miguel Gomez - Heras(2), Ayman Hamed Ahmed (1), and Monica Alvarez de Buergo(2). (1) Faculty of Pet. & Min. Engineering- Suez Canal University, Suez, Egypt, (2) Instituto de Geociencias (CSIC-UCM) Madrid. Spain. Limestone is one of the most frequent building stones in Egypt and is used since the time of ancient Egyptians and salt weathering is one of the main threats to its conservation. Most of the limestone used in historical monuments in Cairo is a biomicrite extracted from the Mid-Eocene Mokattam Group. During this work, cylindrical samples (2.4 cm diameter and approx. 4.8 cm length) were subjected, in a purpose-made simulation chamber, to simulated laboratory weathering tests with fixed salt concentration (10% weight NaCl solution), at different temperatures, which were kept constant throughout each test (10, 20, 30, 40 oC). During each test, salt solutions flowed continuously imbibing samples by capilarity. Humidity within the simulation chamber was reduced using silica gel to keep it low and constant to increase evaporation rate. Temperature, humidity inside the simulation chamber and samples weight were digitally monitored during each test. Results show the advantages of the proposed experimental methodology using a continuous flow of salt solutions and shed light on the effect of temperature on the dynamics of salt crystallization on and within samples. Research funded by mission sector of high education ministry, Egypt and Geomateriales S2009/MAT-1629.

  1. Missile Electro-Optical Countermeasures Simulation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory comprises several hardware-in-the-loop missile flight simulations designed specifically to evaluate the effectiveness of electro-optical air defense...

  2. Limestone and Zeolite as Alternative Media in Horizontal Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands: Laboratory-Scale Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizama, K.; Jaque, I.; Ayala, J.

    2016-12-01

    Arsenic is well known for its chronic toxicity. Millions of people around the world are currently at risk, drinking water with As concentrations above 10 ppb, the WHO drinking water guideline. Although different treatment options exist, they are often limited by elevated costs and maintenance requirements. Constructed wetlands are a natural water treatment system, capable to remove metals and metalloids -including As- via different physical, chemical and biological processes. The use of alternative supporting media to enhance As removal in subsurface flow wetlands has been recommended, but not sufficiently studied. Limestone and zeolite have been identified as effective supporting media in subsurface flow wetlands aiming As removal. However, there are still key aspects to be addressed, such as the implications of using these media, the speciation in the solid phase, the role of vegetation, etc. This study investigated the performance of limestone and zeolite in three types of experiments: batch, column and as main supporting media in a bench scale horizontal subsurface flow wetland system. Synthetic water resembling a contaminated river in Chile (As concentration=3 mg/L, Fe concentration= 100 mg/L, pH=2) was used in all experiments. In the batch experiments, the As concentration, the mass of media and the contact time were varied. The column system consisted of three limestone columns and three zeolite columns, operated under a hydraulic loading of 20 mm/d. The wetland system consisted of twelve PVC cells: six filled with zeolite and six with limestone. Phragmites australis were planted in three cells of each media type, as control cells. From the batch experiments, maximum As sorption capacities as indicated by Langmuir model were 1.3 mg/g for limestone and 0.17 mg/g for zeolite, at 18 h contact time and 6.3 g/L medium concentration. EDS and XPS analyses revealed that As and Fe were retained in zeolite at the end of the batch experiments. Zeolite and limestone

  3. Driving Flows in Laboratory Astrophysical Plasma Jets: The Mochi.LabJet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Evan G.

    Mochi.Labjet is a new experiment at the University of Washington developed to investigate the interaction of shear flows in plasma jets with boundary conditions similar to an accretion disc system. This thesis details the engineering design and first plasmas of the Mochi.Labjet experiment. The experiment required construction of a new three electrode plasma gun with azimuthal symmetric gas injection, two optically-isolated pulsed power supplies for generating and sustaining plasma, and one optically-isolated pulsed power supply for generating a background magnetic field. Optical isolation is achieved with four custom circuits: the TTL-optical transmitter, optical-TTL receiver, optical-relay, and optical-tachometer circuits. First plasmas, during the commissioning phase of the apparatus, show evidence of flared jet structures with significant azimuthal symmetry.

  4. Laboratory studies of stagnating plasma flows with applications to inner solar system and stellar bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T. E.; Smith, R. J.; Hsu, S. C.

    2016-10-01

    Supercritical magnetized collisionless shocks are thought to play a dominant role in the overall partition of energy throughout the universe by converting flow kinetic energy to other forms such as thermal and supra-thermal populations, magnetic field enhancement, turbulence, and energetic particles. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) at LANL creates conditions similar to those of inner solar system and stellar bow shocks by accelerating hot (100s of eV during translation) dense (1022 - 1023 m-3) Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoids to 100s of km/s; resulting in β 1, collisionless plasma flows with Msonic and MAlfvén 10. The drifting FRC can be made to impinge upon a variety of static obstacles including: a strong mirror or cusp magnetic field (mimicking magnetically excited shocks such as the Earth's bow shock), plasma pileup from a solid obstacle (similar to the bow shocks of Mercury and the Moon), and a neural gas puff (bow shocks of Venus or the comets). Characteristic shock length and time scales that are both large enough to observe yet small enough to fit within the experiment, enabling study of the complex interplay of kinetic and fluid processes that mediate cosmic shocks and can generate non-thermal distributions, produce density and magnetic field enhancements much greater than predicted by fluid theory, and accelerate particles. An overview of the experimental program will be presented, including recent results. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25369.

  5. System overview and characterization of a high-temperature, high-pressure, entrained-flow, laboratory-scale gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, Madison A.; Dreyer, Christopher B.; Parker, Terence E.; Porter, Jason M., E-mail: jporter@mines.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Jakulewicz, Micah S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The high-temperature, high-pressure, entrained-flow, laboratory-scale gasifier at the Colorado School of Mines, including the primary systems and the supporting subsystems, is presented. The gasifier is capable of operating at temperatures and pressures up to 1650 °C and 40 bar. The heated section of the reactor column has an inner diameter of 50 mm and is 1 m long. Solid organic feedstock (e.g., coal, biomass, and solid waste) is ground into batches with particle sizes ranging from 25 to 90 μm and is delivered to the reactor at feed rates of 2–20 g/min. The maximum useful power output of the syngas is 10 kW, with a nominal power output of 1.2 kW. The initial characterization and demonstration results of the gasifier system with a coal feedstock are also reported.

  6. System overview and characterization of a high-temperature, high-pressure, entrained-flow, laboratory-scale gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Madison A.; Jakulewicz, Micah S.; Dreyer, Christopher B.; Parker, Terence E.; Porter, Jason M.

    2015-05-01

    The high-temperature, high-pressure, entrained-flow, laboratory-scale gasifier at the Colorado School of Mines, including the primary systems and the supporting subsystems, is presented. The gasifier is capable of operating at temperatures and pressures up to 1650 °C and 40 bar. The heated section of the reactor column has an inner diameter of 50 mm and is 1 m long. Solid organic feedstock (e.g., coal, biomass, and solid waste) is ground into batches with particle sizes ranging from 25 to 90 μm and is delivered to the reactor at feed rates of 2-20 g/min. The maximum useful power output of the syngas is 10 kW, with a nominal power output of 1.2 kW. The initial characterization and demonstration results of the gasifier system with a coal feedstock are also reported.

  7. Lamella formation and emigration from the water by a laboratory colony of Biomphalaria glabrata (SAY in flow-through system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo D. A. Dannemann

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Lamella formation and emigration from the water were investigated in juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata reared at two temperatures in aquaria with a constant water flow. Most snails (97.4% reared at the lower temperature (21- C formed lamella at the shell aperture and emigrated from the water, whereas only 10.1% did so at 25- C. Eighty percent of emigrations at 21- C occurred within a period of 15 days, 70-85 days after hatching. A comparison of the studies done so far indicates that the phenomenon may be affected by the ageing of snail colonies kept in the laboratory and their geographic origin, rather than the rearing conditions. This hypothesis, however, requires experimental confirmation.

  8. Voltage Regulation and Line Loss Minimization of Loop Distribution Systems Using UPFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Mahmoud A.; Takeshita, Takaharu

    This paper presents a new method for achieving line loss minimization and voltage regulation in the loop distribution systems, simultaneously. First, mathematical analysis of the line loss minimum conditions in the loop distribution systems is presented. Then, load voltage regulation is applied in the loop distribution system under line loss minimum condition. Reference angle of the desired load voltage is the main factor that can be used to minimize total line loss during load voltage control. In order to achieve these two objectives simultaneously, the UPFC (unified power flow controller), a typical FACTS (flexible AC transmission systems) device, that is capable of instantaneous control of transmission and distribution power flow, is used. Also, the UPFC control scheme to regulate the load voltage under line loss minimization is presented. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme has been verified experimentally using laboratory prototype in a 200V, 6kVA system.

  9. A fluid response: Alpha-amylase reactions to acute laboratory stress are related to sample timing and saliva flow rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Tamás; van Lien, René; Willemsen, Gonneke; Proctor, Gordon; Efting, Marieke; Fülöp, Márta; Bárdos, György; Veerman, Enno C I; Bosch, Jos A

    2015-07-01

    Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) is used as a sympathetic (SNS) stress marker, though its release is likely co-determined by SNS and parasympathetic (PNS) activation. The SNS and PNS show asynchronous changes during acute stressors, and sAA responses may thus vary with sample timing. Thirty-four participants underwent an eight-minute memory task (MT) and cold pressor task (CPT). Cardiovascular SNS (pre-ejection period, blood pressure) and PNS (heart rate variability) activity were monitored continuously. Unstimulated saliva was collected repeatedly during and after each laboratory stressor, and sAA concentration (U/ml) and secretion (U/minute) determined. Both stressors increased anxiety. The MT caused an immediate and continued cardiac SNS activation, but sAA concentration increased at task cessation only (+54%); i.e., when there was SNS-PNS co-activation. During the MT sAA secretion even decreased (-35%) in conjunction with flow rate and vagal tone. The CPT robustly increased blood pressure but not sAA. In summary, sAA fluctuations did not parallel changes in cardiac SNS activity or anxiety. sAA responses seem contingent on sample timing and flow rate, likely involving both SNS and PNS influences. Verification using other stressors and contexts seems warranted.

  10. Flow regimes and heat transfer modes identification in ANGRA 2 core, during small break in the primary loop with area of 100 cm{sup 2}, simulated with RELAP5 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: gdgian@ipen.br, E-mail: borges.em@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Identifying the flow regimes and the heat transfer modes is important for the analysis of accidents such as the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA). The aim of this paper is to identify the flow regimes, the heat transfer modes, and the correlations used in the RELAP5/MOD3.2.gama code in ANGRA 2 during the Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with a 100cm{sup 2}-rupture area in the cold leg of primary loop. The Chapter 15 of the Final Safety Analysis Report of ANGRA 2 (FSAR - A2) reports this specific kind of accident. The results from this work demonstrated the several flow regimes and heat transfer modes that can be present in the core of ANGRA 2 during the postulated accident. (author)

  11. Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — RTC has a suite of Hardware-in-the Loop facilities that include three operational facilities that provide performance assessment and production acceptance testing of...

  12. In-situ Condition Monitoring of Components in Small Modular Reactors Using Process and Electrical Signature Analysis. Final report, volume 1. Development of experimental flow control loop, data analysis and plant monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Belle [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hines, J. Wesley [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Damiano, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mehta, Chaitanya [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Collins, Price [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Lish, Matthew [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Cady, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Lollar, Victor [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); de Wet, Dane [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bayram, Duygu [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The research and development under this project was focused on the following three major objectives: Objective 1: Identification of critical in-vessel SMR components for remote monitoring and development of their low-order dynamic models, along with a simulation model of an integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR). Objective 2: Development of an experimental flow control loop with motor-driven valves and pumps, incorporating data acquisition and on-line monitoring interface. Objective 3: Development of stationary and transient signal processing methods for electrical signatures, machinery vibration, and for characterizing process variables for equipment monitoring. This objective includes the development of a data analysis toolbox. The following is a summary of the technical accomplishments under this project: - A detailed literature review of various SMR types and electrical signature analysis of motor-driven systems was completed. A bibliography of literature is provided at the end of this report. Assistance was provided by ORNL in identifying some key references. - A review of literature on pump-motor modeling and digital signal processing methods was performed. - An existing flow control loop was upgraded with new instrumentation, data acquisition hardware and software. The upgrading of the experimental loop included the installation of a new submersible pump driven by a three-phase induction motor. All the sensors were calibrated before full-scale experimental runs were performed. - MATLAB-Simulink model of a three-phase induction motor and pump system was completed. The model was used to simulate normal operation and fault conditions in the motor-pump system, and to identify changes in the electrical signatures. - A simulation model of an integral PWR (iPWR) was updated and the MATLAB-Simulink model was validated for known transients. The pump-motor model was interfaced with the iPWR model for testing the impact of primary flow perturbations (upsets) on

  13. Genetic structure of African buffalo herds based on variation at the mitochondrial D-loop and autosomal microsatellite loci: Evidence for male-biased gene flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, van W.F.; Groen, A.F.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sexual differences in herding behaviour of African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) were studied by analysing at the herd level mitochondrial D-loop hypervariable region I and fourteen autosomal microsatellites. Three herds from Arusha National Park in Tanzania were analysed with mtDNA and five herds from

  14. New argon-argon (40Ar/39Ar) radiometric age dates from selected subsurface basalt flows at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Mary K.; Turrin, Brent D.; Champion, Duane E.; Swisher, Carl C.

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collected samples for 12 new argon-argon radiometric ages from eastern Snake River Plain olivine tholeiite basalt flows in the subsurface at the Idaho National Laboratory. The core samples were collected from flows that had previously published paleomagnetic data. Samples were sent to Rutgers University for argon-argon radiometric dating analyses.

  15. Spatial analysis of aquifer response times for radial flow processes: Nondimensional analysis and laboratory-scale tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazaei, Farhad; Simpson, Matthew J.; Clement, T. Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental concept in groundwater hydrology is the notion of steady state, or equilibrium conditions. When a system at some initial steady state condition is perturbed by pumping, a transient cone of depression will develop and the system will approach a new steady state condition. Understanding the time scale required for the transient process to occur is of practical interest since it would help practitioners decide whether to use a steady state model or a more complicated transient model. Standard approaches to estimate the response time use simple scaling relationships which neglect spatial variations. Alternatively, others define the response time to be the amount of time taken for the difference between the transient and steady state solutions to fall below some arbitrary tolerance level. Here, we present a novel approach and use the concept of mean action time to predict aquifer response time scales in a two-dimensional radial geometry for pumping, injection and recovery processes. Our approach leads to relatively simple closed form expressions that explicitly show how the time scale depends on the hydraulic parameters and position. Furthermore, our dimensionless framework allows us to predict the response time scales for a range of applications including small scale laboratory problems and large scale field problems. Our analysis shows that the response time scales vary spatially, but are equivalent for pumping, injection and associated recovery processes. Furthermore, the time scale is independent of the pumping or injection flow rate. We test these predictions in a laboratory scale aquifer and find that our physical measurements corroborate the theoretical predictions.

  16. Design Principles for Closed Loop Supply Chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. Krikke (Harold); C.P. Pappis (Costas); G.T. Tsoulfas; J.M. Bloemhof-Ruwaard (Jacqueline)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we study design principles for closed loop supply chains. Closed loop supply chains aim at closing material flows thereby limiting emission and residual waste, but also providing customer service at low cost. We study 'traditional' and 'new' design principles known in the l

  17. Design Principles for Closed Loop Supply Chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. Krikke (Harold); C.P. Pappis (Costas); G.T. Tsoulfas; J.M. Bloemhof-Ruwaard (Jacqueline)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we study design principles for closed loop supply chains. Closed loop supply chains aim at closing material flows thereby limiting emission and residual waste, but also providing customer service at low cost. We study 'traditional' and 'new' design principles known in the

  18. Preferential flow paths and heat pipes: Results from laboratory experiments on heat-driven flow in natural and artificial rock fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1997-06-01

    Water flow in fractures under the conditions of partial saturation and thermal drive may lead to fast flow along preferential localized pathways and heat pipe conditions. Water flowing in fast pathways may ultimately contact waste packages at Yucca Mountain and transport radionuclides to the accessible environment. Sixteen experiments were conducted to visualize liquid flow in glass fracture models, a transparent epoxy fracture replica, and a rock/replica fracture assembly. Spatially resolved thermal monitoring was performed in seven of these experiments to evaluate heat-pipe formation. Depending on the fracture apertures and flow conditions, various flow regimes were observed including continuous rivulet flow for high flow rates, intermittent rivulet flow and drop flow for intermediate flow rates, and film flow for low flow rates and wide apertures. These flow regimes were present in both fracture models and in the replica of a natural fracture. Heat-pipe conditions indicated by low thermal gradients were observed in five experiments. Conditions conducive to heat-pipe formation include an evaporation zone, condensation zone, adequate space for vapor and liquid to travel, and appropriate fluid driving forces. In one of the two experiments where heat pipe conditions were not observed, adequate space for liquid-vapor counterflow was not provided. Heat pipe conditions were not established in the other, because liquid flow was inadequate to compensate for imbibition and the quantity of heat contained within the rock.

  19. Development and laboratory-scale testing of a fully automated online flow cytometer for drinking water analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Frederik; Broger, Tobias; Weilenmann, Hans-Ulrich; Vital, Marius; Helbing, Jakob; Bosshart, Ulrich; Huber, Pascal; Odermatt, Res Peter; Sonnleitner, Bernhard

    2012-06-01

    Accurate and sensitive online detection tools would benefit both fundamental research and practical applications in aquatic microbiology. Here, we describe the development and testing of an online flow cytometer (FCM), with a specific use foreseen in the field of drinking water microbiology. The system incorporated fully automated sampling and fluorescent labeling of bacterial nucleic acids with analysis at 5-min intervals for periods in excess of 24 h. The laboratory scale testing showed sensitive detection (< 5% error) of bacteria over a broad concentration range (1 × 10(3) -1 × 10(6) cells mL(-1) ) and particularly the ability to track both gradual changes and dramatic events in water samples. The system was tested with bacterial pure cultures as well as indigenous microbial communities from natural water samples. Moreover, we demonstrated the possibility of using either a single fluorescent dye (e.g., SYBR Green I) or a combination of two dyes (SYBR Green I and Propidium Iodide), thus broadening the application possibilities of the system. The online FCM approach described herein has considerable potential for routine and continuous monitoring of drinking water, optimization of specific drinking water processes such as biofiltration or disinfection, as well as aquatic microbiology research in general.

  20. Alternative loop rings

    CERN Document Server

    Goodaire, EG; Polcino Milies, C

    1996-01-01

    For the past ten years, alternative loop rings have intrigued mathematicians from a wide cross-section of modern algebra. As a consequence, the theory of alternative loop rings has grown tremendously. One of the main developments is the complete characterization of loops which have an alternative but not associative, loop ring. Furthermore, there is a very close relationship between the algebraic structures of loop rings and of group rings over 2-groups. Another major topic of research is the study of the unit loop of the integral loop ring. Here the interaction between loop rings and group ri

  1. Effect of Injection Flow Rate on Product Gas Quality in Underground Coal Gasification (UCG Based on Laboratory Scale Experiment: Development of Co-Axial UCG System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Hamanaka

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Underground coal gasification (UCG is a technique to recover coal energy without mining by converting coal into a valuable gas. Model UCG experiments on a laboratory scale were carried out under a low flow rate (6~12 L/min and a high flow rate (15~30 L/min with a constant oxygen concentration. During the experiments, the coal temperature was higher and the fracturing events were more active under the high flow rate. Additionally, the gasification efficiency, which means the conversion efficiency of the gasified coal to the product gas, was 71.22% in the low flow rate and 82.42% in the high flow rate. These results suggest that the energy recovery rate with the UCG process can be improved by the increase of the reaction temperature and the promotion of the gasification area.

  2. The thermodynamics of diastole: kinematic modeling-based derivation of the P-V loop to transmitral flow energy relation with in vivo validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossahebi, Sina; Shmuylovich, Leonid; Kovács, Sándor J

    2011-02-01

    Pressure-volume (P-V) loop-based analysis facilitates thermodynamic assessment of left ventricular function in terms of work and energy. Typically these quantities are calculated for a cardiac cycle using the entire P-V loop, although thermodynamic analysis may be applied to a selected phase of the cardiac cycle, specifically, diastole. Diastolic function is routinely quantified by analysis of transmitral Doppler E-wave contours. The first law of thermodynamics requires that energy (ε) computed from the Doppler E-wave (εE-wave) and the same portion of the P-V loop (εP-V E-wave) be equivalent. These energies have not been previously derived nor have their predicted equivalence been experimentally validated. To test the hypothesis that εP-V E-wave and εE-wave are equivalent, we used a validated kinematic model of filling to derive εE-wave in terms of chamber stiffness, relaxation/viscoelasticity, and load. For validation, simultaneous (conductance catheter) P-V and echocadiographic data from 12 subjects (205 total cardiac cycles) having a range of diastolic function were analyzed. For each E-wave, εE-wave was compared with εP-V E-wave calculated from simultaneous P-V data. Linear regression yielded the following: εP-V E-wave=αεE-wave+b (R2=0.67), where α=0.95 and b=6e(-5). We conclude that E-wave-derived energy for suction-initiated early rapid filling εE-wave, quantitated via kinematic modeling, is equivalent to invasive P-V-defined filling energy. Hence, the thermodynamics of diastole via εE-wave generate a novel mechanism-based index of diastolic function suitable for in vivo phenotypic characterization.

  3. A Comparative Study of Electrolyte Flow and Slime Particle Transport in a Newly Designed Copper Electrolytic Cell and a Laboratory-Scale Conventional Electrolytic Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Weizhi; Wang, Shijie; Free, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    An innovative copper electrolytic cell was designed with its inlet at the cell top and its outlet near the cell bottom, in opposite to conventional electrolytic cells. It was modeled in COMSOL Multiphysics to simulate copper electrorefining process. Unlike conventional electrorefining cells, downward electrolyte flows are more dominant in the fluid flow field in this cell, which leads to faster settlement of slime particles and less contamination to the cathode. Copper concentration profiles, electrolyte flow velocity field, slime particle movements, and slime particle distributions were obtained as simulation results, which were compared with those in a laboratory-scale conventional electrolytic cell. Advantages of the newly designed electrolytic cell were found: copper ions are distributed more uniformly in the cell with a thinner diffusion layer near the cathode; stronger convection exists in the inter-electrode domain with dominant downward flows; and slime particles have larger possibilities to settle down and are less likely to reach the cathode.

  4. Research on SFR Intermediate Loop Modeling, Simulation and Flow Control%钠冷快堆中间回路建模仿真及流量控制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张厚明; 姚远; 段天英; 李茂林; 熊文彬; 高强

    2013-01-01

    针对钠冷快堆中间回路泵、管道、换热器等,采用Matlab/Simulink软件建立了一种仿真模型,对回路的流量和管道换热进行了计算。根据相似理论、泵水力特性曲线及回路压力损失等计算流量。编制了SFAC V1.0程序,该程序的计算结果与实验值符合较好,最大相对误差为5%。将管道划分为不同节段,在各节段上建立能量守恒微分方程组,从而建立了管道换热计算的模型。同时,对钠流量的控制方式进行了设计和改进,对控制参数进行了整定,并对流量需求进行了计算。计算结果表明,该控制方式的控制品质较高。%In this paper ,a simulation model composed of sodium flow calculation model and thermal analysis model was developed for sodium-cooled fast reactor intermediate loop flow and thermal analysis using Matlab/Simulink software . Sodium flow calculation model was based on similarity theory ,hydraulic performance characteristic of pump and pressure drop of intermediate loop ,and SFAC V1.0 was programmed .The sodium flow calculated by this code is in good agreement with the experimental data , and the maximum relative error is about 5% . The pipeline was divided into several segments and differential equations for energy conversation on each segment were established ,resulting in a heat transfer calculation model for pipeline .T he sodium flow control was also studied in this research ,and control parameters were set by tuning methodology .The flow regulation was simulated to evaluate this strategy ,and the control quality of this strategy is rather high .

  5. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  6. Self-organizing maps applied to two-phase flow on natural circulation loop study; Aplicacao de mapas auto-organizaveis na classificacao de padroes de escoamento bifasico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Leonardo Ferreira

    2016-11-01

    Two-phase flow of liquid and gas is found in many closed circuits using natural circulation for cooling purposes. Natural circulation phenomenon is important on recent nuclear power plant projects for decay heat removal. The Natural Circulation Facility (Circuito de Circulacao Natural CCN) installed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN, is an experimental circuit designed to provide thermal hydraulic data related to single and two-phase flow under natural circulation conditions. This periodic flow oscillation behavior can be observed thoroughly in this facility due its glass-made tubes transparency. The heat transfer estimation has been improved based on models that require precise prediction of pattern transitions of flow. This work presents experiments realized at CCN to visualize natural circulation cycles in order to classify two-phase flow patterns associated with phase transients and static instabilities of flow. Images are compared and clustered using Kohonen Self-organizing Maps (SOM's) applied on different digital image features. The Full Frame Discret Cosine Transform (FFDCT) coefficients were used as input for the classification task, enabling good results. FFDCT prototypes obtained can be associated to each flow pattern, enabling a better comprehension of each observed instability. A systematic test methodology was used to verify classifier robustness.

  7. Laboratory Deposition Apparatus to Study the Effects of Wax Deposition on Pipe Magnetic Field Leakage Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Mohd Fauzi Abd

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate technique for wax deposition detection and severity measurement on cold pipe wall is important for pipeline cleaning program. Usually these techniques are validated by conventional techniques on laboratory scale wax deposition flow loop. However conventional techniques inherent limitations and it is difficult to reproduce a predetermine wax deposit profile and hardness at designated location in flow loop. An alternative wax deposition system which integrates modified pour casting method and cold finger method is presented. This system is suitable to reproduce high volume of medium hard wax deposit in pipe with better control of wax deposit profile and hardness.

  8. Ponderomotive Acceleration in Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Laming, J. M.; Taylor, B. D.; Obenschain, K.

    2016-11-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, the well-known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3-4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a “by-product” of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 to 0.02 T and lengths from 25,000 to 75,000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets, which act to heat the loop. As a consequence of coronal magnetic reconnection, small-scale, high-speed jets form. The familiar vortex quadrupoles form at reconnection sites. Between the magnetic footpoints and the corona the reconnection flow merges with the boundary flow. It is in this region that the ponderomotive acceleration occurs. Mirroring the character of the coronal reconnection, the ponderomotive acceleration is also found to be intermittent.

  9. Chemical Looping Combustion of Solid Fuels in a Laboratory Fluidized-bed Reactor Combustion de charges solides avec la boucle chimique dans un lit fluidisé de laboratoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leion H.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available When using solid fuel in a chemical looping system, the char fraction of the fuel needs to be gasified before syngas react with the oxygen carrier. This can be done inside the fuel reactor with fuel and oxygen carriers well mixed, and, since this gasification is comparably slow, this will be the time limiting step of such a system. An option is to use an oxygen carrier that is able to release gas-phase oxygen which can react with the fuel by normal combustion giving a significantly faster overall fuel conversion. This last option is generally referred to as Chemical Looping combustion with Oxygen Un-coupling (CLOU. In this work, an overview is given of parameters that affect the fuel conversion in laboratory CLC and CLOU experiments. The main factor determining the fuel conversion, in both CLC and CLOU, is the fuel itself. High-volatile fuels are generally more rapidly converted than low volatile fuels. This difference in fuel conversion rate is more pronounced in CLC than in CLOU. However, the fuel conversion is also, both for CLC and CLOU, increased by increasing temperature. Increased steam and SO2 fraction in the surrounding gas will also enhance the fuel conversion in CLC. CO2 gasification in CLC appears to be very slow in comparison to steam gasification. H2 can inhibit fuel gasification in CLC whereas CO did not seem to have any effect. Possible deactivation of oxygen carriers due to SO2 or ash also has to be considered. Lorsque l’on utilise des combustibles solides dans la boucle chimique (CLC pour Chemical Looping Combustion, il est nécessaire de gazéifier le char avant de faire la combustion du gaz de synthèse au contact du transporteur d’oxygène. Ces réactions peuvent s’effectuer dans le réacteur fuel, dans lequel le combustible et le transporteur d’oxygène sont bien mélangés. Cependant, la gazéification du charbon est lente et reste l’étape limitante du processus de combustion dans ces conditions. Une alternative

  10. Development of a Forced-Convection Liquid-Fluoride-Salt Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Romanoski, Glenn R [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne [ORNL; Aaron, Adam M [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    A small forced-convection molten-fluoride-salt loop is being constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to examine the heat transfer behavior of FLiNaK salt in a heated pebble bed. Objectives of the experiment include reestablishing infrastructure needed for fluoride-salt loop testing, developing a unique inductive heating technique for performing heat transfer (or other) experiments, measuring heat transfer characteristics in a liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled pebble bed, and demonstrating the use of silicon carbide (SiC) as a structural component for salt systems. The salt loop will consist of an Inconel 600 piping system, a sump-type pump, a SiC test section, and an air-cooled heat exchanger, as well as auxiliary systems needed to pre-heat the loop, transport salt into and out of the loop, and maintain an inert cover gas over the salt. A 30,000 Hz inductive heating system will be used to provide up to 250 kW of power to a 15 cm diameter SiC test section containing a packed bed of 3 cm graphite spheres. A SiC-to-Inconel 600 joint will use a conventional nickel/grafoil spiral wound gasket sandwiched between SiC and Inconel flanges. The loop system can provide up to 4.5 kg/s of salt flow at a head of 0.125 MPa and operate at a pressure just above atmospheric. Pebble Reynolds numbers of up to 2600 are possible with this configuration. A sump system is provided to drain and store the salt when not in use. Instrumentation on the loop will include pressure, temperature, and flow measurements, while the test section will be instrumented to provide pebble and FLiNaK temperatures.

  11. The finite Bruck Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Baumeister, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    We continue the work by Aschbacher, Kinyon and Phillips [AKP] as well as of Glauberman [Glaub1,2] by describing the structure of the finite Bruck loops. We show essentially that a finite Bruck loop $X$ is the direct product of a Bruck loop of odd order with either a soluble Bruck loop of 2-power order or a product of loops related to the groups $PSL_2(q)$, $q= 9$ or $q \\geq 5$ a Fermat prime. The latter possibillity does occur as is shown in [Nag1, BS]. As corollaries we obtain versions of Sylow's, Lagrange's and Hall's Theorems for loops.

  12. Paleomagnetic correlation and ages of basalt flow groups in coreholes at and near the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Duane E.; Davis, Linda C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.; Lanphere, Marvin A.

    2013-01-01

    Paleomagnetic inclination and polarity studies were conducted on subcore samples from eight coreholes located at and near the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These studies were used to characterize and to correlate successive stratigraphic basalt flow groups in each corehole to basalt flow groups with similar paleomagnetic inclinations in adjacent coreholes. Results were used to extend the subsurface geologic framework at the INL previously derived from paleomagnetic data for south INL coreholes. Geologic framework studies are used in conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Sample handling and demagnetization protocols are described, as well as the paleomagnetic data averaging process. Paleomagnetic inclination comparisons among NRF coreholes show comparable stratigraphic successions of mean inclination values over tens to hundreds of meters of depth. Corehole USGS 133 is more than 5 kilometers from the nearest NRF area corehole, and the mean inclination values of basalt flow groups in that corehole are somewhat less consistent than with NRF area basalt flow groups. Some basalt flow groups in USGS 133 are missing, additional basalt flow groups are present, or the basalt flow groups are at depths different from those of NRF area coreholes. Age experiments on young, low potassium olivine tholeiite basalts may yield inconclusive results; paleomagnetic and stratigraphic data were used to choose the most reasonable ages. Results of age experiments using conventional potassium argon and argon-40/argon-39 protocols indicate that the youngest and uppermost basalt flow group in the NRF area is 303 ± 30 ka and that the oldest and deepest basalt flow group analyzed is 884 ± 53 ka. A south to north line of cross-section drawn through the NRF coreholes shows corehole-to-corehole basalt flow group correlations derived from the paleomagnetic inclination data. From stratigraphic top to bottom, key results

  13. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  14. Influence of particle density on flow behavior and deposit architecture of concentrated pyroclastic density currents over a break in slope: Insights from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Sedano, L. A.; Sarocchi, D.; Sulpizio, R.; Borselli, L.; Campos, G.; Moreno Chavez, G.

    2016-12-01

    Geological granular flows are highly complex, gravity-driven phenomena whose different behaviors depend on the mechanical properties, density and granulometric distributions of the constituent materials. Years of research have produced significant advances in understanding transport and deposition processes in granular flows. However, the role and effects of clast densities and density contrast in a granular flow are still not fully understood. In this paper we show the effect that pumice has on dry granular flows; specifically on flow velocity and longitudinal segregation of the deposits. Our work confirms, by experimental results, field observations on pumice/lithic segregation and longer pumice runout. We report results of velocity decay and deposit architecture for a granular flow passing over a break in slope (from 38° to 4° inclination). The 30 experimental runs were carried out in a five-meter long laboratory flume equipped with a series of sensors that include laser gates and high-speed cameras (400 fps). We used two polydisperse mixtures of dacitic lithics and rhyolitic pumice in varying amounts, with Weibull and Gaussian particle size distributions. The pumice/lithic ratio changes the flow response passing over a break in slope. This effect is particularly evident starting from 10% of pumice volume into the flow mixture, independently of its granulometric distribution. Runout relates to mass following a power law, with an exponent close 0.2. The experiments confirm that pumice segregation affects polydispersed mixtures, similarly to what has been observed in real field deposits, where density decoupling produces lithic-enriched proximal areas and pumice-enriched distal areas. The results obtained prove that the presence of low-density materials in a dense granular flow has a strong influence on its behavior.

  15. Effects of pulsed and oscillatory flow on water vapor removal from a laboratory soil column. Final report, November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, K.E.

    1993-05-01

    Subsurface contamination by volatile organic contaminants (VOC`s) in the vadose zone and groundwater is primarily due to leaking underground storage tanks and industrial spills. Soil vapor extraction is a technique that is being used successfully to remove VOC`s from the subsurface. A flow of air is established through the soil to remove the vapor phase component of the contaminant. Soil vapor extraction will initially remove high levels of contaminant that is already present in the macropores. The concentration will start to decline as the removal from the soil matrix becomes limited by diffusion of contaminant from regions away from the air flow paths. This study examines potential methods of overcoming the diffusion limitation by adding an oscillatory component to the steady air flow and by pulsed flow, which involves turning air flow on and off at predetermined intervals. The study considered only the removal of water from the soil to try to establish general vapor behavior in the soil under the imposed conditions. Based on a statistical analysis, both the oscillatory and pulsed flow showed an improved water removal rate over the steady state flow. The effect of oscillatory flow was only examined at higher frequencies. The literature indicates that oscillations at lower frequencies may be more effective. Pulsed flow showed the most efficient removal of water compared to steady state conditions. The pulsed flow was most efficient because rather than reducing the diffusion limitation, the system would shut down and wait for diffusion to occur. This optimizes energy consumption, but does not reduce treatment time. The oscillatory flow actually reduced the diffusion limitation within the column which could result in a shorter treatment time.

  16. Closed-Loop Flow Control of the Coupled Wake Dynamics and Aerodynamic Loads of a Freely-Pivoting 3-DOF Bluff Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, T.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    2016-11-01

    The motion of an axisymmetric bluff body model that is free to pivot in pitch, yaw, and roll in a uniform stream in response to flow-induced aerodynamic loads is controlled in wind tunnel experiments using fluidic actuation. The model is attached to an upstream, wire-supported short streamwise sting through a low-friction hinge, and each of the support wires is individually-controlled by a servo actuator through an in-line load cell. The aerodynamic loads on the body, and thereby its motion, are controlled through fluidic modification of its aerodynamic coupling to its near wake using four independent aft mounted synthetic jet actuators that effect azimuthally-segmented flow attachment over the model's tail end. The effects of actuation-induced, transitory changes in the model's aerodynamic loads are measured by its motion response using motion tracking, while the coupled evolution of the near-wake is captured by high-speed stereo PIV. Flow control authority is demonstrated by feedback-controlled manipulation of the model's dynamic response, and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) of the wake is used to characterize changes in the wake structure and stability. It is shown that this flow control approach can modify the stability and damping of the model's motion (e.g., suppression or amplification of its natural oscillations), and impose desired directional attitude. Supported by the ARO.

  17. Continuous traffic flow modeling of driver support systems in multiclass traffic with inter-vehicle communication and drivers in the loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tampere, C.M.J.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Arem, B. van

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a continuous traffic-flow model for the explorative analysis of advanced driver-assistance systems (ADASs). Such systems use technology (sensors and intervehicle communication) to support the task of the driver, who retains full control over the vehicle. Based on a review of diff

  18. Study and development of an air conditioning system operating on a magnetic heat pump cycle (design and testing of flow directors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pao-Lien

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the fabrication, design of flow director, fluid flow direction analysis and testing of flow director of a magnetic heat pump. The objectives of the project are: (1) to fabricate a demonstration magnetic heat pump prototype with flow directors installed; and (2) analysis and testing of flow director and to make sure working fluid loops flow through correct directions with minor mixing. The prototype was fabricated and tested at the Development Testing Laboratory of Kennedy Space Center. The magnetic heat pump uses rear earth metal plates rotate in and out of a magnetic field in a clear plastic housing with water flowing through the rotor plates to provide temperature lift. Obtaining the proper water flow direction has been a problem. Flow directors were installed as flow barriers between separating point of two parallel loops. Function of flow directors were proven to be excellent both analytically and experimentally.

  19. Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe recent progress made in developing neutron imaging based particle imaging velocimetry techniques for visualizing and quantifying flow structure through a high pressure flow cell with high temperature capability (up to 350 degrees C). This experimental capability has great potential for improving the understanding of flow through fractured systems in applications such as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, flow structure measurement can be used to develop and validate single phase flow models used for simulation, experimentally identify critical transition regions and their dependence on fracture features such as surface roughness, and study multiphase fluid behavior within fractured systems. The developed method involves the controlled injection of a high contrast fluid into a water flow stream to produce droplets that can be tracked using neutron radiography. A description of the experimental setup will be provided along with an overview of the algorithms used to automatically track droplets and relate them to the velocity gradient in the flow stream. Experimental results will be reported along with volume of fluids based simulation techniques used to model observed flow.

  20. Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe recent progress made in developing neutron imaging based particle imaging velocimetry techniques for visualizing and quantifying flow structure through a high pressure flow cell with high temperature capability (up to 350 degrees C). This experimental capability has great potential for improving the understanding of flow through fractured systems in applications such as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, flow structure measurement can be used to develop and validate single phase flow models used for simulation, experimentally identify critical transition regions and their dependence on fracture features such as surface roughness, and study multiphase fluid behavior within fractured systems. The developed method involves the controlled injection of a high contrast fluid into a water flow stream to produce droplets that can be tracked using neutron radiography. A description of the experimental setup will be provided along with an overview of the algorithms used to automatically track droplets and relate them to the velocity gradient in the flow stream. Experimental results will be reported along with volume of fluids based simulation techniques used to model observed flow.

  1. Pseudonoise code tracking loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflame, D. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A delay-locked loop is presented for tracking a pseudonoise (PN) reference code in an incoming communication signal. The loop is less sensitive to gain imbalances, which can otherwise introduce timing errors in the PN reference code formed by the loop.

  2. Closing a loop: substance flow analysis of nitrogen and phosphorus in the rainbow trout production and domestic consumption system in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmala, Eero; Saikku, Laura

    2010-03-01

    Ongoing eutrophication is changing the Baltic Sea ecosystem. Aquaculture causes relatively small-scale nutrient emissions, but local environmental impact may be considerable. We used substance flow analysis (SFA) to identify and quantify the most significant flows and stocks of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) related to rainbow trout aquaculture in Finland. In 2004-2007, the input of nutrients to the system in the form of fish feed was 829 t N year(-1) and 115 t P year(-1). Around one-fifth of these nutrients ended up as food for human consumption. Of the primary input, 70% ended up in the Baltic Sea, directly from aquaculture and indirectly through waste management. The nutrient cycle could be closed partially by using local fish instead of imported fish in rainbow trout feed, thus reducing the net load of N and P to a fraction.

  3. Paleomagnetic correlation of surface and subsurface basaltic lava flows and flow groups in the southern part of the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, with paleomagnetic data tables for drill cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Duane E.; Hodges, Mary K.V.; Davis, Linda C.; Lanphere, Marvin A.

    2011-01-01

    Paleomagnetic inclination and polarity studies have been conducted on thousands of subcore samples from 51 coreholes located at and near the Idaho National Laboratory. These studies are used to paleomagnetically characterize and correlate successive stratigraphic intervals in each corehole to similar depth intervals in adjacent coreholes. Paleomagnetic results from 83 surface paleomagnetic sites, within and near the INL, are used to correlate these buried lava flow groups to basaltic shield volcanoes still exposed on the surface of the eastern Snake River Plain. Sample handling and demagnetization protocols are described as well as the paleomagnetic data averaging process. Paleomagnetic inclination comparisons between coreholes located only kilometers apart show comparable stratigraphic successions of mean inclination values over tens of meters of depth. At greater distance between coreholes, comparable correlation of mean inclination values is less consistent because flow groups may be missing or additional flow groups may be present and found at different depth intervals. Two shallow intersecting cross-sections, A-A- and B-B- (oriented southwest-northeast and northwest-southeast, respectively), drawn through southwest Idaho National Laboratory coreholes show the corehole to corehole or surface to corehole correlations derived from the paleomagnetic inclination data. From stratigraphic top to bottom, key results included the (1) Quaking Aspen Butte flow group, which erupted from Quaking Aspen Butte southwest of the Idaho National Laboratory, flowed northeast, and has been found in the subsurface in corehole USGS 132; (2) Vent 5206 flow group, which erupted near the southwestern border of the Idaho National Laboratory, flowed north and east, and has been found in the subsurface in coreholes USGS 132, USGS 129, USGS 131, USGS 127, USGS 130, USGS 128, and STF-AQ-01; and (3) Mid Butte flow group, which erupted north of U.S. Highway 20, flowed northwest, and has been

  4. Reynolds number scaling of influence of boundary layers on the global behavior of laboratory quasi-Keplerian flows

    CERN Document Server

    Edlund, E M

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of quasi-Keplerian flows in a Taylor-Couette device that identify the boundary conditions required to generate near-ideal flows that exhibit self-similarity under scaling of the Reynolds number. These experiments are contrasted with alternate boundary configurations that result in flows that progressively deviate from ideal Couette rotation as the Reynolds number is increased. These behaviors are quantitatively explained in terms of the tendency to generate global Ekman circulation and the balance of angular momentum fluxes through the axial and radial boundary layers.

  5. Experiments on the transition from stratified to slug flow in multiphase pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristiansen, Olav

    2004-12-01

    Severe slugging is reported from some field operations, where an increase in the production rate leads to a transition from steady stratified flow to slug flow in the pipeline. The slugs can be longer than anticipated for hydrodynamic slugging and the flow transients can then be a limitation for the production capacity. The objective was to perform a study on the flow pattern transition from stratified to slug flow. A particular point of interest was the possible occurrence of metastable flow and large initial slugs at elevated pressures. New data have been acquired in an experimental investigation of the transition from stratified to slug flow in horizontal and near-horizontal pipes at atmospheric and pressurised conditions. The experiments were performed with two-phase gas liquid and three-phase gas-liquid-liquid flows. Two flow facilities were used the NTNU Multiphase Flow Laboratory (short flow loop) and the SINTEF Multi-phase Flow Laboratory (long flow loop). Hold-up and pressure drop were measured, and flow patterns were determined visually and by evaluation of hold-up time traces. The following parameters were varied: 1) Inlet flow condition by variation of inlet pipe inclination. 2) System pressure (gas density). 3) Test section inclination (horizontal and near-horizontal). 4) Water cut. 5) Gas and liquid flow rates. 6) Pipe length. Slug flow or stratified flow was introduced upstream to promote either early or delayed transition to slug flow in the test section. A time series analysis was performed on the hold-up time traces, and average and distribution slug characteristics are reported, e.g. slug frequency, bubble propagation velocity, slug fraction, slug length, and growth rate. The results have been compared with steady state model predictions. The work consists of the following parts. 1) An initial study was performed at atmospheric air-water conditions in a short pipe. 2) Experiments at atmospheric and elevated pressures were performed in the medium

  6. Ensemble urban flood simulation in comparison with laboratory-scale experiments: Impact of interaction models for manhole, sewer pipe, and surface flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Seong Jin; Lee, Seungsoo; An, Hyunuk; Kawaike, Kenji; Nakagawa, Hajime

    2016-11-01

    An urban flood is an integrated phenomenon that is affected by various uncertainty sources such as input forcing, model parameters, complex geometry, and exchanges of flow among different domains in surfaces and subsurfaces. Despite considerable advances in urban flood modeling techniques, limited knowledge is currently available with regard to the impact of dynamic interaction among different flow domains on urban floods. In this paper, an ensemble method for urban flood modeling is presented to consider the parameter uncertainty of interaction models among a manhole, a sewer pipe, and surface flow. Laboratory-scale experiments on urban flood and inundation are performed under various flow conditions to investigate the parameter uncertainty of interaction models. The results show that ensemble simulation using interaction models based on weir and orifice formulas reproduces experimental data with high accuracy and detects the identifiability of model parameters. Among interaction-related parameters, the parameters of the sewer-manhole interaction show lower uncertainty than those of the sewer-surface interaction. Experimental data obtained under unsteady-state conditions are more informative than those obtained under steady-state conditions to assess the parameter uncertainty of interaction models. Although the optimal parameters vary according to the flow conditions, the difference is marginal. Simulation results also confirm the capability of the interaction models and the potential of the ensemble-based approaches to facilitate urban flood simulation.

  7. First identification of sub- and supercritical convection patterns from ‘GeoFlow’, the geophysical flow simulation experiment integrated in Fluid Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futterer, B.; Egbers, C.; Dahley, N.; Koch, S.; Jehring, L.

    2010-01-01

    Physical mechanisms of thermally driven rotating fluids are important for a large number of geophysical problems, e.g. to explain the convection of the Earth's liquid outer core. Objective of the 'GeoFlow' experiment is to study stability, pattern formation, and transition to chaos of thermal convection in fluid-filled concentric, co-axially rotating spheres. This experiment is integrated in the Fluid Science Laboratory of the European COLUMBUS module on International Space Station. Fluid dynamics of the experiment was predicted with numerical simulations by means of a spectral code. In the non-rotating case the onset of convection bifurcated into steady fluid flow. Here patterns of convection showed co-existing states with axisymmetric, cubic and pentagonal modes. Transition to chaos was in the form of sudden onset. For the thermal convection in rotating spheres the onset of first instability showed an increase of modes for higher parameter regime. Transition was from steady via periodic to chaotic behaviour. Convection patterns of the experiment are observed with the Wollaston shearing interferometry. Images are in terms of interferograms with fringe patterns corresponding to special convective flows. A first glance at the images showed the classification of sub- and supercritical flow regimes. Aligned with numerical data a shift between experiment and numerical simulation was identified. Identification of convection patterns in interferograms was demonstrated for the example of a supercritical flow.

  8. The use of novel DNA nanotracers to determine groundwater flow paths - a test study at the Grimsel Deep Underground Geothermal (DUG) Laboratory in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittilä, Anniina; Evans, Keith; Puddu, Michela; Mikutis, Gediminas; Grass, Robert N.; Deuber, Claudia; Saar, Martin O.

    2016-04-01

    earlier test. In this study, we present the results of tests of applying novel DNA nanotracers to characterize groundwater flow properties and the flow pathways in a fracture-dominated reservoir in the Deep Underground Geothermal (DUG) Laboratory at the Grimsel Test Site in the Swiss Alps. This study is motivated by subsequent comparisons of similar characterizations of fractured rock masses after hydraulic stimulation. These will take place at the DUG Lab at the end of 2016. The results of the flow-path characterization are also compared with those obtained from classical solute tracer tests.

  9. Supersymmetric Wilson loops at two loops

    CERN Document Server

    Bassetto, Antonio; Pucci, Fabrizio; Seminara, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    We study the quantum properties of certain BPS Wilson loops in ${\\cal N}=4$ supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. They belong to a general family, introduced recently, in which the addition of particular scalar couplings endows generic loops on $S^3$ with a fraction of supersymmetry. When restricted to $S^2$, their quantum average has been further conjectured to be exactly computed by the matrix model governing the zero-instanton sector of YM$_2$ on the sphere. We perform a complete two-loop analysis on a class of cusped Wilson loops lying on a two-dimensional sphere, finding perfect agreement with the conjecture. The perturbative computation reproduces the matrix-model expectation through a highly non-trivial interplay between ladder diagrams and self-energies/vertex contributions, suggesting the existence of a localization procedure.

  10. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.E.; Thomas, D.G.

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  11. Temperature and energy deficit in the ground during operation and recovery phases of closed-loop ground source heat pump system: Effect of the groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Selcuk; Francois, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    The advection/dispersion mechanism of the groundwater flow in the ground has a significant effect on a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) to enhance its thermal performance. However, the amount of energy extracted from the ground never disappears and only shifts with the magnitude of the effective thermal velocity in the infinite domain. In this work, we focus on the temperature and the energy balance of the ground in an advection/dispersion dominated heat transfer system during the operation period of a BHE and the subsequent recovery phase when the system is idle. The problem is treated with single BHE and multi-BHEs systems, for different representative geology and different groundwater flow velocity. In order to assess the thermal energy deficit due to heat extraction from the ground, we used the finite line source analytical model, developed recently (Erol et al., 2015) that provides the temperature distributions around the boreholes for discontinuous heat extraction. The model is developed based on the Green's function, which is the solution of heat conduction/advection/dispersion equation in porous media, for discontinuous heat extraction by analytically convoluting rectangular function or pulses in time domain. The results demonstrate the significant positive impact of the groundwater flow for the recovery in terms of temperature deficit at the location of the borehole. However, the total thermal energy deficit is not affected by the groundwater movement. The energy balance of the ground is the same no matter the prevailing heat transfer system, which can be only conduction or advection/dispersion. In addition, the energy balance of the ground is not based on either the duration of the production period operation or of the recovery phase, but depends on the total amount of heat that is extracted and on the bulk volumetric heat capacity of the ground.

  12. 闭式循环振荡热管内气液两相流数值模拟%Numerical simulation of vapor-liquid two-phase flow in closed loop oscillating heat pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘向东; 郝英立

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model including the effects of vapor-liquid interface and surface tension is proposed to describe the vapor-liquid two-phase flow, heat and mass transfer, and the phase change process in oscillating heat pipe (OHP) . The VOF (volume of fluid) method is used for the vapor-liquid distribution and interface motion and the CSF (continuum surface force) model is used for the effect of surface tension. The initial operation of a typical closed loop OHP was simulated based on the proposed model. The results indicate that the initial distribution of working fluid, the complex flow pattern such as bubbly flow, slug flow, semi-annular/annular flow, back-flow and the flow pattern transition can be predicted by the model. The phenomenon of annular flow and slug flow in alternating vertical tubes at initial circulation stage was also simulated successfully. The results coincide well with the experimental observations. The flow and heat transfer of working fluid in two transition sections at initial operation stage were analyzed. It is shown that the changes of temperature, pressure and flow pattern are obvious in the transition section between adiabatic section and condensing section, where the transition of heat transfer conditions takes place.%建立了考虑气液界面存在及其表面张力影响的较全面描述振荡热管内气液两相流动、传热传质和相变过程的气液两相流数理模型.模型中气液分布及界面运动采用VOF方法,表面张力影响采用CSF模型,对一典型闭式循环振荡热管起始工作阶段进行数值模拟.结果表明:所建立的模型成功模拟了振荡热管初始气液分布,启动阶段管内的泡状流、柱塞流、环状/半环状流和壁面回流等复杂气液流动流型和转变,以及起始循环阶段环状流和柱塞流在竖直管段内交替出现的现象.结果与相关定性实验观测非常一致,进而分析了启动阶段2个过渡管段内工质的流动及

  13. Influence of flow velocity and spatial heterogeneity on DNAPL migration in porous media: insights from laboratory experiments and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fei; Gao, Yanwei; Sun, Yuanyuan; Shi, Xiaoqing; Xu, Hongxia; Wu, Jichun

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the migration of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in complex subsurface systems is important for evaluating contamination source zones and designing remediation schemes after spill events. Six sandbox experiments were performed to explore the individual effect of flow velocity, and the combined effect of flow velocity and layered lenses on a DNAPL (PCE) migration in porous media. DNAPL saturation was measured using a light transmission system, and saturation distribution was quantified by spatial moments. The experimental results show that large flow velocity significantly promotes lateral and vertical migration of the low-viscosity DNAPL, while when layered lenses exist, the infiltration rate decreases and horizontal spread increases. Migration processes were numerically simulated, and the modelling results tested against experimental results. Furthermore, migration of DNAPLs with different viscosities was simulated to explore the combined effects of flow velocity and geological heterogeneity. Simulation results show that enhanced heterogeneity makes low-viscosity DNAPLs migrate along preferential pathways, resulting in irregular DNAPL morphology. Layered lenses combined with heterogeneity complicate the effect of flow velocity on the migration of low-viscosity DNAPLs by changing percolation paths. Results also demonstrate that flow velocity exhibits relatively little influence on the migration of medium/high-viscosity DNAPLs, which is predominantly controlled by viscosity and heterogeneity. Enhanced heterogeneity has a larger effect on migration behavior. Findings indicate that the migration paths and position of the source zone could change significantly, due to the combined effect of groundwater flow velocity and geological heterogeneity; thus, comprehensive hydrogeological investigation is needed to characterize the source zone.

  14. Single-laboratory validation of a multiplex flow cytometric immunoassay for the simultaneous detection of coccidiostats in eggs and feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bienenmann-Ploum, M.E.; Vincent, U.; Campbell, K.; Huet, A.C.; Haasnoot, W.; Delahaut, P.; Stolker, A.A.M.; Elliott, C.T.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2013-01-01

    Coccidiostats are authorized in the European Union (EU) to be used as poultry feed additives. Maximum (residue) levels (M(R)Ls) have been set within the EU for consumer and animal protection against unintended carry-over, and monitoring is compulsory. This paper describes the single-laboratory valid

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Program to Measure the Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor Lower Plenum for Validation of CFD Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-09-01

    The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a prismatic gas-cooled reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A description of the scaling analysis, experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that will be presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits high-quality measurements to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL MIR system is its large size which allows improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements

  16. Inter-comparison of laboratory smog chamber and flow reactor systems on organic aerosol yield and composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Bruns

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of tools are used to simulate atmospheric aging, including smog chambers and flow reactors. Traditional, large-scale smog chambers age emissions over the course of hours to days, whereas flow reactors rapidly age emissions using high oxidant concentrations to reach higher degrees of oxygenation than typically attained in smog chamber experiments. The atmospheric relevance of the products generated under such rapid oxidation warrants further study. However, no previously published studies have compared the yields and chemical composition of products generated in flow reactors and smog chambers from the same starting mixture. The yields and composition of the organic aerosol formed from the photo-oxidation of α-pinene and of wood combustion emissions were determined using aerosol mass spectrometry in a smog chamber (SC and two flow reactors: a potential aerosol mass reactor (PAM and a micro-smog chamber (MSC. Reactants were sampled from the SC and aged in the MSC and PAM using a range of hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations and then photo-chemically aged in the SC. The maximum yields/emission factors and the chemical composition of the products in both the α-pinene and wood combustion systems determined with the PAM and SC agreed reasonably well. High OH exposures have been shown previously to lower yields by breaking carbon-carbon bonds and forming higher volatility species, which reside largely in the gas phase, however, fragmentation in the PAM was not observed. The yields determined using the PAM for the α-pinene system were slightly lower than in the SC, possibly from increased wall losses of gas-phase species due to the higher surface area to volume ratios in the PAM, even when offset with better isolation of the sampled flow from the walls. The α-pinene SOA results for the MSC were not directly comparable, as particles were smaller than the optimal AMS transmission range. For the wood combustion system, emission factors

  17. Multi-Purpose Thermal Hydraulic Loop: Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST) Facility for Support of Advanced Reactor Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. O' Brien; Piyush Sabharwall; SuJong Yoon

    2001-11-01

    Effective and robust high temperature heat transfer systems are fundamental to the successful deployment of advanced reactors for both power generation and non-electric applications. Plant designs often include an intermediate heat transfer loop (IHTL) with heat exchangers at either end to deliver thermal energy to the application while providing isolation of the primary reactor system. In order to address technical feasibility concerns and challenges a new high-temperature multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility “Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test facility” (ARTIST) is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. The facility will include three flow loops: high-temperature helium, molten salt, and steam/water. Details of some of the design aspects and challenges of this facility, which is currently in the conceptual design phase, are discussed

  18. Cosmic string loop shapes

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J; Shlaer, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the shapes of cosmic string loops found in large-scale simulations of an expanding-universe string network. The simulation does not include gravitational back reaction, but we model that process by smoothing the loop using Lorentzian convolution. We find that loops at formation consist of generally straight segments separated by kinks. We do not see cusps or any cusp-like structure at the scale of the entire loop, although we do see very small regions of string that move with large Lorentz boosts. However, smoothing of the string almost always introduces two cusps on each loop. The smoothing process does not lead to any significant fragmentation of loops that were in non-self-intersecting trajectories before smoothing.

  19. Coxeter-Chein Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Blok, Rieuwert J

    2011-01-01

    In 1974 Orin Chein discovered a new family of Moufang loops which are now called Chein loops. Such a loop can be created from any group $W$ together with $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ by a variation on a semi-direct product. We study these loops in the case where $W$ is a Coxeter group and show that it has what we call a Chein-Coxeter system, a small set of generators of order 2, together with a set of relations closely related to the Coxeter relations and Chein relations. As a result we are able to give amalgam presentations for Coxeter-Chein loops. This is to our knowledge the first such presentation for a Moufang loop.

  20. Fiber reinforced composite loop space maintainer: An alternative to the conventional band and loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna Yeluri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The stainless steel band and loop appliance is the most commonly used fixed space maintainer in pediatric dentistry. But there are several disadvantages with this appliance such as the need for a cast or a working model, decalcification of the abutment tooth, loosening because of breakage or dissolution of the luting agent, tendency to get embedded in the soft tissue and the possibility of metal allergy. The purpose of this article is to present a simple, laboratory design of a "Fiber Reinforced Composite" (FRC loop space maintainer and discuss the advantages over the traditional band and loop space maintainers.

  1. Fiber reinforced composite loop space maintainer: An alternative to the conventional band and loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2012-04-01

    The stainless steel band and loop appliance is the most commonly used fixed space maintainer in pediatric dentistry. But there are several disadvantages with this appliance such as the need for a cast or a working model, decalcification of the abutment tooth, loosening because of breakage or dissolution of the luting agent, tendency to get embedded in the soft tissue and the possibility of metal allergy. The purpose of this article is to present a simple, laboratory design of a "Fiber Reinforced Composite" (FRC) loop space maintainer and discuss the advantages over the traditional band and loop space maintainers.

  2. Coxeter-Chein Loops

    OpenAIRE

    Blok, Rieuwert J.; Gagola III, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In 1974 Orin Chein discovered a new family of Moufang loops which are now called Chein loops. Such a loop can be created from any group $W$ together with $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ by a variation on a semi-direct product. We study these loops in the case where $W$ is a Coxeter group and show that it has what we call a Chein-Coxeter system, a small set of generators of order 2, together with a set of relations closely related to the Coxeter relations and Chein relations. As a result we are able to give am...

  3. Fluid Flow Patterns During Production from Gas Hydrates in the Laboratory compared to Field Settings: LARS vs. Mallik

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, B.; Heeschen, K. U.; Priegnitz, M.; Abendroth, S.; Spangenberg, E.; Thaler, J.; Schicks, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The GFZ's LArge Reservoir Simulator LARS allows for the simulation of the 2008 Mallik gas hydrate production test and the comparison of fluid flow patterns and their driving forces. Do we see the gas flow pattern described for Mallik [Uddin, M. et al., J. Can. Petrol Tech, 50, 70-89, 2011] in a pilot scale test? If so, what are the driving forces? LARS has a network of temperature sensors and an electric resistivity tomography (ERT) enabling a good spatial resolution of gas hydrate occurrences, water and gas distribution, and changes in temperature in the sample. A gas flow meter and a water trap record fluid flow patterns and a backpressure valve has controlled the depressurization equivalent to the three pressure stages (7.0 - 5.0 - 4.2 MPa) applied in the Mallik field test. The environmental temperature (284 K) and confining pressure (13 MPa) have been constant. The depressurization induced immediate endothermic gas hydrate dissociation until re-establishment of the stability conditions by a consequent temperature decrease. Slight gas hydrate dissociation continued at the top and upper lateral border due to the constant heat input from the environment. Here transport pathways were short and permeability higher due to lower gas hydrate saturation. At pressures of 7.0 and 5.0 MPa the LARS tests showed high water flow rates and short irregular spikes of gas production. The gas flow patterns at 4.2 MPa and 3.0MPa resembled those of the Mallik test. In LARS the initial gas surges overlap with times of hydrate instability while water content and lengths of pathways had increased. Water production was at a minimum. A rapidly formed continuous gas phase caused the initial gas surges and only after gas hydrate dissociation decreased to a minimum the single gas bubbles get trapped before slowly coalescing again. In LARS, where pathways were short and no additional water was added, a transport of microbubbles is unlikely to cause a gas surge as suggested for Mallik.

  4. Application of Carbonate Looping to Cement Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2012-01-01

    of sorbents in carbonate looping processes. The results show that the CO2 carrying capacity of limestone is much lower at realistic conditions than at mild conditions, which are often used in laboratory experiments. BET and SEM analyses show that the surface area of calcined limestone decreases significantly...

  5. Observational Evidence for Loop-Loop Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiping, W.; Guangli, H.; Yuhua, T.; Aoao, X.

    2004-01-01

    Through analysis of the data including the hard x-ray(BASTE) microwave(NoRP) and magnetogram(MDI from SOHO) as well as the images of soft x-ray(YHKOH) and EIT(SOHO) on Apr. 151998 solar flare in the active region 8203(N30W12) we found: (1) there are similar quasi period oscillation in the profile of hard x-ray flux (25-5050-100keV) and microwave flux(1GHz) with duration of 85+/-25s every peak includes two sub-peak structures; (2) in the preheat phase of the flare active magnetic field changes apparently and a s-pole spot emerges ; (3) several EIT and soft x-ray loops exist and turn into bright . All of these may suggest that loop-loop interaction indeed exist. Through reconnection the electrons may be accelerated and the hard x-ray and microwave emission take place.

  6. Uncertainty evaluation of data and information fusion within the context of the decision loop

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, J Pieter

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the principle taxonomy of the fusion process, the decision loop, is unified with uncertainty quantification and representation. A typical flow of information in the decision loop takes the form of raw information, uncertainty...

  7. Conceptional design of test loop for FIV in fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, W. G.; Yang, J. S.; Kim, S. W. [Hannam Univ., Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-01-01

    It is urgent to develop the analytical model for the structural/mechanical integrity of fuel rod. In general, it is not easy to develop a pure analytical model. Occasionally, experimental results have been utilized for the model. Because of this reason, it is required to design proper test loop. Using the optimized test loop, with the optimized test loop, the dynamic behaviour of the rod will be evaluated and the critical flow velocity, which the rod loses the stability in, will be measured for the design of the rod. To verify the integrity of the fuel rod, it is required to evaluate the dynamic behaviour and the critical flow velocity with the test loop. The test results will be utilized to the design of the rod. Generally, the rod has a ground vibration due to turbulence in wide range of flow velocity and the amplitude of vibration becomes larger by the resonance, in a range of the velocity where occurs vortex. The rod loses stability in critical flow velocity caused by fluid-elastic instability. For the purpose of the present work to perform the conceptional design of the test loop, it is necessary (1) to understand the mechanism of the flow-induced vibration and the related experimental coefficients, (2) to evaluate the existing test loops for improving the loop with design parameters and (3) to decide the design specifications of the major equipments of the loop. 35 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  8. Simulations of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Transport in the Vadose and Saturated Zones beneath Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay H. Birdsell; Kathleen M. Bower; Andrew V. Wolfsberg; Wendy E. Soll; Terry A. Cherry; Tade W. Orr

    1999-07-01

    Numerical simulations are used to predict the migration of radionuclides from the disposal units at Material Disposal Area G through the vadose zone and into the main aquifer in support of a radiological performance assessment and composite analysis for the site. The calculations are performed with the finite element code, FEHM. The transport of nuclides through the vadose zone is computed using a three-dimensional model that describes the complex mesa top geology of the site. The model incorporates the positions and inventories of thirty-four disposal pits and four shaft fields located at Area G as well as those of proposed future pits and shafts. Only three nuclides, C-14, Tc-99, and I-129, proved to be of concern for the groundwater pathway over a 10,000-year period. The spatial and temporal flux of these three nuclides from the vadose zone is applied as a source term for the three-dimensional saturated zone model of the main aquifer that underlies the site. The movement of these nuclides in the aquifer to a downstream location is calculated, and aquifer concentrations are converted to doses. Doses related to aquifer concentrations are six or more orders of magnitude lower than allowable Department of Energy performance objectives for low-level radioactive waste sites. Numerical studies were used to better understand vadose-zone flow through the dry mesa-top environment at Area G. These studies helped define the final model used to model flow and transport through the vadose zone. The study of transient percolation indicates that a steady flow vadose-zone model is adequate for computing contaminant flux to the aquifer. The fracture flow studies and the investigation of the effect of basalt and pumice properties helped us define appropriate hydrologic properties for the modeling. Finally, the evaporation study helped to justify low infiltration rates.

  9. Estrategias para Compensar no Linealidades Generadas por Válvulas en Lazos de Control de Flujo Strategies to Compensate Non-Linearities Generated by Valves in Flow Control Loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael E Vásquez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se compararon diferentes estrategias para compensar no linealidades generadas por válvulas en lazos de control de flujo. Se realizó la identificación de un proceso de flujo de líquido incompresible mediante una prueba en planta y se desarrolló un sistema de control por computador. En este sistema fueron implementados un controlador lineal PI y cuatro diferentes estrategias de compensación, usando LabVIEW®. La comparación fue realizada usando como índices de desempeño la integral del valor absoluto del error, el tiempo de estabilización y el sobrepaso. Las estrategias usadas permitieron mejorar el desempeño del controlador lineal en la zona de saturación del actuador. En conclusión, se puede considerar el uso de estos algoritmos para reemplazar elementos como controladores con auto-sintonía o posicionadores no lineales que elevan los costos de inversión y mantenimiento de la plantaIn this work, different strategies to compensate nonlinearities generated by valves in flow control loops were compared. The identification for an incompressible flow process was made through a plant test and a computer control system was developed. In this system a PI linear controller and four different compensation strategies were implemented using LabVIEW™. The comparison was made using the integral of the absolute value of the error, settling time and overshoot as performance indexes. The compared strategies allowed improving the performance of the linear controller in the actuator saturation zone. In conclusion, using these algorithms can be considered to replace elements as self-tuning controllers or nonlinear positioners that raise the inversion and maintenance costs of the plant

  10. Inter-comparison of laboratory smog chamber and flow reactor systems on organic aerosol yield and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, E. A.; El Haddad, I.; Keller, A.; Klein, F.; Kumar, N. K.; Pieber, S. M.; Corbin, J. C.; Slowik, J. G.; Brune, W. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-06-01

    A variety of tools are used to simulate atmospheric aging, including smog chambers and flow reactors. Traditional, large-scale smog chambers age emissions over the course of hours to days, whereas flow reactors rapidly age emissions using high oxidant concentrations to reach higher degrees of oxygenation than typically attained in smog chamber experiments. The atmospheric relevance of the products generated under such rapid oxidation warrants further study. However, no previously published studies have compared the yields and chemical composition of products generated in flow reactors and smog chambers from the same starting mixture. The yields and composition of the organic aerosol formed from the photo-oxidation of α-pinene and of wood-combustion emissions in a smog chamber (SC) and two flow reactors: a potential aerosol mass reactor (PAM) and a micro-smog chamber (MSC), were determined using aerosol mass spectrometry. Reactants were sampled from the SC and aged in the MSC and the PAM using a range of hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations and then photo-chemically aged in the SC. The chemical composition, as well as the maximum yields and emission factors, of the products in both the α-pinene and wood-combustion systems determined with the PAM and the SC agreed reasonably well. High OH exposures have been shown previously to lower yields by breaking carbon-carbon bonds and forming higher volatility species, which reside largely in the gas phase; however, fragmentation in the PAM was not observed. The yields determined using the PAM for the α-pinene system were slightly lower than in the SC, possibly from increased wall losses of gas phase species due to the higher surface area to volume ratios in the PAM, even when offset with better isolation of the sampled flow from the walls. The α-pinene SOA results for the MSC were not directly comparable, as particles were smaller than the optimal AMS transmission range. The higher supersaturation in the flow reactors

  11. ISS COLUMBUS laboratory experiment `GeoFlow I and II' -fluid physics research in microgravity environment to study convection phenomena inside deep Earth and mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futterer, Birgit; Egbers, Christoph; Chossat, Pascal; Hollerbach, Rainer; Breuer, Doris; Feudel, Fred; Mutabazi, Innocent; Tuckerman, Laurette

    Overall driving mechanism of flow in inner Earth is convection in its gravitational buoyancy field. A lot of effort has been involved in theoretical prediction and numerical simulation of both the geodynamo, which is maintained by convection, and mantle convection, which is the main cause for plate tectonics. Especially resolution of convective patterns and heat transfer mechanisms has been in focus to reach the real, highly turbulent conditions inside Earth. To study specific phenomena experimentally different approaches has been observed, against the background of magneto-hydrodynamic but also on the pure hydrodynamic physics of fluids. With the experiment `GeoFlow' (Geophysical Flow Simulation) instability and transition of convection in spherical shells under the influence of central-symmetry buoyancy force field are traced for a wide range of rotation regimes within the limits between non-rotating and rapid rotating spheres. The special set-up of high voltage potential between inner and outer sphere and use of a dielectric fluid as working fluid induce an electro-hydrodynamic force, which is comparable to gravitational buoyancy force inside Earth. To reduce overall gravity in a laboratory this technique requires microgravity conditions. The `GeoFlow I' experiment was accomplished on International Space Station's module COLUM-BUS inside Fluid Science Laboratory FSL und supported by EADS Astrium, Friedrichshafen, User Support und Operations Centre E-USOC in Madrid, Microgravity Advanced Research and Support Centre MARS in Naples, as well as COLUMBUS Control Center COL-CC Munich. Running from August 2008 until January 2009 it delivered 100.000 images from FSL's optical diagnostics module; here more precisely the Wollaston shearing interferometry was used. Here we present the experimental alignment with numerical prediction for the non-rotating and rapid rotation case. The non-rotating case is characterized by a co-existence of several stationary supercritical

  12. What Controls DNA Looping?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela J. Perez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The looping of DNA provides a means of communication between sequentially distant genomic sites that operate in tandem to express, copy, and repair the information encoded in the DNA base sequence. The short loops implicated in the expression of bacterial genes suggest that molecular factors other than the naturally stiff double helix are involved in bringing the interacting sites into close spatial proximity. New computational techniques that take direct account of the three-dimensional structures and fluctuations of protein and DNA allow us to examine the likely means of enhancing such communication. Here, we describe the application of these approaches to the looping of a 92 base-pair DNA segment between the headpieces of the tetrameric Escherichia coli Lac repressor protein. The distortions of the double helix induced by a second protein—the nonspecific nucleoid protein HU—increase the computed likelihood of looping by several orders of magnitude over that of DNA alone. Large-scale deformations of the repressor, sequence-dependent features in the DNA loop, and deformability of the DNA operators also enhance looping, although to lesser degrees. The correspondence between the predicted looping propensities and the ease of looping derived from gene-expression and single-molecule measurements lends credence to the derived structural picture.

  13. CRADA with Beckman Instruments and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL-013): Development and commercialization of the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFA) using characterization of aridisols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, J.; Conca, J.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to develop and commercialize a technology conceived by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and manufactured by Beckman Instruments, Inc. (Beckman), and to apply this technology to the characterization of and soils. The technology is the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFA). The UFA provides a highly efficient method of direct, rapid measurement of hydraulic conductivity and other flow properties according to Darcy-Buckingham principles because the operator controls both the fluid driving force, using an ultracentrifuge, and the flow into the sample while it is spinning, with a rotating seal assembly. The concept of using centrifugation to significantly decrease the time needed, from years or months to days, for study of subsurface transport, particularly under unsaturated conditions, was conceived by James Conca, Ph.D., and Judith Wright, Ph.D., in 1986. The prototype UFA was developed in 1988 because there was a need to rapidly and accurately determine transport parameters in soils, sediments, and rocks for the Grout Waste Disposal Program. Transport parameters are critical to modeling outcomes for site-specific solutions to environmental remediation and waste disposal problems.

  14. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boosted Fast Flux Loop Project Staff

    2009-09-01

    The Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) project was initiated to determine basic feasibility of designing, constructing, and installing in a host irradiation facility, an experimental vehicle that can replicate with reasonable fidelity the fast-flux test environment needed for fuels and materials irradiation testing for advanced reactor concepts. Originally called the Gas Test Loop (GTL) project, the activity included (1) determination of requirements that must be met for the GTL to be responsive to potential users, (2) a survey of nuclear facilities that may successfully host the GTL, (3) conceptualizing designs for hardware that can support the needed environments for neutron flux intensity and energy spectrum, atmosphere, flow, etc. needed by the experimenters, and (4) examining other aspects of such a system, such as waste generation and disposal, environmental concerns, needs for additional infrastructure, and requirements for interfacing with the host facility. A revised project plan included requesting an interim decision, termed CD-1A, that had objectives of' establishing the site for the project at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), deferring the CD 1 application, and authorizing a research program that would resolve the most pressing technical questions regarding GTL feasibility, including issues relating to the use of booster fuel in the ATR. Major research tasks were (1) hydraulic testing to establish flow conditions through the booster fuel, (2) mini-plate irradiation tests and post-irradiation examination to alleviate concerns over corrosion at the high heat fluxes planned, (3) development and demonstration of booster fuel fabrication techniques, and (4) a review of the impact of the GTL on the ATR safety basis. A revised cooling concept for the apparatus was conceptualized, which resulted in renaming the project to the BFFL. Before the subsequent CD-1 approval request could be made, a decision was made in April

  15. Testing loop quantum cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2017-03-01

    Loop quantum cosmology predicts that quantum gravity effects resolve the big-bang singularity and replace it by a cosmic bounce. Furthermore, loop quantum cosmology can also modify the form of primordial cosmological perturbations, for example by reducing power at large scales in inflationary models or by suppressing the tensor-to-scalar ratio in the matter bounce scenario; these two effects are potential observational tests for loop quantum cosmology. In this article, I review these predictions and others, and also briefly discuss three open problems in loop quantum cosmology: its relation to loop quantum gravity, the trans-Planckian problem, and a possible transition from a Lorentzian to a Euclidean space-time around the bounce point.

  16. Three-Loop Automatic of Control System the Landfill of Household Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereda, T. G.; Kostarev, S. N.

    2017-05-01

    The analysis of models of governance ground municipal solid waste (MSW). Considered a distributed circuit (spatio-temporal) ground control model. Developed a dynamic model of multicontour control landfill. Adjustable parameters are defined (the ratio of CH4 CO2 emission/fluxes, concentrations of heavy metals ions) and control (purging array, irrigation, adding reagents). Based on laboratory studies carried out with the analysis of equity flows and procedures developed by the transferring matrix that takes into account the relationship control loops. A system of differential equations in the frequency and time domains. Given the numerical approaches solving systems of differential equations in finite differential form.

  17. Can the Dupuit-Thiem equation accurately describe the flow pattern induced by injection in a laboratory scale aquifer-well system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Jose; Kalwa, Fritz; Händel, Falk; Binder, Martin; Stefan, Catalin

    2016-04-01

    The Dupuit-Thiem equation is normally used to assess flow towards a pumping well in unconfined aquifers under steady-state conditions. For the formulation of the equation it is assumed that flow is laminar, radial and horizontal towards the well. It is well known that these assumptions are not met in the vicinity of the well; some authors restrict the application of the equation only to a radius larger than 1.5-fold the aquifer thickness. In this study, the equation accuracy to predict the pressure head is evaluated as a simple and quick analytical method to describe the flow pattern for different injection rates in the LSAW. A laboratory scale aquifer-well system (LSAW) was implemented to study the aquifer recharge through wells. The LSAW consists of a 1.0 m-diameter tank with a height of 1.1 meters, filled with sand and a screened well in the center with a diameter of 0.025 m. A regulated outflow system establishes a controlled water level at the tank wall to simulate various aquifer thicknesses. The pressure head at the bottom of the tank along one axis can be measured to assess the flow profile every 0.1 m between the well and the tank wall. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the Dupuit-Thiem equation, a combination of different injection rates and aquifer thicknesses were simulated in the LSAW. Contrary to what was expected (significant differences between the measured and calculated pressure heads in the well), the absolute difference between the calculated and measured pressure head is less than 10%. Beside this, the highest differences are not observed in the well itself, but in the near proximity of it, at a radius of 0.1 m. The results further show that the difference between the calculated and measured pressure heads tends to decrease with higher flow rates. Despite its limitations (assumption of laminar and horizontal flow throughout the whole aquifer), the Dupuit-Thiem equation is considered to accurately represent the flow system in the LSAW.

  18. Comparison between traditional laboratory tests, permeability measurements and CT-based fluid flow modelling for cultural heritage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boever, Wesley; Bultreys, Tom; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the possibility to use on-site permeability measurements for cultural heritage applications as an alternative for traditional laboratory tests such as determination of the capillary absorption coefficient. These on-site measurements, performed with a portable air permeameter, were correlated with the pore network properties of eight sandstones and one granular limestone that are discussed in this paper. The network properties of the 9 materials tested in this study were obtained from micro-computed tomography (μCT) and compared to measurements and calculations of permeability and the capillary absorption rate of the stones under investigation, in order to find the correlation between pore network characteristics and fluid management characteristics of these sandstones. Results show a good correlation between capillary absorption, permeability and network properties, opening the possibility of using on-site permeability measurements as a standard method in cultural heritage applications.

  19. Space Station evolution study oxygen loop closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M. G.; Delong, D.

    1993-01-01

    In the current Space Station Freedom (SSF) Permanently Manned Configuration (PMC), physical scars for closing the oxygen loop by the addition of oxygen generation and carbon dioxide reduction hardware are not included. During station restructuring, the capability for oxygen loop closure was deferred to the B-modules. As such, the ability to close the oxygen loop in the U.S. Laboratory module (LAB A) and the Habitation A module (HAB A) is contingent on the presence of the B modules. To base oxygen loop closure of SSF on the funding of the B-modules may not be desirable. Therefore, this study was requested to evaluate the necessary hooks and scars in the A-modules to facilitate closure of the oxygen loop at or subsequent to PMC. The study defines the scars for oxygen loop closure with impacts to cost, weight and volume and assesses the effects of byproduct venting. In addition, the recommended scenarios for closure with regard to topology and packaging are presented.

  20. CFD and laboratory analysis of axial cross-flow velocity in porous tube packed with differently structured static turbulence promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar Igor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational fluid dynamics (CFD was used for modelling flow regime in a porous tube. This tube is an ultrafiltration membrane filter made from zirconium-oxide which is very effective in the separation of stable oil-in-water microemulsions, especially when the tube is filled with static mixer. The results of the CFD analysis were used in the preliminary optimisation of the static mixer’s geometry since it has significant effect the energy requirement of this advanced membrane technology. The self-developed static mixers were tested “in vitro” from the aspect of separation quality and process productivity as well to validate CFD results and to develop a cost effective, green method to recover unmanageable oily wastewaters for sustainable development. In this work the results of computational simulation of the fluid velocity and membrane separation experiments are discussed.

  1. Slipping magnetic reconnection in coronal loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulanier, Guillaume; Golub, Leon; Deluca, Edward E; Cirtain, Jonathan W; Kano, Ryouhei; Lundquist, Loraine L; Narukage, Noriyuki; Sakao, Taro; Weber, Mark A

    2007-12-07

    Magnetic reconnection of solar coronal loops is the main process that causes solar flares and possibly coronal heating. In the standard model, magnetic field lines break and reconnect instantaneously at places where the field mapping is discontinuous. However, another mode may operate where the magnetic field mapping is continuous but shows steep gradients: The field lines may slip across each other. Soft x-ray observations of fast bidirectional motions of coronal loops, observed by the Hinode spacecraft, support the existence of this slipping magnetic reconnection regime in the Sun's corona. This basic process should be considered when interpreting reconnection, both on the Sun and in laboratory-based plasma experiments.

  2. Comparison between traditional laboratory tests, permeability measurements and CT-based fluid flow modelling for cultural heritage applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Boever, Wesley, E-mail: Wesley.deboever@ugent.be [UGCT/PProGRess, Dept. of Geology, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Bultreys, Tom; Derluyn, Hannelore [UGCT/PProGRess, Dept. of Geology, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoorebeke, Luc [UGCT/Radiation Physics, Dept. of Physics & Astronomy, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cnudde, Veerle [UGCT/PProGRess, Dept. of Geology, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the possibility to use on-site permeability measurements for cultural heritage applications as an alternative for traditional laboratory tests such as determination of the capillary absorption coefficient. These on-site measurements, performed with a portable air permeameter, were correlated with the pore network properties of eight sandstones and one granular limestone that are discussed in this paper. The network properties of the 9 materials tested in this study were obtained from micro-computed tomography (μCT) and compared to measurements and calculations of permeability and the capillary absorption rate of the stones under investigation, in order to find the correlation between pore network characteristics and fluid management characteristics of these sandstones. Results show a good correlation between capillary absorption, permeability and network properties, opening the possibility of using on-site permeability measurements as a standard method in cultural heritage applications. - Highlights: • Measurements of capillary absorption are compared to in-situ permeability. • We obtain pore size distribution and connectivity by using micro-CT. • These properties explain correlation between permeability and capillarity. • Correlation between both methods is good to excellent. • Permeability measurements could be a good alternative to capillarity measurement.

  3. Evaluation of Variable Refrigerant Flow Systems Performance on Oak Ridge National Laboratory s Flexible Research Platform: Part 1 Cooling Season Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Piljae [ORNL; Malhotra, Mini [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL

    2016-08-01

    This report provides second-year cooling season test results for the multi-year project titled “Evaluation of Variable Refrigeration Flow (VRF) System on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)’s Flexible Research Platform (FRP).” The purpose of the second-year project was to (1) evaluate the full- and partload performance of VRF systems compared with an existing baseline heating, ventilation, and airconditioning (HVAC) system, which is a conventional rooftop unit (RTU) variable-air-volume (VAV) system with electric resistance heating and (2) use hourly building energy simulation to evaluate the energy savings potential of using VRF systems in major US cities. The second-year project performance period was from July 2015 through June 2016.

  4. A Method for Evaluating the Efficacy of Antifouling Paints Using Mytilus galloprovincialis in the Laboratory in a Flow-Through System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satuito, Cyril Glenn Perez; Katsuyama, Ichiro; Ando, Hirotomo; Seki, Yasuyuki; Senda, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory test with a flow-through system was designed and its applicability for testing antifouling paints of varying efficacies was investigated. Six different formulations of antifouling paints were prepared to have increasing contents (0 to 40 wt.%) of Cu2O, which is the most commonly used antifouling substance, and each formulation of paint was coated on just one surface of every test plate. The test plates were aged for 45 days by rotating them at a speed of 10 knots inside a cylinder drum. A behavioral test was then conducted using five mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) that were pasted onto the coated surface of each aged test plate. The number of the byssus threads produced by each mussel generally decreased with increasing Cu2O content of the paint. The newly designed method was considered valid owing to the high consistency of its results with observations from the field experiment. PMID:27959916

  5. [Fractional flow reserve and instantaneous wave-free ratio for the physiological assessment of coronary artery stenosis in the catheterization laboratory: Practical tips].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, F; Tadros, V X; Pighi, M; Spagnoli, V; De Hemptinne, Q; Ly, H Q

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, a large body of evidence has revealed the limitations of angiographic evaluation in determining the physiological significance of coronary stenosis, particularly when these are intermediate lesions. Percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) guided by physiological assessment using fractional flow reserve (FFR) have been shown to reduce cardiovascular events when compared to angiography alone. Recently, another coronary physiologic parameter has been introduced: the "instantaneous wave-free ratio" (iFR). In this review, we will discuss the FFR, the iFR, and their use in the functional assessment of coronary stenosis in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This review will cover theoretical aspects for non-interventional cardiologists, as well as practice points and common pitfalls related to coronary physiological assessment for interventional cardiologists.

  6. Active control of one or more EGR loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Michael J.; Cunningham, Michael J.; Henry, Cary A.

    2017-08-08

    Active control of one or more exhaust gas recirculation loops is provided to manage and EGR fraction in the charge flow to produce desired operating conditions and/or provide diagnostics in response to at least one of an oxygen concentration and a NOx concentration in the charge flow and in the exhaust flow.

  7. Numerical simulation of a natural circulation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verissimo, Gabriel L.; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes; Faccini, Jose Luiz H., E-mail: gabrielverissimo@poli.ufrj.b, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.b, E-mail: faccini@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work presents a numerical simulation of a natural circulation loop using computational fluid dynamics. The simulated loop is an experimental model in a reduced scale of 1:10 of a passive heat removal system typical of advanced PWR reactors. The loop is composed of a heating vessel containing 52 electric heaters, a vertical shell-tube heat exchanger and a column of expansion. The working fluid is distilled water. Initially it was created a tridimensional geometric model of the loop components. After that, it was generated a tridimensional mesh of finite elements in order to calculate the variables of the problem. The boundaries of the numerical simulation were the power of the electric resistances and the cooling flow in the secondary side of the heat exchanger. The initial conditions were the temperature, the pressure and the fluid velocity at the time just before the power has been switched on. The results of this simulation were compared with the experimental data, in terms of the evolution of the temperatures in different locations of the loop, and of the average natural circulation flow as a function of time for a given power. (author)

  8. Natively unstructured loops differ from other loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner Schlessinger

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%-70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein-protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested

  9. Natively unstructured loops differ from other loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessinger, Avner; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard

    2007-07-01

    Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions) differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%-70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein-protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested that long

  10. Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. This course will discuss operating principles and performance characteristics of a loop heat pipe. Topics include: 1) pressure profiles in the loop; 2) loop operating temperature; 3) operating temperature control; 4) loop startup; 4) loop shutdown; 5) loop transient behaviors; 6) sizing of loop components and determination of fluid inventory; 7) analytical modeling; 8) examples of flight applications; and 9) recent LHP developments.

  11. Inverse spin Hall effect in a closed loop circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omori, Y.; Auvray, F.; Wakamura, T.; Niimi, Y., E-mail: niimi@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Fert, A. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, 91767 Palaiseau France associée à l' Université de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Otani, Y. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); RIKEN-CEMS, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-06-16

    We present measurements of inverse spin Hall effects (ISHEs), in which the conversion of a spin current into a charge current via the ISHE is detected not as a voltage in a standard open circuit but directly as the charge current generated in a closed loop. The method is applied to the ISHEs of Bi-doped Cu and Pt. The derived expression of ISHE for the loop structure can relate the charge current flowing into the loop to the spin Hall angle of the SHE material and the resistance of the loop.

  12. Steady-State and Transient Groundwater Flow and Advective Transport, Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory and Vicinity, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, J. C.; Ackerman, D. J.; Rousseau, J. P.; Rattray, G. W.

    2009-12-01

    Three-dimensional steady-state and transient models of groundwater flow and advective transport through the fractured basalts and interbedded sediments of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The model domain covers an area of 1,940 square miles that includes most of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A 50-year history of waste disposal at the INL has resulted in measurable concentrations of waste contaminants in the aquifer. Numerical models simulated 1980 steady-state conditions and transient flow for 1980-95. In the transient model, streamflow infiltration was the major stress. The models were calibrated using the parameter-estimation program incorporated in MODFLOW-2000. The steady-state model reasonably simulated the observed water-table altitude and gradients. Simulation of transient conditions reproduced changes in the flow system resulting from episodic infiltration from the Big Lost River. Analysis of simulations shows that flow is (1) dominantly horizontal through interflow zones in basalt, vertical anisotropy resulting from contrasts in hydraulic conductivity of different types of basalt and the interbedded sediments, (2) temporally variable due to streamflow infiltration from the Big Lost River, and (3) moving downward downgradient of the INL. Particle-tracking simulations were used to evaluate how simulated groundwater flow paths and travel times differ between the steady-state and transient flow models, and how well model-derived groundwater flow directions and velocities compare to independently-derived estimates. Particle tracking also was used to simulate the growth of tritium plumes originating at two INL facilities over a 16 year period under steady-state and transient flow conditions (1953-68). The shape, dimensions, and areal extent of these plumes were compared to a map of the plumes for 1968 from tritium releases beginning in 1952

  13. Using laboratory flow experiments and reactive chemical transport modeling for designing waterflooding of the Agua Fria Reservoir, Poza Rica-Altamira Field, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkle, P.; Pruess, K.; Xu, T.; Figueroa, R.A. Hernandez; Lopez, M. Diaz; Lopez, E. Contreras

    2008-10-01

    permeability reduction due to calcite precipitation, which is promoted by the retrograde solubility of this mineral. Using treated water that performed well in the laboratory flow experiments was found to avoid excessive precipitation, and allowed injection to proceed.

  14. Rapid and sensitive detection of novel avian-origin influenza A (H7N9 virus by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a lateral-flow device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyue Ge

    Full Text Available A severe disease in humans caused by a novel avian-origin influenza A (H7N9 virus emerged in China recently, which has caused at least 128 cases and 26 deaths. Rapid detection of the novel H7N9 virus is urgently needed to differentiate the disease from other infections, and to facilitate infection control as well as epidemiologic investigations. In this study, a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a lateral flow device (RT-LAMP-LFD assay to rapidly detect H7N9 virus was developed and evaluated. The RT-LAMP primers were designed to target the haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of H7N9 virus. Results of 10-fold dilution series assays showed that analysis of RT-LAMP products by the LFD method was as sensitive as real-time turbidity detection, and that the analytic sensitivities of the HA and NA RT-LAMP assays were both 10 copies of synthetic RNA. Furthermore, both the assays showed 100% clinical specificity for identification of H7N9 virus. The performance characteristics of the RT-LAMP-LFD assay were evaluated with 80 clinical specimens collected from suspected H7N9 patients. The NA RT-LAMP-LFD assay was more sensitive than real time RT-PCR assay. Compared with a combination of virus culture and real-time RT-PCR, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the RT-LAMP-LFD assay were all 100%. Overall, The RT-LAMP-LFD assay established in this study can be used as a reliable method for early diagnosis of the avian-origin influenza A (H7N9 virus infection.

  15. A loop quantum multiverse?

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Inhomogeneous space-times in loop quantum cosmology have come under better control with recent advances in effective methods. Even highly inhomogeneous situations, for which multiverse scenarios provide extreme examples, can now be considered at least qualitatively.

  16. Blind loop syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of the stomach) and operations for extreme obesity As a complication of inflammatory bowel disease Diseases such as diabetes or scleroderma may slow down movement in a segment of the intestine, leading to blind loop syndrome.

  17. Diffusion of Wilson Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Brzoska, A M; Negele, J W; Thies, M

    2004-01-01

    A phenomenological analysis of the distribution of Wilson loops in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory is presented in which Wilson loop distributions are described as the result of a diffusion process on the group manifold. It is shown that, in the absence of forces, diffusion implies Casimir scaling and, conversely, exact Casimir scaling implies free diffusion. Screening processes occur if diffusion takes place in a potential. The crucial distinction between screening of fundamental and adjoint loops is formulated as a symmetry property related to the center symmetry of the underlying gauge theory. The results are expressed in terms of an effective Wilson loop action and compared with various limits of SU(2) Yang-Mills theory.

  18. Average velocity field of the air flow over the water surface in a laboratory modeling of storm and hurricane conditions in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaurov, A. A.; Troitskaya, Yu. I.; Sergeev, D. A.; Vdovin, M. I.; Baidakov, G. A.

    2014-07-01

    Laboratory experiments on studying the structure of the turbulent air boundary layer over waves were carried out at the Wind-Wave Channel of the Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS), in conditions modeling the near-water boundary layer of the atmosphere under strong and hurricane winds and the equivalent wind velocities from 10 to 48 m/s at the standard height of 10 m. A modified technique of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to obtain turbulent pulsation averaged velocity fields of the air flow over the water surface curved by a wave and average profiles of the wind velocity. The measurements showed that the logarithmic part of the velocity profile of the air flow in the channel was observed in the immediate vicinity from the water surface (at a distance of 30 mm) and could be detected only using remote methods (PIV). According to the measured velocity profiles, dependences of aerodynamic drag factors of the water surface on the wind velocity at a height of 10 m were retrieved; they were compared with results of contact measurements carried out earlier on the same setup. It is shown that they agree with an accuracy of up to 20%; at moderate and strong wind velocities the coincidence falls within the experimental accuracy.

  19. Detection and quantification of bacterial autofluorescence at the single-cell level by a laboratory-built high-sensitivity flow cytometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lingling; Zhou, Yingxing; Zhu, Shaobin; Huang, Tianxun; Wu, Lina; Yan, Xiaomei

    2012-02-07

    Cellular autofluorescence can affect the sensitivity of fluorescence microscopic or flow cytometric assays by interfering with or even precluding the detection of low-level specific fluorescence. Here we developed a method to detect and quantify bacterial autofluorescence in the green region of the spectrum at the single-cell level using a laboratory-built high-sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM). The detection of the very weak bacterial autofluorescence was confirmed by analyzing polystyrene beads of comparable and larger size than bacteria in parallel. Dithionite reduction and air re-exposure experiments verified that the green autofluorescence mainly originates from endogenous flavins. Bacterial autofluorescence was quantified by calibrating the fluorescence intensity of nanospheres with known FITC equivalents, and autofluorescence distribution was generated by analyzing thousands of bacterial cells in 1 min. Among the eight bacterial strains tested, it was found that bacterial autofluorescence can vary from 80 to 1400 FITC equivalents per cell, depending on the bacterial species, and a relatively large cell-to-cell variation in autofluorescence intensity was observed. Quantitative measurements of bacterial autofluorescence provide a reference for the background signals that can be expected with bacteria, which is important in guiding studies of low-level gene expression and for the detection of low-abundance biological molecules in individual bacterial cells. This paper presents the first quantification of bacterial autofluorescence in FITC equivalents.

  20. From Loops to Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, H

    2010-01-01

    The generating function for all antisymmetric characters of a Wilson loop matrix in SU(N) Yang Mills theory is the partition function of a fermion living on the curve describing the loop. This generalizes to fermion subsystems living on higher dimensional submanifolds, for example, surfaces. This write-up also contains some extra background, in response to some questions raised during the oral presentation.

  1. Loop Optimization for Tensor Network Renormalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuo; Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a tensor renormalization group scheme for coarse graining a two-dimensional tensor network that can be successfully applied to both classical and quantum systems on and off criticality. The key innovation in our scheme is to deform a 2D tensor network into small loops and then optimize the tensors on each loop. In this way, we remove short-range entanglement at each iteration step and significantly improve the accuracy and stability of the renormalization flow. We demonstrate our algorithm in the classical Ising model and a frustrated 2D quantum model.

  2. On closed loop transient response system identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christer Dalen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Some methods for transient closed loop step response system identification presented in the literature are reviewed. Interestingly some errors in a method published in the early 80's where propagated into a recently published method. These methods are reviewed and some improved methods are suggested and presented. The methods are compared against each other on some closed loop system examples, e.g. a well pipeline-riser severe-slugging flow regime example, using Monte Carlo simulations for comparison of the methods.

  3. Center-vortex loops with one selfintersection

    CERN Document Server

    Moosmann, Julain

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the 2D behavior of one-fold selfintersecting, topologically stabilized center-vortex loops in the confining phase of an SU(2) Yang-Mills theory. This coarse-graining is described by curve-shrinking evolution of center-vortex loops immersed in a flat 2D plane driving the renormalization-group flow of an effective `action'. We observe that the system evolves into a highly ordered state at finite noise level, and we speculate that this feature is connected with 2D planar high $T_c$ superconductivity in $FeAs$ systems.

  4. Loop Optimization for Tensor Network Renormalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuo; Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    2017-03-17

    We introduce a tensor renormalization group scheme for coarse graining a two-dimensional tensor network that can be successfully applied to both classical and quantum systems on and off criticality. The key innovation in our scheme is to deform a 2D tensor network into small loops and then optimize the tensors on each loop. In this way, we remove short-range entanglement at each iteration step and significantly improve the accuracy and stability of the renormalization flow. We demonstrate our algorithm in the classical Ising model and a frustrated 2D quantum model.

  5. Theoretical study on a solar collector loop during stagnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ziqian; Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon;

    2010-01-01

    A mathematical model simulating the stagnation behavior of a pressurized solar collector loop with solar collectors with a good emptying behavior is developed. Based on the pre-pressure of the expansion vessel, the system filling pressure of the solar collector loop and the design of the solar...... collector loop, the mass of the fluid flowing into the pressurized expansion vessel and the pressures at the top part and at the bottom part of the solar collector loop during stagnation for the solar collector loop are calculated. The theoretically calculated results are compared with experimental results....... There is a good agreement between calculations and measurements. The developed simulation model is therefore suitable to determine the behavior of solar collector loops during stagnation....

  6. Theoretical study on a solar collector loop during stagnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ziqian; Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon;

    A mathematical model simulating the stagnation behavior of a pressurized solar collector loop with solar collectors with a good emptying behavior is developed. Based on the pre-pressure of the expansion vessel, the system filling pressure of the solar collector loop and the design of the solar...... collector loop, the mass of the fluid flowing into the pressurized expansion vessel and the pressures at the top part and at the bottom part of the solar collector loop during stagnation for the solar collector loop are calculated. The theoretically calculated results are compared with experimental results....... There is a good agreement between calculations and measurements. The developed simulation model is therefore suitable to determine the behavior of solar collector loops during stagnation....

  7. Design and Commissioning Test of WKN Sodium Thermodynamic Test Loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the research of fast reactor a sodium thermodynamic test loop was designed and commissioned. Its highest operating temperature is 700℃, after the sodium is passed the cooler, the temperature of the sodium can be reduced to 300 ℃; the sodium flow is 0.2 m3/h. The loop consists of sodium electromagnetic pump, sodium flow meter, two groups of heater, two groups of cooler, surge tank, sodium vapor trap, diffusion cold trap, sodium transportation tank, electric control panel and microprocessor. It has two experimental bypass loops for research of heat transfer

  8. Characterizing oxidative flow reactor SOA production and OH radical exposure from laboratory experiments of complex mixtures (engine exhaust) and simple precursors (monoterpenes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Link, M. L.; Friedman, B.; Ortega, J. V.; Son, J.; Kim, J.; Park, G.; Park, T.; Kim, K.; Lee, T.; Farmer, D.

    2016-12-01

    Recent commercialization of the Oxidative Flow Reactor (OFR, occasionally described in the literature as a "Potential Aerosol Mass") has created the opportunity for many researchers to explore the mechanisms behind OH-driven aerosol formation on a wide range of oxidative timescales (hours to weeks) in both laboratory and field measurements. These experiments have been conducted in both laboratory and field settings, including simple (i.e. single component) and complex (multi-component) precursors. Standard practices for performing OFR experiments, and interpreting data from the measurements, are still being developed. Measurement of gas and particle phase chemistry, from oxidation products generated in the OFR, through laboratory studies on single precursors and the measurement of SOA from vehicle emissions on short atmospheric timescales represent two very different experiments in which careful experimental design is essential for exploring reaction mechanisms and SOA yields. Two parameters essential in experimental design are (1) the role of seed aerosol in controlling gas-particle partitioning and SOA yields, and (2) the accurate determination of OH exposure during any one experiment. We investigated the role of seed aerosol surface area in controlling the observed SOA yields and gas/particle composition from the OH-initiated oxidation of four monoterpenes using an aerosol chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer and scanning mobility particle sizer. While the OH exposure during laboratory experiments is simple to constrain, complex mixtures such as diesel exhaust have high estimated OH reactivity values, and thus require careful consideration. We developed methods for constraining OH radical exposure in the OFR during vehicle exhaust oxidation experiments. We observe changes in O/C ratios and highly functionalized species over the temperature gradient employed in the aerosol-CIMS measurement. We relate this observed, speciated chemistry to the

  9. Genetic Programming with Simple Loops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Yuesheng; WANG Baozhong; KANG Lishan

    1999-01-01

    A kind of loop function LoopN inGenetic Programming (GP) is proposed.Different from other forms of loopfunction, such as While-Do and Repeat-Until, LoopNtakes only oneargument as its loop body and makes its loop body simply run N times,soinfinite loops will never happen. The problem of how to avoid too manylayers ofloops in Genetic Programming is also solved. The advantage ofLoopN in GP is shown bythe computational results in solving the mowerproblem.

  10. Logical inference techniques for loop parallelization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oancea, Cosmin Eugen; Rauchwerger, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a fully automatic approach to loop parallelization that integrates the use of static and run-time analysis and thus overcomes many known difficulties such as nonlinear and indirect array indexing and complex control flow. Our hybrid analysis framework validates...... the parallelization transformation by verifying the independence of the loop's memory references. To this end it represents array references using the USR (uniform set representation) language and expresses the independence condition as an equation, S={}, where S is a set expression representing array indexes. Using...... ( F(S) => S = {} ). Loop parallelization is then validated using a novel logic inference algorithm that factorizes the obtained complex predicates F(S) into a sequence of sufficient-independence conditions that are evaluated first statically and, when needed, dynamically, in increasing order...

  11. Paleomagnetic correlation of basalt flows in selected coreholes near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, and along the southern boundary, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Mary K.V.; Champion, Duane E.

    2016-10-03

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, used paleomagnetic data from 18 coreholes to construct three cross sections of subsurface basalt flows in the southern part of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These cross sections, containing descriptions of the subsurface horizontal and vertical distribution of basalt flows and sediment layers, will be used in geological studies, and to construct numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport.Subsurface cross sections were used to correlate surface vents to their subsurface flows intersected by coreholes, to correlate subsurface flows between coreholes, and to identify possible subsurface vent locations of subsurface flows. Correlations were identified by average paleomagnetic inclinations of flows, and depth from land surface in coreholes, normalized to the North American Datum of 1927. Paleomagnetic data were combined, in some cases, with other data, such as radiometric ages of flows. Possible vent locations of buried basalt flows were identified by determining the location of the maximum thickness of flows penetrated by more than one corehole.Flows from the surface volcanic vents Quaking Aspen Butte, Vent 5206, Mid Butte, Lavatoo Butte, Crater Butte, Pond Butte, Vent 5350, Vent 5252, Tin Cup Butte, Vent 4959, Vent 5119, and AEC Butte are found in coreholes, and were correlated to the surface vents by matching their paleomagnetic inclinations, and in some cases, their stratigraphic positions.Some subsurface basalt flows that do not correlate to surface vents, do correlate over several coreholes, and may correlate to buried vents. Subsurface flows which correlate across several coreholes, but not to a surface vent include the D3 flow, the Big Lost flow, the CFA buried vent flow, the Early, Middle, and Late Basal Brunhes flows, the South Late Matuyama flow, the Matuyama flow, and the Jaramillo flow. The location of vents buried in the subsurface by younger basalt

  12. Loop electrosurgical excisional procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeaux, E J; Harper, M B

    1993-02-01

    Loop electrosurgical excisional procedure, or LEEP, also known as loop diathermy treatment, loop excision of the transformation zone (LETZ), and large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ), is a new technique for outpatient diagnosis and treatment of dysplastic cervical lesions. This procedure produces good specimens for cytologic evaluation, carries a low risk of affecting childbearing ability, and is likely to replace cryotherapy or laser treatment for cervical neoplasias. LEEP uses low-current, high-frequency electrical generators and thin stainless steel or tungsten loops to excise either lesions or the entire transformation zone. Complication rates are comparable to cryotherapy or laser treatment methods and include bleeding, incomplete removal of the lesion, and cervical stenosis. Compared with other methods, the advantages of LEEP include: removal of abnormal tissue in a manner permitting cytologic study, low cost, ease of acquiring necessary skills, and the ability to treat lesions with fewer visits. Patient acceptance of the procedure is high. Widespread use of LEEP by family physicians can be expected.

  13. Measuring maximum and standard metabolic rates using intermittent-flow respirometry: a student laboratory investigation of aerobic metabolic scope and environmental hypoxia in aquatic breathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosewarne, P J; Wilson, J M; Svendsen, J C

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic rate is one of the most widely measured physiological traits in animals and may be influenced by both endogenous (e.g. body mass) and exogenous factors (e.g. oxygen availability and temperature). Standard metabolic rate (SMR) and maximum metabolic rate (MMR) are two fundamental physiological variables providing the floor and ceiling in aerobic energy metabolism. The total amount of energy available between these two variables constitutes the aerobic metabolic scope (AMS). A laboratory exercise aimed at an undergraduate level physiology class, which details the appropriate data acquisition methods and calculations to measure oxygen consumption rates in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, is presented here. Specifically, the teaching exercise employs intermittent flow respirometry to measure SMR and MMR, derives AMS from the measurements and demonstrates how AMS is affected by environmental oxygen. Students' results typically reveal a decline in AMS in response to environmental hypoxia. The same techniques can be applied to investigate the influence of other key factors on metabolic rate (e.g. temperature and body mass). Discussion of the results develops students' understanding of the mechanisms underlying these fundamental physiological traits and the influence of exogenous factors. More generally, the teaching exercise outlines essential laboratory concepts in addition to metabolic rate calculations, data acquisition and unit conversions that enhance competency in quantitative analysis and reasoning. Finally, the described procedures are generally applicable to other fish species or aquatic breathers such as crustaceans (e.g. crayfish) and provide an alternative to using higher (or more derived) animals to investigate questions related to metabolic physiology.

  14. Patterns flow and thermal analysis of the natural convection in a still laboratory; Patrones de flujo y analisis termico de la conveccion natural en un destilador de laboratorio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espana Estrada, Juan M; Poujol Galvan, Federico T [Universidad Autonoma de Baja California Sur, Mexico, La Paz, B.C.S. (Mexico); Fernandez Zayas, Jose L [Instituto de Ingenieria de la UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    A preliminary study transient on the natural convection that occurs within a laboratory still is presented. The reason for this work was to have a better understanding of the transport phenomena, to determine the manner in which it produces an effect in the operation of booth type still. The evolution of the temperature patterns and relation to the flow that is visualized in the interior of the still, with a constant temperature increase on the base of the same analyzed. The still used is composed of a stainless steel base of 1 x 0.5 m under which distilled water is made to circulate at a given temperature. The upper walls, that form an isosceles triangle of 45 Celsius degrees with a height of 0.40 m, are composed two layers of transparent glass in the middle of which the water is made to circulate at a controlled temperature. The flow patterns were visualized using smoke, illuminated with a laser sheet. Likewise, measurements of the temperatures taken with thermocouples strategically situated in the interior of the experimental device were registered. The experimental results demonstrated the initial evolution of the movement of the fluid, as well as the variation of temperature at different positions within the laboratory still throughout the course of the test. [Spanish] Se presentan los avances de un estudio preliminar sobre la conveccion natural en estado transitorio, que ocurre dentro de un destilador de laboratorio. El motivo de este trabajo fue comprender mejor los fenomenos de transporte, para determinar su influencia en la operacion de destiladores solares tipo caseta. Se analiza la evolucion de los patrones de temperatura y su relacion con el flujo que se visualiza en el interior del destilador, el cual esta llenado con agua destilada, bajo condiciones controladas en las paredes del destilador, con un incremento constante de temperatura en la base del mismo. El destilador utilizado consta de una base de acero inoxidable de 1 x 0.5 m debajo de la cual se

  15. U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory's Need for Flow Physics and Control With Applications Involving Aero-Optics and Weapon Bay Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    To develop New Flow Control Techniques: a) Knowledge of the Flow Physics with and without control. b) How does Flow Control Effect Flow Physics (What Works to Optimize the Design?). c) Energy or Work Efficiency of the Control Technique (Cost - Risk - Benefit Analysis). d) Supportability, e.g. (size of equipment, computational power, power supply) (Allows Designer to include Flow Control in Plans).

  16. Logical inference techniques for loop parallelization

    KAUST Repository

    Oancea, Cosmin E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a fully automatic approach to loop parallelization that integrates the use of static and run-time analysis and thus overcomes many known difficulties such as nonlinear and indirect array indexing and complex control flow. Our hybrid analysis framework validates the parallelization transformation by verifying the independence of the loop\\'s memory references. To this end it represents array references using the USR (uniform set representation) language and expresses the independence condition as an equation, S = Ø, where S is a set expression representing array indexes. Using a language instead of an array-abstraction representation for S results in a smaller number of conservative approximations but exhibits a potentially-high runtime cost. To alleviate this cost we introduce a language translation F from the USR set-expression language to an equally rich language of predicates (F(S) ⇒ S = Ø). Loop parallelization is then validated using a novel logic inference algorithm that factorizes the obtained complex predicates (F(S)) into a sequence of sufficient-independence conditions that are evaluated first statically and, when needed, dynamically, in increasing order of their estimated complexities. We evaluate our automated solution on 26 benchmarks from PERFECTCLUB and SPEC suites and show that our approach is effective in parallelizing large, complex loops and obtains much better full program speedups than the Intel and IBM Fortran compilers. Copyright © 2012 ACM.

  17. Loops in Twistor Space

    CERN Document Server

    Bena, I; Kosower, D A; Roiban, R; Bena, Iosif; Bern, Zvi; Kosower, David A.; Roiban, Radu

    2004-01-01

    We elucidate the one-loop twistor-space structure corresponding to momentum-space MHV diagrams. We also discuss the infrared divergences, and argue that only a limited set of MHV diagrams contain them. We show how to introduce a twistor-space regulator corresponding to dimensional regularization for the infrared-divergent diagrams. We also evaluate explicitly the `holomorphic anomaly' pointed out by Cachazo, Svrcek, and Witten, and use the result to define modified differential operators which can be used to probe the twistor-space structure of one-loop amplitudes.

  18. Closed Loop Subspace Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir W. Nilsen

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A new three step closed loop subspace identifications algorithm based on an already existing algorithm and the Kalman filter properties is presented. The Kalman filter contains noise free states which implies that the states and innovation are uneorre lated. The idea is that a Kalman filter found by a good subspace identification algorithm will give an output which is sufficiently uncorrelated with the noise on the output of the actual process. Using feedback from the output of the estimated Kalman filter in the closed loop system a subspace identification algorithm can be used to estimate an unbiased model.

  19. Loop Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Chiou, Dah-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an "in-a-nutshell" yet self-contained introductory review on loop quantum gravity (LQG) -- a background-independent, nonperturbative approach to a consistent quantum theory of gravity. Instead of rigorous and systematic derivations, it aims to provide a general picture of LQG, placing emphasis on the fundamental ideas and their significance. The canonical formulation of LQG, as the central topic of the article, is presented in a logically orderly fashion with moderate details, while the spin foam theory, black hole thermodynamics, and loop quantum cosmology are covered briefly. Current directions and open issues are also summarized.

  20. An efficiency booster for energy conversion in natural circulation loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dongqing, E-mail: wangdongqing@stu.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, Jin, E-mail: jjiang@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • Low driving power conversion efficiency of natural circulation loops is proved. • The low conversion efficiency leads to low heat transfer capacity of such loops. • An efficiency booster is designed with turbine to increase the efficiency. • Performance of the proposed booster has been numerically simulated. • The booster drastically enhances heat transfer capacity of such loops. - Abstract: In this paper, the capacity of a natural circulation loop for transferring heat from a heat source to a heat sink has been analyzed. It is concluded that the capacity of the natural circulation loop depends on the conversion efficiency of the thermal energy from the heat source to the driving force for the circulation of the flow. The low conversion efficiency leading to weak driving force in such loops has been demonstrated analytically and validated through simulation results. This issue has resulted in a low heat transfer capacity in the circulation loop. To increase the heat transfer capacity, one has to improve this efficiency. To meet such a need, a novel efficiency booster has been developed in this paper. The booster essentially increases the flow driving force and hence significantly improves the overall heat transfer capacity. Design and analysis of this booster have been performed in detail. The performance has been examined through extensive computer simulations. It is concluded that the booster can indeed drastically improve the heat transfer capacity of the natural circulation loop.

  1. Open-loop heat-recovery dryer

    Science.gov (United States)

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward Evan

    2013-11-05

    A drying apparatus is disclosed that includes a drum and an open-loop airflow pathway originating at an ambient air inlet, passing through the drum, and terminating at an exhaust outlet. A passive heat exchanger is included for passively transferring heat from air flowing from the drum toward the exhaust outlet to air flowing from the ambient air inlet toward the drum. A heat pump is also included for actively transferring heat from air flowing from the passive heat exchanger toward the exhaust outlet to air flowing from the passive heat exchanger toward the drum. A heating element is also included for further heating air flowing from the heat pump toward the drum.

  2. Development of a passive-flow treatment system for {sup 90}Sr-contaminated seep water at Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P.A.

    1994-08-01

    Seep C is a free-flowing stream of groundwater (typical flow of 0.2 to 2 L/min) that emerges in a narrow valley below the old low-level waste disposal trenches in Solid Waste Storage Area 5 (SWSA 5), which is part of Waste Area Grouping 5 (WAG 5). The seep water contains high concentrations of Sr-90 (10,000 to 20,000 Bq/L) and contributes about 25% of all the Sr-90 leaving Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Seep C was identified as a primary source of off-site contaminant transport and was designated for an early removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response and Liability Act (CERCLA). A passive-flow treatment system was chosen as the most cost-effective method for treating the seep water. The goal of the removal action is to have a system operational by November 1, 1994, that reduces the Sr-90 concentration in the water collected and treated by at least 90%. In order to provide design and operating data for the full-scale system, a pilot-scale system, consisting of a 5-gal bucket with an inlet connection in the lid and a screened outlet on the bottom filled with 16 L of chabazite zeolite, was used to treat the seep water. The test was started on March 17, 1994, and concluded on June 15, 1994. The system treated 63,470 L (3967 bed volumes) of water and 22.7 mCi of Sr-90 from the seep water. The system removed over 99.5% of the Sr-90 from the first 43,000 L of water treated, after which the removal efficiency slowly decreased as the zeolite became loaded until it reached 84% for the final sample. The passive system performed at least as well as comparable pumped zeolite systems in terms of removal efficiency and zeolite utilization. The test was terminated just before the construction crew mobilized at Seep C to build the full-scale system.

  3. Comprehensive Laboratory Evaluation of a Highly Specific Lateral Flow Assay for the Presumptive Identification of Bacillus anthracis Spores in Suspicious White Powders and Environmental Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage, Jason G.; Prentice, Kristin W.; DePalma, Lindsay; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S.; Chivukula, Sruti; Chapman, Carol; Bell, Melissa; Datta, Shomik; Singh, Ajay; Hoffmaster, Alex; Sarwar, Jawad; Parameswaran, Nishanth; Joshi, Mrinmayi; Thirunavkkarasu, Nagarajan; Krishnan, Viswanathan; Morse, Stephen; Avila, Julie R.; Sharma, Shashi; Estacio, Peter L.; Stanker, Larry; Hodge, David R.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive, multiphase laboratory evaluation of the Anthrax BioThreat Alert® test strip, a lateral flow immunoassay (LFA) for the rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis spores. The study, conducted at 2 sites, evaluated this assay for the detection of spores from the Ames and Sterne strains of B. anthracis, as well as those from an additional 22 strains. Phylogenetic near neighbors, environmental background organisms, white powders, and environmental samples were also tested. The Anthrax LFA demonstrated a limit of detection of about 106 spores/mL (ca. 1.5 × 105 spores/assay). In this study, overall sensitivity of the LFA was 99.3%, and the specificity was 98.6%. The results indicated that the specificity, sensitivity, limit of detection, dynamic range, and repeatability of the assay support its use in the field for the purpose of qualitatively evaluating suspicious white powders and environmental samples for the presumptive presence of B. anthracis spores. PMID:27661796

  4. Phosphorus removal by laboratory-scale unvegetated vertical-flow constructed wetland systems using anthracite, steel slag and related blends as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junmei; He, Feng; Xu, Dong; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Xiangling; Xiao, Enrong; Wu, Zhenbin

    2011-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the phosphorus (P) removal of a series of laboratory-scale unvegetated vertical-flow constructed wetland systems using anthracite, steel slag and related blends as substrate in treatment of low concentration domestic sewage. The long-term performance of P removal was firstly studied by using single substrate of anthracite or steel slag, and three systems applying various combined substrates were investigated when the average P loading rate varied between 0.9 and 1.5 g TP/m2 x d. The results demonstrated that both anthracite and steel slag systems were highly effective in removing total P (CTP, 77.17 +/- 23.34% and 90.26 +/- 4.48%) and soluble reactive P (SRP, 92.14 +/- 12.56% and 96.20 +/- 2.58%). The system filled with anthracite, vermiculite and steel slag from the top down removed 82.45 +/- 9.52% and 87.83 +/- 8.58% of TP and SRP, respectively. However, other combined substrate systems showed comparative low and fluctuant P removal. The effluent pH was maintained at 7-9, which met environmental requirements of China. Therefore, anthracite provides a long-term high efficiency of P removal and may be a promising substrate from the standpoint of the effluent pH, and the arrangement of combined substrate has a prominent effect on P removal.

  5. High-throughput single-cell analysis of low copy number β-galactosidase by a laboratory-built high-sensitivity flow cytometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lingling; Huang, Tianxun; Zhu, Shaobin; Zhou, Yingxing; Jiang, Yunbin; Wang, Shuo; Chen, Yuqing; Wu, Lina; Yan, Xiaomei

    2013-10-15

    Single-cell analysis is vital in providing insights into the heterogeneity in molecular content and phenotypic characteristics of complex or clonal cell populations. As many essential proteins and most transcription factors are produced at a low copy number, analytical tools with superior sensitivity to enable the analysis of low abundance proteins in single cells are in high demand. β-galactosidase (β-gal) has been the standard cellular reporter for gene expression in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Here we report the development of a high-throughput method for the single-cell analysis of low copy number β-gal proteins using a laboratory-built high-sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM). Upon fluorescence staining with a fluorogenic substrate, quantitative measurements of the basal and near-basal expression of β-gal in single Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells were demonstrated. Statistical distribution can be determined quickly by analyzing thousands of individual cells in 1-2min, which reveals the heterogeneous expression pattern that is otherwise masked by the ensemble analysis. Combined with the quantitative fluorometric assay and the rapid bacterial enumeration by HSFCM, the β-gal expression distribution profile could be converted from arbitrary fluorescence units to protein copy numbers per cell. The sensitivity and speed of the HSFCM offers great capability in quantitative analysis of low abundance proteins in single cells, which would help gaining a deeper insight into the heterogeneity and fundamental biological processes in microbial populations.

  6. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effects of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  7. Inter-laboratory evaluation of the performance parameters of a Lateral Flow Test device for the detection of Bluetongue virus-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, Jean-Baptiste; Vandenberge, Valerie; Deruelle, Matthias; De Leeuw, Ilse; De Clercq, Kris; Van Borm, Steven; Koenen, Frank; Liu, Lihong; Hoffmann, Bernd; Batten, Carrie Anne; Zientara, Stéphan; Breard, Emmanuel; Van der Stede, Yves

    2016-02-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is a viral vector-borne disease affecting domestic and wild ruminants worldwide. In this study, a commercial rapid immuno-chromatographic method or Lateral Flow Test (LFT) device, for the detection of BT virus-specific antibodies in animal serum, was evaluated in an international inter-laboratory proficiency test. The evaluation was done with sera samples of variable background (ruminant species, serotype, field samples, experimental infections, vaccinated animals). The diagnostic sensitivity was 100% (95% C.I. [90.5-100]) and the diagnostic specificity was 95.2% (95% C.I. [76.2-99.9]). The repeatability (accordance) and reproducibility (concordance) were 100% for seropositive samples but were lower for two of the seronegative samples (45% and 89% respectively). The analytical sensitivity, evaluated by testing positive sera at increasing dilutions was better for the BT LFT compared to some commercial ELISAs. Seroconversion of an infected sheep was detected at 4 days post infection. Analytical specificity was impaired by cross-reactions observed with some of the samples seropositive for Epizootic Haemorrhagic Disease Virus (EHDV). The agreement (Cohen's kappa) between the LFT and a commercial BT competitive ELISA was 0.79 (95% CI [0.62-0.95]). Based on these results, it can be concluded that the BT LFT device is a rapid and sensitive first-line serological test that can be used in the field, especially in areas endemic for the disease where there is a lack of diagnostic facilities.

  8. Status Update: Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The successful completion of a field trial of safeguards monitoring equipment at a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP) demonstrated the need for a facility in which to perform full-scale equipment testing under controlled conditions prior to field deployment of safeguards systems at additional plants. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions for a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process conducted in an NUCP. In addition to calibrating instruments such as the neutron detector developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, UNCLE will be used to test other in-line instruments (mass and volumetric flowmeters, spectrophotometers, etc.). UNCLE will be able to test commercially available equipment, such as the Endress+Hauser Promass 83F Coriolis meter that was used in the field test and other equipment that is presently under development. UNCLE is designed to accommodate different pipe sizes, flow rates, solution concentrations, and other variables of interest. Construction is expected to be completed by the end of September 2008 with initial testing beginning later that year. The design and current status of UNCLE will be presented, along with the capabilities of the facility and the proposed test plans.

  9. Geocentrifuge Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The geocentrifuge subjects a sample to a high-gravity field by spinning it rapidly around a central shaft. In this high-gravity field, processes, such as fluid flow,...

  10. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of finding the quantum theory of the gravitational field, and thus understanding what is quantum spacetime, is still open. One of the most active of the current approaches is loop quantum gravity. Loop quantum gravity is a mathematically well-defined, non-perturbative and background independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Research in loop quantum gravity today forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained are: (i The computation of the physical spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yields quantitative predictions on Planck-scale physics. (ii A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy formula. (iii An intriguing physical picture of the microstructure of quantum physical space, characterized by a polymer-like Planck scale discreteness. This discreteness emerges naturally from the quantum theory and provides a mathematically well-defined realization of Wheeler's intuition of a spacetime ``foam''. Long standing open problems within the approach (lack of a scalar product, over-completeness of the loop basis, implementation of reality conditions have been fully solved. The weak part of the approach is the treatment of the dynamics: at present there exist several proposals, which are intensely debated. Here, I provide a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  11. Reversible hysteresis loop tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, A.; Binek, Ch.; Margulies, D. T.; Moser, A.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2006-02-01

    We utilize antiferromagnetically coupled bilayer structures to magnetically tune hysteresis loop properties. Key element of this approach is the non-overlapping switching field distribution of the two magnetic layers that make up the system: a hard magnetic CoPtCrB layer (HL) and a soft magnetic CoCr layer (SL). Both layers are coupled antiferromagnetically through an only 0.6-nm-thick Ru interlayer. The non-overlapping switching field distribution allows the measurement of magnetization reversal in the SL at low fields while keeping the magnetization state of the HL unperturbed. Applying an appropriate high field or high field sequence changes the magnetic state of the HL, which then influences the SL magnetization reversal due to the interlayer coupling. In this way, the position and shape of the SL hysteresis loop can be changed or tuned in a fully reversible and highly effective manner. Here, we study specifically how the SL hysteresis loop characteristics change as we move the HL through an entire high field hysteresis loop sequence.

  12. Axial gas holdups of riser in Helical-flow Airlift Loop Reactors%旋流气升式环流反应器的气含率轴向分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志敏; 刘永民; 谢嫘祖; 马嘉楠

    2015-01-01

    为强化环隙气升式环流反应器(AALR)的流动、混合与传质性能,提出了旋流气升式环流反应器(HALR)。在8.8L 的 HALR 中,以空气-水和空气-水-K 树脂为实验物系,在表观气速为0.47~2.31cm/s 的范围内,研究了表观气速、导流筒底边与反应器底面的间隙(简称底部间隙)、上升区轴向高度及固体装载量等因素对气含率的影响规律,并与 AALR 进行了对比。结果表明:对于空气-水组成的两相物系来说,在表观气速较小时,旋流片对上升气泡有聚并作用;在表观气速较大时,旋流片对气泡主要起破碎作用;气含率随着轴向高度的增加而增加,增加的幅度随表观气速的增加而增加。对于三相物系,表观气速较大时,气含率随着固体装载量的增大而增大,比两相物系气含率高;表观气速较小时,两相物系的气含率略高于三相物系的。根据实验结果,提出并拟合出了上升区局部气含率与轴向高度的预测模型:εg =(3.00×10-4h +0.0276)Ug0.615,模型的预测值与实验值吻合较好,平均相对误差为12%。%A new type of helical-flow airlift loop reactor (HALR) has been developed to strengthen flow,mixing and mass transfer performance in the annulus airlift loop reactor (AALR).The local gas holdups in riser of the 8.8 liters HALR as superficial gas velocities,the bottom gap —— the distance between the lower end of the draft tube and the bottom of reactor,the height of the reactor,and solid loading were experimentally studied and were compared with the ones in AALR for the system of air -water and air - water -K resin,within the superficial gas velocity of 0.47—2.31cm/s. The results show that for air - water system,at the lower superficial gas velocities,swirling sheets made the rising bubbles coalescence ; at higher superficial gas velocities,the bubbles were mainly broken by the swirl sheets. Axial gas holdup was

  13. Bioassay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Bioassay Laboratory is an accredited laboratory capable of conducting standardized and innovative environmental testing in the area of aquatic ecotoxicology. The...

  14. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory The Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose...

  15. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics LaboratoryThe Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose of...

  16. Two-loop and n-loop eikonal vertex corrections

    OpenAIRE

    Kidonakis, Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    I present calculations of two-loop vertex corrections with massive and massless partons in the eikonal approximation. I show that the $n$-loop result for the UV poles can be given in terms of the one-loop calculation.

  17. Results from tests of TFL Hydragard sampling loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J.L.

    1995-03-01

    When the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is operational, processed radioactive sludge will be transferred in batches to the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), where glass frit will be added and the contents concentrated by boiling. Batches of the slurry mixture are transferred from the SME to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT). Hydragard{reg_sign} sampling systems are used on the SME and the MFT for collecting slurry samples in vials for chemical analysis. An accurate replica of the Hydragard sampling system was built and tested in the thermal Fluids Laboratory (TFL) to determine the hydragard accuracy. It was determined that the original Hydragard valve frequently drew a non-representative sample stream through the sample vial that ranged from frit enriched to frit depleted. The Hydragard valve was modified by moving the plunger and its seat backwards so that the outer surface of the plunger was flush with the inside diameter of the transfer line when the valve was open. The slurry flowing through the vial accurately represented the composition of the slurry in the reservoir for two types of slurries, different dilution factors, a range of transfer flows and a range of vial flows. It was then found that the 15 ml of slurry left in the vial when the Hydragard valve was closed, which is what will be analyzed at DWPF, had a lower ratio of frit to sludge as characterized by the lithium to iron ratio than the slurry flowing through it. The reason for these differences is not understood at this time but it is recommended that additional experimentation be performed with the TFL Hydragard loop to determine the cause.

  18. Control and optimization system and method for chemical looping processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xinsheng; Joshi, Abhinaya; Lei, Hao

    2015-02-17

    A control system for optimizing a chemical loop system includes one or more sensors for measuring one or more parameters in a chemical loop. The sensors are disposed on or in a conduit positioned in the chemical loop. The sensors generate one or more data signals representative of an amount of solids in the conduit. The control system includes a data acquisition system in communication with the sensors and a controller in communication with the data acquisition system. The data acquisition system receives the data signals and the controller generates the control signals. The controller is in communication with one or more valves positioned in the chemical loop. The valves are configured to regulate a flow of the solids through the chemical loop.

  19. Local loop near-rings

    OpenAIRE

    Franetič, Damir

    2015-01-01

    We study loop near-rings, a generalization of near-rings, where the additive structure is not necessarily associative. We introduce local loop near-rings and prove a useful detection principle for localness.

  20. Open-Loop HIRF Experiments Performed on a Fault Tolerant Flight Control Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppen, Daniel M.

    1997-01-01

    During the third quarter of 1996, the Closed-Loop Systems Laboratory was established at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to study the effects of High Intensity Radiated Fields on complex avionic systems and control system components. This new facility provided a link and expanded upon the existing capabilities of the High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory at LaRC that were constructed and certified during 1995-96. The scope of the Closed-Loop Systems Laboratory is to place highly integrated avionics instrumentation into a high intensity radiated field environment, interface the avionics to a real-time flight simulation that incorporates aircraft dynamics, engines, sensors, actuators and atmospheric turbulence, and collect, analyze, and model aircraft performance. This paper describes the layout and functionality of the Closed-Loop Systems Laboratory, and the open-loop calibration experiments that led up to the commencement of closed-loop real-time flight experiments.

  1. On the extended loop calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Griego, J R

    1995-01-01

    Some features of extended loops are considered. In particular, the behaviour under diffeomorphism transformations of the wavefunctions with support on the extended loop space are studied. The basis of a method to obtain analytical expressions of diffeomorphism invariants via extended loops are settled. Applications to knot theory and quantum gravity are considered.

  2. Seismic Absorption and Modulus Measurements in Porous Rocks Under Fluid and Gas Flow-Physical and Chemical Effects: a Laboratory Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmut Spetzler

    2005-11-28

    This paper describes the culmination of a research project in which we investigated the complex modulus change in partially fluid saturated porous rocks. The investigation started with simple flow experiments over ''clean'' and ''contaminated'' surfaces, progressed to moduli measurements on partially filled single cracks, to measurements in ''clean'' and ''contaminated'' porous rocks and finally to a feasibility study in the field. For the experiments with the simple geometries we were able to measure fundamental physical properties such as contact angles of the meniscus and time dependent forces required to get the meniscus moving and to keep it moving at various velocities. From the data thus gathered we were able to interpret the complex elastic moduli data we measured in the partially saturated single cracks. While the geometry in real rocks is too complex to make precise calculations we determined that we had indeed identified the mechanisms responsible for the changes in the moduli we had measured. Thus encouraged by the laboratory studies we embarked on a field experiment in the desert of Arizona. The field site allowed for controlled irrigation. Instrumentation for fluid sampling and water penetration were already in place. The porous loosely consolidated rocks at the site were not ideal for finding the effects of the attenuation mechanism we had identified in the lab, but for logistic and cost constraint reasons we chose to field test the idea at that site. Tiltmeters and seismometers were installed and operated nearly continuously for almost 3 years. The field was irrigated with water in the fall of 2003 and with water containing a biosurfactant in the fall of 2004. We have indications that the biosurfactant irrigation has had a notable effect on the tilt data.

  3. Development and laboratory validation of a lateral flow device for the detection of serotype SAT 2 foot-and-mouth disease viruses in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Nigel P; Nordengrahn, Ann; Hutchings, Geoffrey H; Paton, David J; Kristersson, Therese; Brocchi, Emiliana; Grazioli, Santina; Merza, Malik

    2010-02-01

    A lateral flow device (LFD) for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) of the SAT 2 serotype was developed using a monoclonal antibody (Mab 2H6). The performance of the LFD was evaluated in the laboratory on suspensions of vesicular epithelia: 305 positive for FMDV type SAT 2 from suspected cases of vesicular disease collected from 30 countries and 1002 samples shown to be negative for FMDV type SAT 2 collected from 67 countries between 1968 and 2008. The diagnostic sensitivity of the LFD for FMDV type SAT 2 was higher at 88% compared to 79% obtained by the reference method of antigen ELISA, and the diagnostic specificity of the LFD was approximately 99% compared to 100% for the ELISA. The device recognized FMDV strains of wide diversity within the FMDV SAT 2 serotype and gave a superior performance for their detection compared to the 1F10 LFD which had been developed previously and shown to perform less well for the detection of FMDVs of this particular serotype. Reactions in the SAT 2 2H6 LFD with the viruses of other FMDV serotypes and swine vesicular disease (which produces a clinically indistinguishable syndrome in pigs), did not occur. These data illustrate the potential for the LFD to be employed to complement the 1F10 device next to the animal in the pen-side diagnosis of FMD, for providing rapid and objective support to veterinarians in their clinical judgment of the disease and for specific confirmation of a FMDV type SAT 2 infection.

  4. Closing global material loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosman, Ernst-Jan; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Liotta, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Replacing virgin materials with waste materials, a practice known as Industrial Symbiosis (IS), has been identified as a key strategy for closing material loops. This article adopts a critical view on geographic proximity and external coordinators – two key enablers of IS. By ‘uncovering’ a case...... where both enablers are absent, this study seeks to explore firm-level challenges of IS. We adopt an exploratory case study approach at a cement manufacturer who engages in cross-border IS without the support of external coordinators. Our research presents insights into two key areas of IS: 1) setting...... for geographic proximity and external coordinators. In doing so, our insights into firm-level challenges of long-distance IS exchanges contribute to closing global material loops by increasing the number of potential circular pathways....

  5. Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojowald Martin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations in which classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical spacetime inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding spacetime is then modified. One particular theory is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. The main effects are introduced into effective classical equations, which allow one to avoid the interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early-universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function, which allows an extension of quantum spacetime beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of spacetime arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds light on more general issues, such as the nature of time.

  6. Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojowald Martin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations where classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical space-time inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding space-time is then modified. One particular realization is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. Main effects are introduced into effective classical equations which allow to avoid interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function which allows to extend space-time beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of space-time arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds new light on more general issues such as time.

  7. PAR Loop Schedule Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffer, Jr.; W.F.

    1958-04-30

    The schedule for the installation of the PAR slurry loop experiment in the South Facility of the ORR has been reviewed and revised. The design, fabrications and Installation is approximately two weeks behind schedule at this time due to many factors; however, indications are that this time can be made up. Design is estimated to be 75% complete, fabrication 32% complete and installation 12% complete.

  8. Verification of Loop Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, A.; Lionello, R.; Mok, Y.; Linker, J.; Mikic, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Many different techniques have been used to characterize the plasma in the solar corona: density-sensitive spectral line ratios are used to infer the density, the evolution of coronal structures in different passbands is used to infer the temperature evolution, and the simultaneous intensities measured in multiple passbands are used to determine the emission measure. All these analysis techniques assume that the intensity of the structures can be isolated through background subtraction. In this paper, we use simulated observations from a 3D hydrodynamic simulation of a coronal active region to verify these diagnostics. The density and temperature from the simulation are used to generate images in several passbands and spectral lines. We identify loop structures in the simulated images and calculate the loop background. We then determine the density, temperature and emission measure distribution as a function of time from the observations and compare with the true temperature and density of the loop. We find that the overall characteristics of the temperature, density, and emission measure are recovered by the analysis methods, but the details of the true temperature and density are not. For instance, the emission measure curves calculated from the simulated observations are much broader than the true emission measure distribution, though the average temperature evolution is similar. These differences are due, in part, to inadequate background subtraction, but also indicate a limitation of the analysis methods.

  9. Cosmic string loop microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Chernoff, David F.

    2014-06-01

    Cosmic superstring loops within the galaxy microlens background point sources lying close to the observer-string line of sight. For suitable alignments, multiple paths coexist and the (achromatic) flux enhancement is a factor of two. We explore this unique type of lensing by numerically solving for geodesics that extend from source to observer as they pass near an oscillating string. We characterize the duration of the flux doubling and the scale of the image splitting. We probe and confirm the existence of a variety of fundamental effects predicted from previous analyses of the static infinite straight string: the deficit angle, the Kaiser-Stebbins effect, and the scale of the impact parameter required to produce microlensing. Our quantitative results for dynamical loops vary by O(1) factors with respect to estimates based on infinite straight strings for a given impact parameter. A number of new features are identified in the computed microlensing solutions. Our results suggest that optical microlensing can offer a new and potentially powerful methodology for searches for superstring loop relics of the inflationary era.

  10. Conceptual design of a thermalhydraulic loop for multiple test geometries at supercritical conditions named Supercritical Phenomena Experimental Test Apparatus (SPETA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenariwo, Adepoju

    The efficiency of nuclear reactors can be improved by increasing the operating pressure of current nuclear reactors. Current CANDU-type nuclear reactors use heavy water as coolant at an outlet pressure of up to 11.5 MPa. Conceptual SuperCritical Water Reactors (SCWRs) will operate at a higher coolant outlet pressure of 25 MPa. Supercritical water technology has been used in advanced coal plants and its application proves promising to be employed in nuclear reactors. To better understand how supercritical water technology can be applied in nuclear power plants, supercritical water loops are used to study the heat transfer phenomena as it applies to CANDU-type reactors. A conceptual design of a loop known as the Supercritical Phenomena Experimental Apparatus (SPETA) has been done. This loop has been designed to fit in a 9 m by 2 m by 2.8 m enclosure that will be installed at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology Energy Research Laboratory. The loop include components to safely start up and shut down various test sections, produce a heat source to the test section, and to remove reject heat. It is expected that loop will be able to investigate the behaviour of supercritical water in various geometries including bare tubes, annulus tubes, and multi-element-type bundles. The experimental geometries are designed to match the fluid properties of Canadian SCWR fuel channel designs so that they are representative of a practical application of supercritical water technology in nuclear plants. This loop will investigate various test section orientations which are the horizontal, vertical, and inclined to investigate buoyancy effects. Frictional pressure drop effects and satisfactory methods of estimating hydraulic resistances in supercritical fluid shall also be estimated with the loop. Operating limits for SPETA have been established to be able to capture the important heat transfer phenomena at supercritical conditions. Heat balance and flow calculations have

  11. Development and Deployment of a Full-Scale Cross-Flow Filtration System for Treatment of Liquid Low-Level Waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent, T.E.

    2000-05-12

    A full-scale modular solid/liquid separation (SLS) system was designed, fabricated, installed, and successfully deployed for treatment of liquid low-level waste from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The SLS module, utilizing cross-flow filtration, was operated as part of an integrated tank waste pretreatment system (otherwise known as the Wastewater Triad) to remove suspended solids and prevent fouling of ion-exchange materials and heat exchange surfaces. The information gained from this testing was used to complete design specifications for the full-scale modular SLS system in May 1997. The contract for detailed design and fabrication of the system was awarded to NUMET in July 1997, and the design was completed in January 1998. Fabrication began in March 1998, and the completed system was delivered to ORNL on December 29, 1998. Installation of the system at the MVST facility was completed in May 1999. After completing an operational readiness assessment, approval was given to commence hot operations on June 7, 1999. Operations involving two of the eight MVSTs were performed safely and with very little unscheduled downtime. Filtration of supernatant from tank W-31 was completed on June 24, 1999 and W-26 processing was completed on August 20, 1999. The total volume processed during these two campaigns was about 45,000 gal. The suspended solids content of the liquid processed from tank W-31 was lower than expected, resulting in higher-than-expected filtrate production for nearly the entire operation. The liquid processed from tank W-26 was higher in suspended solids content, and filtrate production was lower, but comparable to the rates expected based on the results of previous pilot-scale, single-element filtration tests. The quality of the filtrate consistently met the requirements for feed to the downstream ion-exchange and evaporation processes. From an equipment and controls standpoint, the modular system (pumps

  12. Effect of Loop Diameter on the Steady State and Stability Behaviour of Single-Phase and Two-Phase Natural Circulation Loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Vijayan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In natural circulation loops, the driving force is usually low as it depends on the riser height which is generally of the order of a few meters. The heat transport capability of natural circulation loops (NCLs is directly proportional to the flow rate it can generate. With low driving force, the straightforward way to enhance the flow is to reduce the frictional losses. A simple way to do this is to increase the loop diameter which can be easily adopted in pressure tube designs such as the AHWR and the natural circulation boilers employed in fossil-fuelled power plants. Further, the loop diameter also plays an important role on the stability behavior. An extensive experimental and theoretical investigation of the effect of loop diameter on the steady state and stability behavior of single- and two-phase natural circulation loops have been carried out and the results of this study are presented in this paper.

  13. LoopIng: a template-based tool for predicting the structure of protein loops.

    KAUST Repository

    Messih, Mario Abdel

    2015-08-06

    Predicting the structure of protein loops is very challenging, mainly because they are not necessarily subject to strong evolutionary pressure. This implies that, unlike the rest of the protein, standard homology modeling techniques are not very effective in modeling their structure. However, loops are often involved in protein function, hence inferring their structure is important for predicting protein structure as well as function.We describe a method, LoopIng, based on the Random Forest automated learning technique, which, given a target loop, selects a structural template for it from a database of loop candidates. Compared to the most recently available methods, LoopIng is able to achieve similar accuracy for short loops (4-10 residues) and significant enhancements for long loops (11-20 residues). The quality of the predictions is robust to errors that unavoidably affect the stem regions when these are modeled. The method returns a confidence score for the predicted template loops and has the advantage of being very fast (on average: 1 min/loop).www.biocomputing.it/loopinganna.tramontano@uniroma1.itSupplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  14. Simulation Study of Enthalpy Gain Characteristics on Nuclear Power 1000MW Unit Pressurized Water Reactor Loop Flow Deviation%环路流量偏差对核电1000 MW机组压水反应堆焓增特性影响的模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建全; 霍启军; 周涛; 钱虹; 陈建韩; 李赢; 李思

    2015-01-01

    使用标准的 k-ε双方程、有限体积离散法,对一台1000MW核电机组反应堆流场、温度场及堆芯焓增特性进行了建模研究;结合堆芯测量仪器及CLP和IN-CORE软件进行了反应堆实际物理试验;将模拟试验和实际物理试验进行了耦合研究。研究了反应堆正常运行及失流等工况下流量偏差对反应堆堆芯焓增特性的影响,并对实际运行流量偏差工况进行了分析。模拟和物理试验结果表明:堆芯流量分配板和下栅格板能够很好地调整进入堆芯的冷却剂流量偏差,堆芯内部温度场具有较强的流量偏差自调节功能。环路流量减少时,反应堆流场、温度场及堆芯焓增特性变化比较明显;环路流量稍有增加时变化不明显,环路流量增加值不大于5%时,反应堆内部流场及温度场偏差无明显变化。试验数据为反应堆的安全运行提供了理论数据。%The flow field, temperature field and enthalpy gain of a 1 000 MW unit nuclear reactor were numerically studied with standard k-ε model and finite volume discretization method. The operation physical tests were done combining the core measuring instrument with CLP and IN-CORE software, then the simulation and physical tests were coupling studied. The flow deviation influence of normal and loss of flow conditions on the core enthalpy gain characteristic has been done, and the flow deviation under operating condition was analyzed. Simulation and physical test results show that, the core flow distribution plate and the under grid plate can adjust the coolant flow deviation into the reactor core effectively. The internal core temperature field can adjust the flow deviation single. The core flow field, temperature field and core enthalpy gain characteristic change obviously when the loop flow reduces, which change not obvious when the loop flow increases slightly. The core flow field and temperature field almost do not change when

  15. Fiber reinforced composite loop space maintainer: An alternative to the conventional band and loop

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishna Yeluri; Autar Krishen Munshi

    2012-01-01

    The stainless steel band and loop appliance is the most commonly used fixed space maintainer in pediatric dentistry. But there are several disadvantages with this appliance such as the need for a cast or a working model, decalcification of the abutment tooth, loosening because of breakage or dissolution of the luting agent, tendency to get embedded in the soft tissue and the possibility of metal allergy. The purpose of this article is to present a simple, laboratory design of a "Fiber Reinfor...

  16. Large and meso scale eddy structures forced by a river flow in the west Mediterranean under rotating conditions: Numerical and laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, J.; Redondo, J.; Fraunie, P.; Durand, N.

    2003-04-01

    This work presents the results of two laboratory and numerical experiments. The characteristic induced structures by stationer typical conditions from spring, summer, fall and winter. Laboratory experiences were developed on a five meters turntable (SINTEF facilities) obeys the Froude-Rossby similarities. While, the meso-escale numerical model was developed in the LSEET laboratory. This work evidences complementary results from the vortex sort characteristic by radius from both experimental and model methods. Additionally numerical model has a better representation from the conditions in the first 15km and the laboratory model represent the resolution between the large and the meso scale boundary.

  17. Improving Loop Dependence Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Nicklas Bo; Karlsson, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Programmers can no longer depend on new processors to have significantly improved single-thread performance. Instead, gains have to come from other sources such as the compiler and its optimization passes. Advanced passes make use of information on the dependencies related to loops. We improve...... the quality of that information by reusing the information given by the programmer for parallelization. We have implemented a prototype based on GCC into which we also add a new optimization pass. Our approach improves the amount of correctly classified dependencies resulting in 46% average improvement...

  18. Closing the loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassau, E; Atlas, E; Phillip, M

    2011-02-01

    Closed-loop algorithms can be found in every aspect of everyday modern life. Automation and control are used constantly to provide safety and to improve quality of life. Closed-loop systems and algorithms can be found in home appliances, automobiles, aviation and more. Can one imagine nowadays driving a car without ABS, cruise control or even anti-sliding control? Similar principles of automation and control can be used in the management of diabetes mellitus (DM). The idea of an algorithmic/technological way to control glycaemia is not new and has been researched for more than four decades. However, recent improvements in both glucose-sensing technology and insulin delivery together with advanced control and systems engineering made this dream of an artificial pancreas possible. The artificial pancreas may be the next big step in the treatment of DM since the use of insulin analogues. An artificial pancreas can be described as internal or external devices that use continuous glucose measurements to automatically manage exogenous insulin delivery with or without other hormones in an attempt to restore glucose regulation in individuals with DM using a control algorithm. This device as described can be internal or external; can use different types of control algorithms with bi-hormonal or uni-hormonal design; and can utilise different ways to administer them. The different designs and implementations have transitioned recently from in silico simulations to clinical evaluation stage with practical applications in mind. This may mark the beginning of a new era in diabetes management with the introduction of semi-closed-loop systems that can prevent or minimise nocturnal hypoglycaemia, to hybrid systems that will manage blood glucose (BG) levels with minimal user intervention to finally fully automated systems that will take the user out of the loop. More and more clinical trials will be needed for the artificial pancreas to become a reality but initial encouraging

  19. Local liquid side mass transfer model in gas-liquid-solid three-phase flow airlift loop reactor for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids%气-液-固三相气升式环流反应器中牛顿型及非牛顿型流体局部液相传质模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闻建平; 贾晓强; 毛国柱

    2004-01-01

    A small scale isotropic mass transfer model was developed for the local liquid side mass transfer coefficients in gas-liquid-solid three-phase flow airlift loop reactor for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.It is based on Higbie's penetration theory and Kolmogoroff's theory of isotropic turbulence with k1 = 3√2Dε1/3 1/π(η-1/3 1 -λ-1/3 f),where ε1 is local rate of energy dissipation,λf is the local microscale,η1 is the local Kolmogoroff scale and D is the diffusion coefficient.The capability of the proposed model is discussed in the light of experimental data obtained from 12 L gas-liquid-solid three-phase flow airlift loop reactor using Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.Good agreement with the experimental data was obtained over a wide range of conditions suggesting a general applicability of the proposed model.

  20. Investigating the impact of variations in particle size on heat flow from chaparral fires into soils using a laboratory based wildfire simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karch, Adam Joseph

    It has been well established that under certain circumstances wildfire is capable of producing water repellent or hydrophobic soils. Hydrophobic soils can dramatically alter runoff and erosion processes and as such have been the subject of considerable research activity. Wildfires in chaparral vegetation are recognized as being particularly susceptible to hydrophobic soil development. A comparison of chaparral fire soil heat profiles from DeBano (1989) and Weirich (unpublished) indicates that under higher fire intensity situations in chaparral a different soil heating mechanism other than just conduction heating may be at work. In contrast to the slow moving low temperature increases expected in conduction heating a much faster heat pulse resulting in more rapid temperature rises and higher temperatures at depth can also occur in chaparral wildland fires. This suggests that a better understanding of the heat transfer processes that occur at extreme fire intensities is both important and is needed. The specific aim of this study was to observe heat flow under a variety of particle sizes using a laboratory based wildfire simulator operating at intensities and durations similar to those experienced in chaparral wildfires. The wildfire simulator system consisted of a propane burner array, an array of thermocouples to measure temperatures at varying locations and depths, and a data logging system to record the results of the heating experiments. Using the simulator homogenous sand, silt, clay, and heterogeneous clay loam were subjected to 600°C, 900°C, and 1200°C peak intensities with two different heating durations or treatments (H1 and H2). The heating levels and durations used were based on data from field based chaparral fire experimental temperature data previously collected by Weirich (unpublished). The system design allowed the user to control the intensity and duration of the heat treatments and the thermocouple sensor arrays measured temperatures at the

  1. Control Difuso de Flujo de Fluidos en una Estación de Laboratorio Fluid Flow Fuzzy Control of a Laboratory Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Castro-Montoya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Se diseñó un controlador de lógica difusa (CLD para regular el flujo de fluidos en una estación de laboratorio. Para medir el desempeño del CLD se ejecutaron diferentes tipos de pruebas, comparando sus resultados con los obtenidos utilizando un PID convencional. El controlador de lógica difusa obtuvo mejores resultados en la respuesta al escalón, lo que implica que este puede utilizarse en el arranque de plantas. Para perturbaciones tipo escalón, pero inversa, el PID no es capaz de seguir la referencia, debido a la no-linealidad del proceso mientras que el CLD presenta buenos resultados. Para perturbaciones tipo rampa, el PID presenta un mejor seguimiento a las rampas que el CLD, ya que su comportamiento es lineal. Con respecto a los métodos de inferencia difusa no se observó una diferencia significativa. Se concluye que no existe una gran diferencia en utilizar cualquiera de los métodos de inferencia, sobre todo si el punto de referencia tiene segmentos constantesA fuzzy controller was designed (CLD to regulate the fluid flow in laboratory station. In order to measure the performance of the CLD, different types of tests were applied and their results were compared with the results using a conventional PID. The fuzzy controller obtained better results in response to stepping, from which we concluded that this could be used in plant startups. For inverse step-type disturbances, the PID is not able to follow the reference, due to the non-linearity of the process, while the CLD produced good results. For ramp type disturbances, the PID showed better tracking of the ramps than the CLD, since its behavior is linear. A significant difference was not observed when using the fuzzy inference method. It is concluded that there is no major difference in the use of these inference methods, especially if the reference point has constant segments

  2. Drain Back Systems in Laboratory and in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perers, Bengt; Furbo, Simon; Fan, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Drain Back systems with ETC collectors are tested and analyzed in a Danish - Chinese cooperation project. Experiences from early work at DTU, with drain back, low flow systems, was used to design two systems: 1) One laboratory system at DTU. 2) One demonstration system in a single family house...... in Sorö Denmark. Detailed monitoring and modelling/validation of the system in the DTU lab is done, to be able to generalize the results, to other climates and loads by simulation and to make design optimizations. The advantage with drain back, low flow systems, is that the system can be made more simple...... with less components and that the performance can be enhanced. Also problems with long term degradation of glycol collector loops are totally avoided. A combination of the drain back and system expansion vessel was tested successfully. It is very important to achieve a continuous slope for the pipes...

  3. Mass flow meter of the Coriolis type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Lötters, Joost Conrad; Lotters, Joost Conrad; Zwikker, Jan Marinus

    2006-01-01

    A mass flowmeter of the Coriolis type with a tube that forms a mechanically closed loop through which a medium flows during operation, and with excitation means for causing the loop to rotate in an oscillatory mode about an axis of rotation during operation. The loop has a starting point and an end

  4. Loop expansion and the bosonic representation of loop quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, E.; Guglielmon, J.; Hackl, L.; Yokomizo, N.

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a new loop expansion that provides a resolution of the identity in the Hilbert space of loop quantum gravity on a fixed graph. We work in the bosonic representation obtained by the canonical quantization of the spinorial formalism. The resolution of the identity gives a tool for implementing the projection of states in the full bosonic representation onto the space of solutions to the Gauss and area matching constraints of loop quantum gravity. This procedure is particularly efficient in the semiclassical regime, leading to explicit expressions for the loop expansions of coherent, heat kernel and squeezed states.

  5. Loop expansion and the bosonic representation of loop quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Eugenio; Hackl, Lucas; Yokomizo, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new loop expansion that provides a resolution of the identity in the Hilbert space of loop quantum gravity on a fixed graph. We work in the bosonic representation obtained by the canonical quantization of the spinorial formalism. The resolution of the identity gives a tool for implementing the projection of states in the full bosonic representation onto the space of solutions to the Gauss and area matching constraints of loop quantum gravity. This procedure is particularly efficient in the semiclassical regime, leading to explicit expressions for the loop expansions of coherent, heat kernel and squeezed states.

  6. Photometrics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Photometrics Laboratory provides the capability to measure, analyze and characterize radiometric and photometric properties of light sources and filters,...

  7. Blackroom Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables evaluation and characterization of materials ranging from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared (LWIR).DESCRIPTION: The Blackroom Laboratory is...

  8. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  9. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  10. Blackroom Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables evaluation and characterization of materials ranging from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared (LWIR). DESCRIPTION: The Blackroom Laboratory is...

  11. A chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1997 progress report and presentations at the annual meeting, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, December 3--4, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, B.; Doughty, C.; Geller, J. [and others

    1998-07-01

    Understanding subsurface flow and transport processes is critical for effective assessment, decision-making, and remediation activities for contaminated sites. However, for fluid flow and contaminant transport through fractured vadose zones, traditional hydrogeological approaches are often found to be inadequate. In this project, the authors examine flow and transport through a fractured vadose zone as a deterministic chaotic dynamical process, and develop a model of it in these terms. Initially, the authors examine separately the geometric model of fractured rock and the flow dynamics model needed to describe chaotic behavior. Ultimately they will put the geometry and flow dynamics together to develop a chaotic-dynamical model of flow and transport in a fractured vadose zone. They investigate water flow and contaminant transport on several scales, ranging from small-scale laboratory experiments in fracture replicas and fractured cores, to field experiments conducted in a single exposed fracture at a basalt outcrop, and finally to a ponded infiltration test using a pond of 7 by 8 m. In the field experiments, they measure the time-variation of water flux, moisture content, and hydraulic head at various locations, as well as the total inflow rate to the subsurface. Such variations reflect the changes in the geometry and physics of water flow that display chaotic behavior, which they try to reconstruct using the data obtained. In the analysis of experimental data, a chaotic model can be used to predict the long-term bounds on fluid flow and transport behavior, known as the attractor of the system, and to examine the limits of short-term predictability within these bounds. This approach is especially well suited to the need for short-term predictions to support remediation decisions and long-term bounding studies. View-graphs from ten presentations made at the annual meeting held December 3--4, 1997 are included in an appendix to this report.

  12. Condition Monitoring of Control Loops

    OpenAIRE

    Horch, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    The main concern of this work is the development of methodsfor automatic condition monitoring of control loops withapplication to the process industry. By condition monitoringboth detection and diagnosis of malfunctioning control loops isunderstood, using normal operating data and a minimum amount ofprocess knowledge. The use of indices for quantifying loop performance is dealtwith in the first part of the thesis. The starting point is anindex proposed by Harris (1989). This index has been mo...

  13. A detailed BWR recirculation loop model for RELAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araiza-Martínez, Enrique, E-mail: enrique.araiza@inin.gob.mx; Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier, E-mail: javier.ortiz@inin.gob.mx; Castillo-Durán, Rogelio, E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.mx

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A new detailed BWR recirculation loop model was developed for RELAP. • All jet pumps, risers, manifold, suction and control valves, and recirculation pump are modeled. • Model is tested against data from partial blockage of two jet pumps. • For practical applications, simulation results showed good agreement with available data. - Abstract: A new detailed geometric model of the whole recirculation loop of a BWR has been developed for the code RELAP. This detailed model includes the 10 jet pumps, 5 risers, manifold, suction and control valves, and the recirculation pump, per recirculation loop. The model is tested against data from an event of partial blockage at the entrance nozzle of one jet pump in both recirculation loops. For practical applications, simulation results showed good agreement with data. Then, values of parameters considered as figure of merit (reactor power, dome pressure, core flow, among others) for this event are compared against those from the common 1 jet pump per loop model. The results show that new detailed model led to a closer prediction of the reported power change. The detailed recirculation loop model can provide more reliable boundary condition data to a CFD models for studies of, for example, flow induced vibration, wear, and crack initiation.

  14. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung

    2016-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The startup transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe startup behaviors. Topics include the four startup scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the startup scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power startup, and methods to enhance the startup success. Also addressed are the pressure spike and pressure surge during the startup transient, and repeated cycles of loop startup and shutdown under certain conditions.

  15. Numerical simulation of losses along a natural circulation helium loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knížat, Branislav; Urban, František; Mlkvik, Marek; RidzoÅ, František; Olšiak, Róbert

    2016-06-01

    A natural circulation helium loop appears to be a perspective passive method of a nuclear reactor cooling. When designing this device, it is important to analyze the mechanism of an internal flow. The flow of helium in the loop is set in motion due to a difference of hydrostatic pressures between cold and hot branch. Steady flow at a requested flow rate occurs when the buoyancy force is adjusted to resistances against the flow. Considering the fact that the buoyancy force is proportional to a difference of temperatures in both branches, it is important to estimate the losses correctly in the process of design. The paper deals with the calculation of losses in branches of the natural circulation helium loop by methods of CFD. The results of calculations are an important basis for the hydraulic design of both exchangers (heater and cooler). The analysis was carried out for the existing model of a helium loop of the height 10 m and nominal heat power 250 kW.

  16. Hendra virus detection using Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foord, Adam J; Middleton, Deborah; Heine, Hans G

    2012-04-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a zoonotic paramyxovirus endemic in Australian Pteropus bats (fruit bats or flying foxes). Although bats appear to be unaffected by the virus, HeV can spread from fruit bats to horses, causing severe disease. Human infection results from close contact with the blood, body fluids and tissues of infected horses. HeV is a biosecurity level 4 (BSL-4) pathogen, with a high case-fatality rate in humans and horses. Current assays for HeV detection require complex instrumentation and are generally time consuming. The aim of this study was to develop a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) assay to detect nucleic acid from all known HeV strains in horses without the requirement for complex laboratory equipment. A LAMP assay targeting a conserved region of the HeV P-gene was combined with a Lateral Flow Device (LFD) for detection of amplified product. All HeV isolates, the original HeV isolated in 1994 as well as the most recent isolates from 2011 were detected. Analytical sensitivity and specificity of the HeV-LAMP assay was equal to a TaqMan assay developed previously. Significantly, these assays detected HeV in horses before clinical signs were observed. The combined LAMP-LFD procedure is a sensitive method suitable for HeV diagnosis in a resource-limited situation or where rapid test results are critical.

  17. 3D MHD Models of Active Region Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon

    2004-01-01

    Present imaging and spectroscopic observations of active region loops allow to determine many physical parameters of the coronal loops, such as the density, temperature, velocity of flows in loops, and the magnetic field. However, due to projection effects many of these parameters remain ambiguous. Three dimensional imaging in EUV by the STEREO spacecraft will help to resolve the projection ambiguities, and the observations could be used to setup 3D MHD models of active region loops to study the dynamics and stability of active regions. Here the results of 3D MHD models of active region loops are presented, and the progress towards more realistic 3D MHD models of active regions. In particular the effects of impulsive events on the excitation of active region loop oscillations, and the generation, propagations and reflection of EIT waves are shown. It is shown how 3D MHD models together with 3D EUV observations can be used as a diagnostic tool for active region loop physical parameters, and to advance the science of the sources of solar coronal activity.

  18. Determination of the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) of Photocatalytic Oxidation (PCO) Purifiers for Indoor Air Pollutants Using a Closed-Loop Reactor. Part I: Theoretical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Éric; Héquet, Valérie

    2017-03-06

    This study demonstrated that a laboratory-scale recirculation closed-loop reactor can be an efficient technique for the determination of the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) of PhotoCatalytic Oxidation (PCO) air purification devices. The recirculation closed-loop reactor was modeled by associating equations related to two ideal reactors: one is a perfectly mixed reservoir and the other is a plug flow system corresponding to the PCO device itself. Based on the assumption that the ratio between the residence time in the PCO device and the residence time in the reservoir τP/τR tends to 0, the model highlights that a lab closed-loop reactor can be a suitable technique for the determination of the efficiency of PCO devices. Moreover, if the single-pass removal efficiency is lower than 5% of the treated flow rate, the decrease in the pollutant concentration over time can be characterized by a first-order decay model in which the time constant is proportional to the CADR. The limits of the model are examined and reported in terms of operating conditions (experiment duration, ratio of residence times, and flow rate ranges).

  19. Estimation of fluid flow and mass transport properties in a natural fracture using laboratory testing system on mass transport in fractured rock (LABROCK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Naoto; Uchida, Masahiro [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Satou, Hisashi [Inspection Development Company Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    The understanding of mass transport and fluid flow properties in natural rock fractures is important for safety assessment of geological disposal of high level nuclear waste. The authors developed advanced tracer test equipment in which a 50-cm cubic scale rock sample was feasible. The mass transport and fluid flow properties in a single fracture were also examined. The relation among hydraulic, transport and mass balance apertures of a natural single fracture were obtained. Heterogeneity of the aperture distribution was evident, as was the possibility of some major flow line perpendicular to the flow direction. Additionally, the relation between normal stress and each aperture was also obtained by loading normal stress on the fracture. In future, measuring the aperture distribution and establishing the model considering fluid flow and mass transport properties in natural rock fractures will be conducted. (author)

  20. Establishing a cost-per-result of laboratory-based, reflex Cryptococcal antigenaemia screening (CrAg) in HIV+ patients with CD4 counts less than 100 cells/μl using a Lateral Flow Assay (LFA) at a typical busy CD4 laboratory in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassim, Naseem; Schnippel, Kathryn; Coetzee, Lindi Marie; Glencross, Deborah Kim

    2017-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in countries with high HIV prevalence, primarily affecting patients whose CD4 are results are positive. A laboratory-based reflexed CrAg screening approach, using a Lateral Flow Assay (LFA) on remnant EDTA CD4 blood samples, was piloted at three CD4 laboratories. This study aimed to assess the cost-per-result of laboratory-based reflexed CrAg screening at one pilot CD4 referral laboratory. CD4 test volumes from 2014 were extracted to estimate percentage of CD4 result was estimated using a bottom-up method, inclusive of test kits and consumables (reagents), laboratory equipment and technical effort costs. The ZAR/$ exchange of 14.696/$1 was used, where applicable. One-way sensitivity analyses on the cost-per-result were conducted for possible error rates (3%- 8%, reductions or increases in reagent costs as well as test volumes (ranging from -60% to +60%). The pilot CD4 laboratory performed 267000 CD4 tests in 2014; ~ 9.3% (27500) reported CD4result of $4.28 was reported, with reagents contributing $3.11 (72.8%), while technical effort and laboratory equipment overheads contributed $1.17 (27.2%) and $0.03 (result range of $3.84 to $6.03. A cost-per-result of $4.28 was established in a typical CD4 service laboratory to enable local budgetary cost projections and programmatic cost-effectiveness modelling. Varying reagent costs linked to currency exchange and varying test volumes in different levels of service can lead to varying cost-per-test and technical effort to manage workload, with an inverse relationship of higher costs expected at lower volumes of tests.

  1. Buoyant Magnetic Loops Generated by Global Convective Dynamo Action

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Nicholas J; Brun, A Sacha; Miesch, Mark S; Toomre, Juri

    2012-01-01

    Our global 3D simulations of convection and dynamo action in a Sun-like star reveal that persistent wreaths of strong magnetism can be built within the bulk of the convention zone. Here we examine the characteristics of buoyant magnetic structures that are self-consistently created by dynamo action and turbulent convective motions in a simulation with solar stratification but rotating at three times the current solar rate. These buoyant loops originate within sections of the magnetic wreaths in which turbulent flows amplify the fields to much larger values than is possible through laminar processes. These amplified portions can rise through the convective layer by a combination of magnetic buoyancy and advection by convective giant cells, forming buoyant loops. We measure statistical trends in the polarity, twist, and tilt of these loops. Loops are shown to preferentially arise in longitudinal patches somewhat reminiscent of active longitudes in the Sun, although broader in extent. We show that the strength o...

  2. Corrosion of alloy 718 in a mercury thermal convection loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, S.J.; DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.

    1999-12-01

    Two thermal convection loops (TCLs) fabricated from annealed alloy 718 continuously circulated mercury (Hg) with 1000 wppm gallium (Ga), respectively, for about 5000 h, duplicating previous TCL tests for annealed 316L. In each case, the maximum loop temperature was 305C, the minimum temperature was 242C, and the Hg flow rate was approximately 1.2 m/min. Unlike the 316L exposed to Hg, which above about 260C exhibited a thin, porous surface layer depleted in Ni and Cr, the alloy 718 coupons revealed essentially no wetting and, therefore, no interaction with that Hg at any temperature. Alloy 718 coupons suspended in the loops revealed inconsequentially small weight changes, and both the coupons and loop tubing exhibited no detectable metallographic evidence of attack.

  3. Assessing catchment connectivity using hysteretic loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jason; Masselink, Rens; Goni, Mikel; Gimenez, Rafael; Casali, Javier; Seeger, Manuel; Keesstra, Saskia

    2017-04-01

    Storm events mobilize large proportions of sediments in catchment systems. Therefore understanding catchment sediment dynamics throughout the continuity of storms and how initial catchment states act as controls on the transport of sediment to catchment outlets is important for effective catchment management. Sediment connectivity is a concept which can explain the origin, pathways and sinks of sediments within catchments (Baartman et al., 2013; Parsons et al., 2015; Masselink et al., 2016a,b; Mekonnen et al., 2016). However, sediment connectivity alone does not provide a practicable mechanism by which the catchment's initial state - and thus the location of entrained sediment in the sediment transport cascade - can be characterized. Studying the dynamic relationship between water discharge (Q) and suspended sediment (SS) at the catchment outlet can provide a valuable research tool to infer the likely source areas and flow pathways contributing to sediment transport because the relationship can be characterized by predictable hysteresis patterns. Hysteresis is observed when the sediment concentration associated with a certain flow rate is different depending on the direction in which the analysis is performed - towards the increase or towards the diminution of the flow. However, the complexity of the phenomena and factors which determine the hysteresis make its interpretation ambiguous. Previous work has described various types of hysteretic loops as well as the cause for the shape of the loop, mainly pointing to the origin of the sediments. The data set for this study comes from four experimental watersheds in Navarre (Spain), owned and maintained by the Government of Navarre. These experimental watersheds have been monitored and studied since 1996 (La Tejería and Latxaga) and 2001 (Oskotz principal and Oskotz woodland). La Tejería and Latxaga watersheds are similar to each other regarding size (approximately 200 ha), geology (marls and sandstones), soils (fine

  4. In situ and laboratory investigations of fluid flow through an argillaceous formation at different scales of space and time, Tournemire tunnel, southern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisson, Jean-Yves; Bertrand, Lucien; Heitz, Jean-François; Golvan, Yann Moreau-Le

    2001-01-01

    In the context of a research and development program on waste disposal, an experimental site (Tournemire tunnel, Aveyron, France) was selected by the French Institute for Nuclear Protection and Safety (IPSN) in order to undertake studies on potential fluid flow at different scales of space and time within a 250-m-thick argillaceous formation. The argillite has a low natural water content ( 3-5%) and very low radii access porosity. Diffusion (tritiated water) coefficients (1×10-12 to 2×10-11 m2/s) and hydraulic conductivities derived from different types of laboratory tests (10-14 to 10-13 m/s) are characteristics of a very low-permeable rock. In situ hydraulic tests (including long-term hydraulic-head measurements) were used to obtain values for hydraulic head and hydraulic conductivity at a scale of 1-10 m (10-13 to 10-11 m/s). Despite uncertainties on these data (due to a scale factor, presence of fissures, and possible artefacts due to hydro-chemo-mechanical coupling), it is expected that fluid flow is essentially governed by diffusion processes. Identification of possible natural flows at larger scales of time and space was investigated using natural isotopic tracers from interstitial fluids. Modelling, based on the deuterium profile along the clay formation and assuming pure diffusion processes, provides estimations of possible flow times. However, lack of knowledge concerning the past geological evolution of the site and the possible role of a fracture network do not permit reduction of uncertainties on these estimations at this stage. Résumé. Dans le cadre de son programme de recherche et développement sur les stockages de déchets, un site expérimental (tunnel de Tournemire, Aveyron, France) a été sélectionné par l'Institut de Protection et Sûreté Nucléaire (IPSN) pour conduire des études sur les possibilités de transferts de fluides à différentes échelles de temps et d'espace au sein d'une formation argileuse de 250 m d'épaisseur. L

  5. Energy Conversion Advanced Heat Transport Loop and Power Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, C. H.

    2006-08-01

    operating conditions as well as trade offs between efficiency and capital cost. Prametric studies were carried out on reactor outlet temperature, mass flow, pressure, and turbine cooling. Recommendations on the optimal working fluid for each configuration were made. A steady state model comparison was made with a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) power conversion system developed at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). A preliminary model of the CBC was developed in HYSYS for comparison. Temperature and pressure ratio curves for the Capstone turbine and compressor developed at SNL were implemented into the HYSYS model. A comparison between the HYSYS model and SNL loop demonstrated power output predicted by HYSYS was much larger than that in the experiment. This was due to a lack of a model for the electrical alternator which was used to measure the power from the SNL loop. Further comparisons of the HYSYS model and the CBC data are recommended. Engineering analyses were performed for several configurations of the intermediate heat transport loop that transfers heat from the nuclear reactor to the hydrogen production plant. The analyses evaluated parallel and concentric piping arrangements and two different working fluids, including helium and a liquid salt. The thermal-hydraulic analyses determined the size and insulation requirements for the hot and cold leg pipes in the different configurations. Economic analyses were performed to estimate the cost of the va

  6. Hydraulic analysis of the Wendelstein 7-X cooling loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnow, M., E-mail: michael.smirnow@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Orozco, G.; Boscary, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Peacock, A. [European Commission c/o Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • A hydraulic simulation model of the W7-X cooling loops and plasma facing components. • CFD analysis of orifice components. • Optimization and flow balancing of cooling loops. -- Abstract: Actively water cooled in vessel components (IVC) are required for the long pulse operation of the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X). In total, the cooling pipes have a length of about 4.5 km, supplying the coolant via 304 cooling circuits for the IVC. Within each cooling loop, the IVC are organized mostly in parallel. A homogeneous flow through all branches or at least the minimum specified flow in all of the branches of a circuit is crucial for the IVC to withstand the loading conditions. A detailed hydraulic simulation model of the W7-X cooling loops was built with the commercial code Flowmaster, which is a 1-D computational fluid dynamics software. In order to handle the huge amount of pipe-work data that had to be modelled, a pre- and post-processing macro was developed to transfer the 3D Catia V5 CAD model to the 1-D piping model. Within this model, the hydraulic characteristics of different types of first wall components were simulated, and compared with their pressure drop measurements. As a result of this work, the need for optimization of some cooling loops has been identified and feasible modified solutions were selected.

  7. Dynamic PID loop control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Soyars, W.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.; DeGraff, B.; Darve, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters oscillation.

  8. Inductance loop and partial

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Clayton R

    2010-01-01

    "Inductance is an unprecedented text, thoroughly discussing "loop" inductance as well as the increasingly important "partial" inductance. These concepts and their proper calculation are crucial in designing modern high-speed digital systems. World-renowned leader in electromagnetics Clayton Paul provides the knowledge and tools necessary to understand and calculate inductance." "With the present and increasing emphasis on high-speed digital systems and high-frequency analog systems, it is imperative that system designers develop an intimate understanding of the concepts and methods in this book. Inductance is a much-needed textbook designed for senior and graduate-level engineering students, as well as a hands-on guide for working engineers and professionals engaged in the design of high-speed digital and high-frequency analog systems."--Jacket.

  9. Dynamic PID loop control

    CERN Document Server

    Pei, L; Theilacker, J; Soyars, W; Martinez, A; Bossert, R; DeGraff, B; Darve, C

    2012-01-01

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters' oscillation.

  10. Vortex loops and Majoranas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesi, Stefano [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); CEMS, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Jaffe, Arthur [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Loss, Daniel [CEMS, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Pedrocchi, Fabio L. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel (Switzerland)

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the role that vortex loops play in characterizing eigenstates of interacting Majoranas. We give some general results and then focus on ladder Hamiltonian examples as a test of further ideas. Two methods yield exact results: (i) A mapping of certain spin Hamiltonians to quartic interactions of Majoranas shows that the spectra of these two examples coincide. (ii) In cases with reflection-symmetric Hamiltonians, we use reflection positivity for Majoranas to characterize vortices in the ground states. Two additional methods suggest wider applicability of these results: (iii) Numerical evidence suggests similar behavior for certain systems without reflection symmetry. (iv) A perturbative analysis also suggests similar behavior without the assumption of reflection symmetry.

  11. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler’s “spacetime foam” intuition. (iii Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv A derivation of the Bekenstein–Hawking black-hole entropy. (v Low-energy calculations, yielding n-point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  12. Quenching phenomena in natural circulation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan); Ishida, Naoki [Daihatsu Motor Company, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Quenching phenomena has been investigated experimentally using circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. During the quenching under natural circulation, the heat transfer mode changes from film boiling to nucleate boiling, and at the same time flux changes with time depending on the vapor generation rate and related two-phase flow characteristics. Moreover, density wave oscillations occur under a certain operating condition, which is closely related to the dynamic behavior of the cooling curve. The experimental results indicates that the occurrence of the density wave oscillation induces the deterioration of effective cooling of the heat surface in the film and the transition boiling regions, which results in the decrease in the quenching velocity.

  13. Phenomenology of loop quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2010-01-01

    After introducing the basic ingredients of Loop Quantum Cosmology, I will briefly discuss some of its phenomenological aspects. Those can give some useful insight about the full Loop Quantum Gravity theory and provide an answer to some long-standing questions in early universe cosmology.

  14. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-07-08

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Improved code-tracking loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflame, D. T.

    1980-01-01

    Delay-locked loop tracks pseudonoise codes without introducing dc timing errors, because it is not sensitive to gain imbalance between signal processing arms. "Early" and "late" reference codes pass in combined form through both arms, and each arm acts on both codes. Circuit accomodates 1 dB weaker input signals with tracking ability equal to that of tau-dither loops.

  16. Loop groups and noncommutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Carpi, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    We describe the representation theory of loop groups in terms of K-theory and noncommutative geometry. This is done by constructing suitable spectral triples associated with the level l projective unitary positive-energy representations of any given loop group LG. The construction is based on certain supersymmetric conformal field theory models associated with LG.

  17. Brane Couplings from Bulk Loops

    OpenAIRE

    Georgi, Howard; Grant, Aaron K.; Hailu, Girma

    2000-01-01

    We compute loop corrections to the effective action of a field theory on a five-dimensional $S_1/Z_2$ orbifold. We find that the quantum loop effects of interactions in the bulk produce infinite contributions that require renormalization by four-dimensional couplings on the orbifold fixed planes. Thus bulk couplings give rise to renormalization group running of brane couplings.

  18. Progress in Z-Pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, James E.; Haines, Malcolm G. (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Bliss, David Emery; Olson, Richard Edward; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Olson, Craig Lee; Nash, Thomas J.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Idzorek, George C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Stygar, William A.; Apruzese, John P. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC); Cuneo, Michael Edward; Cooper, Gary Wayne (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chrien, Robert E. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Slutz, Stephen A.; Mock, Raymond Cecil; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Darrell L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Lemke, Raymond William; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Roderick, Norman Frederick (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Watt, Robert G. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New MM)

    2004-06-01

    Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions.

  19. Higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-07-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is the symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity. In this paper, we generalize the structure of loop quantum cosmology to the theories with arbitrary spacetime dimensions. The isotropic and homogeneous cosmological model in n+1 dimensions is quantized by the loop quantization method. Interestingly, we find that the underlying quantum theories are divided into two qualitatively different sectors according to spacetime dimensions. The effective Hamiltonian and modified dynamical equations of n+1 dimensional LQC are obtained. Moreover, our results indicate that the classical big bang singularity is resolved in arbitrary spacetime dimensions by a quantum bounce. We also briefly discuss the similarities and differences between the n+1 dimensional model and the 3+1 dimensional one. Our model serves as a first example of higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology and offers the possibility to investigate quantum gravity effects in higher dimensional cosmology.

  20. Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system customer interface document.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2013-09-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate %E2%80%9Csolar salt%E2%80%9D and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 40 bar (600psi), temperature to 585%C2%B0C, and flow rate of 44-50kg/s(400-600GPM) depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  1. Modelling and characterization of an airlift-loop bioreactor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, P.

    1987-01-01

    An airlift-loop reactor is a bioreactor for aerobic biotechnological processes. The special feature of the ALR is the recirculation of the liquid through a downcomer connecting the top and the bottom of the main bubbling section. Due to the high circulation-flow rate, efficient mixing and oxygen tra

  2. Resilience of Urban Smart Grids Involving Multiple Control Loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Theilgaard; Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna; Schwefel, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Intelligent control of energy distribution grids is implemented via a hierarchy of control loops with different input values and different control targets, which also work on different time-scales. This control is enabled by a bi-directional communication flow, which can be interrupted due to ICT...

  3. Production planning and control of closed-loop supply chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Inderfurth (Karl); R.H. Teunter (Ruud)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractMore and more supply chains emerge that include a return flow of materials. Many original equipment manufacturers are nowadays engaged in the remanufacturing business. In many process industries, production defectives and by-products are reworked. These closed-loop supply chains deserve

  4. 一种适用于具有弱环网和PV节点的配电网的增广雅可比矩阵潮流法%An Augmented Jacobian Method for Power Flow Analysis of Weakly Looped Distribution Systems with PV Buses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈星莺; 余昆; 单渊达

    2002-01-01

    针对带弱环网和PV节点的配电网提出了一种增广雅可比矩阵潮流计算方法.将弱环网和PV节点的边界条件嵌入到雅可比矩阵中,并对雅可比矩阵的因子分解进行了详尽的设计.仿真结果表明了该算法的鲁棒性和计算效率.%A power flow analysis method for weakly looped distribution systems with PV buses is proposed in this paper. The proposed method is computationally more efficient and more robust compared with the conventional compensation methods. The robustness is achieved by embedding the boundary conditions of loops and PV buses into the Jacobian matrix. The computational efficiency is achieved by the carefully designed factorization of Jacobian matrix. Test results on a 33-bus system are presented.

  5. Appraisal of within- and between-laboratory reproducibility of non-radioisotopic local lymph node assay using flow cytometry, LLNA:BrdU-FCM: comparison of OECD TG429 performance standard and statistical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyeri; Na, Jihye; Jang, Won-Hee; Jung, Mi-Sook; Jeon, Jun-Young; Heo, Yong; Yeo, Kyung-Wook; Jo, Ji-Hoon; Lim, Kyung-Min; Bae, SeungJin

    2015-05-05

    Mouse local lymph node assay (LLNA, OECD TG429) is an alternative test replacing conventional guinea pig tests (OECD TG406) for the skin sensitization test but the use of a radioisotopic agent, (3)H-thymidine, deters its active dissemination. New non-radioisotopic LLNA, LLNA:BrdU-FCM employs a non-radioisotopic analog, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and flow cytometry. For an analogous method, OECD TG429 performance standard (PS) advises that two reference compounds be tested repeatedly and ECt(threshold) values obtained must fall within acceptable ranges to prove within- and between-laboratory reproducibility. However, this criteria is somewhat arbitrary and sample size of ECt is less than 5, raising concerns about insufficient reliability. Here, we explored various statistical methods to evaluate the reproducibility of LLNA:BrdU-FCM with stimulation index (SI), the raw data for ECt calculation, produced from 3 laboratories. Descriptive statistics along with graphical representation of SI was presented. For inferential statistics, parametric and non-parametric methods were applied to test the reproducibility of SI of a concurrent positive control and the robustness of results were investigated. Descriptive statistics and graphical representation of SI alone could illustrate the within- and between-laboratory reproducibility. Inferential statistics employing parametric and nonparametric methods drew similar conclusion. While all labs passed within- and between-laboratory reproducibility criteria given by OECD TG429 PS based on ECt values, statistical evaluation based on SI values showed that only two labs succeeded in achieving within-laboratory reproducibility. For those two labs that satisfied the within-lab reproducibility, between-laboratory reproducibility could be also attained based on inferential as well as descriptive statistics.

  6. Operational Results of a Closed Brayton Cycle Test-Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven A.; Fuller, Robert; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Nichols, Kenneth; Brown, Nicholas

    2005-02-01

    A number of space and terrestrial power system designs plan to use nuclear reactors that are coupled to Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems to generate electrical power. Because very little experience exists regarding the operational behavior of these systems, Sandia National Laboratories (through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development program) is developing a closed-loop test bed that can be used to determine the operational behavior of these systems and to validate models for these systems. Sandia has contracted Barber-Nichols Corporation to design, fabricate, and assemble a Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) system. This system was developed by modifying commercially available hardware. It uses a 30 kWe Capstone C-30 gas-turbine unit (www.capstoneturbine.com) with a modified housing that permits the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller that are connected to the turbo-machinery in a closed loop. The test-loop reuses the Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator. The Capstone system's nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system are also reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled either by adjusting the alternator load by either using the electrical grid or a separate load bank. This report describes the test-loop hardware SBL-30 (Sandia Brayton Loop-30kWe). Also presented are results of early testing and modeling of the unit. The SBL-30 hardware is currently configured with a heater that is limited to 80 kWth with a maximum outlet temperature of ˜1000 K.

  7. Double-porosity rock model and squirt flow in the laboratory frequency band%实验室频段的双孔岩石模型与喷射流

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巴晶; 曹宏; 姚逢昌; 聂建新; 杨慧珠

    2008-01-01

    Biot theory research has been extended to the multi-scale heterogeneity in actual rocks. Focused on laboratory frequency bandwidth studies, we discuss the relationships between double-porosity and BISQ wave equations, analytically derive the degeneration method for double-porosity's return to BISQ, and give three necessary conditions which the degeneration must satisfy. By introducing dynamic permeability and tortuosity theory, a full set of dynamic double-porosity wave equations are derived. A narrow band approximation is made to simplify the numerical simulation for dynamic double-porosity wavefields. Finally, the pseudo-spectral method is used for wave simulation within the laboratory frequency band (50 kHz). Numerical results have proved the feasibility for dynamic double-porosity's description of squirt flow and the validity of the quasi-static approximation method.

  8. Modeling loop entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold from a highly disordered state into a highly ordered one. Traditionally, the folding problem has been stated as one of predicting "the" tertiary structure from sequential information. However, new evidence suggests that the ensemble of unfolded forms may not be as disordered as once believed, and that the native form of many proteins may not be described by a single conformation, but rather an ensemble of its own. Quantifying the relative disorder in the folded and unfolded ensembles as an entropy difference may therefore shed light on the folding process. One issue that clouds discussions of "entropy" is that many different kinds of entropy can be defined: entropy associated with overall translational and rotational Brownian motion, configurational entropy, vibrational entropy, conformational entropy computed in internal or Cartesian coordinates (which can even be different from each other), conformational entropy computed on a lattice, each of the above with different solvation and solvent models, thermodynamic entropy measured experimentally, etc. The focus of this work is the conformational entropy of coil/loop regions in proteins. New mathematical modeling tools for the approximation of changes in conformational entropy during transition from unfolded to folded ensembles are introduced. In particular, models for computing lower and upper bounds on entropy for polymer models of polypeptide coils both with and without end constraints are presented. The methods reviewed here include kinematics (the mathematics of rigid-body motions), classical statistical mechanics, and information theory.

  9. The loop gravity string

    CERN Document Server

    Freidel, Laurent; Pranzetti, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study canonical gravity in finite regions for which we introduce a generalisation of the Gibbons-Hawking boundary term including the Immirzi parameter. We study the canonical formulation on a spacelike hypersuface with a boundary sphere and show how the presence of this term leads to an unprecedented type of degrees of freedom coming from the restoration of the gauge and diffeomorphism symmetry at the boundary. In the presence of a loop quantum gravity state, these boundary degrees of freedom localize along a set of punctures on the boundary sphere. We demonstrate that these degrees of freedom are effectively described by auxiliary strings with a 3-dimensional internal target space attached to each puncture. We show that the string currents represent the local frame field, that the string angular momenta represent the area flux and that the string stress tensor represents the two dimensional metric on the boundary of the region of interest. Finally, we show that the commutators of these broken...

  10. Computational Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains a number of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house software packages allowing for both statistical analysis as well as mathematical modeling...

  11. Analytical Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s analytical laboratories in Pittsburgh, PA, and Albany, OR, give researchers access to the equipment they need to thoroughly study the properties of materials...

  12. Geomechanics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geomechanics Laboratory allows its users to measure rock properties under a wide range of simulated service conditions up to very high pressures and complex load...

  13. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  14. Pressure drop and blower performance tests in very high temperature Helium Experimental LooP (HELP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Soo; Hong, Sung Deok; Kim, Yong Wan [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed the gas loops to develop and verify the key components of the nuclear hydrogen production system. At the present, KAERI is operating a small scale gas loop for feasibility tests of process heat exchanger and a very high temperature Helium Experimental LooP (HELP) for verification tests of bench scale prototypes for high temperature key components in Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR). Figure 1 presents the HELP assembled with the key components. The size was designed for the verification test of a 150kW intermediate heat exchanger or the simulation test in a 1/6 scaled down fuel block. The loop consists of the primary loop and the secondary loop. The primary loop and the secondary loop simulate VHTR and intermediate loop in nuclear hydrogen production system, respectively. The loops were designed to withstand the maximum temperature of 1000 .Deg. C, the maximum pressure of 9.0 MPa, and the normal mass velocity of 0.5 kg/sec. The working fluid is helium as the actual coolant of VHTR. The primary loop is composed of a preheater, a high temperature heater, a hot gas duct, intermediate heat exchangers, a water cooled U tube heat exchanger, a gas bearing circulator, a passive venting system and gas filters. The secondary loop has the same system configuration as the primary loop except a high temperature heater. Two loops share a helium supply system, a helium purification system and the water loop for a cooling tower as Figure 2. In this study, the experimental results of the bypass line pressure drop and blower performance at the nitrogen condition are analyzed to predict the main line mass flow rates without heaters.

  15. 油气水多相流动环道实验中蜡沉积实验的思考%Thinking on the Wax Deposition Experiment in Multiphase Flow Loop Experiment of Oil, Gas and Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马志荣; 李长俊

    2015-01-01

    实验研究一直是一项重要的科学研究手段。蜡沉积实验装置主要通过研究原油的温度、环境温度、气液流量、流型等参数对蜡沉积的影响。通过实验模拟输油管道中某一管段的蜡沉积情况,来研究多相流中结蜡的机理和影响管壁结蜡的因素。它可以非常准确的计算出不同条件下管道中结蜡量和蜡沉积速率,还可以确定不同条件下多相流管道中含蜡原油的流型和流态。%Experimental study is an important mean of scientific research. Wax deposition experiment device mainly through researching the crude oil temperature, environment temperature, gas and liquid flow rate, flow pattern and other parameters to influence wax deposition. Through the simulation of wax deposition in pipeline by the experiment, the mechanism of paraffin deposit in the multiphase flow and the factors that affect tube wall wax are studied. It can accurately calculate the wax precipitation amount and wax deposition rate in the pipeline under different conditions, and also can determine the flow regime and flow pattern of waxy crude oil in the multiphase flow pipeline under different conditions.

  16. Compressible vortex loops: Effect of nozzle geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare-Behtash, H. [School of MACE, University of Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: h.zare-behtash@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Kontis, K. [School of MACE, University of Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.kontis@manchester.ac.uk; Gongora-Orozco, N. [School of MACE, University of Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Takayama, K. [Tohoku University, Shock Wave Research Centre, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Vortex loops are fundamental building blocks of supersonic free jets. Isolating them allows for an easier study and better understanding of such flows. The present study looks at the behaviour of compressible vortex loops of different shapes, generated due to the diffraction of a shock wave from a shock tube with different exit nozzle geometries. These include a 15 mm diameter circular nozzle, two elliptical nozzles with minor to major axis ratios of 0.4 and 0.6, a 30 x 30 mm square nozzle, and finally two exotic nozzles resembling a pair of lips with minor to major axis ratios of 0.2 and 0.5. The experiments were performed for diaphragm pressure ratios of P{sub 4}/P{sub 1}=4, 8, and 12, with P{sub 4} and P{sub 1} being the pressures within the high pressure and low pressure compartments of the shock tube, respectively. High-speed schlieren photography as well as PIV measurements of both stream-wise and head-on flows have been conducted.

  17. Hard Loops, Soft Loops, and High Density Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, T

    2003-01-01

    We study several issues related to the use of effective field theories in QCD at large baryon density. We show that the power counting is complicated by the appearance of two scales inside loop integrals. Hard dense loops involve the large scale $mu^2$ and lead to phenomena such as screening and damping at the scale $gmu$. Soft loops only involve small scales and lead to superfluidity and non-Fermi liquid behavior at exponentially small scales. Four-fermion operators in the effective theory are suppressed by powers of $1/mu$, but they get enhanced by hard loops. As a consequence their contribution to the pairing gap is only suppressed by powers of the coupling constant, and not powers of $1/mu$. We determine the coefficients of four-fermion operators in the effective theory by matching quark-quark scattering amplitudes. Finally, we introduce a perturbative scheme for computing corrections to the gap parameter in the superfluid phase

  18. A Role for the Cytoskeleton in Heart Looping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kersti K. Linask

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 10 years, key genes involved in specification of left-right laterality pathways in the embryo have been defined. The read-out for misexpression of laterality genes is usually the direction of heart looping. The question of how dextral looping direction occurred mechanistically and how the heart tube bends remains unknown. It is becoming clear from our experiments and those of others that left-right differences in cell proliferation in the second heart field (anterior heart field drives the dextral direction. Evidence is accumulating that the cytoskeleton is at the center of laterality, and the bending and rotational forces associated with heart looping. If laterality pathways are modulated upstream, the cytoskeleton, including nonmuscle myosin II (NMHC-II, is altered downstream within the cardiomyocytes, leading to looping abnormalities. The cytoskeleton is associated with important mechanosensing and signaling pathways in cell biology and development. The initiation of blood flow during the looping period and the inherent stresses associated with increasing volumes of blood flowing into the heart may help to potentiate the process. In recent years, the steps involved in this central and complex process of heart development that is the basis of numerous congenital heart defects are being unraveled.

  19. Radial propagators and Wilson loops

    CERN Document Server

    Leupold, S; Leupold, Stefan; Weigert, Heribert

    1996-01-01

    We present a relation which connects the propagator in the radial (Fock-Schwinger) gauge with a gauge invariant Wilson loop. It is closely related to the well-known field strength formula and can be used to calculate the radial gauge propagator. The result is shown to diverge in four-dimensional space even for free fields, its singular nature is however naturally explained using the renormalization properties of Wilson loops with cusps and self-intersections. Using this observation we provide a consistent regularization scheme to facilitate loop calculations. Finally we compare our results with previous approaches to derive a propagator in Fock-Schwinger gauge.

  20. Loop heat pipe for thermal conditions supplying systems for elements of radio electronic equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khayrnasov S. М.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The loop heat pipe design presented in the article provides the transmission of thermal flow up to 105 W when working in temperature range of 20—90°C and on any space orientation.

  1. Closed-loop control of an experimental mixing layer using machine learning control

    CERN Document Server

    Parezanović, Vladimir; Cordier, Laurent; Noack, Bernd R; Delville, Joël; Bonnet, Jean-Paul; Segond, Marc; Abel, Markus; Brunton, Steven L

    2014-01-01

    A novel framework for closed-loop control of turbulent flows is tested in an experimental mixing layer flow. This framework, called Machine Learning Control (MLC), provides a model-free method of searching for the best function, to be used as a control law in closed-loop flow control. MLC is based on genetic programming, a function optimization method of machine learning. In this article, MLC is benchmarked against classical open-loop actuation of the mixing layer. Results show that this method is capable of producing sensor-based control laws which can rival or surpass the best open-loop forcing, and be robust to changing flow conditions. Additionally, MLC can detect non-linear mechanisms present in the controlled plant, and exploit them to find a better type of actuation than the best periodic forcing.

  2. Paleomagnetism of Basaltic Lava Flows in Coreholes ICPP 213, ICPP-214, ICPP-215, and USGS 128 Near the Vadose Zone Research Park, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Duane E.; Herman, Theodore C.

    2003-01-01

    A paleomagnetic study was conducted on basalt from 41 lava flows represented in about 2,300 ft of core from coreholes ICPP-213, ICPP-214, ICPP-215, and USGS 128. These wells are in the area of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Vadose Zone Research Park within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Paleomagnetic measurements were made on 508 samples from the four coreholes, which are compared to each other, and to surface outcrop paleomagnetic data. In general, subhorizontal lines of correlation exist between sediment layers and between basalt layers in the area of the new percolation ponds. Some of the basalt flows and flow sequences are strongly correlative at different depth intervals and represent important stratigraphic unifying elements. Some units pinch out, or thicken or thin even over short separation distances of about 1,500 ft. A more distant correlation of more than 1 mile to corehole USGS 128 is possible for several of the basalt flows, but at greater depth. This is probably due to the broad subsidence of the eastern Snake River Plain centered along its topographic axis located to the south of INEEL. This study shows this most clearly in the oldest portions of the cored sections that have differentially subsided the greatest amount.

  3. Laboratory study on streaming potential for exploring underground water flow; Shitsunai jikken ni yoru ryudo den`i wo mochiita mizu michi tansa no kanosei no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, H.; Shima, H. [Oyo Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    To investigate a possibility of exploration of underground water flow as well as to grasp the underground fluid flow by measuring streaming potential at the ground surface, some experiments were conducted using a model unit by considering the difference of permeability. For this experimental unit, water is driven by adding head difference between the polyethylene vessel filled with water and the experimental water tank. The size of water tank is 350{times}160 mm with a height of 160 mm. Twenty platinum electrodes are set on the cover of water tank. Toyoura standard sand and Kanto loam were used for the experiments. For the experiments, fluid was injected in various combined models by considering the permeability, to measure the streaming potential. As a result, it was explained by the streaming potential that the fluid flows in a form of laminar flow in the experimental water tank, and that the movement of fluid in the Kanto loam is quite slow. It was also confirmed that the streaming potential method is an effective technique for grasping the movement of fluid. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Conceptual Design for a High-Temperature Gas Loop Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James B. Kesseli

    2006-08-01

    This report documents an early-stage conceptual design for a high-temperature gas test loop. The objectives accomplished by the study include, (1) investigation of existing gas test loops to determine ther capabilities and how the proposed system might best complement them, (2) development of a preliminary test plan to help identify the performance characteristics required of the test unit, (3) development of test loop requirements, (4) development of a conceptual design including process flow sheet, mechanical layout, and equipment specifications and costs, and (5) development of a preliminary test loop safety plan.

  5. A LabVIEW model incorporating an open-loop arterial impedance and a closed-loop circulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, R T; Lucas, C L; Cascio, W E; Johnson, T A

    2005-11-01

    While numerous computer models exist for the circulatory system, many are limited in scope, contain unwanted features or incorporate complex components specific to unique experimental situations. Our purpose was to develop a basic, yet multifaceted, computer model of the left heart and systemic circulation in LabVIEW having universal appeal without sacrificing crucial physiologic features. The program we developed employs Windkessel-type impedance models in several open-loop configurations and a closed-loop model coupling a lumped impedance and ventricular pressure source. The open-loop impedance models demonstrate afterload effects on arbitrary aortic pressure/flow inputs. The closed-loop model catalogs the major circulatory waveforms with changes in afterload, preload, and left heart properties. Our model provides an avenue for expanding the use of the ventricular equations through closed-loop coupling that includes a basic coronary circuit. Tested values used for the afterload components and the effects of afterload parameter changes on various waveforms are consistent with published data. We conclude that this model offers the ability to alter several circulatory factors and digitally catalog the most salient features of the pressure/flow waveforms employing a user-friendly platform. These features make the model a useful instructional tool for students as well as a simple experimental tool for cardiovascular research.

  6. Improving the efficiency of the loop method for the simulation of water distribution networks

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Efficiency of hydraulic solvers for the simulation of flows and pressures in water distribution systems (WDSs) is very important, especially in the context of optimization and risk analysis problems, where the hydraulic simulation has to be repeated many times. Among the methods used for hydraulic solvers, the most prominent nowadays is the global gradient algorithm (GGA), based on a hybrid node-loop formulation. Previously, another method based just on loop flow equations was proposed, which...

  7. FY 1993 progress report on the ANS thermal-hydraulic test loop operation and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; Farquharson, G. [and others

    1994-07-01

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) is an experimental facility constructed to support the development of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Highly subcooled heavy-water coolant flows vertically upward at a very high mass flux of almost 27 MG/m{sup 2}-s. In a parallel fuel plate configuration as in the ANSR, the flow is subject to a potential excursive static-flow instability that can very rapidly lead to flow starvation and departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) in the ``hot channel``. The current correlations and experimental data bases for flow excursion (FE) and critical heat flux (CHF) seldom evaluate the specific combination of ANSR operating parameters. The THTL facility was designed and built to provide known thermal-hydraulic (T/H) conditions for a simulated full-length coolant subchannel of the ANS reactor core, thus facilitating experimental determination of FE and CHF thermal limits under expected ANSR T/H conditions. A series of FE tests with water flowing vertically upward was completed over a nominal heat flux range of 6 to 17 MW/m{sup 2}, a mass flux range of 8 to 28 Mg/m{sup 2}-s, an exit pressure range of 1.4 to 2.1 MPa, and an inlet temperature range of 40 to 50 C. FE experiments were also conducted using as ``soft`` a system as possible to secure a true FE phenomena (actual secondary burnout). True DNB experiments under similar conditions were also conducted. To the author`s knowledge, no other FE data have been reported in the literature to date that dover such a combination of conditions of high mass flux, high heat flux, and moderately high pressure.

  8. Modeling the behavior of a two-phase flow apparatus in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Eric W.; Tuttle, Ronald F.

    1992-01-01

    There are many unknown parameters in two-phase flow in microgravity environment. The database is incomplete and therefore correlations are unknown. This has prompted theoretical and experimental work in the area. A Phillips Laboratory program is currently exploring this area. The Phillips Laboratory experiment is a closed loop rankine cycle with a boiler, condenser/subcooler, accumulator and a pump. The work reported herein attempts to model the Phillips Laboratory Apparatus using a thermal-hydraulic software modeling system called Sim-Tool, developed by Mainstream Engineering. This work also explores the limitations of software modeling a microgravity environment. Results of this modeling effort indicate that Sim-Tool needs further development in order to correctly predict two-phase flow in a microgravity environment.

  9. Product Integrals and Wilson loops

    CERN Document Server

    Karp, R L

    2001-01-01

    Using product integrals we review the unambiguous mathematical representation of Wilson line and Wilson loop operators, including their behavior under gauge transformations and the non-abelian Stokes theorem. Interesting consistency conditions among Wilson lines are also presented.

  10. Thermal fluctuations in loop cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J; Magueijo, Joao; Singh, Parampreet

    2007-01-01

    Quantum gravitational effects in loop quantum cosmology lead to a resolution of the initial singularity and have the potential to solve the horizon problem and generate a quasi scale-invariant spectrum of density fluctuations. We consider loop modifications to the behavior of the inverse scale factor below a critical scale in closed models and assume a purely thermal origin for the fluctuations. We show that the no-go results for scale invariance in classical thermal models can be evaded even if we just consider modifications to the background (zeroth order) gravitational dynamics. Since a complete and systematic treatment of the perturbed Einstein equations in loop cosmology is still lacking, we simply parameterize their expected modifications. These change quantitatively, but not qualitatively, our conclusions. We thus urge the community to more fully work out this complex aspect of loop cosmology, since the full picture would not only fix the free parameters of the theory, but also provide a model for a no...

  11. Loop Quantum Cosmology Gravitational Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Odintsov, S D

    2016-01-01

    Loop Quantum Cosmology is an appealing quantum completion of classical cosmology, which brings along various theoretical features which in many cases offer remedy or modify various classical cosmology aspects. In this paper we address the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism in the context of Loop Quantum Cosmology. As we demonstrate, when Loop Quantum Cosmology effects are taken into account in the resulting Friedmann equations for a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe, then even for a radiation dominated Universe, the predicted baryon-to-entropy ratio from the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism is non-zero, in contrast to the Einstein-Hilbert case, in which case the baryon-to-entropy ratio is zero. We also discuss various other cases apart from the radiation domination case, and we discuss how the baryon-to-entropy ratio is affected from the parameters of the quantum theory. In addition, we use illustrative exact solutions of Loop Quantum Cosmology and we investigate under which circumstances the bar...

  12. Continuous smearing of Wilson Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Lohmayer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Continuum smearing was introduced in section 4.1 of JHEP03, 064 (2006) as a meaningful continuum analogue of the well known set of lattice techniques by the same name. Here we apply continuous smearing in continuous space-time to Wilson loops in order to clarify what it does in the context of field theory and also in the context of the loop calculus of the Makeenko-Migdal equation.

  13. Introduction to Loop Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Mercuri, Simone

    2010-01-01

    The questions I have been asked during the 5th International School on Field Theory and Gravitation, have compelled me to give an account of the premises that I consider important for a beginner's approach to Loop Quantum Gravity. After a description of some general arguments and an introduction to the canonical theory of gravity, I review the background independent approach to quantum gravity, giving only a brief survey of Loop Quantum Gravity.

  14. Bifurcations of nontwisted heteroclinic loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田清平; 朱德明

    2000-01-01

    Bifurcations of nontwisted and fine heteroclinic loops are studied for higher dimensional systems. The existence and its associated existing regions are given for the 1-hom orbit and the 1-per orbit, respectively, and bifurcation surfaces of the two-fold periodic orbit are also obtained. At last, these bifurcation results are applied to the fine heteroclinic loop for the planar system, which leads to some new and interesting results.

  15. Design validation and performance of closed loop gas recirculation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmani, S. D.; Joshi, A. V.; Majumder, G.; Mondal, N. K.; Shinde, R. R.

    2016-11-01

    A pilot experimental set up of the India Based Neutrino Observatory's ICAL detector has been operational for the last 4 years at TIFR, Mumbai. Twelve glass RPC detectors of size 2 × 2 m2, with a gas gap of 2 mm are under test in a closed loop gas recirculation system. These RPCs are continuously purged individually, with a gas mixture of R134a (C2H2F4), isobutane (iC4H10) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) at a steady rate of 360 ml/h to maintain about one volume change a day. To economize gas mixture consumption and to reduce the effluents from being released into the atmosphere, a closed loop system has been designed, fabricated and installed at TIFR. The pressure and flow rate in the loop is controlled by mass flow controllers and pressure transmitters. The performance and integrity of RPCs in the pilot experimental set up is being monitored to assess the effect of periodic fluctuation and transients in atmospheric pressure and temperature, room pressure variation, flow pulsations, uniformity of gas distribution and power failures. The capability of closed loop gas recirculation system to respond to these changes is also studied. The conclusions from the above experiment are presented. The validations of the first design considerations and subsequent modifications have provided improved guidelines for the future design of the engineering module gas system.

  16. Closed Loop Control of Soft Switched Interleaved Buck Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shenbagalakshmi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Design, Modeling and Simulation of a closed loop control is presented for Interleaved Buck Converter with Soft Switching. The features of the closed loop system are to reduce the switching losses and load current sharing among the parallel connected converters. The control system of the converter is designed using PWM technique. In order to improve the transient response and dynamic stability of the converters, the controller parameters are designed based on current mode control. Resonant components thus designed enable the application of zero current switching for both the converters connected in parallel thereby maintaining greater efficiency and minimizing voltage and current oscillations. The system analysis, design and performance are verified through simulation using MATLAB/Simulink environment. The simulation approach reveals the high speed dynamic performance of the closed loop system designed using robust PID controller. The laboratory prototype of the Buck converter is developed to verify the controller platform using PIC16F877A microcontroller.

  17. Customization of an optical probe device and validation of a signal processing procedure to study gas-liquid-solid flows. Application to a three-phase internal-loop Gas-lift Bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Mota, A; Ferreira, António; Vicente, A.A.; Sechet, P.; Martins, Jean; Teixeira, J. A.; Cartellier, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The study of local hydrodynamic properties of three-phase bioreactors in biotechnology processes is of great importance, mainly because of the complex interaction between bioreactor and microorganisms. However, classical techniques used for measuring local hydrodynamic properties such as single needle probes are mainly limited to two-phase flows. In this work it was developed and validated a new system, based on the customization of an optical probe initially designed in LEGI. The necessity o...

  18. Beyond the Black Box: Coupling x-ray tomographic imaging of multi-phase flow processes to numerical models and traditional laboratory measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Dorthe; Porter, M.L.; Schaap, M.G.

    Quantitative non-invasive imaging has evolved rapidly in the last decade, and is now being used to assess a variety of problems in vadose zone research, including unsaturated flow and transport of water and contaminants, macropore-dominated processes, soil-water-root interactions, more recent work...... on colloidal processes, and significant work on NAPL-water interactions . We are now able to use non-invasive imaging to probe processes that could not previously be quantified because of lack of opacity, resolution, or accurate techniques for quantitative measurement. This work presents an overview of recent...... advances in x-ray microtomography techniques that can generate high-resolution image-based data for (1) validation of pore-scale multi-phase flow models such as the lattice-Boltzmann technique and pore network models (with respect to fluid saturations, fluid distribution, and relationships among capillary...

  19. Laboratory Evaluation of a Point-of-Care Downward-Flow Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Antibodies to Treponema pallidum and Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Herbst de Cortina, S.; Bristow, C. C.; Vargas, S. K.; Perez, D. G.; Konda, K. A.; Caceres, C. F.; Klausner, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Combining the detection of syphilis and HIV antibodies into one point-of-care test integrates syphilis screening into already existing HIV screening programs, which may be particularly beneficial in settings such as antenatal care. Using the INSTI Multiplex downward-flow immunoassay, we tested 200 stored serum samples from high-risk patients enrolled in a longitudinal study on HIV infection and syphilis in Peruvian men who have sex with men and transgender women. This rapid assay detected HIV...

  20. Establishing a cost-per-result of laboratory-based, reflex Cryptococcal antigenaemia screening (CrAg) in HIV+ patients with CD4 counts less than 100 cells/μl using a Lateral Flow Assay (LFA) at a typical busy CD4 laboratory in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassim, Naseem; Schnippel, Kathryn; Coetzee, Lindi Marie

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cryptococcal meningitis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in countries with high HIV prevalence, primarily affecting patients whose CD4 are Cryptococcal Antigen (CrAg) screening is thus recommended in the South African HIV treatment guidelines for all patients with CD4 counts < = 100 cells/μl, followed by pre-emptive anti-fungal therapy where CrAg results are positive. A laboratory-based reflexed CrAg screening approach, using a Lateral Flow Assay (LFA) on remnant EDTA CD4 blood samples, was piloted at three CD4 laboratories. Objectives This study aimed to assess the cost-per-result of laboratory-based reflexed CrAg screening at one pilot CD4 referral laboratory. Methods CD4 test volumes from 2014 were extracted to estimate percentage of CD4 < = 100 cells/μl. Daily average volumes were derived, assuming 12 months per/year and 21.73 working days per/month. Costing analyses were undertaken using Microsoft Excel and Stata with a provider prospective. The cost-per-result was estimated using a bottom-up method, inclusive of test kits and consumables (reagents), laboratory equipment and technical effort costs. The ZAR/$ exchange of 14.696/$1 was used, where applicable. One-way sensitivity analyses on the cost-per-result were conducted for possible error rates (3%– 8%, reductions or increases in reagent costs as well as test volumes (ranging from -60% to +60%). Results The pilot CD4 laboratory performed 267000 CD4 tests in 2014; ~ 9.3% (27500) reported CD4< = 100 cells/μl, equivalent to 106 CrAg tests performed daily. A batch of 30-tests could be performed in 1.6 hours, including preparation and analysis time. A cost-per-result of $4.28 was reported, with reagents contributing $3.11 (72.8%), while technical effort and laboratory equipment overheads contributed $1.17 (27.2%) and $0.03 (<1%) respectively. One-way sensitivity analyses including increasing or decreasing test volumes by 60% revealed a cost-per-result range of $3.84 to $6