WorldWideScience

Sample records for krka river croatia

  1. VISION, STRATEGY AND ACTION PLAN FOR SHELLFISH FARMING DEVELOPMENT IN THE KRKA RIVER ESTUARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Maguš

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are presented the vision, strategic guidelines/measures and the action plan for shellfish farming development in the Krka river estuary. They came as a result from several discussions that were held with shellfish farmers of the estuary area in year 2008 while writing the Integrated Plan for Shellfish Farming for Krka Estuary Area, which was realized in the framework of the Green Business Support Programme (UNDP COST Project — Conservation, and Sustainable Use of Biodiversity in the Dalmatian Coast through Greening Coastal Development. For a short–term, a considerable impetus for the development of shellfish farming in the Krka river estuary could be the construction of common distribution and purification center, building of warehouse for shellfish farming equipment, and providing work space for the preparation of the equipment as well as the space for waste disposal; for a long–term it could be building of shellfish hatchery at the location of Martinska marine station.

  2. Hydrogeochemical and Isotopic Characteristics of Tufa Precipitating Wates: A Case Study of the River Krka (Slovenia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavadlav, S.; Lojen, S. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department of Environmental Sciences, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-07-15

    The geochemical and stable isotope composition of tufa precipitating water in the River Krka in the Slovenian karst area were studied. Surface water chemistry in the River Krka is controlled by groundwater interactions with carbonate rocks, soil CO{sub 2} and meteoric water in the aquifer. Major element chemistry of water is controlled by dissolution of dolomite and calcite. The aquifer is the main source of cations, since concentrations of Mg{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} in water are highest at the spring. Ca{sup 2+} concentrations are slightly increasing due to the additional mixing of surface and groundwater downstream. Oxygen isotope composition of water indicates homogenization of meteoric water in the aquifer, while {delta}{sup 13}C values of dissolved inorganic carbon in water are affected by biological activity in the soil. {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C of bulk tufa show that deposition of tufa precipitates in the River Krka is kinetically controlled resulting in enrichment with heavier isotopes. Calculated equilibrium temperature of tufa precipitation based on the oxygen isotope composition of water and tufa fit with measured water temperature when average {delta}{sup 18}O values of water and tufa are considered. (author)

  3. Development of river sediment monitoring in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frančišković-Bilinski, Stanislav; Bilinski, Halka; Mlakar, Marina; Maldini, Krešimir

    2017-04-01

    Establishment of regular river sediment monitoring, in addition to water monitoring, is very important. Unlike water, which represents the current state of a particular watercourse, sediment represents a sort of record of the state of pollution in the long run. Sediment monitoring is crucial to gain a real insight into the status of pollution of particular watercourses and to determine trends over a longer period of time. First scientific investigations of river sediment geochemistry in Croatia started 1989 in the Krka River estuary [1], while first systematic research of a river basin in Croatia was performed 2005 in Kupa River drainage basin [2]. Up to now, several detailed studies of both toxic metals and organic pollutants have been conducted in this drainage basin and some other rivers, also Croatian scientists participated in river sediment research in other countries. In 2008 Croatian water authorities (Hrvatske Vode) started preliminary sediment monitoring program, what was successfully conducted. In the first year of preliminary program only 14 stations existed, while in 2014 number of stations increased to 21. Number of monitored watercourses and of analysed parameters also increased. Current plan is to establish permanent monitoring network of river sediments throughout the state. The goal is to set up about 80 stations, which will cover all most important and most contaminated watercourses in all parts of the country [3]. Until the end of the year 2016, regular monitoring was conducted at 31 stations throughout the country. Currently the second phase of sediment monitoring program is in progress. At the moment parameters being determined on particular stations are not uniform. From inorganic compounds it is aimed to determine Cd, Pb, Ni, Hg, Cu, Cr, Zn and As on all stations. The ratio of natural concentrations of those elements vs. anthropogenic influence is being evaluated on all stations. It was found that worse situation is with Ni, Hg and Cr, who

  4. Total and cytosolic concentrations of twenty metals/metalloids in the liver of brown trout Salmo trutta (Linnaeus, 1758) from the karstic Croatian river Krka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragun, Zrinka; Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Krasnići, Nesrete; Ivanković, Dušica; Valić, Damir; Žunić, Jakov; Kapetanović, Damir; Smrzlić, Irena Vardić; Redžović, Zuzana; Grgić, Ivana; Erk, Marijana

    2018-01-01

    Total and cytosolic concentrations of twenty metals/metalloids in the liver of brown trout Salmo trutta (Linnaeus, 1758) were studied in the period from April 2015 to May 2016 at two sampling sites on Croatian river Krka, to establish if river water contamination with metals/metalloids downstream of Knin town has influenced metal bioaccumulation in S. trutta liver. Differences were observed between two sites, with higher concentrations of several elements (Ag, As, Ca, Co, Na, Se, Sr, V) found downstream of Knin town, whereas few others (Cd, Cs, Mo, Tl) were, unexpectedly, increased at the Krka River spring. However, total metal/metalloid concentrations in the liver of S. trutta from both sites of the Krka River were still mainly below previously reported levels for pristine freshwaters worldwide. The analysis of seasonal changes of metal/metalloid concentrations in S. trutta liver and their association with fish sex and size mostly indicated their independence of fish physiology, making them good indicators of water contamination and exposure level. Metal/metalloid concentrations in the metabolically available hepatic cytosolic fractions reported in this study are the first data of that kind for S. trutta liver, and the majority of analyzed elements were present in the cytosol in the quantity higher than 50% of their total concentrations, thus indicating their possible availability for toxic effects. However, the special attention should be directed to As, Cd, Cs, and Tl, which under the conditions of increased exposure tended to accumulate more within the cytosol. Although metal/metalloid concentrations in S. trutta liver were still rather low, monitoring of the Krka River water quality and of the health status of its biota is essential due to a trend of higher metal/metalloid bioaccumulation downstream of Knin town, especially taking into consideration the proximity of National Park Krka and the need for its conservation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  5. ANNUAL ACTIVITY OF THE NOBLE CRAYFISH (ASTACUS ASTACUS) IN THE ORLJAVA RIVER (CROATIA)

    OpenAIRE

    FALLER M.; MAGUIRE I.; KLOBUČAR G.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the annual activity of the noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) at three sites along the Orljava River, in the continental part of Croatia, between August 2003 and September 2004. Each site represented the typical characteristics of the upper, middle and lower section of the river (5, 24 and 37 km from the spring, respectively). The biggest population size was recorded on the most upstream site, with greatest structural variability of bottom, high biotic index, and the lowest mean wate...

  6. Macroinvertebrate diversity in the karst Jadro River (Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađa Biljana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of 10 years of investigation of the aquatic macroinvertebrate fauna along the karst Jadro River. The Jadro is a typical karst river. Benthic macroinvertebrates were collected along the river at 15 sites by standard methods of sampling, in addition to which several physicochemical parameters were also determined. Based on qualitative and quantitative composition of the macroinvertebrate fauna, correspondence analysis divided the river course into three sections: upstream, midcourse, and downstream. Forty-three taxa were recorded. Results of saprobiological analysis based on macrozoobenthos indicate that water of the Jadro River belongs to quality classes I and II.

  7. Do Karst Rivers “deserve” their own biotic index? A ten years study on macrozoobenthos in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađa Biljana

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present the results of a ten year survey of the aquatic macroinvertebrate fauna along four karst rivers: Jadro, Žrnovnica, Grab and Ruda, all of them situated in the Middle Dalmatia region of Croatia, in an attempt to construct the Iliric Biotic Index, which will be more applicable for the water quality analysis than the most frequently applied biotic index in Croatia, the Italian Modification of Extended Biotic Index. The rivers geologically belong to the Dinaric karst, unique geological phenomena in Europe. Benthic macroinvertebrates were collected along each river at 15 sites by standard methods of sampling along with several physicochemical parameters, including: temperature, dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, alkalinity, hardness and pH. Univariate and multivariate techniques revealed differences in the macroinvertebrate community structure as well as in physicochemical parameters between the Karst rivers and continental rivers. Based on those differences, the Iliric Biotic Index was proposed as the standard of karst river water quality in Croatia in accordance with the EU Water Framework Directive. Differences between the Iliric Biotic Index and the most commonly used biotic indices in the European Community and the USA (The Biological Monitoring Working Party (B.M.W.P. scores, i.e. Extended Biotic Index, Indice Biotique, Family Biotic Index suggest that karst rivers need a new biotic index.

  8. ANNUAL ACTIVITY OF THE NOBLE CRAYFISH (ASTACUS ASTACUS IN THE ORLJAVA RIVER (CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FALLER M.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the annual activity of the noble crayfish (Astacus astacus at three sites along the Orljava River, in the continental part of Croatia, between August 2003 and September 2004. Each site represented the typical characteristics of the upper, middle and lower section of the river (5, 24 and 37 km from the spring, respectively. The biggest population size was recorded on the most upstream site, with greatest structural variability of bottom, high biotic index, and the lowest mean water temperature. Males dominated in catch during the whole research period (total sex ratio was 1.77 males: 1 female. The number of caught crayfish fluctuated during the year and their activity was positively correlated with the water temperature. The crayfish catch within the two downstream sites was dramatically lower in the autumn 2004 then the year before. No obvious reason could be found; therefore we concluded that this was probably result of natural fluctuations in population. Males were significantly longer than females on all three sites. Males and females had similar percentages of injuries, mainly on claws and antennae. Crayfish were active during the whole year, even when water temperature was just 1°C. Phases of life cycle (moulting, active cement glands, mating, hatchlings occurred a month later in our population than in the Northern Europe populations, probably as a consequence of differences in the climate.

  9. Multidisciplinary work on barium contamination of the karstic upper Kupa River drainage basin (Croatia and Slovenia); calling for watershed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisković-Bilinski, S; Bilinski, H; Grbac, R; Zunić, J; Necemer, M; Hanzel, D

    2007-02-01

    The present work was designed as an extension of a previous study of a barium anomaly observed in stream sediments of the Kupa River. In its upper part the Kupa River drains a region underlain by a trans-boundary aquifer. The river is a significant water resource in a region of tourism, sport, and fishing in both Croatia and Slovenia. The contamination source is situated in Homer (Lokve), Croatia, where barite was mined until 10 years ago. The barium processing waste material (waste and stream sediments were analyzed using comparative techniques: X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Mössbauer spectroscopy, and grain size analysis. XRD of the waste material identified the major minerals quartz, barite, and dolomite and the Fe-containing minor minerals muscovite and goethite. Barite was identified as a minor or trace mineral in the Kupica River sediments. XRF analysis of the waste material has shown Ba and Fe to be the predominant elements, Ca and K to be minor elements, and Mn, Zn, Sr, Pb, Co, Cu, As, Zr, Rb, Y, and Mo to be trace elements. Mössbauer spectroscopy performed at room temperature (RT) was used to study iron minerals, particularly to obtain information on the valence status of Fe ions. Grain size analysis of the waste material (waste disposal on human health in Lokve. At this stage of the work, concentrations of Ba and other toxic elements in the water compartment of the Kupica River (a source of drinking water) have not been monitored by Croatian Waters (name of the Croatian water authorities). The necessity of such measurements in future studies has been highlighted. A preliminary study of diseases diagnosed in Lokve shows that about 18% of the total inhabitants have serious medical problems. Diseases of the circulatory system, endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic diseases, neoplasms, and respiratory diseases predominate. This paper calls for further multidisciplinary research on the health effects of barium and trace elements, as well

  10. Contribution to the knowledge of butterfly fauna (Lepidoptera: Rhopalocera) of Zrmanja River region, Croatia: Prispevek k poznavanju metuljev (Lepidoptera: Rhopalocera) območja reke Zrmanje, Hrvaška:

    OpenAIRE

    Bjelić, Maja; Božinovska, Emilija; Burić, Ivona; Koren, Toni; Štih, Ana

    2011-01-01

    A total of 104 butterfly species were recorded in the wider surroundings of the river Zrmanja in Croatia between April and September of 2010. The region is exceptionally rich as this number represents 55% of all species recorded in Croatia. Euro-Siberian and Mediterranean species are prevailing. The known area of occurrence has been expanded for some interesting species: Hyponephele lupina (Costa, 1836), Lycaena thersamon (Esper, 1784), Polyommatus damon (Esper, 1785), Melitaea aurelia Nicker...

  11. Community structure of aquatic insects in the karstic Jadro River in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rađa, Biljana; Santić, Mate

    2014-04-19

    This study focused on the aquatic insect community in the longitudinal gradient and temporal scales of the Jadro River. The river was sampled for a period of ten years (2000- 2010), four times per year through the various seasons, along the river course. Sampling stations were selected in the upper, middle, and downstream parts of the river. A total of 21,852 specimens of aquatic insects belonging to six orders were obtained. The species determination confirmed 27 different species in the river. The data were analyzed by the multivariate methodologies of correspondence analysis and cluster analysis (unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean) using the similarity index of Morosita for all ten years. Canonical correspondence analysis was applied to the data to check which of the mesured physicochemical variables significantly explained community variation. According to those data, significant variables for the upper station were water temperature and dissolved oxygen, and chlorides was the significant variable for the lower stations. This is an open access paper. We use the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license that permits unrestricted use, provided that the paper is properly attributed.

  12. Characterization of the Gacka River basin karst aquifer (Croatia): Hydrochemistry, stable isotopes and tritium-based mean residence times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozyurt, Nur N. [Department of Geological Engineering, Hacettepe University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Lutz, Hans O. [Stable Isotope Laboratory, Medical Faculty, Rijeka University, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Hunjak, Tamara; Mance, Diana [Stable Isotope Laboratory, Medical Faculty, Rijeka University, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Roller-Lutz, Zvjezdana, E-mail: roller@medri.uniri.hr [Stable Isotope Laboratory, Medical Faculty, Rijeka University, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia)

    2014-07-01

    aquifer volumes. - Highlights: • The Gacka River karst aquifer is part of the strategic water resource of Croatia. • The discharge of springs indicates a long mean residence times of ground water. • Tritium-based models yield MRTs of ca. 12 years and a large reservoir volume. • Areal recharge mainly in the cold season; plug flow conditions are dominant.

  13. The population of Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterc, S; Crkvencic, I

    1996-04-01

    The authors examine historical and current population dynamics in Croatia. "The demographic structure of Croatia indicates a series of specificities which were primarily conditioned by the historical development of Croatia and which is particularly expressed in constant emigration since the end of the nineteenth century, the relatively large direct and indirect losses to the population during and immediately after the First and Second World Wars, emigration as a type of population movement in all inter-census periods after 1945, the appearance of a natural decline and the aging of the population on almost one half of the state territory." excerpt

  14. Energy Transformation of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potocnik, V.

    2014-01-01

    Due to obvious climate change, caused mainly by combustion of the fossil fuels, as well as to their modest reserves, energy transformation is under way. It is the transition from the fossil fuels to improved energy efficiency (ENEF) and renewable energy sources (RES). Leading role in the energy transformation has Germany with 'Energiewende', which among other includes closing of existing nuclear power plants until 2022. Croatia has very limited proven fossil fuels reserves, which cover 3/4 of primary energy in consumption. Croatia also has large potential for improvements in ENEF and RES. Therefore, energy transformation of Croatia is justified. (author).

  15. Franchising in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Erceg

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Franchising is the practice where a company (franchisor gives a licence to use its trade name (brand and its business model (know-how to a particular person or group (franchisee who agrees to act in accordance with the terms and conditions of a franchise agreement. Many different types of franchise can be found in research and practice. There are two theories explaining the reasons for using franchising: agency theory and resource scarcity theory. Franchising has a major impact on the world economy. In Croatia, franchising is in the early stage of development and there is a need to encourage businesses to expand this business model as a way of developing and expanding business (franchisor or starting a new business (franchisee. This paper is divided in two parts. The first part deals with the franchising (definition, theoretical framework and franchising in Croatia, while the second part gives an example of a franchising business in Croatia.

  16. Environmental performance reviews. Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Environmental Performance Review of Croatia began with the preparatory mission in June 1998. This report was prepared on the basis of the team's review mission to Croatia in March 1999. Its draft was submitted to the ECE Committee on Environmental Policy at its annual session in Geneva on 22 September 1999. A high-level delegation from Croatia attended this evaluation, which was prepared in-depth by two reviewing countries, the Netherlands and Slovakia. At the end of its evaluation, the Committee approved the recommendations as set out in this report. The review of Croatia's environmental performance identified a number of strengths and weaknesses in the implementation of environmental policy and management. The systematic and professional preparation of environmental management measures in the State Directorate for the Protection of Nature and the Environment is often impressive. However, their implementation and enforcement suffer from a lack of institutional weight and cooperation throughout State institutions. Therefore, improving the cooperation with all key partners is an important task. Furthermore, greater involvement of the general public in environmental management might help to strengthen the overall recognition and results of environmental management. Finally, the review also found impediments to better performance with regard to remediation of the environmental consequences of the war - a problem that can be successfully dealt with only if sufficient funds are allocated for that work

  17. Tax Expenditures in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjekoslav Bratić

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The tax system of the Republic of Croatia contains a large number of very diverse kinds of tax expenditures whose the declared aim is to achieve certain social and economic objectives. This paper considers all the items that constitute tax expenditures in Croatia, within the systems of the personal income tax, corporate income tax, and real estate transfer tax and value added tax. The objective of the article is to determine the real level of tax expenditures per form of tax in the 2001-2004 period. We hypothesised that the tax expenditures in the analysed forms of tax are both high and growing, which was ultimately borne out, for almost all the analysed items in the tax forms considered are growing.

  18. Time for Competent Decisions on Radioactive Waste Management in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, A.; Levanat, I.; Saponja-Milutinovic, D.; Lokner, V.

    2013-01-01

    After a couple of decades of hesitant and indecisive consultations between Slovenia and Croatia on the management options for the Krsko nuclear power plant (KNPP) waste, time for decision making has approached. Council Directive 2011/70/Euratom requires that both countries adopt specific national programs for radioactive waste and spent fuel management before August 23, 2015. In the nineties, Croatia undertook a campaign aimed at constructing a low and intermediate level waste (LILW) repository. The region of Trgovska gora was designated as the potential repository site, and a preliminary safety assessment indicated that it was suitable for a near surface vault-type disposal facility - but then the campaign was stopped. Soon after, Slovenia intensified preparations for a LILW repository on its territory, and Krsko (near the NPP) was selected for disposal site. An exotic and expensive silo-type disposal concept was adopted, disposal units immersed into the groundwater flowing towards the nearby Sava river. The project continues. Presently, however, Croatia does not know whether it will be allowed to dispose of its share of LILW from the KNPP into the Slovenian repository, nor under what conditions. Croatia does not know whether it will have to build its own repository, nor whether such solution would be financially preferable - although Croatia may have to begin transferring its half of the KNPP waste to its territory in less than ten years. It is therefore high time for Croatia to resume intensive preparations for the establishment of a LILW repository on Trgovska gora - regardless of whether or not it would actually be constructed. Without such preparations, and the insights gained, Croatia will not be capable of making competent decisions about its national interests regarding the KNPP waste management, nor will it be prepared for competent and convincing negotiations with Slovenia about the options for sharing the Krsko facility.(author)

  19. Radiation protection infrastructure in the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grgic, S.

    2001-01-01

    According to present legislation the organization structure of radiation protection in the Republic of Croatia is similar to the organizational structure in many countries of the world. Regulatory (competent) authority for the safe, traffic, purchase, import and transport of the radioactive sources is the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Croatia. The Ministry of Health of the Republic of Croatia is also responsible for the health of workers who work with the radioactive sources in medicine and in industry, as well for the health of patients and members of public. Furthermore, The Ministry of Health is also responsible for the follow-up of radioactivity in the human environment (air, soil, water - sea, lakes, rivers) and radioactive waste management. To be able to accomplish those tasks, The Ministry of Health developed two institutes, Croatian Institute for Radiation Protection and Croatian Institute for Occupational Medicine. For technical assistance and support The Ministry of Health authorized three expert institutions. (author)

  20. Croatia : Country Procurement Assessment Report

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    Based on the CPAR's analysis of the legislative framework, procurement practices, institutional capacity and the opportunity for corruption, the assessment found that the environment for conducting public procurement in Croatia is average. This report makes a series of recommendations designed to strengthen the public procurement environment of Croatia, including legislative reform, improving procurement procedures and practices, institutional reform, capacity building, and the development of...

  1. Healthcare financing in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevenka Kovač

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare financing system is of crucial importance for the functioning of any healthcare system, especially because there is no country in the world that is able to provide all its residents with access to all the benefits afforded by modern medicine. Lack of resources in general and rising healthcare expenditures are considered a difficult issue to solve in Croatia as well. Since Croatia gained its independence, its healthcare system has undergone a number of reforms, the primary objective of which was to optimize healthcare services to the actual monetary capacity of the Croatian economy. The objectives of the mentioned re - forms were partially achieved. The solutions that have been offered until now, i.e. consolidation measures undertaken in the last 10 years were necessary; however, they have not improved the operating conditions. There is still the issue of the deficit from the previous years, i.e. outstanding payments, the largest in the last decade. Analysis of the performance of healthcare institutions in 2011 shows that the decision makers will have to take up a major challenge of finding a solution to the difficulties the Croatian healthcare system has been struggling with for decades, causing a debt of 7 billion kuna. At the same time, they will need to uphold the basic principles of the Healthcare Act, i.e. to provide access to healthcare and ensure its continuity, comprehensiveness and solidarity, keeping in mind that the National Budget Act and Fiscal Responsibility Act have been adopted.

  2. Use of Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) in the analysis of historical landslide occurred in 1885 in the Rječina River Valley, Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugonjić Jovančević, Sanja; Peranić, Josip; Ružić, Igor; Arbanas, Željko; Kalajžić, Duje; Benac, Čedomir

    2016-04-01

    Numerous instability phenomena have been recorded in the Rječina River Valley, near the City of Rijeka, in the past 250 years. Large landslides triggered by rainfall and floods, were registered on both sides of the Valley. Landslide inventory in the Valley was established based on recorded historical events and LiDAR imagery. The Rječina River is a typical karstic river 18.7km long, originating from the Gorski Kotar Mountains. The central part of the Valley, belongs to the dominant morphostructural unit that strikes in the northwest-southeast direction along the Rječina River. Karstified limestone rock mass is visible on the top of the slopes, while the flysch rock mass is present on the lower slopes and at the bottom of the Valley. Different types of movements can be distinguished in the area, such as the sliding of slope deposits over the flysch bedrock, rockfalls from limestone cliffs, sliding of huge rocky blocks, and active landslide on the north-eastern slope. The paper presents investigation of the dormant landslide located on the south-western slope of the Valley, which was recorded in 1870 in numerous historical descriptions. Due to intense and long-term rainfall, the landslide was reactivated in 1885, destroying and damaging houses in the eastern part of the Grohovo Village. To predict possible reactivation of the dormant landslide on the south-western side of the Valley, 2D stability back analyses were performed on the basis of landslide features, in order to approximate the position of sliding surface and landslide dimensions. The landslide topography is very steep, and the slope is covered by unstable debris material, so therefore hard to perform any terrestrial geodetic survey. Consumer-grade DJI Phantom 2 Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) was used to provide the data about the present slope topography. The landslide 3D point cloud was derived from approximately 200 photographs taken with RPAS, using structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry

  3. Marketing Innovations in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Božić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the introduction of marketing innovations by companies in Croatia. This study provides an insight into the innovativeness with regard to the introduction of marketing innovations. It explores the presence of marketing innovations in general and the introduction of four types of marketing innovation (significant changes to the aesthetic design or packaging, new media or techniques for product promotion, new methods for product placement or sales channels and new methods of pricing goods or services. The changes in all four elements of the marketing mix are described. The paper also explores the extent to which the introduction of marketing innovation is related to the companies that introduce other types of innovations.

  4. Croatia: health system review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Džakula, Aleksandar; Sagan, Anna; Pavić, Nika; Lonćčarek, Karmen; Sekelj-Kauzlarić, Katarina

    2014-01-01

    Croatia is a small central European country on the Balkan peninsula, with a population of approximately 4.3 million and a gross domestic product (GDP) of 62% of the European Union (EU) average (expressed in purchasing power parity; PPP) in 2012. On 1 July 2013, Croatia became the 28th Member State of the EU. Life expectancy at birth has been increasing steadily in Croatia (with a small decline in the years following the 1991 to 1995 War of Independence) but is still lower than the EU average. Prevalence of overweight and obesity in the population has increased during recent years and trends in physical inactivity are alarming. The Croatian Health Insurance Fund (CHIF), established in 1993, is the sole insurer in the mandatory health insurance (MHI) system that provides universal health coverage to the whole population. The ownership of secondary health care facilities is distributed between the State and the counties. The financial position of public hospitals is weak and recent reforms were aimed at improving this. The introduction of concessions in 2009 (public private partnerships whereby county governments organize tenders for the provision of specific primary health care services) allowed the counties to play a more active role in the organization, coordination and management of primary health care; most primary care practices have been privatized. The proportion of GDP spent on health by the Croatian government remains relatively low compared to western Europe, as does the per capita health expenditure. Although the share of public expenditure as a proportion of total health expenditure (THE) has been decreasing, at around 82% it is still relatively high, even by European standards. The main source of the CHIFs revenue is compulsory health insurance contributions, accounting for 76% of the total revenues of the CHIF, although only about a third of the population (active workers) is liable to pay full health care contributions. Although the breadth and scope

  5. Library Consortia in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Jokic

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the increasing number of information sources and their costs as well as more demanding users on the one side, and limited financial resources on the other, has not avoided Croatia. One of the attempts to deal with this state of affairs is associating libraries into consortia. A consortium could, through cooperative cataloguing, help optimise the processing of library material, it could help in solving the problem of rational ways of continuous education of staff and users and coordinate acquisition policy through common purchasing of information resources, from bibliographic databases to electronic journals under various licensing conditions. This last aspect of cooperation in a consortium will be dealt with in detail in the text that follows.

  6. Drug Policy in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culig, Josip; Antolic, Sinisa; Szkultecka-Dębek, Monika

    2017-09-01

    We presented a general overview of the health care system as well as the pricing and reimbursement environment in Croatia. In Croatia, most of the public funding for health care is collected from employers, through mandatory health care contributions for all the employed citizens. This contribution is a dedicated tax reserved for the health care system derived from employees' salaries. The rest of the public funds is mainly from taxes used by the Ministry of Finance to complement the overall health budget each year. The population is covered by a basic health insurance plan provided by statute and optional insurance, administered by the Croatian Health Insurance Fund. Reimbursement decisions are based on the Ordinance of Ministry of Health issued in 2013, which is an ordinance establishing the criteria for inclusion of medicinal products in the Croatian Health Insurance Fund basic and supplementary drug lists. A health technology assessment agency was established in 2007 as a legal, public, independent, nonprofit institution under the Act on Quality of Health Care. Budget impact analysis is obligatory, and cost-effectiveness analysis is beneficial. Two reimbursement lists exist: the basic (100% drug coverage) and the supplementary (co-payment from 10% to 90%) lists. The basic list covers both hospital and retail drugs. There is also a special drug list for expensive drugs (mainly hospital drugs). International reference pricing is also in place. List updates are done on an yearly basis. Real-world evidence can be required for health technology assessment as evidence for the budget impact models and cost-effective analysis; it is, however, not mandatory. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Regional Development and Social Indicators in Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Željko Lovrin?evi?; Davor Mikuli?

    2012-01-01

    This report, Regional Development and Social Indicators in Croatia, provides a comprehensive profile of social and economic characteristics of Croatia's regions as well as profiling the Government s social transfers to households. Demographic and economic structure of Croatian economy is analyzed, as well as the process of secondary distribution of income in Croatia on the regional level. ...

  8. Development of commodity exchange in Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Sicel, Mladen

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of this thesis work is to show relevance and necessarity for existing of commodity exchange and it’s influence to the economy of Croatia. Because eastern part of Croatia, region called Slavonia is mostly agricultural oriented, it is of essential relevance to establish and make operate of first commodity exchange in Croatia.

  9. Early Childhood Inclusion in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubešic, Marta; Šimleša, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    This article explains early childhood inclusion in Croatia from its beginnings up to challenges in current policy and practice. The first preschool education for children with disabilities dates back to the 1980s and was provided in special institutions. In the last 10 years, mainstream kindergartens have been enrolling children with disabilities…

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubić, Petra; Jurcić, Dragan; Ebling, Barbara; Gmajnić, Rudika; Nikolić, Bojana; Pribić, Sanda; Bilić, Ante; Levak, Maja Tolusić

    2014-06-01

    There are three epidemiological studies of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) that were conducted in Croatia (in the area of Zagreb in 2002, Bjelovarsko-bilogorska County in 2008, and finally in Osjecko-baranjska County in 2011). The aim of this study is to analyze the anthropometric, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of IBS in Croatia comparing these three studies. The studies included a questionnaire based on Rome criteria. Study population matched the adult population of Croatia according last available census (1991, 2001 resp.). Studies showed a high prevalence of IBS and some common factors relevant for development of IBS were determined such as gender, body mass index and lower level of education. There is a need for further investigations in coastal Croatia applying a uniform questionnaire on anthropometric, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of IBS and Rome III criteria, diagnostic questionnaires and scoring algorithm for functional gastrointestinal disorders developed by Rome Foundation applicable in clinical practice and population studies, regarding the significant high prevalence of IBS in our country.

  11. Employment protection legislation in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Kunovac

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available According to business climate and competitiveness indicators published by international organisations, Croatia is a country with a rigid labour market and a high level of the legal protection of employees. Given that an Act on Amendments to the Labour Act (OG 73/13 entered into force in Croatia in June 2013, this paper examines changes in employment protection legislation in Croatia and Central and Eastern European (CEE countries, as well as in Croatia's main trading partners during the period between 2008 and 2013. A cross-country comparison shows a strong downward trend in legal employment protection in most CEE countries during the observed period, primarily as concerns individual dismissal in the cases of regular employment contracts, while in the case of temporary employment the protection strengthened slightly. On the other hand, despite the adoption of amendments to the Labour Act (LA, Croatian labour legislation governing employment protection for regular employment contracts remains relatively inflexible compared to that in other countries.

  12. Tackling the undeclared economy in Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, C.C.; Baric, M.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate how undeclared work is being tackled in Croatia this paper reports an\\ud e-survey and in-depth interviews with key stakeholders in Croatia. It is revealed\\ud that, compared with the European Economic Area countries, Croatia has a weak\\ud institutional infrastructure for tackling undeclared work and pursues a narrower\\ud range of policy measures. The outcome is a call to develop a single body to better\\ud coordinate actions to tackle the undeclared economy in Croatia and for a shif...

  13. Visits from Croatia and Belarus

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 23 September, CERN was visited by two Ministers, Anatoly Rusetsky, Chairman of the Committee on Science and Technology of the Republic of Belarus, and Professor Gvozden Flego, Croatian Minister of Science and Technology. Mr Rusetsky met with Roger Cashmore, Research Director for Collider Programmes, and Michel Della Negra, spokesperson of the CMS experiment, and visited the CMS detector assembly hall. Professor Flego also met Mr Cashmore and visited the NA49 and CAST experiments, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall, the ALICE experiment cavern, and the assembly hall for the CMS experiment. From left to right: Nikola Godinovic, working at CMS, Jürgen Schukraft, ALICE spokesperson, Gordan Markotic, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Croatia to the United Nations and other international organisations in Geneva, Professor Gvozden Flego, Minister of Science and Technology, Republic of Croatia.

  14. SWOT analysis & privatization in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Družić Ivo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Legal framework for privatization in Croatia was based on two key laws: the Transformation Act of 1991, and the Privatization Act of 1993, amended in 1996. Early start of privatization process in 1990s in Croatia was marked by the transformation of socially-owned companies into stock holding companies or limited liability companies. The first step (1991-1993 of this process of almost 2700 companies which entered privatization was their evaluation and transformation into private ownership entities. The second step (1994- 1997 consisted of privatization of CPF portfolio. The portfolios change constantly, not only as a result of privatization but also because companies themselves change, as does their position in the market. The third step (1998 in the privatization process was voucher privatization. Privatization of large infrastructure and utility companies designated as public enterprises began in 1999 (Croatian Telecom and INA in 2002 (public enterprises are privatized on the basis of separate laws. Attempts to discuss privatization in Croatia in terms of SWOT analysis have been motivated by the stark difference among Croatian professional economists in an appraisal of Croatia's performance during the transition process in general and of the privatization process in particular. Therefore we considered the elements of SWOT analysis to be an acceptable way to delve into the confusing world of bickering arguments on the state and perspective of the Croatia's privatization process. In this paper we have tried to provide an impartial approach by employing two criteria i.e. strength and weaknesses in judging the events and results of the privatization process in Croatia. Strength of the overall privatization process can be mostly ascribed to the institutional swiftness on micro as well as on macro level. On the micro level 80% of the companies were formally privatized in the first two years despite unfavorable external conditions comprising the

  15. Energy Strategy and Regional Planning in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toljan, I.

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes the relationship between energy strategy and regional planning in Croatia, the targets, environmental issues and preconditions to be met for the establishment of a modern energy sector. (author)

  16. Intelligent Network in the Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Šarić

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of intelligence into the telecommunicationnetwork of Croatia is becoming one of the key elements ofthe future development of the network. The paper describes there-organisation of the telecommunication network in Croatia,the process of creating and managing the intelligent services,the initial situation and the feasible plan of introducing the INconcepts. The paper is concluded with a list of IN services thatare being introduced in the initial phase of the Croatian telecommunicationnetwork.

  17. PRESS - WORLD MILESTONE AND CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Majnaric

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The machine printing and rapid cultural development in Europe begins with the discovery of metal lettering at the end of the 15th century. This printing technique has been named the letterpress printing and is one of the greatest inventions of mankind. The development of printing was one of the main indicators of the development of individual countries. We believe that today in the world and in Europe the Croatian development of that age is significantly neglected. This paper presents European development and development in Croatia. This paper will contribute to a more accurate evaluation of Croatian printing and cultural level of that time by displaying Croatian achievements of that era, the printing staff, printed works and printing houses, throughout European and Croatian development of printing.

  18. Nuclear Knowledge Preservation in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleslic, S.; Novosel, N.

    2006-01-01

    providing. For nuclear knowledge preservation non-conventional literature (NCL - PhD thesis, conference papers, patent documents, laws, scientific and technical reports etc.) is more important than conventional literature because NCL is not readily available through commercial channels. Almost 30% of the INIS database comes from NCL making this database very interesting and unique. Another segment of nuclear knowledge preservation is capturing tacit knowledge where is important to define what is tacit knowledge, why it should be captured, from whom and how. The Republic of Croatia joined INIS on 29 September 1994. Croatian membership in INIS was established as a decentralized system. Croatia was strongly involved in all activities in knowledge and information management by continuous covering of NCL from nuclear and nuclear related fields. Input submitting was continuous with significant increase of input records. Also, Croatia joined group of INIS Members, which was working on voluntary input in INIS Database contributing and improving quality and quantity of the database. In last two INIS Training Seminars, Croatia showed some initiatives to start with a nuclear knowledge preservation project which will emphasised importance and value of tacit knowledge.(author)

  19. Trace metal detection in Sibenik Bay, Croatia: Cadmium, Lead and Copper with anodic stripping voltammetry and manganese via sonoelectrochemistry. a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omanovic, D.; Kwokal, Z.; Goodwin, A.; Lawrence, A.; Banks, C.E.; Compton, R.G.; Komersky-Lovric, S.

    2006-01-01

    The vertical profiles of the concentration of reactive Mn and total concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Cu ions in the water column of the Sibenik Bay (Krka river estuary) were determined. The measured ranges of concentrations are: 60-1300 ng 1 -1f or Mn, 5-13 ng 1 -1 for Cd, 70-230 ng 1 -1f or Pb, and 375-840 ng 1 -1f or Cu. These values are comparable with the concentrations found in the unpolluted estuaries. The Krka river estuary is highly stratified, with the measured salinity gradient of 20% within a half meter of the freshwater-seawater interface . The main changes in the vertical profiles of the measured parameters occur in the freshwater-seawater interface: the temperature increases for 1 d ig C and the pH decreases for 0.1 unit, whereas the metal concentrations show different behaviour. Generally, Mn, Pb, and Cd ions show the increase of concentrations in the freshwater-seawater interface , while copper concentration profile indicates anthropogenic pollution in the brackish layer caused by agriculture activities and by the paint with copper basis used as an antifoulant biocide for the ships. UV-digested samples show an increase in manganese concenbations for at least 3.5 times comparing to non UV-digested. This suggests that in natural water manganese exists mainly in the form of inert complexes and as associated to particulate matter (about 70-80%). UV irradiation has no influence on the concentration of cadmium, while for lead an increase of 50% in the seawater layer is observed. The twofold increase of the copper concentration in the upper freshwater layer and at least the fourfold one in the seawater layer were measured in the UV-digested samples. These results show that copper is strongly bound to inert complexes, and that UV-digestion is necessary step in determination of the total metal concentrations in natural water samples. No significant increase of the metal concentrations in the deeper seawater layer was observed, indicating the absence of the

  20. The Economic Effects of Croatia's Accession to the EU

    OpenAIRE

    Lejour, Arjan Marcel; Mervar, Andrea; Verweij, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    We explore the economic implications of Croatia's possible accession to the European Union. We focus on two main changes associated with the EU-membership: accession to the internal European Market and institutional reforms in Croatia triggered by the EU-membership. GDP per capita in Croatia is estimated to rise by about 1.1 percent as a result of accession to the internal market. In particular the textile and wearing apparel sectors expand. If Croatia succeeds in reforming its domestic insti...

  1. IMPACT OF GLOBALIZATION ON RETAILING IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Mrvica MAĐARAC

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Trade is one of the leading sectors of the Croatian economy, which has undergone significant changes under the influence of globalization over the last decade. According to Central Bureau of Statistics in Croatia about 16 % of all employees work in trade business, and more than a quarter of business entities are registered in this sector. Therefore the trade has a significant share in Croatian GDP creation. Globalization is considered an important factor of economic development around the world. Through development of communication technology the world has become integrated into the "global village" and a business contact itself can be accomplished in a matter of minutes. The effects of globalization on retailing in Croatia are mostly reflected in the introduction of new retailing forms, development of e-commerce, consumer protection, the introduction of space management, changes in consumer habits and the arrival of multinational trading companies on the market of Croatia. In this way, the Croatian market has become a part of a single system. Globalization has a negative effect on trade in the Republic of Croatia too, because the domestic production and retail sales of small neighborhood stores are threatened in this way. Retailing in Croatia should make an attempt to adapt to the global trends in the world and to new changes taking into account the domestic production by the principle of comparative advantage.

  2. Selected aspects of tobacco control in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubeau, Patricia R

    2009-03-01

    This paper seeks to outline the challenges of tobacco consumption control in the transitional economy of Croatia. It focuses on issues of taxation, high unemployment, and smuggling while attempting to meet European Union (EU) accession requirements for tobacco control legislation that reduces smoking consumption. The issue of tobacco control is not a simple one and requires a multi-pronged approach. While Croatia has made good progress in adopting legislation, it needs to strengthen its efforts both in terms of enforcement and increased taxation of cigarettes.

  3. Report on radiation protection in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragan, K.; Svilicic, N.; Novakovic, M.; Franic, Z.

    2001-01-01

    The Ministry of Health in the Republic of Croatia is in charge of radiation protection, and the new Ionizing Radiation Protection Act defines the responsibilities of the different organizations and institutions. The report explains the existing national system of notification and registration in Croatia and some of the main provisions of the above referred Act. Reference is made to the national provisions for the management of disused sources, recovery or control of orphan sources, and to the national inventory of radiation sources in the country with the data collected during 1998 and 1999. (author)

  4. Energy in Croatia 2008, Brief Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The sixth edition of concise energy review 'Energy in Croatia 2008' presents brief information on relations and developments in the Croatian energy sector to domestic and international audience. Apart od basic energy indicators, this report provides data on energy production and consumption, as well as energy commodities, balances for the past period. In addition, the report gives other interesting indicators, such as, basic facts on the Republic of Croatia, air pollutant emissions, energy prices, energy capacities and energy reserves. The report presents the croatian energy sector in practical and informative style

  5. Abortion in Croatia and Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    In Slovenia abortion will continue to be available during the first 10 weeks of pregnancy as it has been since 1978. The Slovenian Constitutional Court passed this decision in December, 1991 calling the right to abortion a basic human right. T he ruling was a setback both for the government's conservative parties and the Catholic church. In Croatia, where the Catholic church is campaigning against abortion, the situation is quite different. Zagreb is full of stickers and posters with anti-abortion messages branding abortion murder and spreading inaccurate information in announcements. In 1990, there were 56,000 abortions. For every child that was born, one was aborted. The largest Croatian newspaper publicizes the Catholic view. They want pro-choice women of the volunteer group Tresnjevka to stop their struggle. The church and conservative women's groups press for inclusion of abortion in the Constitution. They are very powerful, and the fear is that might soon succeed in restricting or outlawing abortion. Tresnjevka is making efforts to organize a coordination and information center for women in Zagreb where there are 350,000 women and children refugees. Informative brochures are printed on natural healing methods in gynecology, as drugs are very scarce, and addresses for gynecological emergency care are also provided. Abortion has been legally available on demand during the 1st 10 weeks of pregnancy since 1978. Fore year Tresnjevka has worked for women, trying to raise funds from personal donations and from the government for their activities. Funds from foreign countries have never been received. At present many of the group's activities are on hold because of lack of funds, nevertheless the determination to continue fighting is alive.

  6. Problems with drugs in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrhovac, B

    1997-01-01

    Croatia has 4.8 million inhabitants, 11,800 physicians, 2000 pharmacists, two now shareholding, pharmaceutical companies (about 6500 employees, total sales of about 350 million US dollars). There are a number of problems due to the war (GNP fell from 3800 to about 1500 US dollars), occupation of 25% of its territory, 0.5 million refugees and lack of resources (139 US dollars/capita for health, about 40 US dollars i.e. 30%!! for drugs)--about three times less than before the aggression. The drug situation is controlled with the help of: (1) donations (approximate value of 600 million US dollars since 1991 from Europe and US), (2) (essential) drug formularies--250 for outpatients, and 580 generic names for various levels of hospital use, (3) special efforts to purchase drugs of good quality at a reasonable price (a kind of tender), (4) control of prescribing (prescriptions, specialists referral) especially by GPs. A new Medicines Act is in preparation and about 1000 generic names are on the market. DRUG EDUCATION: Pharmaca: the Croatian journal of pharmacotherapy has been published since 1962, there are several Drug bulletins (one published since 1975); special chapters on clinical pharmacology in textbooks, translation of three editions of Laurence's textbook with special commentary and adaptation to local needs; ADR spontaneous and intensive monitoring (WHO programme) with a personal feedback to the reporters and regular articles on drug use in a number of periodicals. Data on drug consumption indicates that there is room for improvement of prescribing. There is an enthusiasm for 'vasoactive drugs'--after dipirydamole came oxpentifylline and antimicrobials are always overprescribed. All these problems will hopefully decrease when the war finally stops and when industry (especially tourism) starts being fruitful again. In any case the importance of teaching of pharmacotherapy at the under- and postgraduate level should be recognized. Copyright 1997 by John Wiley

  7. Peer Evaluation of Oral Presentations in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Mirjana Matea; Sirkovic, Nina

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to explore student engagement in peer evaluation activities related to giving scientific presentations in English (L2) and to investigate student attitudes towards this form of evaluation in the course Communication skills in Croatian (L1). The participants in this study were first-year students of engineering in Split, Croatia.…

  8. Doing Business 2014 Economy Profile : Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank; International Finance Corporation

    2013-01-01

    This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Croatia. In a series of annual reports, Doing Business assesses regulations affecting domestic firms in 189 economies and ranks the economies in 10 areas of business regulation, such as starting a business, resolving insolvency and trading across borders. This year's report data cover regulations measured from June 2012 throug...

  9. Corporate Governance Country Assessment : Republic of Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2001-01-01

    Croatia's corporate governance system is framed by civil law with regulation for traded companies in part based on London securities rules and international standards for accounting and auditing. There are two public exchanges, which both have three tiers. The majority of companies are listed on the third tier, which has the lowest level of disclosure and listing requirements. The small nu...

  10. Analysis of leadership styles in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Udovčić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades, leadership has become the focus of intense interest and research by scientists and theorists. A large number of leadership models have been developed in order to define and enable a certain level of business flexibility that is crucial for survival in a new business environment characterized by frequent market changes, growing global competition and technology development together with demographic changes of employees. This paper aims to determine the dominant leadership style in organizations in Croatia. For the purpose of this paper, empirical research was conducted with the goal of defining the leadership styles of top and middle management of 205 active organizations in Croatia. The research was based on the leadership model developed and established by Rensis Likert. An analysis of leadership styles variables showed that there is a distinguished leadership style in organizations in Croatia. Furthermore, there is an empirically distinguished leadership style concerning the size of the organizations, ownership type and the branches of activity of the organizations in Croatia.

  11. The determinants of exchange rate in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel BENAZIC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The dilemma for every country with an independent monetary policy is which kind of exchange rate arrangement should be applied. Through the exchange rate policy, countries can influence their economies, i.e. price stability and export competiveness. Croatia is a new EU member state, it has its own monetary policy and currency but it is on the way to euro introduction. Regarding the experiences from the beginning of the 1990s when Croatia was faced with serious monetary instabilities and hyperinflation, the goal of Croatian National Bank (CNB is to ensure price stability and one way to do so is through exchange rate policy. Croatia, as a small and open economy, has applied a managed floating exchange rate regime. The exchange rate is determined primarily by the foreign exchange supply and demand on the foreign exchange market, with occasional market interventions by the CNB. Therefore, in order to maintain exchange rate stability, policymakers must be able to recognize how changes in these factors affect changes in the exchange rate. This research aims to find a relationship among the main sources of foreign currency inflow and outflow and the level of exchange rate in Croatia. The analysis is carried out by using the bounds testing (ARDL approach for co-integration. The results indicate the existence of a stable co-integration relationship between the observed variables, whereby an increase in the majority of variables leads to an exchange rate appreciation.

  12. Croatia: 20 years of INIS membership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podhraški Benković, Sunčana

    2015-01-01

    The Republic of Croatia joined the IAEA in 1993 and became an INIS member in September 1994. The Croatian INIS Centre is located in one of the regulatory bodies in charge of nuclear safety. It was first a part of the Ministry of Economy, Department for Nuclear Safety. In 2005, it moved to the State Office for Nuclear Safety and since 2011, has belonged to the State Office for Radiological and Nuclear Safety. The Croatian INIS Centre is rather small because, presently, it has only two staff – the INIS Liaison Officer and the Alternate INIS Liaison Officer. It deals with the organization, collection and preparation of inputs, as well as the use of INIS output products. In the beginning, inputs were prepared by outside users. During that time Croatia had one National ILO (in the Ministry of Economy) to coordinate all INIS work. Later, inputs were prepared by the Alternate ILO (outside of the Ministry of Economy) through an on-line platform. In 2005, Croatia established a new regulatory body, the State Office for Nuclear Safety, where INIS was located until 2010. In 2011, Croatia merged the two regulatory bodies, creating the State Office for Radiological and Nuclear Safety. The INIS Centre has been there ever since. Inputs are now prepared by the ILO. At the end of 2014, Croatia appointed a new ILO (who also had been the ILO from 2005–2010). Because of the frequent changes in ILO, due to the constant move of employees in the state administration body in charge of nuclear safety, the INIS Centre work flow was sometimes interrupted. It also affected the participation of ILOs in INIS trainings; however, INIS promotion and input never stopped. Training was mainly attended for general INIS matters and once for inputting. The ILO regularly attends the bi-annual INIS Consultative Meetings. Several experts and university teachers have been trained to search the INIS database and formulate inputs for INIS

  13. Contribution to Radioactive Waste Management in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudec, M.; Frgic, L.; Sunjerga, S.

    2002-01-01

    The problem of dangerous waste disposal in Croatia is not more only technical problem; it grew over to political one of the first degree. Nobody likes to have the repository in own courtyard. Some five hundred institutions and factories produce in Croatia low, intermediate or high level radioactive waste. Till now all the dangerous waste is keeping in basements of the institute Rudjer Boskovic in Zagreb, just one kilometre form the city centre. This temporary solution is working fore some fifty years, but cannot be conserved forever. In the paper are presented some of the solutions for radioactive waste deposition, known from the references. The deep, impermeable layers in Panonian area have conserved petroleum and gas under pressure of more hundred bars for few dozens millions of years. Therefore, we propose the underground deposition of radioactive waste in deep boreholes. The liquid waste can be injected in deep isolated layers. In USA and Russia, for many years such solutions are realised. In USA exist special regulations for this kind of waste management. In the paper is described the procedure of designing, execution and verification of deposition in Russia. In northern part of Croatia exist thousand boreholes with known geological data. The boreholes were executed for investigation and exploitation of oil and gas fields. This data can make good use to define safe deep layers capable to be used for repositories of liquid waste. For the high level radioactive waste we propose the deep boreholes of greater diameter, filled with containers. One borehole with 50 cm diameter and 1000 m deep can be safe deposition for c/a 50 m3 of solid high level radioactive waste. Croatia has not big quantity of waste and some boreholes can satisfy all the quantities of waste in Croatia. This is not the cheapest solution, but it can satisfy the strongest conditions of safety. (author)

  14. Image Quality in Screening Mammography in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brnic, Z.; Klasic, B.; Popic-Ramac, J.; Ljevar, A.

    2011-01-01

    Mortality reduction through screening mammography (SMG) is possible only with examination of high image quality (IQ), which should be performed with acceptable patient breast radiation dose (BRD). Besides film processing control, equipment assessment with breast phantom and dosimetry, periodical external mammographic IQ assessment (MIQA) is needed, including image labelling (L), breast positioning (BP), exposure (EX) and artefacts (AR) assessment. The nationwide breast cancer screening program (NBSP) has been introduced in Croatia in 2006, and the MIQA is initiated as the first step in establishing quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) framework in breast imaging in Croatia. The current study was aimed: (1) to provide objective evidence about the technical MIQ in NBSP in Croatia, (2) to compare MIQ between different types of mammographic units (MUs), (3) to identify the common deficiencies, and (4) to propose corrective activities. Mammograms (MGs) for IQA were collected from a total of 84 MUs which participate in NBSP, which represents 70 % of all MUs nationwide: A total of 420 MG examinations were reviewed. Each MU was requested to submit ''what they consider to be their five best representative MGs, each one performed in one of five consecutive workdays''. Mean age of MG machines was 7.76 years (range 2 - 21), with no difference between four MU types. This very first study of MIQ in Croatia corroborated our intuitive impression of inadequate IQ, staff training and equipment in many MUs nationwide. As MIQ strongly influences BC detection rate, suboptimal QA/QC always carries a risk to compromise the success of NBSP. Deficiencies in SMG, especially in ID and BP reflect different level of competency of radiological staff in Croatia. Differences in MIQ in various MU types are determined by their organization, equipment, education, working habits and motivation. More efforts are needed to train both RTs and radiologists to implement and maintain QA/QC in their

  15. Poverty and Social Transfers in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Šuæur

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Various aspects of poverty in Croatia are still insufficiently well researched. Not only is there no knowledge about how long Croatian citizens remain poor, but there are also some disagreements about the actual number of the poor and the choice of the national poverty line. Nor has there been any precise evaluation of the effects of the individual anti-poverty policy measures. The objective of this paper was to analyse the basic indicators of the scope and distribution of poverty, the risk groups and the structure of the population of the poor and to investigate the role of social transfers in the reduction of poverty. The paper consists of four parts and an introduction. In Part 1 there is an analysis of the trends in the numbers of the poor in Croatia at the beginning of the millennium and the profile of poverty. The second part deals with the policy for the reduction or elimination of poverty, while in Part 3 the author deals with the problem of selecting the official poverty line and the role of the minimum income in Croatia. Part 4 contains the conclusions. Using the official EU poverty line, a comparative analysis shows that the rates of relative poverty in Croatia do not deviate greatly from the EU mean, although Croatia does have a somewhat higher rate of poverty than most of the countries in the Union. Most at risk of falling below the poverty line are the elderly, the retired and the unemployed, single-person households, single-parent families and families with three or more children. The total system of social transfers is not less effective than the transfer systems of most of the countries of the EU. If we exclude old age and survivor pensions from the social transfers, in fact, Croatia has the most effective social transfers of any of the countries observed. However, on the other hand, the poverty rate reduction due to old age and survivor pensions is one of the lowest in the countriescompared.

  16. Caring for academic ophthalmology in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandić, Zdravko; Vatavuk, Zoran

    2004-06-01

    Like any other area of academic medicine in Croatia, academic ophthalmology has always been limited by or has depended on the factors outside the profession itself: during the communist regime, it was mostly political and ideological correctness of academic ophthalmologists, and today during the social and economic transition, it is the lack of finances, planning, and sophisticated technology. The four university eye clinics, which are the pillars of academic ophthalmology in Croatia, provide health care to most difficult cases, educate students, residents, and specialists, and do research. On the other hand, they lack equipment, room, and financial recognition. This ever growing imbalance between requirements imposed on academic ophthalmology today and its possibilities make it less and less attractive, especially in comparison with private practice. The possible solution lies in increasing the independence of ophthalmology from pharmaceutical industry and politics, especially in research and financial aspects.

  17. GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF RELIGIOUS TOURISM IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Rot

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Croatia has a rich sacral (tangible and intangible heritage, which undoubtedly has great cultural value, and part of the religious heritage has been included in the World Heritage List of UNESCO. The fact is, however, that, except when it comes to top attractions, churches as tourist facilities, are poorly attended and do not get almost no direct tourism income.. In this paper, after the introductory explanations of basic terms related to religious tourism and pilgrimage, we explore the basic features of religious tourism in Croatia, both on tourist attractions, as well as on the tourist demand. It also presents the results of empirical research on the socio-demographic profile of the author, the role of religion in the life of pilgrims and the satisfaction of the visitors to the Shrine of Mary of Bistrica in 2013 among 50 pilgrims in Marija Bistrica. The main objective is to determine how the pilgrims perceived the tourism offer in religious tourism.

  18. FACTORING PERSPECTIVE: CROATIA VS EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Ivanovic

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper points out the problems of liquidity, disposal and obtaining funds, inability to collect receivables, delayed payments in times of economic and financial instability and dynamic business upheavals and uncertainty. As a contribution to resolve these issues new alternative methods of financing for business are imposing, one of them is factoring. Although most countries don’t have adequate legal framework, factoring has emerged as the dominant form of financing, whose current status and development points to the prospects of development in the future. In terms of measures and actions which are taken to combat these issues, as well as legislation, many efforts are made at international level in European Union and in Croatia. Overview and description of the factoring development, and indications for further development are presented in relation to the world, the European Union and the Republic of Croatia. This paper also describes factoring comparison among European countries.

  19. IMPACT OF GLOBALIZATION ON RETAILING IN CROATIA

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Mrvica MAĐARAC; Višnja BARTOLOVIĆ; Matej GALIĆ

    2017-01-01

    Trade is one of the leading sectors of the Croatian economy, which has undergone significant changes under the influence of globalization over the last decade. According to Central Bureau of Statistics in Croatia about 16 % of all employees work in trade business, and more than a quarter of business entities are registered in this sector. Therefore the trade has a significant share in Croatian GDP creation. Globalization is considered an important factor of economic development around the wor...

  20. GAME MEAT MARKET IN EASTERN CROATIA

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Tolušić; T. Florijančić; I. Kralik; M. Sesar; M. Tolušić

    2006-01-01

    In the Republic of Croatia, game meat is consumed far less than meat of domestic animals. Yearly game meat consumption amounts to only 0.55 kg per household member. Consumers prefer meat of domestic animals, because it is cheaper, not paying attention to specific nutritive advantages of game meat. A research on the game meat market and consumers’ preferences was carried out on 101 examinees, chosen among inhabitants of Slavonia and Baranja. The majority of questioned inhabitants did consume g...

  1. Ochratoxin A Contamination of Food from Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peraica, Maja; Flajs, Dubravka; Domijan, Ana-Marija; Ivić, Dario; Cvjetković, Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin with nephrotoxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic properties produced by Penicillium and Aspergillus moulds under different climatic conditions. Humans and animals are exposed to this compound mainly via ingestion of contaminated food. In Croatia, research on mycotoxins focused on OTA when the mycotoxin theory of endemic nephropathy (EN) was postulated. Ochratoxin A was more frequent and at higher concentration in foods from EN than those from the control regions. Subsequently, OTA concentrations were determined in some commodities intended for human consumption such as maize, wheat, beans and wine. Samples from all parts of Croatia were analyzed and OTA was found in all types of commodities. It was frequently found together with other mycotoxins (fumonisin B1, fumonisin B2 and zearalenone). In general, OTA concentration in foods from Croatia is low, but the frequency of positive samples shows considerable variations from year to year depending also on sampling location. Although low levels of OTA were found in a large proportion of analyzed food samples, its persistent co-occurrence with other significant mycotoxins should raise serious public health concerns as there interactions may be synergistic or additive in causing toxicity in humans and animals. There is need to establish control measures through which such contaminations in foods can be managed. PMID:22069674

  2. The Child Health Care System of Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestrovic, Julije; Bralic, Irena; Simetin, Ivana Pavic; Mujkic, Aida; Radonić, Marija; Rodin, Urelija; Trošelj, Mario; Stevanović, Ranko; Benjak, Tomislav; Pristaš, Ivan; Mayer, Dijana; Tomić, Branimir

    2016-10-01

    The Republic of Croatia is a Parliamentary Republic with a population of 4.2 million people that sits on the Adriatic coast within Central Europe. Gross domestic product is approximately 60% of the European Union average, which in turn, limits health service spending. The health system is funded through universal health insurance administered by the Croatian Health Insurance Fund based on the principles of social solidarity and reciprocity. The children of Croatia are guaranteed access to universal primary, hospital, and specialist care provided by a network of health institutions. Pediatricians and school medicine specialists provide comprehensive preventive health care for both preschool and school-aged children. Despite the Croatian War of Independence in the late 20th century, indicators of child health and measures of health service delivery to children and families are steadily improving. However, similar to many European countries, Croatia is experiencing a rise in the "new morbidities" and is responding to these new challenges through a whole society approach to promote healthy lifestyles and insure good quality of life for children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. THE STATE OF BEEKEEPING IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Svečnjak

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper analysis of beekeeping conditions, number and distribution of beekeepers and honeybee colonies, annual colony losses as well as honey production, export, import and consumption are given. Beekeeping in Croatia has a long tradition. In comparison to pasture potential and necessity for pollination of cultivated and wild plants, present beekeeping is inadequately developed and distributed in different regions. According to data of the Croatian Livestock Center (2008 there are 313 978 honeybee colonies registered in the 2007 in Croatia on professional and sideline apiaries. The majority of honeybee colonies is placed in Pannonian region with 238 300 (76%, second in representation is in Mediterranean region with 59 763 (19% and less represented is in Mountain region with 15 915 (5% honeybee colonies. Yearly honey production is approximately 5 000 t and 2 000 t of national honey consumption (0.4 kg per capita gives possibility for honey export. Croatia exported 1 051 in 2003, but 274 t of honey in 2007, which indicates on significant export decreasing trend. Normal 10 % of winter colony losses till 2007 increased in 2007/2008 on 55 615 (41.71 % in Pannonian region, 13 892 (37.46 % in Mediterranean and 5 359 (32.71 % in Mountain region. There is a need to make beekeeping much more flexible to fit into an integrated agricultural system, as well as more oriented to the consumers’ demands, to be able to increase competitiveness.

  4. Social Trust: Croatia 1995-2003.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berto Šalaj

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author deals with the concept of social trust. It is the author’s view that this concept has been neglected in past political science research in Croatia; consequently, he wishes to present it to the academic and professional political science public, thus creating a basis for its future use. Moreover, through application of a secondary dana analysis the author describes the state of social trust in Croatia. First, he contextualises the concept of social trust with regard to the dominant research approaches in political science; then he points to the distinctiveness of social trust in relation to other types of trust; fi nally, he provides an overview of the most relevant works on the importance and functions of social trust. In the concluding part of the paper, an analysis of the levels of social trust is conducted, revealing that Croatia is a society with markedly low levels of social trust. In the author’s opinion, this could present an obstacle to further political and economic development.

  5. Characteristics of Student Employment in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Čavar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with student term-time employment in Croatia, causes of its growing prevalence, its patterns and legal regulation, and finally its effects on the higher education system and labour market. Overview of the theories on combining work and study singled out few relevant factors determining motivations of students for engaging in term-time employment and employment's different academic and professional outcomes, mainly related to the massification of higher education phenomenon (higher number of students and their greater diversity, youth unemployment, and questionable college degree relevance. Although conducted on non-systematic data, gathered from previous research of student population in Croatia and EUROSTUDENT international research on the quality of student life, analysis carried out in this article showed the occurrence of higher education massification and its influence on student employment, especially in the fields of social sciences and humanities. Croatian students' motivations for term-time employment are mainly a wish to improve their living standard and a need for work experience, while their average workload is of low to medium intensity, usually on jobs not at all related to their future profession. Apart from presenting the practice of student work use, this article also gives an overview of its legal regulation in Croatia, and examples of its misuse, i.e., negative implications it may have on student and regular workers.

  6. Research of private label development in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Horvat

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Private labels have been present on the market since 19th century but their intensive market growth began in the last thirty years after retailers realized what their potential could be in the fight against ever-growing competition. Their market growth has not been distributed equally thought the world so Europe became the region with the highest private label market share, which exceeds 40% on some markets. Although the private label market share in Croatia is considerably smaller, it has also increased steadily over the last decade since private labels were introduced on the market. This paper presents the findings of a research conducted for the purpose of identifying trends in private label development on the Croatian market. The research was conducted through in-depth interviews with private label managers in retail companies in Croatia, and with the managers responsible for private label production in manufacturing companies. The research identified three expected trends of private label development in Croatia and these are: an increase in private label quality, the maintenance of a price gap between private labels and manufacturers’ brands and a further increase in the private label market share.

  7. Rickettsiae and rickettsial diseases in Croatia: Implications for travel medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzelalija, Boris; Punda-Polic, Volga; Medic, Alan; Dobec, Marinko

    To review the current state of knowledge concerning rickettsiae and rickettsioses in Croatia and to discuss their implications for travellers. The PubMed database was searched from 1991 to 2015 by combining the words "rickettsia," "rickettsiosis", "travellers" and "Croatia". Since 1969, Croatia appears to be free of epidemic typhus (ET) caused by Rickettsia prowazekii and the last case of Brill-Zinsser disease was recorded in 2008. Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) caused by Rickettsia conorii is the most frequent human rickettsial infection in Croatia, followed by murine typhus caused by Rickettsia typhi. Human cases of MSF and murine typhus have been predominantly observed along the eastern Adriatic coast from Zadar to Dubrovnik and between Zadar and Split, respectively. Rickettsia akari, etiologic agent of rickettsialpox, was isolated from blood of a patient diagnosed with MSF in Zadar, but no cases of rickettsialpox were reported. Several species of pathogenic (Rickettsia slovaca, Rickettsia aeschlimannii, Ricketsia helvetica, and Ricketsia raoultii) and species of undetermined pathogenicity (Ricketsia hoogstraalii sp. nov.) rickettsiae were identified in ticks collected in different ecological regions of Croatia. A search of the literature revealed no evidence of rickettsial infection in travellers visiting Croatia. Three imported cases of Rickettsia africae were observed in travellers returning from South Africa. Rickettsiae and rickettsial diseases continue to be present in Croatia. As they can be acquired while travelling, physicians should consider rickettsial infection in the differential diagnosis of patients returning from Croatia and presenting with febrile illness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Checklist of the earthworm fauna of Croatia (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutuzović, Davorka Hackenberger; Kutuzović, Branimir Hackenberger

    2013-01-01

    A checklist of the Croatian earthworm fauna (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae) is presented, including published records and authors' personal data. This is the first checklist for Croatia only, with comprehensive information for each earthworm species regarding ecological category, habitat, distribution type and distribution in Croatia. The currently known earthworm fauna of Croatia comprises 68 species belonging to 17 genera, with Octodrilus being the species-richest genus (15 species). Chorologically these species can be allocated to 13 different types of distribution. Nineteen species are endemic of which 10 species are endemic to Croatia and 9 species are endemic to Croatia and neighbouring countries (Italy, Slovenia, Hungary, and Montenegro). The endemic earthworms are distributed in the areas of higher altitudes in the Continental and Alpine biogeographic region, mostly covered with forest or autochtonous vegetation.

  9. Review Of Development And Characteristics Of Organic Agriculture In Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Petljak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, an ever increasing interest of both foreign and domestic academic and general public for organic agriculture can be observed. Organic agriculture, as a new agricultural production system, enables full utilization of farming potentials while satisfying social and economic needs and preserving natural ecosystem and environment. Act on Organic Production of Agricultural Products and Foodstuffs provides an elementary strategic frame for agricultural production development in Republic of Croatia. This article gives an overview of organic agriculture legislation in Croatia and detailed analysis of development periods of organic agriculture. Special emphasis is put on structure of organic production which highlights data on organic plant and animal production in Croatia. The paper provides a comparison between levels of organic agriculture development in the world (with the special emphasis on Europe and in Croatia, as well as the overview of main obstacles towards more significant development of organic agriculture in Republic of Croatia.

  10. Preliminary Estimation of Kappa Parameter in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanko, Davor; Markušić, Snježana; Ivančić, Ines; Mario, Gazdek; Gülerce, Zeynep

    2017-12-01

    Spectral parameter kappa κ is used to describe spectral amplitude decay “crash syndrome” at high frequencies. The purpose of this research is to estimate spectral parameter kappa for the first time in Croatia based on small and moderate earthquakes. Recordings of local earthquakes with magnitudes higher than 3, epicentre distances less than 150 km, and focal depths less than 30 km from seismological stations in Croatia are used. The value of kappa was estimated from the acceleration amplitude spectrum of shear waves from the slope of the high-frequency part where the spectrum starts to decay rapidly to a noise floor. Kappa models as a function of a site and distance were derived from a standard linear regression of kappa-distance dependence. Site kappa was determined from the extrapolation of the regression line to a zero distance. The preliminary results of site kappa across Croatia are promising. In this research, these results are compared with local site condition parameters for each station, e.g. shear wave velocity in the upper 30 m from geophysical measurements and with existing global shear wave velocity - site kappa values. Spatial distribution of individual kappa’s is compared with the azimuthal distribution of earthquake epicentres. These results are significant for a couple of reasons: to extend the knowledge of the attenuation of near-surface crust layers of the Dinarides and to provide additional information on the local earthquake parameters for updating seismic hazard maps of studied area. Site kappa can be used in the re-creation, and re-calibration of attenuation of peak horizontal and/or vertical acceleration in the Dinarides area since information on the local site conditions were not included in the previous studies.

  11. Commercial banking and personal indebtedness in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Social phenomenon of personal over-indebtedness has emerged in the past thirty years. The trend of excessive indebtedness of households is not losing but gaining momentum. The problem of personal over-indebtedness becomes the focus of interest of regulators, research community and the public in general. In Croatia the number of citizens whose bank accounts are frozen as well as the level of their debt is steadily rising. One of the reasons of such trend is easier access to debt. Studies document the process of 'credit democratization', one of the reasons enabling it being the relaxation of financial regulation. Only few studies can be found that research the role of bank operations policies in inducing the higher levels of household debt. Bank marketing, specifically the advertising and promotion are the tools to communicate with clients, and it has been proven that effective marketing content is as powerful as the interest rate level in deciding upon getting a credit. This leads the way to the research of possible relation between marketing efforts of the bank and the level of household indebtedness. This paper focuses on the possible proactive role of banks, driven by the profitability, and accompanied with the inappropriate quality and level of regulation, in the rise of the number of over-indebted persons in Croatia. The effect of the economic downturn on the proposed relationship is also taken into account. The analysis is based on the bank financial statements data and selected macroeconomic indicators. The goal of the paper is to describe how banks impact the consumer behavior, and consequently give incentive to the rise of personal indebtedness in Croatia.

  12. Radioactive Waste Management Program Activities in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanic, R.

    2000-01-01

    The concept of radioactive waste management in Croatia comprises three major areas: management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILRW), spent fuel management and decommissioning. All the work regarding radioactive waste management program is coordinated by Hazardous Waste Management Agency (APO) and Croatian Power Utility (HEP) in cooperation with other relevant institutions. Since the majority of work has been done in developing low and intermediate level radioactive waste management program, the paper will focus on this part of radioactive waste management, mainly on issues of site selection and characterization, repository design, safety assessment and public acceptance. A short description of national radioactive waste management infrastructure will also be presented. (author)

  13. [Demographic development of Croatia, 1991-1994].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajic, I

    1995-01-01

    "The demographic development of Croatia in the period 1991-1994, marked by... Serbian aggression, the state of ¿half-war', and the war in Bosnia and Hercegovina, should be described as irregular--its components being determined by the above conditions. This proves especially true concerning forced migrations and their past and future influence on population change. The paper analyzes the insufficiently studied topic of war mortality, as well as various dimensions of the refugee population. It also emphasizes several structural characteristics of the population, particularly its ethnic structure, and the population dynamics in the temporarily occupied territories." (EXCERPT)

  14. MYCOPOPULATION OF MEDICINAL PLANTS IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Vrandečić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There has not been a systematic research of medicinal plants mycoflora in Croatia. This paper aims to present the results of preliminary research of mycopopulation of 14 species of medicinal plants. Total of 393 plant parts has been examined and 10 genera of fungi were isolated: Penicillium, Aspergillus, Sordaria, Phoma, Cladosporium, Rhizopus, Stemphillium, Fusarium, Phomopsis and one unidentified genus. Penicillium sp. (from 11 of 14 plant species was isolated from the majority of samples. The plants fungi were isolated from did not show any macroscopically visible symptoms of infection, except plant parts of Lavandula x intermedia and Foeniculum vulgare, from which Phomopsis sp. and Fusarium sp. were isolated

  15. INFLUENCE OF FDI ON TOURISM IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Ivanovic

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is one of the most rapidly growing industries in the world. Many developing countries consider it as possibility for raising export earnings. Most important role in the internationalization of production has foreign direct investment. This paper investigates the contribution of FDI (Foreign direct investment on economic growth, how does it reflect on tourism in Croatia. FDI are important for development of technology, unfortunately most foreign investment went to infrastructure, in terms of high unemployment and stagnating exports priority should be investment in the industrial structure since they have the greatest multiplier effect overall economic growth. Croatian export structure is obsolete. The share of technologically advanced products is small.

  16. Open-end Investment Funds in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Morić Milovanović

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This work discusses investment funds in Croatia, with a particular emphasis on openend investment funds. After a short review of the development of the funds, the perception of the funds is analysed, as are the trends in total assets and in average yields. The degree of concentration of open-end investment funds is shown with statistical measures of concentration (the Gini Coefficient, the Lorenz Curve and concentration ratios. All these indicators show that the concentration is moderate to strong. The greatest yields are given by the equity funds, but these are also the most risky.

  17. Relations Between Transport and Tourism- Croatia's Possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinko Jurčević

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Relations between tourism and transport industries are importantfor the entire Croatian economy and are expected togrow in the future. The most important thing from the aspect oftransport is definitely the infrastructure of all branches of transport(primarily road traffic, followed by the development ofship and ferry lines, both along the Adriatic coast and betweenthe islands. The construction of transport access and infrastructureof our tourist destinations, as well as transport linksbetween them, is crucial for the development of tourism. Morethan 70 per cent of foreign tourists and 70 per cent of touristboats (up to 7 m come to Croatia by roads. They all expecttransport infrastructure on a European level, providing fast,safe and comfortable transport from their homes to tourist destinations.Therefore, our transport lines and their quality, roadfeatures, traffic capability and equipment are what the developmentof our tourism depends on, especially in central andsouthern Adriatic, considering the wider economic goals ofCroatia and the growing interest of the European Union in ourcountry, its economy and tourism.

  18. Country policy profile - Croatia. December 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    Promotion of renewable energy sources has an important place in the national energy policy of Croatia. The energy policy is set in an Energy Act where a basis for exploitation of renewable energy sources is set. The objectives for 2020 are set in Energy Strategy adopted in 2009. It obliges the Croatia to encourage the future use of RES and to achieve a higher percentage of primary use of RES in the heating sector. The production of electricity from renewable energy sources is promoted through a feed-in tariff and loans. The Croatian Bank for Development and Reconstruction and the Fund for Environmental Protection and Energy Efficiency operate a loan scheme for RES-E projects. In past renewable energy sources for heating hadn't been promoted by the state so far. Currently, a support scheme for RES heating from biomass is in progress. The main promotion scheme in the field of RES-T is a bio-fuel quota obligation. Additionally, the state provides a subsidy for producers of bio-fuels as well as a tax regulation mechanism to encourage the usage of bio-fuels

  19. Climate Protection and Employment in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potocnik, V.

    2015-01-01

    One of the largest problem in Croatia are high rate of unemployment and climate protection with mitigation of consequences from climate changes. These two problems are closely related and the main connection is energy industry, as the largest cause of climate change because of greenhouse gases emissions from fossil fuels combustion. The most important measures of climate protection in energy industry are increase in energy efficiency (ENEF) and giving priority to renewable energy sources (RES) projects over fossil fuels combustion projects. Other than contributing to climate protection and mitigating the consequences from climate changes, ENEF and RES have other advantages over fossil fuel combustion projects. That is notably larger specific domestic employability of investment in ENEF and RES, regarding fossil fuels. Moreover, the import of fossil fuels is reduced, which fixes foreign trade balance sheet and reduces Croatian foreign debt and increases energy security. Wider application of ENEF and RES is dealing with a lot of obstacles, e.g. resistance from suppliers, which have smaller revenues and sell less energy because of expansion of ENEF and RES. There are multiple methods of dealing with such obstacles. Countries that put ENEF and RES in their energy policy focus, are dealing easier with crisis, with minimum unemployment rates. Regardless of results of COP21 in Paris in December 2015, Croatia would benefit from orientation to rapid development and implementation of ENEF and RES. (author).

  20. Towards a Spatial Data Infrastructure in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlado Cetl

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The term Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI is not new and has already been present in the world for quite a long time. President Clinton's Executive Order 12906 from April 1994 played a crucial role and was an initiative in establishing National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI. This Order induced briskly the building of NSDI and also of all additional counterparts in the USA and around the whole world. Besides NSDI, various other initiatives at regional (EUROGI, PCGIAP, … and global level (GSDI were also launched.In this paper, an overview of different initiatives and efforts in establishing SDI in Croatia will be presented. State bodies such as the Government and State Geodetic Administration have the main role in it in collaboration with public and commercial sector and also with academic community. As the main factor in creating a future SDI, State Geodetic Administration has launched several initiatives the goal of which is the installation of new technologies, equipment and procedures in map production and the establishment of digital topographic and cadastre databases. The arrangement and modernization of spatial records and the establishment of NSDI make the key factors for sustainable physical planning and land development at local and national level.In the next few years Croatia must solve numerous duties to arrange spatial records. These duties must be solved very conscientiously and in a reasonable period of time. It is very important for Croatian prosperity and for the fulfilment of the conditions set in the process of entering European and international integrations.

  1. Structural changes in dairy business in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teo Vujčić

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Croatia today is in the economy transition process that also includes agriculture aiming to increase production and achieving competitive standard with international and European markets. Currently, domestic cow milk production ensures 80% of annual milk and dairy products requirements with the 20% import. In the period from 1990-1992, during the patriot war, 103000 cows and heifers were destroyed. Since then, Croatia started the gradual process of reorganization of the agricultural private sector including dairy business in order to increase production insensitivity.The agricultural structure of dairy segment is unsatisfactory with only 23.39% of farms holding four or more heifers. Households with 3 cows per farm dominate with average real estate of 0.10-3.0 acres.Changes in milk production (1990-2003 are reflected in the decrease of the number of breeding cattle – index 56.13%, and decrease of milk market producers from 65 000 to 65 151. Never the less, positive trends towards stabilization in milk production (2003 – 642 mil litres and annual milk intake increased from 342 mil litres in 1990 to 472 mil litres in 2003 (index 138.08% can be noticed. Changes in the structure of milk producers show certain positive movements as 23.39% of producers have 53.40% cows and respectively participation in milk production and buy off. Until 2008, with determined development conditions, cow milk production can increase for 42% and from 2703 litres to average of 4000 litres per dairy cow.

  2. Croatia energy planning and Kyoto Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duic, Neven; Juretic, Franjo; Zeljko, Mladen; Bogdan, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Croatia as an Annex I country of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and a country that has pledged in the Annex B of the Kyoto Protocol to reduce its GHG emissions by 5% will have to envisage a new energy strategy. Compared to the energy consumption collapse in some transitional countries, Croatia has passed through a relatively short-term reduction of GHG emissions since 1990 because of higher energy efficiency of its pretransition economy. It is expected that in case of baseline scenario, it will breach the Kyoto target in 2003. Several scenarios of power generation are compared from the point of view of GHG emissions. The cost-effective scenario expects a mixture of coal and gas fired power plants to be built to satisfy the new demand and to replace the old power plants that are being decommissioned. More Kyoto friendly scenario envisages forcing the compliance with the Protocol with measures only in power generation sector by the construction of mainly zero emission generating capacity in the future, while decommissioning the old plants as planned, and is compared to the others from the GHG emissions point of view. The conclusion is that by measures tackling only power generation, it will not be possible to keep GHG emission under the Kyoto target level. The case of including the emissions from Croatian owned power plants in former Yugoslavia is also discussed

  3. Natural Radioactivity of Thermal Springs in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marovic, G.; Sencar, J.; Cesar, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Republic of Croatia is rich in thermal and mineral springs, which are widely popular for medical therapy, tourism, recreation, rehabilitation and drinking. Considering the popularity of the spas and the habits of our population to use the beneficial effects of these springs it is of interest to estimate the radiation doses received by patients or tourists staying in the spas. In view of this, the Radiation Protection Unit of the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health in Zagreb has been engaged in a research programme dealing with the natural radioactivity concentration in the Croatian thermal and mineral waters. The aim of this paper was to estimate total natural radioactivity (Ra, Ra decay) in thermal and mineral waters from the several spas in Croatia. On basis of the obtained data the Ra and Ra activity ratio was calculated for each investigated spa. In this study possible effects of natural radioactivity were determined for each radionuclide using a derived concentration (DC) for a group of individuals for municipal drinking water supplies. Values exceeding DC represent radionuclide concentrations for radioactive waste. Total percentage ratio for each spring was also calculated. Since natural radioactivity in some spas exceeds DC value the practise of using these waters should be regularly estimated and monitored in order to avoid any possible health effects. (author)

  4. GAME MEAT MARKET IN EASTERN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Tolušić

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Republic of Croatia, game meat is consumed far less than meat of domestic animals. Yearly game meat consumption amounts to only 0.55 kg per household member. Consumers prefer meat of domestic animals, because it is cheaper, not paying attention to specific nutritive advantages of game meat. A research on the game meat market and consumers’ preferences was carried out on 101 examinees, chosen among inhabitants of Slavonia and Baranja. The majority of questioned inhabitants did consume game meat (92%, of whom 66% consider game meat to be of better quality than meat of domestic animals. Significant number of examinees considers game meat as healthy food, being also convinced that game was healthier to consume if hunted in their natural environment, than if reared on specialized farms (90%. Irrespective of quality, only 22% of examinees buy game meat, and 51% think such meat is too expensive. This is the main reason why consumers have game meat only once a month (51%. Taking into consideration monthly income of their respective household, 58% of examinees can afford game meat only once a month, and, if having an opportunity, they would opt for meat of roe deer (55% and rabbit (25%. When asked what would stimulate the game meat market in Croatia, 56% of examinees believe this could be achieved by lowering of prices, 27% think the issue could be addressed by opening of specialty stores, and only 17% opted for more aggressive marketing activities.

  5. Plants and geographical names in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargonja, Hrvoje; Daković, Branko; Alegro, Antun

    2008-09-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to present some general observations, regularities and insights into a complex relationship between plants and people through symbolic systems like geographical names on the territory of Croatia. The basic sources of data for this research were maps from atlas of Croatia of the scale 1:100000. Five groups of maps or areas were selected in order to represent main Croatian phytogeographic regions. A selection of toponyms from each of the map was made in which the name for a plant in Croatian language was recognized (phytotoponyms). Results showed that of all plant names recognized in geographical names the most represented are trees, and among them birch and oak the most. Furthermore, an attempt was made to explain the presence of the most represented plant species in the phytotoponyms in the light of general phytogeographical and sociocultural differences and similarities of comparing areas. The findings confirm an expectation that the genera of climazonal vegetation of particular area are the most represented among the phytotoponyms. Nevertheless, there are ample examples where representation of a plant name in the names of human environment can only be ascribed to ethno-linguistic and socio-cultural motives. Despite the reductionist character of applied methodology, this research also points out some advantages of this approach for ethnobotanic and ethnolinguistic studies of greater areas of human environment.

  6. LEGAL DRAFTING IN CROATIA - CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Đerđa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the importance of legal drafting and its essential elements, which has not drawn a lot of attention in the Republic of Croatia so far. The paper emphasises the importance of proportionality in the simplicity and legal distinctness of a legal text in the process of drafting for the purpose of its clarity. The paper also presents objective requirements necessary for quality legal drafting, as well as subjective qualities of the drafters. With the purpose of drawing attention to imperfections in the legal drafting in Croatia, some defi ciencies are presented in the process of drafting and amending of the Utility Services Act. The process of drafting and amending of this Act is a good example of the way how legal drafting should not be done. It contains a lot of defi ciencies and failures that are the result of legal drafting mistakes. At the end, authors expect that the adoption of the Uniform methodology and nomotechnical rules for the drafting of acts enacted by Parliament should contribute to the higher quality of legal texts and to their full adjustment to the general requirements of legal certainty and rule of law.

  7. [Are there counterfeit medicines in Croatia?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomić, Sinisa; Milcić, Neven; Sokolić, Milenko; Sucić, Anita Filipović; Martinac, Adrijana Ilić

    2010-01-01

    Counterfeit medicines are a growing problem in the world, for their use may endanger patient's health and therefore they pose an enormous public health risk. The manufacture of counterfeit medicines usually involves organised crime groups which place the counterfeit medicines on the market for reasons of profit. Detection and prevention of trade in counterfeit medicines requires close cooperation between medicine regulatory authorities, police, customs, judiciary and pharmaceutical industry. To this day, there have been no recorded cases of counterfeit medicines in the legal supply chain in Croatia. However, medicines without marketing authorisation in Croatia, originating from different countries, could be found on the illegal market. Most frequently, this includes medicines for the treatment of erectile dysfunction such as: sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil. In this study, 26 medicines for the treatment of erectile dysfunction, seized in illegal supply chain, were tested. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used for identification and quantification of active substances in the tested samples. It was determined that 13 out of 26 samples did not comply with declared composition of medicine and quality specification. Furthermore, two samples did not contain declared active substance vardenafil and that may indicate that these medicines are counterfeit.

  8. Country policy profile - Croatia. February 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-02-01

    Promotion of renewable energy sources has an important place in the national energy policy of Croatia. The energy policy is set in an Energy Act where a basis for exploitation of renewable energy sources is set. The objectives for 2020 are set in Energy Strategy adopted in 2009. It obliges the Croatia to encourage the future use of RES and to achieve a higher percentage of primary use of RES in the heating sector. The production of electricity from renewable energy sources is promoted through a feed-in tariff and loans. The Croatian Bank for Development and Reconstruction and the Fund for Environmental Protection and Energy Efficiency operate a loan scheme for RES-E projects. In past renewable energy sources for heating hadn't been promoted by the state so far. Currently, a support scheme for RES heating from biomass is in progress. The main promotion scheme in the field of RES-T is a bio-fuel quota obligation. Additionally, the state provides a subsidy for producers of bio-fuels as well as a tax regulation mechanism to encourage the usage of bio-fuels

  9. Country policy profile - Croatia. October 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-10-01

    Promotion of renewable energy sources has an important place in the national energy policy of Croatia. The energy policy is set in an Energy Act where a basis for exploitation of renewable energy sources is set. The objectives for 2020 are set in Energy Strategy adopted in 2009. It obliges the Croatia to encourage the future use of RES and to achieve a higher percentage of primary use of RES in the heating sector. The production of electricity from renewable energy sources is promoted through a feed-in tariff and loans. The Croatian Bank for Development and Reconstruction and the Fund for Environmental Protection and Energy Efficiency operate a loan scheme for RES-E projects. In past renewable energy sources for heating hadn't been promoted by the state so far. Currently, a support scheme for RES heating from biomass is in progress. The main promotion scheme in the field of RES-T is a bio-fuel quota obligation. Additionally, the state provides a subsidy for producers of bio-fuels as well as a tax regulation mechanism to encourage the usage of bio-fuels

  10. Energy in Croatia 2007, Annual Energy Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    With a great deal of pleasure we present the sixteenth edition of the review Energy in Croatia. With this Review the Ministry of Economy, Labor and Entrepreneurship continues the practice of informing domestic and foreign public on relations and trends within the Croatian energy sector. This Review gives data and characteristic values relevant to the Croatian energy sector, providing an overview on energy production and consumption at all levels. There is a detailed analysis of the trends present in the energy sector as well as a number of information on capacities, reserves, prices and energy balances for crude oil, all petroleum products, natural gas, electricity, heat energy, coal and renewable energy sources. The Review also brings the main economic and financial indicators, data on air pollutant emissions and main energy efficiency indicators. It also gives the ODEX energy efficiency index, which is determined according to the methodology used in the European Union. This indicator monitors the energy efficiency trends over a period of time in the sectors of industry, transport, households and in total consumption. Finally, the Review brings the energy balances of the Republic of Croatia for the years 2006 and 2007, made following the EUROSTAT and IEA methodologies. Total annual energy consumption in Croatia in 2007 increased by 1.5 percent from the previous year. At the same time gross domestic product increased by 5.6 percent, which resulted in a continuing energy intensity reduction, by 3.8 percent. In relation the European Union (EU 27), energy intensity in Croatia was 16.5 percent above the European average. In 2007 the Croatian production of primary energy decreased by 6.4 percent. The production decrease was recorded in most of primary energy forms. The only energy forms with growing production in 2007 were natural gas production and energy from renewable sources. Due to unfavorable hydrology in 2007, hydro power utilization decreased by 27.4 percent

  11. Energy in Croatia 2005, Annual Energy Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-12-01

    Report presents the latest information on relations and trends in the Croatian energy sector. The reports gives a familiar overview of comprehensive data about and representative features of the Croatian energy sector, related to the supply and demand of energy at all levels. It produces a detailed analysis of energy trends and provides extensive data on capacity, reserves and prices as well as balances of individual energy sources - crude oil, petroleum products, natural gas, electricity, heat, coal and renewable source of energy. Basic economic and financial indicators, emissions of air pollutants and basic energy efficiency indicators for Croatia are also presented. In 2005, total primary energy supply in Croatia decreased slightly by 0.1 per cent with respect to the previous year. At the same time, GDP rose by 4.3 per cent, resulting in a drop in energy intensity of the total primary energy supply of 4.2 per cent. The energy intensity in Croatia was 20.1 per cent higher than the average energy intensity in the European Union, but a positive decreasing trend was noted during the past period. In 2005 the total primary energy production in Croatia fell by 3.5 per cent with respect to the previous year. The highest decrease was recorded in harnessing hydro power, and the production of crude oil and fuel wood also declined. Only the production of natural gas showed a growth of 3.5 per cent. Due to the decrease in the primary energy production, energy self-supply was also reduced to 47.9 per cent. A less value was achieved only in the year 2003. A continuing trend towards a gradual decline in energy self-supply was present throughout the past several years. Final energy demand increased by 3 per cent while demands in other sectors decreased. Energy transformation losses were reduced by 7 per cent, non-energy use declined by 5.6 per cent and energy transmission and distribution losses by 5.5 per cent, and there was a slight drop of 0.2 per cent in demand in energy

  12. Forecasting ozone concentrations in the east of Croatia using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    for urban and another one for rural area in the eastern part of Croatia. ... 2010). Apart from the negative impact on respiratory system, atmo- ..... Figure 3. Daily average ozone concentrations in the rural (Tikveš) and urban (Osijek) areas.

  13. The Battle of Vukovar: The Battle That Saved Croatia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sebetovsky, Mario

    2002-01-01

    The key battle in the Croatian Homeland War that led to Croatia independence was the Battle of Vukovar Despite its importance very little has been written about this battle from a professional military perspective...

  14. All at Sea: Sustaining livelihoods through maritime tourism in Croatia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal for Physical Activity and Health Sciences ... human capital, physical and social aspect, and natural capital) have proved to ... Keywords: Sustainable livelihoods, maritime tourism, seafaring community, entrepreneurship, Croatia.

  15. Unused Energy Resources of the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potocnik, V.

    2008-01-01

    Croatia has very modest fossil fuels resources and relatively large unused potentials of increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy sources. Energy import dependency is close to 60 percent and constantly rising, thus increasing already considerable Croatian foreign debt. By using potential of these resources until the year 2020 Croatia could almost totally eliminate fossil fuels import, reduce foreign debt as well as energy systems' harmful influences on environment, climate and health, and increase domestic employment.(author)

  16. Importance of bottom-up approach in water management - sustainable development of catchment areas in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavic, M.; Cosic-Flajsig, G.; Petricec, M.; Blazevic, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Association for preservation of Croatian waters and sea SLAP is a non-governmental organization (NGO) that gathers more than 150 scientist, hydrologist and civil engineers. SLAP has been established in 2006 and since then had organized many conferences and participated in projects dealing with water management. We have started our work developing plans to secure water supply to the 22 (21) villages in the rural parts of Dubrovnik (Pozega) area and trough the years we have accumulated knowledge and experience in dealing with stakeholders in hydrology and water management. Within this paper we will present importance of bottom-up approach to the stakeholders in water management in Croatia on two case studies: (1) Management of River Trebizat catchment area - irrigation of the Imotsko-Bekijsko rural parts; (2) Development of multipurpose water reservoirs at the River Orljava catchment area. Both projects were designed in the mid and late 1980's but due to the war were forgotten and on halt. River Trebizat meanders between Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina and acquires joint management by both countries. In 2010 and 2011 SLAP has organized conferences in both countries gathering all the relevant stakeholders from representatives of local and state governments, water management companies and development agencies to the scientist and interested NGO's. The conferences gave firm scientific background of the topic including presentation of all previous studies and measurements as well as model results but presented in manner appropriate to the stakeholders. The main result of the conference was contribution to the development of joint cross-border project sent to the EU Pre-Accession funds in December 2011 with the aim to strengthen capacities of both countries and prepare larger project dealing with management of the whole Trebizat catchment area to EU structural funds once Croatia enters EU in 2013. Similar approach was taken for the Orljava catchment in the northern

  17. Traffic- Croatia Facing the Global Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Mahalec

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Traffic today is an indispensable part of our lives and oneof the basic preconditions of what is called social progress. Likeblood in our body it circulates across the whole globe and allowsfor the necessary flow of people and materials. This workconsiders the impact of traffic on the lives of people and on theenvironment, analyses the available energy sources and vehiclepropulsion systems and illustrates global climatic issues. Thepaper presents the methodology created by EU for monitoringof harmful emissions at the national/eve! and gives data on differencesin emissions of individualtransp01t modes. The trafficcondition in the Republic of Croatia is analysed and a thesis isgiven regarding possible solution of the stated problems.

  18. Energy in Croatia 2012, Annual Energy Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    With the twenty-first edition of the Review Energy in Croatia, Ministry of Economy, Labour and Entrepreneurship continues the practice of informing domestic and foreign public on relations and trends within the Croatian energy sector. This Review gives, in a recognizable and comprehensible way, data and characteristic values relevant to the Croatian energy sector, providing an overview on energy production and consumption at all levels. There is a detailed analysis of the trends present in the energy sector as well as a number of information on capacities, reserves, prices and energy balances for crude oil, all petroleum products, natural gas, electricity, heat energy, coal and renewable energy sources. The Review also brings the main economic and financial indicators, data on air pollutant emissions and main energy efficiancy indicators. It also gives the ODEX energy efficiency index, which is determined according to the methodology used in the European Union. This indicator monitors the energy efficiancy trends over a period of time in the sectors of industry, transport, households and in total consumption. Finally, the Review brings the energy balances of the Republic of Croatia for the years 2011 and 2012, made following the EUROSTAT and IEA methodologies. In 2012 total energy demand in Croatia was 4.7 percent lower than the year before. At the same time, gross domestic product fell by 2 percent, which resulted in a decrease in a total primary energy supply intensity by 2.8 percent. When compared to the average energy intensity level in the EU (EU27), the energy intensity in Croatia was 6.9 percent higher. The primary energy production in 2012 decreased by 5.6 compared to the previous year. Also, due to hydrological situation the hydropower utilization grew by 6.7 percent. The energy from renewable sources increased by 29.8 percent and the energy from fuel wood increased by 5.6 percent. The production of crude oil in 2012 decreased by 9.7 percent and of natural

  19. Energy in Croatia 2009, Annual Energy Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    With the eighteenth edition of the Review Energy in Croatia, Ministry of Economy, Labour and Entrepreneurship continues the practice of informing domestic and foreign public on relations and trends within the Croatian energy sector. This Review gives, in a recognizable and comprehensible way, data and characteristic values relevant to the Croatian energy sector, providing an overview on energy production and consumption at all levels. There is a detailed analysis of the trends present in the energy sector as well as a number of information on capacities, reserves, prices and energy balances for crude oil, all petroleum products, natural gas, electricity, heat energy, coal and renewable energy sources. The Review also brings the main economic and financial indicators, data on air pollutant emissions and main energy efficiancy indicators. It also gives the ODEX energy efficiancy index, which is determined according to the methodology used in the European Union. This indicator monitors the energy efficiancy trends over a period of time in the sectors of industry, transport, households and in total consumption. Finally, the Review brings the energy balances of the Republic of Croatia for the years 2008 and 2009, made following the EUROSTAT and IEA methodologies. In 2009 total energy demand in Croatia was 1.6 percent lower than the year before. At the same time, gross domestic product fell by 5.8 percent, which as a result gave a 4.4 percent higher level of energy intensity in total energy consumption. When compared to the average energy intensity level in the EU (EU27), the energy intensity in Croatia was 6.8 percent higher. The primary energy production in 2009 was 7.1 percent higher form the previous year. Also, due to favorable hydrological situation the hydropower utilization grew by 31 percent. The energy from renewable sources increased by 29.8 percent and the energy from fuel wood increased by 5.6 percent. The production of crude oil in 2009 decreased by 6

  20. MARICULTURE IN CROATIA, HISTORY AND PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boško Skaramuca

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Croatia is the country where the sea was used as a food source about a thousand years ago. The tradition of some forms of collection and culture of marine organisms is very long along the Adriatic coast. The farming of marine organisms has a long tradition on the eastern Adriatic coast dating back to the 19th century. L o r i n i (1903 mentioned a figure of 116 such fish ponds on the eastern Adriatic coast. Long tradition of shellfish and fish breeding and particularly a growing fund knowledge recently provided a mariculture development at a growing pace. The eastern Adriatic coast with a number of bays, coves and channels protected from the wind and waves by chains of islands provide marvelous conditions for intensive farming on floating platforms

  1. Twenty years of radiation sterilization in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ražem, Dus̆an

    2004-09-01

    The development of radiation processing in Croatia is described from its inception 20 years ago up to the present time. Annual throughputs of treated materials are given by the categories of materials and pertaining volumes. The pasteurization of hard gelatine capsules occured during the early stages, while sterilization of disposable medical supplies has been dominant in the later stages. Irradiation of foods and of cosmetics and toiletries has been a minor fraction of the total throughput. Since the recovery of everyday life and economy of the country after the war, the total throughput has increased steadily to reach 13,000 m 3 kGy in 2002, 90% of which are medical supplies. Estimates of the present maximum capacity of 30,000 m 3 kGy and of future needs indicate that the present rate of growth could be sustained for the next several years only, unless a major upgrading is undertaken. An estimate of potential future needs is made.

  2. Connections between Central Asia and Mediaeval Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Heršak

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the development of Croat visions of self-origin, especially in relation to the Central Asian or Central Eurasian world. Located on the southern rim of the Pannonia plain, which constitutes a type of continuity of the great Eurasian steppe, the area of Croatia has many times in the past been exposed to diverse incursions of nomadic peoples from the East. True, the oldest expansions from the East in the context of initial Indo-Europeanisation (i.e. effects on the aeneolithic Vučedol culture, etc. cannot yet be included in such a scheme. The “Scythian-Cimmerian phenomenon” in the early Iron Age marks the first appearance of this model in regard to the Croatian area. Towards the end of historical Antiquity, Yazygs and other Sarmatians arrived from the East, and later the movement of the Huns created the stereotype through which contemporaries envisioned the following incursions of Bulgars and Avars, closed connected to the Slavic migrations, the arrival of the Hungarians and later the Tatar-Mongol invasion. Although essentially different, the subsequent Ottoman Turk expansion – which was to have significant ramifications for Croatia – also constituted an aspect of the total picture of relations with Asia. At the beginning of the Ottoman invasion, the old phrase dating from the Mediaeval Crusades, antemurale Christianitatis, was applied to Croatia. This had double significance. On the one hand it confirmed ties with the Western Christendom, but on the other hand the very term antemurale (“forewall, bulwark” implies an external position, hence a certain conceptual shift of Croatia toward the Orient. In the next part of the paper, the authors examine various legends pertaining to Croat origins. The oldest were registered by the Byzantine emperor Constantine VI Porphyrogenitus. This included the account of the invitation made by the emperor Heraclius to the Croats and the story of the arrival of the Croats under the

  3. The perspectives of nuclear option for Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feretic, D.

    2004-01-01

    In order to satisfy the expected level of electricity consumption in Croatia it will be necessary, as a minimum, until the year 2020 to install about 2000 MW in new power plants. Gas and coal fired plants presently are main competitors to nuclear power plants. In near future it my be different due to expected problems with gas availability and cost increase and also in adverse environmental impact (particularly due to CO 2 emissions) of coal fired plants. Nuclear power plants have advantage not only in economics of produced energy but also in impact to the environment. Preservation of knowledge obtained during construction of NPP Krsko is also an important reason to maintain nuclear option. Pre construction and construction period for new plants (particularly for coal fired and nuclear plants) could be long so that timely start of preparatory activities is indispensable to meet the required schedule.(author)

  4. Power Generation Strategy Development in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curkovic, A.; Androcec, I.; Tarnik, T.

    2010-01-01

    Electricity generation as an economic sector contributes to the national GDP through increasing investments and exports. In the period from 2000 to 2008 the annual growth rate of final electricity demand was 3,8% which was higher than for any other energy form. Almost 1200 MW of thermal power plants will go out of system due to lifetime (more than 30 years). Energy Strategy is a basic document of the Energy Act with the purpose to define energy policy and future plans for energy development of the Republic of Croatia till 2020. Based on the adopted strategy the Government will create the Energy Strategy Implementation Programme for the four-year period. Croatian's energy development should be based on best available technologies as well as on energy-related, economic and environmental assessment of all available energy options. Energy strategy of Croatia (NN 130/09) puts up next goals: 300 MW hydro power plants (bigger than 10 MW), 1200 MW gas-fired thermal power plants (including 300 MW of cogeneration), 1200 MW of coal-fired thermal power plants, and 35% of renewable (including hydro). The market, i.e. a competitive generation, is the driving force in the construction of new power plants. The main stimulus for the construction is the possibility of definite return of invested capital as well as earning of reasonable profit for investors. Choose of location, environmental impact and competitiveness are main criteria for decision making. Technological and financial terms of new power plant is under influence of the law of supply and demand, so short marginal costs are in the first view - power plant life is at least 30 years - how to deal with this conditions, who will invest in long-term projects with condition of short pay-back period. Climate change and greenhouse gas emissions have become a priority development issue. The main challenge is a long-term development of economy with decreased emission of carbon dioxide. Kyoto protocol obligations, Copenhagen Accord

  5. Energy in Croatia 2011, Annual Energy Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    With the twentieth edition of the Review Energy in Croatia, Ministry of Economy, Labour and Entrepreneurship continues the practice of informing domestic and foreign public on relations and trends within the Croatian energy sector. This Review gives, in a recognizable and comprehensible way, data and characteristic values relevant to the Croatian energy sector, providing an overview on energy production and consumption at all levels. There is a detailed analysis of the trends present in the energy sector as well as a number of information on capacities, reserves, prices and energy balances for crude oil, all petroleum products, natural gas, electricity, heat energy, coal and renewable energy sources. The Review also brings the main economic and financial indicators, data on air pollutant emissions and main energy efficiancy indicators. It also gives the ODEX energy efficiency index, which is determined according to the methodology used in the European Union. This indicator monitors the energy efficiancy trends over a period of time in the sectors of industry, transport, households and in total consumption. Finally, the Review brings the energy balances of the Republic of Croatia for the years 2010 and 2011, made following the EUROSTAT and IEA methodologies. In 2011 total primary energy supply in Croatia was 6.8 percent lower than the year before. At the same time, gross domestic product slightly decreased by 0.01 percent, which resulted in lowering energy intensity of total energy consumption by a 6.8 percent. When compared to the average energy intensity level in the EU (EU27), the energy intensity in Croatia was only 1.2 percent higher. The primary energy production in 2011 decreased by 18 percent from the previous year. Also, due to unfavorable hydrological situation the hydropower utilization was as much as 46.6 percent lower than in 2010. The energy from renewable sources increased by 13.3 percent and the energy from fuel wood, ondustrial waste wood, energy

  6. ANALYSIS OF THE CAPITAL MARKET IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Buljat

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The financial crisis that began in 2008 in the USA turned into a global economic crisis in a short time. As such, it had a big impact on the financial stability of Croatia, primarily on capital market. Capital market includes securities trading, primarily stocks and bonds, whose market value is influenced by the market capitalization of capital market and vice versa. Macro economically, market capitalization had an influence on the fall in the value of the entire capital market, and micro economically, it had an influence on the fall of the prices of stocks, bonds and other financial instruments of companies. The volume of trade decreased, but there was an increase in the number of transactions. In other words, people traded more and in smaller quantities. Therefore, the risk increased, and investors became more cautious.

  7. Cointegration Approach to Analysing Inflation in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Malešević-Perović

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyse the determinants of inflation in Croatia in the period 1994:6-2006:6. We use a cointegration approach and find that increases in wages positively influence inflation in the long-run. Furthermore, in the period from June 1994 onward, the depreciation of the currency also contributed to inflation. Money does not explain Croatian inflation. This irrelevance of the money supply is consistent with its endogeneity to exchange rate targeting, whereby the money supply is determined by developments in the foreign exchange market. The value of inflation in the previous period is also found to be significant, thus indicating some inflation inertia.

  8. Radon in the spas of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radolic, V.; Vukovic, B.; Smit, G.; Stanic, D.; Planinic, J.

    2005-01-01

    Radon concentrations in air and geothermal water of the spa pools in Croatia were measured and the average values of 40.3 and 4.5 kBq/m 3 were obtained, respectively. Great difference between radon concentrations in pool and spring water was considered as a result of mixing normal and geothermal water in the pool as well as the radon decay. Estimation of an effective dose, received by the personnel in the Bizovac spa, gave the value of 0.27 mSv/y. At the location Stubica, the transfer factor of the radon for air and thermal water in the pool was calculated, and the value of 4.9 ± 0.7 x 10 -3 was obtained

  9. Radon in houses and soil of Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radolic, V.; Vukovic, B.; Stanic, D.; Miklavcic, I.; Planinic, J. [Osijek Univ., Dept. of Physics (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    Long-term indoor radon measurements in thousand Croatian homes, randomly selected, were performed by the LR-115 track etch detectors during a year 2003/2004. The obtained values of arithmetic means of radon concentrations in 20 Croatian counties were in range from 33 to 198 Bq/m{sup 3}, while the arithmetic and geometric means for Croatia were 68 and 50 Bq/m{sup 3}, respectively. Indoor radon concentrations follow log-normal distribution and the percentage of dwellings with concentrations above 400 Bq/m{sup 3} was 1.8 %. Radon concentrations in soil gas, at depth of 0.8 m, were measured by 'Alphaguard' measuring system. Association between levels of indoor and soil radon was investigated. (authors)

  10. Radon in the spas of Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radolic, V. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, P.O. Box 144, 31000 Osijek (Croatia); Vukovic, B. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, P.O. Box 144, 31000 Osijek (Croatia); Smit, G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Osijek, P.O. Box 144, 31000 Osijek (Croatia); Stanic, D. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, P.O. Box 144, 31000 Osijek (Croatia); Planinic, J. [Department of Physics, University of Osijek, P.O. Box 144, 31000 Osijek (Croatia)]. E-mail: planinic@pedos.hr

    2005-07-01

    Radon concentrations in air and geothermal water of the spa pools in Croatia were measured and the average values of 40.3 and 4.5 kBq/m{sup 3} were obtained, respectively. Great difference between radon concentrations in pool and spring water was considered as a result of mixing normal and geothermal water in the pool as well as the radon decay. Estimation of an effective dose, received by the personnel in the Bizovac spa, gave the value of 0.27 mSv/y. At the location Stubica, the transfer factor of the radon for air and thermal water in the pool was calculated, and the value of 4.9 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup -3} was obtained.

  11. Government guarantees and public debt in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anto Bajo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Government fi nancial and performance guarantees have been issued in Croatia since 1996, to support funding and ensure favourable borrowing conditions in the fi nancial market for companies in majority state ownership. However, government guarantees have rarely been part of defi ned strategies and goals of public debt and risk management. Despite their steady growth, the structure of active guarantees and their infl uence on Croatian public debt are still unknown. This paper analyses the amount and structure of state guarantees, their maturities and the authority and accountability for their management, and it compares the structure of guarantees in terms of economic sectors. The main objective of the paper is to determine the infl uence of government guarantees on the public debt growth.

  12. Twenty years of radiation sterilization in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razem, Dusan

    2004-01-01

    The development of radiation processing in Croatia is described from its inception 20 years ago up to the present time. Annual throughputs of treated materials are given by the categories of materials and pertaining volumes. The pasteurization of hard gelatine capsules occured during the early stages, while sterilization of disposable medical supplies has been dominant in the later stages. Irradiation of foods and of cosmetics and toiletries has been a minor fraction of the total throughput. Since the recovery of everyday life and economy of the country after the war, the total throughput has increased steadily to reach 13,000 m 3 kGy in 2002, 90% of which are medical supplies. Estimates of the present maximum capacity of 30,000 m 3 kGy and of future needs indicate that the present rate of growth could be sustained for the next several years only, unless a major upgrading is undertaken. An estimate of potential future needs is made

  13. Renaissance Music in Croatia, and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Zara

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Depuis la fin de l’année 2009, la base de données Renaissance Music in Croatia [http://ricercar.cesr.univ-tours.fr/3-programmes/EMN/Croatie/] est désormais consultable en ligne, en accès libre. Il s’agit de l’issue finale d’un projet de recherche de longue haleine, mené depuis 2006 entre le Centre d’études supérieures de la Renaissance de Tours et l’Académie des sciences et des arts de Zagreb. Ce projet a été rendu possible grâce au soutien du Partenariat Hubert Curien, COGITO, du ministère ...

  14. Prerequisites of Sustainable Development of Rural Tourism in Continental Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartoluci Mato

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper was to analyze the current status of rural tourism in Croatia and to identify possibilities, guidelines and methods of its sustainable development. The research has shown that rural tourism in Croatia falls behind the sun-and-beach holiday tourism in coastal Croatia and that numerous and diverse natural and social resources in Continental Croatia are insufficiently employed, especially in the Continental part of the country Past research of rural tourism in continental Croatia relied on individual entrepreneurial initiative and scarce funding resources, so that consequently a heterogeneous and fragmented rural tourism offer, based on various tourism forms and special interest tourism types, has developed in an unorganized way. However, rural tourism can become a driving force for the development of rural areas, taking into account the concept of sustainable development, based on the balance of economic, ecological and social responsibility. In the future, it should encourage development projects that ensure integrated tourist offer and thereby enable long-term sustainable development of rural tourism in continental Croatia.

  15. How corruption affects business results: The case of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Budak

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The background of this paper is found in recent theories why corruption prevalence menaces the safety of business environment. In order to examine if exposure to corruption derogates business results of firms in Croatia we have tested the hypothesis that higher corruption perceptions of business leaders in small, medium and large firms in Croatia are associated with firms’ worse financial results. As a seminal research we measure corruption perceptions of business by employing unique data from three annual surveys conducted in more than one hundred firms in Croatia. The constructed index of corruption perceptions of business is used in the empirical analysis how higher corruption perceptions of firms in Croatia are affecting financial results in terms of total revenue per employee, net profit per employee and total sales per employee. The years of observation are 2002, 2003 and 2004. The extension of our research to three groups of small, medium and large firms in Croatia aims to separately examine the correlation between corruption perceptions indices and financial results for each group of firms. The preliminary results indicate that corruption is more affecting small firms in Croatia. Policy recommendations and lines of further research are discussed.

  16. COINTEGRATION ANALYSIS OF PURCHASING POWER PARITY IN REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kozul

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the validity of purchasing power parity (PPP hypothesis in the Republic of Croatia. The main aim is to test whether the PPP Theory holds in the case of the Republic of Croatia and whether the PPP Theory is an appropriate method on which monetary policy makers can rely in determining the size of the market exchange rate deviations from its long-run value. The PPP Theory in the Republic of Croatia has been tested using methods of cointegration analysis. Two cointegration tests have been applied: Engle-Granger test and ADL test. The existence of the long-run relationship between the price level in the EMU (expressed in Croatian Kuna and the price level in the Republic of Croatia has been tested using monthly observations of average nominal Croatian Kuna exchange rate against Euro, Consumer Prices Index in the Republic of Croatia (2005=100 and the Harmonised Index of Consumer Prices for the European Monetary Union (2005=100 in the period from January 2000. to December 2012. Based on the Engle-Granger test, it can't be concluded if there is a long-run relationship between the two price levels. The non-existence of the long-run relationship between two price levels has also been confirmed by the ADL cointegration test. Thus, on the basis of the cointegration tests it can be concluded that the PPP hypothesis in the Republic of Croatia has not been confirmed.

  17. Epidemiological Characteristics of Dementia Treatment in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasović, Sanja; Sremec, Josip; Košćak, Jelena; Klepac, Nataša; Draganić, Pero; Bielen, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    In spite of the increase in the number of patients with dementia in countries with older population, basic epidemiologic data are still scarce. The objective of this paper is to investigate pharmacoepidemiological characteristics of treatment of dementia in Croatia, and to present them in the context of certain epidemiological characteristics that illustrate the growing pressure this disease exerts on the healthcare system. Data on medication utilization were taken from Croatian Health Insurance Fund (HZZO) and Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices of Croatia (HALMED). Data on the number of hospital stays were supplied by Croatian Institute of Public Health (HZJZ). Internal data on the number of outpatient examinations from the Clinical hospital "Sveti Duh" were used as well. In the observed period (2012-2014), 4568 patients were treated with anti-dementia medications, of which 1275 (32%) with donepezil, and 2753 (68%) with memantine. According to HALMED, the utilization of those medications is constantly increasing, and has increased manifold from 2005 to 2014. The estimate of the proportion of treated patients with dementia aged 60 years and over is around 9.2%. The number of dementia-related hospital stays is also increasing, and has increased by 9.6% in the last 5-year period, compared to the preceding 5-year period. The number of outpatient examinations in Clinical Hospital "Sveti Duh" grew from 351 in 2007 to 1151 in 2015 (January 1(st) - October 26(th)). The strain this condition exerts on the healthcare system is increasing yearly. In spite of the large increase in the medication utilization over the previous years, the proportion of treated patients is still small, and further increase in their use is to be expected. It is necessary to monitor this in the years ahead.

  18. War in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegowina, and Kosovo, and PCBs hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picer, M.; Kovac, T.; Picer, N.; Calic, V. [Rudjer Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia); Miosic, N. [Geological Survey, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Kodba, Z.C. [Maribor Environmental Protection Inst., Maribor (Slovenia); Rugova, A. [Pristina Univ., Pristina (Serbia)

    2005-07-01

    Recent warfare in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegowina, and Kosovo has increased hazardous waste levels in the involved regions. Data on contaminant levels from water and soil samples collected before 1995 did not demonstrate significant levels of contamination. This paper provided the results of a study which showed that significant levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) exist in many of the areas worst affected by the war. During the study, soil and sediment samples were extracted with n-hexane. Fish extracts were extracted using a high revolution blender. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were then separated from organochlorine insecticides on a silica gel column. Electron capture detection gas chromatography (ECD-GC) was used to quantify the POPs. Results showed that levels of PCBs in soil samples from Bosnia and Herzegowina sampled during 2003 showed significantly high levels of total PCBs. Levels of contamination exceeded tolerance levels accepted in Netherlands. Fish samples did not demonstrate high levels of contaminants. Sediment samples from Bosnian rivers showed significant levels of PCBs. It was concluded that levels of PCBs in Bosnia and Herzegowina in 2003 were lower than levels observed in fish sampled in Dalmatia and Croatia. 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  19. SWOT Analysis and Related Countermeasures for Croatia to Explore the Chinese Tourist Source Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Croatia is a land endowed with rich and diversified natural and cultural tourist resources. Traveling around Croatia, I was stunned by its beauty. However, I noticed that there were few Chinese tourists in Croatia. How can we bring more Chinese tourists to Croatia? How can we make them happy and comfortable in Croatia? And, at the same time, how can we avoid polluting this tract of pure land? Based on first-hand research work, I make a SWOT analysis of the Chinese tourist source market of Croatia and put forward related countermeasures from the perspective of a native Chinese. The positioning of tourism in Croatia should be ingeniously packaged. I recommend developing diversified and specialized tourist products, various marketing and promotional activities, simple and flexible visa policies and regulations, and other related measures to further explore the Chinese tourist source market of Croatia.

  20. 78 FR 70480 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; New Designated Country-Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... Organization Government Procurement Agreement (WTO GPA). On July 1, 2013, Croatia joined the European Union..., 2013, the WTO Committee on Government Procurement approved the application of the WTO GPA to Croatia... Organization Government Procurement Agreement (WTO GPA) [[Page 70481

  1. Energy in Croatia 2004, Annual Energy Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    Report represents a continuous information source for both national and international public on relations and trends in the Croatian energy system. This edition brings certain changes in the energy topics' outline and broader scope of information compared to the previous editions. However, the representative features of the Croatian energy sector, related to supply and demand of energy at all levels, kept the familiar outlook of presentation.Besides the detailed analysis of energy trends, this edition provides numerous information on capacity, reserves and prices of energy as well as individual energy sources' balances - crude oil and oil derivates, natural gas, electricity, heat, coal and renewable energy sources. In addition, Croatian basic and economic and financial indicators, emission of air pollutants plus basic energy efficiency indicators were presented in order to give better understanding of the Croatian energy sector environment. Finally, there is a special novelty of representing energy balances of the Republic of Croatia made in the compliance with EUROSTAT and IEA methodology for years 2003 and 2004. Total primary energy supply in the Republic of Croatia in 2004 was 4.1 percent higher compared to the previous year. The gross domestic product increased by 3.8 percent over the same period. This means that energy intensity, primary energy supply per unit of gross domestic product, increased by 0.3 percent. Compared to the European Union average Croatian energy intensity was approximately 24 percent higher. Total primary energy production, on the other hand, increased by 11.2 percent due to extremely favourable hydrological conditions. The raise i n hydropower by 48.5 percent improved Croatian primary energy self-supply to 49.6 percent. In the structure of total primary energy supply for 2004, the losses of transmission and distribution of energy were reduced only while the rest of the categories of energy consumption increased. The 3.3 percent increase

  2. Significance of NTM infections in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Katalinic-Jankovic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM are environmental, opportunistic pathogens found in soil and water. NTM are adapted for residence in drinking water distribution systems as they are disinfectant-resistant, surface adherent, and able to grow on low concentrations of organic matter. Reports of NTM infections have been increasing over the past two decades. Of the >150 NTM species reported in the literature, some 25 species have been strongly associated with a variety of human diseases, of which the pulmonary NTM disease (PNTM is the most frequent. The distribution of NTM species differs strongly by region and it is generally accepted that NTM species differ in their clinical relevance. Further, NTM differ strongly in their growth rate, temperature tolerance, and drug susceptibility, making the correct species identification a very important step in the process of diagnosis. Because NTM are environmental bacteria, the diagnosis of PNTM is complex and requires good communication between clinicians, radiologists, and microbiologists. Extensive microbial resistance, often misleading in vitro drug susceptibility patterns, and complicated treatment regimens are just some of the factors adding to the frustration of the clinical management of NTM diseases. To prevent unwarranted diagnoses and treatment of NTM disease as well as unnecessary diagnostic delay, it could be helpful to use separate, more stringent criteria for species of low relevance, and less stringent criteria for species considered to be of high clinical relevance in the local setting, namely: isolation of Mycobacterium kansasii (worldwide and Mycobacterium malmoense (north-western Europe from pulmonary specimens usually indicates disease, whereas Mycobacterium gordonae and Mycobacterium simiae typically represent contamination. This approach requires complete and up-to-date insight in locally prevalent NTM and their clinical relevance. In Croatia, all strains of NTM isolated in any

  3. Energy in Croatia, Annual Energy Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The publication creates a condensed review of the state of affairs within our energy system. It includes the latest data for 1996, which were at the same time compared to the situations from the previous four years in order to achieve a more accurate insight into all the related problems. The relation of the gross domestic product (GDP) and the electric energy consumption illustrates the fact that the economic conditions are closely connected to the development of the energy sector. In 1996 the gross domestic product was 4.2% higher than in the year before and the electric energy consumption increased by approximately the same figure. It rose from the consumed 12958.0 GWh in 1995 to 12877.9 GWh in 1996, i.e. 4.2%. The total energy consumption in 1996 increased by entire 10.8%, amounting to 352.56 PJ, this predominantly being a result of growing hydro power and natural gas consumption. The immediate energy consumption grew by 8.3%, from 185.96 PJ in 1995 to 201.35 PJ in 1996. Apart from the data included in the review, there are also other presentations referring to the energy generation and consumption in Croatia. A special chapter comprises an analysis of oil and gas system, i.e. hydrocarbon and coal reserves as well as the capacities required for oil and gas processing and transportation. The attention was directed to positive environmental incentives, as the energy sector is responsible for more than 90% of all polluting substances. Apart from the economic and financial indices, the publication includes the prices for electric energy, natural gas and oil derivations as well as maps showing the route of the gas and JANAF systems and the transmission electric energy network. The review puts forward some positive achievements in the development of our energy sector, which create the basis for continued efforts in order to bring about the desired objectives. This will be realized by defining the legislation system and the institutions ensuring high-quality market

  4. Energy of forest biomass in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupin, N.; Krivak, B.; Dundovic, J.

    2005-01-01

    Forest biomass is organic substance raised in forest ecosystem, consisting of trees and bushes which are used for mechanical processing and thermal use. Croatia, with 44 percent of surface under forests, has the renewable energy potential in forest biomass that could cover as much as about 50 percent of the current heating consumption. The existence of an appropriate heating consume and district heating are a prerequisite for exploitation of the mentioned potential. At the same time, heating consumption enables the utilization of cogeneration plants and the paper gives examples of such possibilities in industry, community and special facilities (sport centres, hotels, hospitals etc.). Among them, the so called 'Croatian energy absurdum' is mentioned. The paper underlines the feasibility of exploitation of forest biomass at the national level and suggests that, in order to promote and accelerate the development of cogeneration plants, the HED expert group should be established. The task of the expert group would be to draft proposal for appropriate measures in this regard and submit it to the Government for consideration.(author)

  5. Reform of health insurance in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek, S

    1999-06-01

    After democratic changes in 1990 and the declaration of independence in 1991, Croatia inherited an archaic system of economy, similar to all the other post-communist countries, which had especially negative effects on the health system. Health services were divided into 113 independent offices with their own local rules; they could not truly support the health care system, which gradually stagnated, both organizationally and technologically. Such an administrative system devoured 17.5% of the total funds, and primary care used only 10.3% of this. Despite the costly hospital medicine the entire system was financed with US$300 per citizen. The system was functioning only because of professionalism and enthusiasm of well-educated medical personnel. Such health policy had a negative effect on all levels of the system, with long-term consequences. The new health insurance system instituted a standard of 1,700 insureds per family medicine team, reducing hospital capacities to 3.8 beds per 1,000 citizens for acute illnesses. Computerization of the system makes possible the transparency of accounting income and expenses. In a relatively short period, in spite of the war, and in a complex, socially and ethically delicate area, Croatian Health Insurance Institute has successfully carried out the rationalization and control of spending, without lowering the level of health care or negatively influencing the vital statistics data.

  6. CONCERT MANAGEMENT IN CROATIA: OBSTACLES AND CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Basara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of concert management in the Republic of Croatia encounters numerous obstacles in any attempt to institutionalize it. Unlike other countries in the European Union, there is no register of the concert stages, venues as well as facilities for the provision of hearing / consumption of music in the form of performances. Process management organization is incomplete, and institutions that are closely associated with such events do not carry out the classification, categorization and analysis of events that are within the concerts' domain. Commercial music, economically far most cost-effective, is completely ignored and within the framework of cultural events not even the slightest attention is given to it. On the contrary, it is considered the music of poor quality and completely irrelevant. This paper tries to frame the mentioned genre, which includes various musical directions that economically bring significant benefits and help the survival of these related activities indirectly, and ultimately have a positive impact on the economy. Comparing global trends it speaks about the position of the Croatian music industry and lists the main obstacles for setting up a solid foundation for the construction of an adequate system of indexation of concert businesses that, as part of the creative industries records a meteoric economic growth.

  7. Fiscal Austerity Versus Growth in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinko Škare

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of fiscal austerity has been questioned for centuries, but a rapidly increasing deficit along with the financial crisis in 2007/2008 influenced a renewed debate on the economics of austerity. This paper analyzes the role of austerity versus the role of economic growth. It also attempts to highlight the role of the theoretical context of austerity policy and the economic history lesson learned during the transition from the Bretton Woods model to Washington’s consensus. Despite numerous studies and polarized debate, no consensus on the implementation of fiscal austerity has been achieved because this complex subject has not been the subject of a sufficient methodological exploration. Emphasis should be placed on defining the methodology of austerity and gathering statistical data to influence the implementation of social transfer policies. In addition, it is necessary not only to take a hybrid approach to fiscal and monetary policy but also to adopt economic laws and quantitative economic relationships. The benchmarking country used in this paper is Croatia. The outcome of this research can serve as the basis for future decision-making and research.

  8. Research on organic food purchase in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Petljak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research findings based on the research conducted on a representative sample of respondents using a highly structured questionnaire. The first part of the paper focuses on the theoretical background and overview of the research results related to the research problem in the world and in Croatia. The results of the research which has been conducted indicate that respondents are not familiar with the definition of organic food. Furthermore, the paper elaborates on the Croatian consumers’ perception of organic food and conventional food. The research on organic food purchase places a special emphasis on regular buyers of organic food who were asked to evaluate the importance of individual characteristics in choosing a place of sale for organic food. Based on the hierarchical regression analysis, the frequency of organic food purchases by regular buyers was found to correlate with the perception of organic food and the importance of characteristics of a place of sale for organic food. The research also identified the main reasons for not buying organic food, and it sets out the guidelines which may be useful to organic producers, marketers and retailers in encouraging further purchases of organic food.

  9. Twenty years of radiation sterilization in Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razem, Dusan E-mail: razem@irb.hr

    2004-10-01

    The development of radiation processing in Croatia is described from its inception 20 years ago up to the present time. Annual throughputs of treated materials are given by the categories of materials and pertaining volumes. The pasteurization of hard gelatine capsules occured during the early stages, while sterilization of disposable medical supplies has been dominant in the later stages. Irradiation of foods and of cosmetics and toiletries has been a minor fraction of the total throughput. Since the recovery of everyday life and economy of the country after the war, the total throughput has increased steadily to reach 13,000 m{sup 3} kGy in 2002, 90% of which are medical supplies. Estimates of the present maximum capacity of 30,000 m{sup 3} kGy and of future needs indicate that the present rate of growth could be sustained for the next several years only, unless a major upgrading is undertaken. An estimate of potential future needs is made.

  10. Nuclear knowledge and information management in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleslic, S.; Novosel, N.

    2004-01-01

    Since the IAEA was authorized for exchange of technical and scientific information on peaceful uses of atomic energy, it established INIS in 1970 as an international bibliographic database in nuclear field and in nuclear related areas. All Member States, which are at different levels of technological development, could derive benefits from INIS output products and get the support from the IAEA in systematic knowledge preservation and information exchange. Intention is the transferring of practical experience to the younger generation and the archiving of important information. Croatia is successfully involved in activities in knowledge and information management from 1994 when joined INIS. Accumulation of knowledge including technical information in databases and documents, and knowledge of scientists, engineers, researchers and technicians is base for the use of nuclear technology. Nuclear knowledge and information exchange are important for process of decision-making. Thanks to development and application of new information technologies within INIS information management framework, Members improve the collection, production and dissemination of nuclear knowledge and information. (author)

  11. AUDIT MARKET CONCENTRATION – EVIDENCE FROM CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Sever Mališ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statutory audit is designated to protect the public interest and has a significant impact on the overall economy. There are concerns that the Big Four audit firms have become too dominant and that the collapse of one of these firms would disrupt the whole financial system. In terms of revenues received, the total market share of the Big Four audit firms for listed companies exceeds 90% in a vast majority of European Union Member States. Prior studies have shown that high audit market concentration limits the choice of auditor for large companies and sets a high barrier of entry for mid-tier audit firms, while the effect on audit quality and audit fees is still unclear. Therefore, the regulators are considering reforms to dilute the Big Four’s dominance and improve competition in the audit market. The paper reviews the proposed and implemented measures that are the most common, together with their advantages and drawbacks. In addition, the characteristics of the audit market in Croatia are investigated, with a focus on market concentration measured by standard measures such as the Concentration rate, the Herfindahl Hirschman Index and the Gini coefficient. According to market shares based on total clients’ assets and revenues, the audit market for listed companies is moderately to highly concentrated, with a decrease in the five-year period (2013 compared to 2008.

  12. Tax wedge in Croatia, Austria, Hungary, Poland and Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Onorato

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to compare the tax burden on labour income in Croatia, Austria, Greece, Hungary and Poland in 2013. The Taxing Wages methodology has been applied to hypothetical units across a range of gross wages in order to calculate net average tax wedge, net average tax rate, as well as other relevant indicators. When it comes to single workers without children, the smallest tax wedge for workers earning less than the average gross wage was found in Croatia, while Poland had the smallest tax wedge for above-average wages. Due to a progressive PIT system, the tax wedge for a single worker in Croatia reaches 50% at 400% of the average gross wage, equalling that of Austria, Greece and Hungary. Tax wedges for couples with two children show a similar trend.

  13. Radioactivity of tap water in the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, D.; Maracic, M.; Franic, Z.; Kovac, J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the paper was to establish the difference between radioactivity level measured in tap water in relation to maximum permissible concentrations determined by law in the Republic of Croatia. Tables 1 and 2 give percentages of total beta activity in tap water of several cities in Croatia and Table 3 of 137 Cs, 3 H and 90 Sr specific activities, in relation to permissible levels. On basis of these data it could be concluded that total beta activity has exponentially decreased over the past 30 years and radioactivity in tape water of Croatia has never exceeded permissible levels. Taking in account possible hazards to human health that might be caused by the presence of radioactivity in water, this kind of investigation should be continued also in the future

  14. Geothermal energy in Croatia and the world until 2020

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelic, K.; Kevric, I.; Cubric, S.

    1996-01-01

    The use of geothermal energy in watering place, heating, the production of electric power, and for other purposes is increasing throughout the world. Over the past ten years, besides traditional production from natural thermal wells, this energy has also been produced in Croatia from geothermal wells discovered as a results of deep exploration drilling for hydrocarbons. This paper analyses the current state of geothermal energy both in the world and in Croatia, and makes projections about its immediate future. Energy potential data on the croatian part of the Panonian basin are given along with perspective locations for producing this ecologically acceptable and partially reusable energy. (author)

  15. Proceedings of the Fifth Forum: Energy day in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Fifth forum is dedicated to energy consumption. After liberation of some parts of Croatia and peaceful reintegration of Podunavlje in the Republic of Croatia, we think about future, economic development and living standard increasing. Main factors in energy consumption are investments, choice and decisions of consumers. Also, there is a problem of environmental protection which is parallel to economic development. There is no simple solution because of different circumstances in every country. However, organized energy system must contain some basic principles, which connect economic laws, national safety, energy efficiency and environmental protection

  16. Report of the application of the INES in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcic, I.

    1997-01-01

    The Republic of Croatia has no nuclear installation, no power reactors, no research reactors, nor any other nuclear fuel circle installations, on its territory. All facilities with installations and/or equipment for application of ionising radiation (irradiators, accelerators, sealed sources etc.) have operated without radiation safety relevant incidents. Also all transport activities have been carried out without any safety relevant incidents. Consequently, no one abnormal event was rated in Croatia using INES in period Oct. 1996 - Oct. 1997, and no INES report was communicated to the INES information system

  17. The Development of Low-Carbon Strategy in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grgasovic, V.

    2013-01-01

    United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol have initiated an awareness of the necessity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and have provided guidelines of the energy in the world, especially within the European Union. EU sets its action within the negotiations on a new global agreement in the field of climate change, for the period after the 2020. Croatia, also, has to follow these guidelines. Therefore, Croatia conducts activities to develop low-carbon development strategy and to establish the legal and institutional framework for the successful implementation of measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.(author)

  18. Medical Informatics in Croatia – a Historical Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezelic, Gjuro; Kern, Josipa; Petrovecki, Mladen; Ilakovac, Vesna; Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira

    2014-01-01

    A historical survey of medical informatics (MI) in Croatia is presented from the beginnings in the late sixties of the 20th century to the present time. Described are MI projects, applications in clinical medicine and public health, start and development of MI research and education, beginnings of international cooperation, establishment of the Croatian Society for MI and its membership to EFMI and IMIA. The current status of computerization of the Croatian healthcare system is sketched as well as the present graduate and postgraduate study MI curricula. The information contained in the paper shows that MI in Croatia developed and still develops along with its advancement elsewhere. PMID:24648620

  19. Venomous snakebites in children in southern Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabuva, Svjetlana; Vrkić, Ivana; Brizić, Ivica; Ivić, Ivo; Lukšić, Boris

    2016-03-15

    This retrospective study represents observation of 160 children and adolescents aged up to 18 years that experienced venomous snakebites in southern Croatia and were treated in the Clinical Department of Infectious Diseases in the University Hospital Centre Split from 1979 to 2013. The main purpose of this research was to determine the epidemiological characteristics, clinical presentation, local and general complications, and received treatment. Most bites occurred during warm months, from early May to late August (80%), mostly in May and June. Upper limb bites were more frequent (59%) than lower limb bites (40%). Out of the total number of poisoned children, 24% developed local, and 25% general complications. The most common local complications were haemorrhagic blisters that occurred in 20% children, followed by compartment syndrome presented in 7.5% patients. The most dominated general complication was cranial nerve paresis or paralysis, which was identified in 11.2% patients, whereas shock symptoms were registrated in 7% children. According to severity of poisoning, 9.4% children had minor, 35% mild, 30.6% moderate, and 24.4% had severe clinical manifestation of envenomation. Only one (0.6%) child passed away because of snakebite directly on the neck. All patients received antivenom produced by the Institute of Immunology in Zagreb, tetanus prophylaxis as well, and almost all of them received antibiotics, and a great majority of them also received corticosteroids and antihistamines. Neighter anaphylactic reaction nor serum disease were noticed in our patients after administrating antivenom. A total of 26% children underwent surgical interventions, and incision of haemorrhagic blister was the most common applied surgical treatment, which was preformed in 15.6% patients, while fasciotomy was done in 7.5% subjects. All of our surgically treated patients recovered successfully. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 95th Anniversary of Pathophysiology in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovač, Zdenko

    2017-12-01

    University level of Pathophysiology research and teaching in Croatia had started with the third year of Medical School of Zagreb in academic year 1919./20. Ever since, despite historical changes of the main university stake holder, the state of Croatia, Department of Pathophysiology development progressed and has made visible academic achievements, with a broader effect in medical community. The first 95 years of academic tradition and major achievements are shortly described in this paper. Professor Miroslav Mikuličić envisioned Pathophysiology in close relations with Pharmacology and made the pioneering steps of establishing the "double" department at Šalata. His group was academically very pro-active, with strong international scientific participation and recruitment of professionals. The group published the first voluminous textbook of Pharmacology and Pathophysiology, in Croatian. In fifties, professor Pavao Sokolić established clinical pathophysiology within the Hospital Centre at Rebro. Out of "double" department two new departments were founded, the Pathophysiology one was completed with the clinical ward. That institutional move from Šalata hill to the Rebro hill was a necessary gigantic step and a prerequisite for the proper further development. It was in accordance with the concept of the Mikuličić's program of Pathophysiology from 1917. Pavao Sokolić has been remembered for his visions, deep insights into etiopathogenesis, ability to transfer knowledge and friendly relations to students. Sharp intellectual power, emanating charisma, academic erudition and unique clinical competencies made the legendary image of the "Teacher" - as students used to refer to him with admiration. He was second to no one when complex patient issues were to be resolved. Clinical Hospital Centre Zagreb and his Department at Rebro have become a referral point to whom to go to despair. Students recognized in their Teacher the landmark of Croatian medicine, which made a

  1. Some deep caves in Biokovo Mountain (Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garasic, Mladen; Garasic, Davor

    2014-05-01

    The investigation of 3 caves explored more than 1000 meters in depth in the Dinaric karst area in Croatia, has been in progress for a considerable period of time. These are complex speleological features situated in the longest mountain range of the Dinaric karst, i.e. at the Northern Velebit mountain range. In fact, these caves have been studied for over two decades now. The first one is a cave system of Lukina jama (Luke's Cave) - Trojama cave, which has been investigated until the depth of 1421 meters (Jalžić, 2007; Šmida, 1993). Its total length is 3731 meters and a new expedition will soon continue to investigate this pit through speleodiving in siphons. The second greatest cave by depth is Slovačka jama (Slovak Cave), 1320 meters in depth, with cave chanals measuring 5677 meters in total length. The third greatest cave by depth is the Cave system of Velebita, reaching down to 1026 m in depth, with the chanal length of 3176 meters (Bakšić, 2006a; 2006b). However, another 3 speleological sites, which can rightly be added to those deeper than 1000 m, have recently been discovered. These are three caverns that were discovered during construction of the Sveti Ilija Tunnel that passes through Mt. Biokovo, in the Dinaric karst area. These caverns undoubtedly point to the link with the ground surface, while the rock overburden above the tunnel in the zone where the caverns were discovered ranges from 1250 and 1350 meters. Bats from the ground surface were found in the caverns and, according to measurements, they are situated in the depth from 200 and 300 meters below the tunnel level. This would mean that the depth of these newly found caves ranges from 1450 and 1650 m, when observed from the ground surface. There are several hundreds of known caves in Biokovo, and the deepest ones discovered so far are Jama Mokre noge (Wet Feet Cave) 831 m in depth, and Jama Amfora (Amphora Cave) 788 m in depth (Bockovac, 1999; Bakšić & all, 2002; Lacković & all, 2001

  2. PARTICULARITIES AND THREATS ON THE BIODIVERSITY FROM CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea BĂLTĂREŢU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Because it has a specific geographic position and it’s situated at the crossroads of several bio-geographical regions and as a result of its ecological characteristics, the climate and geo-morphological conditions, Croatia is one of the wealthiest countries from Europe concerning the biodiversity. The great variety of the territory, maritime and underground habitats has determined the existence of numerous species and subspecies, including a significant number of endemic species. Although the climate of Croatia has a great value, many of its components are threatened. The most important threats of wild species are losing the habitats and the degradation. Because of its shape and its position in Europe, Croatia has very rich landscape diversity. Croatia contains significant populations of many species that are threatened at the European level. These are connected to preserved large areas of their habitats. Vast mountain beech and fir forests are rich in bear, wolf and lynx populations. Large wetland complexes with alluvial forests are important breeding, the migration and wintering sites for European water birds and for wetland birds nesting in forests. The wealth of marine biodiversity, in combination with the immense diversity of islands and cliffs with endemic life forms, gives the Croatian coastal area international significance.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF FRANCHISING IN CROATIA OBSTACLES AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Alpeza

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Franchising is very popular growth model but despite the wide application of franchising in the developed countries of the world, its impact on the Croatian economy is still marginal. The purpose of this research is to identify the obstacles and challenges to a wider application of franchising in Croatia and generate policy recommendations for removing the identified obstacles. Obstacles and recommendations are identified on the basis of a conducted longitudinal qualitative research, the first phase of which was conducted in 2006, and second in 2014. The overall results of this research were presented in a form of PEST analysis and compared with the results of the 2006 research aiming to detect changes (improvements/ deterioration in individual areas of the research political, economic, legal and technologic factors of influence on the development of franchising in Croatia. Based on the detected changes, conclusions and policy recommendations were identified.The obstacles can be divided in two categories: franchising specific barriers and general business related obstacles for doing business in Croatia. Without removing most of these obstacles, it is unrealistic to expect high growth of franchising activities in Croatia in near future.

  4. INVESTMENT EFFICIENCY IN NEW HOTEL BUILDINGS IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Rot

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abandonment of mass tourism in the late 80-ies of 20th century and attitude of humane tourism oriented to the needs and requirements of individuals, it is characterized by changes in the design and architectural design of hotel facilities. Features and functionality of hotel facilities are affected by trends in tourism demand. Tourism gets new features, which hotel companies must adapt. Individualism, humanism and hedonism are the guidelines that accompany the tourist industry in the 21st century. They determine the new considerations shaping and arranging hotel facilities, and the need for transformation of the hotel buildings designed for mass tourism in facilities for contemporary tourist who is aware of his needs, desires and aspirations. These trends should be monitored and the hotel industry in Croatia. The last decade marked by investments in reconstruction and modernization of existing hotel facilities, but investment in new hotel facilities are still minor. The reason for this is the fact that the hotel industry is low profitable activity, but also in the unfinished privatization, lack of domestic financial capital and the lack of attractiveness of the Croatia to attract foreign capital which would allow meaningful construction of new and rehabilitation of existing hotel facilities in line with trends in the tourism market. This paper critically examines the state of the hotel industry in the Republic of Croatia and its competitiveness in Europe, and it presents the results of research on the effectiveness of building a fictional hotel in Croatia, with a comparative analysis with European hotels.

  5. Citizenship Education in Croatia: At the Margins of the System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekez, Anka; Horvat, Martina; Šalaj, Berto

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper unfolds the ways in which Croatia, as a young post-communist democracy, has aligned its transition and consolidation with the development of education programs that would support the protection of human rights and the creation of a democratic political culture. Design/methodology/approach: By combining the existing studies with…

  6. The Educational Program "Zajedno Jaci" (Stronger Together) in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanja, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we explore intercultural learning undertaken through the educational program "Stronger Together." The program "Stronger Together" was created in 1998 in order to support and educate teachers working with children in post-war regions of Croatia using intercultural education and cooperative learning as tools for…

  7. Informed consent in Croatia. A work in progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučemilo, Luka; Borovečki, Ana

    2014-07-01

    As Croatia makes the transition from one political system and type of economy to another, there are inevitable social and political changes that have a profound affect on the healthcare system. This article charts some of the progress of change with respect to patients' rights and informed consent.

  8. Energy demand modelling and GHG emission reduction: case study Croatia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pukšec, Tomislav; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Novosel, Tomislav

    2013-01-01

    In the light of new European energy-climate package and its measures for increasing security of supply, decreasing the impact on environment and stimulating sustainable development with special emphasis on job creation and regional growth, Croatia as a future EU member state, needs to reconsider ...

  9. Learning Wellness: A Water Exercise Class in Zagreb, Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Donald N., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The research reported in this article investigated the dynamics of a water exercise class with older adults in Zagreb, Croatia. It focused on 3 classes of older swimmers at a community exercise center. A total of 105 participants were asked to complete a short questionnaire. The questionnaire contained items on demographics, use of free time, and…

  10. Prevalence of salmonella in captive reptiles from Croatia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukac, Maja; Pedersen, Karl; Prukner-Radovcic, Estella

    2015-01-01

    from 200 apparently healthy reptiles were tested for Salmonella excretions by bacteriologic culture and serotyping. These 200 individual reptiles included 31 lizards, 79 chelonians, and 90 snakes belonging to private owners or housed at the Zagreb Zoo, Croatia. Salmonella was detected in a total of 13...

  11. Regional Energy Potential of Municipal Solid Waste in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potocnik, V.

    1997-01-01

    MSW energy recovery in Croatia by thermal treatment in waste and landfill gas plants, similar to some 1200 such plants operating worldwide, could reduce waste impact on health and environment, and simultaneously substitute approximate 300000 tonnes of imported hard coal. (author)

  12. The Roma in Croatia: From Migration to Intercultural Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neven Hrvatić

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available From their first arrival in Croatia (in Dubrovnik in 1362, due to their transnational identity, the Roma have formed a historical ethnic community. A specific tribal system and economic backwardness determined their dispersion, specialisation, the partial loss of their ethnic identity and their marginal position. Based on empirical surveys carried out among secondary school students in Croatia, the scientific research projects: “Genealogy and the Transfer of Intercultural Models” and “The School Curriculum and the Traits of Croatian National Culture” (1991–2001, have revealed the existence of stereotypes in regard to the Roma, a low level of acceptance of elements of Roma culture (language, art, history, customs, as well as great social distance towards the Roma (through a modified Bogardus scale, which altogether indicates a need for intercultural education and schooling for all school pupils in Croatia. An improvement in their socio-economic situation and integration into all segments of society is crucial to the Roma national minority in Croatia, but there is likewise a need to preserve Roma culture, traditions and lifestyle, so that the Roma could become and/or remain a recognisable part of the multicultural milieu.

  13. Academic Marginalism in Western Balkans: The Case of Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brajkovic, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study relies on document analysis and in-depth, open-ended interviews with university leaders and government officials in a post-socialist and a recent European Union entrant country, Croatia. The study seeks to provide a comprehensive overview of the Croatian academic sector, as well as to unpack the top academic officials'…

  14. Education of ethics committee members: experiences from Croatia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borovecki, A.; Have, H.A.M.J. ten; Oreskovic, S.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study knowledge and attitudes of hospital ethics committee members at the first workshop for ethics committees in Croatia. DESIGN: Before/after cross-sectional study using a self administered questionnaire. SETTING: Educational workshop for members of hospital ethics committees,

  15. Nuclear Liability Legislation in the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sladonja, B.

    1998-01-01

    This paper contains a basic data about the legislation referring to third party liability for nuclear damage in Croatia. It also, gives some drafting provisions in the Croatian Nuclear Liability Act, but only those which implements a substantial changes compared to the Act currently in force. (author)

  16. Dimensions of health among the elderly in Poland and Croatia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knurowski, T.; Lazic, D.; van Dijk, J.P.; Geckova, Andrea; Tobiasz-Adamczyk, B.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of the WHO definition of health, we aimed at exploring the model of health and identifying the most important dimensions of health among the elderly in two Central European countries: Poland and Croatia. Randomly chosen elderly aged 65-85 from Krakow (Poland) and from Zagreb and some

  17. The endemic mollusks reveal history of the long-lived Pliocene Lake Slavonia in NW Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandic, Oleg; Kurečić, Tomislav; Neubauer, Thomas A.; Harzhauser, Mathias

    2015-04-01

    The present investigation deals with the fossil mollusk record of the long-lived Pliocene Lake Slavonia settled in the southern Pannonian Basin. The samples originate from Vukomeričke gorice, a low hill-range situated north of the Kupa River in the area between the towns of Zagreb, Sisak and Karlovac in NW Croatia. Representing the SW margin of the Lake Slavonia the freshwater deposits alternate there with the alluvial series, providing altogether about 400-m-thick, Pliocene continental succession, known in literature by informal name Paludina beds (acc. to a junior synonym of Viviparus). The endemic fauna of the Lake Slavonia became particularly well-known in the late 19th century after Melchior Neumayr demonstrated that the gradual evolutionary change of the mollusk phenotypes toward more complex morphology represents a function of adaptation to environmental change in the paleolake. Even Charles Darwin commented that result as by far the best case which I have ever met with, showing the direct influence of the conditions of life on the organization. The deposition in the Lake Slavonia (~4.5 to ~1.8 Ma) coincides with the Pliocene Climate Optimum (PCO), but captures also the transition into the Pleistocene climate marked by the initial Ice Age pulse at 2.59 Ma. The increase of polar temperatures resulted during PCO in a significant melting of the ice caps leading to a global sea level rise tentatively getting up to 25 m higher than today. Coincidence of the climate and geodynamic settings in southeastern Europe provided conditions supporting extended settlement of lacustrine environments including Lake Slavonia, Lake Kosovo, Lake Transylvania and Lake Dacia, all characterized by explosive adaptive radiations of viviparid snails. In particular, the latter adaptive radiations resulted in the regional phylostratigraphy of Lake Slavonia Viviparus species enabling excellent stratigraphic control for the investigated deposits. Hence, based on this evidence, the

  18. Seroepidemiology of cytomegalovirus infections in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilibic-Cavlek, Tatjana; Kolaric, Branko; Beader, Natasa; Vrtar, Izabela; Tabain, Irena; Mlinaric-Galinovic, Gordana

    2017-02-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is endemic worldwide, with marked differences in the seroprevalence rates between countries. The aim of this study was to analyze the seroprevalence of CMV infections in Croatia. During a 3-year period (2013-2015) 2438 consecutive serum samples collected from Croatian residents were tested for the presence of CMV IgM and IgG antibodies using enzyme-linked immunoassay. The IgM/IgG positive samples were further tested for IgG avidity. The overall seroprevalence rates for CMV IgG and IgM antibodies were 74.4 % and 4.3 %, respectively. The IgG seroprevalence showed significant differences between population groups: children/adolescents 54.6 %, general adult population 77.2 %, hemodialysis patients 91.4 % (p < 0.001). Seropositivity of CMV was strongly age-dependent with prevalences ranging from 53.0 % in children less than 10 years old to 93.8 % in persons above 60 years (p < 0.001). There was no difference in the prevalence rate between women with normal pregnancy and women with poor obstetric history. Gender and place of residence were not associated with CMV seropositivity. Using IgG avidity, current/recent primary CMV infection was confirmed by a low/borderline avidity index (AI) in 46.7 % participants, while in 53.3 % a high AI indicated CMV reactivation or reinfection. Primary infections were detected mainly in children and adolescents (83.2 % and 70.5 %, respectively), while reactivation/reinfection was common in persons older than 40 (77.0-100 %). Reactivation/reinfection was most commonly detected in hemodialysis patients (92.3 %). Logistic regression showed that older age and being on hemodialysis were significant predictors of CMV seropositivity. Infections with CMV are widespread in the Croatian population. Older age and being on hemodialysis appear to be the main risk factors for CMV infection.

  19. Storm wave deposits in southern Istria (Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biolchi, Sara; Furlani, Stefano; Devoto, Stefano; Scicchitano, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    The accumulation of large boulders related to extreme waves are well documented in different areas of the Mediterranean coasts, such as in Turkey, Algeria, Egypt, Greece (Lesbos and Crete islands), France, Spain, Malta, Italy (Sicily and Apulia regions). These deposits have been associated to storm or tsunami events or both, depending on the local history. If compared to the Mediterranean Sea, the Adriatic Sea is considered a shallow basin, with very low wave energy. In particular the NE Adriatic, where Istria Peninsula (Croatia) is located, geological and geomorphological evidences of extreme wave events have never been described, as well as no tsunamis have been registered. We present the boulder deposits that have been recently found out in southern Istria, at Premantura and Marlera localities and we discuss the mechanisms that could have been responsible of the detachment and movement of these large rocky blocks from the emerged part of the coast and from the sea bottom inland. A multidisciplinary approach was adopted: geological and geomorphological surveyings, UAV and digital photogrammetric analysis, applying of the hydrodynamic equations as well as underwater profiles were carried out between 2012 and 2016. The southern Istrian coasts are composed of Cretaceous bedded limestones, sub-horizontal or gently inclined toward the sea and are exposed to southern winds, Scirocco and Libeccio, with wide fetch. The boulder deposits occur in correspondence of flat promontories or ancient quarry pavements, where the topography, together with the bedding planes and a dense fracture pattern constitute the predisposing factors of the boulder sizing and detachment. Boulder sizes, density, position and elevation have been measured in order to apply the hydrodynamic equations, which provide wave height values that can discriminate a storm from a tsunami origin. Biogenic marine encrustations, sometimes very recent, have been observed on large part of the boulders, attesting

  20. Energy in Croatia 2003. Annual Energy Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    Reports have kept domestic and international audience continuously informed about the latest relations and developments in the Croatian energy system. Annual report presents all characteristic indicators of the Croatian energy system in 2003, outlines their development over a longer past period, and suggests a future course of development of basic energy system indicators. Total primary energy supply in the Republic of Croatia in 2003 was 5.2 percent higher compared to the previous year. The gross domestic product increased by 4.3 percent over the same period. This means that energy intensity, primary energy supply per unit of gross domestic product, increased by 0.9 percent. Compared to the european Union average Croatian energy intensity was approximately 32 percent higher. Total primary energy production, on the other hand, decreased by 1.1 percent compared to 2002. This means that primary energy self-supply, which fell to 46.4 percent, reached its lowest level to-date in the observed period. The remaining energy needs were met by imports, which increased by 1.7 percent. In the structure of total primary energy supply, decrease has been observed only in energy conversion losses, while all other categories increased. Final energy demand increased by 6.7 percent in 2003, with the levels recorded in different sectors ranging from 2.5 percent in industry to 7.5 and 8 percent in transport and other sectors, respectively. In terms of final energy demand, an increase has been recorded in all energy forms except natural gas, whose consumption showed stagnation. This is due to lower consumption in the energy transformation sector and a significant 9.2 percent increase in its final energy demand. A continuous increase in electricity consumption - which reached 4.8 percent in the observed period - is worth nothing. Energy forms which recorded highest consumption increase levels in 2003 are coal (16 percent) and diesel fuel (15 percent). In contrast to the fast increase in

  1. THE HISTORY OF EXPLORATION AND EXPLOITATION OF BITUMINOUS AND KEROGENOUS DEPOSITS IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berislav Šebečić

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available It is assumed thal the first known sedimens of natural bitumen or asphalt in coastal Croatia were exploited as the early moddle ages. Yet authenticated written documents about Vinišće near Trogir derive from no earlier than 1628, about Vrgorac/Paklina from only 1753. By the end of the 18th century, many deposits were discovered in Dalmatia, but it was Škrip on the Island of Brač and Suhi Dolac that were important. The earliest known deposits and occurrences of kerogenous rocks, or bituminous or oil shales, are mentioned as stone or fossil coal in Sovinjak, in the upper course of the River Mirna, and in Rebići in Istria; near Sinj, Slivno not far from the River Neretva, Mirta and near Nerežišće on the Island uf Brač. All if these were well known and described in 1804, while Sovinjak was mentioned in the 16th century. In the article, some of new information derived from mining and geological research into bituminous and kerogenous sediments and deposits are provided (the paper is published in Croatian.

  2. SYSTEMIC RESEARCH MODEL OF DEVELOPMENT OF MARKETING THOUGHT AND EDUCATION IN CROATIA

    OpenAIRE

    Renko, Nataša

    2001-01-01

    The author conceived the model for systemic research of development of marketing thought and education in Croatia. The model consists of six elements which are completely interactive and have essential influence on development of marketing educational system. The model also helped to evaluate historical occurences which had preceded and influenced the present situation in Croatia, and which might have possible consequences to future development of marketing educational system in Croatia.

  3. Periodontal diseases at the transition from the late antique to the early mediaeval period in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodanović, Marin; Peroš, Kristina; Zukanović, Amila; Knežević, Marjana; Novak, Mario; Slaus, Mario; Brkić, Hrvoje

    2012-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the transition from the late antique to the early mediaeval period in Croatia had a negative impact on the periodontal health. 1118 skulls were examined for dental calculus, alveolar bone resorption, fenestrations, dehiscences and root furcation involvement. The prevalence of teeth with calculus varied from 40.7% in the LA sample of continental parts of Croatia to 50.3% in the LA sample of Adriatic Croatia. The prevalence of alveolar bone resorption ranged between 21.2% in the EM sample from continental Croatia and 32.3% in the LA sample from Adriatic Croatia. The prevalence of individuals with alveolar bone dehiscences varied from 8.6% in the LA sample from continental Croatia up to 15.0% in the EM sample from Adriatic Croatia. The prevalence of individuals with alveolar bone fenestrations varied from 21.5% in the LA sample from Adriatic Croatia up to 36.2% in the LA sample from continental Croatia. The prevalence of individuals with exposed root bifurcations or trifurcations varied from 9.0% in the EM sample from Adriatic Croatia up to 20.7% in the EM sample from continental Croatia. Statistically significant differences were found between samples. The transition from the late antique to the early mediaeval period in Croatia did not have a negative impact on periodontal health. Studies of periodontal health of ancient populations should be performed to provide a better and more reliable reconstruction of living conditions in the past. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Direct Investments in Croatia in the Form of Personal Companies – Tax Related Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Luketina, Marina

    2017-01-01

    The bilateral economic relations between Austria and Croatia are of prime importance to both countries: more than one quarter of foreign investments realised in Croatia stem from Austrian sources. Indeed, Austria is the largest investor in Croatia. Although the Croatian legal framework provides for several investment possibilities, Austrian residents prefer to invest in Croatian capital companies. However, especially from the perspective of Austrian residents, substantial tax benefits may res...

  5. Proceedings of 17th Forum: Energy Day in Croatia: Europe, Region and Croatia in 2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The international community is faced with a big test of determining the marginal requirements of environmental impact aimed at preventing the climate change potentially endangering the survival of the civilisation as we know it. This phrase actually reflects the course of developments to be expected if we do not change our attitude towards the protection of the environment. This is a huge challenge for the energy sector and technological development: how to meet the growing needs for energy and, at the same time, significantly diminish the ecological burden. In the past 2 years the EU has put forward very ambitious plans. The question is are the designed mechanisms sufficient to facilitate the implementation of these plans and if the awareness of all actors participating in the process is high enough to enable this implementation.This Forum wants to open the decision about the future of the future in energy development in Europe, Region and Croatia. It is important that we all become aware that the changes in the energy sector will be dramatic if the obligations to reduce greenhouse gases emissions, mostly CO 2 , are accepted in order to start working in that direction as soon as today

  6. PRODUCTION AND SUPPLY BALANCE OF POULTRY MEAT IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Grgić

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Poultry meat is an important protein source in the human consumption. The main factors that have a positive effect on the development of the poultry industry are short production cycle, relatively low cost and the lack of religious restrictions on consumption. Chicken meat has the biggest share in the structure of poultry meat. The paper objective was to calculate the level of self-sufficiency degree in poultry meat in Croatia in the period from 2000 to 2012 and the degree of self-sufficiency in 2016 based on the results obtained. The method of balancing was used for calculation of self-sufficiency degree. The degree of self-sufficiency in the production of poultry meat in Croatia is higher than in other types of meat being between 80 and 90%. However, further decrease is expected and in 2016 domestic production would meet 81.17% of the domestic needs.

  7. Solar wind power electric plant on Vis (Croatia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A project of a solar photovoltaic electric power plant presented by the Republic of Croatia at the meeting of the E.P.I.A. Mission for photovoltaic technology of the Mediterranean countries, aroused a great interest of the representatives of the invited countries. However, the interest within Croatia in the project has disappeared although E.P.I.A. offered a financing of two thirds of costs. There are attempts to construct 1800 kw wind-driven generators at the same location not taking into consideration a possibility of building a hybrid solar-wind-power electric plant. The chance that the solar part is completely of domestic origin is not accepted but the preference is given to the building of imported wind-driven generators. (orig.)

  8. Tax wedge in Croatia, Belgium, Estonia, Germany and Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gabrilo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyse the taxation of labour income in Croatia, Belgium,Estonia, Germany and Slovakia. Having presented an outline of tax system rules, the paper shows the decomposition of the net average tax wedge for different family types and different income levels based on the OECD methodology. The results show that all observed countries apply a progressive tax schedule, apart from Germany where taxation for higher gross wages is not progressive due to a  cap on the SIC base. When it comes to a taxpayer earning an average gross wage, a Croatian single worker without children has the lowest tax burden, followed by Estonia, Slovakia, Germany and Belgium. However, as regards taxpayers earning 400% of AGW, Estonia has the smallest tax wedge, followed by Slovakia, Germany, Croatia and Belgium. Similar results are obtained by analyzing the tax wedge for couples with two children where one spouse is out of work.

  9. The Politics of the Budgetary Process: The Case of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjekoslav Bratić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The budget is a mechanism of governing a state that has a very important role for any economy as well as for the inhabitants of each country. The budget is the outcome of the budgetary process. With its development, many budgetary functions have been developed. These functions best describe what the budget and its purpose are. The budgetary process, which is extremely complex and consists of many phases, is a serious economic and political activity in all modern countries. In each phase various factors play important roles. This topic has seldom been researched in Croatia and therefore the paper offers an overview of previous research devoted to the politics of the budgetary process in the world, particularly describing the budgetary process in Croatia.

  10. New Accomplishments and Development of INIS in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.; Pleslic Jovicic, S.

    1998-01-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS) is the leading information system on peaceful use of nuclear energy in the world. INIS is realized through co-operation of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its member states. It contains information related to literature on nuclear science and technology in the form of a bibliographic record. The Republic of croatia became an INIS member at the end of 1994 and since then this database has been available in a written form as INIS Atomindex and on CD-ROM. Moreover, several representatives of expert organizations have been trained for searching the database and for formulating of input data for INIS. This article describes new accomplishments in the development of the INIS database and joining of Croatia into the international exchange of nuclear information through national contribution in the form of INIS input data. (author)

  11. Constructing Poverty Lines in Croatia Using Kakwani’s Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinko Škare

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new model for defining the poverty line as a possible candidate for the construction of a new official poverty line in Croatia. The model, based on Kakwani’s (2010 approach (nutrition-based anchor, uses consumer theory as the basis for defining food and non-food poverty lines. In Croatia, various alternative poverty indicators have been developed to define the official poverty line. To ensure international comparability and consistency, the poverty threshold expressed in local currency by applying the exchange rate of currencies’ purchasing power (PPP is expressed in international dollars. It is important to ensure implementation of redistributive policies, maximization of market efficiency, and increased social justice. All this policy goals and instruments heavily depend on efficient and precise poverty measurement methods.

  12. Financial Integration and Financial Crisis: Croatia Approaching the EMU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen Derado

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The breakdown of command economies has significantly increased growth potentials all over Europe and opened up prospects for economic development. Encouraged by that, the EU embarked on the process of deeper economic integration. Its main aspects – economic liberalization and monetary integration – coincided with the worldwide globalization of trade and capital flows. As a laggard country in the process of economic integration, Croatia is in a particularly difficult position – besides soaring trade deficit, it is highly indebted and strongly dependant upon foreign capital. Appreciating theoretical inferences and empirical evidence on monetary integration, while taking reference to the realized level of international financial integration and external vulnerability, the aim of the paper is to find out if Croatia fulfils the criteria for successful monetary integration.

  13. Determinants of disability pensions in Croatia: the role of institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Badun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to investigate why Croatia has a large number of disability pension beneficiaries. Approximately one quarter of Croatia’s retired population is receiving a pension based on disability. After a presentation of the most important facts and figures, the following possible determinants of disability pensions in Croatia are considered: health status, conditions of work, socioeconomic status, war, and institutions. Simple before-after comparisons suggest that institutional reforms had a strong impact on the number of disability pension beneficiaries. Furthermore, the granting of disability pensions has been plagued by corruption, which shows the importance of informal institutions as well. Future research should focus on micro-data in order to find specific social and health care policy measures to alleviate the effect of socioeconomic and health factors on the incidence of disability.

  14. Volatiles of Helichrysum italicum (Roth) G. Don from Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeljković, Sanja Ćavar; Šolić, Marija Edita; Maksimović, Milka

    2015-01-01

    Helichrysum italicum (Roth) G. Don is a flowering plant of the family Asteraceae. It is rich in oil that is used for different medicinal purposes and in fragrance industry. Volatile profile of four populations of H. italicum, collected from natural habitat in Dalmatia (Croatia), was analysed by capillary GC-MS. Sample from BraČ Island had α-trans-bergamotene (10.2%) and β-acoradiene (10.1%) as the majors, whereas sample collected on Biokovo Mt. was rich in neryl acetate (8.1%). β-Acoradiene was also the main constituent of sample collected near Tijarica, whereas rosifoliol (8.5%) was the most abundant constituent in sample collected near Makarska. Presented results show the influence of environmental conditions on chemical differentiation of the volatiles of H. italicum from Croatia.

  15. Risk Management in Air Protection in the Republic of Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Peternel, Renata; Toth, Ivan; Hercog, Predrag

    2014-01-01

    In the Republic of Croatia, according to the Air Protection Act, air pollution assessment is obligatory on the whole State territory. For individual regions and populated areas in the State a network has been established for permanent air quality monitoring. The State network consists of stations for measuring background pollution, regional and cross-border remote transfer and measurements as part of international government liabilities, then stations for measuring air quality in areas of cul...

  16. From political capitalism to clientelist capitalism? The case of Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Cvijanovic; Denis Redzepagic

    2011-01-01

    The paper analyses the typology of capitalism in Croatia. The Croatian form of capitalism is specific, in form and origin, with links between the pre-independence and post-independence periods, implying that capitalism has gradually evolved – from the political during the eighties towards current clientelistic capitalism. The manufacturing focus aims to facilitate the analysis of institutional, political and economic changes over the past forty years, emphasising the implications of instituti...

  17. Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjumov) - a New Pest of Cereals in Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Tanja Gotlin Čuljak; Jasminka Igrc Barčić

    2002-01-01

    The first finding of the Russian Wheat Aphid (RWA), Diuraphis noxia Kurdjumov in Croatia was registered in 1999. This insect is important pest of cereals (specially in wheat and barley) in USD and South Africa. Information on morphometrie allows a differentiation to other similar-looking species. The distribution of the species is briefly demonstrated. Damage to small grain cereals, range of host plants and possible strategies to control the aphids are presented.

  18. Achievements and Perspectives of the Adult Education in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapan, Anita

    Historical development of adult education in Croatia can be identified in seven phases: (1) the beginning of the 20th century and the period between the two World Wars; (2) World War II; (3) period from 1945 to the early 1950s; (4) early 1950s to 1965; (5) period between 1965 and 1980; (6) 1980s; and (7) period after the fall of the Berlin…

  19. SOME INDICATORS OF HEALTH CARE STATUS IN CROATIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puntarić, Dinko; Stašević, Ina; Ropac, Darko; Poljičanin, Tamara; Mayer, Dijana

    2015-03-01

    The article presents the basic principles of health care, health care measures and strategic objectives of these measures in Croatia. The health of the population does not depend solely on the activities of the health care system but also on various demographic indicators. Our success in implementing health care depends largely on the structure of health facilities and health workers. The Croatian health system in late 2013 had permanently employed 74,489 workers. Out of these, 77% were health care workers. Most health care workers had only secondary school education (37.7%); physicians represented 17.4% of the workforce. On assessing the health of the population, certain health indicators are of utmost importance. The leading cause of deaths were circulatory diseases (in 2012, 24,988 persons died, 585.5/100,000). Neoplasms were the cause of death in 13,940 persons (326.6/100,000), then injuries and poisoning (69.1/100,000), diseases of the gastrointestinal system (53.1/100,000), and respiratory diseases (50.4/100,000). Data are presented on the basis of diseases reported from several national registries (cancer, psychoactive drug abuse, the disabled, diabetes, and suicides). The importance of vaccination for the control of infectious diseases in Croatia is especially emphasized, as well as the experience and excellent results achieved in this area. The epidemiological situation in Croatia in terms of infectious diseases can be assessed as favorable. This is due to the general living conditions, which contributed to the entire health system, making Croatia equal to other developed countries of Europe and throughout the world.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF FRANCHISING IN CROATIA OBSTACLES AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Alpeza, Mirela; Erceg, Aleksandar; Oberman Peterka, Sunčica

    2015-01-01

    Franchising is very popular growth model but despite the wide application of franchising in the developed countries of the world, its impact on the Croatian economy is still marginal. The purpose of this research is to identify the obstacles and challenges to a wider application of franchising in Croatia and generate policy recommendations for removing the identified obstacles. Obstacles and recommendations are identified on the basis of a conducted longitudinal qualitative research, the firs...

  1. Split, Croatia - Educational, Adventurous and Sustainable Tourism Destination

    OpenAIRE

    Chabik, Szymon; Imran, Md. Azim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this Bachelor’s thesis is to create an audio-visual documentation about an educational trip to Split, Croatia. The trip took place in April, 2014. The educational tour was organized by Laurea University of Applied Sciences. The destination, Split, were chosen by participants’ vote. The tour was arranged and planned by a group of students and the theme of the tour was Educational Tourism. The entire trip was taken into consideration from sustainable, Adventure and educational po...

  2. Electricity market in Croatia according to the new energy laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelec, L.; Tomasic-Skevin, S.; Blagajac, S.; Dokmanovic, B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents laws and regulations related to the electricity market, with emphasis on changes introduced after the package of energy laws had been adopted in 2001. The paper gives an overview of by-laws, which are about to enter into force or are in final preparation stage, creating conditions for eligible customers to change supplier and freely negotiate electricity price. The paper also presents electricity market model in Croatia as well as procedure of supplier change. (author)

  3. Homogenization of monthly precipitation time series in Croatia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zahradníček, Pavel; Rasol, D.; Cindric, K.; Štěpánek, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 14 (2014), s. 3671-3682 ISSN 0899-8418 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0248; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.4.31.0056 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : homogenization * Croatia * precipitation * inhomogeneities * break points Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 3.157, year: 2014

  4. A Comment on Kyoto and Electricity Generation in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, V.

    1998-01-01

    Kyoto convention signed in December 1997 will, pending ratification, introduce legal obligations to countries of Annex I of the Convention to reduce CO 2 emission. Reductions will be obligatory for a number of small and medium European countries. Croatia will have to reduce its emission to 95% of the 1990 level. Possibility to meet this target without the use of new nuclear facility is doubtful. (author)

  5. Customs Representation in Simplified Customs Procedures in Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čedomir Ivaković

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available When introduced in 2000 the use of authorized consigneeand consignor status was not particularly popular among companies,despite its apparent advantages. The number of the statususers compared to the total number of exporters and importerswas almost negligible. The aim of this paper was to find outto which extent the simplified customs procedures have beenaccepted in Croatia through an objective outline of advantagesand disadvantages that the companies - users of the simplifiedprocedures face on a daily basis.

  6. Creative approach in designing family hotels in Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Rocco, Sanja; Šipić, Neven

    2013-01-01

    Hotel industry is becoming a leading segment of tourism in Croatia, evident from the constant increase in accommodation capacities, number of overnights, and employees in the hotel industry. To succeed, hotel managers need to identify the needs of their clients and find creative ways to please them. Hence, the future of small family-owned hotels is likely in differentiation by design. It implies a wide spectre of areas of applicability. The design is implemented in marketing strategy in the p...

  7. EVALUATION OF THE FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE OF PENSION FUNDS IN CROATIA

    OpenAIRE

    Dražen Novaković

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the financial performance of pension funds in Croatia. Although there are other factors which are important in the pension funds overall performance, this paper focuses on investment accomplishments. The purpose of measuring portfolio performance is to determine whether portfolio managers add value compared to passive investment strategies. The traditional approach to pension funds’ performance evaluation underlines standard measures of financial performan...

  8. Tariff System and Electricity Price in the Republic if Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topic, J.; Jurisic, S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the origin and development of Electricity Tariff System in Croatia with special emphasis on the tariff system established in 1991. The analyzed period of the application of the tariff system in force and all other tariff rates from 1991 to 1995 are the basis for the assessment of required and possible alternations of tariff rates till the year 2000. (author). 4 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs., 1 plan

  9. Budget perspective in Croatia after accession to the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Sopek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Upon accession to the European Union, the New Member State’s budget undergoes significant structural changes due to the appearance of new categories of revenues and expenditures. The aim of this paper is to estimate the possible effects of Croatian membership in the EU on changes in the structure and size of budget revenues and expenditures upon the country’s accession to the EU in the second half of 2013, as well as to indicate the possibilities for utilization of EU funds in the new financial perspective up to 2020. It is shown that in 2013 Croatia might realize a positive net financial position in transactions with the EU budget in the amount of approximately 0.28% of GDP, i.e. EUR 136 m. The total net financial position of Croatia due to EU accession, which includes some additional costs and benefits like different harmonization and the need for project co-financing at state and local levels, is also positive in 2013 and amounts to approximately 0.15% of GDP or equivalently EUR 72 m. Total amount of all funds that Croatia might receive in the new EU financial perspective covering the period from 2014 to 2020 amounts to EUR 6.34 bn, whereby annual amounts increase from EUR 0.7 bn in 2014 up to EUR 1.2 bn in 2020. By using exponential regression analysis it is estimated that in 2020 Croatia should be a net recipient of funds from the EU budget in total amount of 1.72% of GDP, i.e. EUR 1.13 bn.

  10. Geographical Basis for Development of Organic Olive Grow in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anica Čuka

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional agriculture is among the biggest polluters of the environment. Overuse of synthetic pesticides, herbicides and mineral fertilisers have caused soil exhaustion, erosion, unbalance in the ecosystem, and their harmful effect on human health has been proven. This is why the author tried to point to the importance of development of organic agriculture, and olive growing as a traditional agricultural sector in coastal Croatia.The main intention is to show the basic geographical aspects of coastal Croatia and to explain the ways it can influence the development of organic olive farming. It is specially emphasized that organically produced food must be incorporated in Croatian tourist offer. It will stimulate a bigger interest for Croatia as an attractive tourist destination in the world tourist market and will simplify the sale of organically produced food. Development of organic olive farming will also contribute to the revitalisation of small villages where a strong presence of negative processes, such as deagrarisation, deruralisation and demographic regression is evident.

  11. CONSUMERS' WILLINGNESS TO PAY MORE FOR ORGANIC FOOD IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Petljak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking into consideration growing concerns about conventional agricultural practices, food safety, human health, animal welfare and the environment, the main goal of this paper is to identify the predictors of consumers' willingness to buy organic food and to pay a premium price for it. The research was conducted on a representative sample of respondents in the Republic of Croatia, a growing organic food market, using a highly structured questionnaire. Research results indicate that respondents in Croatia perceive organic food as more expensive, healthier and tastier than conventional food; also, they believe that the origin of organic food is strictly controlled. The results of hierarchical regression analysis indicate that higher monthly household income predicts a greater willingness to pay (WTP a higher price for organic food compared to conventional food. Also, perception of organic food as healthier and tastier than conventional food predicts a greater WTP a higher price for organic food compared to conventional products. It is expected that research results will be useful for food retailers in their market communication strategies towards further development and overall growth of the organic food market in Croatia. This research is one of its kind as it captures WTP a premium price for organic food and identifies the main factors influencing WTP a premium price for organic food on the growing Croatian market.

  12. Secular trends in monthly heating and cooling demands in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvitan, Lidija; Sokol Jurković, Renata

    2016-08-01

    This paper analyzes long-term heating and cooling trends for five locations in Croatia from 1901 to 2008 to assist in the revision of Croatia's heating and cooling energy policy. Trends in monthly heating degree-days (HDD) and cooling degree-days (CDD) were determined for three related temperature threshold values each and analyzed to provide insight into the influence of desired thermal comfort on the extent of changes in energy consumption. Monthly trends in the corresponding number of heating days (HD) and cooling days (CD) were also analyzed. A basic investigation of HDD, HD, CDD, and CD trends proved to be essential to the development of a complete description of important climate-related conditions that impact energy demands associated with heating and cooling. In a few cases, the dependence of the trends on the implemented temperature thresholds was rather pronounced and was reflected in great spatial and temporal variations in monthly trends. The statistical significance of the detected monthly trends illustrated a diverse range of possible impacts of climate changes on heating and cooling energy consumption both across and within three main climate regions in Croatia (continental, mountainous, and maritime). It is confirmed that the applied monthly scale for analyses is suitable for assessing heating and cooling practices.

  13. Capital Structure Determinants of Small and Medium Enterprises in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Šarlija

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of the research about capital structure is focused towards two theories: trade off theory (TOT and pecking order theory (POT. The idea is to explore which theory works better in certain conditions and identify the key determinants that affect the capital structure of the company. However, in different countries different determinants with opposite relation to the leverage are found to be significant. Besides, most of the previous researches are oriented on listed companies. The aim of this paper is to analyse the capital structure of small and medium enterprises in Croatia through the analysis of the fundamental determinants of the capital structure. The research was conducted on a data sample of 500 SMEs in Croatia in the period of 2005–2011. On the unbalanced panel data set a linear regression is applied. Influence of determinants on leverage is estimated by a static panel model with random effect and with fixed effect estimation. Four capital structure determinants are analysed: growth, size, profitability and tangible assets. The results of this research support the pecking order theory confirming that SMEs in Croatia are primarily financed frominternally generated funds that affect profitability, growth, tangible assets and enterprise size.

  14. PREVALENCE OF SALMONELLA IN CAPTIVE REPTILES FROM CROATIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukac, Maja; Pedersen, Karl; Prukner-Radovcic, Estella

    2015-06-01

    Salmonellosis transmitted by pet reptiles is an increasing public health issue worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Salmonella strains from captive reptiles in Croatia. From November 2009 to November 2011 a total of 292 skin, pharyngeal, cloacal, and fecal samples from 200 apparently healthy reptiles were tested for Salmonella excretions by bacteriologic culture and serotyping. These 200 individual reptiles included 31 lizards, 79 chelonians, and 90 snakes belonging to private owners or housed at the Zagreb Zoo, Croatia. Salmonella was detected in a total of 13% of the animals, among them 48.4% lizards, 8.9% snakes, and 3.8% turtles. Representatives of five of the six Salmonella enterica subspecies were identified with the following proportions in the total number of isolates: Salmonella enterica enterica 34.6%, Salmonella enterica houtenae 23.1%, Salmonella enterica arizonae 23.1%, Salmonella enterica diarizonae 15.4%, and Salmonella enterica salamae 3.8%. The 14 different serovars isolated included several rarely occurring serovars such as Salmonella Apapa, Salmonella Halle, Salmonella Kisarawe, and Salmonella Potengi. These findings confirm that the prevalence of Salmonella is considerable in captive reptiles in Croatia, indicating that these animals may harbor serovars not commonly seen in veterinary or human microbiologic practice. This should be addressed in the prevention and diagnostics of human reptile-transmitted infections.

  15. Evaluation of energy efficiency policy instruments effectiveness : case study Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukarica, V.

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposed a theoretical basis for evaluating energy efficiency policy in the Republic of Croatia and corroborated it with the analysis of energy efficiency market development and transformation. The current status of the market was evaluated and policy instruments were adapted to achieve optimal results. In particular, the energy efficiency market in Croatia was discussed in terms of micro and macro environment factors that influence policy making processes and the choice of policy instruments. The macro environment for energy efficiency market in Croatia is the process of European Union pre-integration with all related national and international legislation, political and economical factors and potential to use financial funds. The micro environment consists of government institutions, local financing institutions and a range of market players on the supply and demand side. Energy efficiency is the most powerful and cost-effective way for achieving goals of sustainable development. Policy instruments developed to improve energy efficiency are oriented towards a cleaner environment, better standard of living, more competitive industry and improved security of energy supply. Energy efficiency is much harder to implement and requires policy interventions. In response to recent trends in the energy sector, such as deregulation and open competition, policy measures aimed at improving energy efficiency should shift from an end-users oriented approach towards a whole market approach. The optimal policy instruments mix should be designed to meet defined targets. However, market dynamics must be taken into consideration. 9 refs., 4 figs

  16. Usage of Business Simulation Games in Croatia: Perceived Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Zoroja

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Business simulation games (BSGs enhance learning, since they actively involve students in the educational process through game playing. They began to play important role in business education in many universities in Croatia. However, quantitative information on their usage in higher educational institutions (HEIs in Croatia is still scarce. Goals of the paper are to explore: (1 differences among BSGs users and non-users according to demographic characteristics, (2 differences among BSGs users and non-users according to perceived obstacles of BSGs usage, and (3 impact of both demographic characteristics and perceived obstacles on the decision on usage or not-usage of BSGs. A survey was taken in business and economics departments of HEIs in Croatia. A regression model has been used to test the impact of demographic characteristics of educators and the perceived obstacles to the usage of BSGs in educational practice. Results indicate that BSGs usage is currently at a low level, mainly due to the lack of funds and management support. Academic rank, gender, and attitude toward new technologies also impact BSGs usage.

  17. BUSINESS TRANSFER ECOSYSTEM IN CROATIA - MISSING COMPONENTS AND INTERACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpeza Mirela

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Business transfer is an important issue that the European Commission has been actualising since the early 1990s, when the first recommendations for the improvement of national business transfer ecosystems of the EU countries were created. Neglecting business transfer as a critical phase in the development of a company can have significant negative implications for companies, their owners and wide network of stakeholders. Business transfer is a particularly important topic for the Croatian economy where more than 5,300 businesses with around 57,000 employees represent a risk group whose owners underestimate the complexity and longevity of the business transfer process. The aim of this paper is to analyse the structure and quality of the business transfer ecosystem in Croatia. For this purpose, secondary research and a qualitative study in the form of interviews with representatives of key stakeholders were conducted. The Croatian business transfer ecosystem is benchmarked to the national business transfer ecosystems of Spain, Finland, Sweden and France, based on the data collected through the EU project BTAR. The research results indicate low level of development, interconnection and complementarity of individual components of the business transfer ecosystem in Croatia. Policy recommendations for improving the quality of the business transfer ecosystem in Croatia were identified.

  18. AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO THE TRADE DYNAMICS IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Tomic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The point of understanding the international finance and trade perspective is closely related to comprehension of the terms of trade (exchange rate – trade balance nexus. How well can a country balance its international trade engagement over international price changes and/or applied exchange rate regime is of great importance, especially for a small, opened, indebted and import dependent country such as Croatia. By focusing on the relationship between the terms of trade, exchange rate, volume of trade, current account and output we are trying to provide some new insights into trade dynamics over a business cycle in Croatia. Furthermore, the analysis is done on aggregate level and evaluates only the market of goods, for it constitutes the larger part of the trade balance. Empirical assessment relies on the lead and lag cross-correlation functions between the variables comprising the period 2000 – 2014. Results suggest the existence of the S-curve pattern leading us to some indicative conclusions regarding the trade dynamics in Croatia.

  19. Communication of 28 February 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Croatia to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Director General has received a note verbale of 28 February 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Croatia to the International Atomic Energy Agency providing information on the nuclear export policies and practices of the Government of Croatia

  20. FRESHWATER FISHERY OF THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatko Homen

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available As fishery, including freshwater, is very important for economy of the Republic of Croatia, the aim of this paper is to show its condition from 1995 to 1998. and also to draw a plan for fish production in 1999. The period from 1998-1999. is more stressed in order to have a total and detailed view into the present condition of the freshwater fishery and into the direction in wish that production is going. Data about carp ponds and also about trout ponds is presented. Twentynine fish-ponds are processed out of which 20 are carp ponds and 9 trout ponds. Data was delivered to the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry Fisheries Directorate. An assessment of the condition is made for 3 fish-ponds as the desired data was not provided. As to the number of employees on fish-ponds, a slight decline could be percived in the period from 1995 to 1997. In 1998 a number of employees considerably increased for 10.07% in relation to 1997. qualification of the employees in 1998. show that the most of them are unqualified what is in accord with the requirements of a job on a fish-pond. Overall surface of the carp ponds in 1998 was 12,708 and the production surface was 9,782 ha. The most of the fish-ponds have up to 500 ha of total surface (45.45%, while 50% of the fish-ponds have production surface from 500-100 ha. The production in the trout ponds is made on 165,905 m 2 of the overall surface of the ponds, and only 40,538 m 2 are the production surface of the ponds. The production of fish in that period was in constant increase and that increasing trend in expected in 1999, and it will be an 28.30 % increase in relation to 1998. The increase is expected for all kids of fish except for big head carps, silver carps and tinch fishs. As a part of the production of tinch fishs an increase in production of consumption tinch fish is expected, but a decrease in production of one-year and two-year old fishs and two-year old fish. Out of all kinds of fish, the most produced

  1. Comparing pharmaceutical pricing and reimbursement policies in Croatia to the European Union Member States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Sabine; Habl, Claudia; Bogut, Martina; Vončina, Luka

    2011-01-01

    Aim To perform a comparative analysis of the pharmaceutical pricing and reimbursement systems in Croatia and the 27 European Union (EU) Member States. Methods Knowledge about the pharmaceutical systems in Croatia and the 27 EU Member States was acquired by literature review and primary research with stakeholders. Results Pharmaceutical prices are controlled at all levels in Croatia, which is also the case in 21 EU Member States. Like many EU countries, Croatia also applies external price referencing, ie, compares prices with other countries. While the wholesale remuneration by a statutorily regulated linear mark-up is applied in Croatia and in several EU countries, the pharmacy compensation for dispensing reimbursable medicines in the form of a flat rate service fee in Croatia is rare among EU countries, which usually apply a linear or regressive pharmacy mark-up scheme. Like in most EU countries, the Croatian Social Insurance reimburses specific medicines at 100%, whereas patients are charged co-payments for other reimbursable medicines. Criteria for reimbursement include the medicine’s importance from the public health perspective, its therapeutic value, and relative effectiveness. In Croatia and in many EU Member States, reimbursement is based on a reference price system. Conclusion The Croatian pharmaceutical system is similar to those in the EU Member States. Key policies, like external price referencing and reference price systems, which have increasingly been introduced in EU countries are also applied in Croatia and serve the same purpose: to ensure access to medicines while containing public pharmaceutical expenditure. PMID:21495202

  2. Risks/Needs of Children/Youth with Behavior Disorders in Correctional Institutions in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratkajec, Gabrijela; Jedud, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Previous research and experience in Croatia show that interventions are not matched with the risk level and intervention needs of children with behavior disorders. As a result of that, the situation in Croatia requires actuarial approach to the risks and needs assessment of children and youth. The purpose of the current research is to put stronger…

  3. Croatia - Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes : Accounting and Auditing

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2007-01-01

    This report provides an updated assessment of accounting, financial reporting, and auditing requirements and practices within the enterprise and financial sectors in Croatia. It uses International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), International Standards on Auditing (ISA), and the relevant portions of European Union (EU) law (also known as the acquis communautaire). Croatia has made co...

  4. Maryland physicians on a humanitarian mission to war-torn Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukenmann, B

    1993-04-01

    Six physicians from Maryland, California, and Utah participated in a 10-day humanitarian mission to Croatia. They spent long hours in antiquated operating rooms performing maxillofacial and extremity reconstructive procedures; most patients were young or war-injured males. Though not a third world country, Croatia urgently needs finances to acquire drugs, supplies, textbooks, and equipment.

  5. Comparing pharmaceutical pricing and reimbursement policies in Croatia to the European Union Member States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Sabine; Habl, Claudia; Bogut, Martina; Voncina, Luka

    2011-04-15

    To perform a comparative analysis of the pharmaceutical pricing and reimbursement systems in Croatia and the 27 European Union (EU) Member States. Knowledge about the pharmaceutical systems in Croatia and the 27 EU Member States was acquired by literature review and primary research with stakeholders. Pharmaceutical prices are controlled at all levels in Croatia, which is also the case in 21 EU Member States. Like many EU countries, Croatia also applies external price referencing, i.e., compares prices with other countries. While the wholesale remuneration by a statutorily regulated linear mark-up is applied in Croatia and in several EU countries, the pharmacy compensation for dispensing reimbursable medicines in the form of a flat rate service fee in Croatia is rare among EU countries, which usually apply a linear or regressive pharmacy mark-up scheme. Like in most EU countries, the Croatian Social Insurance reimburses specific medicines at 100%, whereas patients are charged co-payments for other reimbursable medicines. Criteria for reimbursement include the medicine's importance from the public health perspective, its therapeutic value, and relative effectiveness. In Croatia and in many EU Member States, reimbursement is based on a reference price system. The Croatian pharmaceutical system is similar to those in the EU Member States. Key policies, like external price referencing and reference price systems, which have increasingly been introduced in EU countries are also applied in Croatia and serve the same purpose: to ensure access to medicines while containing public pharmaceutical expenditure.

  6. GYPSUM DEPOSITS IN THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anto Gabrić

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurences and deposits of gypsum can be found in big karst poljes (Sinjsko, Vrličko, Petrovo, Kosovo and Kninsko as well as in tectonnically predestined river valleys of Zrmanja, Butišnica and Una. There also appear spatially localized occurences on the island of Vis and in the vicinity of Samobor. Evaporites (gypsum and anhydrite with adjoining overlying clastic rocks (red sandstones, siltites and pelites, carbonate rocks (dolomites and limestones and porous carbonate breccias (Rauhwackes were deposited during the period of Upper Permian. The recent position of the Upper Permian beds is a result of complex tectonic, particularly neotectonic, movements and diapiric displacements. Evaporites were deposited in marginal areas of the epicontinental marine basin, in a period of favourable conditions for the sabkha and playa sedimentation due to the continuous shoreline progradation. The Upper Permian age of these sediments in Dalmatio is proved by the characteristic mineral paragenesis and palinological determinations in elastics rocks, as well as by isotope analyses of sulphure in gypsum. Gypsum is a significant ore mineral resource in building, cement production, as well as in a number of tehnological processes used in chemical industry and elsewhere. According to the recent investigations gypsum is predestined to serve as an ore mineral resource of significant perspectives (the paper is published in Croatian.

  7. Radiostrontium contamination of milk in the republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franic, Z.; Lokobauer, N.; Marovic, G.

    2000-01-01

    Milk is the sensitive indicator for presence of fission products in the environment. In addition, milk as the very important foodstuff in dietary habits is potentially a major source of radioactive contamination by ingestion. Since the days of intensive atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, dairy milk in Croatia has been continuously collected and analyzed for radioactivity. In this paper are summarized the results of long-term systematic measurements of radiostrontium activities in Milk. Milk samples from Zagreb dairy, 1 L every day were obtained commercially. In 1960s 90 Sr was determined by the conventional radiochemical analysis with fuming nitric acid separation. From 1970 to present 90 Sr was determined by extraction with tributyl phosphate, except in the year of the Chernobyl nuclear accident, when fuming nitric acid was also used. Fallout activity affects milk activity, the coefficient of correlation being >0.9. The radiostrontium activities in milk in Croatia are log-normally distributed, reflecting the exponential decrease of activity. The nuclear accident in Chernobyl did not cause any significant increase of 90 Sr activities in environmental samples in Croatia, including 8 milk. The dose due to radiostrontium ingestion by milk consumption was estimated for the Croatian population (approximately 4.8 million of inhabitants). The annual collective equivalent dose in the year of Chernobyl was 5.5 manSv. The 90 Sr activity in milk decreases exponentially ever since 1960s. Peak values were recorded in 1964, following the most intensive nuclear weapon tests. Reflecting the exponential decrease of activity doses due to radiostrontium from milk consumption are small, in spit of large consumption of milk by Croatian population. (author)

  8. Understanding of Democracy among Young People in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vujčić

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The task of this paper was to explore how young people understand the values of democracy, how much they believe in democracy as a political system, how much they are satisfi ed with the way democracy works (“constitution at work”, and how much they trust government institutions. It is important to analyse the understanding of democracy, for democracy is dependent on the citizens’ opinions and the level of their political culture rather than on its normative constitution and formal value system. Thus, this analysis joins in the debate between foundationalists and antifoundationalists on democracy and its functioning. The present model of research has provided insights into the relationship between so-called diff use and specifi c support of democracy (D. Easton and an explanation of that which R. Dahl defi nes as the “democratic paradox” in contemporary democracies. This scrutiny shows that young people in Croatia understand democracy within the framework of liberal values, but also that they largely tend towards so-called consensual democracy and a socialist syndrome involving a prevalent aspiration to social equality and an economically interventionist state. Moreover, the analysis shows that young people in Croatia have a low level of democratic legitimation and an even lower level of trust in government institutions. This is not a good basis for the development of stable and well-functioning democracy in Croatian society. It all warns against serious shortcomings in the political education of young people in Croatia and in the development of democratic political culture and democratic citizenship.

  9. EVALUATION OF THE FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE OF PENSION FUNDS IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen Novaković

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to evaluate the financial performance of pension funds in Croatia. Although there are other factors which are important in the pension funds overall performance, this paper focuses on investment accomplishments. The purpose of measuring portfolio performance is to determine whether portfolio managers add value compared to passive investment strategies. The traditional approach to pension funds’ performance evaluation underlines standard measures of financial performance (e.g. ratios such as Sharpe’s, Sortino’s, Treynor’s, etc. which quantify the ability of pension fund managers to deliver an active management risk premium, with respect to benchmarks. In this paper, the previously mentioned traditional measures of risk-adjusted performance are applied to Croatian pension funds. Due to recent changes in pension systems in other Eastern European countries once again emphasis is put on this issue in Croatia. The analysis furthermore includes evaluation of pension funds’ asset allocation. The period of analysis covers twelve years, from the establishment of pension funds in Croatia in 2002 until 2013. The main hypothesis of the paper states that Croatian pension funds underperform with respect to benchmark comparisons, set as return on the combined CROBEX/CROBIS portfolio. Results show that the main hypothesis does not hold. The financial performance of pension funds directly influences their competitiveness, derived from the possibility of measuring their success in active portfolio management. In addition, pension funds are expected to support the national economy. By investing their accumulating assets, they can protect jobs and enhance economic growth. However, they can achieve that only if they are competitive in means of financial performance.

  10. National survey of pain clinics in Croatia: Organization and services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Fidahić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze organization and therapeutic procedures administered in tertiary outpatient pain clinics in Croatia. Methods. Data about organization of pain clinics, its personnel, equipment, continuing medical education, therapeutic procedures, research activities and relations with pharmaceutical industry were collected using questionnaires. Results. Twenty-two Croatian pain clinics were included in the study. Most of the pain clinics employ exclusively anesthesiologists and nurses. The most frequently prescribed therapeutic procedures in pain clinics were pharmacotherapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, acupuncture and trigger point injections. Almost all pain clinics provide educational material for patients. Most of the pain clinics have regular interactions with pharmaceutical companies. Prescribing decisions were based mostly on information from scientific meetings, research articles and consultations with colleagues. Information sources which are considered to be the gold standard – the systematic reviews of The Cochrane Collaboration – were used less frequently (n=12; 57% than advertising materials from pharmaceutical companies (n=16; 76%. Few physicians and other pain clinics staff had scientific degrees or academic titles or were involved in a research project. Conclusion. The national study about pain clinics in Croatia pointed out that there is room for improvement of their organization and services. Pain clinics should employ health-care professionals with diverse backgrounds. They should offer treatments backed by the highest-level of scientific evidence. Since pain is a major public health issue, pain clinic staff should engage more in research to contribute to the growing field of pain research, to enhance capacities for pain research in Croatia, to incorporate scientific evidence into their daily decision-making and to enable evidence-based practice.

  11. Epidemiology of hepatitis C in Croatia in the European context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilibic-Cavlek, Tatjana; Kucinar, Jasmina; Kaic, Bernard; Vilibic, Maja; Pandak, Nenad; Barbic, Ljubo; Stevanovic, Vladimir; Vranes, Jasmina

    2015-08-28

    We analyzed prevalence, risk factors and hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype distribution in different population groups in Croatia in the context of HCV epidemiology in Europe, with the aim to gather all existing information on HCV infection in Croatia which will be used to advise upon preventive measures. It is estimated that 35000-45000 of the Croatian population is chronically infected with HCV. Like in other European countries, there have been changes in the HCV epidemiology in Croatia over the past few decades. In some risk groups (polytransfused and hemodialysis patients), a significant decrease in the HCV prevalence was observed after the introduction of routine HCV screening of blood/blood products in 1992. Injecting drug users (IDUs) still represent a group with the highest risk for HCV infection with prevalence ranging from 29% to 65%. Compared to the prevalence in the Croatian general population (0.9%), higher prevalence rates were found in prison populations (8.3%-44%), human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients (15%), persons with high-risk sexual behavior (4.6%) and alcohol abusers (2.4%). Low/very low prevalence was reported in children and adolescents (0.3%) as well as in blood donors (0%-0.009%). In addition, distribution of HCV genotypes has changed due to different routes of transmission. In the general population, genotypes 1 and 3 are most widely distributed (60.4%-79.8% and 12.9%-47.9%, respectively). The similar genotype distribution is found in groups with high-risk sexual behavior. Genotype 3 is predominant in Croatian IDUs (60.5%-83.9%) while in the prison population genotypes 3 and 1 are equally distributed (52.4% and 47.6%). Data on HCV prevalence and risk factors for transmission are useful for implementation of preventive measures and HCV screening.

  12. Rivalry of domestic and foreign retailers in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Dunković

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign retailers are gaining progressively more of the Croatian retail market share. This paper is an analysis of the retail structure in the Republic of Croatia (sector G – 52, with respect to the origin of trading companies (domestic and foreign retailers, to their size (small, medium and large companies and to sub-sectors within a sector G – 52. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of causes underlying the foreign retailers’ expansion regarding their business success. The paper includes an analysis of the structure of household consumption in the Republic of Croatia as an important condition for the development of the retail structure. The analysis involves the indicators of domestic and foreign retailers’ business success: the turnover per one trading company and the turnover per one employee of the trading company. The comparison of these indicators for domestic and foreign retailers lead to certain differences (foreign retailers are slightly more productive than the domestic retailers and to the evaluation of the differences caused by the size of the company. Since a correlation of the size of the structure of domestic and foreign trading companies in certain sub-sectors within sector G –52 must not exist, the conclusion suggests itself in the form of a need to investigate other features of the retail structure. The research is related to the year 2001. Nevertheless, the research presented in the paper points at an inadequate adaptability of domestic retailers to the structure of demand in the Republic of Croatia as the cause of the insufficient trading success.

  13. 90-Sr in Milk in the North-Western Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maracic, M.; Marovic, G.; Lokobauer, N.; Sencar, J.; Petroci, Lj.

    2003-01-01

    The program of radioactivity measurements and monitoring of the human environment in Croatia, carried out by the Radiation Protection Unit of the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Heath in Zagreb, involve also investigations of radiostrontium in milk and milk products. Milk is a very important foodstuff and a critical food in respect to the presence and persistence of nuclides in the body. Because of its high calcium content, milk is used as a sensitive indicator for the presence of fission products in foods and in the environment. It is also an important route of entry of radiostrontium from fallout to man. Radiostrontium, a highly toxic radionuclide, is similar to calcium in its chemical behaviour, including its deposition in human bone. The paper describes investigation of 9 0S r activity in milk collected over the period of six year at two locations in the north-western part of the Republic of Croatia. 9 0S r was determined by extraction with tributyl phosphate. 9 0S r was measured on basis of radioactive balance with its decay product 9 0Y , counted by low background level anti-coincidence shielded GM counter. In the Republic of Croatia, milk consumption of approximately 100 L per year/person can potentially lead to the accumulation of significant radiation dose. The doses received from milk consumption are small, but owing to the long retention time of 9 0S r in bone which can be the basis for its potential hazard, 9 0S r level require continuous control and monitoring. Special emphasis should be given to children as the most vulnerable part of population. (author)

  14. National survey of pain clinics in Croatia: Organization and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidahić, Mahir; Dogan, Katarina; Sapunar, Damir; Puljak, Livia

    2015-01-01

    To analyze organization and therapeutic procedures administered in tertiary outpatient pain clinics in Croatia. Data about organization of pain clinics, its personnel, equipment, continuing medical education, therapeutic procedures, research activities and relations with pharmaceutical industry were collected using questionnaires. Twenty-two Croatian pain clinics were included in the study. Most of the pain clinics employ exclusively anesthesiologists and nurses. The most frequently prescribed therapeutic procedures in pain clinics were pharmacotherapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, acupuncture and trigger point injections. Almost all pain clinics provide educational material for patients. Most of the pain clinics have regular interactions with pharmaceutical companies. Prescribing decisions were based mostly on information from scientific meetings, research articles and consultations with colleagues. Information sources which are considered to be the gold standard--the systematic reviews of The Cochrane Collaboration--were used less frequently (n=12; 57%) than advertising materials from pharmaceutical companies (n=16; 76%). Few physicians and other pain clinics staff had scientific degrees or academic titles or were involved in a research project. The national study about pain clinics in Croatia pointed out that there is room for improvement of their organization and services. Pain clinics should employ health-care professionals with diverse backgrounds. They should offer treatments backed by the highest-level of scientific evidence. Since pain is a major public health issue, pain clinic staff should engage more in research to contribute to the growing field of pain research, to enhance capacities for pain research in Croatia, to incorporate scientific evidence into their daily decision-making and to enable evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2015 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  15. Main Aspects of the Rodos System Implementation in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sucic, B.; Medakovic, S.; Skanata, D.; Tomisa, T.

    2002-01-01

    Analyses made in Europe after the accident in Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant have shown that the key-element with the biggest impact on the development of consequences during and immediately after the accident was deficient notifying which was also unsystematic and in disorder. Therefore, scientific and expert organisations of the European Union have been faced with the task of system development above all meant to improve communication between European countries in terms of measured parameters exchange (the radiological and meteorological ones), that would be generally applicable in all the European countries. Development of such a system going by the name of RODOS (Real Time On Line DecisiOn Support) began in 1989 within the framework of the European Commission's research and technological development program. The main aspects associated with the implementation of the RODOS system in Croatia are described within this article. By the main aspects of implementation we mean technical prerequisites that the Republic of Croatia is due to fulfil before joining in, and they include activities like: (1) translating users' interfaces into Croatian, (2) adapting various models in consistence with local parameters, (3) collecting geographical data, (4) making specific local maps and collecting statistical data (GIS), and (5) linking the RODOS real-time data base with the net of local measure stations (radiological and meteorological). Activities of this scale and technically so demanding, request certain organisational prerequisites as well as considerable material resources. From the point of view of the Republic of Croatia, establishment of the RODOS system and inclusion into the real-time international exchange of measured radiological data would mean major improvement of the nuclear emergency response preparedness system. (author)

  16. Organized massive forced migration of Serbs from Croatia in 1941

    OpenAIRE

    Škiljan Filip

    2012-01-01

    The author brings forth a range of information on forced migration of the Serb population from the Croatian part of the Independent State of Croatia in 1941 (NDH). Almost one third of the population were Serbs in the NDH. One of the methods of solving “the Serbia issue” in the NDH was migrating the Serbs into Serbia. The other methods were forced conversions of the Serbian population, namely physical killings. The adopted legal provisions made the terror policy over Serbian population l...

  17. Improvements of existing early warning system in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomisa, T.

    2000-01-01

    The gamma radiation early warning system in Croatia was established in 1993. The first configuration contained 3 measuring stations connected to the monitoring center and up today the system is expanded with 5 additional locations. Each location is equipped with the MFM202 gamma-monitor and additional equipment that is not unique for all locations. This difference in remote equipment configuration caused by different communication medium used, is the reason to improve existing system trough equipment unification introducing PLC unit in the standard configuration. Such configuration enables additional functions such as automatic alerting and collecting meteorological data. (author)

  18. Reproductive rights and the state in Serbia and Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Jeremy; Skrabalo, Marina; Subotic, Jelena

    2002-02-01

    The global reproductive rights movement arose in the late 1980s and early 1990s as a challenge to the population control paradigm that has dominated family planning policy for almost half a century. The essence of the challenge is to place women into the center of population discussions as subjects, not objects of policy, and to reorient family planning and health programs toward meeting the broad reproductive health needs of individuals, rather than the narrow population control objectives of states. Reproductive rights advocates argue that the use of family planning programs for developmentalist-oriented population control objectives is illegimate, and inevitably relegates women to the status of depersonalized policy "targets". The cases of Croatia and Serbia, the two dominant partners in the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, offer interesting twists on these reproductive rights issues. In Croatia and Serbia, unlike in many nations, the governments are deliberately seeking to increase rather than decrease fertility levels. Moreover, the objective concerns identity politics, more so than development: the governments have encouraged increased fertility to safeguard the survival of their nations and to strengthen national power amidst threatening internal and external environments of ethnic conflict. In this paper, we examine the dynamics of pro-natalist fertility policy in Croatia and Serbia. We do so with a view to explaining why, despite similarities, the two have followed divergent paths. While reproductive rights violations have occurred in both nations, they have been markedly higher in Serbia than Croatia. To explain this divergence we look at a series of sociopolitical factors, including the space available for groups to mobilize in each political system; the degree of nationalistic extremism present in the discourse of central political leaders; and perceptions of threats and opportunities in external geopolitical environments. In conducting this

  19. Predicting gross wages of non-employed persons in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Bezeredi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the findings of a study aimed at building a model for predicting wages of non-employed persons in Croatia. The predictions will be used in the calculation of marginal effective tax rate at the extensive margin and in labour supply modelling. The database used is 2012 “EU statistics on income and living conditions”. The paper comprehensively explains the data source, variables, subgroups of employed and non-employed, and the results of the linear regression model, the Heckman selection model and the quantile regression model. The quality of predictions obtained by different models is compared and discussed.

  20. National survey of indoor radon levels in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radolic, V.; Vukovic, B.; Stanic, D.; Katic, M.; Faj, Z.; Lukacevic, I.; Planinic, J.; Suveljak, B.; Faj, D.; Lukic, M.

    2006-01-01

    National survey of indoor radon was performed by a random sampling of thousand (782 realized) dwellings in Croatia. Radon concentrations were measured for one year with LR-115 SSNT detectors and arithmetic and geometric means of 68 and 50 Bq/m 3 were obtained, respectively. The arithmetic means of radon concentrations on 20 counties were from 33 to 198 Bq/m 3 . The percentage of dwellings with radon concentrations above 200 and 400 Bq/m 3 was 5.4% and 1.8%, respectively. The average annual effective dose of the indoor radon was estimated as 2.2 mSv. (author)

  1. Nuclear liability legislation in the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sladonja, B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper contains same basic data about the legal norms relating to the third party liability system for nuclear damage that are in force in Croatia. It also describes the provisions of the new Croatian Act on Liability for Nuclear Damage, giving emphasis on those implementing substantial changes compared to the old Act. Finally, it contains some remarks relating to the possible adoption of Vienna Protocol and Convention on Supplementary Compensation of 1997 or Pariz/Brussels conventions as an alternative and at the end about the practice on the insurance of nuclear risks in the last twenty years by the Croatian Pool. (author)

  2. Using hydrochemical data and modelling to enhance the knowledge of groundwater flow and quality in an alluvial aquifer of Zagreb, Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marković, Tamara, E-mail: tmarkovic@hgi-cgs.hr; Brkić, Željka; Larva, Ozren

    2013-08-01

    The Zagreb alluvial aquifer system is located in the southwest of the Pannonian Basin in the Sava Valley in Croatia. It is composed of Quaternary unconsolidated deposits and is highly utilised, primarily as a water supply for the more than one million inhabitants of the capital city of Croatia. To determine the origin and dynamics of the groundwater and to enhance the knowledge of groundwater flow and the interactions between the groundwater and surface water, extensive hydrogeological and hydrochemical investigations have been completed. The groundwater levels monitored in nested observation wells and the lithological profile indicate that the aquifer is a single hydrogeologic unit, but the geochemical characteristics of the aquifer indicate stratification. The weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals has an important role in groundwater chemistry, especially in the area where old meanders of the Sava River existed. Groundwater quality was observed to be better in the deeper parts of the aquifer than in the shallower parts. Furthermore, deterioration of the groundwater quality was observed in the area under the influence of the landfill. The stable isotopic composition of all sampled waters indicates meteoric origin. NETPATH-WIN was used to calculate the mixing proportions between initial waters (water from the Sava River and groundwater from “regional” flow) in the final water (groundwater sampled from observation wells). According to the results, the mixing proportions of “regional” flow and the river water depend on hydrological conditions, the duration of certain hydrological conditions and the vicinity of the Sava River. Moreover, although the aquifer system behaves as a single hydrogeologic unit from a hydraulic point of view, it still clearly demonstrates geochemical stratification, which could be a decisive factor in future utilisation strategies for the aquifer system. - Highlights: • The Zagreb aquifer is the largest utilised source of

  3. Incidence of Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack in Croatia: A Population Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadojić, Dragutin; Demarin, Vida; Dikanović, Marinko; Lusić, Ivo; Tuskan-Mohar, Lidija; Trkanjec, Zlatko; Mihaljević, Ivan; Kadojić, Mira; Bitunjac, Milan; Vranjes, Zeljko

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this population based neuroepidemiological study was to establish the real incidence rates of acute cerebrovascular disease (CVD): stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) in the Republic of Croatia. Multicentric study included 89 501 persons of all ages in four regional centres in Croatia: Zagreb, Osijek + Slavonski Brod, Rijeka and Split. The following incidence rates of stroke, expressed at population of 100 000, have been established: Zagreb 290.52, Osijek + Slavonski Brod 302.14, Rijeka 219.65, Split 195.82. Incidence rate of stroke for the Republic of Croatia is 251.39. The following incidence rates of TIA, expressed at population of 100,000, have been established: Zagreb 87.15, Osijek + Slavonski Brod 156.53, Rijeka 90.11, Split 59.10. Incidence rate of TIA for the Republic of Croatia is 100.55. In the continental part of Croatia (Zagreb, Osijek + Slavonski Brod) incidence rate of stroke is higher by 45%, while incidence rate of TIA is higher by 82% than in the coastal part of Croatia, probably due to different lifestyle and environmental factors. The study has shown relatively high incidence rates of acute CVD (stroke and TIA) in the Republic of Croatia, which proves that CVD are a great public health problem.

  4. Population Ageing in Rural Settlements in the Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Nejašmić

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the basic demographic characteristics of Croatia is the inherited dispersed population density with a large number of small settlements and the undeveloped system of regional and micro-regional centres. Such settlement structure was entirely inappropriate in the conditions of accelerated and urban-based industrialization after the Second World War. This period was characterised by a mass transition of agricultural population into non-agricultural activities, along with the abandonment of rural settlements. In addition to the strong emigration from rural areas in which younger age groups participated for the most part, there was a continuous reduction in fertility, too. All this has led to the narrowing of young age groups and consequently to the increase in the proportion of the elderly. An important factor of demographic ageing is the reduction in mortality of persons over 30 years of age and longer life respectively. Life expectancy of the Croatian population was 64.8 years in 1960 and 77.2 years in 1972. The average age constantly increased: it was 32.5 years in 1961, 35.4 in 1981 and it reached the high 41.7 years in 2011. The aggression and war against Croatia happened in the 1990s. Dramatic events affected the general social conditions and processes, strongly accelerating negative demographic trends. All this had further affected the socio-demographically eroded rural areas. There was a particularly difficult situation in the regions directly affected by the war; part of these areas had had the features of extreme demographic regression before the war sufferings and the war only further strengthened it. The overall population of Croatia is characterised by decreasing fertility, natural depopulation (negative natural change, total depopulation (since 1990 and intense population ageing. The duration and intensity of these processes clearly testifies to the demographic development of Croatia being very unfavourable. All this also

  5. Prevention of Polluting Rivers and Lakes from Ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalija Jolić

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Traffic on rivers and lakes in Europe has been ve1y well developed.The reason for this is the transport cost, relative speedand good connectivity of major European cities by rivers andcanals. In Croatia, this transport mode is lagging behind therest of Europe. Croatia is located at an interesting section of theriver transversal, but due to several reasons, river navigation inCroatia has not been developed to any major extent. As operatingriver ships the most frequent types are: towboats, pushboatsand self-propelled ships. The installed diesel engines, propulsionand auxiliary engines run at high power. Proportional tothe increase in the power of installed engines is also the increasein the volume of waste produced by the engines. Also, the olderthe engine, the greater volume of waste it produces. Ships mayalso cause pollution by wastewaters and garbage. This pollutionthreat grows with the greater number of people on boardand the age of the ship. In order to minimize these possibilitiesof pollution, it is necesswy to control all the time the properfunctioning of the ships, train the staff and construct receptionfacilities on land.

  6. Proceedings of the Sixth Forum: Energy day in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The problem of ''Regional Planning as a Part of National Energy Planning'' has been chosen as a subject of the Sixth FORUM, with the aim of giving an impetus to the necessary transfer of certain responsibilities in the planning process, as well as in the process of energy management, to local levels. Transformation procedures in Croatia which help establish the infrastructure of state and local authorities essentially lead to the recognition of tasks on each of the level so that operational activities run as efficiently as possible. It should be emphasised that on global level the energy sector is facing major changes leading to market liberalization and demonopolization. Discussion are being held regarding market range and opportunities, requirements and levels of planning, needs and scope of government and local community measures in achieving increased energy efficiency and utilization of renewable resources, and ultimately in overall energy management. The objective of this FORUM is to start discussions of all the mentioned problems without giving final solutions or removing dilemmas. The only unquestionable issue is that each country will have to find its own manner in transforming the energy sector, in defining the range and mode of planning within the sector, as well as the proportions and active involvement of the state and local community in increasing energy efficiency and environment protection. Experiences and views of our foreign colleagues are certainly going to be of great help in our efforts to review the needs of the Republic of Croatia. (author)

  7. Assessment of the Balassa-Samuelson Effect in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Ljubaj

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to assess the importance of the Balassa-Samuelson effect in Croatia and to quantify its influence on inflation and the real exchange rate.The productivity growth differential between tradable and ontradable sectors within a given country compared to abroad has recently often been used to explain the real appreciation of Central and East European (CEE transition countries’ currencies against euro, and also to explain the inflation differential between the aforementioned countries and the euro area. Since all new EU member states are obligated to introduce the euro as the national currency, the Balassa-Samuelson effect associated with real convergence could impede nominal convergence and fulfilment of the necessary Maastricht criteria. The main conclusion of this paper is that in the period from 1998:Q1 to 2006:Q3 the Balassa-Samuelson effect in Croatia was not statistically significant, so it should not constitute a barrier to meeting convergence criteria.

  8. Education of ethics committee members: experiences from Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovecki, A; ten Have, H; Oresković, S

    2006-03-01

    To study knowledge and attitudes of hospital ethics committee members at the first workshop for ethics committees in Croatia. Before/after cross-sectional study using a self administered questionnaire. Educational workshop for members of hospital ethics committees, Zagreb, 2003. Knowledge and attitudes of participants before and after the workshop; everyday functioning of hospital ethics committees. The majority of the respondents came from committees with at least five members. The majority of ethics committees were appointed by the governing bodies of their hospitals. Most committees were founded after the implementation of the law on health protection in 1997. Membership structure (three physicians and two members from other fields) and functions were established on the basis of that law. Analysis of research protocols was the main part of their work. Other important functions-education, case analysis, guidelines formation-were neglected. Members' level of knowledge was not sufficient for the complicated tasks they were supposed to perform. However, it was significantly higher after the workshop. Most respondents felt their knowledge should be improved by additional education. Their views on certain issues and bioethical dilemmas displayed a high level of paternalism and over protectiveness, which did not change after the workshop. The committees developed according to bureaucratic requirements. Furthermore, there are concerns about members' knowledge levels. More efforts need to be made to use education to improve the quality of the work. Additional research is necessary to explore ethics committees' work in Croatia especially in the hospital setting.

  9. Fertility and the changing female educational attainment in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čipin Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the aggregate relationship between cohort fertility and female educational attainment in Croatia. Numerous demographic studies have examined the link between fertility and the level of education. However, newer research indicates that the field of education might also play a role when trying to explain fertility behavior. We contribute to existing literature on macro-level factors related to reproductive outcomes by considering both the level and field of education as possible sources of cohort fertility differentials. The main goal of the present study is to assess the effect of structural changes in educational attainment on cohort fertility decline by means of demographic decomposition techniques. Our analysis is based on detailed 2011 Census data, which provide information on the number of livebirths by mother’s year of birth, birth order, marital status and educational attainment (i.e. the level and field of education. The results of our decomposition analyses reveal the dominance of the structural effect in explaining the overall completed fertility decline in Croatia. We assumed that the changing distribution of women by field of education at least partially accounts for the observed patterns in completed fertility but found no strong evidence in support of the outlined hypothesis.

  10. Water balance of the Republic of Croatia: achievements and necessities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonaccil, Ognjen; Horvat, Bojana

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents recent results of water balance of the Republic of Croatia based on definition of average values for the thirty years period from 1961 to 1990. The long-term mean hydrological balance for the seventeen watersheds is presented as P·Q=ET, where P is average annual precipitation in a watershed, Q is average annual runoff from the watershed, and ET is average annual evapotranspiration (runoff deficit) from a watershed given in mm and m3/s. The simplified water balances according to given equation does not consider the distribution of hydrological variables into components as well as: variation of water storage within the catchment; water volumes infiltrating in or flowing out from the deep strata, etc. Most of the runoff data is based on the measured values, while the dispersed surface water and groundwater flows are estimated using regional analyses. The annual average precipitation is 1162 mm or 2083 m 3 /s. The annual average inner water runoff is 461 mm or 827m 3 /s, while transit water runoff is 2303 mm or 4130 m 3 /s. Croatia is the country rich in water with unevenly (in space and time) distributed water resources due to extremely variable geological setting (karst and flatland) and different climatic conditions (Mediterranean and continental climate).(Author)

  11. The first report on mushroom green mould disease in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatvani, Lóránt; Sabolić, Petra; Kocsubé, Sándor; Kredics, László; Czifra, Dorina; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Kaliterna, Joško; Ivić, Dario; Đermić, Edyta; Kosalec, Ivan

    2012-12-01

    Green mould disease, caused by Trichoderma species, is a severe problem for mushroom growers worldwide, including Croatia. Trichoderma strains were isolated from green mould-affected Agaricus bisporus (button or common mushroom) compost and Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) substrate samples collected from Croatian mushroom farms. The causal agents of green mould disease in the oyster mushroom were T. pleurotum and T. pleuroticola, similar to other countries. At the same time, the pathogen of A. bisporus was exclusively the species T. harzianum, which is different from earlier findings and indicates that the range of mushroom pathogens is widening. The temperature profiles of the isolates and their hosts overlapped, thus no range was found that would allow optimal growth of the mushrooms without mould contamination. Ferulic acid and certain phenolic compounds, such as thymol showed remarkable fungistatic effect on the Trichoderma isolates, but inhibited the host mushrooms as well. However, commercial fungicides prochloraz and carbendazim were effective agents for pest management. This is the first report on green mould disease of cultivated mushrooms in Croatia.

  12. The biennial cycle of respiratory syncytial virus outbreaks in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drazenovic Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The paper analyses the epidemic pattern of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV outbreaks in children in Croatia. Over a period of 11 consecutive winter seasons (1994–2005 3,435 inpatients from Zagreb County aged from infancy to 10 years who were hospitalised with acute respiratory tract infections were tested for RSV-infection. RSV was identified in nasopharyngeal secretions of patients by virus isolation in cell culture and by detection of viral antigen with monoclonal antibodies. In the Zagreb area, RSV outbreaks were proven to vary in a two-year cycle, which was repeated every 23–25 months. This biennial cycle comprised one larger and one smaller season. Climate factors correlated significantly with the number of RSV cases identified only in the large seasons, which suggests that the biennial cycle is likely to continue regardless of meteorological conditions. Knowledge of this biennial pattern should be useful in predicting the onset of RSV outbreaks in Croatia, and would facilitate planning for the prevention and control of RSV infections in the region.

  13. Measuring real exchange rate misalignment in Croatia: cointegration approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Palić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to analyze misalignment of the real exchange rate in Croatia. The misalignment analysis is conducted using the permanent equilibrium exchange rate approach. The equilibrium real exchange rate is computed using the cointegration approach whereby the real exchange rate and its fundamentals, namely terms of trade, net foreign assets and the ratio of prices of tradables to non-tradables are included in cointegration analysis. The Hodrick and Prescott filter is used to obtain permanent values of the equilibrium real exchange rate. The real exchange rate misalignment is computed as the deviation of the RER from its permanent equilibrium level. Four overvaluation periods and three undervaluation periods are recorded in Croatia in the observed period. Overvaluation periods are more often and of longer duration than undervaluation periods. However, the real exchange rate does not deviate largely from its estimated equilibrium value in the observed period, and it is neither overvalued nor undervalued constantly, but the periods alternate. Considering the results of the analysis, together with the empirical characteristics of Croatian economy, namely the high foreign currency indebtedness, highly euroized economy and underdeveloped export oriented sector, the depreciation of the real exchange rate is not recommended to economic policy makers and the current Croatian exchange rate policy is appropriate.

  14. State Office for Nuclear Safety - New Regulatory Body in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.; Prah, M.; Valcic, I.; Cizmek, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Act on Nuclear Safety was adopted by the Croatian Parliament on 15 October 2003, and it is published in the Official Gazette No. 173/03. This Act regulates safety and protective measures for using nuclear materials and specified equipment and performing nuclear activities, and establishes the State Office for Nuclear Safety. Provisions of this Act apply on nuclear activities, nuclear materials and specified equipment. Also, by accession to international conventions and agreements, Croatia took the responsibility of implementing the provisions of those international treaties. In the process of European and international integrations, Croatia has to make harmonization with European and international standards also in the field of nuclear safety. The State Office for Nuclear Safety as an independent regulatory authority started its work on 1st June 2005 by taking over responsibility for activities relating to nuclear safety and cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency from the Ministry of the Economy, Labour and Entrepreneurship. In this paper responsibilities, organization and projects of the State Office for Nuclear Safety will be presented, with the accent on development of regulations and international cooperation. (author)

  15. The restructuring of the fiscal equalization system in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Primorac

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to propose a model of fiscal equalization in Croatia. This paper tests the hypothesis of a lack of effectiveness of the existing fiscal equalization model compared to a model that would be based on alleviating the difference in the potential to collect revenue from the personal income tax and surtax. Fiscal inequalities of local government units are determined first under the current equalization system by calculating the Gini coefficients and graphically presented with Lorenz curves. Thereafter, a distribution of equalization grants is simulated based on the new (proposed model. The effectiveness of the proposed model in alleviating the fiscal inequalities is determined in relation to the effectiveness of the current equalization system. It was found that the model based on equalizing the difference in the capacity to collect revenue from the personal income tax and surtax alleviates inequalities in fiscal capacities of local government units much better than the existing system at the same cost. The main conclusion is that the fiscal equalization in Croatia should urgently be redesigned in order to improve efficiency and fairness, but also the transparency and credibility of the equalization system.

  16. Civil war, social integration and mental health in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunovich, R M; Hodson, R

    1999-12-01

    Research has shown that social relationships are generally beneficial for mental health (Thoits 1995). However, few scholars have examined this association after the occurrence of a significant shock to the social system as a whole. The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between social integration and war-related distress in Croatia immediately following the recent civil war. Does social integration decrease war-related distress? Does social integration buffer the effect of traumatic events on war-related distress? We analyze these questions using nationally representative survey data collected in Croatia in 1996. Results suggest that social integration has both positive and negative direct effects on distress. Being a member of informal organizations, such as sports clubs, and participating in social activities are beneficial for mental health. On the other hand, being a member of some formal organizations, such as church organizations and unions, is detrimental to mental health. There is little support for the idea that social integration buffers the effect of traumatic events on distress. Only one of thirty-six possible interactions is significant and supports the buffer hypothesis. Frequent participation in social activities buffers the effect of experiencing violence on war-related distress. Also, some forms of social integration appear to aggravate the effect of traumatic events on war-related distress. In sum, social integration does affect war-related distress after a system shock, but in complex and sometimes unexpected ways.

  17. ENGINEERING GEOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE ROAD SOLIN - KLIS (DALMATIA, CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Šestanović

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The research, that has been done both on the »intact« terrain and on the opened cuts and discontinuities, and which has been carried on in the basic caves of the object, as well as in the tunnels; has verified the engineering geological and basic tectonic characteristics of Senonian limestones, Eocene flysch, the Promina breccias and breccia-conglomerates, as well as Oligocene poorly sorted breccias, on the route of semi-highway Solin-Klis (Dalmatia, Croatia. The lab analyses, of the great number of the rock samples, have brought out the parametres of their basic physical and mechanical features within a particular engineering geological unit. The results, thus obtained, have been compared to the qualities of the rock structure block as a whole, and had been previously evaluated by applying RMR-classification of the rocks, and the results of the measured velocities of the longitudinal waves. It has been pointed out that similar procedure may be applied in the publication of General Engineering Geological Map of the Republic of Croatia (the paper is published in Croatian.

  18. DEPOSITS AND MINING POTENTIAL OF BENTONITE IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Klanfar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is one of the materials that is planed to be used for buffering and backfilling in spent nuclear fuel repositories, within deep crystalline rock. There are several locations in Croatia that bentonite deposits and occurrences are found on. Some were exploited in past, and others were more or less explored. This paper presents overview of bentonite deposits, basic properties and potential resources, and mining practices in Croatia. Largest exploited deposits are found in area of Poljanska luka, Gornja Jelenska and Bednja. Surface and underground methods (drift and fill, sublevel caving were used during exploitation. In the area of Svilaja and Lika are found potentially valuable deposits that were never exploited. Montmorilonite content ranges form 20-50% to 57-89%. Most deposits contain bentonite beds with thickness 0,4-1,6 m, and have plunge 10°-30°. Few exceptions are nearly horizontal and thick more than 5 m and even 12 m. One is declined at 70° and up to 40m thick. Proven reserves are about 2,3 Mt with some level of uncertainty. Average production per mine during exploitation period can be assumed to be several thousands t/y.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučina, V Višekruna; Filipović, S Kurečić; Kožnjak, N; Stamenić, V; Clark, A D; Mounaud, B; Blau, J; Hoestlandt, C; Kaić, B

    2015-05-07

    Pneumococcus is a known cause of meningitis, pneumonia, sepsis, and acute otitis media in children and adults globally. Two new vaccines for children have the potential to prevent illness, disability, and death, but these vaccines are expensive. The Croatian Ministry of Health has considered introducing the vaccine in the past, but requires economic evidence to ensure that the limited funds available for health care will be used in the most effective way. Croatia appointed a multidisciplinary team of experts to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of introducing pneumococcal conjugate vaccination (PCV) into the national routine child immunization program. Both 10-valent and 13-valent PCV (PCV10 and PCV13) were compared to a scenario assuming no vaccination. The TRIVAC decision-support model was used to estimate cost-effectiveness over the period 2014-2033. We used national evidence on demographics, pneumococcal disease incidence and mortality, the age distribution of disease in children, health service utilization, vaccine coverage, vaccine timeliness, and serotype coverage. Vaccine effectiveness was based on evidence from the scientific literature. Detailed health care costs were not available from the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance at the time of the analysis so assumptions and World Health Organization (WHO) estimates for Croatia were used. We assumed a three-dose primary vaccination schedule, and an initial price of US$ 30 per dose for PCV10 and US$ 35 per dose for PCV13. We ran univariate sensitivity analyses and multivariate scenario analyses. Either vaccine is estimated to prevent approximately 100 hospital admissions and one death each year in children younger than five in Croatia. Compared to no vaccine, the discounted cost-effectiveness of either vaccine is estimated to be around US$ 69,000-77,000 per disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted over the period 2014-2033 (from the government or societal perspective). Only two alternative scenarios

  20. Nuclear Energy - a Part of a Solution to Generate Electric Power in Croatia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikulicic, V.; Simic, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The growth in Croatian energy, particularly electricity, demand together with growing environmental considerations is such that Croatia needs to have flexibility to respond, by having the option of expanding the nuclear sector. This paper deals with nuclear energy as an option for sustainable Croatian economic development, and with the nuclear power controversy. The conclusion is that there is a necessity for extended use of nuclear energy in Croatia. Most certainly the nuclear technology can provide the energy necessary to sustain progress and, as a country without coal, Croatia should favour nuclear power utilisation as the lowest cost option for base-load electricity generation. (author)

  1. Analysis of Cruise Tourism on Croatian Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Zekić

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cruise trips have been rising in popularity since the 1970sand are currently a trend in the tourism market. This is particularly true of river cruises, which record a constant growth in the number of ship calls. The general upward trend in the number of river cruise passengers and dockings is also present in Croatia. Prerequisites for the development of cruising on Croatian rivers include, in addition to other geographical features, also the length of navigable water ways, but a systematic approach to this issue is needed for further development. The authors investigate the level of development of infrastructure on Croatian rivers and analyse the passenger and ship traffic on them. Special attention is given to the importance of cruises for tourism on European rivers and worldwide. In accordance with the Croatian Tourism Development Strategy until 2020, the authors explore geographical and other conditions necessary for the development of river cruise tourism. The aim of the paper is to point to the importance of building infrastructure for accommodation of vessels sailing on Croatian rivers, and in particular to the need to improve tourism offer in river destinations.

  2. Unemployment and Long-Term Unemployment of Immigrants in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerija Botrić

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Migration issues in Croatia have been mostly discussed in relation to the recent increase in emigration, in particular related to the emigration of young and highly educated persons. However, active migration policy should consider immigration dynamics as well. In the framework of long-term prospects of the Croatian labour market, and taking into consideration the advanced effects of the demographic aging process, the issue of active immigration policy is expected to become more important in the future. The main goal of the paper is to analyse the existing position of immigrants on the Croatian labour market. Important characteristics of the Croatian labour market in recent years have been a high unemployment rate and high share of long-term unemployment. The effects of these adverse conditions are manifold, not only at the level of the economy (in terms of under-utilisation of available resources, but also at the level of affected individuals. Regarding individuals, the consequences of long-term unemployment frequently incorporate increased distance from the labour market due to the (perceived loss of skills. The aim of the paper is to investigate individual characteristics that predict either unemployment or long-term unemployment of the immigrant population in Croatia. The empirical analysis is based on the Labour Force Survey conducted by the Croatian Central Bureau of Statistics. Due to the data source used, the immigrant population is not defined on the basis of their nationality or citizenship. It entails all persons who were born outside Croatia and currently have permanent residence in the country. The second condition is directly related to the nature of the sample used for the Survey, where the sample frame relies on permanent residency. This implies that any short-term circular migrations (due to, for example, increased labour market during the tourist season are probably not covered by the data. To the extent that this is important

  3. Solar hydrogen infrastructure of road and maritime traffic in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firak, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the next 10 to 20 years the world and national economy will be faced with the need to transition from traditional sources of primary energy (e.g., fossil fuels) to renewable energy resources, mainly solar and wind power. At the same time hydrogen will appear on the energy scene, so already today we discuss the coming 'Hydrogen Economy', i.e., the economy based on hydrogen use. Given such developments, the question is how and when Croatia will begin to keep up with this global scenario? One of possible answers is discussed in this paper. It starts with the fact that Croatia is a significant tourist destination, visited by 10 millions mainly motorized tourists a year. World Tourism Organization forecast the increase in foreign tourists' arrivals by 8.4 percent a year until 2020. More than 90 percent of tourists stay in the Adriatic coast and islands; 55 percent of them arrive in the two summer months. Hence, the visits occur mainly in the region where and during the season when solar energy is abundant. The other assumption is the so called Hart Report, a study addressing the introduction of hydrogen infrastructure in the European traffic road system. It projects the number of hydrogen-fueled vehicles on the roads of the EU until 2020. Based on these two assumptions estimated is the number of hydrogen-fueled vehicles that in this period could arrive to the Croatian coast and islands for which the hydrogen infrastructure should be provided. Since during the holiday season thousands of motorized vessels sail along the Croatian coast and islands and many of them have some of 'hydrogen options' installed, it will be an additional reason for development for hydrogen infrastructure on the islands. Considering the above the paper proposed the hydrogen infrastructure based on photo-voltaic technology of solar energy use and water electrolysis as hydrogen production technology. The suggestion is to connect these installations to the Croatian electricity production and

  4. The Rise of Direct Democracy in Croatia: Balancing or Challenging Parliamentary Representation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butković Hrvoje

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2010 the Croatian Constitution was changed to lower the requirements for the implementation of direct democracy at the national level, in order to save the referendum on Croatia’s EU membership from possible failure. Since then, Croatia has witnessed a sharp increase in people’s initiatives that have managed to block a number of the government’s reform proposals. Therefore, the newly discovered appeal of direct democracy in Croatia has created a new environment for the operation of its representative democracy. Starting from theoretical notions, this paper analyses the practice of direct democracy in selected transitional countries, which could be instructive for Croatia. In its central part, the paper explores the obstacles that stand in the way of the efficient implementation of direct democracy in Croatia.

  5. Review of Investigations on Site Selection for Nuclear Power Plants in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malbasa, N.

    2008-01-01

    A review of site investigation for nuclear facilities in the Republic of Croatia that had been performed from 1964, when investigation started for the first nuclear power plant, to 1994 when the activities were stopped, is presented therein. Brief results of the main investigation were presented including the Tanja site on the Danube upstream of Vukovar. It is the best of all the investigated locations for nuclear power plant in Croatia. The review of results for site selection of low and intermediate level of radioactive waste disposal is also given. The position of nuclear power plants in the strategic documents of the Republic of Croatia was analysed. It is concluded that the status of nuclear facilities in the main strategic documents must be improved because the energy future in Croatia - as almost in all European countries - could hardly be successful without any further development of nuclear energy.(author)

  6. Glass Spherules in Badenian Siliciclastics and Carbonates of N. Croatia, Possible Ries Crater Distal Ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogovic, M.; Marjanac, T.; Fazinic, S.; Sremac, J.; Bosnjak, M.; Bosak, L.

    2017-07-01

    We have found glass spherules in Badenian sediments at three locations in Northern Croatia that are good candidates for Ries Crater distal ejecta. Their chemical composition generally fits the composition of suevite glass.

  7. Review of Investigations on Site Selection for Nuclear Power Plants in Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malbasa, N [Ekonerg, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2008-07-01

    A review of site investigation for nuclear facilities in the Republic of Croatia that had been performed from 1964, when investigation started for the first nuclear power plant, to 1994 when the activities were stopped, is presented therein. Brief results of the main investigation were presented including the Tanja site on the Danube upstream of Vukovar. It is the best of all the investigated locations for nuclear power plant in Croatia. The review of results for site selection of low and intermediate level of radioactive waste disposal is also given. The position of nuclear power plants in the strategic documents of the Republic of Croatia was analysed. It is concluded that the status of nuclear facilities in the main strategic documents must be improved because the energy future in Croatia - as almost in all European countries - could hardly be successful without any further development of nuclear energy.(author)

  8. Constitutional framework of the process of decentralization and public administration reform in Serbia and Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čiplić Svetozar M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the comparative analyze of the processes of the decentralization reorganization and reform of the public administration at the level of the horizontal governance organization in Serbia and Croatia. At the first part of the work the authors analyze the decentralization and devolution as well as their demarcation in the sense of their related but not similar meanings. The second part is devoted to the historical experiences and genesis foundations of the common state where Serbia and Croatia were joined. The particular historical developments of Serbia and Croatia influenced the present attitude of their political elites toward decentralization. The third, final part/conclusion, is dedicated to a comparative analyses of the constitutional solutions in Serbia and Croatia which are related to the vertical organization. .

  9. THE IMPACTS OF THE COMMON CONSOLIDATED CORPORATE TAX BASE IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Hodžić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As of 1 July 2013, i.e. with Croatia’s accession to the European Union, the number of Member States of the European Union rose to 28. The diversity of tax systems among the Member States causes interferences in cross-border activities of tax firms. That encourages transfer of income to countries with lower tax rates. The aim of this paper is to present the main points of view on the implications of the introduction of the Common Consolidated Corporate Tax Base (CCCTB in Croatia. This paper also estimates the effects of the prospective apportionment procedure on corporate group entities in Croatia. The acceptance of the CCCTB system will make Croatia attractive to foreign investors. It will also enable foreign multinational companies to do business in Croatia, which will contribute to its economic growth.

  10. An empirical analysis of consumer awareness and trust in organic food legislation in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Brčić-Stipčević

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The results of the research conducted in March 2009 on a representative sample of the citizens of the Republic of Croatia using a highly structured survey questionnaire in households have shown that the majority of the respondents (76.6% are familiar with organic food. In the survey, special emphasis is put on the purchase of organic food, especially among regular buyers. Methods: Regular buyers were asked about their familiarity with the information on the organic food declaration and their trust in the reliability of the information on the organic food declaration. Furthermore, research explored respondents' familiarity with the label organic product of Croatia according to frequency of organic food purchase. Also, research explored consumer trust in organic food monitoring and control system in Croatia.  Results and conclusions:  The research gives insight into familiarity with measures for organic food consumer protection in Croatia and recommendations for organic food legislation bodies.  

  11. Effects of Fiscal Policy in a Small Open Economy: Evidence of Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Deskar-Škrbić, Milan; Šimović, Hrvoje; Ćorić, Tomislav

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we use structural VAR model to analyze dynamic effects of fiscal shocks on economic activity in Croatia from 2000Q1-2012Q2. Due to the fact that Croatia is a small open economy we assume that shocks of foreign origination can have notable effects on its performance. Therefore, original Blanchard-Perotti (2002) model is extended by introducing variables that represent external (foreign) demand shocks. The results show that the government spending has a positive and statistically ...

  12. National consumption of opioid and nonopioid analgesics in Croatia: 2007–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnic D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Darko Krnic,1 Andrea Anic-Matic,2 Svjetlana Dosenovic,2 Pero Draganic,1 Sasa Zezelic,1 Livia Puljak2 1Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices, Zagreb, 2Laboratory for Pain Research, School of Medicine, University of Split, Split, Croatia Background: The increased consumption of analgesics has been documented worldwide during the last 2 decades. The aim of the study was to examine the trends in opioid and nonopioid analgesic consumption in Croatia between 2007 and 2013. Methods: Data on opioid consumption were extracted from the database of the national authority. All opioid and nonopioid analgesics were included in the analysis. Data were presented as defined daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants per day. Adequacy of opioid consumption was calculated using adequacy of consumption measure. Results: During the examined 7-year period, the total consumption and total cost of all analgesics in Croatia showed continuous increase. In the M01A group (anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic products, nonsteroids, ibuprofen had an exponential increasing trend, and in 2011, it overtook diclofenac consumption. Ibuprofen and diclofenac had the highest consumption also in the M02A group of topical products for joint and muscular pain. Tramadol was by far the most consumed type of opioids (N02A group and paracetamol in the group of other analgesics and antipyretics (N02B. The adequacy of consumption measure value was 0.19, indicating that Croatia is a country with a low opioid consumption. Conclusion: Between 2007 and 2013, both consumption of analgesics and their cost in Croatia had an increasing trend. Comparisons with data from other countries, based on the published literature, indicate that analgesic consumption in Croatia is still relatively low. Calculation of the adequacy of opioid consumption indicated that Croatia is a country with low opioid consumption. Further studies are necessary for establishing whether current analgesic consumption in

  13. Investigating Parents' Attitudes towards Digital Technology Use in Early Childhood: A Case Study from Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Nives MIKELIĆ PRERADOVIĆ; Gordana LEŠIN; Mirjana ŠAGUD

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate perceptions of parents in Croatia towards advantages and disadvantages of computer use in general as well as their children's computer use and to reveal parents' concerns and opinions about digital technology (DT) education in kindergarten. The paper reports on research findings from one of the large public kindergartens in the capital city of Croatia. A total of 152 parents of the children aged 3 to 7 enrolled at this early childhood education institut...

  14. Croatia's EU Accession: Socio-economic Assessment of Farm Households and Policy Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Möllers, Judith; Zier, Patrick; Frohberg, Klaus; Buchenrieder, Gertrud; Bojnec, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Croatia is very close to meeting the requirements necessary for becoming a member of the European Union (EU). On February 6, 2008, the European Enlargement Commissioner Olli Rehn said that accession negotiations with Croatia are moving ahead well. As in all new member states (NMS), the agricultural sector and food processing chain are core issues within the negotiation process. Successful negotiation requires intimate knowledge of the issue at hand, including the socio-economic situation and ...

  15. Modelling tourist consumption to achieve economic growth and external balance: case of Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Jelušić, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to develop a model able to explain international tourist expenditures (inflows) in Croatia, and domestic tourist expenditures (outflows) abroad. Design – The present study is based on the research of international tourism demand, aimed at describing the behavior of international expenditures concepts applied to the case of Croatia. Methodology –The proposed model is a multiple linear regression model. Findings – The modelling procedure with all ...

  16. Water consumption in Iron Age, Roman, and Early Medieval Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, E; Slaus, M; O'Connell, T C

    2014-08-01

    Patterns of water consumption by past human populations are rarely considered, yet drinking behavior is socially mediated and access to water sources is often socially controlled. Oxygen isotope analysis of archeological human remains is commonly used to identify migrants in the archeological record, but it can also be used to consider water itself, as this technique documents water consumption rather than migration directly. Here, we report an oxygen isotope study of humans and animals from coastal regions of Croatia in the Iron Age, Roman, and Early Medieval periods. The results show that while faunal values have little diachronic variation, the human data vary through time, and there are wide ranges of values within each period. Our interpretation is that this is not solely a result of mobility, but that human behavior can and did lead to human oxygen isotope ratios that are different from that expected from consumption of local precipitation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Copper and zinc content in human milk in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, Zlatko; Mandic, Milena L.; Grgic, Jerica; Grgic, Zdravko; Klapec, Tomislav; Primorac, Ljiljana; Hasenay, Damir

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to research whether there had been any statistically significant difference in the content of Cu and Zn in human milk depending on the social status of women (refugee and non-refugee), age, number of deliveries, days after delivery, weight gained by nursing women and smoking habits, as well as whether the infants had received sufficient quantities of these elements. The elements were determined by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. The samples were collected in the Clinical Hospital Osijek and Refugee Centre Nabrde, near Osijek, Eastern Croatia. The Cu in human milk ranged from 0.27 mg/l to 1.35 mg/l, and Zn from 0.62 mg/l to 15.0 mg/l. The mean levels of Cu and Zn for each group, formed according to the results of the questionnaire are presented too. Calculated daily dietary intake of these elements accords with the RDA

  18. Laparoscopic treatment of achalasia -first case in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferid Latić

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder. Commonly used treatments are botulinum toxin injections, endoscopic balloon dilation and surgical myotomy with or withoutfundoplication. We are hereby presenting the first case of laproscopic myotomy with fundoplication performed in Croatia. A 32-year old female was admitted to the hospital due to the symptoms of dysphagia, regurgitation, chest pain and weight loss. Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography with contrast and flexible endoscopy confirmed the clinical diagnosis of achalasia. She was treated by the Heller laparoscopic procedure and Dor anterior fundoplication. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged on the fifth postoperative day. This case shows thatlaparoscopic treatment of achalasia is a feasibile and safe procedure which can be performed even in a small country hospital, but it requires great technical care and experience of the surgeon.

  19. Can confidence indicators forecast the probability of expansion in Croatia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Čižmešija

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate how reliable are confidence indicators in forecasting the probability of expansion. We consider three Croatian Business Survey indicators: the Industrial Confidence Indicator (ICI, the Construction Confidence Indicator (BCI and the Retail Trade Confidence Indicator (RTCI. The quarterly data, used in the research, covered the periods from 1999/Q1 to 2014/Q1. Empirical analysis consists of two parts. The non-parametric Bry-Boschan algorithm is used for distinguishing periods of expansion from the period of recession in the Croatian economy. Then, various nonlinear probit models were estimated. The models differ with respect to the regressors (confidence indicators and the time lags. The positive signs of estimated parameters suggest that the probability of expansion increases with an increase in Confidence Indicators. Based on the obtained results, the conclusion is that ICI is the most powerful predictor of the probability of expansion in Croatia.

  20. Employees motivation in two wood industry companies in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Jelačić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research analysed the motivating and demotivating factors amongst employees in two wood processing companies in Croatia. Research was conducted over the year 2014 and 2015, during the economic recovery of the companies and Croatian economy in general. Research was conducted with a survey using a questionnaire containing six questions with multiple choice statements. The questions were closed-ended, and respondents used the Likert four-level scale of importance for each statement. A total of 180 employees were surveyed, and results were statistically processed by using the χ2 - test and cluster analysis. This study established that the motivation factors most important to employees between researched companies are significantly different. Employees were most concerned about social needs. Also, employees consider psychological circumstances of work to be very important. Employees’ overall motivation can be linked to higher efficiency and higher quality production and business results, and such research should be conducted more often.

  1. Immigrant Students’ Achievements in Croatia, Serbia and Slovenia in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nika Šušterič

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Achievement gaps between immigrant and native students indicate failure to assure educational equity in the majority of countries assessed by the Programme for International Student Assessment in 2009 (PISA, 2009. The present article explains disparate achievement results in Europe, first testing the hypothesis of old and new democracies. In further contextualisation of the achievement results, the analysis seeks explanations beyond the common education system explanatory model. Specifically, the article considers results from Croatia, Serbia and Slovenia, highlighting the significance of language distance between native and immigrant students as well as migration regimes as important factors in creating or reducing the achievement gap between native and immigrant students. Evidence has been found that immigrant students score worse in countries with guest labour immigration regimes than in the countries with large scale forced immigration of people of the same ethnic (linguistic origin.

  2. Attitude of Management Students towards Whistleblowing: Evidence from Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bogdanovic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the attitude of management students towards whistleblowing in a sample of 121 master students of business ethics at the Faculty of Economics University in Split, Croatia. The three measurement instruments include whistleblowers´ attitudes (3 items, whistleblowing attitudes (2 items and potential types of whistleblowing reactions (8 items, i.e. external reactions (4 items and internal reactions (4 items. The results of the study indicated a positive attitude toward whistleblowing and whistleblowers. The authors also found that female students exhibited more confidence in management and were more prone to whistleblowing than male students. Also, students with professional experience considered whistleblowing to be in the public interest more than students with no professional experience. The results may be of practical use to managers who can benefit from whistleblowing while keeping in mind that whistleblowing can't be avoided and that punishing whistleblowers seems to be a bad managerial practice.

  3. Developing Model for Supply Chain Management - the Case of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jurun

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a model of supply chain management (SCM. It explains overall supply chain issues, strategic importance of SCM, supply chain strategies and an example of mathematical formulation. A supply chain is a global network of organizations that cooperate to improve the flows of material and information between suppliers and customers at the lowest cost and the highest speed. The objective of a supply chain is customer satisfaction. At the strategic level, a supply chain can be considered as being composed of five activities: buy, make, move, store and sell. Each activity is a module. The set of modules, along with its links, constitutes a model of the supply chain. Our paper presents some insights into the supply chain strategies of companies in Croatia. The major goal of this paper is to show a model for supply chain management in mathematical terms, with an example of mathematical formulation.

  4. The reduced VAT rate for small business in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Dimitrić

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the potential effects of introduction of the reduced VAT rate for small business, based on the EU VAT legislation development. The analysis includes effects on prices, sales, shadow economy and employment. It starts with the assumption of no substantial effect. Survey for Croatia is done by small business owners’ interviews and encompasses descriptive and inferential statistics based on parametric tests. The EU expected existence of a link between VAT reduction, price reduction, sales increase and positive effects on employment (as well as decline in the shadow economy is proved even in this research. However, the pass-through to prices is very moderate as well as other effects. The reduced VAT rate could have some positive results for the restaurants and bars only. There exists also some possibility for construction of housing and construction services related to housing as well as some other labour intensive services.

  5. UNIVERSAL VALUES AND ETICAL BEHAVIOUR OF HOTEL MANAGERS IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Ivaniš

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Personal values are seen as a higher level of attitudes and they reflect the general view on life and the world, dispositions aimed for achieving goals that are desirable and valuable for human- universal values in the structure of human personality that it strongly and permanently run on certain activities. It is found that ethical behavior have long been associated with personal values and that personal values in personal value systems of universalism, benevolence, tradition, conformism, security and independence are positively and significantly correlated with ethical behaviour, whereas universal values in personal value systems of power, achievement, hedonism and incentive are negatively and significantly correlated with ethical behaviour.”This study presents the results of empirical research on personal value systems and ethical / unethical behavior among hotel strategic managers in large hotel companies in Croatia.

  6. Population Mobility in Croatia from a Life Course Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Čipin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Spatial mobility receives a lot of research attention in Croatia. Many studies deal with international migration (Nejašmić, 2015; Lajić, 2002; Pokos, 1999; Gelo, Akrap and Čipin, 2005 as it is becoming an increasingly important component of population change. Movement of people within country also seeks thorough investigation – internal migration can have a considerable impact on the changing size and composition of population residing in local areas. However, existing literature on internal migration in Croatia (Klempić Bogadi and Lajić, 2014; Mikačić, 2000; Nejašmić, 1992 provides little information on lifetime population mobility. This paper employs a life course perspective to explore internal population mobility in Croatia. In the absence of cohort data on internal migration, the application of life table methods offers a way of estimating lifetime population mobility. The outcome is migration expectancy – the average number of moves an individual may expect to make during his or her lifetime (making allowance for the effect of mortality. Migration expectancy was first introduced by Wilber (1963 and further developed by Long (1970, 1973, 1988. The same concept has been successfully applied to assess internal population mobility in several countries (e.g. Long and Boertlein, 1976; Kulkarani and Pol, 1994; Bell, 1996; Rees et al., 2000; US Census Bureau, 2016. Migration expectancy offers a number of advantages compared to conventional measures of internal population mobility (Bell, 1996: 108–109; Bell et al., 2002: 446. Firstly, it is both readily understood and statistically valid. Computation of migration expectancy is transparent and straightforward – it requires the use of simple spreadsheet procedures. Secondly, migration expectancy enables a detailed examination of internal mobility timing. Thirdly, life table stationary population used to determine migration expectancy automatically standardizes for varying age

  7. PRODUCTION OF POULTRY MEAT AND EGGS IN THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA AND IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Bošnjaković

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Poultry meat and eggs are a significant source of nutrients in the human diet. Poultry products are widely consumed because they are nutritionally valuable, there are no religious restrictions on consumption, it is relatively easy to prepare diverse meals based on poultry, and the price of such products is relatively low. The aim of this research was to investigate the development of poultry production in the Republic of Croatia in the period 2010-2014, comprising the period of two years after Croatia joined the EU. The paper also compares data of poultry production in Croatia and in the EU. Over the period in question, total meat production in Croatia was reduced by 23%, meat import was increased by 45%, poultry meat export was increased by 46%, and production of eggs decreased by 20%. At the same time, in the EU countries poultry production was increased by 8.8% on average, export was increased by 10%, and import was reduced by 3.7%, while the egg production stagnated. In 2014, consumption of poultry meat in Croatia was 18.3 kg per capita, and in the EU 26.8 kg per capita. Self-sufficiency in the poultry production over the analyzed period was not satisfactory, therefore in the coming years, Croatia will have to develop quickly this important branch of livestock breeding. In addition to conventional production, faster development refers to production of organic and functional poultry products.

  8. The Analysis of the Impact of Depreciation on External Debt in Long Run: Evidence From Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Palić

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The impact of exchange rate changes in small open economies has been a widely researched topic for decades. According to economic theory and relevant research, depreciation can have a positive impact on the economy through an increase in exports, and a negative effect through decrease in an individual consumption. The aim of this artcle is to assess the impact of exchange rate depreciation on external debt in Croatia in the long-run. The long-run impact of depreciation on external debt in Croatia is assessed using Johansen cointegration approach. The results point to the existence of one cointegration relation. The long-run impact of exchange rate depreciation on external debt in Croatia is statistically significant and positive, what is in line with previous research and economic theory. The conducted analysis outlines the possible negative impact of depreciation on Croatian economy through the increase of external indebtedness, what could consequently decrease the wealth of all sectors indebted in foreign currency. Since Croatia is a highly euroised small open economy with high external indebtedness in foreign currency, this research provides captivating results for monetary and fiscal policy-making in Croatia. Therefore, as a result of the conducted empirical analysis, the exchange rate depreciation in Croatia is not recommended as the instrument of increasing export competitiveness due to current high external indebtedness in foreign currency.

  9. The repercussions of the discovery of radioactivity in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razem, D.

    1996-01-01

    The discovery of radioactivity has repercussions on both basic and applied science in Croatia. The impact of the discovery in basic science was an indirect one: investigations of the phenomenon itself or relevant investigations on the trail of the atomistic paradigm could not be experimentally pursued in Croatia until the establishment of the Rudjer Boskovic Institute in 1951. Informative, historical and popular accounts on the subject are all we have from that period, with the addition of philosophy discussions enriched with the illustrations taken from the contemporary physics. The first demonstrations of radioactivity took place before the Croatian Medical Assembly in 1904 and 1908. The first one dealt with the general principles of radioactivity, and Crookes' spynthariscope was shown on that occasion, whereas the second one was concerned with the therapeutic value of radioactive spas, and an emanator to produce radon-saturated water was demonstrated. The first institution for radiotherapy was established at the Maternity Hospital in Zagreb in 1931, possessing 453 mg of radium. Mention should also be made of the determination of radioactivity in Croatian mineral springs. Only by the end of this period photographic methods for radiation protection dosimetry and the visualization of heavy ion tracks have been developed. However, it took an impressive amount of work after the Second World War to inform and educate general public, to introduce modern physics to university curricula, and to establish a dedicated national institution, such as the Rudjer Boskovic Institute, in order to enable modern scientific concepts to become an integral part of the Croatian intellectual property. These deeds were largely accomplished thanks to the books and actions of Ivan Supek. (author)

  10. Breast and gynecological cancers in Croatia, 1988-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelava, Iva; Tomičić, Karlo; Kokić, Marina; Ćorušić, Ante; Planinić, Pavao; Kirac, Iva; Murgić, Jure; Kuliš, Tomislav; Znaor, Ariana

    2012-01-01

    Aim To analyze and interpret incidence and mortality trends of breast and ovarian cancers and incidence trends of cervical and endometrial cancers in Croatia for the period 1988-2008. Methods Incidence data were obtained from the Croatian National Cancer Registry. The mortality data were obtained from the World Health Organization (WHO) mortality database. Trends of incidence and mortality were analyzed by joinpoint regression analysis. Results Joinpoint analysis showed an increase in the incidence of breast cancer with estimated annual percent of change (EAPC) of 2.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9 to 3.4). The mortality rate was stable, with the EAPC of 0.3% (95% CI, -0.6 to 0.0). Endometrial cancer showed an increasing incidence trend, with EAPC of 0.8% (95% CI, 0.2 to 1.4), while cervical cancer showed a decreasing incidence trend, with EAPC of -1.0 (95% CI, -1.6 to -0.4). Ovarian cancer incidence showed three trends, but the average annual percent change (AAPC) for the overall period was not significant, with a stable trend of 0.1%. Ovarian cancer mortality was increasing since 1992, with EAPC of 1.2% (95% CI, 0.4 to 1.9), while the trend for overall period was stable with AAPC 0.1%. Conclusion Incidence trends of breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers in Croatia 1988-2008 are similar to the trends observed in most of the European countries, while the modest decline in cervical cancer incidence and lack of decline in breast cancer mortality suggest suboptimal cancer prevention and control. PMID:22522987

  11. Honey As A Bioindicator Of Environmental Radioactive Contamination In Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franic, Z.; Petrinec, B.; Marovic, G.

    2015-01-01

    Radioecological investigations regarding fission products in foodstuffs in Croatia are implemented as part of an extended and still ongoing radioactive contamination monitoring programme of the human environment. The programme has been designed and endorsed by the Croatian State Office for Radiological and Nuclear Security and fully harmonized with European legislation, i.e. the European Commission's recommendation of June 2000 on the application of Article 36 of the Euratom Treaty. For describing the overall possible impact the contaminants have on the entire region, the most efficient sampler would be one that covers the largest area possible. In this sense, honey has been shown to be an excellent biological indicator for detecting radionuclides but also other pollutants such as heavy metals. In Croatia, radiocaesium nuclides like 137Cs and 134Cs in honey were first investigated after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. For both radionuclides, the activity concentrations in honey, which peaked in May 1986, decreased exponentially and the estimated ecological residence time, corrected for radioactive decay, was found to be 1.23 y for 137Cs and 1.07 y for 134Cs. In the early 1990s, activity concentrations in honey for both radionuclides were under the detection limit, but again rose after the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Effective radiation doses due to radiocaesium, received by the Croatian population by honey consumption, even in the year of the Chernobyl accident were estimated to be very small, the per caput dose being less than 1 micro Sv. Based on radioecological investigations of honey, we argue that the mobility of honey bees and their ability to integrate all exposure pathways could add another level of confidence to the present monitoring program if honey and other bee-farming products are included in the routine radioecological monitoring programme for the Croatian environment. (author).

  12. Kyoto Protocol Objectives in Croatia Energy Planning: Nuclear Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duic, N.; Bogdan, Z.; Juretic, F.; Zeljko, M.

    2002-01-01

    Croatia as an Annex I country of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and a country that has pledged in the Annex B of the Kyoto Protocol to reduce its greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions by 5% from the pre-transition level by the budget period 2008-12, will have to envisage a new energy strategy. Compared to the energy consumption collapse in some transitional countries like Russia and Ukraine, Croatia has passed through a relatively limited long term reduction of GHG emissions since 1990 because of higher efficiency of its pre-transition economy. It is expected that in case of business as usual scenario it will breach the Kyoto target in 2003 since the demand for energy will be high, especially as the income continues to rise, particularly in domestic use for heating, for transport and for electricity generation. Several scenarios of developing energy system are compared from the point of view of GHG emissions. The energy sector that will most probably be the most influenced by the UNFCCC objectives is electricity generation. Several scenarios are compared. The cost-effective scenario expects a mixture of coal and gas fired power plants to be built to satisfy the new demand and to replace the old power plants that are being decommissioned. More Kyoto friendly scenario envisages the construction of mostly nuclear power plants in the future, while decommissioning the old ones as planned, and is compared to the others from the GHG emissions point of view. The conclusion is that by measures tackling only electricity generation it will not be possible to keep GHG emission under the Kyoto target level, but that choosing the nuclear option might reduce significantly the cost of compliance. (author)

  13. The game damages on agricultural crops in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Novosel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Conflicts between wildlife and humans have been reported from all over the world, but in Croatia the extent and intensity of the conflict is increasing. Agricultural damage by game is a major concern for both agricultural and wildlife agencies at the national level. In this study 4,695 cases of game damage over a 4-year period were analysed. Results indicated that the total amount of economic impact on agriculture from game damage was significant. The distribution of payments shows that a majority of payments have lower economic value with an average amount of single payment being 477.08 €. The annual number of payments was found to have a negative correlation coefficient (-0.469 to the total payment amount for damages. According to the number of payments (68% of the number of payments and the payment amount (60% of total payment amount, the crop most often damaged was maize. Analysis of the data found that there was a negative growth trend of payment frequency and total payment amount for grape vineyards. The correlation between yearly number of payments and yearly production was not calculated for any crop. The high seasonal nature of payments was a determent of seasonal regression using a dummy variable regression (r2=0.93. A comparison of the monthly number of payments and monthly amounts is depicted by a time series using a seasonal line. The impact of wild boar damage on agriculture crops, in total, leads to the conclusion that this game species is a major problem. The results showed a specific subset of game damage in Croatia and, as such, it can be extrapolated to provide insight into the damage caused by wild boar in other countries.

  14. The spreading of Alfalfa mosaic virus in lavandin in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Stanković

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available survey was conducted in 2012 and 2013 to detect the presence and distribution of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV in lavandin crops growing in continental parts of Croatia. A total of 73 lavandin samples from six crops in different localities were collected and analyzed for the presence of AMV and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV using commercial double-antibody sandwich (DAS-ELISA kits. AMV was detected serologically in 62 samples collected at three different localities, and none of the samples tested positive for CMV. For further analyses, six selected samples of naturally infected lavandin plants originating from different localities were mechanically transmitted to test plants: Chenopodium quinoa, C. amaranticolor, Nicotiana benthamiana and Ocimum basilicum, confirming the infectious nature of the disease. Molecular detection was performed by amplification of a 751 bp fragment in all tested samples, using the specific primers CP AMV1/CP AMV2 that amplify the part of the coat protein (CP gene and 3’-UTR. The RT-PCR products derived from the isolates 371-13 and 373-13 were sequenced (KJ504107 and KJ504108, respectively and compared with the AMV sequences available in GenBank. CP sequence analysis, conducted using the MEGA5 software, revealed that the isolate 371-13 had the highest nucleotide identity of 99.5% (100% amino acid identity with an isolate from Argentina originating from Medicago sativa (KC881010, while the sequence of isolate 373-13 had the highest identity with an Italian AMV isolate from Lavandula stoechas (FN667967 of 98.6% (99% amino acid identity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the clustering of selected isolates into four molecular groups and the lavandin AMV isolates from Croatia grouped into two distinct groups, implying a significant variability within the AMV lavandin population.

  15. Milk yield of some goat breeds in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boro Mioč

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In Croatia, goats are primarily bred for meat production. However, for the past twenty years the interest in goat milk production was based on imported breeds such as Alpine-French, Saanen and German Improved Fawn goat. The purpose of this paper is to establish litter size of the principal goat breeds in Croatia and the indicators related to milk yield and chemical composition. The largest average litter size has been determined on the German Improved Fawn (1.72, then with the Boer (1.54, the Saanen (1.53 and the Croatian coloured goat (1.51, while the Alpine-French goat was the smallest (1.31. The longest lactation period (259 days has been determined on the Alpine-French goat, while the largest milk yield during lactation (724.4 kg and the largest milk fat yield (20.16 kg and protein yield (18.64 kg have been determined on the Saanen goat. However, it has been established that the Alpine-French goat milk has the highest average fat content (3.55 %, while the German Improved Fawn’s milk has the highest protein content (3.23 %. The Saanen goat had the longest milking period (222 days and the shortest suckling period (32 days, while the Alpine-French and the German Improved Fawn had the longest suckling period (51 and 45 days, respectively. The lowest quantity of milk during the suckling period (102.97 kg, i.e. 14 % was suckled by Saanen kids, while the Alpine-French (122.08 kg, i.e. 22 % and the German Improved Fawn kids suckled the greatest quantity (116.31 kg, i.e. 22 %.

  16. Radiocaesium in uncultivated soil on some locations in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrinec, B; Franic, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health carries out a programme of long-term monitoring of radioactive contamination of human environment in Croatia, which involves investigation of man-made fission radionuclides in soil. Contaminated soil can significantly increase exposure doses due to the indirect contamination of edible plants entering the human food chain. This article reports the specific activity of 1 37C s in soil on two locations in Croatia monitored over the last decade. Soil samples were taken from three different layers, 0-5 cm, 5-10 cm, and 10-15 cm, in the cities of Zagreb and Zadar. A gamma-ray spectrometry system based on a low-level ORTEC Ge(Li) detector (FWHM 1.82 keV at 1.33 MeV) coupled to a computerized data acquisition system was used to determine radiocaesium levels in the samples from their gamma-ray spectra. The exponential decline was found in soil samples collected in Zadar with the estimated ecological half-life of 13.5 years, while no such behaviour was observed in the samples collected near Zagreb. Transient increases in 1 37C s specific activity concentrations in Zagreb soil, such as those in 1997 and 2000, can only be partially explained by a variety of environmental physical factors that naturally fluctuate, which calls for further investigations. As with time radiocaesium signal in undisturbed soils penetrated deeper layers, it would be appropriate to study deeper soil cores in the future. No direct correlation was found between fallout radioactivity and soil radioactivity in the first layer. However, 1 37C s activity concentrations in fallout could now be regarded as no more than background variations, having no deeper impact on the existing caesium levels in soil.(author)

  17. THE RESEARCH IN FISH GENETICS IN CROATIA AND FORMER YUGOSLAVIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Treer

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available This is a review on fish genetics research in Croatia and former Yugoslavia, based on the analyses of all the articles published in four main journals (Ribarstvo Jugoslavije, Morsko ribarstvo, Ichthyologia and Acta Adriatica since 1945 till disintegration of Yugoslavia in 1991. Most of the papers cover the fields on cytogenetics and hybridization (24 and 13 respectively. Eight papers were on fish selection and five on population genetics. Apart from those, five papers were written by foreign authors. Two groups of researchers from the University of Sarajevo were specially active. One of them lead by B e r b e r o v i ć and S o f r a d ž i j a did extensive work in cytogenetics, analyzing the karyotypes of many fish species, some of them endemic. Another one lead by V u k o v i ć , investigated some natural hybrids and created many of them artificially, particulary among cyprinids. These results are presented in a special table. Contrary to the mountainous Bosnia where this type of research was of systematic and ecologic importance, in Croatia whwrw aquaculture was highly developed, the approach was quite different. The scientists from the University of Zagreb, H a b e k o v i ć and T u r k , studied the hybridization and selection of important cultured cyprinids. Apart from these scientific groups, many papers were published by A l - S a b t i , who later became world famous in fish cytogenetics. The works of many other authors who contributed with papers in different fields of fish genetics are also described.

  18. Regional differences in incidence and clinical presentation of type 1 diabetes in children aged under 15 years in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipancić, Gordana; La Grasta Sabolić, Lavinia; Pozgaj Sepec, Marija; Radica, Ana; Skrabić, Veselin; Severinski, Srećko; Kujundzić Tiljak, Mirjana

    2012-04-01

    To determine regional differences in the incidence, incidence trends, and clinical presentation of type 1 diabetes in children under the age of 15 years in Croatia in a 9-year period (1995-2003). We included the patients who had been diagnosed with the disease and had started the insulin treatment before they were 15 years old. Regional differences between eastern, central, and southern Croatia were observed. The gross incidence was expressed by the number of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients in 100000 children of the same age and sex per year, ie, for the 0-14 age group, and for the 0-4, 5-9, and 10-14 subgroups. The highest incidence was observed in southern Croatia (10.91 per 100000/y) and the lowest in central Croatia (8.64 per 100000/y), and in eastern Croatia the incidence was 8.93 per 100000/y. All three regions showed a growing incidence trend, which was significant only in eastern and southern Croatia. There was 35.9% of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis in eastern Croatia, 41.7% in central Croatia, and 31.28% in southern Croatia. Croatian regions show differences in the incidence, incidence trends, and disease presentation of type 1 diabetes. A further follow-up is needed to establish whether the regional differences are a consequence of the population dynamics in the observed period or they will continue to exist, pointing to differences in environmental risk factors.

  19. Current status of iodine intake in Croatia--the results of 2009 survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusić, Zvonko; Jukić, Tomislav; Rogan, Suncica Andreja; Juresa, Vesna; Dabelić, Nina; Stanicić, Josip; Borić, Marta; Lukinac, Ljerka; Mihaljević, Ivan; Punda, Ante; Smokvina, Aleksandar; Topalović, Zlatko; Katalenić, Marijan

    2012-03-01

    In 1996, due to persistence of mild to moderate iodine deficiency, new law on obligatory salt iodination with 25 mg of potassium iodide (KI) per kg of salt was implemented in Croatia. Along with a new law, a new program for monitoring of iodine prophylaxis was implemented. Investigations of goiter and iodine intake performed in 2002, demonstrated sufficient iodine intake in Croatia with overall median of urinary iodine concentration (UIC) for schoolchildren in Croatia of 140 microg/L. In 2002, thyroid volumes (TV) measured by ultrasound in schoolchildren from all four geographic regions of Croatia were for the first time within the normal range according to ICCIDD reference values. Nowadays, Croatia is internationally recognized as iodine sufficient country. The aim of the present study was to assess current status of iodine intake in Croatia. The investigation was carried out in 2009. A total of 386 schoolchildren aged 7-10 years from all four major geographic regions of Croatia, 103 euthyroid pregnant women and 36 women of child-bearing age from Zagreb, the capital, were included in the survey. Urinary iodine concentration (UIC) was measured in all participants. Thyroid volumes were measured by ultrasound in schoolchildren from the capital of Zagreb (N = 101) and the village of Rude (N = 56). In the time period 2002-2009, the content of KI was analyzed in 384 salt samples from Croatian salt plants and samples of imported salt. An overall median UIC for schoolchildren in Croatia was 248 microg/L. Median UIC in pregnant women was 159 microg/L, with 50% of samples below and under 150 microg/L. Median UIC in women of child-bearing age was 136 microg/L. Thyroid volumes in schoolchildren were within the normal range according to the new reference values. Mean value of KI/kg of salt in samples from Croatian salt plants was 25.5 mg/kg and 24.9 mg/kg in samples of imported salt. A total of 72/384 (18.8%) of salt samples didn't corresponded to the Croatian law on

  20. National consumption of opioid and nonopioid analgesics in Croatia: 2007–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krnic, Darko; Anic-Matic, Andrea; Dosenovic, Svjetlana; Draganic, Pero; Zezelic, Sasa; Puljak, Livia

    2015-01-01

    Background The increased consumption of analgesics has been documented worldwide during the last 2 decades. The aim of the study was to examine the trends in opioid and nonopioid analgesic consumption in Croatia between 2007 and 2013. Methods Data on opioid consumption were extracted from the database of the national authority. All opioid and nonopioid analgesics were included in the analysis. Data were presented as defined daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants per day. Adequacy of opioid consumption was calculated using adequacy of consumption measure. Results During the examined 7-year period, the total consumption and total cost of all analgesics in Croatia showed continuous increase. In the M01A group (anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic products, nonsteroids), ibuprofen had an exponential increasing trend, and in 2011, it overtook diclofenac consumption. Ibuprofen and diclofenac had the highest consumption also in the M02A group of topical products for joint and muscular pain. Tramadol was by far the most consumed type of opioids (N02A group) and paracetamol in the group of other analgesics and antipyretics (N02B). The adequacy of consumption measure value was 0.19, indicating that Croatia is a country with a low opioid consumption. Conclusion Between 2007 and 2013, both consumption of analgesics and their cost in Croatia had an increasing trend. Comparisons with data from other countries, based on the published literature, indicate that analgesic consumption in Croatia is still relatively low. Calculation of the adequacy of opioid consumption indicated that Croatia is a country with low opioid consumption. Further studies are necessary for establishing whether current analgesic consumption in Croatia corresponds to patient needs. PMID:26357478

  1. Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovina. Renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Agency for International Business and Cooperation of the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs (EVD) has contracted Larive Serbia to conduct a market survey about Western Balkan's Renewable Energy market, with attention limited to Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovina. After the survey has been conducted according to the ToR No 80MVK13 published by EVD, Larive Serbia presents this market study as the summary of the results obtained by the survey. The survey was intended to identify the market of the four sources of renewable energy (wind energy, bio energy, hydro energy and thermal energy) in Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovina, and derive concrete business opportunities and prospects for Dutch trade and industry. Favorable terms for providing consultancy and engineering services, as well as production of the equipment used in the renewable energy sector were also to be identified. Specific development potential of each country included in the survey was to be provided as a mean of support to possible future market players originating from the Netherlands. Cross-border projects undertaken among the three countries themselves and with neighboring countries were to be included as well. The methodology used for preparing the study included gathering information from public sources, drafting primary version of the study and hypothesis, conducting in-depth interviews, and drafting the final version of the study and supporting hypothesis. As defined in the ToR of the study, first generation bio-fuels have not been included in the scope. In order to present situation in the RES sector objectively, investments based on these were mentioned. The statistical data were used to support and clarify the written information provided. Comparable and reliable data on the renewable energy sources for Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina are rather scarce, while methodologies applied in national statistics are not in line with EUROSTAT. Additionally, international sources

  2. Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovina. Renewable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-01-15

    The Agency for International Business and Cooperation of the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs (EVD) has contracted Larive Serbia to conduct a market survey about Western Balkan's Renewable Energy market, with attention limited to Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovina. After the survey has been conducted according to the ToR No 80MVK13 published by EVD, Larive Serbia presents this market study as the summary of the results obtained by the survey. The survey was intended to identify the market of the four sources of renewable energy (wind energy, bio energy, hydro energy and thermal energy) in Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovina, and derive concrete business opportunities and prospects for Dutch trade and industry. Favorable terms for providing consultancy and engineering services, as well as production of the equipment used in the renewable energy sector were also to be identified. Specific development potential of each country included in the survey was to be provided as a mean of support to possible future market players originating from the Netherlands. Cross-border projects undertaken among the three countries themselves and with neighboring countries were to be included as well. The methodology used for preparing the study included gathering information from public sources, drafting primary version of the study and hypothesis, conducting in-depth interviews, and drafting the final version of the study and supporting hypothesis. As defined in the ToR of the study, first generation bio-fuels have not been included in the scope. In order to present situation in the RES sector objectively, investments based on these were mentioned. The statistical data were used to support and clarify the written information provided. Comparable and reliable data on the renewable energy sources for Croatia, Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina are rather scarce, while methodologies applied in national statistics are not in line with EUROSTAT. Additionally, international

  3. Is Croatia Going to Build a Radioactive Waste Repository?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, Alemka; Levanat, Ivica; Saponja-Milutinovc, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Site selection process for low and intermediate level radioactive waste repository in Croatia was ended in 1999, nominating Trgovska gora as the potential macrolocation for the facility. Feasibility of the Trgovska gora disposal project was analyzed in a number of studies prepared by APO Ltd. from the mid-nineties up to 2003. An affirmative, though preliminary and largely generic safety assessment was completed. Specific microlocations were selected and analyzed based on literature data (garnished with low-resolution digital satellite pictures), and the best microlocation was tentatively narrowed down to Pavlovo brdo. After 2003, no further activities related to the repository project were undertaken for nearly ten years, until in its public procurement plan for 2013 the Croatian Fund for financing the NPP Krsko decommissioning and waste disposal dedicated over half a million euro to continuation of the project. In general, safe radioactive waste disposal pre-requires establishment of a complex national framework with appropriate functionality and competence; with such a framework established, decisive first steps towards building a repository are to identify potentially suitable locations and to ensure local community consent and cooperation. The rest should mainly be routine. But in Croatia, both lack of proper framework and the project history of indecisiveness may adversely affect further developments. Trgovska gora was designated as the potential location in the national land use plan only after three other potential locations had been dismissed by political decisions based on the largely assumed adverse attitudes of local communities. Repository project now appears to depend on cooperation of a single local community hosting the only potential site. The site has never been visited by any repository project participants, nor has the local community ever been officially contacted in an open and straightforward way, despite the 20-year old history of the project

  4. [Clinical picture of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Croatia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzman, Ilija

    2003-01-01

    Among many viral hemorrhagic fevers, only hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) occurs in Croatia. HFRS is a natural focus zoonosis with sudden onset, characterized by high fever and other clinical symptoms, renal insufficiency and hemorrhages. In Croatia, HFRS is caused by two types of hantaviruses--Puumala (PUU) and Dobrava (DOB). The basic pathologic and patophysiologic disorder in HFRS is capillary damage (vasculitis). Incubation of HFRS has not been precisely determined, it is most frequently around two weeks. The disease onset is usually abrupt. At the beginning, general symptoms include high fever and myalgias, especially in the lumbar region, and abdominal pain, as well as strong headaches, malaise and nausea, and often vomiting or diarrhea. In half of the patients respiratory symptoms occur. Later on, some patients may experience hypotension, oliguria and other signs of renal failure, and apart from petechial, severe hemorrhages may also occur in other organs. During typical clinical presentation of the disease, some characteristic symptoms are clearly distinguished in particular stages of the disease. Therefore, the course of HFRS is usually divided into five distinct stages (febrile, hypotensive, oliguric, polyuric and convalescent). Such a course of the disease is more commonly present in case of DOB virus than PUU virus infection. The febrile stage with sudden onset usually lasts from 3 to 7 days, when thrombocytopenia and hemoconcentration, as well as albuminuria and hematuria are almost always recorded. The hypotensive stage lasts from one to 2 days on an average and is characterized by lower blood pressure and signs of renal failure. The oliguric stage usually starts at the beginning of the second week of the disease, when extensive hemorrhage may occur and urea and creatinine reach their highest values. The oliguric stage is followed by the polyuric stage which can last for up to two weeks, and is characterized by excretion of a large

  5. 31 CFR 585.524 - Humanitarian aid and trade in United Nations Protected Areas of Croatia and those areas of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Nations Protected Areas of Croatia and those areas of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina controlled by... Humanitarian aid and trade in United Nations Protected Areas of Croatia and those areas of the Republic of... in the Republic of Croatia and those areas of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina under the...

  6. [The influence of the economic recession on health care labor market in Croatia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagat, Mario; Drakulić, Velibor

    2010-01-01

    Trends in the labor market, as a result of global economic recession, are characterized by reduction of manpower activity, decreased number of employed and increased number of unemployed persons. As the result of economic recession more then million workplaces are expected to be lost in the European Union. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of economic recession on labor market in general and healthcare labor market in Croatia. In Q1/2009, the number of employed persons in the European Union declined by -1.2% compared to the same quarter of 2008, while in Croatia the number of employed persons declined by -0.4%. The comparison of quarterly employment rate in Croatia and the European Union in the period from Q2/2008 to Q1/2009 was not significantly different (p = 0.169, df = 6, t = 1.564, Student t test). Average unemployment rate in Q1/2009 in the European Union was 8.1% +/- 0.3 and it was increased by 9.4% compared to Q4/2008, while in Croatia the average unemployment rate in Q1/2009 was 8.4% +/- 0.1 and it was increased by 3.3% compared to Q4/2008. Monthly changes of unemployment rates compared between the European Union and Croatia in the six month period (Q4/2008 and Q1/2009) was significantly different (p = 0.001, df = 10, t = 4.425, Student t test). In Croatian health care system in Q1/2009 the number of employed person increased by 0.7% compared to Q1/2008, while the number of unemployed persons in the same period was reduced by -1.0%. Trends in the labor market in Croatia follow the global trends in the labor market in times of economic recession, although the increase in unemployment in Croatia was slower than in the countries of the European Union. As a result of Croatian healthcare system organization, system of financing, supply and demand on healthcare labor market, healthcare workforce in Croatia was less affected by recession than workforce in Croatia in general.

  7. Introduction of Participatory Conservation in Croatia, Residents' Perceptions: A Case Study from the Istrian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladonja, Barbara; Brščić, Kristina; Poljuha, Danijela; Fanuko, Neda; Grgurev, Marin

    2012-06-01

    Croatia, like many other transition countries has undergone radical changes in its nature protection models. This paper discusses a historical overview, present situation and future possibilities for nature conservation in Croatia. A conservative top-down approach to nature protection was applied in the past in Croatia and is now being replaced by a prevalent bottom-up approach. Social context is crucial to introducing participatory conservation, therefore special concern is given to the perception of the local population towards protected area management in Istria as a case study in Croatia. Survey data were used to assess the conservation knowledge of local populations and their perception towards Protected Areas (PAs), leadership activities and management authorities in Istria County. This paper examines the perceptions of 313 residents living in and around six natural PAs located in Istria. The results revealed a moderate general knowledge about PAs in Istria and environmental issues, and a low awareness of institutions managing PAs, eagerness to participate in the activities of PAs and general support for the conservation cause. Understanding the perception of local residents enables the creation of feasible, long-term strategies for the implementation of participatory conservation. The research identifies the need for greater human, technical and financial efforts to strengthen the management capabilities of local agencies responsible for PAs. The process of participatory conservation optimization in Croatia is underway and world experiences must be observed in order to create a congruent, site-specific model with the best possible results.

  8. Multielement atmospheric deposition study in Croatia using moss biomonitoring, NAA, AAS and GIS technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiric, Z.; Frontas'eva, M.V.; Gundorina, S.F.; Ostrovnaya, T.M.; Stafilov, T.; Enimiteva, V.; Steinnes, E.; Bukovec, D.

    2009-01-01

    For the first time the moss biomonitoring technique and two complementary analytical techniques - neutron activation analysis (NAA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) - were applied to study multielement atmospheric deposition in the Republic of Croatia. Moss samples were collected during the summer 2006 from 98 sites evenly distributed over the country. Sampling was performed in accordance with the LRTAP Convention - ICP Vegetation protocol and sampling strategy of the European Programme on Biomonitoring of Heavy Metal Atmospheric Deposition. Conventional and epithermal neutron activation analyses made it possible to determine concentrations of 41 elements including key heavy metals such as Pb, Cd, Hg, and Cu determined by AAS. Principal component analysis (factor analysis with VARIMAX rotation) was applied to distinguish elements mainly of anthropogenic origin from those predominantly originating from natural sources. Geographical distribution maps of the elements over the sampled territory were constructed using GIS technology. The median values for Croatia are consistent with the corresponding values for all Europe for most elements. It was shown that the Adriatic coastline of Croatia may be considered as an environmentally pristine area. This study was conducted for providing reliable assessment of air quality throughout Croatia and producing information needed for better identification of pollution sources and improving the potential for assessing environmental and health risks in Croatia associated with toxic metals

  9. The Quality of Gymnasium Education in the Banal Croatia in the Era of Neoabsolutism (1854-1860)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bošnjak, Arijana Kolak

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present an attempt to increase the quality of education in the Banal Croatia by analysing the reports sent to the Ministry of Religion and Education in Vienna by secondary school supervisor for the Banal Croatia Anton Jarc as well as the existing scholarly literature. The mentioned attempt was based on a reform of the…

  10. Communication of 2 June 1998 received from the Permanent Mission of Croatia to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of a communication dated 2 June 1998 received at the IAEA from the Permanent Mission of Croatia to the IAEA, including a statement from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Croatia, regarding the tests of nuclear weapons conducted by Pakistan

  11. The radioactive contamination level in Croatia by means of radioactive rainwaters, caused by the accident in NPP 'Lenin'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barishicj, D.; Koshuticj, K.; Kvastek, K.; Lulicj, S.; Tuta, J.; Vertachnik, A.; Vrhovac, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, the radioactive contamination level in Croatia by means of radioactive rainwaters, caused by the accident in NPP 'Lenin', has been described. The results represent the sum of measured and evaluated data, the map of the radioactive contamination in Croatia caused by radioactive rainwaters between April, 28 to May, 20 1986 has been constructed. (author) 3 tabs.; 5 figs

  12. Some predictors of life goals in Slovenia and Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Poljšak Škraban

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Personal goals and interests play an important role in human development because they orient people's life planning, decision-making and also, therefore, their future life course. The article presents the findings of a research which explores the eventual differences between Slovenian and Croatian sample in agency-oriented and communion-oriented life goals and the analysis of significant predictors of above mentioned life goals on both samples. The research included 924 adults of both genders, aged between 21 and 70 years from Slovenia and Croatia. In the study we used the scale of Goals (Pohlman and Brunstein, 1997 and a set of questions regarding various participant's life domains and their perceived importance. The results show significant differences on agency- oriented and communion-oriented life goals between the Slovenian and Croatian sample; in both cases croatian participants reach higher results than those from slovenina sample. As significant predictors in both samples were identified (a age and importance of effective use of free time for agency-oriented goals, and (b and gender, parenthood, importance of parenthood and importance of effective use of free time for communion-oriented life goals. The differences in results are explained by respective levels of social modernisation and social welfare, given the fact the Slovenian respondents are embedded in the social environment that offers more possibilities for fullfilment of their life goals, and are closer to postmaterialism and individualism.a

  13. PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT OF UCITS INVESTMENT FUNDS IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Curkovic

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available UCITS investment funds represent an important investment opportunity for retail, as well for institutional investors in the European Union. The aim of this paper is to analyse the performance of the UCITS investment funds in Croatia and to detect relatively homogeneous groups among the UCITS funds based on its performance. The analysis includes 55 UCITS, in the period from the beginning of 2011 until the end of 2014, and it is conducted on daily data of share prices, available from Bloomberg terminal. Analysis is performed separately within the groups of different investment fund by investment strategy. The research methodology is based on the calculation of various indicators of absolute and relative risk-adjusted performance and riskiness of the funds. In general, based on analysis of performance measures, it can be concluded that funds with higher values of net assets were more successful compared to the funds with below-average asset values. Also, funds with below-average values of net assets were more volatile. At the same time, funds run by foreign own management companies were more successful by the absolute performance measures, compared to funds run by management companies with domestic ownership. On the other hand, those funds were more volatile, as well.

  14. Biogas production on dairy farms: A Croatia case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Bilandžija

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the differences in the production and composition of biogas as well as the quality of digested residue from anaerobic digestion of the raw materials generated by dairy farms in Croatia, investigations were undertaken in the biogas laboratory facility of the Faculty of Agriculture. The investigated raw materials were: dairy manure, corn silage, haylage and equal-measure mix (1/3 of all raw materials. For each substrate, three runs of experiments were performed with the same overall hydraulic retention time (40 days and temperature of digestion (35 °C in mesophilic conditions. The investigations found that the most efficient production of biogas was from corn silage. As for biogas composition, it was acceptable in all investigated samples both in energy and environmental terms. Digested residues, which are mildly alkaline, have low dry matter content. About 70 % of dry matter content is organic. On the basis of N:P:K analysis and the analysis of biogenic elements values and heavy metal values, it can be concluded that digested residues of all input raw materials can be used in agricultural production.

  15. EUROPEAN FUNDING - IMPACT ON RESEARCH CAPACITY IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Kotarski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Limited national budgetary resources for R&D in period from 2007 to 2013 imposed a need for Croatian researchers to apply for European research grants. A challenge for effective absorption of European Structural and Investment Funds in the period 2014 to 2020, highlight a need to assess the impact of this external funding on research capacity in Croatia in 2007-2013 period. Qualitative interviews with grant recipients from Ruder Boskovic Institute revealed intangible achievements in terms of research career, enhanced interaction and knowledge transfer to business community, improved research management competences and possibilities for collaboration with internationally recognized research teams. Similar results from studies carried out in other countries indicates the importance of intangible achievements of research grants, which are becoming more and more relevant in the context of public policies (networking, cooperation, strategic planning, knowledge management. The use of EU funds is an extremely complex process which requires a change of approach to the use of public funds and the introduction of the principle of transparency of procedures for all stakeholders in the process, equal access to information and sound financial management. Weaknesses of the Croatian scientific system and absence of will to support excellent research through competitive funding present real threats to successful participation of Croatian researchers in the European framework programs and other external research funding programs. Findings of the study provide valuable insight for national authorities in terms of effective management of national research and innovation programs while maximizing the potential impact of EU funds allocated.

  16. Poverty and Politics on the Labour Market in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran Šošić

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares indicators of the Croatian labor market and implemented policies with indicators and policies in other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Although unemployment and long-term unemployment (which latter is particularly correlated with poverty in the transition countries do not in Croatia depart from the range in which other transition countries are positioned, still they are above their average, which is connected with the somewhat less flexible nature of the Croatian labor market. New findings on the effects of labor market policies in the transition countries indicate that the process of the reform of the institutional framework through which in the last few years the restrictiveness of Croatian employment protection legislation has been reduced might work in the direction of reducing overall and long-term unemployment. The paper suggests that it is possible to improve the effectiveness of the application of active policy measures. Furthermore, a better compensation for a reduction in the restrictiveness of the regulations would probably be an increase in average unemployment benefits rather than an extension of their duration, while greater labor market flexibility, resulting from the reforms, should contribute to a greater coverage of unemployed persons. The expected reduction of overall and long-term unemployment under the influence of the new institutional framework, in spite of the possible emergence of low-paid and insecure jobs, might alleviate the problem of poverty, because unemployment and, especially, long-term unemployment are among the prime causes of poverty in the transition countries.

  17. Energy potential of fruit tree pruned biomass in Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilandzija, N.; Voca, N.; Kricka, T.; Martin, A.; Jurisic, V.

    2012-11-01

    The world's most developed countries and the European Union (EU) deem that the renewable energy sources should partly substitute fossil fuels and become a bridge to the utilization of other energy sources of the future. This paper will present the possibility of using pruned biomass from fruit cultivars. It will also present the calculation of potential energy from the mentioned raw materials in order to determine the extent of replacement of non-renewable sources with these types of renewable energy. One of the results of the intensive fruit-growing process, in post pruning stage, is large amount of pruned biomass waste. Based on the calculated biomass (kg ha{sup 1}) from intensively grown woody fruit crops that are most grown in Croatia (apple, pear, apricots, peach and nectarine, sweet cherry, sour cherry, prune, walnut, hazelnut, almond, fig, grapevine, and olive) and the analysis of combustible (carbon 45.55-49.28%, hydrogen 5.91-6.83%, and sulphur 0.18-0.21%) and non-combustible matters (oxygen 43.34-46.6%, nitrogen 0.54-1.05%, moisture 3.65-8.83%, ashes 1.52-5.39%) with impact of lowering the biomass heating value (15.602-17.727 MJ kg{sup 1}), the energy potential of the pruned fruit biomass is calculated at 4.21 PJ. (Author) 31 refs.

  18. Geochemical patterns in soils of the karst region, Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohic, E.; Hausberger, G.; Davis, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Soil samples were collected at 420 locations in a 5-km grid pattern in the Istria and Gorski Kotar areas of Croatia, and on the Croatian islands of Cres, Rab and Krk, in order to relate geochemical variation in the soils to underlying differences in geology, bedrock lithology, soil type, environment and natural versus anthropogenic influences. Specific objectives included assessment of possible agricultural and industrial sources of contamination, especially from airborne effluent emitted by a local power plant. The study also tested the adequacy of a fixed-depth soil sampling procedure developed for meager karstic soils. Although 40 geochemical variables were analyzed, only 15 elements and 5 radionuclides are common to all the sample locations. These elements can be divided into three groups: (1) those of mostly anthropogenic origin -Pb, V, Cu and Cr; (2) those of mixed origin - radionuclides and Zn; and (3) those of mostly geogene origin -Ba, Sr, Ti, Al, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Ni and Co. Variation in Pb shows a strong correlation with the pattern of road traffic in Istria. The distributions of Ca, Na and Mg in the flysch basins of southern Istria and Slovenia are clearly distinguishable from the distributions of these elements in the surrounding carbonate terrains, a consequence of differences in bedrock permeability, type of drainage and pH. The spatial pattern of Cs from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident reflects almost exclusively the precipitation in Istria during the days immediately after the explosion. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Real estate boom and export performance bust in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Tkalec

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to estimate the effect of resource reallocation from the manufacturing to the real estate economic sector on exporting activity in Croatia, a small open post-transition country that experienced a real estate boom during the previous decade. This paper follows the work by Égert and Kierzenkowski (2014 as we test the hypothesis that the real estate boom had an adverse impact on country’s export performance. For that purpose we use quarterly data ranging from 1Q1998 to 3Q2013, and estimate export equations using maximum likelihood and dynamic ordinary least squares estimators of cointegration. Our results indicate that the distortion of relative prices in favor of non-tradable sectors (construction and real estate, which is a direct by-product of the real estate boom, has had stifling effects on export performance. Our results also suggest that ailing cost competitiveness and governments’ inability to implement policies promoting private sector economic development adversely influenced export performance during the period analyzed. The basic conclusion of our research is that the expansion of a non-tradable sector in a country with limited supply of production factors can have a detrimental effect on the ability of the tradable sector to increase its output and compete in international markets.

  20. Wound infection after median sternotomy during the war in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelić, I; Anić, D; Alfirević, I; Kalinić, S; Ugljen, R; Letica, D; Ante Korda, Z; Vucemilo, I; Bulat, C; Predrijevac, M; Corić, V; Husar, J; Jelic, M; Hulina, D; Depina, I; Dadić, D

    1996-12-01

    From 1990 to 1994 at Clinical Hospital Center, Zagreb, 1904 median sternotomies were performed for cardiac operations. Patients shared the same intensive care unit (ICU) with the wounded persons, admitted to the hospital from battlefield. Infection developed in 124 patients, an incidence of 6.51%. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated from 90, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) from 19, and gram negative bacilli (GNB) from 56 patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 2, and Clostridium pneumoniae in 1 case. Ninety-six patients (5.04%) developed superficial localized infection of subcutaneous tissues and they were treated with frequent dressing changes with antibiotic-soaked gauze in combination with systemic antibiotics. Twenty-eight patients (1.47%) developed mediastinitis and sternal dehiscence. They were treated by operative debridement followed by reclosure of the sternum with continuous antibiotic irrigation. We obtained satisfactory results with our method of closure of sternum which is a modification of Robicsek's technique. Nine of them required further operation. In seven cases we performed muscle flaps and in two omentoplasty. One hundred and twenty patients were discharged in satisfactory condition. The uncontrolled mediastinal sepsis caused death in 4 patients. Higher infection rate after median sternotomy during 1991 and 1992 could be possibly explained with the war circumstances in Croatia, and especially with MRSA strain becoming endemic in surgical ICU.

  1. Secular trend of menarche in Zagreb (Croatia) adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veček, Nenad; Veček, Andrea; Zajc Petranović, Matea; Tomas, Zeljka; Arch-Veček, Branka; Skarić-Jurić, Tatjana; Miličić, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    To study the secular trend of menarche in high-school urban adolescent girls (Zagreb, Croatia) over the last two decades, and to evaluate the possible impact of worsening of socio-economic conditions on age at menarche during the Croatian War of Independence (1991-1995). Three surveys of female adolescents aged 15-19 years: (a) 523 girls interviewed in 1990, (b) 888 girls interviewed in 1997, and (c) 399 girls interviewed in 2010. Self-reported age at menarche (in decimal years) was presented by age groups and year of interview. Differences in mean age at menarche between adolescent age groups as well as between surveys were tested using One-way ANOVA. The mean age at menarche was 12.82 years in 1990, 12.92 years in 1997 and 12.31 years in 2010. It increased by 0.10 years from 1990 to 1997 (p=0.290) and then declined by 0.61 years from 1997 to 2010 (pZagreb adolescents continued to decline significantly from 1990 to 2010 (p<0.001), in spite of a statistically insignificant initial increase between 1990 and 1997. When put in broader context, age at menarche mirrored socio-economic changes in the war period. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radon dose in cellars during the war in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planinic, J.; Lokobauer, N.; Franic, Z.; Bauman, A.

    1993-01-01

    During the war in 1991 and 1992, because of artillery bombardment, the citizens of Croatia have been forced to live underground in shelters and cellars and therefore they have been exposed to an additional radon radiation. Rn concentration in shelters (cellars) and dwellings of Osijek and Zagreb were measured by means of a silicon detector (Radhome) and also, at several locations, by an LR-115 nuclear track detector. Estimated monthly radon exposures in dwellings and cellars of Osijek or Zagreb were (2.88±1.58)x10 4 Bq h m -3 and (6.62±3.17)x10 4 Bq h m -3 , respectively, or (1.94±0.72)x10 4 Bq h m -3 and (7.46±7.78)x10 4 Bq h m -3 . Inhabitants of Osijek and Zagreb have received, on the average, the effective dose equivalent of 4.1 and 2.6 mSv y -1 , respectively. (author) 4 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  3. Studies of osteoporosis in Croatia using isotope related techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozegovic, D.D.

    2000-01-01

    Pilot study was held to evaluate bone stiffness in children and adolescents in two districts of Croatia which, according to previous knowledge, differ in calcium intake. The relationship between habitual calcium intake and bone stiffness was determined. It was difficult and expensive to organise a transport of Istrian children to Zagreb in order to perform x-rays absorptiometry. Therefore, bone stiffness was determined with a portable ultrasound system. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were continued in subjects of both sex, across the age range 20-50 years from the central district of the city of Zagreb. Subjects were randomly selected from the demographic list. There is a tendency of BMD fall after the age of menopause in women. It appears that peak bone mass in women is obtained in the mid- 20s and In men at 30 years of age. The general conclusion about the trends observed In the population will be given after collection of all data. Calcium intake has an influence on peak bone mass, which becomes evident at the adolescent age. Children who had higher calcium intake had a higher bone mass, although that difference was not statistically significant That finding was more apparent in males. The calcium intake in Zagreb children was higher, so was the energy intake, but the mean body mass Index was identical, which indicates higher physical activity in children from Zagreb. Besides the calcium intake, the role of energy value of the food and habitual physical activities seem to be important in bone maturation

  4. HYDROGEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE ST. IVAN SPRING IN ISTRIA, CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Vlahović

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to geological, hydrogeological investigations and groundwater tracing, detailed surveying of the groundwater quality is becoming particularly important for environmental impact monitoring on karst aquifers. Groundwater quality data contain two types of information i.e. the natural chemistry of water and its modifications caused by antropogenic impacts. The method of results presentation as well as the importance of water quality surveying particularly with respect to the indicators showing its natural chemistry, are shown here exemplified by the St. Ivan spring in Istria, Croatia. Natural chemistry of the groundwater is a consequence of hydrogeochemical facies, and it is used here for interpretation of spring generating conditions and the origin of groundwater. Results obtained so far confirm that the extent of recharge area of the spring change in dependence of the hydrological conditions. Hydrogeochemical characteristics of the spring are presented graphically in the form of correlation diagrams showing major groundwater parameters, saturation conditions and trends of particular parameters as a function of time.

  5. Citizenship Education in Croatia: At the Margins of the System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anka Kekez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper unfolds the ways in which Croatia, as a young post-communist democracy, has aligned its transition and consolidation with the development of education programs that would support the protection of human rights and the creation of a democratic political culture. Design/methodology/approach: By combining the existing studies with the authors’ own analyses of documents and internet sources, as well as interviews with teachers, this paper reveals that by adopting vague and non-binding policies, the Croatian political elite has demonstrated a lack of political will and courage over the past twenty-five years to develop a systematic and quality-based citizenship education. Findings: After long-term negligence, in the most recent five-year period, the need to change the educational path has gained prominence on the policy and political agenda. However, the reform process did not result in bridging, but in the deepening of ideological divides within the Croatian society. With the officially adopted interdisciplinary and cross-curricular approach, the responsibility for carrying out citizenship education was placed in the hands of teachers, with civil society organizations taking a compensating role. Whilst the former lack practical education, as well as guidelines and resources to incorporate citizenship education into the subjects they teach, the latter are incapable of reaching out to a sufficient share of the youth population. The outcome is that the youth continuously displays inadequate levels of citizenship competences.

  6. Volatiles from a rare Acer spp. honey sample from Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerković, Igor; Marijanović, Zvonimir; Malenica-Staver, Mladenka; Lusić, Drazen

    2010-06-24

    A rare sample of maple (Acer spp.) honey from Croatia was analysed. Ultrasonic solvent extraction (USE) using: 1) pentane, 2) diethyl ether, 3) a mixture of pentane and diethyl ether (1:2 v/v) and 4) dichloromethane as solvents was applied. All the extracts were analysed by GC and GC/MS. The most representative extracts were 3) and 4). Syringaldehyde was the most striking compound, being dominant in the extracts 2), 3) and 4) with percentages 34.5%, 33.1% and 35.9%, respectively. In comparison to USE results of other single Croatian tree honey samples (Robinia pseudoacacia L. nectar honey, Salix spp. nectar and honeydew honeys, Quercus frainetto Ten. honeydew as well as Abies alba Mill. and Picea abies L. honeydew) and literature data the presence of syringaldehyde, previously identified in maple sap and syrup, can be pointed out as a distinct characteristic of the Acer spp. honey sample. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with GC and GC/MS identified benzaldehyde (16.5%), trans-linalool oxide (20.5%) and 2-phenylethanol (14.9%) as the major compounds that are common in different honey headspace compositions.

  7. Problem of radioactive lightning rods in the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.

    1994-01-01

    It became evident that as in most countries in Europe and other world, the radioactive lightning preventers will be prohibited in Croatia. It has to be done gradually and in phases. About 50% of whole number of radioactive lightning rods is mounted on hotels, and other are on industrial objects. Request for immediate replacement of them can almost fully load the available storage with radioactive waste, and the ex users should spent a significant sums of money to built an alternative lightning protection. One of the options is to use dismounted sources and use them for some other convenient purpose even for renewing the other radioactive lightning rod. In our opinion the best is to prohibit installation of the new lightning rods and existing ones dismount after elapsing the time for replacement of the radioactive attachment. After some years all radioactive lightning rods would be dismounted with smaller financial burden to ex users and community resulting also with less net amounts of radioactive waste

  8. Radiocarbon application in environmental science and archaeology in Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajcar Bronic, I., E-mail: krajcar@irb.h [Radiocarbon Laboratory, Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Obelic, B.; Horvatincic, N.; Baresic, J.; Sironic, A. [Radiocarbon Laboratory, Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Minichreiter, K. [Institute of Archaeology, Ulica grada Vukovara 68, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2010-07-21

    Radiocarbon is a cosmogenic radioisotope equally distributed throughout the troposphere and biosphere. This fact enables its most common application-radiocarbon dating. Natural equilibrium of radiocarbon has been disturbed by diverse anthropogenic activities during the last {approx}150 years, enabling also the use of {sup 14}C in various environmental applications. Here we present three types of studies by using {sup 14}C that were performed in the Zagreb Radiocarbon Laboratory. {sup 14}C in atmospheric CO{sub 2} has been monitored at several sites with various anthropogenic influences and the difference between the clean-air sites, the industrial city and the vicinity of a nuclear power plant has been established. {sup 14}C has been applied in geochronology of karst areas, especially in dating of tufa, speleothems and lake sediments, as well as in studies of geochemical carbon cycle. {sup 14}C has been used in various archaeological studies, among which the dating of the early Neolithic settlements in Croatia is presented. In these studies {sup 14}C was measured by radiometric techniques, i.e., by gas proportional counting and more recently by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Two sample preparation techniques for LSC measurement were used: benzene synthesis for archaeological dating and other applications that require better precision, and direct absorption of CO{sub 2} for monitoring purposes. The presented results show that various studies by using {sup 14}C can be successfully performed by the LSC technique, providing a large enough sample (>1 g of carbon).

  9. MOTIVES FOR ASSET REVALUATION POLICY CHOICE IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željana Aljinović Barać

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to research managers’ motives of accounting policy choice for long-term nonfinancial assets. International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS allow managers to choose between cost and revaluation model for measurement after recognition. The assumption is that manager’s decision is opportunistic so they use the revaluation model as a device to improve perceptive borrowing capacity of a company, and consequently, to reduce debt cost. Prior studies were mainly conducted in developed, marketoriented economies, unlike Croatia. The contribution of this paper is the research of motives and determinants of asset revaluation policy choice in bank-oriented economies with inactive markets. Furthermore, multivariate logistic regression was not used as a research method in this field of accounting in transition and emerging economies till now. Empirical evidence is provided through the sample of Croatian listed companies and the results show that large, profitable companies with low liquidity ratio, low cash flow ratio and increasing debt are more likely to perform upward revaluation.

  10. Organizing for Emergencies - Issues in Wildfire Fighting in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fabac

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Croatia's accession to the European Union implies inevitable changes in the national emergency management system. New requirements for adjustment in accordance with the EU standards and practices also apply to the fire-services organization. Harmonious functioning of a large number of relatively autonomous organizations related to the National Protection and Rescue Directorate necessitates clear decision-making authority and coordination mechanisms as well as a high level of interoperability and core competencies development. This paper gives an overview of the Croatian fire protection organization along with its accompanying legislation, followed by an analysis of identified problems, especially those concerning fighting of wildfire. In our research a survey questionnaire comprised of Likert-scale items was used to assess the attitudes and experiences of trained fire department members. The respondents reported a relatively low evaluation of effectiveness and appropriateness of the following key fire service attributes: organizational structure, legislation and firefighting logistics support. From the obtained results guidelines can be drawn for possible redesign of the emergency management organization, especially those concerning the fire protection service.

  11. Card products market in the Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Šučur

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Card business in the Republic of Croatia started to develop more than 30 years ago in the form of non-bank card products, issued by American Express and Diners Club global payment systems. These card products were defined as standard charge cards and had been the only card products present in the market until bank cards appeared about ten years ago. The situation changed completely when banks started to enter the market as active participants in the card business. In co-operation with bank global payment systems, MasterCard Worldwide and Visa International, banks have issued several millions of various cards in just a few years, while non-bank issuers have followed the same trend with new card products. This paper explores the current situation in the domestic market; it determines who the cardholders of particular products are, which products they are familiar with, whether they use them or not and for what reason. Cardholders’ opinions, attitudes and preferences towards existing products have been explored, as well as the benefits they would like to get. The results obtained imply that cardholders are familiar with all bank and non-bank card brands, but that they use mostly those which provide them with specific benefits. Therefore, instead of focusing on providing more similar products, issuers should concentrate on designing differentiated products that have been tailored to cardholders’ real needs.

  12. Development of Small Entrepreneurship in the Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijan Rajsman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship is a driving force of any economy and as such, the foundation of a country’s success. Whether we speak of small, medium or large enterprises, each of them has responsibility assumed by taking on a risk of starting a new business, because every new idea to be realized reveals a true entrepreneur. A small initial idea can become a big business in the course of its implementation, thereby ensuring further development of entrepreneurs, but also contributing to the growth of the entire economy. New “entrepreneurs” are emerging on a daily basis, funding their start-ups with their own or borrowed means. A true entrepreneur is the one who manages to realize his or her idea. Small entrepreneurs account for the largest proportion of new businesses. They have to deal with conditions of ruthless competition characterized by a large number of bankruptcies and financial problems. In this paper we address the situation of small business n the Republic of Croatia and the problems faced by entrepreneurs in conducting their business.

  13. Designing the model for evaluating business quality in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ježovita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the paper includes designing a model for evaluating the financial quality of business operations. In that context, for the paper purposes, the financial quality of business operations is defined as an ability to achieve adequate value of individual financial ratios for financial position and performance evaluation. The objective of the model is to obtain comprehensive conclusion about the financial quality of business operation using only value of the function. Data used for designing the model is limited to financial data available from the annual balance sheet and income statement. Those limitations offer the opportunity for all sizes of companies from the non-financial business economy sector to use the designed model for evaluation purposes. Statistical methods used for designing the model are multivariate discriminant analysis and logistic regression. Discriminant analysis resulted in the function which includes five individual financial ratios with the best discriminant power. Respecting the results obtained in the classification matrix with classification accuracy of 95.92% by the original sample, or accuracy of 96.06% for the independent sample, it can be concluded that it is possible to evaluate the financial quality of business operations of companies in Croatia by using the model composed of individual financial ratios. Conducted logistic regression confirms the results obtained using discriminant analysis.

  14. Perspectives of tax reforms in Croatia: expert opinion survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Šimović

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to shape tax reform it is necessary objectively to assess the current stateof-the-art of and of the outlook for the tax system. After having reviewed all previous reforms in the light of the consumption-based (interest-adjusted concept of direct taxation, which was almost systematically implemented in Croatia in 1994, we present the results of a broad expert opinion survey about the Croatian tax system. The most interesting results suggest the maintenance/(reintroduction of different tax incentives and reduced VAT rates, rejection of a flat tax as well as decrease of tax brackets, an increase in alcohol and tobacco duties, the introduction of a financial activities tax, a further shift from income to consumption, a decrease of the tax share in GDP and a belief in the behavioral responsiveness of tax decreases/exemptions, as well as a firm commitment to the principle of equity. The last three economic views/values are important predictors of other tax attitudes.

  15. First Epigravettian Ceramic Figurines from Europe (Vela Spila, Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbstein, Rebecca; Radić, Dinko; Brajković, Dejana; Miracle, Preston T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent finds of 36 ceramic artifacts from the archaeological site of Vela Spila, Croatia, offer the first evidence of ceramic figurative art in late Upper Palaeolithic Europe, c. 17,500–15,000 years before present (BP). The size and diversity of this artistic ceramic assemblage indicate the emergence of a social tradition, rather than more ephemeral experimentation with a new material. Vela Spila ceramics offer compelling technological and stylistic comparisons with the only other evidence of a developed Palaeolithic ceramic tradition found at the sites of Pavlov I and Dolní Věstonice I, in the Czech Republic, c. 31,000–27,000 cal BP. Because of the 10,000-year gap between the two assemblages, the Vela Spila ceramics are interpreted as evidence of an independent invention of this technology. Consequently, these artifacts provide evidence of a new social context in which ceramics developed and were used to make art in the Upper Palaeolithic. PMID:22848495

  16. Impact of the economic crisis on the roadworthiness of vehicles in the Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stipe BILIĆ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the economic crisis, i.e. the decrease in purchasing power in the Republic of Croatia, has been reflected negatively on the sales of new road vehicles and the maintenance plan of used road vehicles. A comparison of the results of technical inspections on vehicle roadworthiness has indicated a slight increase in unroadworthy vehicles, with a tendency for this to increase. Unroadworthiness and the average age of vehicles amounting to 12.18 years prompt for thinking about road safety in the Republic of Croatia. This paper aims to establish the extent of the increase in vehicle unroadworthiness and the importance of its reduction in order to increase road safety. The Republic of Croatia has adopted the National Road Safety Program for 2011-2020, accepting thereby a task that will be difficult to accomplish without organising training on the importance of vehicle roadworthiness.

  17. Quantification of climate tourism potential of Croatia based on measured data and regional modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosy, Caroline; Zaninovic, Ksenija; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Tourism is one of the most important economic sectors in Croatia. The Adriatic coast is a popular travel destination for tourists, especially during the summer months. During their activities, tourists are affected by atmospheric conditions and therefore by weather and climate. Therefore, it is important to have reliable information about thermal conditions as well as their impacts on human beings. Here, the climate tourism potential of Croatia is presented and quantified on the basis of three selected stations in different climatic regions. The physiologically equivalent temperature is used for analysis as well as other climatic parameters relevant for tourism and recreation. The results already point to hot conditions for outdoor activities in summer during afternoons, especially along the coast but also for continental regions, resulting in a reduction of the climate tourism potential. In the future, this trend looks set to increase, possibly leading to a changing tourism sector in Croatia requiring adaptation and new strategies.

  18. Energy policy as the bridge in Croatia's approach to the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuvela, I.

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of the paper brings elements of the EU energy policy through three development phases. in order to decrease deficit in energy resources, the Union required from the member-countries to adjust their national energy policies to the common strategic interests of the Union and to exploit the synergic effects' advantages brought by the energy sector integration and common energy market. In continuation the energy policy development and the newest reform of energy sector in Croatia are analysed, which will introduce market relations and the rationalisation of energy production and consumption into the sector. The comparative analysis of energy policies and long-term tendencies of energy development reveals some substantial similarities in the development of energy sector and energy policy of the EU and Croatia. Therefore, it can be presumed the energy reform implementation would bring croatia close to the energy standards of the EU. (author)

  19. Radwaste management and transport in the Republic of Croatia -present status and main issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucar Dragicevic, S.; Subasic, D.

    1996-01-01

    Radioactive waste in Croatia is generated from various nuclear applications as well as from Krsko NPP (a joint venture Slovenian and Croatian facility). The national programme on radioactive waste management is aimed at straightening existing infrastructure in the field, establishing a new and more transparent system of responsibilities as well as developing new legislation. The siting of the LLW/ILW repository in the Republic of Croatia is one of the most important steps in the whole radioactive waste management cycle. A review of the main activities, the role of institutions involved and some on-going projects which cover the present situation in the field of radioactive waste management in Croatia are presented. (Author)

  20. Attitudes Towards Immigrants, Immigration Policies and Labour Market Outcomes: Comparing Croatia with Hungary and Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botrić Valerija

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides comparative evidence on attitudes towards immigrants, their labour market outcomes and policies in Croatia and two neighbouring countries – Slovenia and Hungary. Three different data sources have been used: the European Social Survey, an ad-hoc Labour Force Survey module for the year 2014, and the MIPEX index. Although immigrants have a disadvantaged position on the Croatian labour market, most analysed indicators do not imply that they are in a worse position than in other European economies. Migrant integration policies related to the labour market are assessed as being relatively favourable for Croatia. Judging by the comparable indicators for the native population in Croatia, immigrants’ adverse labour market outcomes seem to be more related to the unfavourable general economic situation, and particularly by the deep and long recession.

  1. First molecular analysis of West Nile virus during the 2013 outbreak in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurolt, Ivan C; Krajinović, Vladimir; Topić, Antea; Kuzman, Ilija; Baršić, Bruno; Markotić, Alemka

    2014-08-30

    This is the second subsequent year of West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND) outbreak in Croatia. Between July and October 2013, 22 patients presented with symptoms of WNND: all with meningitis and 18 additionally with encephalitis. In contrast to 2012, where six autochthonous infections were confirmed in eastern Croatia, the majority of this year's cases occurred in and around the city of Zagreb, where no West Nile virus infections have been observed before. Viral RNA was recovered from two patients and phylogenetic analyses revealed West Nile virus lineage 2. This represents the first molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the circulating West Nile virus strain in Croatia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The analysis of tobacco consumption in Croatia--are we successfully facing the epidemic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padjen, Ivan; Dabić, Marina; Glivetić, Tatjana; Biloglav, Zrinka; Biočina-Lukenda, Dolores; Lukenda, Josip

    2012-03-01

    Tobacco is the largest cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to analyse several health and economically related indicators of tobacco consumption: smoking prevalence, standardized death rates (SDRs) from lung cancer and the proportion of GDP spent on tobacco in Croatia and other transitional countries--the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Hungary, Slovenia, Romania, and Bulgaria. The overall smoking prevalence in Croatia decreased by 5.2% during 1994-2005, more among females (-9.9%) than males (-0.3%). There is no significant difference in the smoking prevalence between Croatia (27.4%) and other countries. However, 33.8% of Croatian males smoked during 2002-2005, more than in Romania and the Czech Republic, and less than in Hungary and Poland. The prevalence of female smoking (21.7%) in Croatia is similar to the female smoking prevalence in Poland, the Czech Republic, and Hungary, but male smoking is predominant in all countries. The proportion of smokers among youth is above 20% and it is the highest in the Czech Republic (29.7%), followed by Hungary (26.7%), Slovenia (24.9%), Croatia (24.1%), and Poland (21.5%). The proportion of smokers among girls is higher than among boys in Slovenia, Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Croatia, contrary to Slovakia, Bulgaria, and Poland where boys smoke slightly more. There is no significant difference between the prevalence of smoking among girls in Croatia and Bulgaria, Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovenia, and Slovakia. According to the SDR from lung cancer in males (70.3/100,000), Croatia is ranked high assuming the 3rd place, after Hungary (99.7) and Poland (72.0). With a SDR of 15.9/100,000 for females, Croatia is ranked slightly better--5th place. Tobacco consumption continues to be a major public health problem in transitional countries. Croatia conducted several campaigns and programmes in the past. However, results reveal that current anti-tobacco strategies are ineffective in reducing

  3. The state of external equilibrium in Croatia and its long term stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen Derado

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available From the outset of transition Croatia faces a serious problem of external imbalance as a consequence of unfinished structural and institutional reforms. The external balance crisis can be seen through raising international trade deficit and structural characteristics of trade flows. To these unfavorable characteristics belong export reorientation from developed to less developed countries, increasing number of industries in which Croatia has position of net-importer and export structure in which dominate low-value-added products. Increasing trade deficit in 2001 and 2002 followed by further growth in external indebtedness cause increasing burden of debt service and limit the possibilities for economic growth. Taking all this as well as real limits in further external imbalance growth into consideration it can be said that Croatia realizes high level of external disequilibrium. In contrast, advanced transition countries achieve fairly good and stabile external positions thanks to successful economic restructuring and strong export growth.

  4. River engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, M.

    1993-01-01

    One dimension models - basic eauations, analytical models, numberical models. One dimensional models -suspended load, roughness and resistance of river beds. Solving river problems - tools, flood mitigation, bank protection.

  5. Microsatellite based genetic structure of regional transboundary Istrian sheep breed populations in Croatia and Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Gutierrez-Gil

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Istrian dairy sheep is a local breed essential for the identity and development of the Northern- Adriatic karstic region through high-quality products, primarily the hard sheep artisanal cheese. Border changes fragmented the initial Istrian dairy sheep population in three genetically isolated sub-populations in Italy (1000 animals, Slovenia (1150 animals and Croatia (2500 animals. Due to the drastic reduction of their population sizes and fragmentation, the populations in Croatia and Slovenia are included in governmentally supported conservation programs. The initial subpopulation in Italy was restored after near extinction with stock from Slovenia, and is used today in meat production. The aim of this study was to provide an initial understanding of the current genetic structure and distribution of the genetic variability that exists in Istrian sheep by analysing individuals sampled in two regional groups of Istrian sheep from Croatia and Slovenia. Cres island sheep and Lika pramenka sheep were used as out-groups for comparison. Genetic differentiation was analysed using factorial correspondence analysis and structure clustering over 26 microsatellite loci for a total of 104 sheep belonging to three breeds from Croatia and Slovenia. Factorial correspondence analysis and clustering-based structure analysis both showed three distinct populations: Lika pramenka sheep, Cres island sheep and Istrian sheep. We did not find a marked genetic divergence of the regional groups of Istrian sheep. Istrian sheep regional group from Slovenia showed lower genetic variability compared to the one from Croatia. Variability and structure information obtained in this study considered alongside with socio-cultural-contexts and economic goals for the Istrian sheep reared in Croatia and Slovenia indicate that the cross-border exchange of genetic material of animals carrying private alleles among populations would maintain these alleles at low frequencies and minimize

  6. Serbs in political and military elites of the Ustaše's Independent State of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atlagić Marko P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of Serbian participation in the political and military elites and leadership of the Independent State of Croatia was not enough or rather not at all scientifically analysed and researched. The purpose of this paper is to inspire the historians of our recent past to research and critically evaluate the problems. In the beginning of the war during the establishment of the Independent State of Croatia, the Serbs were not involved in the Home Guard units as regular armed forces of Independent State of Croatia. Along with the development of the Independent Ustaš State of Croatia, the necessity for Serbian participation in Home Guard units arose. The Serbs were mainly educated in Austro-Hungarian schools for officers. They also participated in the armed forces of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes i.e. the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. The most prominent among them were: Dr Savo Besarović, general Teodor Dragojlov, general Đuro Dragičević, general Đuro Grujić, a knight, general Milan Desović, general Mihailo Lukić, general Dušan Palčić, general Miroslav Opačić (Fridrich, a church official Zvonimir Stimaković, general Miloš Obrknežević, Minister without portfolio Ljubomir Antić, general Lalislav Milić, general Milan Uzelac and others. Apart from being the most prominent ones in the Home Guard units, there were Serbs in the political elites of the Independent State of Croatia, as well as in the Presidency of the Parliament and in the positions of the Ministers in the Independent State of Croatia. This phenomenon should be an example for future generations, in a case of war, not to happen that one part of the people takes the enemy side because the greatest sin ever is to betray its own people and country.

  7. The Recent Development of Croatia's Population – Regular and Irregular Population Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Lajić

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of Croatia’s population is burdened by many phenomena, due to which we can define it as irregular. Aggression against the newly-independent Croatian state, as well as the wars in its neighbourhood, brought about mechanical population movements that to a great degree enter into the category of forced migrations. The war death rate in the early 1990s and the strong refugee and expellee flows caused the strongest depopulation in recent times. Depopulation was present not only in war-effected areas – its further consequences were felt throughout Croatia. The mechanical, rather than the biological component determined this regressive development. The paper identifies the key modalities in migration flows in Croatia, which show that it is at the same time both an emigration and an immigration country. Wars in former Yugoslavia, which were to a high degree characterized by inter-ethnic conflicts, resulted in migration flows of people to their ethnic core areas. Thus, Croatia has received a strong immigration current made up of Croats from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia and Montenegro, whereas emigration from Croatia to the latter countries mostly involved rural Serbs. Besides these migration trends, members of the ethnically Croatian (majority population and also other groups from Croatia, have migrated to Western Europe, which was a continuation of traditional migration trends. Among these migrants there is a large contingent which could be denoted as part of the “brain drain”. The census conducted in 2001 applied a different methodology than earlier censuses. The problem of different census methodologies is especially pertinent in a country which has a large number of refugees and economic migrants that cannot be classified into the category of emigrants. Thus the 2001 Census registered that Croatia has 4,437,460 inhabitants, or 7.25% less than in 1991.

  8. MAPPING OF TOURISM POTENTIAL: THE PRECONDITIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF TOURISM IN CONTINENTAL CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Banožić

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Many Croatian scientists indicate that there are significant opportunities in tourism that can beneficially influence the overall socio-economic development of Croatia. It is recognised that Croatia has to follow more closely the contemporary tourism trends, in which much greater attention is given to ecology, the cultural identity of the destination, active vacations, service quality and selective forms of tourism development. There is also agreement that the clean sea, the coast, and the abundance of natural and cultural beauty are the advantages of Croatia’s tourism supply in the maritime part of the country. However, there are some discussions that the Continental part of Croatia is also abundant in natural beauty, cultural wealth, and gastronomy, and that it has many other underutilised tourism potentials. Different viewpoints on tourism in Croatia are based on statistical indicators, such as the level of development of tourist regions expressed through investments in infrastructure, the number of employed and the direct benefit of tourism to the economy. Despite the fact that the Continental part of Croatia abounds in tourism potential, what is offered is recognised only locally. This problem has negative impacts at the strategic level, as project planning and financing need to have a regional dimension. Some authors (Kušen, 1999; Koščak, 1998; Krippendorf, 1986; Müller, 1994; Stabler, 1996; Travis et al., 1994 have developed a cadastre of tourism potential, which has never been implemented. Therefore, this paper aims to map the tourism potentials of Continental Croatia by using the triple helix model, based on which regional tourism can be developed and future project funding ensured.

  9. The discrepancy in the perception of the public-political speech in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanta, Ivan; Lesinger, Gordana

    2014-03-01

    Key place in this paper takes the study of political speech in the Republic of Croatia and their impact on voters, or which keywords are in political speeches and public appearances of politicians in Croatia that their voting body wants to hear. Given listed below we will define the research topic in the form of a question - is there a discrepancy in the perception of the public-political speech in Croatia, and which keywords are specific to the two main regions in Croatia and that inhabitant these regions respond. Marcus Tullius Cicero, the most important Roman orator, he used a specific associative mnemonic technique that is called "technique room". He would talk expound on keywords and conceptual terms that he needed for the desired topic and join in these make them, according to the desired order, in a very creative and unique way, the premises of the house or palace, which he knew well. Then, while holding the speech intended to pass through rooms of the house or palace and then put keywords and concepts come to mind, again according to the desired order. Given that this is a specific kind of research political speech that is relatively recent in Croatia, it should be noted that there is still, this kind of political communication is not sufficiently explored. Particularly the emphasis on the impact and use of keywords specific to the Republic of Croatia, in everyday public and political communication. The paper will be analyzed the political, campaign speeches and promises several winning candidates, and now Croatian MEPs, specific keywords related to: economics, culture, science, education and health. The analysis is based on comparison of the survey results on the representation of key words in the speeches of politicians and qualitative analysis of the speeches of politicians on key words during the election campaign.

  10. The potential of bioash for utilization in road construction in eastern Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagvozda, Martina; Dimter, Sanja; Rukavina, Tatjana

    2017-12-01

    In recent years usage of biomass as energy source has intensified in eastern Croatia. Newly built biomass power plants generate great amounts of bioash that is being disposed at landfills. Due to its favorable properties bioashes could be reused as alternative materials in road construction or road fundation. Therefore, research on application of bioashes in construction industry is being conducted at Faculty of Civil Engineering in Osijek. The main motivation behind this research, in a form of biomass and bioash production in eastern Croatia as well as international research on potential application of this types of bioashes, is show in this paper.

  11. Legislation for radiation protection and nuclear safety in the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.

    1994-01-01

    The main prerequisite of radiation protection and nuclear safety development and improvement in the Republic of Croatia are: national legislation for radiation protection and nuclear safety in accordance with international recommendations; and development of state infrastructure for organization and management of radiation protection and nuclear safety measures. In this paper I the following topics are present: inherited legislation for radiation protection and nuclear safety; modern trends in world nowadays; and what is done and has to be done in the Republic of Croatia to improve this situation

  12. Vision of Energy Development, Relationships and Influences in the Period Until Year 2050 in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granic, G.; Pesut, D.; Juric, Z.

    2011-01-01

    The paper discussed the vision of energy development opportunities, relationships and influences in Croatia for the period until the year 2050. The analysis has been made on a qualitative level which includes energy markets, energy efficiency, conventional and renewable energy sources. In the end, recommendations for further energy system development are presented. Authors support the new concept of development platform, which is based on energy efficiency, new technologies and renewable energy sources. Croatia has all resources for its realization. The new development platform is also a possibility for developing science and economy. (author)

  13. The Role of Interconnecting Transmission Network in Energy Market Environment in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radmilovic, B.

    2001-01-01

    For energy market liberalisation in a small country like Croatia, it is necessary to build strong interconnecting lines to neighbouring systems. In that way it is possible to get power under favourable market conditions and also to export domestic production (especially from hydro power plants) to external markets. Geographical position of Croatia in Europe (East West, North South) is very interesting under liberalised energy market conditions. In that sense, the possibilities and role of Croatian transmission network (400 and 220 kV) for possible transits and other country needs should be analysed. (author)

  14. Migration Processes Provoked yy the Break-Up of Yugoslavia and the Agression against Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Domini

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with forced migration caused by Serb aggression in areas of Croatia and the neighbouring countries. The first part presents the relevant facts relating to Croatia and important for an understanding of the migration flows (some demographic data as well as the basic guidelines of migration policy, legal regulations and most important problems connected with expellees, refugees and displaced persons. The main elements of contemporary migration movements in Croatia are indicated – migration based on economic causes (traditional migration, migration provoked by crisis and war destruction in former Yugoslavia and migration flows that are difficult to register (mainly clandestine crossings of the border of the Republic of Croatia and the irregular labour market. The author states that the expellee, refugee and displaced persons crisis (with psychological and material repercussions began in 1991 and reached a climax in 1992 when Croatia became one of the most pronounced refugee countries in the world, with refugees accounting for about 15% of its population. As the war crisis shifted, the areas from which intense forced migration to and from Croatia resulted also shifted as did the mechanisms for regulating these forced migrations (dual citizenship, transit visas, accords with "third countries" for accepting refugees and expellees, ways of resolving and caring for the refugee-expellee populations in the Republic of Croatia. The author concludes that even after seven years from the start of the aggression against Croatia, this humanitarian crisis among expellees, refugees and displaced persons has not yet finished, as testified by the new military conflict in Kosovo and by many open questions in regard to the future organisation of states in this crisis area as well as the creation of mechanisms for monitoring potential conflicts. A fundamental idea is expressed throughout the paper – i.e. the notion that now it is maybe more

  15. The Role of Economic and Political Measures on the Palliation of Poverty in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Bejaković

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers measures for palliating poverty in Croatia. After an introductory account, poverty is defined, and a very brief description of the situation in Croatia is given. In the sequel, attention is devoted to the encouragement of economic growth, the creation of greater opportunities for employment, the enhancement of human capital, an effective welfare system and well-oriented targeting of benefits to groups that need assistance, decentralization, the restraining of corruption and the development of institutions. The paper concludes with some final considerations and proposals.

  16. Competitiveness and sustainability of HRM activities in Croatia –CRANET survey results

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Pološki Vokić

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to assess whether HRM practices in Croatia, as the newest European Union (EU) member country with only cca 20 years of free market economy which implies the change in the HRM philosophy, is heading towards more competitive or more sustainable HRM. In the theoretical part of the paper the characteristics of competitive HRM and sustainable HRM are provided. In the empirical part of the paper, using CRANET methodology, the survey of HRM practices in Croatia has been condu...

  17. Studies of osteoporosis in Croatia using isotope related techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekanic, D.; Cvijetic, S.; Bolanca, S.; Blanusa, M.; Prester, L.; Korsic, M.

    1998-01-01

    Research activities concerning the IAEA Osteoporosis Study in Croatia, during the period November 1995 - September 1996, are presented, as well as a brief summary of the study, revealing the effect of combined therapy with antiresorptive and bone stimulating agents on bone mineral density in postmenopausal women with osteopenia and osteoporosis. Bone mineral density was measured by the method of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (Lunar DPX) in the lumbar spine (L 2 -L 4 ) and at the left proximal femur (neck, Ward, trochanter) in a representative sample of 112 subjects of both sexes in the age range 15-50 years, from the city of Zagreb. Analysis of the scans and statistical evaluation of data are in progress. In a pilot study conducted in a sample of 67 college girls, ages 16-18, calcium intake, type and frequency of physical activity, alcohol consumption and smoking habit were roughly evaluated by use of a questionnaire. Height (cm), weight (kg) and calcium intake (mg/day) were (mean - + SD) 169.4- + 5.7, 57.8- + 6.1, 937- + 327, respectively. About 20 percent of girls drank less than 10 dL of wine or beer and less than 2 dL of spirits weekly, while 8% of them consumed 15-20 dL of wine or beer and 3-6 dL of spirits weekly. Fifteen percent smoked up to 20 cigarettes weekly and 5 percent 30-60 cigarettes weekly. Approximately 50 percent were regularly involved, in some kind of sporting activity, 2-3 times a week. Steps have been undertaken to organize evaluation of the present - day dietary habits of children from Istria, a part of Croatia, which was previously known as a low calcium region. All procedures necessary to start the work on a supplementary programme have been carried out. The plan for future work within the framework of the IAEA-CRP Osteoporosis Study is presented. The effect on bone mineral density of intermittent cyclical treatment with etidronate (group A) alone (400 mg orally for two weeks, followed by 500 mg of calcium daily for the next 10 weeks

  18. THE POSSIBILITIES OF MARICULTURE DEVELOPMENT IN THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Katavić

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A stronger development of national mariculture that would be compatible with natural potentialities has not been acheived yet, primarily because of uncertain political and global macroeconomic environment in which mariculture is being developed. Such a characterization can be applied for finfish production in the floating cages and hanging shellfish culture on longline systems while breeding of tuna fish in cages is expanding. An intensive development of tuna culture is a consequence of increased demands of Japan market, eventhough one can expect slow down of such a production because of limited catch of subadult fish on which tuna production is based. The mariculture development is looked upon as controlled breeding of existing and newly introduced autochthonous fish and shellfish species with constant efforts made to make these products competitive on national and interantional market. Thus the reduction of costs, better product quality and constant advancement of ecological and health standards are the main tasks of further mariculture development in Croatia. It is also indispensable to create the necessary preconditions for further development of tuna culture in floating cages particularly paying attention to ecological aspects of such a production. There are also needs to medernise the production of sea bass and gilthead sea bream, to reinforce mariculture infrastructure and logistic, in addition to sistematic support to research and development of new mariculture projects. That will be a way how mariculture can provide market with high valued marine products, to contribute improvement of trade and economic growth, and finaly to advance the living standards in rural and island communities in particular.

  19. WEATHERING PROCESS IN EOCENE FLYSCH IN REGION OF SPLIT (CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Miščević

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The Eocene flysh in the region of Split (Dalmatia, Croatia is char¬acterized by the presence of layers with different characteristics. It mainly includes thin-layered marls, clayey marls, calcareous marls, clastic lay¬ered limestones, calcarenites and breccias. Those parts that can be de¬scribed as the soft rocks or hard clays by the mechanical means, exposed to weathering reduce the durability within "an engineering time scale". The paper deals with the factors that influence the weathering process. The analyzed weathering is a combination of processes acting simulta¬neously. Most of these processes depend on the change of the water con¬tent, thus the weathering process mainly develops when a material is subjected to the wetting-drying process, On the base of these results form of degradation process is modeled. The weathering process can be main¬ly described as physical weathering combined with chemical weathering on the free surfaces and on the cracks walls. Erosion as a result of weath¬ering, is the dominant geomorphic process on analyzed flysch terrain. According to the analysis, as the most appropriate due to the characteris¬tics the tests are chosen as index properties. Some of these tests are modified in order to adapt them to the determined characteristics of ma¬terials from flysch layers. The correlations between the measured values are used as the basis for the classification proposal of the analyzed mate¬rial, according to its resistance to weathering processes. Roughly, three main groups of samples are recognizable: the first one with carbonate content more then 90% is not weathered at the engineers time scale; the second group with carbonate content from 75% to 90% include samples susceptible to weathering in engineers time scale; the third group with carbonate content less then 75% include samples in which the weather¬ing occurs immediately after the exposition to the weathering factors.

  20. Isotopic measurement in ice, Ledenica Cave, Velebit, Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvatincic, N.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of radioactive tritium ( 3 H) and stable isotopes of hydrogen ( 2 H/ 1 H) and oxygen ( 18 O/ 16 O) was determined in 45 m long ice deposit found in the Ledenica Cave, Velebit Mt., Croatia. The aim of this work was to determine the influence of the significant radioactive contamination of the atmosphere in sixties to the naturally protected environment. We took ice samples from the ice deposit at each 20 cm from the surface up to 1 m, then at the 3rd, 4th, and 5th m and at the 30th and 40 th m from the surface. The tritium analyses showed the following: The tritium activity at the surface is 1.3 Bq/L, similar as tritium concentration in the recent precipitation in Zagreb area. The maximum tritium activity was measured at the 3th m from the surface, 2.8 Bq/L. It means that the ice layer originated from the time period of 1960-1965 when, because of the thermonuclear weapon tests, the tritium activity of the atmosphere was significantly higher than today. The estimated time period of the ice deposit formation according to the tritium activity distribution and assuming the uniform sedimentation rate of ice, was app. 500 years. This is in good agreement with the 14 C age of ice deposit is 450±100 years. d 18 O and d 2 H values for ice samples range between -6.74 promilles and -10.25 promilles, and -50.3 promilles and -67.9 promilles, respectively. These values indicate the influence mostly of continental climate with dominant part of winter precipitation. A sample of speleothem from the Ledenica Cave was also dated by the 14 C and 230 Th/ 234 U dating methods. The 230 Th/ 234 U age is 301000±55000 years. (author)

  1. Mediterranean diet in the southern Croatia - does it still exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolčić, Ivana; Relja, Ajka; Gelemanović, Andrea; Miljković, Ana; Boban, Kristina; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Polašek, Ozren

    2016-10-31

    To assess the adherence to the Mediterranean diet in the population of Dalmatia in southern Croatia. A cross-sectional study was performed within the 10001 Dalmatians cohort, encompassing 2768 participants from Korčula and Vis islands and the City of Split, who were recruited during 2011-2014. Using the data obtained from food frequency questionnaire we calculated the Mediterranean Diet Serving Score (MDSS). Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the characteristics associated with the adherence to the Mediterranean diet, with age, sex, place of residence, education attainment, smoking, and physical activity as covariates. The median MDSS score was 11 out of maximum 24 points (interquartile range 8-13), with the highest score recorded on the island of Vis. Participants reported a dietary pattern that had high compliance with the Mediterranean diet guidelines for consumption of cereals (87% met the criteria), potatoes (73%), olive oil (69%), and fish (61%), moderate for consumption of fruit (54%) and vegetables (31%), and low for consumption of nuts (6%). Overall, only 23% of the participants were classified as being adherent to the Mediterranean diet, with a particularly low percentage among younger participants (12%) compared to the older ones (34%). Men were less likely to show good adherence (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.42-0.65). This study revealed rather poor compliance with the current recommendations on the Mediterranean diet composition in the population of Dalmatia. Public health intervention is especially needed in younger age groups and in men, who show the greatest departure from traditional Mediterranean diet and lifestyle.

  2. Sustainability assessment of cogeneration sector development in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liposcak, Marko; Afgan, Naim H.; Duic, Neven; Graca Carvalho, Maria da

    2006-01-01

    The effective and rational energy generation and supply is one of the main presumptions of sustainable development. Combined heat and power production, or co-generation, has clear environmental advantages by increasing energy efficiency and decreasing carbon emissions. However, higher investment cost and more complicated design and maintenance sometimes-present disadvantages from the economical viability point of view. As in the case of most of economies in transition in Central and Eastern Europe, Croatia has a strong but not very efficient co-generation sector, delivering 12% of the final energy consumption. District heating systems in the country's capital Zagreb and in city of Osijek represent the large share of the overall co-generation capacity. Besides district heating, co-generation in industry sector is also relatively well developed. The paper presents an attempt to assess the sustainability of Croatian co-generation sector future development. The sustainability assessment requires multi-criteria assessment of specific scenarios to be taken into consideration. In this respect three scenarios of Croatian co-generation sector future development are taken into consideration and for each of them environmental, social and economic sustainability indicators are defined and calculated. The assessment of complex relationships between environmental, social and economic aspects of the system is based on the multi-criteria decision-making procedure. The sustainability assessment is based on the General Sustainability Index rating for different cases reflecting different criteria and their priority. The method of sustainability assessment is applied to the Croatian co-generation sector contributing to the evaluation of different strategies and definition of a foundation for policy related to the sustainable future cogeneration sector development

  3. The estimate of regional balances of payments in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Filipić

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neither the region, as part of the state, nor regional development has occupied the centre of attention in the theory of international trade. There are several reasons, both theoretical and methodological, as well as entirely practical, including the want of any adequate statistics, particularly those necessary for the construction of Croatian regional balances of payments. Accordingly, there are several objectives to this work. After the introduction in which reference is made to the limitations of the running of individual regional economic policies, comes a chapter in which the content of an ideal regional balance of payments is defined. On the way from the ideal to the objective content of regional balances of payments, that is, one reflecting the available data, many methodological problems had to be solved and suitable statistics set up. In the sequel, the analysis of the balances of payments reveals a whole scale of regions that are negative or positive in terms of foreign currency. Although the quantities of the individual balances and items are interesting in themselves, it is important to understand that the different regional exposures to monetary policy possibly require a selective approach from economic policy. At the end, making use of the regional balances of payments, the influence of the depreciation of the kuna on the gross domestic product of the regions is analysed. It is established that in some hypothetical depreciation, if foreign currency transactions were treated ceteris paribus in relation to other economic aggregates, there would be important gains and losses, which would lead to ever greater developmental inequality in Croatia.

  4. From political capitalism to clientelist capitalism? The case of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Redžepagić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the typology of capitalism in Croatia. The Croatian form of capitalism is specific, in form and origin, with links between the pre-independence and post-independence periods, implying that capitalism has gradually evolved – from the political during the eighties towards current clientelistic capitalism. The manufacturing focus aims to facilitate the analysis of institutional, political and economic changes over the past forty years, emphasising the implications of institutional changes which have to a great extent, apart from the war of course, influenced the evolution of capitalism. The paper finds that the transition generated a number of costs, mainly generated by the state (fall in employment, manufacturing and social capital. The claim that the manufacturing industry has inherited low competitiveness neglects the necessary discussion on the role of the state in the formation of industrial policy and market actions. It is also an ex post argument for the claim that restructuring should have been implemented prior to privatisation as this would reduce negative impacts. Institutional changes led to a drastic reduction of the role of the manufacturing sector in the economy. The main finding in this paper is that the change in the interaction between the financial and the real sectors of the economy, the educational system and industrial relations system exposed the vulnerability of the current institutional environment. Despite similarities, institutional advantages of political capitalism are lost in the new type of Croatian capitalism, due to the complexity of the double transition process and the institutional or socio-economic particularities.

  5. Atmospheric conditions during high ragweed pollen concentrations in Zagreb, Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prtenjak, Maja Telišman; Srnec, Lidija; Peternel, Renata; Madžarević, Valentina; Hrga, Ivana; Stjepanović, Barbara

    2012-11-01

    We examined the atmospheric conditions favourable to the occurrence of maximum concentrations of ragweed pollen with an extremely high risk of producing allergy. Over the 2002-2009 period, daily pollen data collected in Zagreb were used to identify two periods of high pollen concentration (> 600 grains/m3) for our analysis: period A (3-4 September 2002) and period B (6-7 September 2003). Synoptic conditions in both periods were very similar: Croatia was under the influence of a lower sector high pressure system moving slowly eastward over Eastern Europe. During the 2002-2009 period, this type of weather pattern (on ~ 70% of days), in conjunction with almost non-gradient surface pressure conditions in the area (on ~ 30% of days) characterised days when the daily pollen concentrations were higher than 400 grains/m3. Numerical experiments using a mesoscale model at fine resolution showed successful multi-day simulations reproducing the local topographic influence on wind flow and in reasonable agreement with available observations. According to the model, the relatively weak synoptic flow (predominantly from the eastern direction) allowed local thermal circulations to develop over Zagreb during both high pollen episodes. Two-hour pollen concentrations and 48-h back-trajectories indicated that regional-range transport of pollen grains from the central Pannonian Plain was the cause of the high pollen concentrations during period A. During period B, the north-westward regional-range transport in Zagreb was supplemented significantly by pronounced horizontal recirculation of pollen grains. This recirculation happened within the diurnal local circulation over the city, causing a late-evening increase in pollen concentration.

  6. Organized massive forced migration of Serbs from Croatia in 1941

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škiljan Filip

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The author brings forth a range of information on forced migration of the Serb population from the Croatian part of the Independent State of Croatia in 1941 (NDH. Almost one third of the population were Serbs in the NDH. One of the methods of solving “the Serbia issue” in the NDH was migrating the Serbs into Serbia. The other methods were forced conversions of the Serbian population, namely physical killings. The adopted legal provisions made the terror policy over Serbian population legitimate. A conference was held on June 4th in the German legation in Zagreb. At the meeting it was agreed that Slovenians from Styria were to be moved to NDH, and Serbs from the NDH to Serbia. Deportation was to be carried out in three waves. The first wave was to last from June 7th to July 5th and 5000 Slovenian intellectuals from Lower Styria were to be deported directly to Serbia, except for catholic priests who were to be deported to the NDH. Orthodox priests from the NDH were to be deported to Serbia together with their families. In the second wave, lasting from June 10th to August 30th, 25,000 Slovenians from Slovenia were to be deported to the NDH and NDH was to deport just as many Serbs. In the last wave (from September 15th to October 31st, 65,000 Slovenian peasants from the Gorenjska region (Upper Carniola region were to be deported to the NDH, and NDH was to migrate just as many Serbs to Serbia, as well as 30,000 Serbs whose citizenship was not acknowledged by the NDH. The government of the NDH founded an office for this purpose under the name State Directorate for Renewal. The migration of the Serbs from NDH began in June of 1941. Volunteers from the Salonika Front were then moved from their properties in Slavonia and Srem. Their total number was about 28,000. Then the Orthodox priests were migrated. According to the lists made by the NDH authorities, 327 of them were migrated from the NDH. 104 priests from the Croatian part of NDH were moved away

  7. The Gap between the Knowledge and Current Practices--A Case of Tobacco Control Programs in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civljak, Marta; Tudor Car, Lorainne; Skara, Silvana; Oresković, Stipe

    2015-09-01

    Despite the availability of numerous evidence-based smoking prevention and cessation programs, many countries are still not implementing these research-proven programs. The primary aim of this paper is to summarize the extent to which evidence-based smoking control programs have been implemented in Croatia over the last two decades. Data from the systematic reviews of the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group, which are readily available worldwide, were used as criteria to evaluate whether effective, evidence-based programs have been implemented in Croatia. According to our findings, the most effective behavioral and pharmacological smoking cessation interventions have thus far been underutilized in Croatia. In addition, some interventions that have been continuously implemented in Croatia--such as using self-help materials, school-based programs and the celebration of World No Tobacco Day--have only small, short-term beneficial effects according to the Cochrane reviews. However, Croatia is a party to the World health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and therefore has effective national legislation on tobacco control. Croatia should develop and implement programs that integrate the existing high-quality empirical evidence on the effectiveness of various behavioral, pharmacological, and social interventions for smoking prevention and cessation. This programming should become a part of a continuous national strategy, and should be implemented throughout all of Croatia.

  8. Mineral raw materials for power production in legislation of the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matisa, Z.

    1999-01-01

    According to the Constitution of the Republic of Croatia, mineral wealth is a public good of legal interest to the Republic of Croatia and enjoys its special protection. The Mining Law establishes that mineral wealth (including mineral resources that are used for power production) is the property of the Republic of Croatia. Among other mineral raw materials, this refers to mineral raw materials that are used for power production: coal, oil, natural gas, radioactive mineral raw materials and geothermal waters. These mineral resources are as almost all other mineral raw materials with the exception of geothermal waters, an unrecoverable natural resource. The right to use that natural resource may be granted only by a concession. The mining legislation provides for exploration and exploitation of mineral raw materials. Exploration of oil and gas is considered to comprise operations and testing with the aim to establish the existence, position and form of oil and natural gas deposits, their quality and quantity, as well as exploitation conditions. Exploitation of oil and natural gas is considered to comprise extraction from deposits, refining and transport, as well as disposal in geological structures. Mineral raw materials used in power production amount to 63% of national total primary energy production, and they cover 33% of total power consumption in the country. Legislation in the Republic of Croatia, which refers to exploration and exploitation of oil and natural gas, allows economic utilization of that unrecoverable natural wealth to run smoothly and in compliance with practices in our European environment. (author)

  9. Involvement of Roma Parents in Children's Education in Croatia: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahic, Tea; Vidovic, Vlasta Vizek; Miljevic-Ridicki, Renata

    2011-01-01

    This article compares Roma and mainstream parents' involvement in the education of their children, based on Epstein's six-dimensional model of parent-school partnership. The survey was conducted in Croatia on two sub-samples: 60 Roma parents and 908 mainstream parents. Results suggest that Roma parents show lower interest in participating in…

  10. Investigating Parents' Attitudes towards Digital Technology Use in Early Childhood: A Case Study from Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikelic Preradovic, Nives; Lešin, Gordana; Šagud, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate perceptions of parents in Croatia towards advantages and disadvantages of computer use in general as well as their children's computer use and to reveal parents' concerns and opinions about digital technology (DT) education in kindergarten. The paper reports on research findings from one of the large public…

  11. Investigator Argus X-12 study on the population of northern Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Crnjac

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract X chromosome STR typing has emerged recently as a powerful tool, complementary to autosomal STR typing, in solving complex forensic and missing person cases. Investigator® Argus X-12 is a commercial product that allows co-amplification of 12 X chromosomal markers belonging to four linkage groups (LGs. In this study, we analyzed by capillary electrophoresis blood samples from 100 females and 102 males from a population of northern Croatia. Statistical analysis included calculation of allele and haplotype frequencies, as well as forensic parameters. The most informative marker for the northern Croatia population was DXS10135 with PIC=0.9211 and a total of 27 alleles. The least polymorphic marker was DXS8378 with 6 alleles. The proportion of observed haplotypes from the number of possible haplotypes varied from 2.74–8.57% across all LGs, with LG1 being the most informative. Of the 11 tested world populations compared to the population of northern Croatia, significant differences in genetic distance (FST were found for Greenlandic and all non-European populations. We found that all tested markers are in HWE and can thus be used for match probability calculation. Because of high combined power of discrimination in both men and women, Investigator® Argus X-12 is applicable for the northern Croatia population in routine forensic casework.

  12. [General aspects of population reproduction in the Socialist Republic of Croatia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheimer-baletic, A

    1986-01-01

    The author presents a social and historical review of population growth in Yugoslavia. Aspects of population growth unique to a Marxist society are identified. Using Croatia as an example of a region with a low birth rate, the author discusses fertility, mortality, and migration as they affect overall population growth. (SUMMARY IN ENG AND RUS)

  13. The politics of international law and compliance : Serbia, Croatia and The Hague Tribunal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajkovic, Nikolas

    2012-01-01

    Leading the debate on the domestic effect of the growing influence of international adjudication, this invaluable text examines Serbia and Croatia's erratic record of compliance with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). Since the demise of the Milosevic and Tudjman

  14. [The beginnings of the demographic transition in Croatia and its socioeconomic foundations (until 1918)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, I

    1986-01-01

    This is a historical survey of the process of modernization and the formulation of political and economic systems in Croatia, Yugoslavia, from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Population dynamics and concurrent demographic transitions are addressed. (SUMMARY IN ENG AND RUS)

  15. Readability and Content Assessment of Informed Consent Forms for Medical Procedures in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučemilo, Luka; Borovečki, Ana

    2015-01-01

    High quality of informed consent form is essential for adequate information transfer between physicians and patients. Current status of medical procedure consent forms in clinical practice in Croatia specifically in terms of the readability and the content is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the readability and the content of informed consent forms for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures used with patients in Croatia. 52 informed consent forms from six Croatian hospitals on the secondary and tertiary health-care level were tested for reading difficulty using Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) formula adjusted for Croatian language and for qualitative analysis of the content. The averaged SMOG grade of analyzed informed consent forms was 13.25 (SD 1.59, range 10-19). Content analysis revealed that informed consent forms included description of risks in 96% of the cases, benefits in 81%, description of procedures in 78%, alternatives in 52%, risks and benefits of alternatives in 17% and risks and benefits of not receiving treatment or undergoing procedures in 13%. Readability of evaluated informed consent forms is not appropriate for the general population in Croatia. The content of the forms failed to include in high proportion of the cases description of alternatives, risks and benefits of alternatives, as well as risks and benefits of not receiving treatments or undergoing procedures. Data obtained from this research could help in development and improvement of informed consent forms in Croatia especially now when Croatian hospitals are undergoing the process of accreditation.

  16. Understanding of Words and Symbols by Chemistry University Students in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladušic, Roko; Bucat, Robert; Ožic, Mia

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study conducted in Croatia on students' understanding of scientific words and representations, as well as everyday words used in chemistry teaching. A total of 82 undergraduate chemistry students and 36 pre-service chemistry teachers from the Faculty of Science, University of Split, were involved. Students' understanding…

  17. Entrepreneurial Management Education Needs in the Republic of Croatia, Poland and the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabic, Marina; Vlajcic, Davor; Novak, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to take the emergence of the knowledge mobilization as an opportunity to develop an understanding of needs for catching up appropriate knowledge application in SMEs in the Republic of Croatia, Poland and the UK. It draws upon the "frame mobilization" literature, which illuminates the role that acts…

  18. Building a Team of Passionate Callers to Enrich Education in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojsic, Jasenka; Magzan, Masa

    2010-01-01

    This article is about a group of eight people joined by a common idea--a strong call to enrich education in Croatia so that it motivates leadership and empowers children. Through use of philosophy and methodology of Appreciative Inquiry, this informal group of people has gradually developed into the core team of a potential national movement.…

  19. Emerging cases of chlamydial abortion in sheep and goats in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spičic, Silvio; Račić Ivana; Andrijanić, Milan; Duvnjak, Sanja; Zdelar-Tuk, Maja; Stepanić, Maja; Cvetnić, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    In a recent lambing season (2012/2013), the seroprevalence of ovine chlamydiosis was monitored in small ruminant abortion cases in Croatia. Blood samples of 93 sheep and 69 goats were examined. In addition, 50 sheep and 61 goat samples were tested using molecular methods. Furthermore, 14 sheep blood samples, one goat blood sample and one sheep placenta sample from Bosnia and Herzegovina (BIH) were also tested as a part of inter-laboratory cooperation. Overall high seroprevalence was detected in sheep, 19.6% with the ELISA IDEXX kit and 20.5% with the ClVTEST kit. Seroprevalence in goats was 11.4%. In BIH, four sheep and one goat blood sample were seropositive for chlamydiosis. The disease causing agent, Chlamydia abortus (C. abortus) was confirmed using molecular methods in two sheep flocks in continental Croatia and in one sheep flock in BIH. In this study, C. abortus infection in sheep was identified for the first time in Croatia using species specific molecular methods. Ovine chlamydiosis is present in national sheep and goat flocks in Croatia and BIH. Thus should be subject to ongoing controls in the case of abortion. A combination of serological and molecular methods should be used for optimal laboratory diagnostics of C. abortus.

  20. Historical and contemporary population genetics of the invasive western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemic, D; Mikac, K M; Bažok, R

    2013-08-01

    Classical population genetic analyses were used to investigate populations of the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, in Croatia in 1996 and 2009. The number of alleles was low in both 1996 and 2009; however, more alleles were found in the putative populations surveyed in 2009. Croatia had only 51% of the alleles recorded from the United States and 69% from Europe. However, 10 private (unique) alleles were found in Croatia, which were not found previously in Europe. Most populations were out of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, although no linkage disequilibrium was found. Low to no genetic differentiation was found between population pairwise comparisons in 1996, with a greater level of differentiation found between populations sampled in 2009. Using the program STRUCTURE, a single genetic cluster was found for populations sampled in 1996 and 2009. However, two genetic clusters were detected when the 1996 and 2009 data were combined, indicating significant temporal differentiation. Isolation by distance pattern of gene flow characterized populations sampled in 2009 only when the most distant population of Ogulin (the head of the expansion front) was included in the analysis. When Ogluin was excluded from the 2009 analysis no isolation by distance pattern was found. The possible impact that control practices have had on the population genetics of D. v. virgifera in Croatia from 1996 to 2009 are discussed in light of the temporal genetics differences found.

  1. The Bologna Process as a Reform Initiative in Higher Education in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucin, Pero; Prijic Samarzija, Snjezana

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, the Croatian higher education system has been under intensive transformation, one mostly driven by an increased demand for postsecondary education and by the process of Croatia's accession to the European Union. Although there had already been a constant need and pressure for the transformation of tertiary education…

  2. Young People in Croatia in Times of Crisis and Some Remarks about Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrnjaus, Kornelija; Vrcelj, Sofija; Zlokovic, Jasminka

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors address the youth as a research phenomenon and present the current position of young people in the Croatian society. The authors exhibit interesting results of a recent study of youth in Croatia and present the results of their research conducted among Croatian students aiming to explore the attitudes of young people and…

  3. Blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae) in Croatia: species richness, distribution and relationship to surrounding countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivković, Marija; Kúdela, Matuš; Kúdelová, Tatiana

    2016-05-05

    All records of blackflies (Simuliidae) from the territory of Croatia are summarized, including previously unpublished data. The blackfly fauna of Croatia consists of 28 species. Simulium (Nevermannia) angustitarse (Lundström), Simulium (Nevermannia) cryophilum (Rubtsov) complex, Simulium (Nevermannia) lundstromi (Enderlein), Simulium (Nevermannia) vernum Macquart complex, Simulium (Simulium) argyreatum Meigen, Simulium (Simulium) bezzii (Corti) complex, Simulium paraequinum Puri and Simulium pseudequinum Séguy are reported for the first time from Croatia. Information related to the ecoregions, in which species were found and specific species traits are given. Genus Prosimulium Roubaud is represented by one species only. Genus Simulium Latreille is represented by 27 species in six subgenera, with subgenus Simulium Latreille s. str. being most species rich (13 species) and subgenera Boophthora Enderlein and  Trichodagmia Enderlein represented each by only one species. Compared to the neighboring countries, the Croatian species assemblage is most similar to the fauna of Slovenia and least similar to that of Italy. The relatively low number of species, presence of several species complexes and unclear identity of other species show that further research of blackflies in Croatia is needed.

  4. Identification of Coxiella burnetii genotypes in Croatia using multi-locus VNTR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Račić, Ivana; Spičić, Silvio; Galov, Ana; Duvnjak, Sanja; Zdelar-Tuk, Maja; Vujnović, Anja; Habrun, Boris; Cvetnić, Zeljko

    2014-10-10

    Although Q fever affects humans and animals in Croatia, we are unaware of genotyping studies of Croatian strains of the causative pathogen Coxiella burnetii, which would greatly assist monitoring and control efforts. Here 3261 human and animal samples were screened for C. burnetii DNA by conventional PCR, and 335 (10.3%) were positive. Of these positive samples, 82 were genotyped at 17 loci using the relatively new method of multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). We identified 13 C. burnetii genotypes not previously reported anywhere in the world. Two of these 13 genotypes are typical of the continental part of Croatia and share more similarity with genotypes outside Croatia than with genotypes within the country. The remaining 11 novel genotypes are typical of the coastal part of Croatia and show more similarity to one another than to genotypes outside the country. Our findings shed new light on the phylogeny of C. burnetii strains and may help establish MLVA as a standard technique for Coxiella genotyping. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Export Control in the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcic, I.; Prah, M.; Mikec, N.

    2006-01-01

    In accordance with its internationally accepted obligations, the Republic of Croatia is actively implementing principles of non-proliferation and export control of nuclear materials and/or equipment. The article deals with treaties, conventions, agreements and other international arrangements that are creating certain obligation for Republic of Croatia related to nuclear non-proliferation. The most important are the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material, the Agreement between the Republic of Croatia and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards with Protocol, the Protocol Additional to the Agreement Between the Republic of Croatia and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards, the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty, the NSG Guidelines for the Export of Nuclear Material, Equipment and Technology and NSG Guidelines for Transfers of Nuclear-Related Dual-Use Equipment, Materials, Software and Related Technology. In addition the article describes a national regulative framework, the basis for conducting activities in nuclear material control, export control of dual-use items as well as non-proliferation of the weapons of mass destruction. Details are given about the Nuclear Safety Act, the Act on Liability for Nuclear Damage, the Act on Export of Dual-Use Items, the Decree on the List of Dual-Use Items, the Law on Production, Repair and Trade in Arms and Military Equipment and the Decree specifying goods subject to export and import licenses. (author)

  6. Optimal Conformal Polynomial Projections for Croatia According to the Airy/Jordan Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen Tutić

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes optimal conformal polynomial projections for Croatia according to the Airy/Jordan criterion. A brief introduction of history and theory of conformal mapping is followed by descriptions of conformal polynomial projections and their current application. The paper considers polynomials of degrees 1 to 10. Since there are conditions in which the 1st degree polynomial becomes the famous Mercator projection, it was not considered specifically for Croatian territory. The area of Croatia was defined as a union of national territory and the continental shelf. Area definition data were taken from the Euro Global Map 1:1 000 000 for Croatia, as well as from two maritime delimitation treaties. Such an irregular area was approximated with a regular grid consisting of 11 934 ellipsoidal trapezoids 2' large. The Airy/Jordan criterion for the optimal projection is defined as minimum of weighted mean of Airy/Jordan measure of distortion in points. The value of the Airy/Jordan criterion is calculated from all 11 934 centres of ellipsoidal trapezoids, while the weights are equal to areas of corresponding ellipsoidal trapezoids. The minimum is obtained by Nelder and Mead’s method, as implemented in the fminsearch function of the MATLAB package. Maps of Croatia representing the distribution of distortions are given for polynomial degrees 2 to 6 and 10. Increasing the polynomial degree results in better projections considering the criterion, and the 6th degree polynomial provides a good ratio of formula complexity and criterion value.

  7. Creating an Intercultural Learning Opportunity: Zagreb, Croatia and Plattsburgh, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountcastle, Amy

    2011-01-01

    In the spring of 2009 I embarked on a teaching experiment in which I joined an online SUNY-Plattsburgh class taking my Anthropology of Human Rights course with a conventional class at the University of Zagreb, Croatia, where I was a visiting professor teaching the same course. My motivations were several, but prominent among them was to test the…

  8. Reflections on a Visit to the Union of the Blind of Croatia, Zagreb, Yugoslavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cylke, Frank Kurt; Hanke, Peter

    The paper reports a visit to the Union of the Blind in Croatia, an organization serving the needs of 4,500 blind individuals in this part of Yugoslavia. Briefly considered are personnel, financial support, and services (such as braille and talking book production). A separate section describes the organization's library, recorded and braille…

  9. Genetic Characterization of porcine circovirus type 2 isolated from different pig-farms in Croatia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudan, Nevenka; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Dupont, Kitt

    2009-01-01

    Histopathological fifi ndings in 25 pig tissue samples, which indicated PCVD (porcine circovirus diseases), were studied. Pig tissue samples originated from 5 different pig-farms in the north-west part of Croatia. Histopathological lesions showed two clinical pictures of the disease: porcine...

  10. AN OVERVIEW AND ANALYSIS OF ENERGY CHALLENGES IN THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rada Cristina IRIMIE

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the key energy challenges that Croatia faces, how those challenges are likely to evolve in the coming years, and some possible solutions to the issues presented. While there is a wide variety of issues that Croatia will need to address, this paper will address two of the most pressing: reliance on energy imports, and an inadequate power grid and energy infrastructure. After identifying current vulnerabilities that the country is facing, the analysis points out the trends and the ongoing challenges regarding the demand for energy in Croatia. Finally, this paper concludes with the recommendation that Croatia pursue a multi-pronged approach to renewable energy generation, emphasizing decentralized production as the most time and cost effective strategy until the national power grid can be sufficiently upgraded and integrated to support more centralized approaches. Its geographic location, immanent admission to the EU and potential for diverse domestic sources of renewable energy combine to set the stage for a bright future for Croatia’s economic development, as long as the Croatian authorities place a priority on a multi - pronged approach to energy sources on the one hand, while continuing to work to a unified energy infrastructure on the other.

  11. Chthonius (Chthonius) onaei n. sp. (Chthoniidae, pseudoscorpiones), a new epigean species from Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Ćurčić B.P.M.; Dimitrijević R.N.; Rađa T.; Ćurčić Nina B.; Milinčić M.

    2010-01-01

    A new epigean pseudoscorpion, Chthonius (Chthonius) onaei n. sp. is erected from Podašpilje, nr. Omiš, Mt. Omiška Dinara, Dalmatia, Croatia. Its interrelations with two close congeners, Chthonius (C.) litoralis Hadži, 1933 and Chthonius (C.) dalmatinus Hadži, 1930 are briefly discussed.

  12. Chthonius (Chthonius onaei n. sp. (Chthoniidae, pseudoscorpiones, a new epigean species from Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćurčić B.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new epigean pseudoscorpion, Chthonius (Chthonius onaei n. sp. is erected from Podašpilje, nr. Omiš, Mt. Omiška Dinara, Dalmatia, Croatia. Its interrelations with two close congeners, Chthonius (C. litoralis Hadži, 1933 and Chthonius (C. dalmatinus Hadži, 1930 are briefly discussed.

  13. Ethnobotanical knowledge of the Istro-Romanians of Zejane in Croatia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieroni, A.; Giusti, M.E.; Munz, H.; Lenzarini, C.; Turkovic, G.; Turkovic, A.

    2003-01-01

    An ethno-pharmacognostic survey was carried out in one of the smallest ethnic and linguistic groups in Europe: the Istro-Romanians of the village of Zejane (in Croatia), which has a population of approximately 140 persons, mainly elderly. Using an intensive field participant observation methodology,

  14. Possibilities of the natural gas supply in the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavrovic, S.; Matic, D.

    1996-01-01

    Europe and Croatia meet 70% of their total natural gas demand from indigenous production and import other 30% (20% from the Russian Federation and 10% from Algeria). Croatia imports gas only from Russia. Forecasts and analysis of energy sector development point out that natural gas consumption will be doubled till 2010 when it will reach approximately 555-651 bcm. Natural gas consumption is expected to rise significantly in Croatia. Estimations of required import made by INA and PROHES - preliminary results, are similar. It has been expected that future import in 2010 will be between 2 and 3 bcm depending on considered scenario. Due to expectations of rising gas demand, Europe is turning on to new projects aiming to better connections by pipelines and LNG chains. New projects are considering constructions of new Russian transmission lines, additional lines from North Sea, increasing capacity of lines from Algeria, UK interconnection with Continent, and new pipelines and LNG routes from Middle East and Central Asia. Involvement in some the above mentioned projects is of importance for Croatia because it enables additional natural gas quantities and diversification of sources. (author)

  15. The determinants of health among the population aged 50 and over: evidence from Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sime Smolic

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explore the association between demographic, socio-economic and physical health variables and self-assessed health (SAH of people aged 50 years and over in Croatia. Cross-sectional data was collected in 2012 in the survey “The Economics of Ageing in Croatiaˮ that was based on the SHARE (Survey of Health Ageing and Retirement in Europe study. Altogether 761 individuals aged 50 and over were included in the working sample that has been used in statistical analysis. Data were analysed in an ordered logistic regression model. The results show that females were more likely to report a higher category of SAH than males. Higher educational level was a statistically significant predictor of higher SAH, when controlled for other variables. This study, unlike other studies in Croatia, introduces a set of physical health variables as the determinants of health. Our results suggest that people aged 50 and over with fewer limitations, health related symptoms and diagnosed chronic conditions were more likely to report higher levels of SAH. These findings could be beneficial to policymakers in their efforts to improve health among elderly in Croatia.

  16. 78 FR 65220 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: New Designated Country-Croatia (DFARS Case...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... as a new designated country under the World Trade Organization Government Procurement Agreement (WTO..., 2012, the WTO Committee on Government Procurement accepted the European Union notification indicating..., this rule adds Croatia to the list of World Trade Organization Government Procurement Agreement...

  17. SWOT ANALYSIS OF THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA AS AN INVESTMENT DESTINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Hedda Sola

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that foreign direct investments benefit the economic development of a host country. However, numerous examples of an inadequate investment structure point to the possible damages for an economic, as well as socio- political development of a country. The purpose of this paper is to looks into the structure of total foreign direct investments realised in the Republic of Croatia and, by using scientific methods, analyse the importance and the effect of foreign direct investments on the Croatian economy. Through following world’s the best practice, the paper offers a comparative analysis of the Republic of Croatia and the countries of the region, with the purpose of identifying the institutional obstacles for investment and producing a detailed SWOT analysis of the Republic of Croatia as an investment destination. Despite numerous existing conventions and protocols, a desired degree of adjustment to international conventions has not yet been achieved, which hinders investment. The Government should create a protection mechanism in order to keep the investors in the times of crisis, as well as policy of attracting the strategically oriented investments that will facilitate long-term economic growth. The first method through which it is possible to define a strategy of attracting strategically oriented investments into the economy, is the qualitative identification of the Republic of Croatia as an investment destination through SWOT analysis.

  18. Chlamydia trachomatis in Cervical Lymph Node of Man with Lymphogranuloma Venereum, Croatia, 20141.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjurašin, Branimir; Lepej, Snježana Židovec; Cole, Michelle J; Pitt, Rachel; Begovac, Josip

    2018-04-01

    We report an HIV-infected person who was treated for lymphogranuloma venereum cervical lymphadenopathy and proctitis in Croatia in 2014. Infection with a variant L2b genovar of Chlamydia trachomatis was detected in a cervical lymph node aspirate. A prolonged course of doxycycline was required to cure the infection.

  19. Cultural Capital--A Shift in Perspective: An Analysis of PISA 2009 Data for Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzic, Saša; Gregurovic, Margareta; Košutic, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Using PISA 2009 data for Croatia, this paper addresses the relationship between socio-economic background, cultural capital and educational attainment. Following Bourdieu, we emphasized the importance of interpreting cultural capital effects as effects of family habitus. The results indicated that the material and the relational dimension of…

  20. Modelling local government unit credit risk in the Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Posedel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to determine possible indicators that affect local unit credit risk and investigate their effect on default (credit risk of local government units in Croatia. No system for the estimation of local unit credit risk has been established in Croatia so far causing many practical problems in local unit borrowing. Because of the specific nature of the operations of local government units and legislation that does not allow local government units to go into bankruptcy, conventional methods for estimating credit risk are not applicable, and the set of standard potential determinants of credit risk has to be expanded with new indicators. Thus in the paper, in addition to the usual determinants of credit risk, the hypothesis of the influence of political factors on local unit credit risk in Croatia is also tested out, with the use of a Tobit model. Results of econometric analysis show that credit risk of local government units in Croatia is affected by the political structure of local government, the proportion of income tax and surtax in operating revenue, the ratio of net operating balance, net financial liabilities and direct debt to operating revenue, as well as the ratio of debt repayment and cash, and direct debt and operating revenue.

  1. International Trends in Health Science Librarianship Part 19: The Balkan States (Bulgaria and Croatia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, Savina; Skoric, Lea

    2016-09-01

    This is the 19th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship in the 21st century. The focus of the present issue is the Balkan Region (Bulgaria and Croatia). The next regular feature column will investigate two other Balkan states - Serbia and Slovenia. JM. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  2. A Language Academy by Any Other Name(s): The Case of Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Keith; Peti-Stantic, Anita

    2011-01-01

    There are three main institutions in Croatia today that are actively engaged in language management activities on the national level: The Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts, The Council for the Norms of the Croatian Standard Language, and the Institute for the Croatian Language and Linguistics. Their efforts are focused on establishing the…

  3. Introduction of Digital Storytelling in Preschool Education: A Case Study from Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preradovic, Nives Mikelic; Lesin, Gordana; Boras, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Our case study from Croatia showed the benefits of digital storytelling in a preschool as a basis for the formal ICT education. The statistical analysis revealed significant differences between children aged 6-7 who learned mathematics by traditional storytelling compared to those learning through digital storytelling. The experimental group that…

  4. Control of medfly by SIT in the Nereva river valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjelis, Mario; Ljubetic, Visnja; Novosel, Nevenka

    2006-01-01

    A feasibility study of medfly suppression by means of sterile males released program in the Neretva Vallley, Croatia, is presented. The increase of medfly infestation is considered, as almost all cultures of the region represent host plants for the insect. Environmental friendly methods such well developed SIT technique associated with other organic methods are mentioned as an option of no disruption of the present natural balance. Area study and strategy planning is briefly presented. Population dynamics of Ceratitis capitata in the different parts of the delta Neretva valley, during period 2002 - 2004 Year is reported. Medfly capture on selected locations with different host availability in Neretva river is studied. (MAC)

  5. Control of medfly by SIT in the Nereva river valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjelis, Mario, E-mail: mario.bjelis@zzb.h [Institut for Plant Protection in Agriculture and Foresty of Republic of Croatia, Zagreb, Zvonimirova (Croatia); Ljubetic, Visnja [Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Watter Managment of Republic of Croatia, Zagreb (Croatia); Novosel, Nevenka [State Office for Nuclear Safety, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    A feasibility study of medfly suppression by means of sterile males released program in the Neretva Vallley, Croatia, is presented. The increase of medfly infestation is considered, as almost all cultures of the region represent host plants for the insect. Environmental friendly methods such well developed SIT technique associated with other organic methods are mentioned as an option of no disruption of the present natural balance. Area study and strategy planning is briefly presented. Population dynamics of Ceratitis capitata in the different parts of the delta Neretva valley, during period 2002 - 2004 Year is reported. Medfly capture on selected locations with different host availability in Neretva river is studied. (MAC)

  6. Box Tree Moth (Cydalima perspectalis, Lepidoptera; Crambidae, New Invasive Insect Pest in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinka Matošević

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Alien invasive species have been described as an outstanding global problem. Hundreds of species are intentionally and unintentionally moved worldwide and and numbers of introductions to new habitats have been accelerated all over the world due to the increasing mobility of people and goods over the past decades. Numerous alien insect species, many of them introduced only in the last 20 years, have become successfully established in various ecosystems in Croatia. Box tree moth (Cydalima perspectalis, Lepidoptera; Crambidae is an invasive pest recently introduced to Europe causing serious damage to ornamental box (Buxus sp. shrubs and trees. The aim of this paper is to describe the biology of box tree moth with prognosis of its future spread and damages in Croatia. Material and Methods: Young larvae (first and second larval stage and adults of box tree moth were collected in August and September 2013 in Arboretum Opeka and in Varaždin. They were brought to the entomological laboratory of Croatian Forest Research Institute where they were reared to pupae and then to moths. Results and Conclusions: The box tree moth was recorded for the first time in North Croatia in August 2013. Larvae were found defoliating box plants (B. sempervirens in Arboretum Opeka, Vinica and they have been identified as C. prespectalis. According to damages it can be assumed that the pest has been introduced to the region earlier (in 2011 or 2012 and that the primary infection has not been detected. At least two generations per year could be assumed in Croatia in 2013. The damage done to box tree plants on the locality of study is serious. The plants have been defoliated, particularly in the lower parts. The defoliation reduced the amenity value of plants. This is the first record of this pest and its damages in Northern Croatia and it can be expected that the pest will rapidly spread to other parts of Croatia seriously damaging box plants

  7. Epidemiologic characteristics and military implications of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulić, Rosanda; Ropac, Darko

    2002-10-01

    To analyze epidemiologic characteristics of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Croatia, including military implications of the disease and measures for its prevention. We analyzed data from obligatory infectious disease reports and notification of deaths due to infectious diseases, data on the hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome epidemics in Croatia, and data collected by survey of the population, serological findings, and studies of wild rodents serving as reservoirs of the infection. During the 1987-2001 period, 235 cases of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome were recorded in Croatia, with 147 (62.6%) of them among Croatian Army soldiers. Mortality rate was up to 15.4% (mean 2.2%) (5/235). The highest number of cases was recorded in months of June and July, ie, during the warm season characterized by increased activity of both the animals acting as infection reservoirs and humans as hosts. The known natural foci of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome have been Plitvice and Slunj areas, Velika and Mala Kapela mountains, Zagreb area (Velika Gorica and Jastrebarsko), west Slavonia, Novska area, and Dinara Mountain. The disease has not been recorded in the littoral area and Adriatic islands. The identified causative agents include Dobrava and Puumala viruses of the genus Hantavirus, whereas rodents Clethrionomys glareolus, Apodemus flavicollis, Apodemus agrarius, and Apodemus sylvaticus serve as the main reservoirs of the infection. Typical biotopes of the infection in Croatia are deciduous woods. The measures of prevention in Croatia include pest control, disinfection, hygienic waste disposal, preventing rodent access to food and water, proper choice of camping sites, and health education. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome occurs predominantly in soldiers, in a sporadic or epidemic form. Because of the course of disease and potentially lethal outcome, the disease has a considerable impact on the field task performance and combat readiness of

  8. Trends in incidence of lung cancer in Croatia from 2001 to 2013: gender and regional differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroglavić, Katarina Josipa; Polić Vižintin, Marina; Tripković, Ingrid; Šekerija, Mario; Kukulj, Suzana

    2017-10-31

    To provide an overview of the lung cancer incidence trends in the City of Zagreb (Zagreb), Split-Dalmatia County (SDC), and Croatia in the period from 2001 to 2013. Incidence data were obtained from the Croatian National Cancer Registry. For calculating incidence rates per 100 000 population, we used population estimates for the period 2001-2013 from the Croatian Bureau of Statistics. Age-standardized rates of lung cancer incidence were calculated by the direct standardization method using the European Standard Population. To describe incidence trends, we used joinpoint regression analysis. Joinpoint analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in lung cancer incidence in men in all regions, with an annual percentage change (APC) of -2.2% for Croatia, 1.9% for Zagreb, and -2.0% for SDC. In women, joinpoint analysis showed a statistically significant increase in the incidence for Croatia, with APC of 1.4%, a statistically significant increase of 1.0% for Zagreb, and no significant change in trend for SDC. In both genders, joinpoint analysis showed a significant decrease in age-standardized incidence rates of lung cancer, with APC of -1.3% for Croatia, -1.1% for Zagreb, and -1.6% for SDC. There was an increase in female lung cancer incidence rate and a decrease in male lung cancer incidence rate in Croatia in 2001-20013 period, with similar patterns observed in all the investigated regions. These results highlight the importance of smoking prevention and cessation policies, especially among women and young people.

  9. Republic of Croatia's Experiences in the Implementation of the EU Directive About Dual-Use Items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidas, Z.; Orehovec, Z.; Superina, V.

    2007-01-01

    The Republic of Croatia is undergoing a process of adjusting its own legislation to the legislation of EU. It is one of the most important obligations of the EU-Croatia Stabilization and Association Agreement. It is also a basic prerequisite for the practical realization of the modern, unique and integral Export and Import Control system of the Sensitive Items. At the same time, it is a very important step towards better understanding of real and great danger of the weapons of mass destruction (WMD) proliferation and their possible usage in terrorism. That means that Republic of Croatia will act along with EU in the complex activities to prevent and minimize the WMD proliferation, to participate in antiterrorism activities, and to maintain regional and global security. In the year 2004, along the lines of the EU Legislation, the Croatian Parliament adopted the basic legal act - Act on export of Dual-use Items and its accompanying rules and regulations. The existing act on dual-purpose items in Croatia is mostly in harmony with the 2000 and 2003 EU Decrees which regulate te regime of the dual-purpose items export control. Nevertheless, the EU legislation experiences constant amendments in the field. And the Croatian Government is committed to following the improvements of te system and adjusting its own. However, during this process, a series of vague wordings and inconsistencies were noticed in the WMD nonproliferation policy and in the legislation to control the export of high technology products which could be abused for the WMD development. In addition, there is neither regulation on import control system nor control on the export of knowledge through scientific and professional cooperation. The purpose of this article is to professionally elaborate the value wordings and inconsistencies. It can be done on the basis of Croatia's experiences in the export and import control system of the dual-purpose items and knowledge and experience acquired through the

  10. Planning international transit oil pipeline projects in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekulic, G.; Vrbic, D.

    2004-01-01

    Planning and development of international oil pipeline projects are aimed primarily at enhancing the safety of crude oil supply. Pipeline development is affected by a variety of overlapping factors, such as energy - and environment-protection-related factors, as well as political, economic, legislative, social, technical and technological ones. The success of any pipeline planning, construction and operation in the present conditions will depend upon the degree to which the above factors have been brought in line with global trends. The government should create stable political, economic and legislative frameworks that will meet the global requirements of crude oil transport development. As regards (new) transportation companies, their function is to secure safe transport by providing competitive tariffs and granting environmental protection. A prerequisite for the pipeline planning is to have both major crude oil consumers and producers (as well as their economic and political integrations) consider any state or company as potential partners for crude oil transport and transit, respectively. Croatia and the JANAF transport company have been 'chosen' as one of priority routes for European supply with crude oil from the Caspian region and Russia and one of the directions for Russian crude oil export due to a number of advantages, opportunities and prospects for a successful development. Two international oil pipeline projects - the Druzba Adria Project and the Constanta-Pancevo-Omisalj-Trieste Project - are currently under consideration. The government commitment towards these projects has been documented by the Croatian Energy Development Strategy (April 2002) and by the Programme for its implementation (March 2004). JANAF has assumed the responsibility for carrying out the project preparation activities assigned to it by the Croatian Government and the pertinent ministries. Cooperation between JANAF and government institutions is an integral part of the procedure

  11. Control of Nuclear Material in Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizmek, A.; Medakovic, S.; Prah, M.; Novosel, N.

    2008-01-01

    State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) is established based on 'Nuclear Safety Act' (Official Gazette No. 173/2003) as an independent state organization responsible for all questions in connection with safe use of nuclear energy and technology, for expert matters of preparedness in the case of nuclear emergency, as well as for international co-operation in these fields (regulatory body). In the second half of year 2006, stationary detection systems for nuclear and other radioactive materials were installed on Border Crossing Bregana, Croatia. Yantar 2U, which is the commercial name of the system, is integrated automatic system capable of detection of nuclear and other radioactive materials prepared for fixed-site customs applications (Russian origin). Installed system contains portal monitors, camera, communication lines and communication boxes and server. Two fully functional separate systems has been installed on BC Bregana, one on truck entrance and another one on car entrance. In this article the operational experience of installed system is presented. This includes statistical analysis of recorded alarms, evaluation of procedures for operational stuff and maintenance and typical malfunction experience, as well as some of the recommendation for future use of detection systems. Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment (Official Gazette No. 15/08) lays down the list of nuclear materials and special equipment as well as the list of other activities related to the production of special equipment and non-nuclear materials; the contents of the declaration of intent form for export/import of goods, the form for notifying export/import of goods, the form for notifying transport of nuclear material, the form for notifying the activity related to producing of special equipment and non-nuclear material, as well as of the form of the report on nuclear material balance in the user's material balance area. This Ordinance lays down the method of

  12. "Izbori '95" na Hrvatskoj televiziji i u novinama (TV and Newspaper Coverage of the 1995 Elections in Croatia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranovic, Branislava

    1995-01-01

    Presents the results of empirical research of media coverage of recent elections in Croatia. Uses qualitative analysis to examine coverage on broadcasts and in weekly and daily newspapers. Concludes that coverage of political parties was uneven. (PA)

  13. Correlation between Annual Corn Crop per Hectare in Croatia and Drought Indices for Zagreb-Gric Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandzic, Kreso; Likso, Tanja

    2017-04-01

    Correlation coefficients between annual corn crop per hectare in Croatia and 9-month Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) for Zagreb - Gric for August are shown as significant. The results indicate that there is also a significant correlation between those drought indices and drought damages. Thus a forecast of the indices for August could be used for estimation e.g. annual corn crop per hectare in Croatia. Better results could be expected if statistical relationship between annual corn crops per hectare will be considered on county level instead the whole Croatia and indices calculated for weather stations for the same county. Effective way for reduction of drought damages is irrigation which need to be significantly improved in future in Croatia

  14. Human Resources – One of the Key Challenges of Tourism Development in the Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buneta Anđelka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tourist activity in the Republic of Croatia is one of the leading and most promising activities. It is our past, present and future. According to the National Bank, the share of revenues from travel - tourism in overall GDP in the first 9 months of 2015 was 22.2%, an increase of 1.2% compared to the same period in 2014. In the third quarter share of revenues from travel - tourism in total GDP amounted to 41.3%, as compared to the same period in 2014, representing a growth of 1.4%. The conclusion is that tourism is one of the leading economic sectors in the Republic of Croatia. Due to realized 78 million and 569,000 overnight stays (6.8% more than in 2014 and more than 8 billion of foreign exchange inflows, the Republic of Croatia on the overall tourism market has been recognized as an important destination whose development potentials have not yet been exhausted. Relevant institutions and predictions underline the fact that tourism is one of the keys for faster integration of Croatia in the entire world economy and the networked society, from which it can be read that Croatia must view this sector in a new way and allow tourism to undergo complete transformation, in order to cope with future competitive challenges more easily. According to estimates by the World Travel & Tourism Council direct and indirect employment in the tourism sector in 2008 was about 300,000 employees, but that number will have increased by additional 100,000 in the next ten years. The Croatian tourism today employs 35-40% of workers. Thus, the tourism industry is a comprehensive and a very important generator of jobs of different profiles - from catering and hotel industry to entertainment and animation. In the light of progress in the development of tourism, and regardless of specific personnel, Croatia still needs a lot of work on the construction of the existing profile of tourism personnel and management and educate the tourist interest in tourism future. In addition

  15. Charles River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on the efforts of the US EPA, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the municipalities within the Charles River Watershed and nongovernmental organizations to improve the water quality of the Charles River.

  16. RHAGOLETIS COMPLETA (DIPTERA; TEPHRITIDAE) DISTRIBUTION, FLIGHT DYNAMICS AND INFLUENCE ON WALNUT KERNEL QUALITY IN THE CONTINENTAL CROATIA

    OpenAIRE

    Božena Barić; Ivana Pajač Živković; Dinka Matošević; Milorad Šubić; Erzsébet Voigt; Miklós Tóth

    2015-01-01

    Walnut husk fly (WHF), Rhagoletis completa Cresson 1929 is an invasive species spreading quickly and damaging walnuts in Croatia and neighbouring countries. We researched distribution of this pest in the continental part of Croatia, flight dynamics in Međimurje County and its influence on quality of walnut kernels. CSALOMON®PALz traps were used for monitoring the spread and flight dynamics of R. completa. Weight and the protein content of kernels and the presence of mycotoxin contamination we...

  17. [Pharmacoeconomic indicators of cardiovascular drug utilization in the Republic of Croatia and city of Zagreb in 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimac, Danijela; Stambuk, Ivanka

    2010-12-01

    In comparison with original drugs, generic drugs have the same efficacy but considerably lower price and should therefore be preferred to original drugs on prescribing. The aim of the present study was to assess outpatient utilization and rationality of cardiovascular drug prescribing in the City of Zagreb and Republic of Croatia based on the generic to original drug prescribing ratio. Data on the financial indicators and number of cardiovascular drug packages issued in 2008 were obtained from the Croatian Institute of Health Insurance. These data were used to calculate the number of defined daily doses (DDD) and number of DDD per 1000 inhabitants per day (DDD/1000/day). The index of generic/original drug utilization was determined for Zagreb and Croatia as a measure for assessment of prescribing rationality; the significance of difference was determined by X2-test. The rate of prescribing original cardiovascular drugs was significantly higher in Zagreb as compared with Croatia as a whole. The index of prescribing generic versus original drugs was 1.20 (249/208 DDD/1000/day) in Zagreb and 1.65 (249/151 DDD/1000/day) in Croatia. Difference in the utilization of generic drugs between Zagreb and Croatia as determined by X2-test (the level of statistical significance was set at PZagreb and 2.02 in Croatia; and hypolipemics with the generic/original drug index of 0.96 in Zagreb and 1.34 in Croatia. According to financial indicators, the generic/original drug index was 1.44 in Croatia and only 0.96 in Zagreb. The significantly greater influence of pharmaceutical industry marketing in Zagreb entailed the significantly higher rate of original drug prescribing, which is associated with considerably greater drug expenses. Measures to stimulate prescribing generic drugs should be launched at the national level.

  18. Crveno jezero - the biggest sinkhole in Dinaric Karst (Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garasic, M.

    2012-04-01

    fascinating and has been measured on a number of occasions. Valuable and interesting data about the lake depth, as presented by academician Milivoj Petrik in 1955, show that the lake is about 250 meters deep, which discouraged any attempts to dive to the bottom of the lake. During the 5th International Congress of Speleology held in Stuttgart in Germany, Croatian cavers and speleologists have tried to add the Red Lake to the list of deepest pits in the world, as its real depth amounted to 518 meters at the time. However, the response of the documentation committee was that the depth had not been duly documented, that no man has been at such depth etc., although in reality it is a real pit one half of which is filled with water. In late 1970's and early 1980's the speleodiving activities rapidly gathered momentum in all parts of the world and it is in this period that deepest dives were made at the source called Fontaine de Vaucluse. At that time, a special underwater vehicle, the so called "Speleonaut", attained (without crew) the depth of 315 meters. Similar vehicle called Hyball descended down to the depth of 165 meters in Hranicke propasti in Czech Republic. These speleological structures are therefore considered as sufficiently documented and, as such, they have been added to the list of the world's deepest water structures. In 1980's speleodiving has became an increasingly popular cave exploration method in Croatia. Thus, the decision was made to contact the world's best speleodivers and invite them to investigate the Red Lake. In 1981, during their stay in the USA, Dr. Mladen Garašić contacted Mr. Jochan Hassenmayer who was at that time the best speleodiver of the world. However, because of political climate that prevailed in that period, Mr. Hassenmayer finally decided not to come to our country. In an unfortunate turn of events, this diver was later affected with a permanent disability. In the course of 1989 and 1990, Dr. Garašić established contact with Mr. Sheck

  19. Modelling soil properties in a crop field located in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogunovic, Igor; Pereira, Paulo; Millan, Mesic; Percin, Aleksandra; Zgorelec, Zeljka

    2016-04-01

    Development of tillage activities had negative effects on soil quality as destruction of soil horizons, compacting and aggregates destruction, increasing soil erosion and loss of organic matter. For a better management in order to mitigate the effects of intensive soil management in land degradation it is fundamental to map the spatial distribution of soil properties (Brevik et al., 2016). The understanding the distribution of the variables in space is very important for a sustainable management, in order to identify areas that need a potential intervention and decrease the economic losses (Galiati et al., 2016). The objective of this work is study the spatial distribution of some topsoil properties as clay, fine silt, coarse silt, fine sand, coarse sand, penetration resistance, moisture and organic matter in a crop field located in Croatia. A grid with 275x25 (625 m2) was designed and a total of 48 samples were collected. Previous to data modelling, data normality was checked using the Shapiro wilk-test. As in previous cases (Pereira et al., 2015), data did not followed the normal distribution, even after a logarithmic (Log), square-root, and box cox transformation. Thus, for modeling proposes, we used the log transformed data, since was the closest to the normality. In order to identify groups among the variables we applied a principal component analysis (PCA), based on the correlation matrix. On average clay content was 15.47% (±3.23), fine silt 24.24% (±4.08), coarse silt 35.34% (±3.12), fine sand 20.93% (±4.68), coarse sand 4.02% (±1.69), penetration resistance 0.66 MPa (±0.28), organic matter 1.51% (±0.25) and soil moisture 32.04% (±3.27). The results showed that the PCA identified three factors explained at least one of the variables. The first factor had high positive loadings in soil clay, fine silt and organic matter and a high negative loading in fine sand. The second factor had high positive loadings in coarse sand and moisture and a high

  20. Croatia's rural areas - renewable energy based electricity generation for isolated grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protic Sonja Maria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several Western Balkan states face the consequences of the Yugoslavian war, which left hometowns with dilapidated electricity grid connections, a high average age of power plant capacities and low integration of renewable energy sources, grid bottlenecks and a lack of competition. In order to supply all households with electricity, UNDP Croatia did a research on decentralized supply systems based on renewable energy sources. Decentralized supply systems offer cheaper electricity connections and provide faster support to rural development. This paper proposes a developed methodology to financially compare isolated grid solutions that primarily use renewable energies to an extension of the public electricity network to small regions in Croatia. Isolated grid supply proves to be very often a preferable option. Furthermore, it points out the lack of a reliable evaluation of non-monetizable aspects and promotes a new interdisciplinary approach.

  1. Consumers attitudes on organic food in Serbia and Croatia: A comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Nenad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the association between socio-demographic variable and attitudes of respondents from Serbia and Croatia towards organic food. Consumers around the world have a positive attitude towards organic food without particular differences between various socio-demographic variables. However, the level of organic food consumption is low - organic farming covers 1% of agricultural land. High price and low income of respondents represent the basic limiting factors. The economic factor is especially important for the markets of Serbia and Croatia. Also, a lack of information and trust in the organic production and organic certificates constitute part of the decision in purchase. Therefore, manufactures of organic products needs marketing activities to build a recognizable brand and develop trust among consumers. Also, consumers have shown a high degree of self-awareness in making decisions about the purchase of organic products, which makes brand communication at the point of sale very important.

  2. Waste convention regulatory impact on planning safety assessment for LILW disposal in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcic, I.; Subasic, D.; Lokner, V.

    2000-01-01

    Preparations for establishment of a LILW repository in Croatia have reached a point where a preliminary safety assessment for the prospective facility is being planned. The planning is not based upon the national regulatory framework, which does not require such an assessment at this early stage, but upon the interagency BSS and the IAEA RADWASS programme recommendations because the national regulations are being revised with express purpose to conform to the most recent international standards and good practices. The Waste Convention, which Croatia has ratified in the meantime, supports this approach in principle, but does not appear to have more tangible regulatory relevance for the safety assessment planning. Its actual requirements regarding safety analyses for a repository fall short of the specific assessment concepts practiced in this decade, and could have well been met by the old Croatian regulations from the mid-eighties. (author)

  3. Estimating the size of non-observed economy in Croatia using the MIMIC approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjekoslav Klarić

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a quick overview of the approaches that have been used in the research of shadow economy, starting with the definitions of the terms “shadow economy” and “non-observed economy”, with the accent on the ISTAT/Eurostat framework. Several methods for estimating the size of the shadow economy and the non-observed economy are then presented. The emphasis is placed on the MIMIC approach, one of the methods used to estimate the size of the nonobserved economy. After a glance at the theory behind it, the MIMIC model is then applied to the Croatian economy. Considering the described characteristics of different methods, a previous estimate of the size of the non-observed economy in Croatia is chosen to provide benchmark values for the MIMIC model. Using those, the estimates of the size of non-observed economy in Croatia during the period 1998-2009 are obtained.

  4. Comparison of several hydrological cycle parameters in Croatia for two periods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandzic, Kreso; Trninic, Dusan

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of several hydrological cycle parameter averages for two periods in Croatia is considered. Parameters are: yearly averages of: 2m air temperature, precipitation amounts, potential and real evapotranspiration amounts. A basic period (1951-1980) and period for comparison (1981-1997) have been chosen. (These periods accepted at The First Sub-Regional Expert Meeting on the 'Assesment of Climate Change Impacts on the Hydrological Cycles in South-Eastern Europe' held in Sofia (Bulgaria) 17-20 February 1999.) Differences between two period averages for 30 weather stations have been calculated. Temperature differences and those for potential evaporation are positive while for precipitation they are mainly negative. Real evaporation differences for two periods are an exception i.e. they are positive in continental but negative in Mediterranean part of Croatia. These results agree with global warming trend. (Author)

  5. Quality of Working Life during the Recession: The Case of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonimir Galić

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The quality of working life depends on the extent to which aspects of the job enable employees to satisfy important psychological needs. In this paper we describe two studies exploring the quality of working life in Croatia during the economic crisis that started in 2008. Within the first study, independent samples of employees recruited by psychology students were asked to self-report quality of their jobs on four occasions between 2008 and 2010. In the second study, we tried to replicate the findings of Study 1, using employees drawn from nationally representative samples of citizens between 2008 and 2011. Results of both studies showed that the quality of working life in Croatia deteriorated during the recession. The decline was mainly related to extrinsic job aspects such as adequate pay, fair pay, and job security. The most hardly hit by the recession were lower educated employees.

  6. The challenges and issues facing the radioactive waste management in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subasic', D.; Saler, A.

    1994-01-01

    There are substantial experiences in Croatia in the field of radioactive waste management concerning both the waste from nuclear applications and waste generated at nuclear power plant. The essential issue now is how set-up infrastructure and to realize institutional and capacity building to get adjusted to needs of the newly independent state. In connection to this, the issues related to national radioactive waste management strategy, past and new organization of the Regulatory Body, and changes in legislation and regulations are discussed. In addition, some on-going projects important for realization of a complete radioactive waste management in the country round up the present situation in the field of radioactive waste management in Croatia

  7. The structure and economic significance of government guarantees in Croatia and the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Primorac

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the aftermath of the financial crisis, when countries are facing difficulties in raising the amounts of revenue needed to cover the expenditure side of the budget, fiscal risks can pose a significant threat to the sustainability of public finance. This became particularly evident in the case of public enterprises and their liabilities, which often increased public debt because of difficulties in meeting their financial obligations. The aim of this paper is to evaluate fiscal risks from government guarantees in Croatia and the European Union in general. Moreover, the paper aims to analyse the dynamics of the value and structure of government guarantees in Croatia in the period from 2009 to first half of 2015. Particular emphasis is placed on the impact of government guarantees on direct public debt in the context of methodological changes in the registration of public debt.

  8. The Security-scape and the (InVisibility of Refugees: Managing Refugee Flow through Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Čapo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses certain aspects of the exceptional migration process unfolding in Europe from the middle of September to the beginning of November, 2015. It focuses on analysis of managing that migration in Croatia through the presentation of the functioning of the reception (and transit centre at Opatovac. A qualitative ethnographic and anthropological research approach has been applied. The ethnographic perspective offers a complex view of responses to the events, pointing out the paradoxes in refugee reception and transit migration management in Croatia. It is established that there are constant contradictions contained in the nexus of security and humanitarian demands in the migration process management, these largely coming to the fore because of a lack of international co-operation and a firm stance and common policy on the part of the EU. In that way, the EU has contributed to the deepening of the humanitarian migration crisis, but also demonstrated its deep value crisis.

  9. Carbon Storage Potential of Forest Land: A Comparative Study of Cases in Finland and Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Tijardović

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have been increasing over the last hundred years in relation to the Fourth IPCC assessment report that highlighted human activities as a direct influence on climate changes. Since Croatia and Finland signed the Kyoto Protocol, they are both committed to fulfil international obligations of lowering GHG’s emissions, enhancing the storage, as well as protecting and enhancing the current pools where the forestry sector has a prominent role. These obligations created a need for a review on carbon storage potentials for both countries with the aim of setting further scientific and management guidelines as the basic purpose of this research. Materials and Methods: Data collection was conducted within the scope of the Sort Term Scientific Mission (STSM in the period from May 2 – July 22, 2009 in the Finnish Forest Research Institute in Joensuu. The research encompassed an overview of literature, personal contacts with scientists and experts from both countries (research institutes, ministries, the EFI branch office in Joensuu and a field inspection which altogether provided an insight into the applied silvicultural and utilization activities. A significant data source were official documents and published project results on the carbon storage potential. Results and Discussion: Mitigation activities within the framework of the LULUCF project reduced the total emissions for 33.4 millions tons of CO2 equivalents in Finland in 2006 (this data has varied from 18 to 33.4 millions tons CO2 equivalents in the last fifteen years while for Croatia the availability of such data is limited. Finland has some former agricultural land which may be afforested but not in the substantial share, while in Croatia such areas amount to around 1 million ha. According to the climate change scenario for Finland (FINADAPT, predicting the largest climate changes, the total forest growth

  10. Nuclear power as an option in electrical generation planning for Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feretic, D.; Tomsic, Z.; Cavlina, N.; Kovacevic, T.

    2000-01-01

    The expected increase of electricity consumption in the next two decades, if covered mainly by domestic production, will require roughly 4500 MW of new installed capacity. The question is which resource mix would be optimal for the future power plants. Taking into account lack of domestic resources for electricity generation, current trends in the European energy markets, and environmental impact of various energy technologies, it seems reasonable for Croatia to keep the nuclear option open in the future energy planning. In line with that conclusion, this paper analyzes how the introduction of nuclear power plants would influence future power system expansion plans in Croatia, and the possibility to meet the Kyoto requirement. The effects of CO 2 emission tax and external costs on the optimal capacity mix and the emissions levels are also examined. (author)

  11. Nationwide survey of policies and practices related to capillary blood sampling in medical laboratories in Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Lenicek Krleza, Jasna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Capillary sampling is increasingly used to obtain blood for laboratory tests in volumes as small as necessary and as non-invasively as possible. Whether capillary blood sampling is also frequent in Croatia, and whether it is performed according to international laboratory standards is unclear. Materials and methods: All medical laboratories that participate in the Croatian National External Quality Assessment Program (N = 204) were surveyed on-line to collect information about t...

  12. Mind the Gap: Citizens’ and Companies’ Views of Business Culture in Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Budak, Jelena; Rajh, Edo; Stubbs, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This paper is an investigation of the various aspects of business culture in Croatia. The existing literature is focused mainly on the significance of cross-country cultural differences in doing business, whereas this research explores the specifics of the national business culture from a different angle. Using original survey data, it provides comparative insights into how Croatian citizens and companies assess business culture. The main research questions were whether there is a common unde...

  13. Does productivity affect profitability in dairy processing industry? Evidence from Slovenia, Croatia and Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Saša Muminović; Željana Aljinović Barać

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides insights into productivity in dairy processing companies in Slovenia, Croatia and Serbia. The aim is to find out whether EBITDA per employee, as a measure of overall productivity as well as labour and capital productivity and their management positively affect company’s profitability. Literature review shows that this issue was relatively neglected, although increase in productivity is regarded as the most important factor in maintaining a competitive advantage in most dev...

  14. The Recruitment Process as a Part of Effective Human Resource Management in Public Administration in Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Tišma, Sanja; Ozimec, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    Facing global trends, recognizing and retaining talented and perspective employees became an important issue in every public administration reform. Human resources management in public administration has a mission to help an institution to meet strategic goals by attracting, maintaining and managing employees more effectively. On its way to EU Croatia also has to cope with improvements and development of its public administration system with accent on HRM importance. Taking into account other...

  15. Energy needs by the year 2025 in Croatia; Potrebe energije do 2025. godine u Hrvatskoj

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesut, D [Energetski institut Hrvoje Pozar, Zagreb (Croatia); Slipac, G [Hrvatska elektroprivreda, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1997-12-31

    In this work are presented first, working results of forecasting energy needs by the year 2025 in Croatia, what is being carried out as a part of the Project PROHES. Future needs for useful heat, motor fuels and electricity for nonthermal purposes, have been analysed. Research still continues, more scenarios are being worked out, and its results, that will also include primary energy needs, are expected in the middle of the year 1997. (author). 29 figs.

  16. Insurance of nuclear Risks in the Republic of Croatia and Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sladonja, B.; Pavliha, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives basic information about the history and present situation of nuclear insurance pools in the republics of Croatia and Slovenia, on the legal basis of their establishment and their organization. Furthermore, it gives a brief description on the kinds of insurance provided by the Croatian and the Slovenian pools in the past and present, as well as about their participation in the world-wide reinsurance exchange in this field as a partner to nuclear insurance pools abroad. (author)

  17. Readability and Content Assessment of Informed Consent Forms for Medical Procedures in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučemilo, Luka; Borovečki, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background High quality of informed consent form is essential for adequate information transfer between physicians and patients. Current status of medical procedure consent forms in clinical practice in Croatia specifically in terms of the readability and the content is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the readability and the content of informed consent forms for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures used with patients in Croatia. Methods 52 informed consent forms from six Croatian hospitals on the secondary and tertiary health-care level were tested for reading difficulty using Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) formula adjusted for Croatian language and for qualitative analysis of the content. Results The averaged SMOG grade of analyzed informed consent forms was 13.25 (SD 1.59, range 10–19). Content analysis revealed that informed consent forms included description of risks in 96% of the cases, benefits in 81%, description of procedures in 78%, alternatives in 52%, risks and benefits of alternatives in 17% and risks and benefits of not receiving treatment or undergoing procedures in 13%. Conclusions Readability of evaluated informed consent forms is not appropriate for the general population in Croatia. The content of the forms failed to include in high proportion of the cases description of alternatives, risks and benefits of alternatives, as well as risks and benefits of not receiving treatments or undergoing procedures. Data obtained from this research could help in development and improvement of informed consent forms in Croatia especially now when Croatian hospitals are undergoing the process of accreditation. PMID:26376183

  18. Genetic identification of new alien pest species Illinoia liriodendri and its parasitoid Areopraon silvestre in Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Franjević, Milivoj; Glavaš, Milan; Hrašovec, Boris; Koletić, Nikola; Franjević, Damjan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: During June 2015 in Zagreb city area (Croatia) samples of tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) leaves were collected with symptoms of attack by some unknown aphid. Material and methods: Aphids were collected form leaves of tulip trees on different locations in Zagreb during July 2015. Total genomic DNA was extracted from ethanol-preserved specimens. PCR analysis was carried out and PCR products were purified from 1% agarose gel for sequencing purposes. The obtaine...

  19. Box Tree Moth (Cydalima perspectalis, Lepidoptera; Crambidae), New Invasive Insect Pest in Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Matošević, Dinka

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Alien invasive species have been described as an outstanding global problem. Hundreds of species are intentionally and unintentionally moved worldwide and and numbers of introductions to new habitats have been accelerated all over the world due to the increasing mobility of people and goods over the past decades. Numerous alien insect species, many of them introduced only in the last 20 years, have become successfully established in various ecosystems in Croatia. Box t...

  20. Differences in the Fitness Levels of Urban and Rural Middle School Students in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Dario; Bernstein, Eve R.; Podnar, Hrvoje; Vozzolo, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is known that suburban youth are more fit than urban youth in Croatia. Method: Differences (p < 0.05) in fitness levels and motor abilities of 9,164 (F = 4,671, M = 4,493) Croatian children (age range: 11-14 years) from urban (F = 1,380, M = 1,268), mixed rural-urban (F = 274, M = 289), and rural (F = 3017, M = 2936) areas were…

  1. The Epidemiological Characteristics of Hepatitis B in Croatia: The Results of the Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kljajić, Zlatko; Petricević, Josko; Poljak, Nikola Kolja; Pranić, Shelly; Mulić, Rosanda

    2015-09-01

    This study shows epidemiological characteristics and preventive measures implemented for the prevention and control of hepatitis B infections in Croatia. We analyzed the data from obligatory infectious disease reports and notifications of death due to infectious diseases, data on the hepatitis B infections in Croatia, and data collected by survey of the population. The average prevalence of the disease is 3.67 per 100,000 annually. All age groups are affected, but still a higher rate of the disease is found in the age groups from 15-19 and 20-29 years of age. Hepatitis B disease is 1.4 times more likely in men than in women. For the past 18 years, the average rate of mortality was 0.2%. The incidence of HbsAg-positive donors of blood is within the range of 0.65% in 1992 to 0.012% in 2011. The largest part of preventive measures implemented in Croatia against hepatitis B is predicted and required by legislation. The registrations of acute and chronic carriers of the virus are obligatory. High-risk groups have started being vaccinated since 1992. The obligatory vaccination of infants was introduced in the mandatory vaccination program in 2007. Routine testing of blood exclusively from voluntary donors for HbsAg presence is obligatory. The non-governmental organization "Help" created for intravenous drug users, along with the "Harm reduction" program implemented hepatitis B, C, and HIV/AIDS prevention program in 1995. In order to gain a better understanding of epidemiological characteristics of hepatitis B in Croatia, the specifics of its dynamics in small communities are required since the research of Croatian public health officials and researchers have shown that hepatitis B is spread in different ways.

  2. INNOVATION IN TOURISM: PERCEPTION OF TOURISM PROVIDERS FROM CROATIA AND SERBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Slivar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Innovations represent a challenge that every company faces during its life cycle no matter what kind of business sector it operates in. In today’s world of competition and fastgrowing industries, it is paramount to be innovative, especially in tourism. The main aim of this study was to determine how businesses and their employees in two countries - Croatia and Serbia, are directed toward new innovations, which innovations are most important to them, what are the main barriers to implementation and if there is a difference between innovation implementation in those two countries. For this purpose, the study was conducted in 13 tourism companies in Croatia and 20 in Serbia, in the period July-October 2016. The results indicate that companies in Croatia (M=3.86 are more open to innovations than Serbian tourism companies (M=3.50. Furthermore, the study showed that respondents have similar wishes and motives when implementing new ideas or innovations, such as educated workforce, health and well-being of people or improved business management. However, when it comes to key areas for innovation implementation, in Croatia emphasis should be on training and education of the workforce, while in Serbia emphasis should be placed on the introduction of new technologies. In addition, the key limiting factors of innovation implementation that stood out only in Serbia are lack of funds and poor ownership structure. However, there is willingness to implement innovations and readiness to work towards it. Education and a capable workforce are deemed essential to accomplish and implement new innovations in most companies.

  3. Collective Memory of International Women’s Day in Part of the Feminist Community in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Petras

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the collective memory of International Women’s Day in part of the feminist community in Croatia. Having in mind the importance of social context and mnemonic communities for the (reconstruction of memory, the development of women’s movements in Yugoslavia and Croatia is presented. Relying on Zerubavel’s concept of collective memory and qualitative analysis of interviews, this paper discusses the origins of International Women’s Day, its historical horizon, the memory of commemorations in socialist and post-socialist periods, and the mnemonic battles arising around them. Data necessary to describe these elements of collective memory of International Women’s Day was collected through semi-structured interviews conducted with several members of the feminist community in Croatia. Even though today’s feminist community in Croatia, to a certain point, consolidates the legacies of both bourgeois feminism and proletarian feminism, collective memory of International Women’s Day, at least on the part of the feminist mnemonic community, serves as a reminder of its socialist or communist origins. An important form of commemoration in both the socialist and the post-socialist period is public commemoration, whether as protest walks or petition signings. On the other hand, commemorative pluralism and overall decline in the importance or symbolic value of IWD in Croatian society in the post-socialist period, is the most significant difference from the period of socialism. Elements of IWD which appear in both the socialist and post-socialist period and are the focal points of mnemonic battles that are fought over the meaning of IWD and its forms of commemoration are: Mother’s Day and Valentine’s Day symbolism, the conflict between politicized commemoration and depoliticized celebration, and cooptation or patronization by the politics. The most important factor for the appearance of mnemonic battles is found in the

  4. Impact of Public Internal Financial Control on Public Administration in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna VAŠIČEK

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The PIFC /Public Internal Financial Control/ was developed by the European Commission. PIFC is set of principles internal financial controls system established for the purpose of controlling, auditing, supervise on the use of national budget and European Union budget and funds. Also, in order to support candidate countries in their internal control system reforms in the public sector. Therefore, it is expected for the candidate countries to establish and develop the system of internal financial controls according to the concept which was in that field developed by the European Union based on International Standards and the best practice of European countries. Since the year 2003 the Republic of Croatia undertakes intensive activities on the establishment and development of the internal financial control system according with the regulation of European Union. In keeping with the set concept, the Republic of Croatia undertook numerous activities during the past six years to create all the necessary assumptions for the establishment and development of the system, including: the adoption of the initial strategic documents; drafting of laws; the creation of organisational capacities and human resources; and the implementation of the system with budget users at central government and local levels. In this paper we will present phases of implementation PIFC in Croatian Public Sector. Through this phases we will show impact that PIFC has on development of New Public Management in Croatia and changes in organizational structure and human resource that are caused during this process. Also, we will give critical opinion of that process and problems which occur during implementation. In this paper we will present approach in implementation of PIFC in Slovenia and Bosnia and Herzegovina and compare this with implementation in Croatia.

  5. Budget Impact Analysis of Biosimilar Trastuzumab for the Treatment of Breast Cancer in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarec, August; Likić, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and has considerable impact on healthcare budgets and patients' quality of life. Trastuzumab (Herceptin ® ) is a monoclonal antibody directed against the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) for the treatment of breast cancer. Several trastuzumab biosimilars are currently in development. In 2015, trastuzumab was the drug with the highest financial consumption among all drugs in Croatia. This model estimates the 1-year budget impact of the introduction of biosimilar trastuzumab in Croatia. A budget impact model, based on approvals for trastuzumab treatment in 2015, was developed for the introduction of biosimilars. Two biosimilar scenarios were developed: biosimilar scenario 1, based on all approvals in 2015, and biosimilar scenario 2, based on approvals after February 2015 and the reimbursement of the subcutaneous formulation of trastuzumab in Croatia. Only trastuzumab-naïve patients and drug-acquisition costs were used in the model. Uptake of biosimilar was assumed at 50 %. Scenarios were calculated with price discounts of 15, 25 and 35 %. The robustness of the model was tested by extensive sensitivity analyses. The projected drug cost savings from the introduction of biosimilar trastuzumab range from €0.26 million (scenario 2, 15 % price discount) to €0.69 million (scenario 1, 35 % price discount). If budget savings were reinvested to treat additional patients with trastuzumab, 14 (scenario 2, 15 % price discount) to 47 (scenario 1, 35 % price discount) additional patients could be treated. Sensitivity analyses showed that the incidence of breast cancer had the highest impact on the model, with a 10 % decrease in incidence leading to an 11.3 % decrease in projected savings. The introduction of biosimilar trastuzumab could lead to significant drug cost savings in Croatia.

  6. The Activities of Students in Leisure Time in Sisak-Moslavina County (Republic of Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ðuranovic, Marina; Opic, Siniša

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the prevalence of activities in leisure time of the young. A survey was conducted on 1062 students in 8 primary (n = 505; 47,6%) and high schools (n = 557; 52,4%) in Sisak-Moslavina County in the Republic of Croatia. The questionnaire of spending leisure time used was made up of 30 variables on a five-degree…

  7. Business Ethics in the Republic of Croatia - results of a study

    OpenAIRE

    Koprek, Ivan; Rogošič, Nediljka

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study could be summarized as it follows: a) to examine the factors influencing the behaviour and actions of per-sons who have the authority and duty or responsibility to contribute to the general welfare and the common good ; and, b) to examine the factors preventing or impeding ethical behaviour in the Republic of Croatia. The starting hypotheses are as follows: Hypoth. 1.) Business ethics is an important factor affecting individual business behaviour in the Republic of Cr...

  8. Characteristics and drivers of forest cover change in the post-socialist era in Croatia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanovi, Marin; Blackburn, George Alan; Rudbeck Jepsen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    of deforestation and reforestation in private- and state-owned forests during the post-socialist period and the causal drivers of change. The selected region of Northern Croatia is characterised by a high percentage of privately owned forests with minimal national monitoring and control. We used a mixed...... show that the deforestation in private forests is weakening overall, mostly due to the continuation of the de-agrarisation and de-ruralisation processes which began during socialism....

  9. IRRIGATION AND LIMING AS FACTORS OF MAIZE YIELD INCREASES IN EASTERN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika MARKOVIĆ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Maize is the main field crop on arable lands in Croatia. Climatic changes, particularly temperature regime and precipitation quantities and their distribution during growing season had often adverse effects on maize yield. Therefore, irrigation of maize crops in critical periods is useful considering the variations among annual yields caused by water stressed conditions. Acid soils are covering one-third of agricultural soils in Croatia (about 832.000 hectares and correction of pH by liming is also an important factor for increase and stabilization of annual yield values. The aim of this study was to review irrigation and liming effects on maize yield in eastern Croatia. Eastern Croatia covers an area of 12.454 km2 or 22.0% of the State territory. This region is termed as the “granary of Croatia” because 75% of wheat and 50% of maize harvested areas of the country are located in this region. Maize yields in the long-term (since 2000 irrigation experiments carried on since 2000 on Agricultural Institute Osijek increased by 20% in years with average climate conditions, while under drought conditions of three growing seasons in 2007, 2011 and 2012, yield increases were 32%, 36%, and 47%, respectively. Soil improvement by liming with increasing rates of carbocalk (by-product of sugar factory containing about 43% CaO and about 6% of organic matter up to 60 t ha-1 was also a useful management practice, because in two experiments maize yields increased up to 25% (4-year average. However, for satisfied yield increases for 16% in both experiments the lowest amount of carbocalk needed for application was 15 t ha-1.

  10. Business Efficiency - Ranking the Republic of Croatia as a Destination in Regional, European and Global Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Mladen Verdris; Ruzica Simic

    2008-01-01

    Since the beginning of this decade, which corresponds to the processes of an accelerated political, social and economic opening to the European and global environment, the Republic of Croatia has become aware of the need for deep reforms to enable the creation of permanently sustained success of its national economy. In this context, the creation of conditions for efficiency in existing business entities, and the shaping of new and effective institutions, is becoming the central question for ...

  11. Choice of optimal exchange rate system For the Republic of Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Dražen Koški

    2008-01-01

    The aim of research whose results are presented in this article was to choose the optimal system of exchange rate for the Republic of Croatia, of course before its accession to EU. The analyzed exchange rate systems here range from free-floating exchange rate to system without domestic currency in circulation. Naturally, the classification of International Monetary Fond is included in it. After that, the comparison of basic economic advantages and disadvantages of the fixed exchan...

  12. The Intensity and Impact of Consumer Animosity and Ethnocentrism in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matea Matić

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumers’ attitudes and feelings towards foreign products have been the subject of research in the field of consumer behaviour for years. Consumer ethnocentrism and animosity refer to the economic consequences of consumer purchasing choices as a result of consumers’ moral and social obligations or their emotional responses. Negative stereotypes and feelings can strongly affect consumers’ moral and social responsibility and thus their final choice to purchase a domestic or a foreign product. This paper aims to determine the difference in animosity and ethnocentric tendencies with regard to a particular region, county, and type and size of settlements in Croatia. Moreover, the objective of the paper was to assess the direction and size of the impact of consumer animosity towards the countries of former Yugoslavia on consumer ethnocentric tendencies. The research was conducted on a sample of 1,000 respondents in the Republic of Croatia. The data were collected through a questionnaire and analysed using factor analysis, analysis of variance (ANOVA and the Pearson correlation coefficient to obtain relevant results. Analysis of variance has showed that there are significant differences in the consumer animosity and ethnocentric tendencies between counties and different types of settlements, but not between individual regions. The results also confirmed the correlation between consumer animosity towards the countries of former Yugoslavia and consumer ethnocentric tendencies in Croatia.

  13. Political Changes in Croatia and the Croatian Emigrant Press in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Perić

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview of the Croatian emigrant press in Chile through five historical periods (before World War I, during World War I, between the two world wars, during World War II, after World War II. Parallels are drawn between political changes in Croatia and changes in the contents and themes of the emigrant press. One emigrant newspaper is analysed for each historical period, via the content analysis method, and front-page articles are taken as the units of analysis. Apart from the messages’ contents, their form is analysed, so as to assess opinions that the messages’ senders transmit to their receivers. Based on the analysis of the newspapers, the author concludes that changes in Croatia had an important influence on the emigrant press, which was especially visible in the period during World War I and World War II. In the period from World War I onwards, headings and themes in the emigrant press were used to propagate Yugoslavism and a sense of belonging to the Yugoslav nation and state. The identity of the emigrants changed under the influence of political changes in Croatia. Up to World War I they were mainly anti-Austrian oriented, and in the next four periods they accepted the state and the government of both the first and the second Yugoslavia, identifying themselves with Yugoslavia, and raising their descendents in a Yugoslav spirit.

  14. First case of Anaplasma platys infection in a dog from Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyachenko Viktor

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that Anaplasma (A. platys, the causative agent of infectious canine cyclic thrombocytopenia, is endemic in countries of the Mediterranean basin. However, few reports are available from the Balkans. This case report describes a dog, which was imported from Croatia to Germany in May 2010. One month later the dog was presented to a local veterinarian in Germany due to intermittent/recurrent diarrhoea. Diagnostic tests were performed to identify infections caused by Anaplasma spp., Ehrlichia spp., Hepatozoon canis, Babesia spp., Leishmania spp., Borrelia burgdorferi and/or Dirofilaria immitis. Findings Haematological examination of a blood smear revealed basophilic inclusions in thrombocytes, which were confirmed as A. platys with a species-specific real-time PCR. Additionally, an infection with Babesia (B. vogeli was also detected (PCR and serology. No specific antibodies against Anaplasma antigen were detectable. Although the dog showed no specific clinical signs, thrombocytopenia, anaemia and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP were observed. Sequencing of a 1,348-bp partial ribosomal RNA gene revealed highest homology to A. platys sequences from Thailand, Japan and France. Conclusions A. platys was detected for first time in a dog imported from Croatia. As the dog was also co-infected by B. vogeli, unique serological and haematological findings were recorded. Thrombocytopenia, anaemia and elevated values of C-reactive protein were the laboratory test abnormalities observed in this case. A. platys infections should be considered in dogs coming from Croatia and adjacent regions.

  15. International Cooperation of the Republic of Croatia in the Field of Radiological and Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.

    2011-01-01

    International cooperation of the Republic of Croatia in the field of radiological and nuclear safety can be divided in two parts - political part, for which the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and European Integration is responsible, and technical part, for which the State Office for Radiological and Nuclear Safety is responsible. According to the Radiological and Nuclear Safety Act (OG 28/10) the State Office for Radiological and Nuclear Safety: ''coordinates technical cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency for all participants from the Republic of Croatia''; ''fulfils the obligations which the Republic of Croatia has assumed through international conventions and bilateral agreements concerning protection against ionising radiation, nuclear safety and the application of protective measures aimed at the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons'' and ''cooperates with international and domestic organisations and associations in the area of protection against ionising radiation and nuclear safety, and appoints its own expert representatives to take part in the work of such organisations and associations or to monitor their work''. In this paper various aspects of the technical cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, as well as international conventions and bilateral agreements in the field of radiological and nuclear safety, are presented. Also, cooperation with other international organizations and associations in the area of radiological and nuclear safety, such as Nuclear Suppliers Group, the Zangger Committee, the Wassenaar Arrangement, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization, Euratom and certain civil expert groups of NATO, is described. (author)

  16. Molecular Survey of Zoonotic Agents in Rodents and Other Small Mammals in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadin, Ante; Tokarz, Rafal; Markotić, Alemka; Margaletić, Josip; Turk, Nenad; Habuš, Josipa; Svoboda, Petra; Vucelja, Marko; Desai, Aaloki; Jain, Komal; Lipkin, W Ian

    2016-02-01

    Croatia is a focus for many rodent-borne zoonosis. Here, we report a survey of 242 rodents and small mammals, including 43 Myodes glareolus, 131 Apodemus flavicollis, 53 Apodemus agrarius, three Apodemus sylvaticus, six Sorex araneus, four Microtus arvalis, one Microtus agrestis, and one Muscardinus avellanarius, collected at eight sites in Croatia over an 8-year period. Multiplex MassTag polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for detection of Borrelia, Rickettsia, Bartonella, Babesia, Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, Francisella tularensis, and Coxiella burnetii. Individual PCR assays were used for detection of Leptospira, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, orthopoxviruses, flaviviruses, hantaviruses, and Toxoplasma gondii. Of the rodents, 52 (21.5%) were infected with Leptospira, 9 (3.7%) with Borrelia miyamotoi, 5 (2%) with Borrelia afzelii, 29 (12.0%) with Bartonella, 8 (3.3%) with Babesia microti, 2 (0.8%) with Ehrlichia, 4 (1.7%) with Anaplasma, 2 (0.8%) with F. tularensis, 43 (17.8%) with hantaviruses, and 1 (0.4%) with an orthopoxvirus. Other agents were not detected. Multiple infections were found in 32 rodents (13.2%): dual infections in 26 rodents (10.7%), triple infections in four rodents (2.9%), and quadruple infections in two rodents (0.8%). Our findings indicate that rodents in Croatia harbor a wide range of bacteria and viruses that are pathogenic to humans. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  17. Alloimmune neonatal neutropenia in Croatia during the 1998-2008 period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomicic, Maja; Starcevic, Mirta; Ribicic, Rebeka; Golubic-Cepulic, Branka; Hundric-Haspl, Zeljka; Jukic, Irena

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of the disease and to analyze laboratory data of 23 newborns undergoing serologic testing for alloimmune neonatal neutropenia (ANN) during the 1998-2008 period in Croatia. Laboratory data on 23 newborns undergoing serologic testing for ANN during the 1998-2008 period and epidemiologic data on the number of live births in Croatia were analyzed. Laboratory testing for ANN included serologic screening of maternal and neonatal sera and granulocytes (neutrophils) by immunofluorescence (IF) method. The monoclonal antibody immobilization of neutrophil antigens (MAINA) was employed to determine anti-HNA antibody specificity. Anti-HNA antibodies were detected in seven (54%) of 13 cases of serologically positive ANN. Only anti-HLA class I antibodies were demonstrated in four (31%) of 13 cases In the 2007-2008 period of prospective data collection, the number of serologically verified ANN cases was one case per 17,323 live births. Results of the prospective study conducted at Maternity Ward, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital Center yielded the ANN incidence of one case per 2843 live births. Monitoring of neutrophil count in neonatal blood and serologic testing for ANN in case of isolated neutropenia in the newborn contributed considerably to timely detection of ANN. Neonatal alloimmune neutropenia-incidence, serologic diagnosis, antineutrophil antibodies, anti-HNA, anti-HLA class I, Croatia. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Functional distribution of income and economic activity in Croatia: Post-Keynesian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Vujčić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to quantify the effects of changes in functional income distribution on selected macroeconomic variables in Croatia in period from 2000-2012. We use structural VAR approach with identification scheme based on a priori restrictions that are derived from theoretical framework of Post-Keynesian macroeconomic model. Our main hypothesis, which is confirmed in the empirical analysis, is that the accumulation of capital in Croatia was primarily determined by income from labor, i.e. that Croatia had wage-led accumulation. We also found that labor market dynamics was dominantly influenced by demand side shocks and that positive effects of the rise in exports, resulting from the gain in competitiveness (after reducing wage share in income outweigh negative effects of weaker demand on the capacity utilization. So in our opinion export share increase should become policy priority, as domestic demand is currently constrained by high private and public debt levels. To the extent that increase in exports might require decline in the relative share of labor, negative impact on the investments in non-tradable sector would need to be offset with higher investments in tradable sector of Croatian economy.

  19. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in the old institutionalized people in Zagreb, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevajda, Branimir; Havelka-Mestrović, Ana; Bilić, Morana; Nevajda, Andreja Podvez; Romić, Dominik; Vuletić, Vladimira; Cukljek, Snjezana; Sicaja, Mario; Bocina, Zeljko

    2013-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MeS) is defined by a cluster of abnormalities comprising obesity, hypertension, carbohydrate intolerance and dyslipidemia. MeS increases the risk of developing various diseases, including coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral angiopathy and type 2 diabetes. In our study, the subjects were 561 persons, residents of 11 homes for the elderly in Zagreb, Croatia. There were 160 men (28.5%) and 401 women (71.5%), aged from 56 to 96 years (the average being 79 years). Physical examination was conducted, which included blood pressure measurement, and body height and weight. Blood samples were taken for biochemical analysis. Along with other biochemical parameters, the levels of glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol (LDL, HDL-C) were also measured. The results have shown the prevalence of MeS in the elderly instutionalised people to be in the range of 20.8%, according to WHO criteria. The most common MeS component was hypertension, and it was significantly more frequent in women than in men; also, the elevated triglyceride levels were more often found in women; the difference between men and women was also statistically significant. MeS is a serious and growing health problem not only in Croatia but worldwide as well. Further studies are needed to verify the prevalence of MeS in Croatia, as it is a major risk for CVD and many other severe diseases.

  20. Exploring the relationship between energy consumption and GDP: Evidence from Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borozan, Djula

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between total energy consumption and real gross domestic product (GDP) covering the period between 1992 and 2010 in Croatia. The methodology employed in this paper is based on the bivariate vector autoregression (VAR) and Granger causality tests. Moreover, the impulse response function and variance decomposition analysis are employed to trace the dynamic response paths of shocks to the system. The empirical analysis shows that, when it is allowed for any deterministic component in the data, total energy consumption and real GDP are not co-integrated in the period observed. Furthermore, there is a unidirectional causality running from total energy consumption to GDP, and an impulse response to GDP caused by energy consumption, being mainly embodied in the first years. The results indicate that total energy consumption is an important component determining economic growth in Croatia and that energy conservation policy should be formulated and implemented wisely. This paper also tests the causality between real GDP and consumption of the five energy variables by using the bivariate VAR. The main implication of these tests is that individual energy forms matter when it comes to energy policy formulation. - Highlights: • There is a unidirectional causality running from energy consumption to real GDP in Croatia. • There is an impulse response to real GDP caused by energy consumption, being mainly embodied in the first years. • Energy consumption is an important component determining economic growth. • Individual energy forms matter when it comes to energy policy formulation

  1. International Cooperation of the Republic of Croatia in the Field of Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.; Rosandic, L.

    2010-01-01

    International cooperation of the Republic of Croatia in the field of nuclear safety can be divided in two parts - political part, for which the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and European Integration is responsible, and technical part, for which the State Office for Nuclear Safety is responsible, in cooperation with other state administration bodies, where applicable. According to the Nuclear Safety Act (OG 73/2003) the State Office for Nuclear Safety: 'coordinates technical cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency for all participants from the Republic of Croatia'; 'fulfills the obligations which the Republic of Croatia has assumed through international conventions and bilateral agreements concerning nuclear safety and the application of protective measures aimed at the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons' and 'cooperates with international organizations and associations in the area of nuclear safety, and appoints its own expert representatives to take part in the work of such organizations and associations or to monitor their work'. In this paper various aspects of the technical cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, as well as international conventions and bilateral agreements in the field of nuclear safety, will be presented. Also, cooperation with other international organizations and associations in the nuclear area, such as Nuclear Suppliers Group, Zangger Committee, Wassenaar Arrangement, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization, Euratom and certain civil expert groups of NATO, will be described.(author).

  2. PUBLIC OPINION ON NECESSITY FOR CONSTRUCTION OF REPOSITORY IN THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mostečak

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to examine the familiarity of the Croatian citizens with the issue of radioactive waste management, their opinion on the idea of building a radioactive waste landfill in the Republic of Croatia, potential concern and its determinants. The research was conducted on a sample of 447 Croatian citizens using a questionnaire designed for the purpose of the research. Results were processed and interpreted depending on the gender, age, educational level and urbanization of the area the examinees live in. The results have shown that the younger examinees support the use of nuclear energy as well as most of the male examinees, while the examinees older than 24 and the female examinees think the opposite. For the residents of Zagreb, the use of nuclear energy isn’t justified, nor is the idea of building a landfill in the Republic of Croatia. In general, a negative stance towards building the landfill in Croatia is shared by half of the total number of examinees. The main causes of concern to the citizens are: the threat to human health and the safety of the environment (the paper is published in Croatian.

  3. Research on user satisfaction with the quality of services in secondary education in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Jurković Majić

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available With the arrival of private schools and competition a new situation has arisen in which, due to long-term survival of some schools, it is necessary to consider marketing activities and service quality in the field of secondary education. It is well-known that during their secondary education students are influenced by many persons, among whom the most significant are teachers, other students and parents. Therefore, human relations at school are in the focus of the analysis of student satisfaction. In order to determine the level of student satisfaction with the secondary education service in Croatia as well as the acceptance and the use of marketing principles in Croatian secondary education during May, June and September 2006, research was conducted among students of secondary schools. The size of the sample for this occasion was n = 600 students, with a highly structured questionnaire as the research instrument. Research results have shown average satisfaction of students in Croatia with the cur¬rent level of interaction and of interactive connection in the secondary education system, while also showing that business marketing philosophy has not been implemented sufficiently in secondary education in Croatia.

  4. First Record of Eutypella parasitica on Maples in Urban Area in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Ivić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Eutypella parasitica, a plant pathogenic fungus attacking maples (Acer spp. was detected for the first time in Croatia in 2007. From 2007 to 2014, it was found only in forests, on several trees in Hum na Sutli, near Slovenian border. In 2015, the presence of Eutypella parasitica was monitored for the first time in urban areas. Materials and Methods: Within the official survey programme, 23 visual surveys were conducted and 24 samples were collected and analysed for the presence of fungi. E. parasitica was found in Bundek Park in Zagreb. Typical symptoms of Eutypella canker were detected on two field maples (Acer campestre and two boxelder maples (Acer negundo. Twelve isolates were collected from symptomatic trees. Conclusions: Eleven out of twelve isolates from four trees were confirmed as E. parasitica by species-specific polymerase chain reaction. This is the first report of E. parasitica in Zagreb, the first record of E. parasitica in Croatia outside forests, as well as a record of a new host species in Croatia, boxelder maple (A. negundo. Introduction pathway of E. parasitica in Zagreb remains unknown.

  5. Health care professionals' and students' attitude toward collaboration between pharmacists and physicians in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seselja-Perisin, Ana; Mestrovic, Arijana; Klinar, Ivana; Modun, Darko

    2016-02-01

    As traditional roles of pharmacists and physicians seem nowadays insufficient to ensure patient safety and therapy effectiveness, interprofessional collaboration has been suggested to improve health outcomes. To assess and compare the attitudes of physicians and pharmacists, as well as medical and pharmacy students in Croatia, toward interprofessional collaboration in primary health care. The study included 513 pharmacists and physicians, and 365 students of pharmacy and medicine from Croatia. The validated questionnaire, Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician–Pharmacist Collaboration, was translated in Croatian and completed, anonymously and voluntarily, by all participants. Results Pharmacists showed a more positive attitude toward collaboration than physicians (53.8 ± 4.8 vs. 50.7 ± 5.0). Pharmacy students expressed the most positive attitude (56.2 ± 4.9), while medical students showed the remarkably lowest attitude toward collaboration (44.6 ± 6.2). Pharmacists and physicians in Croatia expressed a relatively positive attitude toward their collaboration, comparable with their colleges in the USA. On the other hand, medical students expressed a 21 % less positive attitude than pharmacy students which could have an effect on interprofessional collaboration in the future when those students start working as health care professionals. Future studies, focusing on the promotion of this collaboration, on both under-graduated and post-graduated level, are warranted.

  6. Unrecorded capital flows and accumulation of foreign assets: the case of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vukšić

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the magnitude of unrecorded capital flows and the resulting unrecorded accumulation of foreign assets for Croatia, over the period between 2000 and 2007. The problem of unrecorded capital outflows, often labeled as capital flight, has gained significance in the present global financial and economic crises, because of increasing capital scarcity in many emerging markets and transition economies including Croatia. The findings reveal relatively large amounts of unrecorded foreign asset accumulation over the observed period. A large portion of this accumulation relates to cumulative amounts of net errors and omissions term, which is interpreted as unrecorded capital flow. There are reasons to believe that this net errors and omissions item in Croatia possibly partly represents the unrecorded accumulation of foreign cash from foreign tourist spending, and/or partly results from overstated tourism income in the official statistics.However, even after excluding this item from the calculation of capital flight, the remaining unrecorded accumulation of foreign assets over the period is still substantial. Consequently, if these unrecorded flows are taken into account, Croatia’s net international investment position is improved.

  7. Analysis of human resources in science and technology in ICT companies–case of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Horvat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper integrates theories and findings of the level of tertiary educated workforce, the human resources in science and technology and skills that are desirable in employees from in the information and communication technologies (ICT sector. It is important to examine the real situation on the labor market in the ICT sector, which is often referred to as the key to overcoming the crisis and the future of national economy. Basic statistical elements, upon which to predict future demand for human resources in science and technology (HRST, are people who enter tertiary level of education (inputs or are already in the system (throughputs, but until graduation are not considered HRST’s (outputs. Analysis is based on a sample of 56 small companies in ICT sector in Croatia. This paper presents the overview of the situations of human resources in small companies ICT sector in Croatia. Existing literature on HRST, employee’s skills and ICT sector is reviewed in the light of this analysis, in order to better understand current employment structure and desirable competencies of future employees of small companies in the ICT sector in Croatia.

  8. Choice of optimal exchange rate system For the Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen Koški

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of research whose results are presented in this article was to choose the optimal system of exchange rate for the Republic of Croatia, of course before its accession to EU. The analyzed exchange rate systems here range from free-floating exchange rate to system without domestic currency in circulation. Naturally, the classification of International Monetary Fond is included in it. After that, the comparison of basic economic advantages and disadvantages of the fixed exchange rate in relation to floating exchange rate were carried out. Although the question is about the extreme systems, disregarding the system without domestic currency in circulation, their comparison makes possible completely satisfactory basis for the right conclusions on the choice of optimal exchange rate system for the Republic of Croatia. Considering its economic particularities, the system of managed-floating exchange rate without proclaimed exchange direction in advance is certainly optimal for the Republic of Croatia. Namely, within the framework of this system the limited floating exchange rates decrease the foreign exchange risk allowing to monetary authorities, at least partly, the independent monetary policy

  9. The Influence of Foreign Direct Investments on Regional Development in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Kersan-Škabić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the influence of foreign direct investments (FDI on regional development in Croatia and to contribute to previous studies that deal with regional FDI re-allocations. Our analysis was conducted at the NUTS 3 level (21 Croatian counties and applied panel data analysis to determine the influence of FDI as well as other factors that proved to be significant in regional development in Croatia. The results point out that investment (i.e., both domestic and foreign direct investments, labor productivity, and export have a positive and significant influence on regional development, while absorptive capacity has a negative influence. It is therefore important to strengthen the absorptive capacity of Croatian regions to create a favorable investment environment and to provide good preconditions for the development of other factors of regional development. Findings are relevant for policy-makers who should take more proactive roles in attracting FDI as a way of strengthening regional development in Croatia. This may help policy-makers to act locally to achieve cohesion, but it can also be important for foreign investors that observe regional FDI determinants in the European Union.

  10. The 10th Joint Meeting on Medicinal Chemistry (JMMC 2017) Held in Dubrovnik, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perković, Ivana; Stepanić, Višnja; Marković, Vesna Gabelica

    2018-01-08

    The Croatian Chemical Society was established in 1926 and has developed over the decades into a society that actively supports all chemical activities in Croatia. The Society has eight divisions, the youngest of which, the Division of Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, was established in 2012 and immediately became a member of the European Federation of Medicinal Chemistry (EFMC). The mission of the Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry Division is the promotion and development of scientific, professional, and educational activities within the medicinal chemistry community in Croatia, as well as to build partnerships and collaborations with other primarily EU-based medicinal chemistry societies. In Croatia, medicinal chemistry research is ongoing at several institutes, including the University of Zagreb (Faculty of Science, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, and Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology), national institutes of science (Ruđer Bošković Institute), and private-sector drug discovery companies (CRO Fidelta Ltd.). In order to effectively exchange knowledge, ideas, and scientific results, Croatian medicinal chemists meet twice annually. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Proposal for a New Model for Highway Records in the Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldo Paar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Highways are public roads, whose function is to integrate Croatia in the European transport system, link the regions of Croatia and facilitate transit traffic. They are public property for general use, owned by the Republic of Croatia, and they cannot be the subject of acquisition or other proprietary rights of any kind. Today, there are two types of highway record-keeping. The first is conducted by leading companies authorised to manage highways in order to develop a highway database, or create a highway register. The second is conducted by land-management systems; the Cadastre and Land Registry. They are the official public registers for keeping records of land plots, buildings and other structures, and their ownership. Procedures that need to be implemented in the second type of record-keeping often get "stuck" in practice. Based on the problems identified in this model and an analysis of the state of record-keeping, a proposal for a new model for highway records in the Cadastre and Land Registry is given. Keywords: highways; building plot; expropriation; record; Cadastre; Land Registry

  12. IMPACT OF FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT (FDI ON DOMESTIC INVESTMENT IN REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Ivanović

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate how foreign direct investment (FDI affects domestic investment in the Republic of Croatia. More precisely, the general purpose of this study is to determine the impact of net inflow of foreign capital on domestic investment in order to gain a clearer picture about the sensitivity and efficiency of domestic investment. After parsing domestic investment and FDI in Croatia, according to Croatian Bureau of Statistics and the Croatian National Bank, a historical overview of their movement from 1995 to 2014 was analyzed. In the following an overview and comparison of studies from around the world which deal with similar topic was made. In the empirical part; domestic gross fixed capital formation, changes in domestic stocks, net FDI and GDP growth rate was used as variables. Quarterly time series data ranging from the Q1 2001 to Q4 2014 were processed with the subset VAR (vector autoregressive econometric model. The results shows that FDI have negative influence on domestic investment in the Republic of Croatia with time lag.

  13. Preview of BPM6 Methodology and Analysis of Foreign Direct Investment in 2015 in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šlogar Helena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Foreign direct investments include equity capital, reinvested earnings and debt relations between ownership-related residents and non-residents. Since 31 October 2014, the Croatian National Bank has started to publish information in the field of statistics Relations (balance of payments, foreign debt and the IIP in accordance with the methodology prescribed by the sixth edition of the Manual on Balance of Payments (Eng. Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual, BPM6, thus changing the presentational form of direct investment. Direct investments are not classified according to the so-called direction of investments (Eng. directional principle on direct investment in Croatia and direct investment abroad anymore, but according to BPM6 apply the socalled principle of assets and liabilities (Eng. Assets / Liabilities principle. The aim is to point out the differences between the standards BPM5 and BPM6 and determine which activities and which countries are the most represented in the structure of direct investments in Croatia. By identifying relevant activities and countries in the structure of foreign direct investment, relevant information is obtained about the macroeconomic state of the Republic of Croatia and about the opportunities and potential dangers that certain activities and countries provide.

  14. SEDIMENTARY LOW-MANGANESE HEMATITE DEPOSITS OF THE BUKOVICA AREA IN THE NORTHWESTERN MT. PETROVA GORA, CENTRAL CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milivoj Čop

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Middle-Permian Gröden deposits crop out on the surface of 0.8 km in the Bukovica area and on the surface of 0.8 km2 in the Mt. Loskun-jska gora in the NW part of the Petrova gora Mountain. One half of the Bukovica Gröden deposits contains in its lowest parts 1 to 5 m (in average 2.5 m thick hematite bed cutted in blocks by NE-SW stretch¬ing vertical, normal and reverse faults. The hematite bed is unconfor-mably underlain by Lower Permian quartz-wackes (subgraywackes intercalated with shales intercalations. Ore deposit is explored by 308 boreholes (10509 m and by numerous adits, inclines and crosscuts on the underground surface of 0.4 km2 . From 1936 to 1941 and from 1953 to 1969 has been exploited 183000 t of ore with (in wt %: 34.0 Si02, 2.9 Al2O3; 59.0 Fe203; 0.15 MnO; 0.7 CaO; 0.4 MgO; 0.1 P, 0.37 S; 1.25 l.o. ign. Proven remaining ore reserves are 250.000 t. Paragenesis is investigated by microscopy of thin and polished sections, XRD, DTA, AAS analyses and by sedimentological analyses. Paragenesis major minerals are of hematite and quartz, with subordinate stable litho-clasts, muscovite (sericite and scarce kaolinite, calcite, dolomite, and barite. Accessories are zircon, rutile, tourmaline, amphibole, garnet, apatite. Epigenetic veinlets and small nests are built up of quartz or calcite as the main neominerals associated with siderite, barite, kaolinite, pyrite, gypsum. Iron from the Bukovica hematite ore origi¬nated by land weathering during hot climate and transported by rivers and underground waters deposited in river beds, in flood plains and in shallow sea. Precipitation of the Bukovica iron ores took place after the Saalic orogenetic phase. At Hrastno (SE Slovenia and at Rude nearby Samobor (Croatia, similar hematite deposits were found.

  15. Evaluation of architectural and histopathological biomarkers in the intestine of brown trout (Salmo trutta Linnaeus, 1758) challenged with environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barišić, Josip; Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Mijošek, Tatjana; Čož-Rakovac, Rozelindra; Dragun, Zrinka; Krasnići, Nesrete; Ivanković, Dušica; Kružlicová, Dáša; Erk, Marijana

    2018-06-14

    In the present study novel histopathological approach, using fish intestine as a sensitive bioindicator organ of pollution impact in the freshwater ecosystem, was proposed. Histopathological alterations were compared between native brown trout (Salmo trutta Linnaeus, 1758) from the reference (Krka River spring) and pollution impacted location (influence of technological/municipal wastewaters and agricultural runoff near the Town of Knin) of the karst Krka River in Croatia. In brown trout from both locations, severe parasitic infestation with acanthocephalan species Dentitruncus trutae was found, enabling evaluation of acanthocephalan infestation histopathology, which indicated parasite tissue reaction in a form of inflammatory, necrotic and hyperplastic response that extended throughout lamina epithelialis mucosae, lamina propria, and lamina muscularis mucosae. New semi-quantitative histological approach was proposed in order to foresee alterations classified in three reaction patterns: control tissue appearance, moderate (progressive) tissue impairment and severe (regressive and inflammatory) tissue damage. The most frequent progressive alteration was hyperplasia of epithelium on the reference site, whereas the most frequent regressive alterations were atrophy and necrosis seen on the polluted site. Furthermore, histopathological approach was combined with micromorphological and macromorphological assessment as an additional indicator of pollution impact. Among 15 observed intestinal measures, two biomarkers of intestinal tissue damage were indicated as significant, height of supranuclear space (hSN) and number of mucous cells over 100 μm fold distance of intestinal mucosa (nM), which measures were significantly lower in fish from polluted area compared to the reference site. Obtained results indicated that combined histological and morphological approach on fish intestinal tissue might be used as a valuable biological tool for assessing pollution impact on

  16. Some characteristics of social interactions among adolescents in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klarin M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mira Klarin,1 Ana Pororokovic,2 Slavica Šimic Šašic,1 Violeta Arnaudova31Department of Teacher and Preschool Teacher Education, University of Zadar, Zadar, Croatia; 2Department of Psychology, University of Zadar, Zadar, Croatia; 3Faculty of Philosophy, Department of Psychology, University of Ciril and Method, Skopje, MacedoniaIntroduction: The bioecological model refers to the basic social needs that a person has satisfied through social interactions. In individualist cultures, the need for independence is emphasized with the aim of self-realization and personal achievement. In collectivist cultures, togetherness is encouraged and it prevails over individuality.Aim: The aim of this study was to determine whether there were differences in adolescents (n = 1033 from three different cultural environments (Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Macedonia with regard to the various aspects of the social interactions and behaviors these adolescents exercise with their parents and friends.Methods: Three groups of questionnaires were used: those that measure family interactions (the quality of family interactions, loneliness in the family, and family influence; those that assess peer interactions (quality of friendships, social loneliness, and influence of friendships; and those that examined behavioral variables (self-esteem, aggression, and prosocialness.Results: Discriminant analysis has shown that there are two significant functions that differentiate subjects from the three different cultural environments. The first discriminant function that adequately discriminates between subjects in all three cultural environments is related to social and family loneliness and the influence of friends. Loneliness in the family, social loneliness, and influence of friends are most prevalent among adolescents in Macedonia and least among adolescents in Croatia. The second function that distinguished adolescents in Croatia from those in the other two cultural

  17. [Health system research in the Republic of Croatia 1990-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacević, Jasmina; Sogorić, Selma; Dzakula, Aleksandar

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the scope and contents of peer-reviewed scientific publications that bring the results of the Health System Research (HSR) in the Republic of Croatia during the 1990-2010 period. The basic guidelines are in line with the research project, Health Services Research into European Policy and Practice (HSREPP). This project is being implemented with the aim of identifying, evaluating and improving the contribution of Health System Research to the development of Health Policy in Europe. This study included scientific publications indexed in the PubMed database and master theses and doctoral dissertations published at Schools of Medicine in Zagreb, Osijek, Rijeka and Split during the 1990-2010 period. In accordance with the project methodology, scientific publications indexed in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) were searched for by the key words "Croatia AND (Health Care System OR Health System OR Healthcare System)". Then, the database of scientific publications indexed in PubMed was narrowed by key words divided into 4 groups according to HSREPP instructions. The search for master theses and doctoral dissertations was carried out by direct inspection of the completed works in the library of Andrija Stampar School of Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb. Access to master theses and doctoral dissertations at the other three medical schools was done by the Internet. We analyzed the collected summaries of all publications, master theses and doctoral dissertations and excluded all those that did not correspond to our research. Using this method, we found a total of 536 publications indexed in PubMed-in, 70 master theses and 22 doctoral dissertations meeting the study criteria. For further analysis, we separately considered master theses and doctoral dissertations on the one side, and scientific publications indexed in PubMed on the other side. All papers were listed by the year of publication, the author

  18. Is there a potential impact of research and development (R&D policy on health care system development in Croatia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Dabić

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim Major demographic changes over the last decades, increasingnumber of chronic diseases in population and appearance ofnew infectious diseases together with increasing costs of healthcare are imposing a great burden on health care systems in westernsocieties, including Croatia. The aim of this study is to determinethe amount and directions of investments in research and development(R&D activities in biomedicine and biotechnology thatcould significantly impact the quality and costs of the health carein Croatia in long term.Methods We analyzed relevant publicly available informationmaintained at the web sites of Ministry of Science, Education andSport, Croatian National Institute of Public Health, Croatian Instituteof Technology, The National Foundation for Science, HigherEducation and Technological Development, Unity ThroughKnowledge Fund and Central Bureau of Statistics of the Republicof Croatia. Additionally, the comprehensive literature search wasdone on Medline and SCOPUS, Current Contents and other databases.Results There is a substantial increase in investment of R&D activities(scientific and technological project in the field of biomedicineand biotechnology in Croatia, from various national aswell as international resources. There is an emphasis on appliedresearch funding and encouragement of international collaborationand collaboration with Croatian Diaspora.Conclusion In the future, the results of funded projects couldpossibly lead to various products (e.g. new drug discoveries, newmethodology and technology applications, and thus potentiallysignificantly influence the quality and the costs of health care inCroatia in long term.

  19. Ethics committees in Croatia in the healthcare institutions: the first study about their structure and functions, and some reflections on the major issues and problems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borovecki, A.; Have, H.A.M.J. ten; Oreskovic, S.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In Croatia, ethics committees are legally required in all healthcare institutions by the Law on the Health Protection. This paper explores for the first time the structure and function of ethics committees in the healthcare institutions in Croatia. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey of the

  20. River nomads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    sail on the Niger River between Nigeria and Mali. Crossing villages, borders and cultures, they stop only to rest by setting up camp on riverbanks or host villages. In River Nomads, we join the nomadic Kebbawa fishermen on one of their yearly crossing, experiencing their relatively adventurous...

  1. River Piracy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There was this highly venerated river Saraswati flowing through. Haryana, Marwar and Bahawalpur in Uttarapath and emptying itself in the Gulf ofKachchh, which has been described in glowing terms by the Rigveda. "Breaking through the mountain barrier", this "swift-flowing tempestuous river surpasses in majesty and.

  2. Co-operation between Slovenia and Croatia in the low- and intermediate level radioactive waste repository project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, A.; Lokner, V.; Subasic, D.; Zeleznik, N.; Mele, I.; Tomse, P.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes the LILW repository project development in Slovenia and Croatia from the viewpoint of co-operation of national agencies for radioactive waste management - ARAO in Slovenia and APO in Croatia. The project performance, as well as the co-operation itself, are based on the fact that NPP Krsko, sited in Slovenia, is the joint venture facility of both countries, which are consequently obliged to find a proper solution for final disposal of operational and decommissioning radioactive waste generated by the plant. The main aspects of the project development in both countries, such as LILW repository site selection and characterisation, development of repository conceptual design, performance assessment/safety analysis procedures and public participation, are presented in the paper. Based on separate descriptions of the project development in Slovenia and Croatia respectively, the main aspects of co-operation between ARAO and APO are elaborated.(author)

  3. Transparency and public accessibility of clinical trial information in Croatia: how it affects patient participation in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šolić, Ivana; Stipčić, Ana; Pavličević, Ivančica; Marušić, Ana

    2017-06-15

    Despite increased visibility of clinical trials through international trial registries, patients often remain uninformed of their existence, especially if they do not have access to adequate information about clinical research, including the language of the information. The aim of this study was to describe the context for transparency of clinical trials in Croatia in relation to countries in Central and Eastern Europe, and to assess how informed Croatian patients are about clinical trials and their accessibility. We assessed the transparency of clinical trials from the data available in the public domain. We also conducted an anonymous survey on a convenience sample of 257 patients visiting two family medicine offices or an oncology department in south Croatia, and members of national patients' associations. Despite legal provisions for transparency of clinical trials in Croatia, they are still not sufficiently visible in the public domain. Among countries from Central and Eastern Europe, Croatia has the fewest number of registered trials in the EU Clinical Trials Registry. 66% of the patients in the survey were aware of the existence of clinical trials but only 15% were informed about possibilities of participating in a trial. Although 58% of the respondents were willing to try new treatments, only 6% actually participated in a clinical trial. Only 2% of the respondents were aware of publicly available trial registries. Our study demonstrates that there is low transparency of clinical trials in Croatia, and that Croatian patients are not fully aware of clinical trials and the possibilities of participating in them, despite reported availability of Internet resources and good communication with their physicians. There is a need for active policy measures to increase the awareness of and access to clinical trials to patients in Croatia, particularly in their own language.

  4. Building trust with the public in site selection of radioactive waste repository in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerskov Klika, Mirjana; Schaller, Antun

    1995-01-01

    It should be emphasised that the Republic of Croatia ought to find a solution to dispose not only radioactive waste generated on its own territory, i.e. waste derived from diverse medical, industrial and scientific nuclear applications which does not exceed some 70 cubic metres: in total. It is also obliged to find acceptable solutions for disposal of a half of total radioactive waste accumulating in the Krsko NPP which is situated in Slovenia, but is a joint venture facility of both countries, Slovenia and Croatia. Therefore, one of essential duties of the APO - Hazardous Waste Management Agency is just performance of these activities in Croatia. The site selection process of low- and intermediate radioactive waste disposal in Croatia started in 1988. The site selection process itself is organized in two stages: (1) site survey stage; and 2) site evaluation stage. The first stage, being currently in progress, is related to all activities directed to inclusion of preferred sites into the Regional Plan of Croatia, whilst the second stage includes a necessary on-field investigations at few preferred sites and identification of the most suitable one, i.e. the final repository site. Eight potential areas containing even 42 potential sites have been determined so far. Promotion of several preferred sites is expected to be done until July 1995. Official announcement of preferred sites will be followed by public debate on their acceptance at a level of political-territorial organization, including local communities. The people working in APO - Hazardous Waste Management Agency have been aware of considerable public resistance to most of activities the Agency is dealing with since the very beginning of its operation. Consequently, permanent education and honest information to the public have been taken as the Agency's high priority tasks. Namely, if the public is treated as a competent participant in decision making process then it gets obvious that publicity of work is

  5. Developing Spatial Data Infrastructure in Croatia – Incorporating National and Regional Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Bačić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Although still not a member State of the European Union, Croatia has recognized in the spatial data infrastructure a concept that can significantly incite the modernization and effectiveness of the State administration, and create preconditions for the accelerated economic growth. Given this fact, Croatia has defined, after preparations which lasted several years, the legal framework for the national spatial data infrastructure establishment by adopting the Law on State Survey and Real Property Cadastre in 2007. During the adoption of this Law, great attention was paid to it being in line with the EU INSPIRE Directive (European Union, 2007 that was being adopted at the time, so the adopted provisions were fully compatible with the INSPIRE provisions. Regarding the model that Croatia has chosen in the establishment of its National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI, the role of the State Geodetic Administration (SGA, the Croatian National Mapping and Cadastre Agency (NMCA, is significant. The SGA acts as a coordination body for the NSDI establishment, giving technical support to the NSDI bodies. One of the obligations is the establishment of a metadata catalogue through the national geoportal. Significant activities have been undertaken in the field of raising the awareness. The most important studies describing the manner of the NSDI establishment and current national as well as European situation have been translated into Croatian language and distributed to more than 1,000 NSDI stakeholders. Several workshops have been organised in order to transfer the best practices from the countries that have achieved big progress in this field. In parallel with the national activities, Croatia, or rather the SGA, has recognized that the spatial data infrastructure (SDI development cannot be based on isolated national activities connected exclusively to the INSPIRE Directive but that the Croatian spatial data infrastructure development activities must be

  6. Proceedings of the Fifth Forum: Energy day in Croatia; Zbornik radova Petog foruma: Dan energije u Hrvatskoj

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Fifth forum is dedicated to energy consumption. After liberation of some parts of Croatia and peaceful reintegration of Podunavlje in the Republic of Croatia, we think about future, economic development and living standard increasing. Main factors in energy consumption are investments, choice and decisions of consumers. Also, there is a problem of environmental protection which is parallel to economic development. There is no simple solution because of different circumstances in every country. However, organized energy system must contain some basic principles, which connect economic laws, national safety, energy efficiency and environmental protection.

  7. Geothermal energy in Croatia and the world until 2020; Geotermijska energija u svijetu i Hrvatskoj do 2020. godine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelic, K; Kevric, I [Rudarsko-geolosko-naftni fakultet, Zagreb (Croatia); Cubric, S [INA-Naftaplin, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1997-12-31

    The use of geothermal energy in watering place, heating, the production of electric power, and for other purposes is increasing throughout the world. Over the past ten years, besides traditional production from natural thermal wells, this energy has also been produced in Croatia from geothermal wells discovered as a results of deep exploration drilling for hydrocarbons. This paper analyses the current state of geothermal energy both in the world and in Croatia, and makes projections about its immediate future. Energy potential data on the croatian part of the Panonian basin are given along with perspective locations for producing this ecologically acceptable and partially reusable energy. (author). 5 figs., 2 tabs., 9 refs.

  8. Next Generation Access Network Deployment in Croatia: Optical Access Networks and Current IoT/5G Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breskovic, Damir; Sikirica, Mladen; Begusic, Dinko

    2018-05-01

    This paper gives an overview and background of optical access network deployment in Croatia. Optical access network development in Croatia has been put into a global as well as in the European Union context. All the challenges and the driving factors for optical access networks deployment are considered. Optical access network architectures that have been deployed by most of the investors in Croatian telecommunication market are presented, as well as the architectures that are in early phase of deployment. Finally, an overview on current status of mobile networks of the fifth generation and Internet of Things is given.

  9. Biosafety level 3 facility: essential infrastructure in biodefense strategy in the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetko Krajinovic, L.; Markotic, A.

    2009-01-01

    Wide spectrum of microorganisms nowadays present serious health risks to humans and animals and their potential for use as biological weapons has become an important concern for governments and responsible authorities. This has resulted in the implementation of measures (known as biodefense) directed toward containment of potentially harmful biological agents with the purpose to reduce or eliminate hazards to laboratory workers, other persons, and the outside environment. Many of such pathogens are dangerous pathogens which request biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) facility for research and management. Biosafety level 3 comprises the combinations of standard and special microbiological laboratory practices and techniques, safety equipment, and laboratory facilities recommended for work with indigenous or exotic agents that may cause serious or potentially lethal disease through inhalation route exposure. Croatia is endemic for many of these threatening pathogens/diseases (e.g. tularemia, pulmonary and non-pulmonary tuberculosis, brucellosis, Q fever, glanders, melioidosis, typhoid fever, viral hemorrhagic fevers, hepatitis B and C, HIV etc.). Its strategic geographic position and the overall world rise of international trade and travel unlocks the possibility for importing some new microorganisms or even occurrence of an outbreak of totally unknown infectious origin. We, also, cannot exclude the possibility of the so called deliberately emerging microbes used in intentional bioterrorist purposes. However, it is obvious that Croatia needs infrastructure and well trained human capacities on biosafety level 3 to cope with incoming public health challenges and threats. The fundamental objective of the laboratory under which dangerous agents can safely be handled, is surveillance and quick response, as a key elements in controlling of scenarios referred to above. For that purpose, the first BSL-3 facility in Croatia is in the final phase of its reconstruction at the University

  10. Biosafety level 3 facility: essential infrastructure in biodefense strategy in the Republic of Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetko Krajinovic, L; Markotic, A [University Hospital for Infectious Diseases Dr Fran Mihaljevic, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2009-07-01

    Wide spectrum of microorganisms nowadays present serious health risks to humans and animals and their potential for use as biological weapons has become an important concern for governments and responsible authorities. This has resulted in the implementation of measures (known as biodefense) directed toward containment of potentially harmful biological agents with the purpose to reduce or eliminate hazards to laboratory workers, other persons, and the outside environment. Many of such pathogens are dangerous pathogens which request biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) facility for research and management. Biosafety level 3 comprises the combinations of standard and special microbiological laboratory practices and techniques, safety equipment, and laboratory facilities recommended for work with indigenous or exotic agents that may cause serious or potentially lethal disease through inhalation route exposure. Croatia is endemic for many of these threatening pathogens/diseases (e.g. tularemia, pulmonary and non-pulmonary tuberculosis, brucellosis, Q fever, glanders, melioidosis, typhoid fever, viral hemorrhagic fevers, hepatitis B and C, HIV etc.). Its strategic geographic position and the overall world rise of international trade and travel unlocks the possibility for importing some new microorganisms or even occurrence of an outbreak of totally unknown infectious origin. We, also, cannot exclude the possibility of the so called deliberately emerging microbes used in intentional bioterrorist purposes. However, it is obvious that Croatia needs infrastructure and well trained human capacities on biosafety level 3 to cope with incoming public health challenges and threats. The fundamental objective of the laboratory under which dangerous agents can safely be handled, is surveillance and quick response, as a key elements in controlling of scenarios referred to above. For that purpose, the first BSL-3 facility in Croatia is in the final phase of its reconstruction at the University

  11. Survey of mammography practice in Croatia: Equipment performance, image quality and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faj, D.; Stimac, D.; Ivezic, Z.; Kasabasic, M.; Ivkovic, A.; Posedel, D.; Kubelka, D.; Ilakovac, V.; Brnic, Z.; Bjelac, O.C.

    2008-01-01

    A national audit of mammography equipment performance, image quality and dose has been conducted in Croatia. Film-processing parameters, optical density (OD), average glandular dose (AGD) to the standard breast, viewing conditions and image quality were examined using TOR(MAM) test object. Average film gradient ranged from 2.6 to 3.7, with a mean of 3.1. Tube voltage used for imaging of the standard 45 mm polymethylmethacrylate phantom ranged from 24 to 34 kV, and OD ranged from 0.75 to 1.94 with a mean of 1.26. AGD to the standard breast ranged from 0.4 to 2.3 mGy with a mean of 1.1 mGy. Besides clinical conditions, the authors have imaged the standard phantom in the referent conditions with 28 kV and OD as close as possible to 1.5. Then, AGD ranged from 0.5 to 2.6 mGy with a mean of 1.3 mGy. Image viewing conditions were generally unsatisfying with ambient light up to 500 lx and most of the viewing boxes with luminance between 1000 and 2000 cd per m 2 . TOR(MAM) scoring of images taken in clinical and referent conditions was done by local radiologists in local image viewing conditions and by the referent radiologist in good image viewing conditions. Importance of OD and image viewing conditions for diagnostic information were analysed. The survey showed that the main problem in Croatia is the lack of written quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures. Consequently, equipment performance, image quality and dose are unstable and activities to improve image quality or to reduce the dose are not evidence-based. This survey also had an educational purpose, introducing in Croatia the QC based on European Commission Guidelines. (authors)

  12. Cochrane and its prospects in Bosnia and Herzegovina: Relying on Cochrane Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmić-Kaknjo, Mersiha; Puljak, Livia; Markotić, Filipa; Fidahić, Mahir; Muhamedagić, Lejla; Zakarija-Grković, Irena

    2015-01-01

    In this article we describe Cochrane and its products: Cochrane systematic reviews (CSRs) and other Cochrane evidence. Cochrane is a unique, international, non-profit organisation that offers health care providers, health care consumers and other decision makers unbiased and highly reliable information on health, which is pivotal for conscientious and responsible decision making in overall healthcare. Cochrane offers the highest ranked evidence in Evidence Based Medicine (EBM)--systematic reviews. Currently, CSRs are freely available in BH, and therefore, they ought to be widely used, and understood. We will present the new Cochrane Strategy to 2020, which was the main topic of the 6th Croatian Cochrane Symposium (CroCoS), as well as explore prospects for spreading Cochrane activities to Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH), through collaboration with Cochrane Croatia. BH has no officially organized Cochrane activity, as yet. We hope that this article will raise awareness about Cochrane in BH, help promote its activities, and deepen the existing collaboration with Cochrane Croatia. There are already some changes being introduced concerning Cochrane--at least, in one half, the Federation of BH (FBH). Two documents symbolising official recognition of policy changes towards Cochrane have recently been published in the Official Gazette of FBH. Since founding a BH Cochrane Branch would be costly and difficult to achieve in a complicated environment, such as the one we have, BH could use the good will, experience, knowledge, and translated educational, training and web materials of Cochrane Croatia, particularly given the language similarities, to promote evidence based medicine in BH. Copyright © 2015 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  13. Patient radiation doses in the most common interventional cardiology procedures in croatia: First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brnic, Z.; Krpan, T.; Faj, D.; Kubelka, D.; Ramac, J. P.; Posedel, D.; Steiner, R.; Vidjak, V.; Brnic, V.; Viskovic, K.; Baraban, V.

    2010-01-01

    Apart from its benefits, the interventional cardiology (IC) is known to generate high radiation doses to patients and medical staff involved. The European Union Medical Exposures Directive 97/43/EURATOM strongly recommend patient dosimetry in interventional radiology, including IC. IC patient radiation doses in four representative IC rooms in Croatia were investigated. Setting reference levels for these procedures have difficulties due to the large difference in procedure complexity. Nevertheless, it is important that some guideline values are available as a benchmark to guide the operators during these potentially high-dose procedures. Local and national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were proposed as a guidance. A total of 138 diagnostic (coronary angiography, CA) and 151 therapeutic (PTCA, stenting) procedures were included. Patient irradiation was measured in terms of kerma-area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT) and number of cine-frames (F). KAP was recorded using calibrated KAP-meters. DRLs of KAP, FT and F were calculated as third quartile values rounded up to the integer. Skin doses were assessed on a selected sample of high skin dose procedures, using radiochromic films, and peak skin doses (PSD) were presented. A relative large range of doses in IC was detected. National DRLs were proposed as follows: 32 Gy cm 2 , 6.6 min and 610 frames for CA and 72 Gy cm 2 , 19 min and 1270 frames for PTCA. PSD 2 Gy in 8% of selected patients. Measuring the patient doses in radiological procedures is required by law, but rarely implemented in Croatia. The doses recorded in the study are acceptable when compared with the literature, but optimisation is possible. The preliminary DRL values proposed may be used as a guideline for local departments, and should be a basis for radiation reduction measures and quality assurance programmes in IC in Croatia. (authors)

  14. The quality of informed consent in Croatia-a cross-sectional study and instrument development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučemilo, Luka; Milošević, Milan; Dodig, Doris; Grabušić, Bruno; Đapić, Biljana; Borovečki, Ana

    2016-03-01

    To examine the informed consent process implementation and quality in Croatia using a specially developed instrument. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted in 300 patients (response rate 73%) from six hospitals in Croatia, along with psychometric evaluation of the questionnaire. Signing the informed consent form was a formality for 64% of patients, 54% of patients did not give their written consent, and in 39% of cases physicians made treatment decisions by themselves. The overall informed consent process score was 4.06±0.60 (of 5.00). Physician-patient relationship score was 4.61±0.57, Verbal information 3.99±0.98, Decision making 3.94±0.75, and Written information 3.60±1.42. The overall Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.890. Significant correlations were found in relation to Physician-patient relationship and education levels (OR=0.43, 95% CI=0.18-0.99, p=0.048), and Verbal information and duration of health problems (OR=1.83, 95% CI=1.02-3.25, p=0.041). The developed questionnaire is reliable and valid. The informed consent process quality in Croatia was reasonably high, although insufficient and inadequate written materials represent a weak spot that require enhancement. The study contributes to the development of suitable measuring instrument for assessment of the informed consent process quality in clinical practice. The questionnaire could be of use in the hospital accreditation process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of 12 X-STR loci in the population of south Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mršić, Gordan; Ozretić, Petar; Crnjac, Josip; Merkaš, Siniša; Račić, Ivana; Rožić, Sara; Sukser, Viktorija; Popović, Maja; Korolija, Marina

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess forensic pertinence of 12 short tandem repeats (STRs) on X-chromosome in south Croatia population. Investigator ® Argus X-12 kit was used to co-amplify 12 STR loci belonging to four linkage groups (LGs) on X-chromosome in 99 male and 98 female DNA samples of unrelated donors. PCR products were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Population genetic and forensic parameters were calculated by the Arlequin and POPTREE2 software, and an on-line tool available at ChrX-STR.org. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was confirmed for all X-STR markers in female samples. Biallelic patterns at DXS10079 locus were detected in four male samples. Polymorphism information content for the most (DXS10135) and the least (DXS8378) informative markers was 0.9212 and 0.6347, respectively. In both male and female samples, combined power of discrimination exceeded 0.999999999. As confirmed by linkage disequilibrium test, significant association of marker pair DXS10074-DXS10079 (P = 0.0004) within LG2 and marker pair DXS10101-DXS10103 (P = 0.0003) within LG3 was found only in male samples. Number of observed haplotypes in our sample pool amounted 3.01, 7.53, 5 and 3.25% of the number of possible haplotypes for LG1, LG2, LG3 and LG4, respectively. According to haplotype diversity value of 0.9981, LG1 was the most informative. In comparison of south Croatia with 26 world populations, pair-wise [Formula: see text] values increase in parallel with geographical distance. Overall statistical assessment confirmed suitability of Investigator ® Argus X-12 kit for forensic casework in both identification and familial testing in the population of south Croatia.

  16. Analysis of 8 X-chromosomal markers in the population of central Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gršković, Branka; Zidkova, Anastassiya; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Popović, Maja; Primorac, Dragan; Mršić, Gordan

    2013-01-01

    Aim To analyze 8 X-linked short tandem repeat (STR) markers in the population of central Croatia and to evaluate their forensic efficiency. Methods We carried out a statistical analysis of the data from previously performed genetic analyses, collected during routine forensic work by the Forensic Science Centre ‘‘Ivan Vučetić.’’ Mentype® Argus X-8 PCR amplification kit was used for typing the data of 99 unrelated healthy women and 78 men from central Croatia. Haplotype frequencies were calculated only in male samples. Arlequin 3.5 software was used to assess Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), linkage disequilibrium (LD), observed and expected heterozygosity. Power of discrimination (PD) for men and women, polymorphism information content (PIC), power of exclusion, and mean exclusion chance for deficiency cases, normal trios, and duos were determined using online database ChrX-STR.org. Results In female samples, deviations from HWE (P = 0.006) for each locus were not found. LD test performed both on female and male samples revealed no significant association between markers (P = 0.002). DXS10135 was the most polymorphic locus (PIC = 0.931). PD varied from 0.692 to 0.935 in male and from 0.845 to 0.992 in female samples. Combined PD reached 99.999999% in men and 99.9999999999% in women. Conclusion Performed analyses revealed that the studied marker set contained polymorphic markers with high power of discrimination. We can conclude that Mentype® Argus X-8 PCR kit is suitable for application in the population of central Croatia. Results of this study, together with collected allele and haplotype frequencies, are the first step in establishing a national reference X-STR database based on 8 X-STR loci. PMID:23771754

  17. Prevalence and Geographic Distribution of Vector-Borne Pathogens in Apparently Healthy Dogs in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrljak, Vladimir; Kuleš, Josipa; Mihaljević, Željko; Torti, Marin; Gotić, Jelena; Crnogaj, Martina; Živičnjak, Tatjana; Mayer, Iva; Šmit, Iva; Bhide, Mangesh; Barić Rafaj, Renata

    2017-06-01

    Vector-borne pathogens (VBPs) are a group of globally extended and quickly spreading pathogens that are transmitted by various arthropod vectors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the seroprevalence against Babesia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria immitis, and Ehrlichia canis in dogs in Croatia. We investigated 435 randomly selected apparently healthy dogs in 13 different locations of Croatia for antibodies to B. canis by indirect immunofluorescence using a commercial IFA IgG Antibody Kit. All samples were also tested for qualitative detection of D. immitis antigen and for antibodies to A. phagocytophilum, B. burgdorferi sensu lato, L. infantum, and E. canis with two point-of-care assays. Overall, 112 dogs (25.74%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 21.70-30.12) were serologically positive for one or more of the pathogens. B. canis was the most prevalent pathogen (20.00%, 95% CI 16.34-24.07), followed by A. phagocytophilum (6.21%, 95% CI 4.12-8.90), L. infantum, (1.38%, 95% CI 0.51-2.97), and B. burgdorferi sensu lato (0.69%, 95% CI 0.01-2.00). The lowest seroprevalence was for D. immitis and E. canis (0.46%, 95% CI 0.01-1.65). Coinfection was determined in 12 dogs (2.76%, 95% CI 1.43-4.77), of which 10 were positive to two pathogens (7 with B. canis and A. phagocytophilum and 1 B. canis with B. burgdorferi sensu lato or L. infantum or E. canis). One dog was positive to three pathogens and another dog to four pathogens. Seroprevalence for babesia was age, breed, and lifestyle/use dependent. Purebred dogs had almost half the chance of developing disease than crossbred (OR = 0.58, p Croatia. Some of these VBPs are zoonotic and represent a potential risk to public health.

  18. Attitudes of adolescents towards sexual health in three cities from Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puharić, D; Borovac, J A; Petrov, B

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the attitudes of adolescents towards sexual health and to assess their understanding of contraception use and knowledge about sexually transmitted infections in three ethnically different areas of Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. A total of 146 adolescent high school students between 17 and 19 years of age from three different cities were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. The participants completed two anonymous questionnaires: one that measured attitudes towards safe sex practice and another that measured contraception and general sexual health knowledge. Shame was identified as the main factor why adolescents did not seek information about sexual health and contraception. On average, respondents correctly answered only 35% of questions regarding sexual health. Adolescents from East Mostar, with a predominantly Bosniak population, had more positive attitudes towards safe sex and showed less contraception knowledge in comparison to their colleagues from two cities in Croatia. Our study design might be burdened by socially desirable reporting and other biases inherent to the survey design. Adolescents from Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, countries that experienced war and are still undergoing post-communist socio-economic transition, generally did not have adequate knowledge with respect to safe sex lifestyles. Respondents had major problems identifying sexually transmitted infections and their knowledge about contraception was insufficient. Providing care for adolescent populations should address specificities in local ethnical and socio-economical circumstances. There is a need for further studies to determine social, cultural and religious factors influencing the knowledge and attitudes towards sexual health in order to provide most effective interventions for specific adolescent populations. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  19. Analysis of 12 X-chromosomal markers in the population of central Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crnjac, Josip; Ozretić, Petar; Merkaš, Siniša; Ratko, Martina; Lozančić, Mateja; Rožić, Sara; Špoljarić, Daniel; Korolija, Marina; Popović, Maja; Mršić, Gordan

    2016-07-01

    Investigator® Argus X-12 Kit is a commercially available set that allows simultaneous PCR amplification of 12 X-STR markers belonging to four linkage groups (LG). To assess the forensic efficiency of these markers for the population of central Croatia and consequent applicability in routine forensic casework, DNA from 200 blood samples of unrelated donors (100 female and 100 male) was amplified by Investigator® Argus X-12 Kit and analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Statistical computations based on allele and haplotype frequencies for LG1 - LG4 were performed using Arlequin 3.5 software and on-line tool available at ChrX-STR.org. In female samples, all X-STR markers were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). The most informative marker for central Croatia population was DXS10135 with polymorphism information content (PIC) 0.9296. The least polymorphic locus was DXS8378 (PIC=0.6363). Power of discrimination (PD) varied from 0.6968 to 0.9336 in male and from 0.8476 to 0.9916 in female samples. Combined PD exceeded 0.999999999 in both men and women. In male samples, linkage disequilibrium (LD) test revealed significant association (P=0.0000) of one marker pair in LG4 and two marker pairs in LG3. Portion of observed haplotypes in the number of possible haplotypes varied from 2.86% to 7.47% across all LGs. LG1 was the most informative with haplotype diversity (H) 0.9972. High PD of all analyzed markers exhibited for central Croatia population confirms suitability of Investigator® Argus X-12 for forensic pertinence. Moreover, results of this study will be included in establishing a national reference X-STR database based on 12 X-STR loci, which is necessary for the correct interpretation of the forensic casework results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Emission Reduction Potential with the Renewal of the Vehicle Fleet in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidov, B.; Brlek, G.; Brajkovic, J.; Karan, M.

    2015-01-01

    The European Union has identified the typical areas of application of measures to tackle the problem of pollutants emissions into the air. Road transport is recognized as the largest polluter of the environment and an increase in CO2 emissions is most difficult to suppress in this type of transport. Looking at the projected trend of emission reductions in Croatia, it is clear that for achieving the minimum targets by 2050, as proposed by the European Union, implementation of the very strong measures in the coming period will be inevitable. The main aim of the paper refers to the analysis of potential emission reduction of pollutants generated by passenger vehicles registered in Croatia, assuming the implementation of measures that will result in technological renewal of the fleet at the national level. Generally considering, passenger cars before the Euro 1 standard, Euro 1 and Euro 2 standards together emit nearly 40 percent of all CO2 emissions generated by passenger cars registered in Croatia. Assuming replacement of all cars up to and including Euro 2, with Euro 6 vehicles, and taking into account certain assumptions, the potential reductions in emissions of NOx, CO, CH4 and particles were quantified. The potential reduction in NOx emissions is approximately 3,061 tons, in CO emissions approximately 14482 tons, in CH4 approximately 114 tons and in particulate matter approximately 257 tons. Depending on the engine size, with the replacement of the typical gasoline 20 years old passenger vehicle with the new one, without changing the driving mode, annual savings of up to 209 liters of gasoline fuel and reduction of CO2 emissions by 475 kg could be achieved (according to the assumptions described in the paper). With the replacement of diesel vehicles under the same conditions, the savings of up to 311 liters of diesel fuel annually and reduction of CO2 emissions by 815 kg could be achieved. (author).

  1. Cost-Utility Analysis of Depot Atypical Antipsychotics for Chronic Schizophrenia in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukic, Vlado; Jakovljevic, Miro; Filipcic, Igor; Herceg, Miroslav; Silic, Ante; Tomljanovic, Tatjana; Zilbershtein, Roman; Jensen, Rasmus C D; Hemels, Michiel E H; Einarson, Thomas R

    As a nation with a developing economy, Croatia is faced with making choices between pharmaceutical products, including depot injectable antipsychotics. We conducted a pharmacoeconomic analysis to determine the cost-effectiveness of atypical depots in Croatia. A 1-year decision-analytic framework modeled drug use. We determined the average direct cost to the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance of using depot formulations of paliperidone palmitate long-acting injectable (PP-LAI), risperidone LAI (RIS-LAI), or olanzapine LAI (OLZ-LAI). An expert panel plus literature-derived clinical rates populated the core model, along with costs adjusted to 2012 by using the Croatian consumer price index. Clinical outcomes included quality-adjusted life-years, hospitalization rates, emergency room treatment rates, and relapse days. Robustness of results was examined with one-way sensitivity analyses on important inputs; overall, all inputs were varied over 10,000 simulations in a Monte Carlo analysis. Costs (quality-adjusted life-years) per patient were €5061 (0.817) for PP-LAI, €5168 (0.807) for RIS-LAI, and €6410 (0.812) for OLZ-LAI. PP-LAI had the fewest relapse days, emergency room visits, and hospitalizations. Results were sensitive against RIS-LAI with respect to drug costs and adherence rates, but were generally robust overall, dominating OLZ-LAI in 77.3% and RIS-LAI in 56.8% of the simulations. PP-LAI dominated the other drugs because it had the lowest cost and best clinical outcomes. Compared with depots of olanzapine and risperidone and oral olanzapine, PP-LAI was the cost-effective atypical LAI for treating chronic schizophrenia in Croatia. Using depot paliperidone in place of either olanzapine or risperidone would reduce the overall costs of caring for these patients. Copyright © 2013, International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. The content of K-40, Sr-90 and Cs-137 in milk in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, D.; Maracic, M.; Marovic, M.

    1996-01-01

    Milk is one of the most important foodstuffs. The children's diet is based on milk and quality of milk has always been a subject of concern and continuous control. investigation of radioactivity in milk in Croatia has been started in 1960. The samples of milk were collected daily in the towns Osijek, Zadar and Zagreb. In monthly samples specific Sr-90 activities were determined by radiochemical separation, and Cs-137 and K-40 by gammaspectrometric analysis. The values obtained are shown in Figures 1 and 2. The ratio of Sr-90, Cs-137 and K-40 specific activities was calculated as well as the ratio of their maximum prmissible levels. By the division of these two ratios the ratio of their effectiveness was calculated. On basis of the obtained data the following conclusions can be drawn: 1. The level of Sr-90 in milk had been increasing by 1964. in the period that followed Sr-90 was exponentially decreasing which indicated that its content in milk originated mostly from nuclear weapon tests carried out in the period 1945 to 1962. 2. The content of Cs-137 in milk in Croatia has been exponentially decreasing since 1965 in spite of a great increase in 1986. This points to the fact that Cs-137 content in milk originated mostly from nuclear weapon tests in the period 1945 to 1962, and to a lesser degree from Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986. 3. The content of K-40 in milk has not changed significantly over the investigated period, but its level was not the same at all sampling locations. 4. The ratio of the impact of investigated radionuclides on man obtained from the samples of milk in the territory of Croatia is: 90 Sr : 137 Cs : 40 K = 1 : 2 : 5. (author)

  3. Attitudes of Local Population of Tourism Impacts on Destination Sustainability – Case of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izidora Marković

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Space as a resource is intensively used both by the tourism and the local community. Therefore the state of the tourism development must be measured trough time, along with attitudes of local population, to determine the impacts and the pressure that can continues tourism development cause. In the 1990s, tourism becomes the motor of the development of Croatia, which has resulted in continues increase of the number of tourist beds. On the other hand population of the Croatia is experiencing the demographic extinction. To explain pressures of the tourism development on the decreasing community, tourism function index was used in comparison with the research of the attitudes of local population considering tourism impacts. The main objective of this paper is to determine the correlation between the increase in the number of tourists and changes in the life of local population, which arises from the tourism activities in destinations, as well as from the ratio of the number of residents and tourists. The attitudes analysis has shown high level of the negative impacts of tourism in seven Adriatic counties, while in continental parts of Croatia tourism is seen as an activity with mostly positive effects. Still tourism has generally positive impact on the destination and is seen as desirable activity, even in areas with relatively high tourism function index. Accordingly, to enhance the positive impacts it is essential to diminish extremely big differences in tourism development between too developed coastal areas and mainly neglected continental part of the country and to reduce seasonality of tourism, trough sustainable management and diversification of tourism offer in accordance with spatial disparities.

  4. Materialism as a Social Value and Impetus for Intentions to Emigrate from Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krešimir Peračković

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses materialism as a value orientation and background of consumerism, and empirically verifies whether it is connected with the intentions to emigrate from Croatia. The starting point is the definition of materialism as a social value, i.e. belief that the possession of material objects is important, profitable and worthwhile, while consumerism includes dynamic dimension of it or actions focused on achieving these goals. Besides, consumerism is also defined as a culture centred on the promotion, sale and acquisition of consumer goods. From this perspective materialism may be considered an infrastructural value of contemporary consumer culture on a general level, as well as an encouragement of consumer behaviour on an individual level. This primarily means a wider aspect of consumption that goes beyond achieving basic needs, such as existential needs for matter and energy. However, in order to achieve a certain standard of consumption, to ensure access to material goods and climb the consumption ladder, the necessities for such an achievement (or modes of consumption often cannot be provided according to actual (local living conditions. Thus, there is a tendency toward improving conditions, higher earnings and generally better quality of life, as one of the most important motives for economic migration. In this way, horizontal mobility - emigration, becomes a tool that provides the vertical social mobility. In this respect materialism takes a dual role: on the one hand it is an infrastructural value of consumer culture, and on the other it is a possible incentive for emigration. This paper tries to give empirical answers to the following questions: 1 Are materialism and emigration correlated, and 2 Does materialism encourage emigration (if aspirations cannot be fulfilled in domestic society? Consumerism, as a globally relevant phenomenon, is also present locally, in Croatian society, as well as another relevant phenomenon, but

  5. Greek Sovereign Debt Crisis: Causes, Fiscal Adjustment Programs and Lessons for Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mislav Brkić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the factors that have led to the Greek sovereign debt crisis in order to derive policy lessons for Croatia and other highly indebted countries. In the first years after euro adoption, it seemed that membership in the monetary union facilitated a catching-up process for Greece, given that it enjoyed high growth rates and a rapid convergence of per capita income. However, the global crisis has revealed that the previous economic expansion was an unsustainable process based on excessive inflow of debt-creating foreign capital. In this paper, it is argued that the government sector contributed the most to the rising vulnerability of the Greek economy. Data are presented showing that extensive government borrowing was the main factor behind the rapid accumulation of Greece's external debt, which made it highly vulnerable to external shocks. Besides the procyclical fiscal policy, some other factors also contributed to the overheating of economic activity in Greece. Hence, this paper reviews the literature that deals with the compression of peripheral countries' sovereign bond yields after the creation of the monetary union, the doubtful suitability of the ECB's expansionary policy stance from the perspective of then booming peripheral states, and the institutional shortcomings of the EMU. The main motivation of this paper is to identify the key roots of the Greek debt crisis in order to derive lessons for policy-makers in Croatia. Since the beginning of the recession in 2008, Croatia has seen a significant deterioration in fiscal fundamentals, with high public debt becoming the main source of macroeconomic vulnerability. Reducing the debt-to-GDP ratio has emerged as a key policy challenge that needs to be addressed in order to reduce the likelihood of a debt crisis.

  6. Monitoring of nitrates in drinking water from agricultural and residential areas of Podravina and Prigorje (Croatia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemčić-Jurec, Jasna; Konjačić, Miljenko; Jazbec, Anamarija

    2013-11-01

    Nitrates are the most common chemical pollutant of groundwater in agricultural and suburban areas. Croatia must comply with the Nitrate Directive (91/676/EEC) whose aim is to reduce water pollution by nitrates originating from agriculture and to prevent further pollution. Podravina and Prigorje are the areas with a relatively high degree of agricultural activity. Therefore, the aim of this study was, by monitoring nitrates, to determine the distribution of nitrates in two different areas, Podravina and Prigorje (Croatia), to determine sources of contamination as well as annual and seasonal trends. The nitrate concentrations were measured in 30 wells (N = 382 samples) in Prigorje and in 19 wells (N = 174 samples) in Podravina from 2002 to 2007. In Podravina, the nitrate content was 24.9 mg/l and 6% of the samples were above the maximum available value (MAV), and in Prigorje the content was 53.9 mg/l and 38% of the samples above MAV. The wells were classified as correct, occasionally incorrect and incorrect. In the group of occasionally incorrect and incorrect wells, the point sources were within 10 m of the well. There is no statistically significant difference over the years or seasons within the year, but the interaction between locations and years was significant. Nitrate concentrations' trend was not significant during the monitoring. These results are a prerequisite for the adjustment of Croatian standards to those of the EU and will contribute to the implementation of the Nitrate Directive and the Directives on Environmental Protection in Croatia and the EU.

  7. Some characteristics of social interactions among adolescents in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Macedonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarin, Mira; Pororoković, Ana; Šašić, Slavica Šimić; Arnaudova, Violeta

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The bioecological model refers to the basic social needs that a person has satisfied through social interactions. In individualist cultures, the need for independence is emphasized with the aim of self-realization and personal achievement. In collectivist cultures, togetherness is encouraged and it prevails over individuality. Aim The aim of this study was to determine whether there were differences in adolescents (n = 1033) from three different cultural environments (Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Macedonia) with regard to the various aspects of the social interactions and behaviors these adolescents exercise with their parents and friends. Methods Three groups of questionnaires were used: those that measure family interactions (the quality of family interactions, loneliness in the family, and family influence); those that assess peer interactions (quality of friendships, social loneliness, and influence of friendships); and those that examined behavioral variables (self-esteem, aggression, and prosocialness). Results Discriminant analysis has shown that there are two significant functions that differentiate subjects from the three different cultural environments. The first discriminant function that adequately discriminates between subjects in all three cultural environments is related to social and family loneliness and the influence of friends. Loneliness in the family, social loneliness, and influence of friends are most prevalent among adolescents in Macedonia and least among adolescents in Croatia. The second function that distinguished adolescents in Croatia from those in the other two cultural environments was primarily connected with the quality of family interactions, aggressiveness, parent influence, and self-esteem. Finally, it was found that adolescents from Bosnia and Herzegovina were more likely to engage in family interactions, have greater levels of parental influence, and appeared to be less aggressive and had lower self

  8. BUSINESS PERFORMANCE OF HEALTH TOURISM SERVICE PROVIDERS IN THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrkljan, Sanela; Hendija, Zvjezdana

    2016-03-01

    Health tourism can be generally divided into medical, health spa and wellness tourism. Health spa tourism services are provided in special hospitals for medical rehabilitation and health resorts, and include under medical supervision controlled use of natural healing factors and physical therapy in order to improve and preserve health. There are 13 special hospitals for medical rehabilitation and health resorts in Croatia. Most of them are financed through the state budget and lesser by sale on the market. More than half of their accommodation capacity is offered for sale on the market while the rest is under contract with the Croatian Health Insurance Fund. Domestic overnights are several times higher than foreign overnights. The aim of this study was to analyze business performance of special hospitals for medical rehabilitation and health resorts in Croatia in relation to the sources of financing and the structure of service users. The assumption was that those who are more market-oriented achieve better business performance. In proving these assumptions, an empirical research was conducted and the assumptions were tested. A positive correlation was proven in tested indicators of business performance of the analyzed service providers of health-spa tourism with a higher amount of overnight stays realized through sales on the market in relation to total overnight stays, with a greater share of foreign overnights in total of overnights and with a higher share of realized revenue on the market out of total revenue. The results of the research show that special hospitals for medical rehabilitation and health resorts that are more market-oriented are more successful in their business performance. These findings are important for planning the health and tourism policies in countries like Croatia.

  9. Renewable energy technologies and policies - experience in other countries and possibilities for Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renner, F. P.

    2000-01-01

    As Croatia begins the task of restructuring its energy sector, it has the opportunity to design programs and policies which will create the framework for a viable renewable energy contribution to overall energy supply. Croatia has many of the resources required for renewable energy, including good solar insolation, wind resources, small hydro and biomass. Implementing renewable energy projects is still a challenging prospect, mainly because of competition from fossil fuel sources of energy and because of the small scale and intermittent nature of renewable energy sources. However, there are many benefits, the most important of which are sustainability and reduced or zero air emission. in the most cases these benefits are not quantified or internalized into the project costs. As a result, most renewable energy projects are more costly than conventional projects on a purely financial basis. Overcoming the barriers to implementing renewable energy has been focus of many environmental groups as well as governments, especially in the last decade. Several countries, notably Denmark, have aggressively targeted increase use of renewable energy in the energy mix of the countries, and have implemented policies and regulations to encourage private and public sector use of renewables. policies in place include fiscal incentives, such as tax breaks, regulations such as guaranteed market share and pricing, or more market-based approaches such as green pricing, where consumers decide the premium they will pay for energy. Some of these policies have been quite successful in providing the right incentives to developers and utilities in adding more renewable energy to the national generation mix. Additionally, the area of emissions trading can be thought of as a policy initiative for a market-based approach to promoting increased renewable energy use. While the uncertainties of climate change and the politics of climate change make this a difficult area to count on, it should be

  10. Does productivity affect profitability in dairy processing industry? Evidence from Slovenia, Croatia and Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Muminović

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides insights into productivity in dairy processing companies in Slovenia, Croatia and Serbia. The aim is to find out whether EBITDA per employee, as a measure of overall productivity as well as labour and capital productivity and their management positively affect company’s profitability. Literature review shows that this issue was relatively neglected, although increase in productivity is regarded as the most important factor in maintaining a competitive advantage in most developed countries. Results obtained show that comprehensive measure of productivity EBITDA per employee has statistically significant positive impact on company’s profitability, the same as productivity management components labour cost competitiveness and capital productivity.

  11. Non-conventional Energy Sources and Energy Development Strategy of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalea, M.

    2006-01-01

    The distinction between unconventional renewable energy resources is elaborated. Further, general and specific properties of unconventional energy resources are concisely recapitulated; also comparison is made to conventional energy resources. Exact data are brought forth, investment and operative costs are discussed which illustrate some properties of unconventional energy resources. Overview of obligations of different countries is given as well, which derive from the EC directive on renewable energy resources. At the end, a critical view on renewable energy resources in the Strategy of energy development of Croatia is given.(author)

  12. Site selection of radioactive waste repository in the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saler, A.

    1992-01-01

    The radioactive waste repository site-selection procedure in Croatia is divided into two stages: the first, related to the exclusionary screening of the national territory and comparison of potential areas in order to identify preferred sites, acceptable for inclusion into the Regional Plan; and the second, comprising all necessary field investigations as well as additional site-characterization tasks planned to be worked out at a preferred sites. Several potential areas, representing an intermediate goal of the first stage, are defined till now. (author) [hr

  13. Characterization and source apportionment of fine particulate sources at Rijeka, Croatia from 2013 to 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivošević, Tatjana, E-mail: tatjana.ivosevic14@gmail.com [Faculty of Engineering, University of Rijeka, Vukovarska 58, HR-51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Stelcer, Eduard [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Orlić, Ivica [Department of Physics, University of Rijeka, Radmile Matejčić 2, HR-51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Bogdanović Radović, Iva [Laboratory for Ion Beam Interactions, Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Cohen, David [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2016-03-15

    PM{sub 2.5} daily aerosol samples were collected in Rijeka, Croatia during period from 6th August 2013 to 29th January 2015. In total, 259 samples were collected on Teflon filters and analyzed by PIXE and PIGE techniques to give information on 21 elements from Na to Pb. Additionally, black carbon was determined with the Laser Integrated Plate Method. Results were statistically evaluated using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). Eight major pollution sources: auto, smoke, secondary sulfates, heavy oil combustion, sea spray, road dust, industry iron and soil dust were identified together with their relative contributions in total PM{sub 2.5} pollution.

  14. Analysis of the ECO Test Results for Vehicles in the Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen Kovačević

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the classification of engines for theECO test requirement at the technical inspection of vehicles.The types of harmful components in the raw emission of internalcombustion engine are listed and described, as well asthe possibilities of their reduction. In accordance with theclassification of engines for the ECO test requirements the allowedvalues of harmful components according to the legallystipulated standards in Croatia are given. The study includedthe number of vehicles that passed the ECO test at technicalinspection in 2004 and these were then statistically processedand analyzed according to the type of vehicle, classification ofcar engines for the ECO test requirements and the year ofproduction.

  15. E-commerce Analysis in selected European Union Countries: Position of Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Kurnoga, Nataša; Slišković, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Computer and mobile technology, Internet use and e-commerce have grown enormously in recent years. The main aim of this paper was to analyse the e-commerce of Croatia, the European Union (EU) countries and the post-transition EU countries. Due to technological progress, the paper among other things, analyses the trend of online purchase at the Croatian and the EU level. The analysis revealed the presence of a linear trend. Furthermore, hierarchical and non-hierarchical cluster analyses were u...

  16. LOCAL PIG BREEDS AND PORK PRODUCTS IN CROATIA AND SLOVENIA – UNEXPLOITED TREASURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Kušec

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The rationale, the concept and key challenges of the H2020 project TREASURE dealing with local pig breeds is presented and discussed. The action addresses the phenotypic and genetic characterization, performance of local pig breeds in diverse production systems and their environmental impact, specific quality of their products and market potential. The goal is to build up the capacities to develop sustainable pork chains based on local pig breeds. A special emphasis is given to describe the workplan for Black Slavonian and Turopolje local pig breeds from Croatia and Slovenian Krškopolje pig.

  17. Emergency response activities and collecting damaged radiation devices from a war affected area in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subasic, Damir; Schaller, Antum

    1997-01-01

    A number of various devices containing ionizing radiation sources were in use in the area affected by the recent war in Croatia. In destruction caused by the war operations, a number of these devices were damaged, destroyed or even missed/lost. The actions undertaken to (re)collect these radiation sources, experience gained and lessons learned are reviewed. The importance of a well-organized national regulatory system is highlighted as a precondition for the efficient identification and safe collection of radiation sources which were under ruins. Experience from this event could be well applicable to similar situations caused by disasters and particularly for regulatory authorities who design emergency preparedness plans. (author)

  18. Verification of warnings at the Meteorological and Hydrological Service of Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalin, Lovro

    2017-04-01

    The role of national meteorological services is increasingly related to warnings. This is particularly stressed due to more frequent extreme events and severe weather. At the Meteorological and Hydrological Service of Croatia various warnings products are introduced, from Civil protection service and MeteoAlarm to different specialized products, such as heat spells, cold spells, forest fire warnings, etc. Verification of warnings is a relatively new field, with spurious methods and diverse data. Still, various results of warnings will be presented in this paper, mostly through contingency tables and related verification scores. These results provide an insight to the forecast system, it's properties and give a good feed-back to the forecasters.

  19. Survey for hantaviruses, tick-borne encephalitis virus, and Rickettsia spp. in small rodents in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Petra; Dobler, Gerhard; Markotić, Alemka; Kurolt, Ivan-Christian; Speck, Stephanie; Habuš, Josipa; Vucelja, Marko; Krajinović, Lidija Cvetko; Tadin, Ante; Margaletić, Josip; Essbauer, Sandra

    2014-07-01

    In Croatia, several rodent- and vector-borne agents are endemic and of medical importance. In this study, we investigated hantaviruses and, for the first time, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and Rickettsia spp. in small wild rodents from two different sites (mountainous and lowland region) in Croatia. In total, 194 transudate and tissue samples from 170 rodents (A. flavicollis, n=115; A. agrarius, n=2; Myodes glareolus, n=53) were tested for antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence assays (IIFT) and for nucleic acids by conventional (hantaviruses) and real-time RT-/PCRs (TBEV and Rickettsia spp.). A total of 25.5% (24/94) of the rodents from the mountainous area revealed specific antibodies against hantaviruses. In all, 21.3% (20/94) of the samples from the mountainous area and 29.0% (9/31) from the lowland area yielded positive results for either Puumala virus (PUUV) or Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV) using a conventional RT-PCR. All processed samples (n=194) were negative for TBEV by IIFT or real-time RT-PCR. Serological evidence of rickettsial infection was detected in 4.3% (4/94) rodents from the mountainous region. Another 3.2% (3/94) rodents were positive for Rickettsia spp. by real-time PCR. None of the rodents (n=76) from the lowland area were positive for Rickettsia spp. by real-time PCR. Dual infection of PUUV and Rickettsia spp. was found in one M. glareolus from the mountainous area by RT-PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of Rickettsia spp. in small rodents from Croatia. Phylogenetic analyses of S- and M-segment sequences obtained from the two study sites revealed well-supported subgroups in Croatian PUUV and DOBV. Although somewhat limited, our data showed occurrence and prevalence of PUUV, DOBV, and rickettsiae in Croatia. Further studies are warranted to confirm these data and to determine the Rickettsia species present in rodents in these areas.

  20. INTERRELATION OF PERSONAL VALUE SYSTEMS AND ETHICAL BEHAVIOUR OF HIGH-LEVEL HOTEL MANAGEMENT IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Ivaniš

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A successful high-level management is aware of the fact that, in competitive surroundings, business ethics enables growth and development, increases efficiency and productivity. In this sense, at the time when ethical behaviour is of paramount importance if one wants to retain an enterprise on the market, it has become essential to perceive the relationship between personal values of high-level management with ethical behaviour which is the purpose of this paper. The results of the research in this paper indicate the correlation between the personal value system and the ethical/unethical behaviour of hotel manager of large companies in Croatia.