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Sample records for knee extension exercise

  1. Knee extension torque variability after exercise in ACL reconstructed knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetschius, John; Kuenze, Christopher M; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare knee extension torque variability in patients with ACL reconstructed knees before and after exercise. Thirty two patients with an ACL reconstructed knee (ACL-R group) and 32 healthy controls (control group) completed measures of maximal isometric knee extension torque (90° flexion) at baseline and following a 30-min exercise protocol (post-exercise). Exercise included 30-min of repeated cycles of inclined treadmill walking and hopping tasks. Dependent variables were the coefficient of variation (CV) and raw-change in CV (ΔCV): CV = (torque standard deviation/torque mean x 100), ΔCV = (post-exercise - baseline). There was a group-by-time interaction (p = 0.03) on CV. The ACL-R group demonstrated greater CV than the control group at baseline (ACL-R = 1.07 ± 0.55, control = 0.79 ± 0.42, p = 0.03) and post-exercise (ACL-R = 1.60 ± 0.91, control = 0.94 ± 0.41, p = 0.001). ΔCV was greater (p = 0.03) in the ACL-R group (0.52 ± 0.82) than control group (0.15 ± 0.46). CV significantly increased from baseline to post-exercise (p = 0.001) in the ACL-R group, while the control group did not (p = 0.06). The ACL-R group demonstrated greater knee extension torque variability than the control group. Exercise increased torque variability more in the ACL-R group than control group. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Voluntary movement frequencies in submaximal one- and two-legged knee extension exercise and pedaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Sørbø Stang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of behavior and control of human voluntary rhythmic stereotyped leg movements is useful in work to improve performance, function, and rehabilitation of exercising, healthy, and injured humans. The present study aimed at adding to the existing understanding within this field. To pursue the aim, correlations between freely chosen movement frequencies in relatively simple, single-joint, one- and two-legged knee extension exercise were investigated. The same was done for more complex, multiple-joint, one- and two-legged pedaling. These particular activities were chosen because they could be considered related to some extent, as they shared a key aspect of knee extension, and because they at the same time were different. The activities were performed at submaximal intensities, by healthy individuals (n=16, thereof 8 women; 23.4±2.7 years; 1.70±0.11 m; 68.6±11.2 kg.High and fair correlations (R-values of 0.99 and 0.75 occurred between frequencies generated with the dominant leg and the nondominant leg during knee extension exercise and pedaling, respectively. Fair to high correlations (R-values between 0.71 and 0.95 occurred between frequencies performed with each of the two legs in an activity, and the two-legged frequency performed in the same type of activity. In general, the correlations were higher for knee extension exercise than for pedaling. Correlations between knee extension and pedaling frequencies were of modest occurrence.The correlations between movement frequencies generated separately by each of the legs might be interpreted to support the following working hypothesis, which was based on existing literature. It is likely that involved central pattern generators (CPGs of the two legs share a common frequency generator or that separate frequency generators of each leg are attuned via interneuronal connections. Further, activity type appeared to be relevant. Thus, the apparent common rhythmogenesis for the two legs

  3. Muscle activity during knee-extension strengthening exercise performed with elastic tubing and isotonic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Andersen, Christoffer H; Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Lars L

    2012-12-01

    While elastic resistance training, targeting the upper body is effective for strength training, the effect of elastic resistance training on lower body muscle activity remains questionable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the EMG-angle relationship of the quadriceps muscle during 10-RM knee-extensions performed with elastic tubing and an isotonic strength training machine. 7 women and 9 men aged 28-67 years (mean age 44 and 41 years, respectively) participated. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded in 10 muscles during the concentric and eccentric contraction phase of a knee extension exercise performed with elastic tubing and in training machine and normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) EMG (nEMG). Knee joint angle was measured during the exercises using electronic inclinometers (range of motion 0-90°). When comparing the machine and elastic resistance exercises there were no significant differences in peak EMG of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM) during the concentric contraction phase. However, during the eccentric phase, peak EMG was significantly higher (ptubing (5.7±0.6) compared with knee extensions performed in training machine (5.9±0.5). Knee extensions performed with elastic tubing induces similar high (>70% nEMG) quadriceps muscle activity during the concentric contraction phase, but slightly lower during the eccentric contraction phase, as knee extensions performed using an isotonic training machine. During the concentric contraction phase the two different conditions displayed reciprocal EMG-angle patterns during the range of motion. 5.

  4. Acute effects of a vibration-like stimulus during knee extension exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileva, Katya N; Naleem, Asif A; Biswas, Santonu K; Marwood, Simon; Bowtell, Joanna L

    2006-07-01

    This study was conducted to test whether a low-frequency vibration-like stimulus (rapid variable resistance) applied during a single session of knee extension exercise would alter muscle performance. Torque, knee joint angle, EMG activity of rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles, and VL muscle oxygenation status (near-infrared spectroscopy) were recorded during metronome-guided knee extension exercise. Nine healthy adults completed four trials exercising at contraction intensities of 35% (L) or 70% (H) of one-repetition maximum (1RM) in control (no vibration, Vb-) or vibrated condition (superimposed 10-Hz vibration-like stimulus, Vb+). Maximum voluntary contraction and 1RM were tested pre- and postexercise. During 1RM tests, muscle dynamic strength (P=0.02) and power (P=0.05) were significantly higher during vibrated rather than nonvibrated trials, and strength was significantly higher post- than preexercise (P=0.002), except during LVb- trial. Median spectral frequency of VL and RF EMG activity was significantly higher during postexercise than preexercise 1RM test in the vibration trials but unchanged in the control trials (Pvibration superimposition tended to speed muscle deoxygenation rate (P=0.065, 36% effect size) particularly during L trials. Vibration superimposition during knee extension exercise at low contraction intensity enhanced muscle performance. This effect appears to result from adaptation of neural factors such as motor unit excitability (recruitment and firing frequency, conduction velocity of excitation) in response to sensory receptor stimulation. Muscle vibration may increase the training effects derived from light-to-moderate exercise.

  5. Differential glucose uptake in quadriceps and other leg muscles during one-legged dynamic submaximal knee-extension exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Boushel, Robert; Langberg, Henning

    2011-01-01

    One-legged dynamic knee-extension exercise (DKE) is a widely used model to study the local cardiovascular and metabolic responses to exercise of the quadriceps muscles. In this study, we explored the extent to which different muscles of the quadriceps are activated during exercise using positron...... emission tomography (PET) determined uptake of [18F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (GU) during DKE. Five healthy male subjects performed DKE at 25 W for 35 min and both the contracting and contralateral resting leg were scanned with PET from mid-thigh and distally. On average, exercise GU was the highest...

  6. Muscle activity during knee-extension strengthening exercise performed with elastic tubing and isotonic resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2012-01-01

    muscle during 10-RM knee-extensions performed with elastic tubing and an isotonic strength training machine. METHODS: 7 women and 9 men aged 28-67 years (mean age 44 and 41 years, respectively) participated. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded in 10 muscles during the concentric and eccentric......BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: While elastic resistance training, targeting the upper body is effective for strength training, the effect of elastic resistance training on lower body muscle activity remains questionable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the EMG-angle relationship of the quadriceps...... tubing induces similar high (>70% nEMG) quadriceps muscle activity during the concentric contraction phase, but slightly lower during the eccentric contraction phase, as knee extensions performed using an isotonic training machine. During the concentric contraction phase the two different conditions...

  7. Muscle activity during knee-extension strengthening exercise performed with elastic tubing and isotonic resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2012-01-01

    tubing induces similar high (>70% nEMG) quadriceps muscle activity during the concentric contraction phase, but slightly lower during the eccentric contraction phase, as knee extensions performed using an isotonic training machine. During the concentric contraction phase the two different conditions......BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: While elastic resistance training, targeting the upper body is effective for strength training, the effect of elastic resistance training on lower body muscle activity remains questionable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the EMG-angle relationship of the quadriceps...... muscle during 10-RM knee-extensions performed with elastic tubing and an isotonic strength training machine. METHODS: 7 women and 9 men aged 28-67 years (mean age 44 and 41 years, respectively) participated. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded in 10 muscles during the concentric and eccentric...

  8. Estimation of the forces acting on the tibiofemoral joint during knee extension exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Rico Bini

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2008v10n1p35 The objectives of this study were to: (1 evaluate the resistive torque of an open kinetic chain strength-training machine for performing knee extensions, and (2 perform an analysis estimating internal forces in the tibiofemoral joint. During a fi rst phase of the study, measurements were taken of the machine under analysis (external forces, and then calculations were performed to estimate forces on the lower limb (internal forces. Equations were defi ned to calculate human force (HF, and the moment of muscular force (MMF. Perpendicular muscular force (MFp and joint force (JFp, axial muscular force (MF” and joint force (JF”, and total muscular force (MF and joint force (JF were all calculated. Five knee angles were analyzed (zero, 30, 45, 60, and 90 degrees. A reduction was observed in HF at higher knee angles, while MF and JF also increased at the same time. HF was always lower than the load selected on the machine, which indicates a reduced overload imposed by the machine. The reduction observed in MFp and JFp at higher knee angles indicates a lower tendency to shear the tibia in relation to the femur. At the same time, there was an increase in JF” due to higher MF”. The biomechanical model proposed in this study has shown itself adequate for the day-to-day needs of professionals who supervise orient strength training.

  9. Traumatic knee extension deficit (the locked knee)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmark, I C; Neergaard, K; Krogsgaard, M R

    2007-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the validity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy in knees with acute, traumatic extension deficit (the "locked knee"), and evaluated whether arthroscopy of knees with no mechanical pathology could be avoided by MRI evaluation. The study consisted...... of 50 patients who had an acute, traumatic extension deficit of the knee. All patients were submitted to MRI prior to arthroscopy. Following MRI and surgery, standardized forms were filled out, attempting to objectify the findings. The orthopaedic surgeon was not aware of the MRI result prior to surgery....... Evaluating MRI, all grade-3 meniscal lesions were considered able to cause a mechanical block as well as acute partial or total anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-ruptures. ACL-ruptures with an old appearance were not considered able to cause locking. Assuming that arthroscopy was the gold standard...

  10. A randomised clinical trial of the efficacy of drop squats or leg extension/leg curl exercises to treat clinically diagnosed jumper's knee in athletes: pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, L; Taunton, J; Clement, D; Smith, C; Khan, K

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To compare the therapeutic effect of two different exercise protocols in athletes with jumper's knee. Methods—Randomised clinical trial comparing a 12 week programme of either drop squat exercises or leg extension/leg curl exercises. Measurement was performed at baseline and after six and 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures were pain (visual analogue scale 1–10) and return to sport. Secondary outcome measures included quadriceps and hamstring moment of force using a Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer at 30°/second. Differences in pain response between the drop squat and leg extension/curl treatment groups were assessed by 2 (group) x 3 (time) analysis of variance. Two by two contingency tables were used to test differences in rates of return to sport. Analysis of variance (2 (injured versus non-injured leg) x 2 (group) x 3 (time)) was also used to determine differences for secondary outcome measures. Results—Over the 12 week intervention, pain diminished by 2.3 points (36%) in the leg extension/curl group and 3.2 points (57%) in the squat group. There was a significant main effect of both exercise protocols on pain (psquat group returned to sporting activity by 12 weeks, but five of those subjects still had low level pain. Six of nine of the leg extension/curl group returned to sporting activity by 12 weeks and four patients had low level pain. There was no significant difference between groups in numbers returning to sporting activity. There were no differences in the change in quadriceps or hamstring muscle moment of force between groups. Conclusions—Progressive drop squats and leg extension/curl exercises can reduce the pain of jumper's knee in a 12 week period and permit a high proportion of patients to return to sport. Not all patients, however, return to sport by that time. Key Words: knee; patellar tendon; tendinopathy; tendinosis; eccentric strengthening; strength training PMID:11157465

  11. The effect of dynamic knee-extension exercise on patellar tendon and quadriceps femoris muscle glucose uptake in humans studied by positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Langberg, Henning; Ryberg, Ann Kathrine

    2005-01-01

    Both tendon and peritendinous tissue show evidence of metabolic activity, but the effect of acute exercise on substrate turnover is unknown. We therefore examined the influence of acute exercise on glucose uptake in the patellar and quadriceps tendons during dynamic exercise in humans. Glucose...... that tendon glucose uptake is increased during exercise. However, the increase in tendon glucose uptake is less pronounced than in muscle and the increases are uncorrelated. Thus tendon glucose uptake is likely to be regulated by mechanisms independently of those regulating skeletal muscle glucose uptake....... uptake was measured in five healthy men in the patellar and quadriceps tendons and the quadriceps femoris muscle at rest and during dynamic knee-extension exercise (25 W) using positron emission tomography and [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG). Glucose uptake index was calculated by dividing...

  12. Effects of a prior high-intensity knee-extension exercise on muscle recruitment and energy cost: a combined local and global investigation in humans.

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    Layec, Gwenael; Bringard, Aurélien; Le Fur, Yann; Vilmen, Christophe; Micallef, Jean-Paul; Perrey, Stéphane; Cozzone, Patrick J; Bendahan, David

    2009-06-01

    The effects of a priming exercise bout on both muscle energy production and the pattern of muscle fibre recruitment during a subsequent exercise bout are poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether a prior exercise bout which is known to increase O(2) supply and to induce a residual acidosis could alter energy cost and muscle fibre recruitment during a subsequent heavy-intensity knee-extension exercise. Fifteen healthy subjects performed two 6 min bouts of heavy exercise separated by a 6 min resting period. Rates of oxidative and anaerobic ATP production, determined with (31)P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and breath-by-breath measurements of pulmonary oxygen uptake were obtained simultaneously. Changes in muscle oxygenation and muscle fibre recruitment occurring within the quadriceps were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy and surface electromyography. The priming heavy-intensity exercise increased motor unit recruitment (P exercise bout but did not alter muscle energy cost. We also observed a reduced deoxygenation time delay, whereas the deoxygenation amplitude was increased (P exercise led to an increased recruitment of motor units in the early part of the second bout of heavy exercise. Considering the increased oxidative cost and the unaltered energy cost, one could suggest that our results illustrate a reduced metabolic strain per fibre.

  13. Loss of knee-extension strength is related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Kristensen, Morten T; Bencke, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    To examine whether changes in knee-extension strength and functional performance are related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA).......To examine whether changes in knee-extension strength and functional performance are related to knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA)....

  14. RAPID KNEE-EXTENSIONS TO INCREASE QUADRICEPS MUSCLE ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Rasmus Skov; Wilquin, Lousia; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2017-01-01

    rapid knee-extensions were associated with greater voluntary quadriceps muscle activity during an experimental strength training session, compared to that elicited using slow knee-extensions. STUDY DESIGN: A randomized cross-over study. METHODS: Twenty-four patients (age 66.5) 4-8 weeks post total knee...... agonist muscle activity, especially if the exercise is conducted using rapid muscle contractions. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine if patients with total knee arthroplasty could perform rapid knee-extensions using a 10 RM load four to eight weeks after surgery, and the degree to which...... arthroplasty randomly performed one set of five rapid, and one set of five slow knee-extensions with the operated leg, using a load of their 10 repetition maximum, while surface electromyography recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis of the quadriceps muscle. RESULTS: Data from 23...

  15. Rapid knee-extensions to increase quadriceps muscle activity in patients with total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Rasmus Skov; Wilquin, Lousia; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2017-01-01

    rapid knee-extensions were associated with greater voluntary quadriceps muscle activity during an experimental strength training session, compared to that elicited using slow knee-extensions. STUDY DESIGN: A randomized cross-over study. METHODS: Twenty-four patients (age 66.5) 4-8 weeks post total knee...... agonist muscle activity, especially if the exercise is conducted using rapid muscle contractions. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine if patients with total knee arthroplasty could perform rapid knee-extensions using a 10 RM load four to eight weeks after surgery, and the degree to which...... arthroplasty randomly performed one set of five rapid, and one set of five slow knee-extensions with the operated leg, using a load of their 10 repetition maximum, while surface electromyography recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis of the quadriceps muscle. RESULTS: Data from 23...

  16. Exercise Alters Gait Pattern but Not Knee Load in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

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    Ssu-Yu Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Six female patients with bilateral medial knee OA and 6 healthy controls were recruited. Patients with knee OA received a 6-week physiotherapist-supervised and home-based exercise program. Outcome measures, including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and Short Form-36 Health Survey as well as objective biomechanical indices were obtained at baseline and follow-up. After treatment, no significant difference was observed in the knee abductor moment (KAM, lever arm, and ground reaction force. We, however, observed significantly improved pain and physical function as well as altered gait patterns, including a higher hip flexor moment and hip extension angle with a faster walking speed. Although KAM was unchanged, patients with bilateral knee OA showed an improved walking speed and altered the gait pattern after 6 weeks of supervised exercise. This finding suggests that the exercise intervention improves proximal joint mechanics during walking and can be considered for patients with bilateral knee OA. Non-weight-bearing strengthening without external resistance combined with stretching exercise may be an option to improve pain and function in individuals with OA who cannot perform high resistance exercises owing to pain or other reasons.

  17. Effect of knee joint icing on knee extension strength and knee pain early after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Bente; Husted, Henrik; Kehlet, Henrik; Bandholm, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the acute effect of knee joint icing on knee extension strength and knee pain in patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty. A prospective, single-blinded, randomized, cross-over study. A fast-track orthopaedic arthroplasty unit at a university hospital. Twenty patients (mean age 66 years; 10 women) scheduled for primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty. The patients were treated on two days (day 7 and day 10) postoperatively. On one day they received 30 minutes of knee icing (active treatment) and on the other day they received 30 minutes of elbow icing (control treatment). The order of treatments was randomized. Maximal knee extension strength (primary outcome), knee pain at rest and knee pain during the maximal knee extensions were measured 2-5 minutes before and 2-5 minutes after both treatments by an assessor blinded for active or control treatment. The change in knee extension strength associated with knee icing was not significantly different from that of elbow icing (knee icing change (mean (1 SD)) -0.01 (0.07) Nm/kg, elbow icing change -0.02 (0.07) Nm/kg, P = 0.493). Likewise, the changes in knee pain at rest (P = 0.475), or knee pain during the knee extension strength measurements (P = 0.422) were not different between treatments. In contrast to observations in experimental knee effusion models and inflamed knee joints, knee joint icing for 30 minutes shortly after total knee arthroplasty had no acute effect on knee extension strength or knee pain.

  18. Effect of knee joint icing on knee extension strength and knee pain early after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized cross-over study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Husted, Henrik; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the acute effect of knee joint icing on knee extension strength and knee pain in patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty.Design: A prospective, single-blinded, randomized, cross-over study.Setting: A fast-track orthopaedic arthroplasty unit at a university hospital.......Participants: Twenty patients (mean age 66 years; 10 women) scheduled for primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty.Interventions: The patients were treated on two days (day 7 and day 10) postoperatively. On one day they received 30 minutes of knee icing (active treatment) and on the other day they received 30...... minutes of elbow icing (control treatment). The order of treatments was randomized.Main outcome measures: Maximal knee extension strength (primary outcome), knee pain at rest and knee pain during the maximal knee extensions were measured 2-5 minutes before and 2-5 minutes after both treatments...

  19. Knee osteoarthritis, dyslipidemia syndrome and exercise.

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    Păstrăiguş, Carmen; Ancuţa, Codrina; Miu, Smaranda; Ancuţa, E; Chirieac, Rodica

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of aerobic training on the dyslipedemia in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Prospective observational six-month study performed on 40 patients with KOA, fulfilling the inclusion criteria, classified according to their participation in specific aerobic training program (30 minutes/day, 5 days/ week) in two subgroups. A standard evaluation protocol was followed assessing lipid parameters (total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol levels) at baseline, three and six months. Statistical analysis was performed in SPSS 16.0, p 0.05), the mean level of HDL-cholesterol was significantly higher in patients performing aerobic training, reaching the cardio-vascular protective levels. Regular aerobic exercise has a positive effect on plasma lipoprotein concentrations; further research is needed for the assessment of long-term effects of physical exercises for both KOA and lipid pattern.

  20. Knee flexion with quadriceps cocontraction: A new therapeutic exercise for the early stage of ACL rehabilitation.

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    Biscarini, Andrea; Contemori, Samuele; Busti, Daniele; Botti, Fabio M; Pettorossi, Vito E

    2016-12-08

    Quadriceps strengthening exercises designed for the early phase of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rehabilitation should limit the anterior tibial translation developed by quadriceps contraction near full knee extension, in order to avoid excessive strain on the healing tissue. We hypothesize that knee-flexion exercises with simultaneous voluntary contraction of quadriceps (voluntary quadriceps cocontraction) can yield considerable levels of quadriceps activation while preventing the tibia from translating forward relative to the femur. Electromyographic activity in quadriceps and hamstring muscles was measured in 20 healthy males during isometric knee-flexion exercises executed near full knee extension with maximal voluntary effort of quadriceps cocontraction and external resistance (R) ranging from 0% to 60% of the 1-repetition maximum (1RM). Biomechanical modeling was applied to derive the shear (anterior/posterior) tibiofemoral force developed in each exercise condition. Isometric knee-flexion exercises with small external resistance (R=10% 1RM) and maximal voluntary effort of quadriceps cocontraction yielded a net posterior (ACL-unloading) tibial pull (P=0.005) and levels of activation of 32%, 50%, and 45% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction, for the rectus femoris, vastus medialis, and vastus lateralis, respectively. This exercise might potentially rank as one of the most appropriate quadriceps strengthening interventions in the early phase of ACL rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of whole body vibration exercise on muscle strength and proprioception in females with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trans, T; Aaboe, J; Henriksen, M

    2009-01-01

    status was measured using WOMAC. It was found that muscle strength increased significantly (pIsometric knee-extension significantly increased (p=0.021) in VibM compared to Con. TDPM was significantly improved (p=0.033) in VibF compared to Con, while there was a tendency......The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) exercise on muscle strength and proprioception in female patients with osteoarthritis in the knee (knee-OA). A single blinded, randomised, controlled trial was performed in an outpatient clinic on 52 female patients...... groups trained twice a week for 8 weeks, with a progressively increasing intensity. The WBV groups performed unloaded static WBV exercise. The following were measured: knee muscle strength (extension/flexion) and proprioception (threshold for detection of passive movement (TDPM)). Self-reported disease...

  2. Antagonist muscle moment is increased in ACL deficient subjects during maximal dynamic knee extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Magnusson, S Peter

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Coactivation of the hamstring muscles during dynamic knee extension may compensate for increased knee joint laxity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient subjects. This study examined if antagonist muscle coactivation during maximal dynamic knee extension was elevated...

  3. Neuromuscular exercise as treatment of degenerative knee disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Ewa M.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is recommended as first-line treatment of degenerative knee disease. Our hypothesis is that neuromuscular exercise is feasible and at least as effective as tradionally used strength or aerobic training, but aims to more closely target the sensorimotor deficiencies and functional...... instability associated with the degenerative knee disease than traditionally used training methods.SUMMARY FOR TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGECurrent data suggests that the effect from neuromuscular exercise on pain and function is comparable to the effects seen from other forms of exercise....

  4. Muscle weakness, afferent sensory dysfunction and exercise in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Herzog, Walter; Block, Joel A

    2011-01-01

    Lower-extremity muscle strength and afferent sensory dysfunction, such as reduced proprioceptive acuity, are potentially modifiable putative risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Findings from current studies suggest that muscle weakness is a predictor of knee OA onset, while there is confli...... with previous knee injuries) are easily identified, and may benefit from exercise interventions to prevent or delay OA onset....... there is conflicting evidence regarding the role of muscle weakness in OA progression. In contrast, the literature suggests a role for afferent sensory dysfunction in OA progression but not necessarily in OA onset. The few pilot exercise studies performed in patients who are at risk of incident OA indicate...... a possibility for achieving preventive structure or load modifications. In contrast, large randomized controlled trials of patients with established OA have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of strengthening exercises. Subgroups of individuals who are at increased risk of knee OA (such as those...

  5. Effect of subjective knee-joint pain on the laterality of knee extension strength and gait in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Hiroki; Demura, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of subjective knee-joint pain on the laterality of knee extension strength and gait in elderly women. The subjects were 144 elderly women (62-94 years old; mean age 76.2±6.0 years; ±S.D.) who were divided into the following groups: 81 persons without knee-pain (no knee-pain group), 39 persons with the subjective pain in right or left knee (single knee-pain group), and 24 persons with the subjective pain in both knees (double knee-pain group). The subjects took a knee extension strength test and a 12 m maximum effort walk test. Knee extension strength, stance time, swing time, stride length, step length and swing speed were selected as parameters. A significant laterality was found in knee extension strength only in the one knee-pain group. The laterality of gait parameters was not found in all groups. In conclusion, elderly women who can perform daily living activity independently, even though having subjective pain in either knee or laterality in knee extension strength exertion show little laterality of gait during short distance walking. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Community-Based Progressive Aquatic Exercise for the Management of Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayle Maryanna Masslon

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background We examined the feasibility and effectiveness of a community-based progressive aquatic exercise program for community dwelling older adults, with moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis (OA. Objectives The purposes of this study were to 1, assess the effects of a progressive aquatic exercise program on the walking ability, stair climbing ability, quadriceps muscle strength, as well as self-reported symptoms, function, and quality of life in community dwelling adults with moderate to severe knee OA and; 2, assess the feasibility of a community-based aquatic program for community dwelling adults with knee OA. Methods Seventeen volunteers (12 women (x = 61.1 years and 5 men (x = 69.0 years participated in a progressive 8 - 10 week aquatic exercise program, consisting of 20 - 24, 1-hour sessions. Outcome measures, acquired twice before beginning the exercise protocol as well as after 4 and 8 weeks of exercise, included the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS instrument, a 2 minute walk test (2MWT, a 10 step stair climb for time, and an isometric knee extension strength assessment. Results Significant improvements were detected in 2 MWT, 10 step stair climb, right quadriceps isometric force development, and the KOOS symptoms and stiffness subscale. Significant improvement was found on KOOS function subscales between baseline testing sessions and maintained at follow-up. Non-significant improvements were identified in left quadriceps isometric force development, KOOS pain, and KOOS quality of life. Conclusions These data suggest that a community-based, progressive aquatic exercise program is feasible and results in measurable improvements in function without worsening symptoms. Further study is warranted to investigate the impact of a longer program and the role of aquatic exercise in the long-term management of patients with knee OA.

  7. The influence of continuous versus interval walking exercise on knee joint loading and pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Jayabalan, Prakash; Gustafson, Jonathan A; Klatt, Brian A; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Piva, Sara R

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate whether knee contact force and knee pain are different between continuous and interval walking exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty seven patients with unilateral symptomatic knee OA completed two separate walking exercise sessions on a treadmill at 1.3m/s on two different days: 1) a continuous 45min walking exercise session, and 2) three 15min bouts of walking exercise separated by 1h rest periods for a total of 45min of exercise in an interval format. Estimated knee contact forces using the OpenSim software and knee pain were evaluated at baseline (1st minute of walking) and after every 15min between the continuous and interval walking conditions. A significant increase from baseline was observed in peak knee contact force during the weight-acceptance phase of gait after 30 and 45min of walking, irrespective of the walking exercise condition. Additionally, whereas continuous walking resulted in an increase in knee pain, interval walking did not lead to increased knee pain. Walking exercise durations of 30min or greater may lead to undesirable knee joint loading in patients with knee OA, while performing the same volume of exercise in multiple bouts as opposed to one continuous bout may be beneficial for limiting knee pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Manual for guided home exercises for osteoarthritis of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilza Aparecida de Almeida Carvalho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Physiotherapy is one of the most important components of therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee. The objective of this prospective case series was to assess the efficiency of a guidance manual for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee in relation to pain, range of movement , muscle strength and function, active goniometry, manual strength test and function. METHODS: Thirty-eight adults with osteoarthritis of the knee (> 45 years old who were referred to the physiotherapy service at the university hospital (Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo were studied. Patients received guidance for the practice of specific physical exercises and a manual with instructions on how to perform the exercises at home. They were evaluated for pain, range of movement, muscle strength and function. These evaluations were performed before they received the manual and three months later. Patients were seen monthly regarding improvements in their exercising abilities. RESULTS: The program was effective for improving muscle strength, controlling pain, maintaining range of movement of the knee joint, and reducing functional incapacity. DISCUSSION: A review of the literature showed that there are numerous clinical benefits to the regular practice of physical therapy exercises by patients with osteoarthritis of the knee(s in a program with appropriate guidance. This study shows that this guidance can be attained at home with the use of a proper manual. CONCLUSIONS: Even when performed at home without constant supervision, the use of the printed manual for orientation makes the exercises for osteoarthritis of the knee beneficial.

  9. Preoperative methylprednisolone does not reduce loss of knee-extension strength after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Viktoria; Bandholm, Thomas Q; Zilmer, Camilla K

    2017-01-01

    tests, rescue analgesic requirements, and plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) changes. Results - 61 patients completed the follow-up. The loss in quadriceps muscle strength was similar between groups; group MP 1.04 (0.22-1.91) Nm/kg (-89%) vs. group C 1.02 (0.22-1.57) Nm/kg (-88%). Also between......-265) mg/L (p loss of knee-extension strength or other functional outcomes at discharge after fast-track TKA despite a reduced systemic inflammatory response.......Background and purpose - Patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) face challenges related to postoperative reduction in knee-extension strength. We evaluated whether inhibition of the inflammatory response by a single preoperative dose of methylprednisolone (MP) reduces the pronounced loss...

  10. Comparison of different passive knee extension torque-angle assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Sandro R; Vaz, João R; Bruno, Paula M; Valamatos, Maria J; Mil-Homens, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have used isokinetic dynamometry to assess joint torques and angles during passive extension of the knee, often without reporting upon methodological errors and reliability outcomes. In addition, the reliability of the techniques used to measure passive knee extension torque-angle and the extent to which reliability may be affected by the position of the subjects is also unclear. Therefore, we conducted an analysis of the intra- and inter-session reliability of two methods of assessing passive knee extension: (A) a 2D kinematic analysis coupled to a custom-made device that enabled the direct measurement of resistance to stretch and (B) an isokinetic dynamometer used in two testing positions (with the non-tested thigh either flexed at 45° or in the neutral position). The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) of torque, the slope of the torque-angle curve, and the parameters of the mathematical model that were fit to the torque-angle data for the above conditions were measured in sixteen healthy male subjects (age: 21.4 ± 2.1 yr; BMI: 22.6 ± 3.3 kg m −2 ; tibial length: 37.4 ± 3.4 cm). The results found were: (1) methods A and B led to distinctly different torque-angle responses; (2) passive torque-angle relationship and stretch tolerance were influenced by the position of the non-tested thigh; and (3) ICCs obtained for torque were higher than for the slope and for the mathematical parameters that were fit to the torque-angle curve. In conclusion, the measurement method that is used and the positioning of subjects can influence the passive knee extension torque-angle outcome. (paper)

  11. Effects of proprioceptive circuit exercise on knee joint pain and muscle function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck; Kim, Sang-Soo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study applied proprioceptive circuit exercise to patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis and examined its effects on knee joint muscle function and the level of pain. [Subjects] In this study, 14 patients with knee osteoarthritis in two groups, a proprioceptive circuit exercise group (n = 7) and control group (n = 7), were examined. [Methods] IsoMed 2000 (D&R Ferstl GmbH, Hemau, Germany) was used to assess knee joint muscle function, and a Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain level. [Results] In the proprioceptive circuit exercise group, knee joint muscle function and pain levels improved significantly, whereas in the control group, no significant improvement was observed. [Conclusion] A proprioceptive circuit exercise may be an effective way to strengthen knee joint muscle function and reduce pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  12. Immediate effects of whole body vibration on patellar tendon properties and knee extension torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, F; Wiesinger, H-P; Kösters, A; Müller, E; Seynnes, O R

    2016-03-01

    Reports about the immediate effects of whole body vibration (WBV) exposure upon torque production capacity are inconsistent. However, the changes in the torque-angle relationship observed by some authors after WBV may hinder the measurement of torque changes at a given angle. Acute changes in tendon mechanical properties do occur after certain types of exercise but this hypothesis has never been tested after a bout of WBV. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether tendon compliance is altered immediately after WBV, effectively shifting the optimal angle of peak torque towards longer muscle length. Twenty-eight subjects were randomly assigned to either a WBV (n = 14) or a squatting control group (n = 14). Patellar tendon CSA, stiffness and Young's modulus and knee extension torque-angle relationship were measured using ultrasonography and dynamometry 1 day before and directly after the intervention. Tendon CSA was additionally measured 24 h after the intervention to check for possible delayed onset of swelling. The vibration intervention had no effects on patellar tendon CSA, stiffness and Young's modulus or the torque-angle relationship. Peak torque was produced at ~70° knee angle in both groups at pre- and post-test. Additionally, the knee extension torque globally remained unaffected with the exception of a small (-6%) reduction in isometric torque at a joint angle of 60°. The present results indicate that a single bout of vibration exposure does not substantially alter patellar tendon properties or the torque-angle relationship of knee extensors.

  13. Comparing Exercise Prescription Methods in Knee Osteoarthritis Patients in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Gasper Dineesha

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was a qualitative study that investigated the exercise prescription method in knee osteoarthritis patients in Malaysia. It purposed to find out the most common and effective method used by physiotherapist in prescribing exercises for knee osteoarthritis patients in Malaysia. Method: This study used a self-administered survey questionnaire. The subjects recruited for this study were diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis, age range of between 50 to 80 years old.The methods of delivery were divided into three categories, which include only verbal instructions, verbal instruction together with demonstration and lastly a combination of all three methods including verbal instruction, demonstration and handouts with diagrams. Results: The results showed that 52% received their exercise prescription with verbal instruction and together with demonstration, about 43% of them received all three types of methods which included the verbal instruction, demonstration and take home handouts and 5% of them only received verbal instruction. Out of 5% who received verbal instruction alone, only 1% understood the exercises and the remaining 4% did not and 45% out of 52% who received verbal and demonstration method understood the exercises and the remaining 7% did not. 5% who received only verbal instruction did not seem to continue the exercises at home. 52% received verbal instruction together with demonstration, with about 44% of them having continued their exercises but the remaining 8% did not. 43% who received all three methods reported to continue. Conclusion: The best method of delivering exercises to knee osteoarthritis patients was proven to be the method with a combination of verbal instruction, demonstration together with a take home handout. This method showed very positive outcome and should be implemented and emphasized more in both the government and private sectors of physiotherapy departments.

  14. Limited use of surgeon's advice on exercise for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryaa, Sofie; Ingelsrud, Lina H; Skou, Søren T

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D) programme consists of patient education and supervised exercise therapy and adheres to clinical guidelines for knee osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to present the treatment choice and clinical results of patients...

  15. Wearable Sensor-Based Rehabilitation Exercise Assessment for Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Hui Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the knee joint bears the full weight load of the human body and the highest pressure loads while providing flexible movement, it is the body part most vulnerable and susceptible to osteoarthritis. In exercise therapy, the early rehabilitation stages last for approximately six weeks, during which the patient works with the physical therapist several times each week. The patient is afterwards given instructions for continuing rehabilitation exercise by him/herself at home. This study develops a rehabilitation exercise assessment mechanism using three wearable sensors mounted on the chest, thigh and shank of the working leg in order to enable the patients with knee osteoarthritis to manage their own rehabilitation progress. In this work, time-domain, frequency-domain features and angle information of the motion sensor signals are used to classify the exercise type and identify whether their postures are proper or not. Three types of rehabilitation exercise commonly prescribed to knee osteoarthritis patients are: Short-Arc Exercise, Straight Leg Raise, and Quadriceps Strengthening Mini-squats. After ten subjects performed the three kinds of rehabilitation activities, three validation techniques including 10-fold cross-validation, within subject cross validation, and leave-one-subject cross validation are utilized to confirm the proposed mechanism. The overall recognition accuracy for exercise type classification is 97.29% and for exercise posture identification it is 88.26%. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed mechanism which can help patients perform rehabilitation movements and progress effectively. Moreover, the proposed mechanism is able to detect multiple errors at once, fulfilling the requirements for rehabilitation assessment.

  16. Influence of Isometric Exercise Training on Quadriceps Muscle Architecture and Strength in Obese Subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed S Mahmoud

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Obese individuals have reduced quadriceps muscle strength relative to body mass that may increase the rate of progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of isometric exercise training on quadriceps muscle architecture and strength in obese subjects with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Fortyfour obese male subjects aged 40–65 years diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were randomly assigned into group A (n=32 and group B (n=12. Group A subjects performed a 12-week isometric exercise program. Group B subjects did not participate in any exercise program and maintained their ordinary activities for the same period. Both groups received the same conventional physical therapy program including hot packs and therapeutic ultrasonic. Muscle thickness, pennation angles and fascicle length of the vastus lateralis (VL muscle of the affected knee were measured at rest by B-mode ultrasonography. Maximal voluntary isometric knee extension torque (MVIC of the affected knee was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Knee pain and function were evaluated using visual analogue pain scale (VAS and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC. All variables were evaluated before and the end of the intervention period for both groups. Results: at the end of the program, group A subjects showed significant improvements compared with group B subjects regarding MVIC and muscle architecture parameters (p<0.05. Also, there was significant improvement in post-test VAS and WOMAC scores in group A subjects compared to group B subjects (p<0.05. Conclusion: A 12-week quadriceps isometric training program improves knee pain and quadriceps muscle strength and architecture in obese subjects with knee OA. These results indicate that isometric training should be regarded as a proper exercise intervention for obese patients with knee OA.

  17. EFFECT OF ISOMETRIC QUADRICEPS STRENGTHENING EXERCISE AT MULTIPLE ANGLES IN KNEE JOINT AMONG NORMAL ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JibiPaul

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Strengthening exercises have been routinely used in persons with orthopaedic problems and athletes to increase force production or minimize muscle imbalance and joint injuries.Many studies have reported that isometric contractions can rapidly increases strength in quadriceps muscle. Objective: Objective of the study was to find out the effect of isometric strengthening exercise on strength of quadriceps at 45 and 90 degree of knee joint and also to compare the effect of strengthening exercise on strength of quadriceps at multiple angles of knee joint among control and experimental group. Methodology: This was a ccomparative experimental study with forty female healthy subjects from physiotherapy department of KPJ Healthcare University College, Malaysia. Convenient sampling method used to select the samples. The subjects were selected by inclusion criteria and randomly divided equally in to two with 20 subjects in each group. Isometric strengthening exercise and squatting exercise were given as intervention program for eight weeks respectively for experimental and control group. Pre and post data of quadriceps muscle strength measured were collected separately at 45 and 90 degree of knee joint using goniometry during resisted extension of knee in multi gym. Result: In experimental group Pre –Post statistical analysis found significant effect in increase of quadriceps strength at 45 and 90 degree with P<0.0001.****In control group quadriceps pre-post statistical analysis found no significant effect in increase of quadriceps strength at 45 and 90 degree with P<0.083NS and P<0.055 NS respectively. Comparative study between experimental and control groups for quadriceps strength at 90 degree of knee joint found significant effect in increase of quadriceps strength with P< 0.001.*** Comparative study between experimental and control groups for quadriceps strength at 45 degree of knee joint found significant effect in increase of

  18. Knee extension and flexion: MR delineation of normal and torn anterior cruciate ligaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji [Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the effect of joint position of semiflexed and extended knees in MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semiflexed position (average 45{degrees} of flexion) within the magnet bore. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained for both extended and flexed knee positions. Thirty-two knees with intact ACLs and 43 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were evaluated. Two observers compared paired MR images of both extended and flexed positions and rated them by a relative three point scale. Anatomic correlation in MR images was obtained by a cadaveric knee with incremental flexion. The MR images of flexed knees were more useful than of extended knees in 53% of the case reviews of femoral attachments and 36% of reviews of midportions of normal ACLs. Compared with knee extensions, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 48% of reviews of disrupted sites and 52% of residual bundles of torn ACLs. Normal ACL appeared taut in the knee extension and lax in semiflexion. Compared with MR images of knees in extension, MR images of knees in flexion more clearly delineate the femoral side of the ligament with wider space under the intercondylar roof and with decreased volume-averaging artifacts, providing superior visualization of normal and torn ACLs. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. EFFECTIVENESS OF MANUAL THERAPY VERSUS EXERCISE THERAPY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS IN KARACHI PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Zakir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among musculoskeletal disorders knee Osteoarthritis (OA is exceedingly prevailing articular disorder affecting people and it is a major cause of disability and socioeconomic burden. It is more common in women than men. Entities with knee OA must often undergo a variety of problems, such as pain and tenderness in joints, movement limitation, crepitus on movement, swelling, recurrent effusion, and local inflammation which ultimately leads to limitation in physical function, like lack of ability to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADL or Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL. For reducing knee pain in osteoarthritis several conventional treatment methods are used world widely but most extensively used in our country are pharmacologic and physical therapy. The objective of the study is to find out the effectiveness of Manual therapy verses Exercise therapy for the management of knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Sixty patients including both male and female with mean age (51years and SD of (5.1 were enrolled in the study and divided randomly in to two groups. Those who were assigned as group A had received Manual therapy and those who were assigned as group B had received Exercise therapy. Participants had received three treatment sessions of 30 min per week for consecutive 4 weeks. OUTCOME MEASURE: WOMAC index score for pain, stiffness and physical function was used to evaluate the baseline score and treatment effects after 12 therapy sessions. Results: Study showed significant improvement in both groups before and after the treatment but in comparison manual therapy group showed significant results with respect to pain subscale (p=0.003 and physical function subscale (p=0.004. Conclusion: Significant difference found between manual therapy and exercise therapy treatment approaches in treating knee osteoarthritis. Findings of this study revealed the fact that short term treatment sessions of manual therapy were superior to

  20. Comparing the Effects of Therapeutic Exercise and Hydrotherapy on Pain Severity and Knee Range of Motion in Patients with Hemophilia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Mazloum

    2013-10-01

    . Results: Both experimental groups exhibited significant reduction of pain along with improved knee flexion and extension compared with the control group (P<0.001. Pain reduction in subjects treated in water treatment was significantly higher than exercise group in drought (P0.05. Conclusion: The use of therapeutic exercise in water with regular exercise rehabilitation for patients with hemophilia can be helpful to reduce pain and improve range of motion in hemophilia patients. The effect of exercise therapy on pain reduction is more effective compared to traditional pain therapy. Key words: Hydrotherapy, Exercise Therapy, Hemophilia, Knee Range of Motion

  1. Penalty kick skill through knee tuck jump exercise and barrier hops exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usli Wargadinata Lingling

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Football always attracts society’s attention. Unfortunately in practice, at school for example, students have difficulties in mastering penalty kick. This research aimed to know the influence of knee tuck jump exercise towards penalty kick result in football and the influence of barrier hops exercise towards penalty kick result in football. The design of this research is pretest–posttest design. The population taken was the entire students from class XI SMK 3 LPPM-RI Batujajar which consisted of 126 students. Purposive sampling technique was used to determine the sample. Intentionally, the writer chose as many as 30 students who joined football extracurricular as sample then divided them into two groups namely group A (knee tuck jump exercise and group B (barrier hops exercise. Based on the result, there was significant difference in mean score between pretest and posttest in group A (29.00 than group B (26.00 towards the result of penalty kick in football. The result of compared t from the difference of two results is 4.92 bigger than t table 1.70. Therefore, knee tuck jump exercise gives more significant result than barrier hops exercise towards penalty kick result in football to the students of football extracurricular in SMK 3 LPPM-RI Batujajar.

  2. Aquatic exercise for the treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Else Marie; Juhl, Carsten B; Christensen, Robin

    2016-01-01

    CRITERIA: Randomized controlled clinical trials of aquatic exercise compared to a control group (e.g. usual care, education, social attention, telephone call, waiting list for surgery) of participants with knee or hip osteoarthritis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently selected...... databases up to 28 April 2015: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; the Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2014), MEDLINE (from 1949), EMBASE (from 1980), CINAHL (from 1982), PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database), and Web of Science (from 1945). There was no language restriction. SELECTION...... exercise duration was 12 weeks. We found 12 trials at low to unclear risk of bias for all domains except blinding of participants and personnel. They showed that aquatic exercise caused a small short term improvement compared to control in pain (SMD -0.31, 95% CI -0.47 to -0.15; 12 trials, 1076...

  3. Neuromuscular versus quadriceps strengthening exercise in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis and varus malalignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennell, Kim L; Kyriakides, Mary; Metcalf, Ben

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of neuromuscular exercise (NEXA) and quadriceps strengthening (QS) on the knee adduction moment (an indicator of mediolateral distribution of knee load), pain, and physical function in patients with medial knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) and varus malalignment. ME...

  4. Effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, M.E. van; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1999-01-01

    Objectives: To review the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip of knee. Methods: A computerized literature search of Medline, Embase, and Cinahl was carried out. Randomized clinical trials on exercise therapy for OA of the hip of knee were selected if

  5. Normalized knee-extension strength or leg-press power after fast-track total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalund, Peter K; Larsen, Kristian; Hansen, Torben Bæk

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: (s): To investigate which of the two muscle-impairment measures for the operated leg, normalized knee extension strength or leg press power, is more closely associated to performance-based and self-reported measures of function shortly following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). DESIGN...... and dynamic leg presses to determine their body-mass normalized knee extension strength and leg press power, respectively. The 10-m fast speed walking and 30-s chair stand tests were used to determine performance-based function, while the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC......) and Oxford Knee scores were used to determine self-reported function. RESULTS: Normalized leg press power was more closely associated to both performance-based (r=.82, P...

  6. ISOMETRIC EXERCISE VERSUS COMBINED CONCENTRIC-ECCENTRIC EXERCISE TRAINING IN PATIENTS WITH OSTEOARTHRITIS KNEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigombam Amit Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis is a slowly evolving articular disease, which appears to originate in the cartilage and affects the underlying bone and soft tissues. OA results in pain and functional disability. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of isometric exercises and combined concentric-eccentric exercises in reducing pain and functional disability in patients with osteoarthritis of knee. Methods: Forty individuals who were diagnosed as osteoarthritis by qualified orthopaedics and orthopaedic surgeons were chosen and were randomly divided into 2 groups Group A (N=20 and Group B (N=20. Group A was treated with isometric exercises and Group B was treated with combined concentric-eccentric exercises. The intervention lasted eight weeks and the physical activity was carried out for 3 days a week. Both the groups were assessed for pain and functional disability of knee joint by using WOMAC osteoarthritis index and VAS. Results: Between group analysis of pre and post study data reveals that VAS and WOMAC osteoarthritis index revealed significant findings (P=0.00. Group B performs significantly better on both the scales after the treatment. Conclusion: Both the groups showed significant improvement in decreasing pain and functional disability. But mean scores of Group B showed greater improvement in reducing pain and functional disability as compared to Group A in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Thus the results suggest that a combined concentric-eccentric e

  7. Examination of factors affecting gait properties in healthy older adults: focusing on knee extension strength, visual acuity, and knee joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demura, Tomohiro; Demura, Shin-ichi; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Sugiura, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Gait properties change with age because of a decrease in lower limb strength and visual acuity or knee joint disorders. Gait changes commonly result from these combined factors. This study aimed to examine the effects of knee extension strength, visual acuity, and knee joint pain on gait properties of for 181 healthy female older adults (age: 76.1 (5.7) years). Walking speed, cadence, stance time, swing time, double support time, step length, step width, walking angle, and toe angle were selected as gait parameters. Knee extension strength was measured by isometric dynamometry; and decreased visual acuity and knee joint pain were evaluated by subjective judgment whether or not such factors created a hindrance during walking. Among older adults without vision problems and knee joint pain that affected walking, those with superior knee extension strength had significantly greater walking speed and step length than those with inferior knee extension strength (P pain in both knees showed slower walking speed and longer stance time and double support time. A decrease of knee extension strength and visual acuity and knee joint pain are factors affecting gait in the female older adults. Decreased knee extension strength and knee joint pain mainly affect respective distance and time parameters of the gait.

  8. Knee-Extension Torque Variability and Subjective Knee Function in Patients with a History of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetschius, John; Hart, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    When returning to physical activity, patients with a history of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) often experience limitations in knee-joint function that may be due to chronic impairments in quadriceps motor control. Assessment of knee-extension torque variability may demonstrate underlying impairments in quadriceps motor control in patients with a history of ACL-R. To identify differences in maximal isometric knee-extension torque variability between knees that have undergone ACL-R and healthy knees and to determine the relationship between knee-extension torque variability and self-reported knee function in patients with a history of ACL-R. Descriptive laboratory study. Laboratory. A total of 53 individuals with primary, unilateral ACL-R (age = 23.4 ± 4.9 years, height = 1.7 ± 0.1 m, mass = 74.6 ± 14.8 kg) and 50 individuals with no history of substantial lower extremity injury or surgery who served as controls (age = 23.3 ± 4.4 years, height = 1.7 ± 0.1 m, mass = 67.4 ± 13.2 kg). Torque variability, strength, and central activation ratio (CAR) were calculated from 3-second maximal knee-extension contraction trials (90° of flexion) with a superimposed electrical stimulus. All participants completed the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Evaluation Form, and we determined the number of months after surgery. Group differences were assessed using independent-samples t tests. Correlation coefficients were calculated among torque variability, strength, CAR, months after surgery, and IKDC scores. Torque variability, strength, CAR, and months after surgery were regressed on IKDC scores using stepwise, multiple linear regression. Torque variability was greater and strength, CAR, and IKDC scores were lower in the ACL-R group than in the control group (P Torque variability and strength were correlated with IKDC scores (P Torque variability, strength, and CAR were correlated with each other (P Torque variability alone

  9. Thigh and knee circumference, knee-extension strength, and functional performance after fast-track total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Kristensen, Morten Tange; Husted, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To (1) quantify changes in knee-extension strength and functional-performance at discharge after fast-track total hip arthroplasty (THA) and (2) investigate whether these changes correlate to changes in thigh and knee circumference (ie, swelling) or pain. DESIGN: A prospective, descrip......OBJECTIVE: To (1) quantify changes in knee-extension strength and functional-performance at discharge after fast-track total hip arthroplasty (THA) and (2) investigate whether these changes correlate to changes in thigh and knee circumference (ie, swelling) or pain. DESIGN: A prospective......, descriptive, hypothesis-generating study. SETTING: A special unit for fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty operations at a university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-four patients (20 women and 4 men; ages 69 ± 6.1 years) scheduled for primary unilateral THA. METHODS: All patients were evaluated before surgery......, except for hip pain. The average loss in knee-extension strength after surgery (32%, P = .01) did not correlate with increased thigh circumference (6%, P

  10. Changes in fatigue, multiplanar knee laxity, and landing biomechanics during intermittent exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Sandra J; Schmitz, Randy J; Cone, John R; Henson, Robert A; Montgomery, Melissa M; Pye, Michele L; Tritsch, Amanda J

    2015-05-01

    Knee laxity increases during exercise. However, no one, to our knowledge, has examined whether these increases contribute to higher-risk landing biomechanics during prolonged, fatiguing exercise. To examine associations between changes in fatigue (measured as sprint time [SPTIME]), multiplanar knee laxity (anterior-posterior [APLAX], varus-valgus [VVLAX] knee laxity, and internal-external rotation [IERLAX]) knee laxity and landing biomechanics during prolonged, intermittent exercise. Descriptive laboratory study. Laboratory and gymnasium. A total of 30 male (age = 20.3 ± 2.0 years, height = 1.79 ± 0.05 m, mass = 75.2 ± 7.2 kg) and 29 female (age = 20.5 ± 2.3 years, height = 1.67 ± 0.08 m, mass = 61.8 ± 9.0 kg) competitive athletes. A 90-minute intermittent exercise protocol (IEP) designed to simulate the physiologic and biomechanical demands of a soccer match. We measured SPTIME, APLAX, and landing biomechanics before and after warm-up, every 15 minutes during the IEP, and every 15 minutes for 1 hour after the IEP. We measured VVLAX and IERLAX before and after the warm-up, at 45 and 90 minutes during the IEP, and at 30 minutes after the IEP. We used hierarchical linear modeling to examine associations between exercise-related changes in SPTIME and knee laxity with exercise-related changes in landing biomechanics while controlling for initial (before warm-up) knee laxity. We found that SPTIME had a more global effect on landing biomechanics in women than in men, resulting in a more upright landing and a reduction in landing forces and out-of-plane motions about the knee. As APLAX increased with exercise, women increased their knee internal-rotation motion (P = .02), and men increased their hip-flexion motion and energy-absorption (P = .006) and knee-extensor loads (P = .04). As VVLAX and IERLAX increased, women went through greater knee-valgus motion and dorsiflexion and absorbed more energy at the knee (P ≤ .05), whereas men were positioned in greater hip

  11. Effects of knee extension constraint training on knee flexion angle and peak impact ground-reaction force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Wu, Will; Yao, Wanxiang; Spang, Jeffrey T; Creighton, R Alexander; Garrett, William E; Yu, Bing

    2014-04-01

    Low compliance with training programs is likely to be one of the major reasons for inconsistency of the data regarding the effectiveness of current anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs. Training methods that reduce training time and cost could favorably influence the effectiveness of ACL injury prevention programs. A newly designed knee extension constraint training device may serve this purpose. (1) Knee extension constraint training for 4 weeks would significantly increase the knee flexion angle at the time of peak impact posterior ground-reaction force and decrease peak impact ground-reaction forces during landing of a stop-jump task and a side-cutting task, and (2) the training effects would be retained 4 weeks after completion of the training program. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-four recreational athletes were randomly assigned to group A or B. Participants in group A played sports without wearing a knee extension constraint device for 4 weeks and then played sports while wearing the device for 4 weeks, while participants in group B underwent a reversed protocol. Both groups were tested at the beginning of week 1 and at the ends of weeks 4 and 8 without wearing the device. Knee joint angles were obtained from 3-dimensional videographic data, while ground-reaction forces were measured simultaneously using force plates. Analyses of variance were performed to determine the training effects and the retention of training effects. Participants in group A significantly increased knee flexion angles and decreased ground-reaction forces at the end of week 8 (P ≤ .012). Participants in group B significantly increased knee flexion angles and decreased ground-reaction forces at the ends of weeks 4 and 8 (P ≤ .007). However, participants in group B decreased knee flexion angles and increased ground-reaction forces at the end of week 8 in comparison with the end of week 4 (P ≤ .009). Knee extension constraint training for 4 weeks

  12. A Standardized "Rescue" Exercise Program for Symptomatic Flare-up of Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Cecilie; Klokker, Louise; Bandak, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    the implementation of standardized rescue exercises for patients with pain exacerbations and to assess whether performing these benefit or further worsen symptoms in patients with exacerbated symptoms of knee OA. Methods The data from 2 randomized controlled studies of exercise in patients with knee OA were used......Study Design Secondary analysis of clinical trial data. Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) management has changed significantly over recent decades toward nonpharmacological treatments, particularly exercise. However, the optimal exercise program remains to be established. Objective To describe....... A supervised, standard exercise program that included standardized "rescue" exercises to be performed in the event of symptomatic exacerbation, defined as knee pain of greater than 5 on a 0-to-10 numeric pain-rating scale, was conducted for 12 weeks at 3 sessions per week. Pain ratings were obtained before...

  13. Neuromuscular exercise as treatment for knee osteoarthritis in middle aged patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Brian

    influence knee joint load and decrease knee pain. It includes exercises to improve balance, muscle activation, functional alignment, and functional knee stability. The overall aim of this thesis was to compare the effectiveness of a specific neuromuscular exercise program with optimized analgesics and anti......, a novel measure of total knee joint load that incorporates all three planes, and has been shown to be sensitive to changes in pain in subjects with moderate knee OA. However, the relative contribution and inter-subject variation of each plane to the Knee Index has not previously been described...... and adherence, to indicate if NEMEX-KOA could be a suitable intervention for subjects with mild to moderate knee OA. The third study (papers III and IV) described and reported a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (the EXERPHARMA trial), that was designed to investigate the effectiveness of NEMEX...

  14. MR imaging of the knee extension and flexion. Diagnostic value for reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the value of extended and flexed knee positions in MR imaging of the surgically reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, knee joint was enabled to extend to a full-extension and bend vertically to a semi-flexion (average 45deg of flexion) within the confines of the magnet bore. Sets of 3-mm-thick oblique sagittal proton-weighted turbo spin echo MR images were obtained at both extended and flexed positions. Twenty-five knees with intact ACL grafts and three knees with arthroscopically proved graft tears were evaluated. Compared to the extended position, MR images of flexed knee provided better delineation of the intact and complicated ACL grafts with statistical significance. The intact graft appeared relaxed at the semi-flexion and taut at the extension. Overall lengths of the intact grafts were readily identified at the flexion. Stretched along the intercondylar roof, the grafts were poorly outlined at the extension. MR images with knee flexion delineated the disrupted site from the impingement more clearly than that with knee extension. (author).

  15. Increased pain sensitivity but normal function of exercise induced analgesia in hip and knee osteoarthritis - treatment effects of neuromuscular exercise and total joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosek, E; Roos, Ewa M.; Ageberg, E

    2013-01-01

    To assess exercise induced analgesia (EIA) and pain sensitivity in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to study the effects of neuromuscular exercise and surgery on these parameters.......To assess exercise induced analgesia (EIA) and pain sensitivity in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to study the effects of neuromuscular exercise and surgery on these parameters....

  16. Preliminary analysis of knee stress in Full Extension Landing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Davoodi Makinejad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study provides an experimental and finite element analysis of knee-joint structure during extended-knee landing based on the extracted impact force, and it numerically identifies the contact pressure, stress distribution and possibility of bone-to-bone contact when a subject lands from a safe height. METHODS: The impact time and loads were measured via inverse dynamic analysis of free landing without knee flexion from three different heights (25, 50 and 75 cm, using five subjects with an average body mass index of 18.8. Three-dimensional data were developed from computed tomography scans and were reprocessed with modeling software before being imported and analyzed by finite element analysis software. The whole leg was considered to be a fixed middle-hinged structure, while impact loads were applied to the femur in an upward direction. RESULTS: Straight landing exerted an enormous amount of pressure on the knee joint as a result of the body's inability to utilize the lower extremity muscles, thereby maximizing the threat of injury when the load exceeds the height-safety threshold. CONCLUSIONS: The researchers conclude that extended-knee landing results in serious deformation of the meniscus and cartilage and increases the risk of bone-to-bone contact and serious knee injury when the load exceeds the threshold safety height. This risk is considerably greater than the risk of injury associated with walking downhill or flexion landing activities.

  17. Impact of exercise type and dose on pain and disability in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard; Roos, Ewa M.

    2011-01-01

    that it will not always imply benefit in comparison with a matched control group. Stratified analyses provide evidence that exercise programs aiming at improving strength, aerobic capacity or functional performance are more efficacious than combined exercise programs. While the number of supervised sessions may enhance...... the benefits of the aerobic exercise, focusing on the quadriceps only, may increase benefits of resistance training.......TITLE: Impact of exercise type and dose on pain and disability in knee osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-regression analysis PURPOSE: To analyze the effect of published exercise therapy programs aimed at reducing pain in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee, in order to identify...

  18. Knee-joint proprioception during 30-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernauer, E. M.; Walby, W. F.; Ertl, A. C.; Dempster, P. T.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    To determine if daily isotonic exercise or isokinetic exercise training coupled with daily leg proprioceptive training, would influence leg proprioceptive tracking responses during bed rest (BR), 19 men (36 +/- SD 4 years, 178 +/- 7 cm, 76.8 +/- 7.8 kg) were allocated into a no-exercise (NOE) training control group (n = 5), and isotonic exercise (ITE, n = 7) and isokinetic exercise (IKE, n = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted during BR for two 30-min periods.d-1, 5 d.week-1. Only the IKE group performed proprioceptive training using a new isokinetic procedure with each lower extremity for 2.5 min before and after the daily exercise training sessions; proprioceptive testing occurred weekly for all groups. There were no significant differences in proprioceptive tracking scores, expressed as a percentage of the perfect score of 100, in the pre-BR ambulatory control period between the three groups. Knee extension and flexion tracking responses were unchanged with NOE during BR, but were significantly greater (*p < 0.05) at the end of BR in both exercise groups when compared with NOE responses (extension: NOE 80.7 +/- 0.7%, ITE 82.9* +/- 0.6%, IKE 86.5* +/- 0.7%; flexion: NOE 77.6 +/- 1.5%, ITE 80.0 +/- 0.8% (NS), IKE 83.6* +/- 0.8%). Although proprioceptive tracking was unchanged during BR with NOE, both isotonic exercise training (without additional proprioceptive training) and especially isokinetic exercise training when combined with daily proprioceptive training, significantly improved knee proprioceptive tracking responses after 30 d of BR.

  19. Knee-Joint Proprioception During 30-Day 6 deg Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernauer, E. M.; Walby, W. F.; Ertl, A. C.; Dempster, P. T.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    To determine if daily isotonic exercise or isokinetic exercise training coupled with daily log proprioceptive training, would influence log proprioceptive tracking responses during Bed Rest (BR), 19 men (36 +/- SD 4 years, 178 +/- 7 cm, 76.8 +/- 7.8 kg) were allocated into a NO-Exercise (NOE) training control group (n = 5), and IsoTanic Exercise (ITE, n = 7) and IsoKinetic Exercise (IKE, n = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted during BR for two 30-min period / d, 5 d /week. Only the IKE group performed proprioceptive training using a now isokinetic procedure with each lower extremity for 2.5 min before and after the daily exercise training sessions; proprioceptive testing occurred weekly for all groups. There were no significant differences in proprioceptive tracking scores, expressed as a percentage of the perfect score of 100, in the pro-BR ambulatory control period between the three groups. Knee extension and flexion tracking responses were unchanged with NOE during BR, but were significantly greater (*p less than 0.05) at the end of BR in both exercise groups when compared with NOE responses (extension: NOE 80.7 +/- 0.7%, ITE 82.9 +/- 0.6%, IKE 86.5* +/- 0.7%; flexion: NOE 77.6 +/- 1.50, ITE 80.0 +/- 0.8% (NS), IKE 83.6* +/- 0.8%). Although proprioceptive tracking was unchanged during BR with NOE, both lsotonic exercise training (without additional propriaceptive training) and especially isokinetic exercise training when combined with daily proprioceptive training, significantly improved knee proprioceptive tracking responses after 30 d of BR.

  20. [Research progress of larger flexion gap than extension gap in total knee arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weisong; Hao, Dingjun

    2017-05-01

    To summarize the progress of larger flexion gap than extension gap in total knee arthro-plasty (TKA). The domestic and foreign related literature about larger flexion gap than extension gap in TKA, and its impact factors, biomechanical and kinematic features, and clinical results were summarized. During TKA, to adjust the relations of flexion gap and extension gap is one of the key factors of successful operation. The biomechanical, kinematic, and clinical researches show that properly larger flexion gap than extension gap can improve both the postoperative knee range of motion and the satisfaction of patients, but does not affect the stability of the knee joint. However, there are also contrary findings. So adjustment of flexion gap and extension gap during TKA is still in dispute. Larger flexion gap than extension gap in TKA is a new joint space theory, and long-term clinical efficacy, operation skills, and related complications still need further study.

  1. Does aquatic exercise reduce hip and knee joint loading? In vivo load measurements with instrumented implants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Kutzner

    Full Text Available Aquatic exercises are widely used for rehabilitation or preventive therapies in order to enable mobilization and muscle strengthening while minimizing joint loading of the lower limb. The load reducing effect of water due to buoyancy is a main advantage compared to exercises on land. However, also drag forces have to be considered that act opposite to the relative motion of the body segments and require higher muscle activity. Due to these opposing effects on joint loading, the load-reducing effect during aquatic exercises remains unknown. The aim of this study was to quantify the joint loads during various aquatic exercises and to determine the load reducing effect of water. Instrumented knee and hip implants with telemetric data transfer were used to measure the resultant joint contact forces in 12 elderly subjects (6x hip, 6x knee in vivo. Different dynamic, weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing activities were performed by the subjects on land and in chest-high water. Non-weight-bearing hip and knee flexion/extension was performed at different velocities and with additional Aquafins. Joint forces during aquatic exercises ranged between 32 and 396% body weight (BW. Highest forces occurred during dynamic activities, followed by weight-bearing and slow non-weight-bearing activities. Compared to the same activities on land, joint forces were reduced by 36-55% in water with absolute reductions being greater than 100%BW during weight-bearing and dynamic activities. During non-weight-bearing activities, high movement velocities and additional Aquafins increased the joint forces by up to 59% and resulted in joint forces of up to 301%BW. This study confirms the load reducing effect of water during weight-bearing and dynamic exercises. Nevertheless, high drag forces result in increased joint contact forces and indicate greater muscle activity. By the choice of activity, movement velocity and additional resistive devices joint forces can be modulated

  2. Secondary nerve lengthening to obtain full knee extension in popliteal pterygium syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckx, Willy; Misani, Marta; Vandermeeren, Liesbeth; Franck, Diane; Zirak, Christophe; Demey, Albert

    2014-05-01

    Microsurgical nerve lengthening was performed in two siblings presenting a popliteal pterigium syndrome with a knee flexion contracture of 80 degrees. After the first attempt for nerve lengthening and knee extension elsewhere, a repeated lengthening was required due to continuing tip-toe walking and recurrent knee contracture at the age of 3 years. An extensive external and internal interfascicular microsurgical neurolysis resulted in a lengthening of the nerves. A full length of leg procedure had to be performed, inclusive of Achilles tendon lengthening to obtain a complete extension of the knee and a 90-degree ankle flexion. Maintaining the leg in a fully extended position was obtained with a dynamic splinting in the first month after the operation. When timing the operation we have to consider the importance of adequate precision of the microsurgical neurolysis, down to the identification of the Fontana bands, and the adequate postoperative splinting. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Exercise-induced muscle fatigue in the unaffected knee joint and its influence on postural control and lower limb kinematics in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wook Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of exercise-induced muscle fatigue in the unaffected knee joint on postural control and kinematic changes in stroke patients. Forty participants (20 stroke patients, 20 age-matched healthy participants were recruited. To induce fatigue, maximum voluntary isometric contractions were performed in the unaffected knee joint in a Leg Extension Rehab exercise machine using the pneumatic resistance. We measured static and dynamic balance and lower-limb kinematics during gait. Changes in postural control parameters anteroposterior sway speed and total center of pressure distance differed significantly between the stroke and control groups. In addition, changes in gait kinematic parameters knee and ankle angles of initial contact differed significantly between stroke (paretic and non-paretic and control groups. Muscle fatigue in the unaffected knee and ankle impaired postural control and debilitates kinematic movement of ipsilateral and contralateral lower limbs, and may place the fatigued stroke patients at greater risk for falls.

  4. The effect of exercise therapy on knee osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati, Parisa; Farzinmehr, Azizeh; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common musculoskeletal disease among old individuals which affects ability for sitting on the chair, standing, walking and climbing stairs. Our objective was to investigate the short and long-term effects of the most simple and the least expensive exercise protocols in combination to conventional conservative therapy for knee OA. Methods: It was a single blind RCT study with a 12-months follow-up. Totally, 56 patients with knee OA were assigned into 2 random groups. The patients in exercise group received exercise for knee muscles in combination with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and 10 sessions acupuncture and physiotherapy modalities. Non-exercise group received similar treatments except exercise program. The changes in patients’ pain and functional status were evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS), knee and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) questionnaire and functional tests (4 steps, 5 sit up, and 6 min walk test) before and after treatment (1 and 3 months after intervention), and 1 year later at the follow-up. Results: The results showed that the patients with knee OA in exercise group had significant improvement in pain, disability, walking, stair climbing, and sit up speed after treatment at first and second follow-up when compared with their initial status and when compared with non-exercise group. At third follow up (1 year later) there was significant difference between groups in VAS and in three items of KOOS questionnaire in functional status. Conclusion: Non aerobic exercises for muscles around knee can augment the effect of other therapeutic interventions like medical therapy, acupuncture, and modalities for knee OA. PMID:26034739

  5. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery.

  6. A randomized controlled trial of aquatic and land-based exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, H.; Weile, U.; Christensen, R.

    2008-01-01

    patients reported adverse events (i.e. discomfort) in land-based exercise, while only 3 reported adverse events in the aquatic exercise. Conclusion: Only land-based exercise showed some improvement in pain and muscle strength compared with the control group, while no clinical benefits were detectable after......Objective: To compare the efficacy of aquatic exercise and a land-based exercise programme vs control in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Primary outcome was change in pain, and in addition Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score questionnaire (KOOS). Standing balance and strength...... was also measured after and at 3-month follow-up. Seventy-nine patients (62 women), with a mean age of 68 years (age range 40-89 years) were randomized to aquatic exercise (n = 27), land-based exercise (n = 25) or control (n = 27). Results: No effect was observed immediately after exercise cessation (8...

  7. Nonparetic Knee Extensor Strength Is the Determinant of Exercise Capacity of Community-Dwelling Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Te Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the relationship among walking speed, exercise capacity, and leg strength in community dwelling stroke subjects and to evaluate which one was the leading determinant factor of them. Design. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. Thirty-five chronic stroke patients who were able to walk independently in their community were enrolled. Walking speed was evaluated by using the 12-meter walking test. A maximal exercise test was used to determine the stroke subjects’ exercise capacity. Knee extensor strength, measured as isokinetic torque, was assessed by isokinetic dynamometer. Results. The main walking speed of our subjects was 0.52 m/s. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak was 1.21±0.43 L/min. Knee extensor strength, no matter whether paretic or nonparetic side, was significantly correlated to 12-meter walking speed and exercise capacity. Linear regression also showed the strength of the affected knee extensor was the determinant of walking speed and that of the nonparetic knee extensor was the determinant of exercise capacity in community dwelling stroke subjects. Conclusions. Walking speed and peak oxygen uptake were markedly decreased after stroke. Knee extensor strength of nonparetic leg was the most important determinant of exercise capacity of the community-dwelling stroke subjects. Knee extensor strengthening should be emphasized to help stroke patient to achieve optimal community living.

  8. Nonparetic knee extensor strength is the determinant of exercise capacity of community-dwelling stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Te; Huang, Ling-Tzu; Chou, Ya-Hui; Wei, Ta-Sen; Lin, Chung-Che

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the relationship among walking speed, exercise capacity, and leg strength in community dwelling stroke subjects and to evaluate which one was the leading determinant factor of them. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. Thirty-five chronic stroke patients who were able to walk independently in their community were enrolled. Walking speed was evaluated by using the 12-meter walking test. A maximal exercise test was used to determine the stroke subjects' exercise capacity. Knee extensor strength, measured as isokinetic torque, was assessed by isokinetic dynamometer. The main walking speed of our subjects was 0.52 m/s. Peak oxygen uptake (VO₂ peak) was 1.21 ± 0.43 L/min. Knee extensor strength, no matter whether paretic or nonparetic side, was significantly correlated to 12-meter walking speed and exercise capacity. Linear regression also showed the strength of the affected knee extensor was the determinant of walking speed and that of the nonparetic knee extensor was the determinant of exercise capacity in community dwelling stroke subjects. Walking speed and peak oxygen uptake were markedly decreased after stroke. Knee extensor strength of nonparetic leg was the most important determinant of exercise capacity of the community-dwelling stroke subjects. Knee extensor strengthening should be emphasized to help stroke patient to achieve optimal community living.

  9. Association of Exercise Therapy and Reduction of Pain Sensitivity in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Klokker, Louise; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Exercise has beneficial effects on pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA), yet the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise on pressure-pain sensitivity in patients with knee OA. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial...... visual analog scale pain scores during constant pressure for 6 minutes at 125% of the PPT as a measure of temporal summation (TS) of pressure-pain. Secondary outcomes included self-reported pain using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. Analyses were based on the "per...

  10. Increased pain sensitivity but normal function of exercise induced analgesia in hip and knee osteoarthritis--treatment effects of neuromuscular exercise and total joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosek, E; Roos, E M; Ageberg, E; Nilsdotter, A

    2013-09-01

    To assess exercise induced analgesia (EIA) and pain sensitivity in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to study the effects of neuromuscular exercise and surgery on these parameters. The dataset consisted of knee (n = 66) and hip (n = 47) OA patients assigned for total joint replacement at Lund University Hospital undergoing pre-operative neuromuscular exercise and 43 matched controls. Sensitivity to pressure pain was assessed by pressure algometry at 10 sites. Subjects were then instructed to perform a standardized static knee extension. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed at the contracting quadriceps muscle (Q) and at the resting deltoid muscle (D) before and during contraction. The relative increase in PPTs during contraction was taken as a measure of localized (Q) or generalized (D) EIA. Patients were assessed at baseline, following on average 12 weeks of neuromuscular exercise and 3 months following surgery. We found a normal function of EIA in OA patients at baseline. Previous studies have reported beneficial effects of physical exercise on pain modulation in healthy subjects. However, no treatment effects on EIA were seen in OA patients despite the increase in muscle strength following neuromuscular exercise and reduced pain following surgery. Compared to controls, OA patients had increased pain sensitivity and no beneficial effects on pain sensitivity were seen following treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first study of EIA in OA patients. Despite increased pain sensitivity, OA patients had a normal function of EIA. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy of a biomechanically-based yoga exercise program in knee osteoarthritis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Alexander B; Chopp-Hurley, Jaclyn N; Brenneman, Elora C; Karampatos, Sarah; Wiebenga, Emily G; Adachi, Jonathan D; Noseworthy, Michael D; Maly, Monica R

    2018-01-01

    Certain exercises could overload the osteoarthritic knee. We developed an exercise program from yoga postures with a minimal knee adduction moment for knee osteoarthritis. The purpose was to compare the effectiveness of this biomechanically-based yoga exercise (YE), with traditional exercise (TE), and a no-exercise attention-equivalent control (NE) for improving pain, self-reported physical function and mobility performance in women with knee osteoarthritis. Single-blind, three-arm randomized controlled trial. Community in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. A convenience sample of 31 women with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis was recruited through rheumatology, orthopaedic and physiotherapy clinics, newspapers and word-of-mouth. Participants were stratified by disease severity and randomly allocated to one of three 12-week, supervised interventions. YE included biomechanically-based yoga exercises; TE included traditional leg strengthening on machines; and NE included meditation with no exercise. Participants were asked to attend three 1-hour group classes/sessions each week. Primary outcomes were pain, self-reported physical function and mobility performance. Secondary outcomes were knee strength, depression, and health-related quality of life. All were assessed by a blinded assessor at baseline and immediately following the intervention. The YE group demonstrated greater improvements in KOOS pain (mean difference of 22.9 [95% CI, 6.9 to 38.8; p = 0.003]), intermittent pain (mean difference of -19.6 [95% CI, -34.8 to -4.4; p = 0.009]) and self-reported physical function (mean difference of 17.2 [95% CI, 5.2 to 29.2; p = 0.003]) compared to NE. Improvements in these outcomes were similar between YE and TE. However, TE demonstrated a greater improvement in knee flexor strength compared to YE (mean difference of 0.1 [95% CI, 0.1 to 0.2]. Improvements from baseline to follow-up were present in quality of life score for YE and knee flexor strength for TE, while both also

  12. Patients' views toward knee osteoarthritis exercise therapy and factors influencing adherence - a survey in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Hou, Yunfei; Lin, Jianhao; Wang, Kai; Liu, Qiang

    2018-05-01

    To understand the views toward exercise therapy for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) in China and to analyze factors affecting treatment adherence. A survey-based study, which included multiple choice and open-ended questions on knee OA exercise therapy was conducted in a Chinese population. The content included the respondents' attitudes and beliefs, willingness to receive treatment, and reasons why they could or could not adhere to the treatment. We used Chi-squared tests to compare cognitive differences between the patients and non-patient groups. A total of 1,069 people responded to the questionnaire, and the response rate was 81.8%. A total of 93.6% of the patients thought that they could adhere to the exercise treatment if they received professional advice and prescriptions. The following questionnaire items achieved consensus: 'Increasing the strength of the muscles around the knee stops the knee pain from getting worse,' 'It is the person's own responsibility to continue doing their exercise program,' 'How helpful the exercise program will be determines how well a person sticks to it,' 'Health professionals should educate patients with knee pain about how to change their lifestyle for the better,' and 'Exercise for knee pain is most helpful when it is designed for each person, to suit their own particular needs.' Patient adherence was affected by multiple factors, and some negative factors included 'forgetfulness,' 'getting joint symptoms improved after therapy,' 'professional guidance, subsequent monitoring and supervision,' 'willing to enhance overall health and quality of life,' 'having no time,' 'occupational factors,' 'considering that the pain would worsen while/after exercise,' and 'family factors.' A general Chinese population accepted exercise therapy for treating KOA in our survey. Education is necessary because patients were uncertain and had misunderstandings regarding the potential benefits of exercise therapy. Some factors related to treatment

  13. Impact of exercise type and dose on pain and disability in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard; Roos, Ewa M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the optimal exercise program, characterized by type and intensity of exercise, length of program, duration of individual supervised sessions, and number of sessions per week, for reducing pain and patient-reported disability in knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: A systemati...

  14. The role of muscle strengthening in exercise therapy for knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Cecilie; Juhl, Carsten; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyze if exercise interventions for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) following the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) definition of muscle strength training differs from other types of exercise, and to analyze associations between changes in muscle strength, pain, a...

  15. Oxygenation and EMG in the proximal and distal vastus lateralis during submaximal isometric knee extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crenshaw, Albert G.; Bronee, Lars; Krag, Ida

    2010-01-01

    /or (2) fatigue development. Nine males performed 2-min sustained isometric knee extensions at 15% and 30% maximum voluntary contraction during which oxygenation and EMG were recorded simultaneously from proximal and distal locations of the vastus lateralis muscle. Near infrared spectroscopy variables...

  16. Effects of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Masahiro; Gomi, Masahiro; Katoh, Munenori

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting by performing simultaneous measurements with a handheld dynamometer (HHD) and an isokinetic dynamometer (IKD) in the same seated condition. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 healthy volunteers. Isometric knee extension muscle strength was simultaneously measured with a HHD and an IKD by using an IKD-specific chair. The measurement was performed twice. Measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were examined by using the analysis of variance and correlation tests. [Results] The measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were not significantly different. The correlation coefficients between the HHD and IKD measurements were ≥0.96. [Conclusion] Isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement using the HHD in the sitting position resulted in a lower value than that using the IKD, presumably because of the effect of trunk stability on the measurement. In the same seated posture with trunk stability, no significant difference in measurement values was observed between the HHD and IKD. The present findings suggest that trunk stability while seated during isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement influenced the HHD measurement.

  17. Physiotherapy Exercise After Fast-Track Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: Time for Reconsideration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Bandholm T, Kehlet H. Physiotherapy exercise after fast-track total hip and knee arthroplasty: time for reconsideration? Major surgery, including total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), is followed by a convalescence period, during which the loss of muscle strength......-track methodology or enhanced recovery programs. It is the nature of this methodology to systematically and scientifically optimize all perioperative care components, with the overall goal of enhancing recovery. This is also the case for the care component "physiotherapy exercise" after THA and TKA. The 2 latest...... meta-analyses on the effectiveness of physiotherapy exercise after THA and TKA generally conclude that physiotherapy exercise after THA and TKA either does not work or is not very effective. The reason for this may be that the "pill" of physiotherapy exercise typically offered after THA and TKA does...

  18. Postoperative effects of neuromuscular exercise prior to hip or knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Allan; Overgaard, Søren; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    neuromuscular exercise prior to total joint arthroplasty (TJA) of the hip or knee did not confer additional benefits 3 months postoperatively compared with TJA alone. However, the intervention group experienced a statistically significant short-term benefit in ADL and pain, suggesting an earlier onset......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the postoperative efficacy of a supervised programme of neuromuscular exercise prior to hip or knee arthroplasty. METHODS: In this assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial, we included 165 patients scheduled for hip or knee arthroplasty due to severe osteoarthritis (OA......). An 8-week preoperative neuromuscular supervised exercise programme was delivered twice a week for 1 h as adjunct treatment to the standard arthroplasty procedure and compared with the standard arthroplasty procedure alone. The primary outcome was self-reported physical function measured...

  19. Comparison of neuromuscular and quadriceps strengthening exercise in the treatment of varus malaligned knees with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennell Kim L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis of the knee involving predominantly the medial tibiofemoral compartment is common in older people, giving rise to pain and loss of function. Many people experience progressive worsening of the disease over time, particularly those with varus malalignment and increased medial knee joint load. Therefore, interventions that can reduce excessive medial knee loading may be beneficial in reducing the risk of structural progression. Traditional quadriceps strengthening can improve pain and function in people with knee osteoarthritis but does not appear to reduce medial knee load. A neuromuscular exercise program, emphasising optimal alignment of the trunk and lower limb joints relative to one another, as well as quality of movement performance, while dynamically and functionally strengthening the lower limb muscles, may be able to reduce medial knee load. Such a program may also be superior to traditional quadriceps strengthening with respect to improved pain and physical function because of the functional and dynamic nature. This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect of a neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint loading, pain and function in individuals with medial knee joint osteoarthritis. We hypothesise that the neuromuscular program will reduce medial knee load as well as pain and functional limitations to a greater extent than a traditional quadriceps strengthening program. Methods/Design 100 people with medial knee pain, radiographic medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of two 12-week exercise programs: quadriceps strengthening or neuromuscular exercise. Each program will involve 14 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist plus four unsupervised sessions per week at home. The primary outcomes are medial knee load during walking (the peak external knee adduction moment from 3D gait analysis, pain, and self

  20. A systematic review to evaluate exercise for anterior cruciate ligament injuries: does this approach reduce the incidence of knee osteoarthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan KJ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Koji J Duncan, Jaclyn N Chopp-Hurley, Monica R Maly School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Purpose: Among a variety of conservative and surgical options to treat anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries, we do not understand which options could potentially prevent knee osteoarthritis (OA. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the evidence pertaining to exercise treatment of ACL injuries in the context of knee OA. Methods: Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PubMed, and PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database databases were systematically searched using keywords encompassed within four primary key terms: knee, osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament, and exercise. Clinical studies evaluating the effect of an exercise treatment for ACL injuries on the development of knee OA in adult humans were included. The PEDro scale was used to critically assess the studies included in the review. Results: Eighteen studies were included in this review, with a median PEDro score of 6/11 (range, 2/11–9/11. Three studies provided statistical evidence that exercise following ACL injury lowered the risk for knee OA development. Nine studies demonstrated no benefit of exercise in preventing knee OA incidence relative to either operative treatment or the contralateral, unaffected knee. However, exercise resulted in higher knee instability. Nonetheless, there were no significant differences in subjective or objective knee outcomes for early versus late ACL reconstruction. Limitations: This review was not registered through PROSPERO. Conclusion: The relationship between a rehabilitative exercise for ACL injuries and long-term knee OA prevalence is inconclusive. However, research suggests initial conservative treatment with optional late ACL reconstruction because this treatment strategy may reduce the risk of knee OA. More research, ideally randomized controlled trials or comparable designs, is required prior to establishing

  1. No effects of functional exercise therapy on walking biomechanics in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Klokker, Louise; Bartholdy, Cecilie

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effects of a functional and individualised exercise programme on gait biomechanics during walking in people with knee OA. METHODS: Sixty participants were randomised to 12 weeks of facility-based functional and individualised neuromuscular exercise therapy (ET), 3 sessions per...... limited confidence in the findings due to multiple statistical tests and lack of biomechanical logics. Therefore we conclude that a 12-week supervised individualised neuromuscular exercise programme has no effects on gait biomechanics. Future studies should focus on exercise programmes specifically...

  2. Effect of Home Exercise Program in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad; Brismée, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    The Osteoarthritis Research Society International recommended that nonpharmacological methods include patient education programs, weight reduction, coping strategies, and exercise programs for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, neither a systematic review nor a meta-analysis has been published regarding the effectiveness of home exercise programs for the management of knee OA. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the evidence regarding the effect of home exercise programs with and without supervised clinic-based exercises in the management of knee OA. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus, and PEDro for research articles published prior to September 2014 using key words such as pain, exercise, home exercise program, rehabilitation, supervised exercise program, and physiotherapy in combination with Medical Subject Headings "Osteoarthritis knee." We selected randomized and case-controlled trials published in English language. To verify the quality of the selected studies, we applied the PEDro Scale. Two evaluators individually selected the studies based on titles, excluding those articles that were not related to the objectives of this review. One evaluator extracted data from the included studies. A second evaluator independently verified extracted data for accuracy. A total of 31 studies were found in the search. Of these, 19 studies met the inclusion criteria and were further analyzed. Seventeen of these 19 studies reached high methodological quality on the PEDro scale. Although the methods and home exercise program interventions varied widely in these studies, most found significant improvements in pain and function in individuals with knee OA. The analysis indicated that both home exercise programs with and without supervised clinic-based exercises were beneficial in the management of knee OA. The large evidence of high-quality trials supports the effectiveness of home exercise programs with and without supervised clinic

  3. An 8-Week Neuromuscular Exercise Program for Patients With Mild to Moderate Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Brian; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Roos, Ewa M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:   To describe the feasibility of a neuromuscular exercise (NEMEX) program in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (KOA). BACKGROUND:   Neuromuscular exercise has been increasingly used in patients with osteoarthritis to achieve sensorimotor control and improved daily...... function. TREATMENT:   A study of the first 23 physically active patients (11 men, 12 women; age range = 48-70 years) who had mild to moderate KOA and were undergoing an 8-week, twice-weekly program, consisting of 11 exercises with 3 to 4 levels of difficulty, as part of an ongoing randomized controlled...... to increased (n = 2) or persisting (n = 1) knee pain. However, their pain ratings did not show worsening symptoms. UNIQUENESS:   This NEMEX-KOA program was designed for physically active middle-aged patients with mild to moderate KOA; therefore, it involved exercises and difficulty levels that were more...

  4. On the role of the patella, ACL and joint contact forces in the extension of the knee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cleather

    Full Text Available Traditional descriptions of the knee suggest that the function of the patella is to facilitate knee extension by increasing the moment arm of the quadriceps muscles. Through modelling and evidence from the literature it is shown in this paper that the presence of the patella makes the ability of the quadriceps to rotate the thigh greater than their ability to rotate the tibia. Furthermore, this difference increases as the knee is flexed, thus demonstrating a pattern that is consistent with many human movements. This paper also shows that the anterior cruciate ligament plays a previously unheralded role in extending the shank and that translation at the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints is important in improving the capacity for thigh rotation when the knee is flexed. This study provides new insights as to how the structure of the knee is adapted to its purpose and illustrates how the functional anatomy of the knee contributes to its extension function.

  5. The Ottawa panel clinical practice guidelines for the management of knee osteoarthritis. Part three: aerobic exercise programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Taki, Jade; Desjardins, Brigit; Thevenot, Odette; Fransen, Marlene; Wells, George A; Mizusaki Imoto, Aline; Toupin-April, Karine; Westby, Marie; Álvarez Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Gifford, Wendy; Laferrière, Lucie; Rahman, Prinon; Loew, Laurianne; De Angelis, Gino; Cavallo, Sabrina; Shallwani, Shirin Mehdi; Aburub, Ala'; Bennell, Kim L; Van der Esch, Martin; Simic, Milena; McConnell, Sara; Harmer, Alison; Kenny, Glen P; Paterson, Gail; Regnaux, Jean-Philippe; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; McLean, Linda

    2017-05-01

    To identify effective aerobic exercise programs and provide clinicians and patients with updated, high-quality recommendations concerning traditional land-based exercises for knee osteoarthritis. A systematic search and adapted selection criteria included comparative controlled trials with strengthening exercise programs for patients with knee osteoarthritis. A panel of experts reached consensus on the recommendations using a Delphi survey. A hierarchical alphabetical grading system (A, B, C+, C, D, D+, or D-) was used, based on statistical significance ( P osteoarthritis within a 12-week period. An aerobic exercise program demonstrated significant improvement for pain relief (Grade B), physical function (Grade B) and quality of life (Grade C+). Aerobic exercise in combination with strengthening exercises showed significant improvement for pain relief (3 Grade A) and physical function (2 Grade A, 2 Grade B). A short-term aerobic exercise program with/without muscle strengthening exercises is promising for reducing pain, improving physical function and quality of life for individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

  6. The effect of instruction in analgesic use compared with neuromuscular exercise on knee-joint load in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holsgaard-Larsen, A; Clausen, B; Søndergaard, J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of a NEuro-Muscular EXercise (NEMEX) therapy program compared with instructions in optimized analgesics and anti-inflammatory drug use (PHARMA), on measures of knee-joint load in people with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that knee joint...... loading during walking would be reduced by NEMEX and potentially increased by PHARMA. DESIGN: Single-blind, RCT comparing NEMEX therapy twice a week with PHARMA. Participants with mild-to-moderate medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis were randomly allocated (1:1) to one of two 8-week treatments...

  7. Activation of the gluteus maximus and hamstring muscles during prone hip extension with knee flexion in three hip abduction positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sun-Young; Jeon, Hye-Seon; Kwon, Ohyun; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Choi, Boram

    2013-08-01

    The direction of fiber alignment within a muscle is known to influence the effectiveness of muscle contraction. However, most of the commonly used clinical gluteus maximus (GM) exercises do not consider the direction of fiber alignment within the muscle. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of hip abduction position on the EMG (electromyography) amplitude and onset time of the GM and hamstrings (HAM) during prone hip extension with knee flexion (PHEKF) exercise. Surface EMG signals were recorded from the GM and HAM during PHEKF exercise in three hip abduction positions: 0°, 15°, and 30°. Thirty healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this study. The results show that GM EMG amplitude was greatest in the 30° hip abduction position, followed by 15° and then 0° hip abduction during PHEKF exercise. On the other hand, the HAM EMG amplitude at 0° hip abduction was significantly greater than at 15° and 30° hip abduction. Additionally, GM EMG onset firing was delayed relative to that of the HAM at 0° hip abduction. On the contrary, the GM EMG onset occurred earlier than the HAM in the 15° and 30° hip abduction positions. These findings indicate that performing PHEKF exercise in the 30° hip abduction position may be recommended as an effective way to facilitate the GM muscle activity and advance the firing time of the GM muscle in asymptomatic individuals. This finding provides preliminary evidence that GM EMG amplitude and onset time can be modified by the degree of hip abduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of walking versus resistance exercise on pain and function in older adults with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srishti Sanat Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is an important cause of pain and functional limitation in older people. Several short-term studies state that walking and resistance exercise reduce pain and disability and improve physical fitness in people with knee OA. Aims: To compare the effect of walking and resistance exercise on pain and function in older adults with knee OA. Materials and Methods: A quasi-experimental study was conducted at the physiotherapy department of General Hospital. Twenty one males and females in the age range of 60-75 years, diagnosed with knee OA by the orthopedic department according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria were randomly allocated into three groups. Conventional physiotherapy treatment remained common for all the groups. Group A subjects additionally walked at a self-paced speed. Group B subjects received resistance exercise for hip and knee muscles. Group C subjects received conventional physiotherapy treatment alone. Intervention was given 5 days/week for 2 weeks. Pain intensity at rest and during activity was assessed using visual analog scale (VAS and physical function was assessed by Western Ontario McMasters Arthritic Index (WOMAC. The level of significance was set at 5%. Results: There was a significant difference in VAS at rest within group A and group B. The difference in VAS during activity and WOMAC scores was significant within each group. Mean difference in VAS during activity revealed a significant difference between group B and group A and between group B and group C. The mean difference in WOMAC scores was significant between group A and group C. Mean difference in VAS at rest showed no difference between the groups. Conclusion: Resistance exercises are more effective in reducing pain during activity and walking is more effective in improving physical function in older adults with knee OA.

  9. UK-based physical therapists' attitudes and beliefs regarding exercise and knee osteoarthritis: findings from a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Melanie A; Nicholls, Elaine E; Young, Julie; Hay, Elaine M; Foster, Nadine E

    2009-11-15

    Within the UK, differences exist between physical therapists' use of exercise for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and recent exercise recommendations. This may be explained by their underlying attitudes and beliefs. We aimed to describe UK physical therapists' attitudes and beliefs regarding exercise and knee OA, and understand and explain them. A survey was mailed to 2,000 UK-based chartered physical therapists that included 23 attitude statements derived from recently published recommendations. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of questionnaire respondents (n = 24), and were recorded and analyzed thematically. The questionnaire response rate was 58% (n = 1,152); 538 respondents reported treating a patient with knee OA in the last 6 months. The survey highlighted uncertainty about potential benefits of exercise for knee OA: only 56% largely/totally agreed that knee problems are improved by local exercise. Although exercise adherence was deemed important, it was seen as the patient's, not the therapist's, responsibility. Interviews revealed an underlying biomedical model of care of knee pain, with knee OA viewed as a progressive degenerative condition. A paternalistic treatment approach was evident. Health care systems presented a number of barriers to best practice, including limited opportunity to provide followup. Although the attitudes and beliefs of physical therapists may help to explain differences between current practice and recent exercise recommendations, the wider health care system also plays a part. Further research is needed to support meaningful shifts in physical therapy care in line with the best practice recommendations.

  10. Gear Shifting of Quadriceps during Isometric Knee Extension Disclosed Using Ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu; Huang, Weijian; Zeng, Yu; Shi, Wenxiu; Diao, Xianfen; Wei, Xiguang; Ling, Shan

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasonography has been widely employed to estimate the morphological changes of muscle during contraction. To further investigate the motion pattern of quadriceps during isometric knee extensions, we studied the relative motion pattern between femur and quadriceps under ultrasonography. An interesting observation is that although the force of isometric knee extension can be controlled to change almost linearly, femur in the simultaneously captured ultrasound video sequences has several different piecewise moving patterns. This phenomenon is like quadriceps having several forward gear ratios like a car starting from rest towards maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and then returning to rest. Therefore, to verify this assumption, we captured several ultrasound video sequences of isometric knee extension and collected the torque/force signal simultaneously. Then we extract the shapes of femur from these ultrasound video sequences using video processing techniques and study the motion pattern both qualitatively and quantitatively. The phenomenon can be seen easier via a comparison between the torque signal and relative spatial distance between femur and quadriceps. Furthermore, we use cluster analysis techniques to study the process and the clustering results also provided preliminary support to the conclusion that, during both ramp increasing and decreasing phases, quadriceps contraction may have several forward gear ratios relative to femur.

  11. The influence of electromyographic biofeedback therapy on knee extension following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christanell Franz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of knee extension and a deficit in quadriceps strength are frequently found following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the addition of Eletromyographic Biofeedback (EMG BFB therapy for the vastus medialis muscle to the in the early phase of the standard rehabilitation programme could improve the range of knee extension and strength after ACL reconstruction more than a standard rehabilitation programme. The correlation between EMG measurement and passive knee extension was also investigated. Method Sixteen patients, all of whom underwent endoscopic ACL reconstruction using patellar tendon autograft, were randomly assigned to two groups: • Control group (8 patients: standard rehabilitation protocol; with full weight-bearing postoperative, knee brace (0° extension, 90° flexion, electrical stimulation, aquatics and proprioceptive training. • The EMG BFB group (8 patients: EMG BFB was added to the standard rehabilitation protocol within the first postoperative week and during each session for the next 6 weeks. Each patent attended a total of 16 outpatient physiotherapy sessions following surgery. High-Heel-Distance (HHD Test, range of motion (ROM and integrated EMG (iEMG for vastus medialis were measured preoperatively, and at the 1, 2, 4 and 6-week follow ups. Additionally, knee function, swelling and pain were evaluated using standardized scoring scales. Results At 6 weeks, passive knee extension (p  0.01 differences were found between the two groups for the assessment of knee function, swelling and pain. Conclusion The results indicate that EMG BFB therapy, in the early phase of rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction, is useful in enhancing knee extension. Improved innervation of the vastus medialis can play a key role in the development of postoperative knee extension. EMG BFB therapy is a simple, inexpensive and valuable adjunct to conventional

  12. Comparable effects of exercise and analgesics for pain secondary to knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Hansen, Julie B; Klokker, Louise

    2016-01-01

    administered analgesics for pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: The Cochrane Database of systematic reviews was searched for meta-analyses of randomized controlled studies comparing exercise or analgesics with a control group (placebo or usual care) and with pain as an outcome. Individual study......AIM: Evidence of comparative effectiveness of different treatment approaches is important for clinical decision-making, yet absent for most recommended treatments of knee osteoarthritis pain. The objective of this study was to estimate the comparative effectiveness of exercise versus orally...... estimates were identified and effect sizes were calculated from group differences. We combined study-level effects on pain with a random effects meta-analysis and compared effect sizes between exercise trials and trials with analgesic interventions. RESULTS: We included six Cochrane reviews (four...

  13. Muscle protein degradation and amino acid metabolism during prolonged knee-extensor exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Saltin, B; Wagenmakers, A J

    1999-01-01

    to a substantial increase in net muscle protein degradation, and that a lowering of the starting muscle glycogen content leads to a further increase. The carbon atoms of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), glutamate, aspartate and asparagine, liberated by protein degradation, and the BCAA and glutamate......The aim of this study was to investigate whether prolonged one-leg knee-extensor exercise enhances net protein degradation in muscle with a normal or low glycogen content. Net amino acid production, as a measure of net protein degradation, was estimated from leg exchange and from changes...... in the concentrations of amino acids that are not metabolized in skeletal muscle. Experiments were performed at rest and during one-leg knee-extensor exercise in six subjects having one leg with a normal glycogen content and the other with a low glycogen content. Exercise was performed for 90 min at a workload of 60...

  14. Do Pilates-based exercises following total knee arthroplasty improve postural control and quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Aysenur; Yuksel, Inci; Kinikli, Gizem Irem; Caglar, Omur

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this prospective, randomized, controlled study was to investigate the effects of the addition of Pilates-based exercises to standard exercise programs performed after total knee arthroplasty on quality of life and balance. Forty-six volunteers were divided into two groups. The control group (n = 17) was assigned a standard exercise program after discharge; the study group (n = 17) was assigned Pilates-based exercises along with the standard exercise program. We carried out clinical evaluations of all patients on the day of discharge and after the completion of the 6-week exercise program. We also recorded sociodemographic data, Berg Balance test scores, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) health-related quality of life measurements. When we compared the differences between pre- and post-treatment balance scores of the groups, we found a significant change in favor of the Pilates-based exercise group (13.64 ± 1.45; p Pilates-based exercises group were found to be significant in terms of physical function (p = 0.001), physical role restriction (p = 0.01), and physical component score (p = 0.001). Pilates-based exercises performed along with standard exercise programs were more effective for improving balance and quality of life than standard exercise programs alone.

  15. GPs' attitudes, beliefs and behaviours regarding exercise for chronic knee pain: a questionnaire survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Nadine E; Porcheret, Mark; Rathod, Trishna; Roddy, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate general practitioners’ (GPs) attitudes, beliefs and behaviours regarding the use of exercise for patients with chronic knee pain (CKP) attributable to osteoarthritis. Setting Primary care GPs in the UK. Participants 5000 GPs, randomly selected from Binley’s database, were mailed a cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Outcome measures GPs’ attitudes and beliefs were investigated using attitude statements, and reported behaviours were identified using vignette-based questions. GPs were invited to report barriers experienced when initiating exercise with patients with CKP Results 835 (17%) GPs responded. Overall, GPs were positive about general exercise for CKP. 729 (87%) reported using exercise, of which, 538 (74%) reported that they would use both general and local (lower limb) exercises. However, only 92 (11% of all responding) GPs reported initiating exercise in ways aligning with best-evidence recommendations. 815 (98%) GPs reported barriers in using exercise for patients with CKP, most commonly, insufficient time in consultations (n=419; 51%) and insufficient expertise (n=337; 41%). Conclusions While GPs’ attitudes and beliefs regarding exercise for CKP were generally positive, initiation of exercise was often poorly aligned with current recommendations, and barriers and uncertainties were reported. GPs’ use of exercise may be improved by addressing the key barriers of time and expertise, by developing a pragmatic approach that supports GPs to initiate individualised exercise, and/or by other professionals taking on this role. PMID:28624759

  16. Effect of exercise therapy on neuromuscular activity and knee strength in female adolescents with patellofemoral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael S.; Samani, Afshin; Olesen, Jens L.

    2016-01-01

    . A random subsample of 57 female adolescents was included and tested at baseline and after 3months. Neuromuscular control of the knee was quantified as the complexity of surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis during stair descent. Secondary outcomes were complexity of knee...... during stair descent than those receiving patient education alone. This suggest that exercise therapy has an effect not only on self-reported outcome measures but also on objective measures of thigh muscle function in female adolescents with patellofemoral pain....

  17. Development of estimation system of knee extension strength using image features in ultrasound images of rectus femoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsuneo; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Terabayashi, Nobuo; Hara, Takeshi; Muramatsu, Chisako; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    The word "Locomotive syndrome" has been proposed to describe the state of requiring care by musculoskeletal disorders and its high-risk condition. Reduction of the knee extension strength is cited as one of the risk factors, and the accurate measurement of the strength is needed for the evaluation. The measurement of knee extension strength using a dynamometer is one of the most direct and quantitative methods. This study aims to develop a system for measuring the knee extension strength using the ultrasound images of the rectus femoris muscles obtained with non-invasive ultrasonic diagnostic equipment. First, we extract the muscle area from the ultrasound images and determine the image features, such as the thickness of the muscle. We combine these features and physical features, such as the patient's height, and build a regression model of the knee extension strength from training data. We have developed a system for estimating the knee extension strength by applying the regression model to the features obtained from test data. Using the test data of 168 cases, correlation coefficient value between the measured values and estimated values was 0.82. This result suggests that this system can estimate knee extension strength with high accuracy.

  18. Estimations of One Repetition Maximum and Isometric Peak Torque in Knee Extension Based on the Relationship Between Force and Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Yoshito; Hatanaka, Yasuhiko; Arai, Tomoaki; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate whether a linear regression formula based on the relationship between joint torque and angular velocity measured using a high-speed video camera and image measurement software is effective for estimating 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and isometric peak torque in knee extension. Subjects comprised 20 healthy men (mean ± SD; age, 27.4 ± 4.9 years; height, 170.3 ± 4.4 cm; and body weight, 66.1 ± 10.9 kg). The exercise load ranged from 40% to 150% 1RM. Peak angular velocity (PAV) and peak torque were used to estimate 1RM and isometric peak torque. To elucidate the relationship between force and velocity in knee extension, the relationship between the relative proportion of 1RM (% 1RM) and PAV was examined using simple regression analysis. The concordance rate between the estimated value and actual measurement of 1RM and isometric peak torque was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Reliability of the regression line of PAV and % 1RM was 0.95. The concordance rate between the actual measurement and estimated value of 1RM resulted in an ICC(2,1) of 0.93 and that of isometric peak torque had an ICC(2,1) of 0.87 and 0.86 for 6 and 3 levels of load, respectively. Our method for estimating 1RM was effective for decreasing the measurement time and reducing patients' burden. Additionally, isometric peak torque can be estimated using 3 levels of load, as we obtained the same results as those reported previously. We plan to expand the range of subjects and examine the generalizability of our results.

  19. Comparison of the effects of knee and hip and single knee muscles strengthening/ stretching exercises on pain intensity and function in athletes with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Mazloum

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is a common musculoskeletal condition among athletes. The evidence emphasizes on the importance of hip musculature strengthening exercises for such patients. Objective: To investigate the effects of strengthening-stretching knee muscles exercises and hip posterolateral musculature exercises in athletes with PFPS. Methods: In this clinical trial, 28 athletes with age average of 22.7±2.4 years with PFPS were allocated into conventional knee muscles exercises (CKME (n=14 and posterolateral hip muscles exercises (PHME (n=14. The subjects of both groups performed the supervised exercise protocols in 12 sessions. The Visual Analogue Scale and 6-minute walking tests were administrated respectively to evaluate pain intensity and function. The data were analyzed using Shapiro-wilk test, Independent-sample t test, and Repeated Measure ANOVA test. Findings: Demographic, pain intensity, and physical function data were similar between groups at baseline. Both groups significantly improved in pain intensity and function following a 4-week exercise program. Additionally, the athletes in PHME group had higher level of decreased pain intensity and improved function in follow-up assessment than the subjects in CKME group. Conclusion: Using hip posterolateral musculature exercises in addition to the knee conventional exercises is more effective for athletes with PFPS.

  20. The effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, M.E. van; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijl, D.; Voorn, T.B.; Lemmens, J.A.M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. Methods: A randomized single blind, clinical trial was conducted in a primary care setting. Patients with hip or knee OA by American College of Rheumatology criteria were

  1. The effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, M. E.; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R. A.; Bijl, D.; Voorn, T. B.; Lemmens, J. A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. A randomized single blind, clinical trial was conducted in a primary care setting. Patients with hip or knee OA by American College of Rheumatology criteria were selected. Two intervention

  2. The efficacy of early initiated, supervised, progressive resistance training compared to unsupervised, home-based exercise after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Bo; Bogh, Søren B; Kierkegaard, Signe

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if supervised progressive resistance training was superior to home-based exercise in rehabilitation after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. DESIGN: Single blinded, randomized clinical trial. SETTING: Surgery, progressive resistance training and testing was carried out...

  3. Effectiveness of acute in-hospital physiotherapy with knee-extension strength training in reducing strength deficits in patients with a hip fracture: A randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Kronborg

    Full Text Available Is acute in-hospital physiotherapy with additional progressive knee-extension strength training (ST of the fractured limb more effective in reducing knee-extension strength deficit at follow-up compared to physiotherapy without strength training in patients with a hip fracture?Assessor blinded, randomised controlled trial with intention-to-treat analysis.90 patients with a hip fracture admitted to an acute orthopaedic Hip Fracture Unit at a university hospital between October 2013 and May 2015.Daily physiotherapy with or without progressive knee-extension strength training (10RM, 3 x 10 repetitions, of the fractured limb using ankle weight cuffs conducted by ward physical therapists during hospital stay.Primary outcome was the change in maximal isometric knee-extension strength in the fractured limb in percentage of the non-fractured limb from inclusion to postoperative day 10 or discharge (follow-up. Secondary outcome was Timed Up and Go test measured early after surgery and at follow-up.In the intention-to-treat analysis of between-group differences, the primary outcome improved 8.1% (95% CI -2.3; 18.4 by additional strength training from baseline to follow-up. In the per-protocol analysis of non-missing data, significant between-group improvements by 10.5% (95% CI 0.3; 20.7 were found in favour of additional ST. No significant between-group differences were found in any secondary outcome.Physiotherapy with addition of 5 sessions of ST yielded no additional improvements compared to physiotherapy without strength training in reducing the knee-extension strength deficit at follow-up in patients with a hip fracture. It is debatable whether larger improvements than the observed 8-10% can be expected given that only five exercise sessions, on average, were completed. In fragile patients with a hip fracture in the acute phase, where the ability to participate in functional exercise is compromised, we still consider early strength training a

  4. Immediate Efficacy of Neuromuscular Exercise in Patients with Severe Osteoarthritis of the Hip or Knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Allan; Overgaard, Søren; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. The secondary outcomes were the HOOS/KOOS subscales Pain, Symptoms, Sport and Recreation, and Joint-related Quality of Life. Exploratory outcomes were functional performance measures and lower limb...... muscle power. RESULTS: Included were 165 patients, 56% female, average age 67 years (SD ± 8), and a body mass index of 30 (SD ± 5), who were scheduled for primary hip or knee replacement. The postintervention difference between mean changes in ADL was 7.2 points (95% CI 3.5 to 10.9, p = 0.0002) in favor...... and objective performance were improved and pain reduced immediately following 8 weeks of neuromuscular exercise. While the effects were moderate in hip OA, they were only small in knee OA. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01003756....

  5. Impact of a daily exercise dose on knee joint cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bricca, A; Juhl, C B; Grodzinsky, A J

    2017-01-01

    -analysis of 14 studies investigating cartilage thickness showed no effect in the low dose exercise group (SMD -0.02; 95% CI -0.42 to 0.38; I(2) = 0.0%), large but non-significant cartilage thickening in the moderate dose exercise group (SMD 0.95; 95% CI -0.33 to 2.23; I(2) = 72.1%) and non-significant cartilage...... thinning in the high dose exercise group (SMD -0.19; 95% CI -0.49 to 0.12; I(2) = 0.0%). Results were independent of analyzed covariates. The overall quality of the studies was poor because of inadequate reporting of data and high risk of bias. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the relationship between...

  6. Is the relationship between increased knee muscle strength and improved physical function following exercise dependent on baseline physical function status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michelle; Hinman, Rana S; van der Esch, Martin; van der Leeden, Marike; Kasza, Jessica; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Dobson, Fiona; Bennell, Kim L

    2017-12-08

    Clinical guidelines recommend knee muscle strengthening exercises to improve physical function. However, the amount of knee muscle strength increase needed for clinically relevant improvements in physical function is unclear. Understanding how much increase in knee muscle strength is associated with improved physical function could assist clinicians in providing appropriate strength gain targets for their patients in order to optimise outcomes from exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an increase in knee muscle strength is associated with improved self-reported physical function following exercise; and whether the relationship differs according to physical function status at baseline. Data from 100 participants with medial knee osteoarthritis enrolled in a 12-week randomised controlled trial comparing neuromuscular exercise to quadriceps strengthening exercise were pooled. Participants were categorised as having mild, moderate or severe physical dysfunction at baseline using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Associations between 12-week changes in physical function (dependent variable) and peak isometric knee extensor and flexor strength (independent variables) were evaluated with and without accounting for baseline physical function status and covariates using linear regression models. In covariate-adjusted models without accounting for baseline physical function, every 1-unit (Nm/kg) increase in knee extensor strength was associated with physical function improvement of 17 WOMAC units (95% confidence interval (CI) -29 to -5). When accounting for baseline severity of physical function, every 1-unit increase in knee extensor strength was associated with physical function improvement of 24 WOMAC units (95% CI -42 to -7) in participants with severe physical dysfunction. There were no associations between change in strength and change in physical function in participants with mild or moderate physical

  7. The efficacy of early initiated, supervised, progressive resistance training compared to unsupervised, home-based exercise after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Peter B; Bogh, Søren B; Kierkegaard, Signe; Sørensen, Henrik; Odgaard, Anders; Søballe, Kjeld; Mechlenburg, Inger

    2017-01-01

    To examine if supervised progressive resistance training was superior to home-based exercise in rehabilitation after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Single blinded, randomized clinical trial. Surgery, progressive resistance training and testing was carried out at Aarhus University Hospital and home-based exercise was carried out in the home of the patient. Fifty five patients were randomized to either progressive resistance training or home-based exercise. Patients were randomized to either progressive resistance training (home based exercise five days/week and progressive resistance training two days/week) or control group (home based exercise seven days/week). Preoperative assessment, 10-week (primary endpoint) and one-year follow-up were performed for leg extension power, spatiotemporal gait parameters and knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). Forty patients (73%) completed 1-year follow-up. Patients in the progressive resistance training group participated in average 11 of 16 training sessions. Leg extension power increased from baseline to 10-week follow-up in progressive resistance training group (progressive resistance training: 0.28 W/kg, P= 0.01, control group: 0.01 W/kg, P=0.93) with no between-group difference. Walking speed and KOOS scores increased from baseline to 10-week follow-up in both groups with no between-group difference (six minutes walk test P=0.63, KOOS P>0.29). Progressive resistance training two days/week combined with home based exercise five days/week was not superior to home based exercise seven days/week in improving leg extension power of the operated leg.

  8. Extracting time-frequency feature of single-channel vastus medialis EMG signals for knee exercise pattern recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    Full Text Available The EMG signal indicates the electrophysiological response to daily living of activities, particularly to lower-limb knee exercises. Literature reports have shown numerous benefits of the Wavelet analysis in EMG feature extraction for pattern recognition. However, its application to typical knee exercises when using only a single EMG channel is limited. In this study, three types of knee exercises, i.e., flexion of the leg up (standing, hip extension from a sitting position (sitting and gait (walking are investigated from 14 healthy untrained subjects, while EMG signals from the muscle group of vastus medialis and the goniometer on the knee joint of the detected leg are synchronously monitored and recorded. Four types of lower-limb motions including standing, sitting, stance phase of walking, and swing phase of walking, are segmented. The Wavelet Transform (WT based Singular Value Decomposition (SVD approach is proposed for the classification of four lower-limb motions using a single-channel EMG signal from the muscle group of vastus medialis. Based on lower-limb motions from all subjects, the combination of five-level wavelet decomposition and SVD is used to comprise the feature vector. The Support Vector Machine (SVM is then configured to build a multiple-subject classifier for which the subject independent accuracy will be given across all subjects for the classification of four types of lower-limb motions. In order to effectively indicate the classification performance, EMG features from time-domain (e.g., Mean Absolute Value (MAV, Root-Mean-Square (RMS, integrated EMG (iEMG, Zero Crossing (ZC and frequency-domain (e.g., Mean Frequency (MNF and Median Frequency (MDF are also used to classify lower-limb motions. The five-fold cross validation is performed and it repeats fifty times in order to acquire the robust subject independent accuracy. Results show that the proposed WT-based SVD approach has the classification accuracy of 91.85%±0

  9. Subgrouping and TargetEd Exercise pRogrammes for knee and hip OsteoArthritis (STEER OA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holden, Melanie A; Burke, Danielle L; Runhaar, Jos

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Therapeutic exercise is a recommended core treatment for people with knee and hip OA, however, the observed effect sizes for reducing pain and improving physical function are small to moderate. This may...... and (2) mediators of the effect of therapeutic exercise for reducing pain and improving physical function. This will enable optimal targeting and refining the content of future exercise interventions. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Systematic review and individual participant data meta-analyses. A previous...... comprehensive systematic review will be updated to identify randomised controlled trials that compare the effects of therapeutic exercise for people with knee and hip OA on pain and physical function to a non-exercise control. Lead authors of eligible trials will be invited to share individual participant data...

  10. Carryover effect of hip and knee exercises program on functional performance in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Hamada, Hamada; Hussein Draz, Amira; Koura, Ghada Mohamed; Saab, Ibtissam M

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] This study was carried out to investigate the carryover effect of hip and knee exercises program on functional performance (single legged hop test as functional performance test and Kujala score for functional activities). [Subjects and Methods] Thirty patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome were randomly assigned into two equal groups. Group (A) consisted of 15 patients undergoing hip strengthening exercises for four weeks then measuring all variables followed by additional four weeks of knee exercises program then measuring all variables again. Group (B): consisted of 15 patients undergoing knee exercises program for four weeks then measuring all variables followed by additional four weeks of hip strengthening exercises then measuring all variables. Functional abilities and knee muscles performance were assessed using Kujala questionnaire and single legged hop test respectively pre and after the completion of the first 4 weeks then after 8 weeks for both groups. [Results] Significantly increase in Kujala questionnaire in group A compared with group B was observed. While, there were significant increase in single legged hop performance test in group B compared with group A. [Conclusion] Starting with hip exercises improve the performance of subjects more than functional activities while starting with knee exercises improve the functional activities of subjects more than performance.

  11. The attitudes, beliefs and behaviours of GPs regarding exercise for chronic knee pain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Nadine E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Joint pain, specifically chronic knee pain (CKP, is a frequent cause of chronic pain and limitation of function and mobility among older adults. Multiple evidence-based guidelines recommend exercise as a first-line treatment for all patients with CKP or knee osteoarthritis (KOA, yet healthcare practitioners' attitudes and beliefs may limit their implementation. This systematic review aims to identify the attitudes, beliefs and behaviours of General Practitioners (GPs regarding the use of exercise for CKP/KOA. Methods We searched four electronic databases between inception and January 2008, using subject headings to identify studies examining the attitudes, beliefs or behaviours of GPs regarding the use of exercise for the treatment of CKP/KOA in adults aged over 45 years in primary care. Studies referring to patellofemoral pain syndrome or CKP secondary to other causes or that occurring in a prosthetic joint were excluded. Once inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, study data were extracted and summarised. Study quality was independently reviewed using two assessment tools. Results From 2135 potentially relevant articles, 20 were suitable for inclusion. A variety of study methodologies and approaches to measuring attitudes beliefs and behaviours were used among the studies. Quality assessment revealed good reporting of study objective, type, outcome factors and, generally, the sampling frame. However, criticisms included use of small sample sizes, low response rates and under-reporting of non-responder factors. Although 99% of GPs agreed that exercise should be used for CKP/KOA and reported ever providing advice or referring to a physiotherapist, up to 29% believed that rest was the optimum management approach. The frequency of actual provision of exercise advice or physiotherapy referral was lower. Estimates of provision of exercise advice and physiotherapy referral were generally higher for vignette-based studies

  12. Tourniquet versus no tourniquet on knee-extension strength early after fast-track total knee arthroplasty; a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harsten, Andreas; Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Kehlet, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    pressure was based on the patient's systolic pressure and a margin of 100mmHg. It was inflated immediately before surgery and deflated as soon as surgery ended. The primary outcome was the change in knee-extension strength from pre-surgery to 48h after surgery (primary end point). Secondary outcomes were...

  13. Preoperative hypoalgesia after cold pressor test and aerobic exercise is associated with pain relief six months after total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte; Emmeluth, Claus

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Chronic pain after total knee replacement (TKR) is not uncommon. Preoperative impaired conditioning pain modulation (CPM) has been used to predict chronic postoperative pain. Interestingly, exercises reduce pain sensitivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This pilot study...... investigated the association between exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) and CPM on post-TKR pain relief. METHODS: Before and six months post-TKR, 14 patients with chronic knee osteoarthritis performed the cold pressor test on the non-affected leg and two exercise conditions (bicycling and isometric knee...... at the affected leg improved post-TKR compared with pre-TKR (PCPM and bicycling EIH assessed by the increase in cPTT correlated with reduction in NRS pain scores post-TKR (PCPM and EIH responses after TKR were significantly correlated with reduction in NRS pain scores...

  14. Coordinate and synergistic effects of extensive treadmill exercise and ovariectomy on articular cartilage degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Kazumasa; Muneta, Takeshi; Ojima, Miyoko; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Abula, Kahaer; Sekiya, Ichiro; Tsuji, Kunikazu

    2016-05-31

    Although osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease, little has been reported regarding the cooperative interaction among these factors on cartilage metabolism. Here we examined the synergistic effect of ovariectomy (OVX) and excessive mechanical stress (forced running) on articular cartilage homeostasis in a mouse model resembling a human postmenopausal condition. Mice were randomly divided into four groups, I: Sham, II: OVX, III: Sham and forced running (60 km in 6 weeks), and IV: OVX and forced running. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the degeneration of articular cartilage and synovitis in the knee joint. Morphological changes of subchondral bone were analyzed by micro-CT. Micro-CT analyses showed significant loss of metaphyseal trabecular bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV) after OVX as described previously. Forced running increased the trabecular BV/TV in all mice. In the epiphyseal region, no visible alteration in bone morphology or osteophyte formation was observed in any of the four groups. Histological analysis revealed that OVX or forced running respectively had subtle effects on cartilage degeneration. However, the combination of OVX and forced running synergistically enhanced synovitis and articular cartilage degeneration. Although morphological changes in chondrocytes were observed during OA initiation, no signs of bone marrow edema were observed in any of the four experimental groups. We report the coordinate and synergistic effects of extensive treadmill exercise and ovariectomy on articular cartilage degeneration. Since no surgical procedure was performed on the knee joint directly in this model, this model is useful in addressing the molecular pathogenesis of naturally occurring OA.

  15. GPs' attitudes, beliefs and behaviours regarding exercise for chronic knee pain: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Elizabeth; Foster, Nadine E; Porcheret, Mark; Rathod, Trishna; Roddy, Edward

    2017-06-17

    The aim of this study was to investigate general practitioners' (GPs) attitudes, beliefs and behaviours regarding the use of exercise for patients with chronic knee pain (CKP) attributable to osteoarthritis. Primary care GPs in the UK. 5000 GPs, randomly selected from Binley's database, were mailed a cross-sectional questionnaire survey. GPs' attitudes and beliefs were investigated using attitude statements, and reported behaviours were identified using vignette-based questions. GPs were invited to report barriers experienced when initiating exercise with patients with CKP RESULTS: 835 (17%) GPs responded. Overall, GPs were positive about general exercise for CKP. 729 (87%) reported using exercise, of which, 538 (74%) reported that they would use both general and local (lower limb) exercises. However, only 92 (11% of all responding) GPs reported initiating exercise in ways aligning with best-evidence recommendations. 815 (98%) GPs reported barriers in using exercise for patients with CKP, most commonly, insufficient time in consultations (n=419; 51%) and insufficient expertise (n=337; 41%). While GPs' attitudes and beliefs regarding exercise for CKP were generally positive, initiation of exercise was often poorly aligned with current recommendations, and barriers and uncertainties were reported. GPs' use of exercise may be improved by addressing the key barriers of time and expertise, by developing a pragmatic approach that supports GPs to initiate individualised exercise, and/or by other professionals taking on this role. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Intra-Articular Corticosteroids in Addition to Exercise for Reducing Pain Sensitivity in Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto; Klokker, Louise; Bartholdy, Cecilie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of one intra-articular corticosteroid injection two weeks prior to an exercise-based intervention program for reducing pain sensitivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: Randomized, masked, parallel, placebo-controlled trial involving 100 particip......OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of one intra-articular corticosteroid injection two weeks prior to an exercise-based intervention program for reducing pain sensitivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: Randomized, masked, parallel, placebo-controlled trial involving 100...... the injections all participants undertook a 12-week supervised exercise program. Main outcomes were changes from baseline in pressure-pain sensitivity (pressure-pain threshold [PPT] and temporal summation [TS]) assessed using cuff pressure algometry on the calf. These were exploratory outcomes from a randomized....... The mean group difference in changes from baseline at week 14 was 0.6 kPa (95% CI: -1.7 to 2.8; P = 0.626) for PPT and 384 mm×sec (95% CI: -2980 to 3750; P = 0.821) for TS. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that adding intra-articular corticosteroid injection 2 weeks prior to an exercise program does...

  17. Neuromuscular exercises prevent severe knee injury in adolescent team handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, Leonard; Krutsch, Volker; Weber, Johannes; Nerlich, Michael; Luig, Patrick; Loose, Oliver; Angele, Peter; Krutsch, Werner

    2017-10-20

    Team handball is associated with a high risk of severe knee injury that needs to be reduced, particularly at the youth level. The purpose of this study was to show how an injury-prevention programme effectively reduces severe knee injury in adolescent team handball players. Of 23 adolescent handball teams of both sexes, 13 were randomly allocated into the intervention group (168 players) and 10 into the control group (111 players). Players of the intervention group regularly participated in an injury-prevention programme for one season. Handball exposure and sustained injuries were documented for both groups on a monthly basis. The primary outcome parameter of the injury-prevention programme was the incidence of severe knee injury. Of the 279 included players, 68 (24%) sustained 82 injuries yielding an overall incidence of 1.85 injuries per 1000 h handball exposure (intervention group: 50 injuries/incidence: 1.90/1000 h; control group: 32 injuries/incidence: 1.78/1000 h). Knee injury was the second most frequent injury in adolescent team handball. The primary outcome parameter, severe knee injury occurred significantly more often in the control group [mean age (SD) 15.1 (1.0), injury incidence 0.33/1000 h] than in the intervention group [mean age (SD) 14.9 (0.9), injury incidence 0.04/1000 h]. The odds ratio was 0.11 (95% CI 0.01-0.90), p = 0.019. Other injuries to the lower extremities showed no significant difference between the two groups. Frequent neuromuscular exercises prevent severe knee injury in adolescent team handball players and should thus be included in the practical routine as well as in the education of team coaches.

  18. Supervised neuromuscular exercise prior to hip and knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Linda; Roos, Ewa M; Overgaard, Søren

    2017-01-01

    was analysed to estimate the probability for the intervention being cost effective for a range of threshold values. A health care sector perspective was applied. RESULTS: HOOS/KOOS quality of life [8.25 (95% CI, 0.42 to 16.10)] and QALYs [0.04 (95% CI, 0.01 to 0.07)] were statistically significantly improved....... Effect-sizes ranged between 0.09-0.59 for HOOS/KOOS subscales. Despite including an intervention cost of €326 per patient, there was no difference in total cost between groups [€132 (95% CI -3942 to 3679)]. At a threshold of €40,000, preoperative exercise was found to be cost effective at 84% probability....... CONCLUSION: Preoperative supervised neuromuscular exercise for 8 weeks was found to be cost-effective in patients scheduled for THR and TKR surgery at conventional thresholds for willingness to pay. One-year clinical effects were small to moderate and favoured the intervention group, but only statistically...

  19. TO STUDY THE EFFECT OF AGILITY AND PERTURBATION EXERCISES VERSUS DYNAMIC RESISTANCE EXERCISES TO IMPROVE KNEE FUNCTION IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeutishree Roy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary osteoarthritis is more commonly found in post menopausal women; Secondary osteoarthritis had an underlying cause such as trauma, obesity or inflammatory arthritis. It is characterized by a progressive degeneration of the articular cartilage with subsequent remodeling and hypertrophy of the bone at the joint margins. Muscle weakness is associated with increased functional limitation, disability. Muscle strengthening through resistance exercises increases physical function; decreases pain due to osteoarthritis and reduces self reported disability. Agility is the ability to change direction and maintain stability and is more often important in changing direction and speed; In order to train muscle to react quickly neuromuscular training is essential; Perturbation enhances the ability of the proprioceptor signals to the muscle and prevent injuries and enhances performance. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of agility training and dynamic resistance training in patients with primary osteoarthritis. Methods: 50 subjects were assigned in two groups 25 each group and subjects were selected by convenient sampling method. Group A with agility training and Group B with dynamic resistance training. The treatment session was performed 3 days a week for 3 weeks lasting for 45minutes. Day 0 is the starting day of the session and Day-21 last day of the session. Each subject performed all the measurement with knee function assessed by Timed up and Go test (TUG and Lower extremity function Scale (LEFS. Both outcomes were tested at starting day and at the end of 21st day. Results: All the analysis was carried out in PASW version 21.0. An alpha level of 0.05 was used to determine statistical significance. The between group analysis of agility training and dynamic strengthening for LEFS and TUG in evaluation of knee function was done using independent ‘t’ test showed statistically very significant (P=0.000. Conclusions

  20. The effect of instruction in analgesic use compared with neuromuscular exercise on knee-joint load in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsgaard-Larsen, A; Clausen, B; Søndergaard, J; Christensen, R; Andriacchi, T P; Roos, E M

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effect of a neuro-muscular exercise (NEMEX) therapy program compared with instructions in optimized analgesics and anti-inflammatory drug use (PHARMA), on measures of knee-joint load in people with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that knee joint loading during walking would be reduced by NEMEX and potentially increased by PHARMA. Single-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing NEMEX therapy twice a week with PHARMA. Participants with mild-to-moderate medial tibiofemoral knee OA were randomly allocated (1:1) to one of two 8-week treatments. Primary outcome was change in knee load during walking (Knee Index, a composite score from all three planes based on 3D movement analysis) after 8 weeks of intervention. Secondary outcomes were frontal plane peak knee adduction moment (KAM), Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores (KOOS) and functional performance tests. Ninety three participants (57% women, 58 ± 8 years with a body mass index [BMI] of 27 ± 4 kg/m 2 (mean ± standard deviation [SD])) were randomized to NEMEX group (n = 47) or PHARMA (n = 46); data from 44 (94%) and 41 (89%) participants respectively, were available at follow-up. 49% of the participants in NEMEX and only 7% in PHARMA demonstrated good compliance. We found no difference in the primary outcome as evaluated by the Knee Index -0.07 [-0.17; 0.04] Nm/%BW HT. Secondary outcomes largely supported this finding. We found no difference in the primary outcome; knee joint load change during walking from a NEMEX program vs information on the recommended use of analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01638962 (July 3, 2012). Ethical Committee: S-20110153. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mindfulness Is Associated With Treatment Response From Nonpharmacologic Exercise Interventions in Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Augustine C; Harvey, William F; Price, Lori Lyn; Han, Xingyi; Driban, Jeffrey B; Wong, John B; Chung, Mei; McAlindon, Timothy E; Wang, Chenchen

    2017-11-01

    To examine the association between baseline mindfulness and response from exercise interventions in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Cohort study; responder analysis of a clinical trial subset. Urban tertiary care academic hospital. Participants with symptomatic, radiographic knee OA (N=86; mean age, 60y; 74% female; 48% white). Twelve weeks (twice per week) of Tai Chi or physical therapy exercise. Treatment response was defined using Osteoarthritis Research Society International criteria indicating meaningful improvements in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, WOMAC function, or Patient Global Assessment scores. At baseline, participants completed the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (mean total score, 142±17) and were grouped into 3 categories of total mindfulness: higher, medium, or lower. Relative risk (RR) ratios were used to compare treatment response across groups. Participants with higher total mindfulness were 38% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.83) more likely to meet responder criteria than those with lower mindfulness. We found no significant difference between medium and lower mindfulness groups (RR=1.0; 95% CI, 0.69-1.44). Among the 5 mindfulness facets, medium acting-with-awareness was 46% (95% CI, 1.09-1.96) more likely to respond than lower acting-with-awareness, and higher acting-with-awareness was 34% more likely to respond, but this did not reach significance (95% CI, 0.97-1.86). In this study, higher mindfulness, primarily driven by its acting-with-awareness facet, was significantly associated with a greater likelihood of response to nonpharmacologic exercise interventions in knee OA. This suggests that mindfulness-cultivating interventions may increase the likelihood of response from exercise. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Voluntary enhanced cocontraction of hamstring muscles during open kinetic chain leg extension exercise: its potential unloading effect on the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscarini, Andrea; Benvenuti, Paolo; Botti, Fabio M; Brunetti, Antonella; Brunetti, Orazio; Pettorossi, Vito E

    2014-09-01

    A number of research studies provide evidence that hamstring cocontraction during open kinetic chain knee extension exercises enhances tibiofemoral (TF) stability and reduces the strain on the anterior cruciate ligament. To determine the possible increase in hamstring muscle coactivation caused by a voluntary cocontraction effort during open kinetic chain leg-extension exercises, and to assess whether an intentional hamstring cocontraction can completely suppress the anterior TF shear force during these exercises. Descriptive laboratory study. Knee kinematics as well as electromyographic activity in the semitendinosus (ST), semimembranosus (SM), biceps femoris (BF), and quadriceps femoris muscles were measured in 20 healthy men during isotonic leg extension exercises with resistance (R) ranging from 10% to 80% of the 1-repetition maximum (1RM). The same exercises were also performed while the participants attempted to enhance hamstring coactivation through a voluntary cocontraction effort. The data served as input parameters for a model to calculate the shear and compressive TF forces in leg extension exercises for any set of coactivation patterns of the different hamstring muscles. For R≤ 40% 1RM, the peak coactivation levels obtained with intentional cocontraction (l) were significantly higher (P hamstring muscle, maximum level l was reached at R = 30% 1RM, corresponding to 9.2%, 10.5%, and 24.5% maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) for the BF, ST, and SM, respectively, whereas the ratio l/l 0 reached its maximum at R = 20% 1RM and was approximately 2, 3, and 4 for the BF, SM, and ST, respectively. The voluntary enhanced coactivation level l obtained for R≤ 30% 1RM completely suppressed the anterior TF shear force developed by the quadriceps during the exercise. In leg extension exercises with resistance R≤ 40% 1RM, coactivation of the BF, SM, and ST can be significantly enhanced (up to 2, 3, and 4 times, respectively) by a voluntary hamstring

  3. The influence of isometric exercises of the quadriceps muscle on young female patients with anterior knee pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Wilczyński

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anterior knee pain is a disease associated with abnormalities in the patellofemoral joint. It is a common reason for seeking advice from an orthopaedist. This problem is characterised by chronic pain in the anterior part of one or both knees. This issue often affects women, especially at a young age. The effect of this ailment is deterioration of the quality of life. This dysfunction significantly reduces abilities, and often prevents the performance of daily activities. Pain usually occurs during physical activity, but may also be accompanied by prolonged immobilisation of the knee joint. In defining the type of patellofemoral instability, orthopaedists use magnetic resonance imaging, arthroscopy, ultrasonography, and X-ray examination. A relatively effective method of treatment of pain in the patellofemoral joint is through isometric exercises of the quadriceps. They increase the strength of the quadriceps femoris muscle and reduce instability in the patellofemoral joint. Aim of the research: To evaluate the effectiveness of isometric exercises of the quadriceps muscle on young female patients with anterior knee pain. Material and methods : The study involved 30 women aged 13–44 years (mean age: 26.8 years, who had been diagnosed with pain in the front of the knee. Results and conclusions: Isometric exercises of the quadriceps muscle are an effective method of reducing anterior knee pain. Isometric exercises have a beneficial influence on improving physical activity, including performing basic activities of daily living. Student’s t distribution showed, that isometric exercises of the quadriceps muscle reduce pain at the front of the knee. Kruskal-Wallis test confirmed a significant reduction of anterior knee pain.

  4. A lower-extremity exoskeleton improves knee extension in children with crouch gait from cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Zachary F; Damiano, Diane L; Bulea, Thomas C

    2017-08-23

    The ability to walk contributes considerably to physical health and overall well-being, particularly in children with motor disability, and is therefore prioritized as a rehabilitation goal. However, half of ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP), the most prevalent childhood movement disorder, cease to walk in adulthood. Robotic gait trainers have shown positive outcomes in initial studies, but these clinic-based systems are limited to short-term programs of insufficient length to maintain improved function in a lifelong disability such as CP. Sophisticated wearable exoskeletons are now available, but their utility in treating childhood movement disorders remains unknown. We evaluated an exoskeleton for the treatment of crouch (or flexed-knee) gait, one of the most debilitating pathologies in CP. We show that the exoskeleton reduced crouch in a cohort of ambulatory children with CP during overground walking. The exoskeleton was safe and well tolerated, and all children were able to walk independently with the device. Rather than guiding the lower limbs, the exoskeleton dynamically changed the posture by introducing bursts of knee extension assistance during discrete portions of the walking cycle, a perturbation that resulted in maintained or increased knee extensor muscle activity during exoskeleton use. Six of seven participants exhibited postural improvements equivalent to outcomes reported from invasive orthopedic surgery. We also demonstrate that improvements in crouch increased over the course of our multiweek exploratory trial. Together, these results provide evidence supporting the use of wearable exoskeletons as a treatment strategy to improve walking in children with CP. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  5. THE EFFECT OF ADDING SPECIFIC HIP STRENGTHENING EXERCISES TO CONVENTIONAL KNEE EXERCISES IN PATIENTS WITH PATELLO FEMORAL PAIN SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav Monika

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patello femoral pain Syndrome is an over use injury and one of the commonest problems seen in adolescents who are physically active. Till date no study has been done comparing the effect of adding specific hip strengthening exercises (gluteus medius, gluteus maximus & lateral rotators to conventional exercises in patients with Patello femoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS while minimizing the effect of minimizing the activation of tensor fascia lata (TFL. Methods: 30 subjects were randomly allocated using convenience random sampling into 2 Groups Group A and Group B with 15 subjects in each group. Readings were taken for Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS, Manual Muscle Testing (MMT for hip abductors, extensors and external rotators muscles quadriceps and hamstrings, and Anterior Knee Pain Scale (AKPS on baseline and at the end of 4th week. Results: Analysis of the data collected for NPRS, AKPS and MMT of Quadriceps, Hamstrings, Hip Abductors and Hip External Rotators of 30 subjects was done by statistical analysis tests using STATA and software version 11.2. Although improvement was seen in both the groups but group B improved better compared to group A. Conclusion: Group B treatment protocol i.e. Hip specific strengthening (gluteus medius and gluteus maximus in addition to conventional treatment in patients with patello-femoral pain syndrome, was found to be effective in reducing pain, improving functional status and increasing muscle strength than Group A treatment protocol i.e. Knee strengthening and stretching.

  6. Exercise interventions and patient beliefs for people with hip, knee or hip and knee osteoarthritis: a mixed methods review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Michael; Dickson, Kelly; Hallett, Rachel; Grant, Robert; Hauari, Hanan; Walsh, Nicola; Stansfield, Claire; Oliver, Sandy

    2018-04-17

    Chronic peripheral joint pain due to osteoarthritis (OA) is extremely prevalent and a major cause of physical dysfunction and psychosocial distress. Exercise is recommended to reduce joint pain and improve physical function, but the effect of exercise on psychosocial function (health beliefs, depression, anxiety and quality of life) in this population is unknown. To improve our understanding of the complex inter-relationship between pain, psychosocial effects, physical function and exercise. Review authors searched 23 clinical, public health, psychology and social care databases and 25 other relevant resources including trials registers up to March 2016. We checked reference lists of included studies for relevant studies. We contacted key experts about unpublished studies. To be included in the quantitative synthesis, studies had to be randomised controlled trials of land- or water-based exercise programmes compared with a control group consisting of no treatment or non-exercise intervention (such as medication, patient education) that measured either pain or function and at least one psychosocial outcome (self-efficacy, depression, anxiety, quality of life). Participants had to be aged 45 years or older, with a clinical diagnosis of OA (as defined by the study) or self-reported chronic hip or knee (or both) pain (defined as more than six months' duration).To be included in the qualitative synthesis, studies had to have reported people's opinions and experiences of exercise-based programmes (e.g. their views, understanding, experiences and beliefs about the utility of exercise in the management of chronic pain/OA). We used standard methodology recommended by Cochrane for the quantitative analysis. For the qualitative analysis, we extracted verbatim quotes from study participants and synthesised studies of patients' views using framework synthesis. We then conducted an integrative review, synthesising the quantitative and qualitative data together. Twenty-one trials

  7. Strength and Functional Improvement Using Pneumatic Brace with Extension Assist for End-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis: A Prospective, Randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Jeffrey J; Bhave, Anil; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Starr, Roland; McElroy, Mark J; Mont, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    Pneumatic unloader bracing with extension assists have been proposed as a non-operative modality that may delay the need for knee surgery by reducing pain and improving function. This prospective, randomized trial evaluated 52 patients who had knee osteoarthritis for changes in: (1) muscle strength; (2) objective functional improvements; (3); subjective functional improvements; (4) pain; (5) quality of life; and (6) conversion to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) compared to standard of care. Patient outcomes were evaluated at a minimum 3 months. Braced patient's demonstrated significant improvements in muscle strength, several functional tests, and patient reported outcomes when compared to the matched cohort. These results are encouraging and suggest that this device may represent a promising alternative to standard treatment methods for knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Signe; Jørgensen, Peter Bo; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    advancing functional tasks, and how these strategies are associated with leg extension power. The aim of the study was to investigate pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis compared with controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 57...... patients (mean age 65.6 years) scheduled for medial uni-compartmental knee arthroplasty, and 29 age and gender matched controls were included in this cross-sectional study. Leg extension power was tested with the Nottingham Leg Extension Power-Rig. Pelvic range of motion was derived from an inertia......-based measurement unit placed over the sacrum bone during walking, stair climbing and stepping. RESULTS: Patients had lower leg extension power than controls (20-39 %, P

  9. Impairment-targeted exercises for older adults with knee pain: protocol for a proof-of-principle study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise therapy for knee pain and osteoarthritis remains a key element of conservative treatment, recommended in clinical guidelines. Yet systematic reviews point to only modest benefits from exercise interventions. One reason for this might be that clinical trials tend to use a one-size-fits-all approach to exercise, effectively disregarding the details of their participants' clinical presentations. This uncontrolled before-after study (TargET-Knee-Pain aims to test the principle that exercises targeted at the specific physical impairments of older adults with knee pain may be able to significantly improve those impairments. It is a first step towards testing the effectiveness of this more individually-tailored approach. Methods/Design We aim to recruit 60 participants from an existing observational cohort of community-dwelling older adults with knee pain. Participants will all have at least one of the three physical impairments of weak quadriceps, a reduced range of knee flexion and poor standing balance. Each participant will be asked to undertake a programme of exercises, targeted at their particular combination and degree of impairment(s, over the course of twelve weeks. The exercises will be taught and progressed by an experienced physiotherapist, with reference to a "menu" of agreed exercises for each of the impairments, over the course of six fortnightly home visits, alternating with six fortnightly telephone calls. Primary outcome measures will be isometric quadriceps strength, knee flexion range of motion, timed single-leg standing balance and the "Four Balance Test Scale" at 12 weeks. Key secondary outcome measures will be self-reported levels of pain, stiffness and difficulties with day-to-day functional tasks (WOMAC. Outcome measures will be taken at three time-points (baseline, six weeks and twelve weeks by a study nurse blinded to the exercise status of the participants. Discussion This study (TargET-Knee

  10. Strength training alone, exercise therapy alone, and exercise therapy with passive manual mobilisation each reduce pain and disability in people with knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Mariette J; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Lenssen, Antoine F; Hendriks, Erik J M; de Bie, Rob A

    2011-01-01

    What are the effects of strength training alone, exercise therapy alone, and exercise with additional passive manual mobilisation on pain and function in people with knee osteoarthritis compared to control? What are the effects of these interventions relative to each other? A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Adults with osteoarthritis of the knee. INTERVENTION TYPES: Strength training alone, exercise therapy alone (combination of strength training with active range of motion exercises and aerobic activity), or exercise with additional passive manual mobilisation, versus any non-exercise control. Comparisons between the three interventions were also sought. The primary outcome measures were pain and physical function. 12 trials compared one of the interventions against control. The effect size on pain was 0.38 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.54) for strength training, 0.34 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.49) for exercise, and 0.69 (95% CI 0.42 to 0.96) for exercise plus manual mobilisation. Each intervention also improved physical function significantly. No randomised comparisons of the three interventions were identified. However, meta-regression indicated that exercise plus manual mobilisations improved pain significantly more than exercise alone (p = 0.03). The remaining comparisons between the three interventions for pain and physical function were not significant. Exercise therapy plus manual mobilisation showed a moderate effect size on pain compared to the small effect sizes for strength training or exercise therapy alone. To achieve better pain relief in patients with knee osteoarthritis physiotherapists or manual therapists might consider adding manual mobilisation to optimise supervised active exercise programs. Copyright © 2011 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  11. BabeLO--An Extensible Converter of Programming Exercises Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiros, R.; Leal, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, there was a proliferation of programming exercise formats that hinders interoperability in automatic assessment. In the lack of a widely accepted standard, a pragmatic solution is to convert content among the existing formats. BabeLO is a programming exercise converter providing services to a network of heterogeneous…

  12. Effect of isometric quadriceps exercise on muscle strength, pain, and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to investigate the effects of isometric quadriceps exercise on muscle strength, pain, and function in knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Outpatients (N=42, 21 per group; age range 40-65 years; 13 men and 29 women) with osteoarthritis of the knee participated in the study. The experimental group performed isometric exercises including isometric quadriceps, straight leg raising, and isometric hip adduction exercise 5 days a week for 5 weeks, whereas the control group did not performed any exercise program. The outcome measures or dependent variables selected for this study were pain intensity, isometric quadriceps strength, and knee function. These variables were measured using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), strength gauge device, and reduced WOMAC index, respectively. All the measurements were taken at baseline (week 0) and at the end of the trial at week 5. [Results] In between-group comparisons, the maximum isometric quadriceps strength, reduction in pain intensity, and improvement in function in the isometric exercise group at the end of the 5th week were significantly greater than those of the control group (pisometric quadriceps exercise program showed beneficial effects on quadriceps muscle strength, pain, and functional disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

  13. Exercise, Manual Therapy, and Booster Sessions in Knee Osteoarthritis: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis From a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Allyn M; Smith, Kenneth J; Bise, Christopher G; Fritz, Julie M; Childs, John; Brennan, Gerard P; Abbott, J Haxby; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2018-01-01

    Limited information exists regarding the cost-effectiveness of rehabilitation strategies for individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The study objective was to compare the cost-effectiveness of 4 different combinations of exercise, manual therapy, and booster sessions for individuals with knee OA. This economic evaluation involved a cost-effectiveness analysis performed alongside a multicenter randomized controlled trial. The study took place in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Salt Lake City, Utah; and San Antonio, Texas. The study participants were 300 individuals taking part in a randomized controlled trial investigating various physical therapy strategies for knee OA. Participants were randomized into 4 treatment groups: exercise only (EX), exercise plus booster sessions (EX+B), exercise plus manual therapy (EX+MT), and exercise plus manual therapy and booster sessions (EX+MT+B). For the 2-year base case scenario, a Markov model was constructed using the United States societal perspective and a 3% discount rate for costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated to compare differences in cost per QALY gained among the 4 treatment strategies. In the 2-year analysis, booster strategies (EX+MT+B and EX+B) dominated no-booster strategies, with both lower health care costs and greater effectiveness. EX+MT+B had the lowest total health care costs. EX+B cost ${\\$}$1061 more and gained 0.082 more QALYs than EX+MT+B, for an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of ${\\$}$12,900/QALY gained. The small number of total knee arthroplasty surgeries received by individuals in this study made the assessment of whether any particular strategy was more successful at delaying or preventing surgery in individuals with knee OA difficult. Spacing exercise-based physical therapy sessions over 12 months using periodic booster sessions was less costly and more effective over 2 years than strategies not containing booster sessions for

  14. Exercise for people with hip or knee osteoarthritis: a comparison of land-based and aquatic interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann E Rahmann

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ann E RahmannDivision of Physiotherapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Expert opinion considers the referral of people with osteoarthritis (OA for physiotherapy to be a core component of managing the functional disability and pain of the disease. Clinical guidelines for the physiotherapy management of people with OA focus on three main areas: exercise, pain relief, and specific manual therapy techniques. Land-based group and individual physiotherapy exercise programs, as well as manual therapy, have demonstrated a distinct benefit in favor of physiotherapy intervention. Similarly, both general and specific aquatic physiotherapy exercise programs have shown positive outcomes for people with OA. This review will focus primarily on therapeutic exercise to improve strength and fitness and reduce pain in people with hip or knee OA. An overview of the principles of hydrodynamics relevant to aquatic exercise is also included to facilitate an understanding of effective aquatic exercise programs. The issue of compliance with exercise programs will also be discussed. Clinicians will, therefore, gain an understanding of the benefits of land-based and aquatic exercise for people with OA.Keywords: exercise, physical therapy, aquatic therapy, hip and knee osteoarthritis, strength, pain, aerobic exercise

  15. Selective contribution of each hamstring muscle to anterior cruciate ligament protection and tibiofemoral joint stability in leg-extension exercise: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscarini, Andrea; Botti, Fabio Massimo; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2013-09-01

    A biomechanical model was developed to simulate the selective effect of the co-contraction force provided by each hamstring muscle on the shear and compressive tibiofemoral joint reaction forces, during open kinetic-chain knee-extension exercises. This model accounts for instantaneous values of knee flexion angle [Formula: see text], angular velocity and acceleration, and for changes in magnitude, orientation, and application point of external resistance. The tibiofemoral shear force (TFSF) largely determines the tensile force on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Biceps femoris is the most effective hamstring muscle in decreasing the ACL-loading TFSF developed by quadriceps contractions for [Formula: see text]. In this range, the semimembranosus generates the dominant tibiofemoral compressive force, which enhances joint stability, opposes anterior/posterior tibial translations, and protects cruciate ligaments. The semitendinosus force provides the greatest decreasing gradient of ACL-loading TFSF for [Formula: see text], and the greatest increasing gradient of tibiofemoral compressive force for [Formula: see text]. However, semitendinosus efficacy is strongly limited by its small physiological section. Hamstring muscles behave as a unique muscle in enhancing the PCL-loading TFSF produced by quadriceps contractions for [Formula: see text]. The levels of hamstrings co-activation that suppress the ACL-loading TFSF considerably shift when the knee angular acceleration is changed while maintaining the same level of knee extensor torque by a concurrent adjustment in the magnitude of external resistance. The knowledge of the specific role and the optimal activation level of each hamstring muscle in ACL protection and tibiofemoral stability are fundamental for planning safe and effective rehabilitative knee-extension exercises.

  16. [Does transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation or therapeutic ultrasound increase the effectiveness of exercise for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyigör, Sibel; Karapolat, Hale; Ibisoğlu, Uğur; Durmaz, Berrin

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) or therapeutic ultrasound (US) increase the effectiveness of exercise on pain, function, muscle strength and quality of life for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Forty-five patients with primary knee OA diagnosis according to American College Rheumatology criteria were sequentially divided into 3 random groups. The patients in group 1 received TENS (with superficial heat and exercise), group 2 received US (with superficial heat and exercise), and group 3 acted as controls (superficial heat and exercise). Outcome measures were included as visual analog scale (VAS), a 20-meter walking test, Lequesne index, WOMAC scores, isokinetic muscle testing, and the Short Form 36 (SF 36). All treatment groups, physical modalities were carried out for a total fifteen sessions. All of the patients were subjected to six weeks of exercise program. All of the treatment groups had significant improvement on activity VAS, 20 meter walking test, Lequesne index, WOMAC scores, and most of the sub-scores of SF36 when compared with their initial status (p0.05). All of the treatment groups were effective on pain, function, muscle strength and quality of life in patients with knee OA. Statistically significant differences could not be found between the treatment groups. The exercise program, as it is cheaper, more easily performed and efficient, may be preferable for the treatment of knee OA. It is difficult to say, TENS or US could increase the effectiveness of isokinetic exercise for pain, function, muscle strength and quality of life of knee OA in this study.

  17. The Ottawa panel clinical practice guidelines for the management of knee osteoarthritis. Part two: strengthening exercise programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Taki, Jade; Desjardins, Brigit; Thevenot, Odette; Fransen, Marlene; Wells, George A; Mizusaki Imoto, Aline; Toupin-April, Karine; Westby, Marie; Álvarez Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Gifford, Wendy; Laferrière, Lucie; Rahman, Prinon; Loew, Laurianne; De Angelis, Gino; Cavallo, Sabrina; Shallwani, Shirin Mehdi; Aburub, Ala'; Bennell, Kim L; Van der Esch, Martin; Simic, Milena; McConnell, Sara; Harmer, Alison; Kenny, Glen P; Paterson, Gail; Regnaux, Jean-Philippe; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; McLean, Linda

    2017-05-01

    To identify effective strengthening exercise programs and provide rehabilitation teams and patients with updated, high-quality recommendations concerning traditional land-based exercises for knee osteoarthritis. A systematic search and adapted selection criteria included comparative controlled trials with strengthening exercise programs for patients with knee osteoarthritis. A panel of experts reached consensus on the recommendations using a Delphi survey. A hierarchical alphabetical grading system (A, B, C+, C, D, D+ or D-) was based on statistical significance ( p osteoarthritis management within a six-month period. Strengthening exercise programs demonstrated a significant improvement for pain relief (four Grade A, ten Grade B, two Grade C+), physical function (four Grade A, eight Grade B) and quality of life (three Grade B). Strengthening in combination with other types of exercises (coordination, balance, functional) showed a significant improvement in pain relief (three Grade A, 11 Grade B, eight Grade C+), physical function (two Grade A, four Grade B, three Grade C+) and quality of life (one Grade A, one Grade C+). There are a variety of choices for strengthening exercise programs with positive recommendations for healthcare professionals and knee osteoarthritis patients. There is a need to develop combined behavioral and muscle-strengthening strategies to improve long-term maintenance of regular strengthening exercise programs.

  18. Predictors of long-term effect from education and exercise in patients with knee and hip pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Simonsen, Mikkel Elstrup; Odgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    with Arthritis in Denmark is an implementation initiative consisting of education and 12 sessions of neuromuscular exercise delivered by trained physiotherapists. Pain (visual analogue scale 0-100) and quality of life (EQ-5D) were assessed at baseline and after three and 12 months. Changes in outcome from......INTRODUCTION: Education and exercise are poorly implemented in osteoarthritis care. The purpose of the present study was to identify predictors of effectiveness at one year from education and exercise in patients with knee or hip pain in clinical practice. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Good Life...... in pain (p education and exercise. This study indicates that good long-term treatment results...

  19. One year effectiveness of neuromuscular exercise compared with instruction in analgesic use on knee function in patients with early knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holsgaard-Larsen, A; Christensen, R; Clausen, B

    2018-01-01

    of California Activity Score (UCLA) and the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions. RESULTS: Ninety-three patients (57% women, 58 ± 8 years, body mass index 27 ± 4 kg/m(2)) were randomized to NEMEX (n = 47) or PHARMA group (n = 46) with data from 85% being available at 12-months follow-up. Good compliance......OBJECTIVE: To test long-term effectiveness of neuromuscular exercise (NEMEX) with instructions in optimized pharmacological treatment (PHARMA) on activities of daily living (ADL) in patients with early knee osteoarthritis. DESIGN: 12-months follow-up from a randomized controlled trial. Participants...... with mild-to-moderate medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis were randomly allocated to 8 weeks NEMEX or PHARMA. The primary outcome measure was the ADL-subscale of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Secondary outcome measures included the other four KOOS-subscales, the University...

  20. Role of melatonin combined with exercise as a switch-like regulator for circadian behavior in advanced osteoarthritic knee

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Yunkyung; Kim, Hyunsoo; Lee, Seunghoon; Jin, Yunho; Choi, Jeonghyun; Lee, Sang-Rae; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2017-01-01

    Here, we show the role of melatonin combined with or without exercise as a determinant of multicellular behavior in osteoarthritis. We address the relationship between the molecular components governing local circadian clock and changes in the osteoarthritic musculoskeletal axis. Melatonin was injected subcutaneously in animals with advanced knee osteoarthritis (OA) for 4 weeks. Concurrently, moderate treadmill exercise was applied for 30 min/day. Morphometric, histological, and gene/protein-...

  1. Patterns in the knee flexion-extension moment profile during stair ascent and descent in patients with total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Jodie A; Feller, Julian A; Menz, Hylton B; Webster, Kate E

    2014-06-03

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of abnormal knee biomechanical patterns in 40 patients with a modern TKA prosthesis, compared to 40 matched control participants when ascending and descending stairs. Fewer patients were able to ascend (65%) or descend stairs (53%) unassisted than controls (83%). Of the participants who could ascend and descend, cluster analysis classified most patients (up to 77%) as demonstrating a similar knee moment pattern as all controls. A small subgroup of patients who completed the tasks did so with distinctly abnormal biomechanics compared to other patients and controls. These findings suggest that recovery of normal stair climbing is possible. However, rehabilitation might be more effective if it were tailored to account for these differences between patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of a tailor-made exercise program on exercise adherence and health outcomes in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a mixed-methods pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Fung-Kam Iris; Lee, Tze-Fan Diana; So, Winnie Kwok-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that exercise intervention was effective in symptoms control of knee osteoarthritis (OA) but poor intervention adherence reduced the exercise effect. It has been suspected that the design of exercise intervention mainly from the health care professionals' perspective could not address the patients' barriers to exercise. Therefore, a tailor-made exercise program which incorporated the patient's perspective in the design was developed and ready for evaluation. This pilot study estimated the effects of a tailor-made exercise program on exercise adherence and health outcomes, and explored the participants' perception and experience of the program. The intervention of this study was a 4-week community-based group exercise program, which required the participants to attend a 1-hour session each week. Thirty-four older people with knee OA were recruited to the program. Mixed-methods study design was used to estimate the effects of this program and explore the participants' perception and experience of the program. Exercise adherence and performance in return-demonstration of the exercise were assessed at 12 weeks after the program. Disease-specific health status (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index), general health status (12-item Short Form of the Medical Outcome Study Questionnaire), knee range of motion, muscle strength, and endurance of the lower extremities (Timed-Stands Test) were measured at the beginning of the program and 12 weeks after. Six participants were interviewed individually on the 12th week. Thirty-three participants (75.0±7.3 years) completed the one-group pretest and post-test study. The participants' exercise adherence was 91.4%±14.54%, and their correct performance in return-demonstration was 76.7%±21.75%. Most of the participants' health outcomes significantly improved at posttests except the 12-item Short Form of the Medical Outcome Study Questionnaire physical health summary score. The

  3. Three Simple Hands-On Soil Exercises Extension Professionals Can Incorporate into Natural Sciences Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmidt, Andy

    2011-01-01

    The importance of healthy soil and of conveying the importance of soils starts by conveying a few basic concepts of soil science cannot be overstated. This article provides three hands-on exercises Extension professionals can add to natural resources or Master Gardener education curricula. These natural sciences exercises are easy to prepare for…

  4. Educating patients about the benefits of physical activity and exercise for their hip and knee osteoarthritis. Systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, C; Chabaud, A; Guilley, E; Coudeyre, E

    2016-06-01

    Highlight the role of patient education about physical activity and exercise in the treatment of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). Systematic literature review from the Cochrane Library, PubMed and Wiley Online Library databases. A total of 125 items were identified, including 11 recommendations from learned societies interested in OA and 45 randomized controlled trials addressing treatment education and activity/exercise for the treatment of hip and knee osteoarthritis. In the end, 13 randomized controlled trials and 8 recommendations were reviewed (1b level of evidence). Based on the analysis, it was clear that education, exercise and weight loss are the pillars of non-pharmacological treatments. These treatments have proven to be effective but require changes in patient behaviour that are difficult to obtain. Exercise and weight loss improve function and reduce pain. Education potentiates compliance to exercise and weight loss programs, thereby improving their long-term benefits. Cost efficiency studies have found a reduction in medical visits and healthcare costs after 12 months because of self-management programs. Among non-surgical treatment options for hip and knee osteoarthritis, the most recent guidelines focus on non-pharmacological treatment. Self-management for general physical activity and exercise has a critical role. Programs must be personalized and adjusted to the patient's phenotype. This development should help every healthcare professional adapt the care they propose to each patient. Registration number for the systematic review: CRD42015032346. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of targeted exercise on knee-muscle function in patients with persistent hamstring deficiency following ACL reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregenhof, Bo; Jørgensen, Uffe; Aagaard, Per

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, using hamstring auto-graft is a common surgical procedure, which often leads to persistent hamstring muscle-strength deficiency and reduced function. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to investigate the effect...... at 12-24 months' post surgery, will be recruited through outpatient clinics and advertisements. Patients will be randomized to a 12-week progressive, strength and neuromuscular exercise group (SNG) with supervised training twice weekly or a control intervention (CON) consisting of a home-based, low......-intensity exercise program. Outcome measures include between-group change in maximal isometric knee-flexor strength (primary outcome) and knee-extensor muscle strength, hamstring-to-quadriceps strength ratios of the leg that has been operated on and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) (secondary...

  6. Exercise adherence improves long-term patient outcome in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.; Veenhof, C.; Schellevis, F.; Twisk, J.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D. de

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of patient exercise adherence, within the prescribed physiotherapy treatment period and after discharge, on patients’ outcome on pain, physical function and patient self-perceived effect in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. Relevance: The

  7. The effects of a health educational and exercise program for older adults with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman-Rock, M.; Westhoff, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Evaluation of a self-management program for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. The program, which consisted of 6 weekly sessions of 2 hours, included health education by a peer and physical exercises taught by a physical therapist. Methods. Randomized controlled trial.

  8. Early rehabilitation after total knee replacement surgery: a multicenter, noninferiority, randomized clinical trial comparing a home exercise program with usual outpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Annie S Y; Nairn, Lillias; Harmer, Alison R; Crosbie, Jack; March, Lyn; Parker, David; Crawford, Ross; Fransen, Marlene

    2015-02-01

    To determine, at 6 weeks postsurgery, if a monitored home exercise program (HEP) is not inferior to usual care rehabilitation for patients undergoing primary unilateral total knee replacement (TKR) surgery for osteoarthritis. We conducted a multicenter, randomized clinical trial. Patients ages 45-75 years were allocated at the time of hospital discharge to usual care rehabilitation (n = 196) or the HEP (n = 194). Outcomes assessed 6 weeks after surgery included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index pain and physical function subscales, knee range of motion, and the 50-foot walk time. The upper bound of the 95% confidence interval (95% CI) mean difference favoring usual care was used to determine noninferiority. At 6 weeks after surgery there were no significant differences between usual care and HEP, respectively, for pain (7.4 and 7.2; 95% CI mean difference [MD] -0.7, 0.9), physical function (22.5 and 22.4; 95% CI MD -2.5, 2.6), knee flexion (96° and 97°; 95% CI MD -4°, 2°), knee extension (-7° and -6°; 95% CI MD -2°, 1°), or the 50-foot walk time (12.9 and 12.9 seconds; 95% CI MD -0.8, 0.7 seconds). At 6 weeks, 18 patients (9%) allocated to usual care and 11 (6%) to the HEP did not achieve 80° knee flexion. There was no difference between the treatment allocations in the number of hospital readmissions. The HEP was not inferior to usual care as an early rehabilitation protocol after primary TKR. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Pain trajectory and exercise-induced pain flares during 8 weeks of neuromuscular exercise in individuals with knee and hip pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandal, L F; Roos, E M; Bøgesvang, S J; Thorlund, J B

    2016-04-01

    Patients considering or engaged in exercise as treatment may expect or experience transient increases in joint pain, causing fear of exercise and influencing compliance. This study investigated the pain trajectory during an 8-week neuromuscular exercise (NEMEX) program together with acute exercise-induced pain flares in persons with knee or hip pain. Individuals above 35 years self-reporting persistent knee or hip pain for the past 3 months were offered 8 weeks of supervised NEMEX, performed in groups twice weekly. The program consisted of 11 exercises focusing on joint stability and neuromuscular control. Participants self-reported joint pain on a 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS) at baseline and 8-weeks follow-up. NRS pain ratings were also collected before and immediately after every attended exercise session. Joint pain was reduced from baseline (NRS 3.6; 95% CI 3.2-4.1) to 8-weeks follow-up (2.6; 95% CI 2.1-3.1), (P neuromuscular exercise. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Heterogeneous recruitment of quadriceps muscle portions and fibre types during moderate intensity knee-extensor exercise: effect of thigh occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Peter; Söderlund, Karin; Relu, Mihai U.

    2009-01-01

    temperature increase (DeltaT(m)) in RF was 0.52+/-0.09 degrees C, which was 57% and 73% higher (Pmuscle CP in slow twitch (ST) and fast......The involvement of quadriceps femoris muscle portions and fibre type recruitment was studied during submaximal knee-extensor exercise without and with thigh occlusion (OCC) and compared with responses during intense exercise. Six healthy male subjects performed 90-s of moderate exercise without...... twitch (FT) fibres was 81% and 91% of resting levels, respectively, with lower (Pfibres had CP levels below mean-1 SD, respectively, with corresponding values for FT fibres being 41...

  11. Effect of gender on strength gains after isometric exercise coupled with electromyographic biofeedback in knee osteoarthritis: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, S; Equebal, A; Nezamuddin, M; Kumar, R; Lenka, P K

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this trial was to evaluate the effect of gender on strength gains after five week training programme that consisted of isometric exercise coupled with electromyographic biofeedback to the quadriceps muscle. Forty-three (20 men and 23 women) patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), were placed into two groups based on their gender. Both groups performed isometric exercise coupled with electromyographic biofeedback for five days a week for five weeks. Both groups reported gains in muscle strength after five week training. However, the difference was found to be statistically insignificant between the two groups (P=0.224). The results suggest that gender did not affect gains in muscle strength by isometric exercise coupled with electromyographic biofeedback in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Contribution of hamstring fatigue to quadriceps inhibition following lumbar extension exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Joseph M; Kerrigan, D Casey; Fritz, Julie M; Saliba, Ethan N; Gansneder, Bruce; Ingersoll, Christopher D

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of hamstrings and quadriceps fatigue to quadriceps inhibition following lumbar extension exercise. Regression models were calculated consisting of the outcome variable: quadriceps inhibition and predictor variables: change in EMG median frequency in the quadriceps and hamstrings during lumbar fatiguing exercise. Twenty-five subjects with a history of low back pain were matched by gender, height and mass to 25 healthy controls. Subjects performed two sets of fatiguing isometric lumbar extension exercise until mild (set 1) and moderate (set 2) fatigue of the lumbar paraspinals. Quadriceps and hamstring EMG median frequency were measured while subjects performed fatiguing exercise. A burst of electrical stimuli was superimposed while subjects performed an isometric maximal quadriceps contraction to estimate quadriceps inhibition after each exercise set. Results indicate the change in hamstring median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the exercise sets in the history of low back pain group only. Change in quadriceps median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the first exercise set in the control group only. In conclusion, persons with a history of low back pain whose quadriceps become inhibited following lumbar paraspinal exercise may be adapting to the fatigue by using their hamstring muscles more than controls. Key PointsA neuromuscular relationship between the lumbar paraspinals and quadriceps while performing lumbar extension exercise may be influenced by hamstring muscle fatigue.QI following lumbar extension exercise in persons with a history of LBP group may involve significant contribution from the hamstring muscle group.More hamstring muscle contribution may be a necessary adaptation in the history of LBP group due to weaker and more fatigable lumbar extensors.

  13. Validity and reliability of an instrumented leg-extension machine for measuring isometric muscle strength of the knee extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschel, Caroline; Haupenthal, Alessandro; Jacomel, Gabriel Fernandes; Fontana, Heiliane de Brito; Santos, Daniela Pacheco dos; Scoz, Robson Dias; Roesler, Helio

    2015-05-20

    Isometric muscle strength of knee extensors has been assessed for estimating performance, evaluating progress during physical training, and investigating the relationship between isometric and dynamic/functional performance. To assess the validity and reliability of an adapted leg-extension machine for measuring isometric knee extensor force. Validity (concurrent approach) and reliability (test and test-retest approach) study. University laboratory. 70 healthy men and women aged between 20 and 30 y (39 in the validity study and 31 in the reliability study). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values calculated for the maximum voluntary isometric torque of knee extensors at 30°, 60°, and 90°, measured with the prototype and with an isokinetic dynamometer (ICC2,1, validity study) and measured with the prototype in test and retest sessions, scheduled from 48 h to 72 h apart (ICC1,1, reliability study). In the validity analysis, the prototype showed good agreement for measurements at 30° (ICC2,1 = .75, SEM = 18.2 Nm) and excellent agreement for measurements at 60° (ICC2,1 = .93, SEM = 9.6 Nm) and at 90° (ICC2,1 = .94, SEM = 8.9 Nm). Regarding the reliability analysis, between-days' ICC1,1 were good to excellent, ranging from .88 to .93. Standard error of measurement and minimal detectable difference based on test-retest ranged from 11.7 Nm to 18.1 Nm and 32.5 Nm to 50.1 Nm, respectively, for the 3 analyzed knee angles. The analysis of validity and repeatability of the prototype for measuring isometric muscle strength has shown to be good or excellent, depending on the knee joint angle analyzed. The new instrument, which presents a relative low cost and easiness of transportation when compared with an isokinetic dynamometer, is valid and provides consistent data concerning isometric strength of knee extensors and, for this reason, can be used for practical, clinical, and research purposes.

  14. ANALYSIS OF ISOKINETIC KNEE EXTENSION / FLEXION IN MALE ELITE ADOLESCENT WRESTLERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanli Sadi Kurdak

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Wrestling requires strength of the upper and lower body musculature which is critical for the athletic performance. Evaluation of the adolescent's skeletal muscle is important to understand body movement, especially including those involved in sports. Strength, power and endurance capacity are defined as parameters of skeletal muscle biomechanical properties. The isokinetic dynamometer is an important toll for making this type of evaluation. However, load range phase of range of motion has to be considered to interpret the data correctly. With this in mind we aimed to investigate the lover body musculature contractile characteristics of adolescent wrestlers together with detailed analyses of load range phase of motion. Thirteen boys aged 12 - 14 years participated to this study. Concentric load range torque, work and power of knee extension and flexion were measured by a Cybex Norm dynamometer at angular velocities from 450°/sec to 30°/sec with 30°/sec decrements for each set. None of the wrestlers were able to attain load range for angular velocities above 390°/sec and 420°/sec for extension and flexion respectively. Detailed analyses of the load range resulted in statistically significant differences in the normalized load range peak torque for extension at 270°/sec (1.44 ± 0.28 Nm·kg-1 and 1.14 ± 0.28 Nm·kg-1 for total and load range peak torque respectively, p < 0.05, and for flexion at 300°/sec (1.26 ± 0.28 Nm·kg-1 and 1.03 ± 0.23 Nm·kg-1 for total and load range peak torque respectively, p < 0.05, compared to total peak torque data. Similarly, the significant difference was found for the work values at 90°/sec (1.91 ± 0.23 Nm·kg-1 and 1.59 ± 0.24 Nm·kg-1 for total and load range work respectively for extension and 1.73 ± 0.21 Nm·kg-1 and 1.49 ± 0.19 Nm·kg-1 for total and load range work respectively for flexion, p < 0.05, and was evident at higher angular velocities (p < 0.001 for both extension and flexion. At

  15. The effect on knee-joint load of instruction in analgesic use compared with neuromuscular exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial (the EXERPHARMA trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Brian; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, Robin; Andriacchi, Thomas P; Roos, Ewa M

    2014-11-15

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a mechanically driven disease, and it is suggested that medial tibiofemoral knee-joint load increases with pharmacologic pain relief, indicating that pharmacologic pain relief may be positively associated with disease progression. Treatment modalities that can both relieve pain and reduce knee-joint load would be preferable. The knee-joint load is influenced by functional alignment of the trunk, pelvis, and lower-limb segments with respect to the knee, as well as the ground-reaction force generated during movement. Neuromuscular exercise can influence knee load and decrease knee pain. It includes exercises to improve balance, muscle activation, functional alignment, and functional knee stability. The primary objective of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to investigate the efficacy of a NEuroMuscular EXercise (NEMEX) therapy program, compared with optimized analgesics and antiinflammatory drug use, on the measures of knee-joint load in people with mild to moderate medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis. One hundred men and women with mild to moderate medial knee osteoarthritis will be recruited from general medical practices and randomly allocated (1:1) to one of two 8-week treatments, either (a) NEMEX therapy twice a week or (b) information on the recommended use of analgesics and antiinflammatory drugs (acetaminophen and oral NSAIDs) via a pamphlet and video materials. The primary outcome is change in knee load during walking (the Knee Index, a composite score of the first external peak total reaction moment on the knee joint from all three planes based on 3D movement analysis) after 8 weeks of intervention. Secondary outcomes include changes in the external peak knee-adduction moment and impulse and functional performance measures, in addition to changes in self-reported pain, function, health status, and quality of life. These findings will help determine whether 8 weeks of neuromuscular exercise is superior to optimized use

  16. Validity of maximal isometric knee extension strength measurements obtained via belt-stabilized hand-held dynamometry in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiyama, Naoko; Kurobe, Yasushi; Momose, Kimito

    2017-11-01

    [Purpose] To determine the validity of knee extension muscle strength measurements using belt-stabilized hand-held dynamometry with and without body stabilization compared with the gold standard isokinetic dynamometry in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine healthy adults (mean age, 21.3 years) were included. Study parameters involved right side measurements of maximal isometric knee extension strength obtained using belt-stabilized hand-held dynamometry with and without body stabilization and the gold standard. Measurements were performed in all subjects. [Results] A moderate correlation and fixed bias were found between measurements obtained using belt-stabilized hand-held dynamometry with body stabilization and the gold standard. No significant correlation and proportional bias were found between measurements obtained using belt-stabilized hand-held dynamometry without body stabilization and the gold standard. The strength identified using belt-stabilized hand-held dynamometry with body stabilization may not be commensurate with the maximum strength individuals can generate; however, it reflects such strength. In contrast, the strength identified using belt-stabilized hand-held dynamometry without body stabilization does not reflect the maximum strength. Therefore, a chair should be used to stabilize the body when performing measurements of maximal isometric knee extension strength using belt-stabilized hand-held dynamometry in healthy adults. [Conclusion] Belt-stabilized hand-held dynamometry with body stabilization is more convenient than the gold standard in clinical settings.

  17. Knee extension isometric torque production differences based on verbal motivation given to introverted and extroverted female children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhorter, J Wesley; Landers, Merrill; Young, Daniel; Puentedura, E Louie; Hickman, Robbin A; Brooksby, Candi; Liveratti, Marc; Taylor, Lisa

    2011-08-01

    To date, little research has been conducted to test the efficacy of different forms of motivation based on a female child's personality type. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of female children to perform a maximal knee extension isometric torque test with varying forms of motivation, based on the child's personality type (introvert vs. extrovert). The subjects were asked to perform a maximal isometric knee extension test under three different conditions: 1) with no verbal motivation, 2) with verbal motivation from the evaluator only, and 3) with verbal motivation from a group of their peers and the evaluator combined. A 2×3 mixed ANOVA was significant for an interaction (F 2,62=17.530; pintroverted group showed that scores without verbal motivation were significantly higher than with verbal motivation from the evaluator or the evaluator plus the peers. The extroverted group revealed that scores with verbal motivation from the evaluator or the evaluator plus the peers were significantly higher than without verbal motivation. Results suggest that verbal motivation has a varying effect on isometric knee extension torque production in female children with different personality types. Extroverted girls perform better with motivation, whereas introverted girls perform better without motivation from others.

  18. Measuring patient satisfaction with exercise therapy for knee osteoarthritis: evaluating the utility of the physiotherapy outpatient survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, H P; Keogan, F; Gilsenan, C; Waldron, L; O'Connell, P

    2010-06-01

    To assess patient satisfaction with exercise for knee osteoarthritis (OA). A convenience sample of 27 patients recruited to a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing open kinetic chain and closed kinetic chain exercises for knee OA were reassessed at nine months post-randomization. Clinical outcomes included self-report and physical performance measures of function and pain severity. Patients also completed the Physiotherapy Outpatient Survey (POPS), which is a multi-dimensional measure of patient satisfaction with physiotherapy. There was no significant difference in satisfaction between the two intervention groups. Overall mean satisfaction for the entire cohort was 4.07 of a maximum score of 5 (standard deviation (SD) = 0.52). Lower levels of satisfaction with outcome (mean = 3.56, SD = 0.8) were reported compared with other domains of expectations, communication, organization and the therapist (mean = 3.79-4.49; SDs = 0.42-0.92). Both intervention groups improved from baseline on clinical outcomes of pain, self-report function and walking distance, with no significant differences between the two groups. High levels of satisfaction were reported in this subsample of knee OA patients participating in an RCT evaluating the effects of different exercise approaches for knee OA. Satisfaction varied depending on the satisfaction domain, with lower satisfaction with outcome compared with other aspects of care. The POPS questionnaire can be used to measure the multi-dimensional aspects of satisfaction with physiotherapy.

  19. Use of Low Level of Continuous Heat as an Adjunct to Physical Therapy Improves Knee Pain Recovery and the Compliance for Home Exercise in Patients With Chronic Knee Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, Jerrold S; Laymon, Michael S; Alshammari, Faris S; Lee, Haneul

    2016-11-01

    Petrofsky, JS, Laymon, MS, Alshammari, FS, and Lee, H. Use of low level of continuous heat as an adjunct to physical therapy improves knee pain recovery and the compliance for home exercise in patients with chronic knee pain: a randomized controlled trial. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3107-3115, 2016-This study examined if the use of low level continuous heat (LLCH) wraps at home between physical therapy sessions at a clinic resulted in better therapy outcomes in patients with chronic knee pain. Fifty individuals with chronic nonspecific knee pain was randomly allocated to 2 groups: the LLCH group and the placebo group. All subjects underwent 1 hour of conventional physical therapy twice per week for 2 weeks at the outpatient clinic and they were asked to accomplish 1 hour of therapeutic exercise at home each day between sessions. The LLCH group applied LLCH knee wraps for 6 hours at home before home exercise while placebo group took a placebo ibuprofen. (This was done since placebo heat is impossible to use since subjects would notice that the wraps were cold) Before, during, and after intervention, pain intensity, active range of motion of the knee (AROM), knee strength, and home exercise compliance were measured. The LLCH group showed pain attenuation after 2 weeks of therapy sessions (p ≤ 0.05). AROM and strength of the knee significantly improved over time compared to the placebo group. Home exercise compliance was significantly higher in the LLCH group than placebo group (p ≤ 0.05). These results indicated that the use of LLCH as an adjunct to conventional physical therapy for chronic knee pain significantly improved pain attenuation and recovery of strength and movement in patients with chronic knee pain.

  20. Skinfold thickness affects the isometric knee extension torque evoked by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Flávia V A; Vieira, Amilton; Carregaro, Rodrigo L; Bottaro, Martim; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Durigan, João L Q

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue may influence the transmission of electrical stimuli through to the skin, thus affecting both evoked torque and comfort perception associated with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). This could seriously affect the effectiveness of NMES for either rehabilitation or sports purposes. To investigate the effects of skinfold thickness (SFT) on maximal NMES current intensity, NMES-evoked torque, and NMES-induced discomfort. First, we compared NMES current intensity, NMES-induced discomfort, and NMES-evoked torque between two subgroups of subjects with thicker (n=10; 20.7 mm) vs. thinner (n=10; 29.4 mm) SFT. Second, we correlated SFT to NMES current intensity, NMES-induced discomfort, and NMES-evoked knee extension torque in 20 healthy women. The NMES-evoked torque was normalized to the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. The discomfort induced by NMES was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS). NMES-evoked torque was 27.5% lower in subjects with thicker SFT (p=0.01) while maximal current intensity was 24.2% lower in subjects with thinner SFT (p=0.01). A positive correlation was found between current intensity and SFT (r=0.540, p=0.017). A negative correlation was found between NMES-evoked torque and SFT (r=-0.563, p=0.012). No significant correlation was observed between discomfort scores and SFT (rs=0.15, p=0.53). These results suggest that the amount of subcutaneous adipose tissue (as reflected by skinfold thickness) affected NMES current intensity and NMES-evoked torque, but had no effect on discomfort perception. Our findings may help physical therapists to better understand the impact of SFT on NMES and to design more rational stimulation strategies.

  1. MRI demonstrates the extension of juxta-articular venous malformation of the knee and correlates with joint changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jans, L. [University of Melbourne, Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Gent (Belgium); Ditchfield, M.; Jaremko, J.L.; Stephens, N. [University of Melbourne, Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Verstraete, K. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Gent (Belgium)

    2010-07-15

    Juxta-articular venous malformations (VMs) are uncommon, but may cause early arthropathy of the knee in children and adolescents. We sought to describe the prevalence, extent and initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of knee arthropathy in children with VM adjacent to the knee joint. Thirty-five patients with VM adjacent to the knee who had MRI performed between 2000 and 2009 were identified through a keyword search of the radiology information system. VM extended to the joint in 17 of the 35 patients (5.4-21.5 years, mean 11.8 years). Most of these 17 patients had joint changes (15/17, 88%), most commonly haemosiderin deposition (14/17, 82%). Other findings included the presence of subchondral bone lesions (eight, 47%), cartilage loss (six, 35%), synovial thickening (six, 35%), marrow oedema (six, 35%), joint effusion (five, 29%), subchondral cysts (five, 29%) and one loose body (6%). VM location and size did not correlate with the degree of articular involvement. Joint changes were present in focal as well as non-discrete VM. We found that the frequency of arthropathy increased with extension of VM into the joint itself. This finding stresses the importance of early MRI evaluation of all juxta-articular VM. (orig.)

  2. CONTRIBUTION OF HAMSTRING FATIGUE TO QUADRICEPS INHIBITION FOLLOWING LUMBAR EXTENSION EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Hart

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of hamstrings and quadriceps fatigue to quadriceps inhibition following lumbar extension exercise. Regression models were calculated consisting of the outcome variable: quadriceps inhibition and predictor variables: change in EMG median frequency in the quadriceps and hamstrings during lumbar fatiguing exercise. Twenty-five subjects with a history of low back pain were matched by gender, height and mass to 25 healthy controls. Subjects performed two sets of fatiguing isometric lumbar extension exercise until mild (set 1 and moderate (set 2 fatigue of the lumbar paraspinals. Quadriceps and hamstring EMG median frequency were measured while subjects performed fatiguing exercise. A burst of electrical stimuli was superimposed while subjects performed an isometric maximal quadriceps contraction to estimate quadriceps inhibition after each exercise set. Results indicate the change in hamstring median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the exercise sets in the history of low back pain group only. Change in quadriceps median frequency explained variance in quadriceps inhibition following the first exercise set in the control group only. In conclusion, persons with a history of low back pain whose quadriceps become inhibited following lumbar paraspinal exercise may be adapting to the fatigue by using their hamstring muscles more than controls

  3. The Correlation of Exercise and Range of Motion (ROM on Elderly Knee Observasional Study on Elderly People in Pedurungan Semarang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhitya Putra Widyantoro

    2012-06-01

    Design and Method: Observastional study with a cross sectional design 80 elderly men and women were divided into 2 groups: gymnastics group in the Social Rehabilitation Unit Of Pucang Gading (n=40 and unexcercises group in the Penggaron village (n=40. In both groups, the degree of ROM of knee was assessed using the Goniometer. To evaluate the value of its significance, the data were analyzed using the Mann Withney test followed by Spearmann’s rho test. Result: ROM for gymnastic(exercised group and unexercised group were 115.50°±11.591°, 95.38°±12.780° respectively with p<0. 001. Resuts showed that doing exercise was useful for maintaining ROM of knee in elderly people. Spearmann’s rho test resulted in a strong correlation between ROM and exercise with r value of 0.652. Conclusion: exercise correlates with ROM of knee in elderly (Sains Medika, 4(1:39-45.

  4. Exercise therapy, manual therapy, or both, for osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a factorial randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxter G David

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-pharmacological, non-surgical interventions are recommended as the first line of treatment for osteoarthritis (OA of the hip and knee. There is evidence that exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and improving function in patients with knee OA, some evidence that exercise therapy is effective for hip OA, and early indications that manual therapy may be efficacious for hip and knee OA. There is little evidence as to which approach is more effective, if benefits endure, or if providing these therapies is cost-effective for the management of this disorder. The MOA Trial (Management of OsteoArthritis aims to test the effectiveness of two physiotherapy interventions for improving disability and pain in adults with hip or knee OA in New Zealand. Specifically, our primary objectives are to investigate whether: 1. Exercise therapy versus no exercise therapy improves disability at 12 months; 2. Manual physiotherapy versus no manual therapy improves disability at 12 months; 3. Providing physiotherapy programmes in addition to usual care is more cost-effective than usual care alone in the management of osteoarthritis at 24 months. Methods This is a 2 × 2 factorial randomised controlled trial. We plan to recruit 224 participants with hip or knee OA. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to receive either: (a a supervised multi-modal exercise therapy programme; (b an individualised manual therapy programme; (c both exercise therapy and manual therapy; or, (d no trial physiotherapy. All participants will continue to receive usual medical care. The outcome assessors, orthopaedic surgeons, general medical practitioners, and statistician will be blind to group allocation until the statistical analysis is completed. The trial is funded by Health Research Council of New Zealand Project Grants (Project numbers 07/199, 07/200. Discussion The MOA Trial will be the first to investigate the effectiveness and cost

  5. [The impact of dynamic platform exercises on knee joint muscle strength in patients with gonarthrosis treated with microfracture method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klupiński, Kamil; Krochmalski, Jakub; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2017-06-23

    Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease. Gonarthrosis is one of the most serious diseases the highly developed modern medicine must face. The number of patients suffering from joint pain and progressive disability is growing, especially in economically developed countries. Over the years, the disease has been considered merely as a symptom of aging and the effect of "wear and tear" of the cartilage. At present it is known that the degenerative joint disease is of chronic and progressive nature and its pathogenesis is complex. The aim of the study was to determine the impact of dynamic platform exercises on knee joint muscle strength in patients with gonarthrosis treated with microfracture method. The study included 120 patients of both sexes, aged 40 to 65 years, height range1.60-1.90 m., weight 50- 100 kg. Patients were divided into two groups. Group I of 60 patients after knee arthroscopy (with performed microfractures on the articular cartilage) who were subjected to physiotherapy with the use of dynamometric platform and to isometric and dynamic exercises of muscles surrounding the knee joint. Group II (control) of 60 patients after knee arthroscopy (with performed microfractures on the articular cartilage), who were subjected only to isometric and dynamic exercises of muscles surrounding the knee joint. The patients underwent rehabilitation according to the same rehabilitation program suggested by the Medical Magnus Clinic in Lodz, which consisted in performing daily exercises in open and closed kinetic chains. All Group I and II patients were examined three times: before the start of the rehabilitation, after 4th week of rehabilitation (on the average 20 days of the procedures) and 3 months afterwards. The clinical examination included the measurement of muscle strength using Lovett test. It has been demonstrated that the introduction of modern highly specialized physiotherapy contributes to the improvement of the outcome and to the shortening of the

  6. Improvement in upper leg muscle strength underlies beneficial effects of exercise therapy in knee osteoarthritis: secondary analysis from a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, J.; Steultjens, M.P.M.; Roorda, L.D.; Lems, W.F.; van der Esch, M.; Thorstensson, C.A.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.A.; van der Leeden, M.; Dekker, J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Although exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate if improvements in neuromuscular factors (i.e. upper leg muscle strength and knee

  7. Contribution of Hamstring Fatigue to Quadriceps Inhibition Following Lumbar Extension Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Joseph M.; Kerrigan, D. Casey; Fritz, Julie M.; Saliba, Ethan N.; Gansneder, Bruce; Ingersoll, Christopher D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of hamstrings and quadriceps fatigue to quadriceps inhibition following lumbar extension exercise. Regression models were calculated consisting of the outcome variable: quadriceps inhibition and predictor variables: change in EMG median frequency in the quadriceps and hamstrings during lumbar fatiguing exercise. Twenty-five subjects with a history of low back pain were matched by gender, height and mass to 25 healthy controls. Subjec...

  8. Effect of exercise therapy on lower extremity deep venous thrombosis after total knee arthoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Wu Huang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of exercise therapy in preventing the lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT after total knee arthoplasty (TKA. Methods: A total of 153 patients with osteoarthritis who were admitted in our hospital for TKA were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group. The patients in the observation group were given continuous passive motion (CPM in combined with exercise therapy, while the patients in the control group were only given CPM. After 2-week treatment, the related coagulation indicators and femoral venous blood flow in the two groups were detected and compared. The occurrence rate of DVT in the two groups was calculated. Results: PT and APTT from 2 weeks to 2 months after operation in the two groups were shortened first and extended later when compared with before operation, while FIB and D-D contents were elevated first and reduced later, and the coagulation indicator levels 2 months after treatment in the two groups were significantly different from those before operation. The femoral venous blood flow peak and average velocity 1 week after operation in the two groups were significantly elevated when compared with before operation. The femoral venous blood flow peak and average velocity 1 week after operation in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group. The occurrence rate of DVT in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group. Conclusions: CPM in combined with exercise therapy for patients after TKA can effectively prevent the formation of DVT, with a significant effect.

  9. Comparison of the Effects of Therapeutic exercise and Pilates Training on Function and Proprioception in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Vahid Mazloum; Nader Rahnama

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Knee Osteoarthritis (OA) as one of the most prevalent musculoskeletal disorders, leads to joint degeneration and consequent deterioration of function and proprioception. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Pilates exercise on knee OA. Materials & Methods: Forty-one male individuals were randomly categorized into three groups, including Pilates, conventional exercise therapy, and control. Proprioception, objective assessment of functional performance, and pat...

  10. Comparative Treatment Outcomes of Pre and Post-exercise TENS Application on Knee Osteoarthritis: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajediran I. Bello

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective The effects of TENS before exercise (TBE and TENS after exercise (TAE in the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA were compared. Methods Fifteen participants with knee OA were alternatively assigned to either TBE or TAE groups. Participants' pain, active knee flexibility, thigh girth, disability, and activity levels were assessed at baseline and at the end of eight-week study. Mixed design two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA at P < 0.05 was used to compare the two groups. Results The mean age of the participants was 58.1 ± 10.9 years. Post-intervention comparison showed that TAE had significantly lower scores (1.9 ± 0.9 than TBE (4.3 ± 1.5 on Disability Index Questionnaire (DIQ ( F -ratio = 10.5; P = 0.006, and significantly lower scores (0.8 ± 0.3 than TBE (1.4 ± 0.6 on Patient Assessment Scale (PAS ( F -ratio = 8.3; P = 0.013. However, both groups did not significantly differ on the selected impairment measures. Conclusion TAE was found to be more effective on the primary outcome measures in patients with knee OA.

  11. Hydrotherapy versus conventional land-based exercise for the management of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luciana E; Valim, Valeria; Pessanha, Ana Paula C; Oliveira, Leda M; Myamoto, Samira; Jones, Anamaria; Natour, Jamil

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of hydrotherapy in subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee compared with subjects with OA of the knee who performed land-based exercises. Sixty-four subjects with OA of the knee were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups that performed exercises for 18 weeks: a water-based exercise group and a land-based exercise group. The outcome measures included a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain in the previous week, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), pain during gait assessed by a VAS at rest and immediately following a 50-foot (15.24-m) walk test (50FWT), walking time measured at fast and comfortable paces during the 50FWT, and the Lequesne Index. Measurements were recorded by a blinded investigator at baseline and at 9 and 18 weeks after initiating the intervention. The 2 groups were homogenous regarding all parameters at baseline. Reductions in pain and improvements in WOMAC and Lequesne index scores were similar between groups. Pain before and after the 50FWT decreased significantly over time in both groups. However, the water-based exercise group experienced a significantly greater decrease in pain than the land-based exercise group before and after the 50FWT at the week-18 follow-up. Both water-based and land-based exercises reduced knee pain and increased knee function in participants with OA of the knee. Hydrotherapy was superior to land-based exercise in relieving pain before and after walking during the last follow-up. Water-based exercises are a suitable and effective alternative for the management of OA of the knee.

  12. Effectiveness of massage therapy as co-adjuvant treatment to exercise in osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés Godoy, Virginia; Gallego Izquierdo, Tomás; Lázaro Navas, Irene; Pecos Martín, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of exercise therapy in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee (KOA) is widely evidenced. The current study aims to compare the effectiveness of massage therapy as a co-adjuvant treatment for KOA. A blind, randomized controlled trial design was used. Eighteen women were randomly allocated to two different groups. Group A was treated with massage therapy and an exercise program, and Group B was treated with the exercise program alone. The intervention lasted for 6 weeks. Outcomes were assessed using a verbal analogue scale (VAS), the WOMAC index, and the Get-Up and Go test. Baseline, post-treatment, and 1- and 3- month follow-up data were collected. Values were considered statistically significant at a p massage therapy may lead to clinical improvement in patients with KOA. The use of massage therapy combined with exercise as a treatment for gonarthrosis does not seem to have any beneficial effects.

  13. Effects of a 16-week Pilates exercises training program for isometric trunk extension and flexion strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliziene, Irina; Sipaviciene, Saule; Vilkiene, Jovita; Astrauskiene, Audrone; Cibulskas, Gintautas; Klizas, Sarunas; Cizauskas, Ginas

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of Pilates exercises designed to improve isometric trunk extension and flexion strength of muscles in women with chronic low back pain (cLBP). Female volunteers with cLBP were divided into an experimental group (EG; n = 27) and a control group (CG; n = 27). Pilates exercises were performed twice per week by the EG; the duration of each session was 60 min. The program lasted for 16 weeks; thus patients underwent a total of 32 exercise sessions. The maximum isometric waist bending strength of the EG had improved significantly (p = 0.001) after 16 weeks of the Pilates program. The results of trunk flexion muscle endurance tests significantly depended on the trunk extension muscle endurance before the intervention, and at 1 month (r = 0.723, p Pilates exercise program. At the end of the 16-week exercise program, cLBP intensity decreased by 2.01 ± 0.8 (p Pilates exercise program the pain intensified and the functional state deteriorated much faster than the maximum trunk muscle strength. Therefore, it can be concluded that, to decrease pain and improve functional condition, regular exercise (and not only improved strength and endurance) is required. We established that, although the 16-week lumbar stabilization exercise program increased isometric trunk extension and flexion strength and this increase in strength persisted for 2 months, decreased LBP and improved functional condition endured for only 1 month. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: 'SCOPEX', a randomised control trial protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V

    2012-01-01

    Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential...... to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have...

  15. STRETCHING EXERCISES - EFFECT ON PASSIVE EXTENSIBILITY AND STIFFNESS IN SHORT HAMSTRINGS OF HEALTHY-SUBJECTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HALBERTSMA, JPK; GOEKEN, LNH

    Passive muscle stretch tests are common practice in physical therapy and rehabilitation medicine. However, the effects of stretching exercises are not well known. With an instrumental straight-leg-raising set-up the extensibility, stiffness, and electromyographic activity of the hamstring muscles

  16. Exercise effects in a virtual type 1 diabetes patient: Using stochastic differential equations for model extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Schmidt, S.; Nørgaard, K.

    2013-01-01

    extension incorporating exercise effects on insulin and glucose dynamics. Our model is constructed as a stochastic state space model consisting of a set of stochastic differential equations (SDEs). In a stochastic state space model, the residual error is split into random measurement error...

  17. Pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Signe; Jørgensen, Peter Bo; Dalgas, Ulrik; Søballe, Kjeld; Mechlenburg, Inger

    2015-09-01

    During movement tasks, patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis use compensatory strategies to minimise the joint load of the affected leg. Movement strategies of the knees and trunk have been investigated, but less is known about movement strategies of the pelvis during advancing functional tasks, and how these strategies are associated with leg extension power. The aim of the study was to investigate pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis compared with controls. 57 patients (mean age 65.6 years) scheduled for medial uni-compartmental knee arthroplasty, and 29 age and gender matched controls were included in this cross-sectional study. Leg extension power was tested with the Nottingham Leg Extension Power-Rig. Pelvic range of motion was derived from an inertia-based measurement unit placed over the sacrum bone during walking, stair climbing and stepping. Patients had lower leg extension power than controls (20-39 %, P 0.06). Furthermore, an inverse association (coefficient: -0.03 to -0.04; R (2) = 13-22 %) between leg extension power and pelvic range of motion during stair and step descending was found in the patients. Compared to controls, patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis use greater pelvic movements during advanced functional performance tests, particularly when these involve descending tasks. Further studies should investigate if it is possible to alter these movement strategies by an intervention aimed at increasing strength and power for the patients.

  18. Training Self-Administered Acupressure Exercise among Postmenopausal Women with Osteoarthritic Knee Pain: A Feasibility Study and Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Osteoarthritis (OA is more prevalent in women, particularly after menopausal age. Women are more likely to seek complementary and alternative medicine (CAM approaches. We examined the feasibility of training self-administered acupressure exercise and assessed its impact on OA symptoms among women with knee OA. Methods. Thirty-six eligible postmenopausal women were randomly assigned in the acupressure exercise group (n=15 or the control group (n=21 for 12 weeks. Feasibility outcomes (e.g., compliance and adverse effects and clinical outcomes (e.g., pain, stiffness, and physical function were assessed. Data were collected at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks. Both per-protocol and intention-to-treat analysis were employed. Results. The training materials were well received. The feedback from participants suggests that self-administered acupressure exercise is easy to learn and safe to perform at home, although no statistically significant results of the clinical outcome were observed. Our findings didn’t reveal superiority or inferiority of acupressure compared with usual care. Conclusion. Acupressure exercise is feasible to be trained among postmenopausal women with knee osteoarthritis. Due to the limitations of this study such as small sample size and high attrition rate, acupressure’s efficacy needs to be further explored in larger scale studies with more rigorous design.

  19. Sidestep cutting technique and knee abduction loading: implications for ACL prevention exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristianslund, Eirik; Faul, Oliver; Bahr, Roald; Myklebust, Grethe; Krosshaug, Tron

    2014-05-01

    Sidestep cutting technique is essential in programmes to prevent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. A better understanding of how technique affects potentially harmful joint loading may improve prevention programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of sidestep cutting technique on maximum knee abduction moments. Cross-sectional study. Whole-body kinematics and knee joint kinetics were calculated in 123 female handball players (mean±SD, 22.5±7.0 years, 171±7 cm, 67±7 kg) performing sidestep cutting. Three cuts from each side were analysed. Linear regression was applied between selected technique factors and maximum knee abduction moment during the first 100 ms of the contact phase. Furthermore, we investigated to what degree the abduction moment originated from the magnitude of the ground reaction force (GRF) or the knee abduction moment arm of the GRF. Technique factors explained 62% of the variance in knee abduction moments. Cut width, knee valgus, toe landing, approach speed and cutting angle were the most significant predictors. An increase in one of these factors of 1 SD increased the knee abduction moment from 12% to 19%. The effect of the moment arm of the GRF was more important than the force magnitude for maximum knee abduction moments. Lower knee abduction loads during sidestep cutting may be achieved if cuts are performed as narrow cuts with low knee valgus and toe landings. These factors may be targeted in ACL injury prevention programmes.

  20. Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching and Kinesiology Taping on Pelvic Compensation During Double-Knee Extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Seung-Woong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Shortened hamstrings are likely to restrict the anterior pelvic tilt and induce a slumped posture due to the posterior pelvic tilt. This study was conducted to compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF stretching and modified anterior pelvic tilt taping (APTT on hamstring shortness-associated pelvic compensation while executing seated double-knee extension. Male college students (28 healthy young adults; mean age: 21.4 ± 2.1 years with hamstring shortness were recruited as study subjects and randomly assigned to either the PNF stretching group (control group or the APTT group (experimental group. In all the subjects, changes in the movement distance of the centre of gluteal pressure (COGP as well as rectus abdominis (RA and semitendinosus (SEM muscle activities were measured during seated double-knee extension while the respective intervention method was applied. Both groups showed significant decreases in COGP distance and RA muscle activity compared with their respective baseline values (p < 0.05, however, no significant changes were observed in SEM muscle activity. We can infer that not only a direct intervention on the hamstring, such as PNF stretching, but also a modified APTT-mediated pelvic intervention may be used as a method for reducing pelvic compensation induced by hamstring shortness.

  1. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... days. Medications prescribed by your doctor should help control pain. During the hospital stay, you'll be encouraged to move your ... exercise your new knee. After you leave the hospital, you'll continue physical ... mobility and a better quality of life. And most knee replacements can be ...

  2. Physical Activity and Exercise Therapy Benefits More Than Just Symptoms and Impairments in People With Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T.; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Abbott, J. Haxby

    2018-01-01

    2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and dementia, all of which are associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. Physical activity and exercise therapy not only improves symptoms and impairments of OA, it is also effective as prevention of at least 35 chronic conditions and as treatment...... become more physically active alongside participating in structured exercise therapy targeting symptoms and impairments is crucial considering the majority of people with hip and knee OA do not meet physical activity recommendations. OA is associated with a range of chronic comorbidities, including type...... of at least 26 chronic conditions with one of the potential working mechanisms being exercise induced anti-inflammatory effects. Patient education may be crucial to ensure long-term adherence and sustained positive effects on symptoms, impairments, physical activity levels and comorbidities. J Orthop Sports...

  3. Physical Therapists, Telephone Coaches, and Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis: Qualitative Study About Working Together to Promote Exercise Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, Rana S; Delany, Clare M; Campbell, Penelope K; Gale, Janette; Bennell, Kim L

    2016-04-01

    Integrated models of care are recommended for people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Exercise is integral to management, yet exercise adherence is problematic. Telephone-based health coaching is an attractive adjunct to physical therapist-prescribed exercise that may improve adherence. Little is known about the perceptions and interpretations of physical therapists, telephone coaches, and patients engaged in this model of care. The purpose of this study was to explore how stakeholders (physical therapists, telephone coaches, and patients) experienced, and made sense of, being involved in an integrated program of physical therapist-supervised exercise and telephone coaching for people with knee OA. A cross-sectional qualitative design drawing from symbolic interactionism was used. Semistructured interviews with 10 physical therapists, 4 telephone coaches, and 6 patients with painful knee OA. Interviews were audiorecorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis informed by grounded theory. Four themes emerged: (1) genuine interest and collaboration, (2) information and accountability, (3) program structure, and (4) roles and communication in teamwork. Patients reported they appreciated personalized, genuine interest from therapists and coaches and were aware of their complementary roles. A collaborative approach, with defined roles and communication strategies, was identified as important for effectiveness. All participants highlighted the importance of sharing information, monitoring, and being accountable to others. Coaches found the lack of face-to-face contact with patients hampered relationship building. Therapists and coaches referred to the importance of teamwork in delivering the intervention. The small number of physical therapists and telephone coaches who delivered the intervention may have been biased toward favorable experiences with the intervention and may not be representative of their respective professions. Integrated physical therapy and

  4. Effect of exercise-induced enhancement of the leg-extensor muscle-tendon unit capacities on ambulatory mechanics and knee osteoarthritis markers in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanidis, Kiros; Oberländer, Kai Daniel; Niehoff, Anja; Epro, Gaspar; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Leg-extensor muscle weakness could be a key component in knee joint degeneration in the elderly because it may result in altered muscular control during locomotion influencing the mechanical environment within the joint. This work aimed to examine whether an exercise-induced enhancement of the triceps surae (TS) and quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle-tendon unit (MTU) capacities would affect mechanical and biological markers for knee osteoarthritis in the elderly. Twelve older women completed a 14-week TS and QF MTU exercise intervention, which had already been established as increasing muscle strength and tendon stiffness. Locomotion mechanics and serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) levels were examined during incline walking. MTU mechanical properties were assessed using simultaneously ultrasonography and dynamometry. Post exercise intervention, the elderly had higher TS and QF contractile strength and tendon-aponeurosis stiffness. Regarding the incline gait task, the subjects demonstrated a lower external knee adduction moment and lower knee adduction angular impulse during the stance phase post-intervention. Furthermore, post-intervention compared to pre-intervention, the elderly showed lower external hip adduction moment, but revealed higher plantarflexion pushoff moment. The changes in the external knee adduction moment were significantly correlated with the improvement in ankle pushoff function. Serum COMP concentration increased in response to the 0.5-h incline walking exercise with no differences in the magnitude of increment between pre- and post-intervention. This work emphasizes the important role played by the ankle pushoff function in knee joint mechanical loading during locomotion, and may justify the inclusion of the TS MTU in prevention programs aiming to positively influence specific mechanical markers for knee osteoarthritis in the elderly. However, the study was unable to show that COMP is amenable to change in the elderly following a

  5. Muscle fatigue and exhaustion during dynamic leg exercise in normoxia and hypobaric hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulco, C S; Lewis, S F; Frykman, Peter

    1996-01-01

    and during exercise. MVC force was 578 +/- 29 N in normoxia and 569 +/- 29 N in hypobaria before exercise and fell, at exhaustion, to similar levels (265 +/- 10 and 284 +/- 20 N for normoxia and hypobaria, respectively; P > 0.05) that were higher (P ...Using an exercise device that integrates maximal voluntary static contraction (MVC) of knee extensor muscles with dynamic knee extension, we compared progressive muscle fatigue, i.e., rate of decline in force-generating capacity, in normoxia (758 Torr) and hypobaric hypoxia (464 Torr). Eight...... healthy men performed exhaustive constant work rate knee extension (21 +/- 3 W, 79 +/- 2 and 87 +/- 2% of 1-leg knee extension O2 peak uptake for normoxia and hypobaria, respectively) from knee angles of 90-150 degrees at a rate of 1 Hz. MVC (90 degrees knee angle) was performed before dynamic exercise...

  6. Knee-extension strength, postural control and function are related to fracture type and thigh edema in patients with hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten T; Bandholm, Thomas; Bencke, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Post-surgery thigh edema, loss of knee-extension strength, and reduced physical performance are common following a hip fracture. It is not known if knee-extension strength and physical performance are related to the edema and fracture type. The aim of this study was to examine...... the influence of fracture type and post-surgery edema on physical performances in patients with hip fracture. METHODS: Fifteen women and five men admitted from their own home to an acute orthopedic hip fracture unit were examined. Ten had cervical and ten had intertrochanteric fractures. Correlations between...... fracture type and thigh edema in the fractured limb (% non-fractured) to physical performances of basic mobility, postural control (sway), and isometric knee-extension strength were examined. All measures, except those of basic mobility, were conducted at the time of discharge, 8.5 days post...

  7. Physiological exercise loading suppresses post-traumatic osteoarthritis progression via an increase in bone morphogenetic proteins expression in an experimental rat knee model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, H; Ito, A; Nagai, M; Tajino, J; Yamaguchi, S; Kiyan, W; Nakahata, A; Zhang, J; Wang, T; Aoyama, T; Nishitani, K; Kuroki, H

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the dose-response relationship of exercise loading in the cartilage-subchondral bone (SB) unit in surgically-induced post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) of the knee. Destabilized medial meniscus (DMM) surgery was performed on the right knee of 12-week-old male Wistar rats, and sham surgery was performed on the contralateral knee. Four weeks after the surgery, the animals were subjected to moderate (12 m/min) or intense (21 m/min) treadmill exercises for 30 min/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. PTOA development in articular cartilage and SB was examined using histological and immunohistochemical analyses, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis, and biomechanical testing at 8 weeks after surgery. Gremlin-1 was injected to determine the role of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling on PTOA development following moderate exercise. Moderate exercise increased BMP-2, BMP-4, BMP-6, BMP receptor 2, pSmad-5, and inhibitor of DNA binding protein-1 expression in the superficial zone chondrocytes and suppressed cartilage degeneration, osteophyte growth, SB damage, and osteoclast-mediated SB resorption. However, intense exercise had little effect on BMP expression and even caused progression of these osteoarthritis (OA) changes. Gremlin-1 injection following moderate exercise caused progression of the PTOA development down to the level of the non-exercise DMM-operated knee. Exercise regulated cartilage-SB PTOA development in DMM-operated knees in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings shed light on the important role of BMP expression in superficial zone chondrocytes in attenuation of PTOA development following physiological exercise loading. Further studies to support a mechanism by which BMPs would be beneficial in preventing PTOA progression are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: 'SCOPEX', a randomised control trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michelle; Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V; Roos, Ewa M; Hodges, Paul W; Staples, Margaret; Bennell, Kim L

    2012-11-27

    Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. 62 people aged 30-50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee

  9. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: ‘SCOPEX’ a randomised control trial protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. Methods/design 62 people aged 30–50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. Discussion The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home-based, physiotherapist

  10. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: ‘SCOPEX’ a randomised control trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Michelle

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. Methods/design 62 people aged 30–50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. Discussion The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home

  11. The Effect of 8 Weeks of the Selected Combined Exercises on Balance and Pain of Patients Suffering from Arthritis of Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Karimi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is considered as the most common joint disease of humans and one of the most common causes of chronic disability among elderly people in the developed countries. The main objective of the present research was to determine the impact of 8 weeks of the combined exercises on the balance and the amount of pain of patients with knee osteoarthritis. 15 patients with knee arthritis were selected purposefully and in form of convenience and they participated in this research. The patients implemented the Training Protocol of walking in water and land and the knee locking and the front thigh exercises for 8 weeks. Dynamic balance (Y test and pain (McGill questionnaire of patients with knee arthritis were measured and evaluated before and after eight weeks of combined exercises. The data were analyzed by use of the t-dependent (P˂0.05. In the dynamic balance of patients with knee arthritis, there was significant difference regarding the anterior side between before-exercises (39.9 7.2 and after-exercises (50.76.8, regarding the internal posterior side between before-exercises (28.8 9.2 and after-exercises (38.0 8.7, regarding the external posterior direction between before-exercises (37.5 7.2 and after-exercises (44.4 7.4. (P˂0.05. Regarding sense perception of pain by patients, there was significant difference between before-exercises (2.2 0.6 and after-exercises (1.8 0.5, regarding the emotional perception of pain by patients between beforeexercises (1.5 0.3 and after-exercises (1.2 0.3 and on perceiving variety of pain by patients between before- (2.10.8 and after-practices (1.8 0.7 (P˂0.05. From the findings of the present research we can conclude that the hydrotherapy exercises combined with exercises on land can cause to improve the dynamic balance and the pain of patients with knee arthritis; therefore we can recommend it as a modality for these patients.

  12. Effect of Feedback Corrective Exercise on Knee Valgus and Electromyographic Activity of Lower Limb Muscles in Single Leg Squat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Koorosh-fard

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was assessing the effect of feedback correcting exercise in front of mirror during running on frontal plane knee and pelvic kinematic and electromyography activity of some lower extremity muscles in single leg squat (SLS. Materials & Methods: This study was quasi experimental. 23 active female subjects participated in two experimental and control groups with mean age (21.86± 2.43 years .experimental group contains subjects with knee valgus and pelvic drop angle more than a mean plus one standard deviation of the population in functional SLS. Muscular activity (RMS of gluteus maximus, Gluteus medius, rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris and semitendinosus, angle of knee valgus and pelvic drop were register in end of SLS Pre and post of 8 training sessions. Comparing Variable has done with independent t statistical test between 2 groups and pair sample t test within each groups with significant level of 0.05. Results: Statistical analysis Before training showed no significant differences in pelvic drop between two groups (P&ge0.05, but knee valgus angle was significantly more than control group (P&le0.05. In spit that most muscle activities (% MVC except biceps femoris (P&le0.05, were greater in experimental group, no significant difference (P&ge0.05 has seen in two groups. Comparing pre and post test has showed no significant difference in knee valgus of experimental group, however it decreased around 2 degrees and although %MVC decreased in all muscles, just rectuse femoris has shown significant difference (P&le0.05. No significant difference has seen in control group in all variables (P&ge0.05. Conclusion: Findings showed poor neuromuscular control in experimental group which improved to some extent after training because lower muscle activity and energy consumption in specific movement with similar kinematic indicate improvement of motor control or cause learning. It seems that

  13. Effectiveness of acupressure versus isometric exercise on pain, stiffness, and physical function in knee osteoarthritis female patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany S. Sorour

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common form of arthritis and a leading cause of disability in older adults. Conservative non-pharmacological strategies, particularly exercise, are recommended by clinical guidelines for its management. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of acupressure versus isometric exercise on pain, stiffness, and physical function in knee OA female patients. This quasi experimental study was conducted at the inpatient and outpatient sections at Al-kasr Al-Aini hospital, Cairo University. It involved three groups of 30 patients each: isometric exercise, acupressure, and control. Data were collected by an interview form and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC scale. The study revealed high initial scores of pain, stiffness, and impaired physical functioning. After the intervention, pain decreased in the two intervention groups compared to the control group (p < 0.001, while the scores of stiffness and impaired physical function were significantly lower in the isometric group (p < 0.001 compared to the other two groups. The decrease in the total WOMAC score was sharper in the two study groups compared to the control group. In multiple linear regression, the duration of illness was a positive predictor of WOMAC score, whereas the intervention is associated with a reduction in the score. In conclusion, isometric exercise and acupressure provide an improvement of pain, stiffness, and physical function in patients with knee OA. Since isometric exercise leads to more improvement of stiffness and physical function, while acupressure acts better on pain, a combination of both is recommended. The findings need further confirmation through a randomized clinical trial.

  14. The PLE(2)NO self-management and exercise program for knee osteoarthritis: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconcin, Priscila; Espanha, Margarida; Yázigi, Flávia; Campos, Pedro

    2016-06-07

    International recommendations suggest exercise and self-management programs, including non-pharmacological treatments, for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) because they can benefit pain relief and improve function and exercise adherence. The implementation of a combined self-management and exercise program termed PLE(2)NO may be a good method for controlling KOA symptoms because it encourages the development of self-efficacy to manage the pathology. This study will assess the effects of a self-management and exercise program in comparison to an educational intervention (control program) on symptoms, physical fitness, health-related quality of life, self-management behaviors, self-efficacy, physical activity level and coping strategies. This PLE(2)NO study is a single-blinded, randomized controlled trial of elderly (aged above 60 yrs old) patients with clinical and radiographic KOA. The patients will be allocated into either an educational group (control) or a self-management and exercise group (experimental). All participants will receive a supplement of chondroitin and glucosamine sulfates. This paper describes the protocol that will be used in the PLE(2)NO program. This program has several strengths. First, it involves a combination of self-management and exercise approaches, is available in close proximity to the patients and occurs over a short period of time. The latter two characteristics are crucial for maintaining participant adherence. Exercise components will be implemented using low-cost resources that permit their widespread application. Moreover, the program will provide guidance regarding the effectiveness of using a self-management and exercise program to control KOA symptoms and improve self-efficacy and health-related quality of life. NCT02562833 (09/23/2015).

  15. Improvement in upper leg muscle strength underlies beneficial effects of exercise therapy in knee osteoarthritis: secondary analysis from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, J; Steultjens, M P M; Roorda, L D; Lems, W F; van der Esch, M; Thorstensson, C A; Twisk, J W R; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; van der Leeden, M; Dekker, J

    2015-06-01

    Although exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate if improvements in neuromuscular factors (i.e. upper leg muscle strength and knee proprioception) underlie the beneficial effects of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA. Secondary analyses from a randomised controlled trial, with measurements at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 38 weeks. Rehabilitation centre. One hundred and fifty-nine patients diagnosed with knee OA. Exercise therapy. Changes in pain [numeric rating scale (NRS)] and activity limitations [Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) physical function subscale and get-up-and-go test] during the study period. Independent variables were changes in upper leg muscle strength and knee joint proprioception (i.e. motion sense) during the study period. Longitudinal regression analyses (generalised estimating equation) were performed to analyse associations between changes in upper leg muscle strength and knee proprioception with changes in pain and activity limitations. Improved muscle strength was significantly associated with reductions in NRS pain {B coefficient -2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) -3.7 to -1.4], meaning that every change of 1 unit of strength was linked to a change of -2.5 units of pain}, WOMAC physical function (-8.8, 95% CI -13.4 to -4.2) and get-up-and-go test (-1.7, 95% CI -2.4 to -1.0). Improved proprioception was not significantly associated with better outcomes of exercise therapy (P>0.05). Upper leg muscle strengthening is one of the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of low-load exercise on joint pain, function, and activities of daily living in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, Jason; Ripat, Jacquie

    2018-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis has a lifetime risk of nearly one in two, with obese individuals being most susceptible. While exercise is universally recognized as a critical component for management, unsafe or ineffective exercise frequently leads to exacerbation of joint symptoms. Evaluate the effect of a 12week lower body positive pressure (LBPP) supported low-load treadmill walking program on knee pain, joint function, and performance of daily activities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Prospective, observational, repeated measures investigation. Community based, multidisciplinary musculoskeletal medicine clinic. Thirty-one patients, aged 50-75, with a BMI ≥25kg/m 2 and radiographic confirmed mild to moderate knee OA. Twelve week LBPP treadmill walking exercise regimen. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) were used to quantify joint symptoms and patient function; isokinetic thigh muscle strength was evaluated; and a 10-point VAS was used to quantify acute knee pain while walking. Baseline and follow-up data were compared in order to examine the effect of the 12week exercise intervention. There was a significant difference between baseline and follow-up data: KOOS and COPM scores both improved; thigh muscle strength increased; and acute knee pain during full weight bearing walking diminished significantly. Participation in a 12week LBPP supported treadmill walking exercise regimen significantly enhanced patient function and quality of life, as well as the ability to perform activities of daily living that patient's self-identified as being important, yet difficult to perform. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of two physiotherapy booster sessions on outcomes with home exercise in people with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, Kim L; Kyriakides, Mary; Hodges, Paul W; Hinman, Rana S

    2014-11-01

    Enhancing exercise adherence over the longer term is an important goal in self-management of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Following an initial period of more intensive exercise supervision, this study investigated whether 2 additional physiotherapy visits improved outcomes with continued home exercise over a subsequent 24-week period. A total of 78 people with medial knee OA (mean ± SD age 62.1 ± 6.9 years, mean ± SD body mass index 29.4 ± 4.0 kg/m(2) , and radiographic disease severity 19% mild, 49% moderate, and 32% severe) who completed a 12-week physiotherapist-supervised exercise trial were randomly allocated to 2 30-minute physiotherapy booster sessions (delivered by 8 physiotherapists in private clinics) or no booster sessions for the subsequent 24 weeks. All participants were asked to continue home exercises 4 times weekly. Primary outcomes were change in pain, using a 100-mm visual analog scale, and self-reported physical function, measured using the Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. Participants and physiotherapists were unblinded to group allocation, although participants were blinded to the study hypothesis. A total of 74 participants (95%) completed the trial. There was no significant difference between groups for change in pain (mean difference [95% confidence interval (95% CI)] 0.7 mm [-9.4, 8.0]; P = 0.88) or physical function (-0.3 units [95% CI -4.0, 3.5]; P = 0.88). The mean ± SD percentage of home exercise sessions completed was 56% ± 34% in the booster group and 51% ± 37% in the control group (P > 0.05). Two booster sessions with a physiotherapist did not influence pain or physical function outcomes, or measures of home exercise adherence. These findings suggest other more effective strategies are needed to maximize longer-term adherence with the aim to achieve greater improvements in clinical outcomes from exercise in this patient population. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Comparison of erector spinae and hamstring muscle activities and lumbar motion during standing knee flexion in subjects with and without lumbar extension rotation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si-hyun; Kwon, Oh-yun; Park, Kyue-nam; Kim, Moon-Hwan

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the activity of the erector spinae (ES) and hamstring muscles and the amount and onset of lumbar motion during standing knee flexion between individuals with and without lumbar extension rotation syndrome. Sixteen subjects with lumbar extension rotation syndrome (10 males, 6 females) and 14 healthy subjects (8 males, 6 females) participated in this study. During the standing knee flexion, surface electromyography (EMG) was used to measure muscle activity, and surface EMG electrodes were attached to both the ES and hamstring (medial and lateral) muscles. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to measure kinematic data of the lumbar spine. An independent-t test was conducted for the statistical analysis. The group suffering from lumbar extension rotation syndrome exhibited asymmetric muscle activation of the ES and decreased hamstring activity. Additionally, the group with lumbar extension rotation syndrome showed greater and earlier lumbar extension and rotation during standing knee flexion compared to the control group. These data suggest that asymmetric ES muscle activation and a greater amount of and earlier lumbar motion in the sagittal and transverse plane during standing knee flexion may be an important factor contributing to low back pain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of proximally versus distally placed spatially distributed sequential stimulation electrodes in a dynamic knee extension task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Laubacher

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Spatially distributed sequential stimulation (SDSS has demonstrated substantial power output and fatigue benefits compared to single electrode stimulation (SES in the application of functional electrical stimulation (FES. This asymmetric electrode setup brings new possibilities but also new questions since precise placement of the electrodes is one critical factor for good muscle activation. The aim of this study was to compare the power output, fatigue and activation properties of proximally versus distally placed SDSS electrodes in an isokinetic knee extension task simulating knee movement during recumbent cycling. M. vastus lateralis and medialis of seven able-bodied subjects were stimulated with rectangular bi-phasic pulses of constant amplitude of 40 mA and at an SDSS frequency of 35 Hz for 6 min on both legs with both setups (i.e. n=14. Torque was measured during knee-extension movement by a dynamometer at an angular velocity of 110 deg/s. Mean power, peak power and activation time were calculated and compared for the initial and final stimulation phases, together with an overall fatigue index. Power output values (Pmean, Ppeak were scaled to a standardised reference input pulse width of 100 μs (Pmean,s, Ppeak,s. The initial evaluation phase showed no significant differences between the two setups for all outcome measures. Ppeak and Ppeak,s were both significantly higher in the final phase for the distal setup (25.4 ± 8.1 W vs. 28.2 ± 6.2 W, p=0.0062 and 34.8 ± 9.5 W vs. 38.9 ± 6.7 W, p=0.021, respectively. With distal SDSS, there was modest evidence of higher Pmean and Pmean,s (p=0.071, p=0.14, respectively but of longer activation time (p=0.096. The rate of fatigue was similar for both setups. For practical FES applications, distal placement of the SDSS electrodes is preferable.

  20. Effectiveness of acute in-hospital physiotherapy with knee-extension strength training in reducing strength deficits in patients with a hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Lise; Bandholm, Thomas; Palm, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    QUESTION: Is acute in-hospital physiotherapy with additional progressive knee-extension strength training (ST) of the fractured limb more effective in reducing knee-extension strength deficit at follow-up compared to physiotherapy without strength training in patients with a hip fracture? DESIGN......: Assessor blinded, randomised controlled trial with intention-to-treat analysis. PARTICIPANTS: 90 patients with a hip fracture admitted to an acute orthopaedic Hip Fracture Unit at a university hospital between October 2013 and May 2015. INTERVENTION: Daily physiotherapy with or without progressive knee...... strength training from baseline to follow-up. In the per-protocol analysis of non-missing data, significant between-group improvements by 10.5% (95% CI 0.3; 20.7) were found in favour of additional ST. No significant between-group differences were found in any secondary outcome. CONCLUSION: Physiotherapy...

  1. Dynamic knee stability and ballistic knee movement after ACL reconstruction: an application on instep soccer kick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Nuno; Cortes, Nelson; Fernandes, Orlando; Diniz, Ana; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    The instep soccer kick is a pre-programmed ballistic movement with a typical agonist-antagonist coordination pattern. The coordination pattern of the kick can provide insight into deficient neuromuscular control. The purpose of this study was to investigate knee kinematics and hamstrings/quadriceps coordination pattern during the knee ballistic extension phase of the instep kick in soccer players after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL reconstruction). Seventeen players from the Portuguese Soccer League participated in this study. Eight ACL-reconstructed athletes (experimental group) and 9 healthy individuals (control group) performed three instep kicks. Knee kinematics (flexion and extension angles at football contact and maximum velocity instants) were calculated during the kicks. Rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, biceps femoralis, and semitendinosus muscle activations were quantified during the knee extension phase. The ACL-reconstructed group had significantly lower knee extension angle (-1.2 ± 1.6, p ballistic control movement pattern between normal and ACL-reconstructed subjects. Performing open kinetic chain exercises using ballistic movements can be beneficial when recovering from ACL reconstruction. The exercises should focus on achieving multi-joint coordination and full knee extension (range of motion). III.

  2. Exercise increases interleukin-10 levels both intraarticularly and peri-synovially in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmark, Ida C; Mikkelsen, Ulla R; Børglum, Jens

    2010-01-01

    The microdialysis method was applied to the human knee joint with osteoarthritis (OA) in order to reveal changes in biochemical markers of cartilage and inflammation, intraarticularly and in the synovium, in response to a single bout of mechanical joint loading.......The microdialysis method was applied to the human knee joint with osteoarthritis (OA) in order to reveal changes in biochemical markers of cartilage and inflammation, intraarticularly and in the synovium, in response to a single bout of mechanical joint loading....

  3. Effects of a cross-training exercise program in persons with osteoarthritis of the knee a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péloquin, L; Bravo, G; Gauthier, P; Lacombe, G; Billiard, J S

    1999-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate, by means of a randomized controlled trial, the effects of a physical activity program incorporating aerobic, strength, and stretching exercises in individuals with osteoarthritis of the knee. We randomly assigned 137 volunteers ages >/=50 to an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group participated in three 1-hour sessions of supervised exercises per week over a 3-month period. The control participants were instructed to continue their usual daily activities, and they attended 1-hour education sessions twice a month. The effectiveness of the program was evaluated using repeated measurements of parameters related to self-reported health status, physical capacity, and joint tenderness.After 3 months, significantly greater improvements were observed in the experimental group than the control group in terms of: arthritis pain (p = 0.02), ability to walk and bend (p = 0.03), aerobic capacity (p hamstring and low back flexibility (p = 0.003), quadriceps and hamstring strength (p == 0.05), joint tenderness (p = 0.18), and health perception (p = 0.7). The overall results suggest that this program is effective for older persons with osteoarthritis of the knee and that it could contribute to maintaining their independence and improving their quality of life.

  4. Is the modified Tardieu scale in semi-standing position better associated with knee extension and hamstring activity in terminal swing than the supine Tardieu?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, I.R.; Nienhuis, B.; Rijs, N.P.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the modified Tardieu scale (MTS) in a semi-standing position, used for the assessment of hamstrings spasticity, was better associated with knee extension and hamstrings activity in terminal swing than the MTS in a supine position in children with

  5. The effect on knee-joint load of instruction in analgesic use compared with neuromuscular exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Brian; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Søndergaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    , compared with optimized analgesics and antiinflammatory drug use, on the measures of knee-joint load in people with mild to moderate medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis. METHOD/DESIGN: One hundred men and women with mild to moderate medial knee osteoarthritis will be recruited from general medical...... during walking (the Knee Index, a composite score of the first external peak total reaction moment on the knee joint from all three planes based on 3D movement analysis) after 8 weeks of intervention. Secondary outcomes include changes in the external peak knee-adduction moment and impulse and functional...

  6. Hamstring Muscle Use in Females During Hip-Extension and the Nordic Hamstring Exercise: An fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Daniel J; Bourne, Matthew N; Williams, Morgan D; Al Najjar, Aiman; Shield, Anthony J

    2018-04-23

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Background Understanding hamstring muscle activation patterns in resistance training exercises may have implications for the design of strength training and injury prevention programs. Unfortunately, surface electromyography studies have reported conflicting results with regard to hamstring muscle activation patterns in women. Objectives To determine the spatial patterns of hamstring muscle activity during the 45º hip-extension and Nordic hamstring exercises, in females using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods Six recreationally active females with no history of lower limb injury underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on both thighs before and immediately after 5 sets of 6 bilateral eccentric contractions of the 45º hip-extension or Nordic exercises. Using fMRI, the transverse (T2) relaxation times were measured from pre- and post- exercise scans and the percentage increase in T2 was used as an index of muscle activation. Results fMRI revealed a significantly higher biceps femoris long head (BF LongHead ) to semitendinosus ratio during the 45° hip-extension than the Nordic exercise (P = .028). The T2 increase after 45° hip-extension was greater for BF LongHead (P Nordic exercise, the T2 increase for semitendinosus was greater than that of BF ShortHead (P Nordic exercise preferentially recruits that muscle while the hip extension more evenly activates all of the biarticular hamstrings. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 23 Apr 2018. doi:10.2519/jospt.2018.7748.

  7. Position controlled Knee Rehabilitation Orthotic Device for Patients after Total Knee Replacement Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannaphan, Patsiri; Chanthasopeephan, Teeranoot

    2016-11-01

    Knee rehabilitation after total knee replacement arthroplasty is essential for patients during their post-surgery recovery period. This study is about designing one degree of freedom knee rehabilitation equipment to assist patients for their post-surgery exercise. The equipment is designed to be used in sitting position with flexion/extension of knee in sagittal plane. The range of knee joint motion is starting from 0 to 90 degrees angle for knee rehabilitation motion. The feature includes adjustable link for different human proportions and the torque feedback control at knee joint during rehabilitation and the control of flexion/extension speed. The motion of the rehabilitation equipment was set to move at low speed (18 degrees/sec) for knee rehabilitation. The rehabilitation link without additional load took one second to move from vertical hanging up to 90° while the corresponding torque increased from 0 Nm to 2 Nm at 90°. When extra load is added, the link took 1.5 seconds to move to 90° The torque is then increased from 0 Nm to 4 Nm. After a period of time, the speed of the motion can be varied. User can adjust the motion to 40 degrees/sec during recovery activity of the knee and users can increase the level of exercise or motion up to 60 degrees/sec to strengthen the muscles during throughout their rehabilitation program depends on each patient. Torque control is included to prevent injury. Patients can use the equipment for home exercise to help reduce the number of hospital visit while the patients can receive an appropriate therapy for their knee recovery program.

  8. No effects of functional exercise therapy on walking biomechanics in patients with knee osteoarthritis: exploratory outcome analyses from a randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Henriksen, Marius; Klokker, Louise; Bartholdy, Cecilie; Schjoedt-Jorgensen, Tanja; Bandak, Elisabeth; Bliddal, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Aim To assess the effects of a functional and individualised exercise programme on gait biomechanics during walking in people with knee OA. Methods Sixty participants were randomised to 12 weeks of facility-based functional and individualised neuromuscular exercise therapy (ET), 3 sessions per week supervised by trained physical therapists, or a no attention control group (CG). Three-dimensional gait analyses were used, from which a comprehensive list of conventional gait variables were extra...

  9. Design of a wearable hand exoskeleton for exercising flexion/extension of the fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Inseong; Lee, Jeongsoo; Park, Yeongyu; Bae, Joonbum

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, design of a wearable hand exoskeleton system for exercising flexion/extension of the fingers, is proposed. The exoskeleton was designed with a simple and wearable structure to aid finger motions in 1 degree of freedom (DOF). A hand grasping experiment by fully-abled people was performed to investigate general hand flexion/extension motions and the polynomial curve of general hand motions was obtained. To customize the hand exoskeleton for the user, the polynomial curve was adjusted to the joint range of motion (ROM) of the user and the optimal design of the exoskeleton structure was obtained using the optimization algorithm. A prototype divided into two parts (one part for the thumb, the other for rest fingers) was actuated by only two linear motors for compact size and light weight.

  10. Effect of Home Exercise Program Performance in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee or the Spine on the Visual Analog Scale after Discharge from Physical Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hamilton; Onishi, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the effect of the frequency of home exercise program (HEP) performance on pain [10-point visual analog scale (VAS)] in patients with osteoarthritis of the spine or knee after more than 6 months discharge from physical therapy (PT). We performed a retrospective chart review of 48 adult patients with a clinical…

  11. Improvements in force variability and structure from vision- to memory-guided submaximal isometric knee extension in subacute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, John W; Stokic, Dobrivoje S

    2018-03-01

    We examined changes in variability, accuracy, frequency composition, and temporal regularity of force signal from vision-guided to memory-guided force-matching tasks in 17 subacute stroke and 17 age-matched healthy subjects. Subjects performed a unilateral isometric knee extension at 10, 30, and 50% of peak torque [maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)] for 10 s (3 trials each). Visual feedback was removed at the 5-s mark in the first two trials (feedback withdrawal), and 30 s after the second trial the subjects were asked to produce the target force without visual feedback (force recall). The coefficient of variation and constant error were used to quantify force variability and accuracy. Force structure was assessed by the median frequency, relative spectral power in the 0-3-Hz band, and sample entropy of the force signal. At 10% MVC, the force signal in subacute stroke subjects became steadier, more broadband, and temporally more irregular after the withdrawal of visual feedback, with progressively larger error at higher contraction levels. Also, the lack of modulation in the spectral frequency at higher force levels with visual feedback persisted in both the withdrawal and recall conditions. In terms of changes from the visual feedback condition, the feedback withdrawal produced a greater difference between the paretic, nonparetic, and control legs than the force recall. The overall results suggest improvements in force variability and structure from vision- to memory-guided force control in subacute stroke despite decreased accuracy. Different sensory-motor memory retrieval mechanisms seem to be involved in the feedback withdrawal and force recall conditions, which deserves further study. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We demonstrate that in the subacute phase of stroke, force signals during a low-level isometric knee extension become steadier, more broadband in spectral power, and more complex after removal of visual feedback. Larger force errors are produced when recalling

  12. The Effects of Traditional Chinese Exercise in Treating Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjie Zhang

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese exercise (TCE includes a variety of exercise, which is being accepted by more and more people in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis (OA from different countries. With the attendant, many clinical reports focus on it. Our meta-analysis aimed to systematically assess the effects of traditional Chinese exercise on pain, stiffness, physical function, quality of life, mental health and adverse events in people with knee osteoarthritis.PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, the Web of Science, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM were searched from the time of their inception through April 2016 and risk of bias was independently assessed by two authors. Outcome measures included pain, physical functional, joint stiffness, quality of life, mental health and safety. For pooled outcomes, standardized mean differences (SMD and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated.Eight randomized controlled trials with a sample size of 375 cases met the criteria to be included in the study indicating that high quality literature is lacking in this field. Results of the meta-analysis showed that short-term TCE could relieve pain (SMD: -0.77;95% CI: -1.13 to -0.41; P<0.0001, improve physical function (SMD -0.75; 95% CI: -0.98 to -0.52; P<0.00001, and alleviate stiffness (SMD: -0.56; 95%: CI -0.96 to -0.16; P<0.006, but had no significant effect on quality of life (SMD: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.17 to 0.97; P = 0.005, and mental health (SMD 4.12; 95% CI: -0.50 to 8.73; P = 0.08. Moreover, TCE was not associated with serious adverse events.Our systematic review revealed that short-term TCE was potentially beneficial in terms of reducing pain, improving physical function and alleviating stiffness. These results may suggest that TCE could prove useful as an adjuvant treatment for patients with knee OA. Further studies are urgently needed to confirm these results.

  13. Managing knee osteoarthritis with yoga or aerobic/strengthening exercise programs in older adults: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Corjena; Wyman, Jean F; Bronas, Ulf; McCarthy, Teresa; Rudser, Kyle; Mathiason, Michelle A

    2017-03-01

    Although exercise is often recommended for managing osteoarthritis (OA), limited evidence-based exercise options are available for older adults with OA. This study compared the effects of Hatha yoga (HY) and aerobic/strengthening exercises (ASE) on knee OA. Randomized controlled trial with three arms design was used: HY, ASE, and education control. Both HY and ASE groups involved 8 weekly 45-min group classes with 2-4 days/week home practice sessions. Control group received OA education brochures and weekly phone calls from study staff. Standardized instruments were used to measure OA symptoms, physical function, mood, spiritual health, fear of falling, and quality of life at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. HY/ASE adherences were assessed weekly using class attendance records and home practice video recordings. Primary analysis of the difference in the change from baseline was based on intent-to-treat and adjusted for baseline values. Eight-three adults with symptomatic knee OA completed the study (84% female; mean age 71.6 ± 8.0 years; mean BMI 29.0 ± 7.0 kg/m 2 ). Retention rate was 82%. Compared to the ASE group at 8 weeks, participants in the HY group had a significant improvement from baseline in perception of OA symptoms (-9.6 [95% CI -15.3, -4]; p = .001), anxiety (-1.4 [95% CI -2.7, -0]; p = .04), and fear of falling (-4.6 [-7.5, -1.7]; p = .002). There were no differences in class/home practice adherence between HY and ASE. Three non-serious adverse events were reported from the ASE group. Both HY and ASE improved symptoms and function but HY may have superior benefits for older adults with knee OA. Trial registration The full trial protocol is available at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02525341).

  14. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... legs to touch the wall, keeping hips and knees bent. Use your hips to push your body ... Abdominal Exercise Lay on your back with both knees bent. Draw abdominal wall in. Maintaining abdominal wall ...

  15. Barriers and Facilitators to Exercise Participation in People with Hip and/or Knee Osteoarthritis: Synthesis of the Literature Using Behavior Change Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Fiona; Bennell, Kim L; French, Simon D; Nicolson, Philippa J A; Klaasman, Remco N; Holden, Melanie A; Atkins, Lou; Hinman, Rana S

    2016-05-01

    Exercise is recommended for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). Patient initiation of, and adherence to, exercise is key to the success of managing symptoms. This study aimed to (1) identify modifiable barriers and facilitators to participation in intentional exercise in hip and/or knee OA, and (2) synthesize findings using behavior change theory. A scoping review with systematic searches was conducted through March 2015. Two reviewers screened studies for eligibility. Barriers and facilitators were extracted and synthesized according to the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) by two independent reviewers. Twenty-three studies (total of 4633 participants) were included. The greatest number of unique barriers and facilitators mapped to the Environmental Context and Resources domain. Many barriers were related to Beliefs about Consequences and Beliefs about Capabilities, whereas many facilitators were related to Reinforcement. Clinicians should take a proactive role in facilitating exercise uptake and adherence, rather than trusting patients to independently overcome barriers to exercise. Strategies that may be useful include a personalized approach to exercise prescription, considering environmental context and available resources, personalized education about beneficial consequences of exercise and reassurance about exercise capability, and use of reinforcement strategies. Future research should investigate the effectiveness of behavior change interventions that specifically target these factors.

  16. Role of melatonin combined with exercise as a switch-like regulator for circadian behavior in advanced osteoarthritic knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yunkyung; Kim, Hyunsoo; Lee, Seunghoon; Jin, Yunho; Choi, Jeonghyun; Lee, Sang-Rae; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2017-11-14

    Here, we show the role of melatonin combined with or without exercise as a determinant of multicellular behavior in osteoarthritis. We address the relationship between the molecular components governing local circadian clock and changes in the osteoarthritic musculoskeletal axis. Melatonin was injected subcutaneously in animals with advanced knee osteoarthritis (OA) for 4 weeks. Concurrently, moderate treadmill exercise was applied for 30 min/day. Morphometric, histological, and gene/protein-level analyses were performed in the cartilage, synovium, bone, and gastrocnemius muscle. Primary cultured chondrocytes repeatedly exposed to TNF-α were used in an in vitro study. The symptoms of OA include gait disturbance, osteophyte formation, and abnormal metabolism of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the cartilage. Low-level expression of clock genes was accompanied by aberrant changes in cartilage specimens. Nanomolar doses of melatonin restored the expression of clock-controlled genes and corrected the abnormal chondrocyte phenotype. Melatonin combined with or without exercise prevented periarticular muscle damage as well as cartilage degeneration. But prolonged melatonin administration promoted the proteolytic cleavage of RANKL protein in the synovium, leading to severe subchondral bone erosion. These musculoskeletal changes apparently occurred via the regulation of molecular clock components, suggesting a role of melatonin as a switch-like regulator for the OA phenotype.

  17. Group education and exercise is feasible in knee and hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Odgaard, Anders; Rasmussen, Jens Ole

    2012-01-01

    Clinical practice does not reflect current clinical guidelines recommending an early multimodal non-surgical treatment for knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of such an initiative (Good Life with osteoArthritis in Denmark (GLA:D) in persons...

  18. Chronic medial knee pain without history of prior trauma: correlation of pain at rest and during exercise using bone scintigraphy and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, Florian M.; Hoffmann, Alexander; Hofer, Bernhard; Allgayer, Bernhard; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to correlate chronic medial knee pain at rest and during exercise with bone scintigraphic uptake, bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP), cartilage lesions, meniscal tears, and collateral ligament pathologies on magnetic resonance MR imaging (MRI). Fifty consecutive patients with chronic medial knee pain seen at our institute were included in our study. Pain level at rest and during exercise was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). On MR images, BMEP volume was measured, and the integrity of femoro-tibial cartilage, medial meniscus, and medial collateral ligament (MCL) were assessed. Semiquantitative scintigraphic tracer uptake was measured. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed. At the day of examination, 40 patients reported medial knee pain at rest, 49 when climbing stairs (at rest mean VAS 33 mm, range 0-80 mm; climbing stairs mean VAS, 60 mm, range 20-100 mm). Bone scintigraphy showed increased tracer uptake in 36 patients (uptake factor, average 3.7, range 2.4-18.0). MRI showed BMEP in 31 studies (mean volume, 4,070 mm 3 ; range, 1,200-39,200 mm 3 ). All patients with BMEP had abnormal bone scintigraphy. Ten percent of patients with pain at rest and 8% of patients with pain during exercise showed no BMEP but tracer uptake in scintigraphy. Tracer uptake and signal change around MCL predicted pain at rest significantly (tracer uptake p=0.004; MCL signal changes p=0.002). Only MCL signal changes predicted pain during exercise significantly (p=0.001). In chronic medial knee pain, increased tracer uptake in bone scintigraphy is more sensitive for medial knee pain than BMEP on MRI. Pain levels at rest and during exercise correlate with signal changes in and around the MCL. (orig.)

  19. Statistical mapping of the effect of knee extension on thigh muscle viscoelastic properties using magnetic resonance elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnhill, Eric; Kennedy, Paul; Van Beek, Edwin J R; Roberts, Neil; Hammer, Steven; Brown, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle viscoelastic properties reflect muscle microstructure and neuromuscular activation. Elastographic methods, including magnetic resonance elastography, have been used to characterize muscle viscoelastic properties in terms of region of interest (ROI) measurements. The present study extended this approach to create thresholded pixel-by-pixel maps of viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscle during rest and knee extension in eleven subjects. ROI measurements were taken for individual quadricep muscles and the quadriceps region as a whole, and the viscoelastic parameter map pixels were statistically tested at positive false discovery rate q ⩽ 0.25. ROI measurements showed significant (p ⩽ 0.05) increase in storage modulus (G′) and loss modulus (G″), with G″ increasing more than G′, in agreement with previous findings. The q-value maps further identified the vastus intermedius as the primary driver of this change, with greater G″/G′ increase than surrounding regions. Additionally, a cluster of significant decrease in G″/G′ was found in the region of vastus lateralis below the fulcrum point of the lift. Viscoelastic parameter mapping of contracted muscle allows new insight into the relationship between physiology, neuromuscular activation, and human performance. (paper)

  20. Progressive strength training (10 RM) commenced immediately after fast-track total knee arthroplasty: is it feasible?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Husted, Henrik; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    . They received rehabilitation including progressive strength training of the operated leg (leg press and knee-extension), using relative loads of 10 repetition maximum with three training sessions per week for 2 weeks. Rehabilitation was commenced 1 or 2 days after TKA. At each training session, knee pain, knee...... joint effusion and training load were recorded. Isometric knee-extension strength and maximal walking speed were measured before the first and last session. Results: The training load increased progressively (p training exercises......, but knee pain at rest and knee joint effusion (p training sessions. Isometric knee-extension strength and maximal walking speed increased by 147 and 112%, respectively. Conclusion: Progressive strength training initiated immediately after TKA seems feasible...

  1. Estimating Neural Control from Concentric vs. Eccentric Surface Electromyographic Representations during Fatiguing, Cyclic Submaximal Back Extension Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerold R. Ebenbichler

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the differences in neural control of back muscles activated during the eccentric vs. the concentric portions of a cyclic, submaximal, fatiguing trunk extension exercise via the analysis of amplitude and time-frequency parameters derived from surface electromyographic (SEMG data.Methods: Using back dynamometers, 87 healthy volunteers performed three maximum voluntary isometric trunk extensions (MVC's, an isometric trunk extension at 80% MVC, and 25 cyclic, dynamic trunk extensions at 50% MVC. Dynamic testing was performed with the trunk angular displacement ranging from 0° to 40° and the trunk angular velocity set at 20°/s. SEMG data was recorded bilaterally from the iliocostalis lumborum at L1, the longissimus dorsi at L2, and the multifidus muscles at L5. The initial value and slope of the root mean square (RMS-SEMG and the instantaneous median frequency (IMDF-SEMG estimates derived from the SEMG recorded during each exercise cycle were used to investigate the differences in MU control marking the eccentric vs. the concentric portions of the exercise.Results: During the concentric portions of the exercise, the initial RMS-SEMG values were almost twice those observed during the eccentric portions of the exercise. The RMS-SEMG values generally increased during the concentric portions of the exercise while they mostly remained unchanged during the eccentric portions of the exercise with significant differences between contraction types. Neither the initial IMDF-SEMG values nor the time-course of the IMDF-SEMG values significantly differed between the eccentric and the concentric portions of the exercise.Conclusions: The comparison of the investigated SEMG parameters revealed distinct neural control strategies during the eccentric vs. the concentric portions of the cyclic exercise. We explain these differences by relying upon the principles of orderly recruitment and common drive governing motor unit behavior.

  2. A physiotherapist-delivered integrated exercise and pain coping skills training intervention for individuals with knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennell Kim L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA is a prevalent chronic musculoskeletal condition with no cure. Pain is the primary symptom and results from a complex interaction between structural changes, physical impairments and psychological factors. Much evidence supports the use of strengthening exercises to improve pain and physical function in this patient population. There is also a growing body of research examining the effects of psychologist-delivered pain coping skills training (PCST particularly in other chronic pain conditions. Though typically provided separately, there are symptom, resource and personnel advantages of exercise and PCST being delivered together by a single healthcare professional. Physiotherapists are a logical choice to be trained to deliver a PCST intervention as they already have expertise in administering exercise for knee OA and are cognisant of the need for a biopsychosocial approach to management. No studies to date have examined the effects of an integrated exercise and PCST program delivered solely by physiotherapists in this population. The primary aim of this multisite randomised controlled trial is to investigate whether an integrated 12-week PCST and exercise treatment program delivered by physiotherapists is more efficacious than either program alone in treating pain and physical function in individuals with knee OA. Methods/design This will be an assessor-blinded, 3-arm randomised controlled trial of a 12-week intervention involving 10 physiotherapy visits together with home practice. Participants with symptomatic and radiographic knee OA will be recruited from the community in two cities in Australia and randomized into one of three groups: exercise alone, PCST alone, or integrated PCST and exercise. Randomisation will be stratified by city (Melbourne or Brisbane and gender. Primary outcomes are overall average pain in the past week measured by a Visual Analogue Scale and physical function measured by

  3. Nonparetic Knee Extensor Strength Is the Determinant of Exercise Capacity of Community-Dwelling Stroke Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei-Te; Huang, Ling-Tzu; Chou, Ya-Hui; Wei, Ta-Sen; Lin, Chung-Che

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship among walking speed, exercise capacity, and leg strength in community dwelling stroke subjects and to evaluate which one was the leading determinant factor of them. Design. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. Thirty-five chronic stroke patients who were able to walk independently in their community were enrolled. Walking speed was evaluated by using the 12-meter walking test. A maximal exercise test was used to determine the stroke subjects...

  4. The Ottawa panel clinical practice guidelines for the management of knee osteoarthritis. Part one: introduction, and mind-body exercise programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Taki, Jade; Desjardins, Brigit; Thevenot, Odette; Fransen, Marlene; Wells, George A; Imoto, Aline Mizusaki; Toupin-April, Karine; Westby, Marie; Gallardo, Inmaculada C Álvarez; Gifford, Wendy; Laferrière, Lucie; Rahman, Prinon; Loew, Laurianne; Angelis, Gino De; Cavallo, Sabrina; Shallwani, Shirin Mehdi; Aburub, Ala'; Bennell, Kim L; Van der Esch, Martin; Simic, Milena; McConnell, Sara; Harmer, Alison; Kenny, Glen P; Paterson, Gail; Regnaux, Jean-Philippe; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; McLean, Linda

    2017-05-01

    To identify effective mind-body exercise programs and provide clinicians and patients with updated, high-quality recommendations concerning non-traditional land-based exercises for knee osteoarthritis. A systematic search and adapted selection criteria included comparative controlled trials with mind-body exercise programs for patients with knee osteoarthritis. A panel of experts reached consensus on the recommendations using a Delphi survey. A hierarchical alphabetical grading system (A, B, C+, C, D, D+, D-) was used, based on statistical significance ( P osteoarthritis. Hatha Yoga demonstrated significant improvement for pain relief (Grade B) and physical function (Grade C+). Tai Chi Qigong demonstrated significant improvement for quality of life (Grade B), pain relief (Grade C+) and physical function (Grade C+). Sun style Tai Chi gave significant improvement for pain relief (Grade B) and physical function (Grade B). Mind-body exercises are promising approaches to reduce pain, as well as to improve physical function and quality of life for individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

  5. Effects of therapeutic exercise and hydrotherapy on pain severity and knee range of motion in patients with hemophilia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloum, Vahid; Rahnama, Nader; Khayambashi, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Pain and limited range of motion (ROM) are the crucial subsequent results of joint hemorrhages in individuals with bleeding disorders and hemophilia. Exercise interventions are particularly recommended in treatment of such patients. The purpose of this study was to detect the influences of conventional exercise therapy and hydrotherapy on the knee joint complications in patients with hemophilia. A total of 40 patients engaging hemophilia A were randomized into one of three groups: Therapeutic exercise (N = 13), hydrotherapy (N = 14) or control (N = 13). While the first two groups followed their specific programs for 4 weeks, routine life-style was maintained by subjects in the control group in this period. To evaluate the pain level and knee ROM the visual analog scale and standard goniometer were utilized, respectively. The outcome was measured at baseline and after completing the prescribed protocols. Data analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance and Scheffe statistical tests (P hydrotherapy in comparison to exercise therapy, the difference in ROM improvement was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Using hydrotherapy in addition to usual rehabilitation training can result in beneficial effect in terms of pain and knee joint ROM. However, it appears that hydrotherapy is more effective in reducing pain.

  6. Subgrouping and TargetEd Exercise pRogrammes for knee and hip OsteoArthritis (STEER OA): a systematic review update and individual participant data meta-analysis protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holden, M.A.; Burke, D.L.; Runhaar, J.; Windt, D. van der; Riley, R.D.; Dziedzic, K.; Legha, A.; Evans, A.L.; Abbott, J.H.; Baker, K.; Brown, J.; Bennell, K.L.; Bossen, D.; Brosseau, L.; Chaipinyo, K.; Christensen, R.; Cochrane, T; Rooij, M. de; Doherty, M.; French, H.P.; Hickson, S.; Hinman, R.S.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Hurley, M.V.; Ingram, C.; Knoop, J.; Krauss, I.; McCarthy, C.; Messier, S.P.; Patrick, D.L.; Sahin, N.; Talbot, L.A.; Taylor, R.; Teirlinck, C.H.; Middelkoop, M. van; Walker, C.; Foster, N.E.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Therapeutic exercise is a recommended core treatment for people with knee and hip OA, however, the observed effect sizes for reducing pain and improving physical function are small to moderate. This may be due

  7. Subgrouping and TargetEd Exercise pRogrammes for knee and hip OsteoArthritis (STEER OA): a systematic review update and individual participant data meta-analysis protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holden, Melanie A.; Burke, Danielle L.; Runhaar, Jos; van der Windt, Danielle; Riley, Richard D.; Dziedzic, Krysia; Legha, Amardeep; Evans, Amy L.; Abbott, J. Haxby; Baker, Kristin; Brown, Jenny; Bennell, Kim L.; Bossen, Daniel; Brosseau, Lucie; Chaipinyo, Kanda; Christensen, Robin; Cochrane, Tom; de Rooij, Mariette; Doherty, Michael; French, Helen P.; Hickson, Sheila; Hinman, Rana S.; Hopman-Rock, Marijke; Hurley, Michael V.; Ingram, Carol; Knoop, Jesper; Krauss, Inga; McCarthy, Chris; Messier, Stephen P.; Patrick, Donald L.; Sahin, Nilay; Talbot, Laura A.; Taylor, Robert; Teirlinck, Carolien H.; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Walker, Christine; Foster, Nadine E.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Therapeutic exercise is a recommended core treatment for people with knee and hip OA, however, the observed effect sizes for reducing pain and improving physical function are small to moderate. This may be due

  8. Nordic hamstring exercise training alters knee joint kinematics and hamstring activation patterns in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunt, Eamonn; McGroarty, Mark; De Vito, Giuseppe; Ditroilo, Massimiliano

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the kinematic and muscle activation adaptations during performance of the Nordic hamstring exercise (NHE) to a 6-week eccentric hamstring training programme using the NHE as the sole mode of exercise. Twenty-nine healthy males were randomly allocated to a control (CG) or intervention (IG) group. The IG participated in a 6-week eccentric hamstring exercise programme using the NHE. The findings of the present study were that a 6-week eccentric hamstring training programme improved eccentric hamstring muscle strength (202.4 vs. 177.4 nm, p = 0.0002, Cohen's d = 0.97) and optimized kinematic (longer control of the forward fall component of the NHE, 68.1° vs. 73.7°, p = 0.022, Cohen's d = 0.90) and neuromuscular parameters (increased electromyographic activity of the hamstrings, 83.2 vs. 56.6 % and 92.0 vs. 54.2 %, p 1.25) associated with NHE performance. This study provides some insight into potential mechanisms by which an eccentric hamstring exercise programme utilizing the NHE as the mode of exercise may result in an improvement in hamstring muscle control during eccentric contractions.

  9. Effectiveness of Hamstring Knee Rehabilitation Exercise Performed in Training Machine vs. Elastic Resistance Electromyography Evaluation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, M. D.; Sundstrup, E.; Andersen, C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate muscle activity during hamstring rehabilitation exercises performed in training machine compared with elastic resistance. Design Six women and 13 men aged 28-67 yrs participated in a crossover study. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded...... inclinometers. Results Training machines and elastic resistance showed similar high levels of muscle activity (biceps femoris and semitendinosus peak normalized EMG >80%). EMG during the concentric phase was higher than during the eccentric phase regardless of exercise and muscle. However, compared with machine.......001) during hamstring curl performed with elastic resistance (7.58 +/- 0.08) compared with hamstring curl performed in a machine (5.92 +/- 0.03). Conclusions Hamstring rehabilitation exercise performed with elastic resistance induces similar peak hamstring muscle activity but slightly lower EMG values at more...

  10. Exercise & NSAID: Effect on muscle protein synthesis in knee osteoarthritis patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, S.G.; Miller, Ben F; Hansen, M

    2011-01-01

    the contralateral leg remained rested. Twenty-four hours after exercise, we determined circulating concentrations of inflammatory parameters and measured FSR of myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein fractions of vastus lateralis muscle and patellar tendon collagen protein by the direct incorporation method using...... a flooding dose of 13C/12C-proline.RESULTS:Circulating levels of prostaglandin F2α were lower in the NSAID group compared with the placebo group (P effect of exercise on FSR in muscle myofibrillar (P = 0.003) and sarcoplasmic protein (P = 0.026) but not in tendon...... collagen protein (P = 0.52). No overall significant effect of the drug was seen on either of the tissue protein fractions (P > 0.05) or on the interaction between the drug and exercise on FSR in tendon collagen (P = 0.21), muscle myofibrillar (P = 0.68), or sarcoplasmic protein, FSR (P = 0.16).CONCLUSION...

  11. Immediate efficacy of neuromuscular exercise in patients with severe osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a secondary analysis from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadsen, Allan; Overgaard, Søren; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Christensen, Robin; Roos, Ewa M

    2014-07-01

    Knowledge about the effects of exercise in severe and endstage osteoarthritis (OA) is limited. The aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a neuromuscular exercise program in patients with clinically severe hip or knee OA. This was a randomized controlled assessor-blinded trial. Patients received an educational package (care-as-usual) only, or care-as-usual plus an 8-week neuromuscular exercise intervention (NEMEX-TJR). NEMEX-TJR was supervised by a physiotherapist, twice weekly for 1 h. The primary outcome was Activities of Daily Living (ADL) subscale from the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. The secondary outcomes were the HOOS/KOOS subscales Pain, Symptoms, Sport and Recreation, and Joint-related Quality of Life. Exploratory outcomes were functional performance measures and lower limb muscle power. Included were 165 patients, 56% female, average age 67 years (SD ± 8), and a body mass index of 30 (SD ± 5), who were scheduled for primary hip or knee replacement. The postintervention difference between mean changes in ADL was 7.2 points (95% CI 3.5 to 10.9, p = 0.0002) in favor of NEMEX-TJR compared with control. Second, there were statistically significant differences between groups in favor of NEMEX-TJR on all self-reported outcomes and most functional performance tests (walk, chair stands, and 1-leg knee bends). Stratified analyses according to joint revealed moderate effect size for ADL for hip patients (0.63, 95% CI 0.26 to 1.00). Corresponding effect size for knee patients was small (0.23 95% CI -0.14 to 0.60). Feasibility of neuromuscular exercise was confirmed in patients about to have total joint replacement. Self-reported activities of daily living and objective performance were improved and pain reduced immediately following 8 weeks of neuromuscular exercise. While the effects were moderate in hip OA, they were only small in knee OA. Clinical

  12. Motor units in vastus lateralis and in different vastus medialis regions show different firing properties during low-level, isometric knee extension contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Leonardo Mendes Leal; Cabral, Hélio Veiga; de Oliveira, Liliam Fernandes; Vieira, Taian Martins

    2018-04-01

    Architectural differences along vastus medialis (VM) and between VM and vastus lateralis (VL) are considered functionally important for the patellar tracking, knee joint stability and knee joint extension. Whether these functional differences are associated with a differential activity of motor units between VM and VL is however unknown. In the present study, we, therefore, investigate neuroanatomical differences in the activity of motor units detected proximo-distally from VM and from the VL muscle. Nine healthy volunteers performed low-level isometric knee extension contractions (20% of their maximum voluntary contraction) following a trapezoidal trajectory. Surface electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded from VM proximal and distal regions and from VL using three linear adhesive arrays of eight electrodes. The firing rate and recruitment threshold of motor units decomposed from EMGs were then compared among muscle regions. Results show that VL motor units reached lower mean firing rates in comparison with VM motor units, regardless of their position within VM (P motor units (P = .997). Furthermore, no significant differences in the recruitment threshold were observed for all motor units analysed (P = .108). Our findings possibly suggest the greater potential of VL to generate force, due to its fibres arrangement, may account for the lower discharge rate observed for VL then either proximally or distally detected motor units in VM. Additionally, the present study opens new perspectives on the importance of considering muscle architecture in investigations of the neural aspects of motor behaviour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Association Between Exercise Therapy Dose and Functional Improvements in the Early Postoperative Phase After Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Astrid; Hendrich, Simon; Pfeifer, Klaus

    2015-10-01

    To determine whether intensity and duration of standard exercise therapy are associated with changes in function after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Prospective cohort study. Orthopedic inpatient rehabilitation center. A total of 123 patients 2 weeks after THA (n = 58; age, 62.5 ± 10.4 years) and TKA (n = 65; age, 66.6 ± 7.6 years). Standard rehabilitation (hands-on physiotherapy, group exercise therapy, strength training, cycle ergometer therapy, continuous passive motion therapy, and water exercise therapy). The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) and hip and knee range of motion (ROM) were assessed before and after inpatient rehabilitation. The individual rehabilitation period varied between 12-25 days and included 48.1 ± 12.5 (THA) or 41.9 ± 9.7 (TKA) exercise interventions with intensities between 9.6 and 14.0 points on the Borg Rate of Perceived Exertion Scale. WOMAC pain (P hip (P < .001) and knee (P < .001) ROM, improved significantly in THA and TKA patients. Analysis of covariance showed that these changes could not be explained by the total duration or mean intensity of exercise therapy. The findings show a low dose-response relationship between early postoperative exercise therapy and the improvements in function or ROM after THA and TKA. Although the findings raise questions about the efficacy of existing rehabilitation programs, the small sample size, single setting, and geographic differences in postoperative treatment standards limit the generalizability of findings. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Periosteal Electrical Dry Needling as an Adjunct to Exercise and Manual Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Multi-Center Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, James; Butts, Raymond; Young, Ian; Mourad, Firas; Galante, Victoria; Bliton, Paul; Tanner, Michelle; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2018-05-28

    To compare the effects of adding electrical dry needling into a manual therapy and exercise program on pain, stiffness, function, and disability in individuals with painful knee osteoarthritis (OA). Two hundred and forty-two participants (n=242) with painful knee OA were randomized to receive 6 weeks of electrical dry needling, manual therapy and exercise (n=121) or manual therapy and exercise (n=121). The primary outcome was related-disability as assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index at 3 months. Individuals receiving the combination of electrical dry needling, manual therapy and exercise experienced significantly greater improvements in related-disability (WOMAC: F=35.504; P0.82) for all outcome measures in favor of the electrical dry needling group at 3 months. The inclusion of electrical dry needling into a manual therapy and exercise program was more effective for improving pain, function and related-disability than the application of manual therapy and exercise alone in individuals with painful knee OA. Therapy, Level 1b. Prospectively registered February 10, 2015 on http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02373631)This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  15. [Clinical effect of total knee arthroplasty on patients with knee osteoarthritis combined with mild to moderate valgus knee deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Zeng, Min; Xie, Jie; Wang, Long; Su, Weiping; Hu, Yihe

    2016-09-28

    To investigate the clinical effect of total knee arthroplasty on patients with knee osteoarthritis combined with mild to moderate valgus knee deformity.
 A total of 15 patients received total knee arthroplasty for correcting mild (10°-15°) to moderate (15°-30°) valgus knee between January 2011 and February 2014 in Xiangya Hospital of Central South University. We adopted a stable prosthesis surgery through patellar medial approach, osteophytes cleaning, conventional osteotomy, a selective soft tissue release and balance technical correcting of knee valgus deformity. Then conventional anticoagulation and symptomatic rehabilitation was utilized. Preoperative and postoperative X-ray was conducted in patients with measuring femor-tibial angle (FTA) and inspecting the prosthesis position. FTA, visual analog scale (VAS) standard, and parallel knee scoring system (KSS) were used to evaluate the clinical effect.
 Fifteen patients were followed up for 14 to 36 (22.40±11.88) months. The hospitalization time was 7-13 (7.73±1.58) d; operative time was 58-110 (81.8±16.85) min, the dominant blood loss was 140-600 (337.30±143.65) mL. Two cases had knee extension hysteresis, and the knee activity recovered after exercise. Leg power lines were normal. Three postoperative cases suffered anterior knee pain. They were subjected to celecoxib analgesic treatment and the pain gradually eased after 3 months. One postoperative case showed incision discharge and swelling, which was healed after change of dressing. During follow-up, review of X-ray film does not show prosthesis loose, subsidence and other complications. The knee valgus angle (8.1±1.8)°, knee motion range (107.33±9.61)°, KSS knee score (74.7±14.5, 75.3±2.7) and pain score (2.5±0.9) were significantly better than the preoperative (Pclinical and function KSS scores showed that the improvement rate was 80%. 
 Total knee arthroplasty is an effective way to treat patients with knee osteoarthritis combined with

  16. Comparative study of two protocols of eccentric exercise on knee pain and function in athletes with patellar tendinopathy: randomized controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, Ronaldo Alves da; Dias, Andreia Natacha; Santos, Marcelo Bannwart; Lopes, Alexandre Dias

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The eccentric squat on a slope has been proved effective in conservative treatment of patellar tendinopathy, especially in the athletic population. However, several aspects such as intensity and pain during therapy still differ among authors. OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness of two protocols of eccentric exercise (performed with and without pain), in the improvement of knee function and pain intensity in athletes with patellar tendinopathy. METHODS: 7 athletes of both ge...

  17. Effect of Exercise Therapy Compared with Arthroscopic Surgery on Knee Muscle Strength and Functional Performance in Middle-Aged Patients with Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensrud, Silje; Risberg, May Arna; Roos, Ewa M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a 12-wk exercise therapy program and arthroscopic partial meniscectomy on knee strength and functional performance in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscus tears. DESIGN: A total of 82 patients (mean age, 49 yrs; 35% women......) with a symptomatic, unilateral, magnetic resonance imaging-verified degenerative meniscus tear and no or mild radiographic osteoarthritis were randomly assigned to a supervised neuromuscular and strength exercise program or arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Outcomes assessed 3 mos after intervention initiation were...

  18. Comparison of the Effects of Therapeutic exercise and Pilates Training on Function and Proprioception in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Mazloum

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Knee Osteoarthritis (OA as one of the most prevalent musculoskeletal disorders, leads to joint degeneration and consequent deterioration of function and proprioception. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Pilates exercise on knee OA. Materials & Methods: Forty-one male individuals were randomly categorized into three groups, including Pilates, conventional exercise therapy, and control. Proprioception, objective assessment of functional performance, and patients’ pain and disability were examined using Biodex system, aggregate time of four activities of daily living, and Lequesne Index. Descriptive statistical, One-Way ANOVA, and Scheffe test were utilized to analyze the data (P0.05 difference between the experimental groups in improving of functional status and angle reproduction error, they both resulted in more significant (P<0.001 influence than the control. However, significant improvement (P<0.001 in Lequesne Index was gained by participants who followed the exercise protocols, but the Pilates technique had more significant (P<0.05 effects. Conclusion: Pilates training can improve functional ability and proprioception in patients with knee OA. Further studies are required to find out the mechanism.

  19. The development and evaluation of a program for leg-strengthening exercises and balance assessment using Kinect

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jin-Seung; Kang, Dong-Won; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Dae-Hyeok; Yang, Seung-Tae; Tack, Gye-Rae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, a program was developed for leg-strengthening exercises and balance assessment using Microsoft Kinect. [Subjects and Methods] The program consists of three leg-strengthening exercises (knee flexion, hip flexion, and hip extension) and the one-leg standing test (OLST). The program recognizes the correct exercise posture by comparison with the range of motion of the hip and knee joints and provides a number of correct action examples to improve training. The program mea...

  20. Influence of the physical environment on treatment effect in exercise therapy for knee or hip pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, Louise Fleng

    treatment outcomes in other health-care settings, such as rehabilitation and exercise therapy settings. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the role of the physical environment as a contributor to context effects in the treatment response from exercise therapy as treatment for muskuloskeletal pain......Context effects are defined as the effects of a given treatment, not directly caused by the treatment itself, but, rather, caused by the context in which the treatment is delivered. The patient-practitioner relationship is a known context factor, but it is hard to standardize across health-care...... settings. The physical environment is easier to standardize and may act as a context factor and influence treatment outcomes. Studies from hospital environments have shown that the physical environment influences health outcomes, patients, and clinicians. It is unknown if the physical environment affects...

  1. Topographic deformation patterns of knee cartilage after exercises with high knee flexion: an in vivo 3D MRI study using voxel-based analysis at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horng, Annie; Stockinger, M.; Notohamiprodjo, M.; Raya, J.G.; Pietschmann, M.; Hoehne-Hueckstaedt, U.; Glitsch, U.; Ellegast, R.; Hering, K.G.; Glaser, C.

    2015-01-01

    To implement a novel voxel-based technique to identify statistically significant local cartilage deformation and analyze in-vivo topographic knee cartilage deformation patterns using a voxel-based thickness map approach for high-flexion postures. Sagittal 3T 3D-T1w-FLASH-WE-sequences of 10 healthy knees were acquired before and immediately after loading (kneeling/squatting/heel sitting/knee bends). After cartilage segmentation, 3D-reconstruction and 3D-registration, colour-coded deformation maps were generated by voxel-based subtraction of loaded from unloaded datasets to visualize cartilage thickness changes in all knee compartments. Compression areas were found bifocal at the peripheral medial/caudolateral patella, both posterior femoral condyles and both anterior/central tibiae. Local cartilage thickening were found adjacent to the compression areas. Significant local strain ranged from +13 to -15 %. Changes were most pronounced after squatting, least after knee bends. Shape and location of deformation areas varied slightly with the loading paradigm, but followed a similar pattern consistent between different individuals. Voxel-based deformation maps identify individual in-vivo load-specific and posture-associated strain distribution in the articular cartilage. The data facilitate understanding individual knee loading properties and contribute to improve biomechanical 3 models. They lay a base to investigate the relationship between cartilage degeneration patterns in common osteoarthritis and areas at risk of cartilage wear due to mechanical loading in work-related activities. (orig.)

  2. Topographic deformation patterns of knee cartilage after exercises with high knee flexion: an in vivo 3D MRI study using voxel-based analysis at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horng, Annie; Stockinger, M.; Notohamiprodjo, M. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Raya, J.G. [New York University Langone Medical Center, Center for Biomedical Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Pietschmann, M. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Munich (Germany); Hoehne-Hueckstaedt, U.; Glitsch, U.; Ellegast, R. [Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the German Social Accident Insurance (IFA), Sankt Augustin (Germany); Hering, K.G. [Miner' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Dortmund (Germany); Glaser, C. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); RZM Zentrum, Munich (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To implement a novel voxel-based technique to identify statistically significant local cartilage deformation and analyze in-vivo topographic knee cartilage deformation patterns using a voxel-based thickness map approach for high-flexion postures. Sagittal 3T 3D-T1w-FLASH-WE-sequences of 10 healthy knees were acquired before and immediately after loading (kneeling/squatting/heel sitting/knee bends). After cartilage segmentation, 3D-reconstruction and 3D-registration, colour-coded deformation maps were generated by voxel-based subtraction of loaded from unloaded datasets to visualize cartilage thickness changes in all knee compartments. Compression areas were found bifocal at the peripheral medial/caudolateral patella, both posterior femoral condyles and both anterior/central tibiae. Local cartilage thickening were found adjacent to the compression areas. Significant local strain ranged from +13 to -15 %. Changes were most pronounced after squatting, least after knee bends. Shape and location of deformation areas varied slightly with the loading paradigm, but followed a similar pattern consistent between different individuals. Voxel-based deformation maps identify individual in-vivo load-specific and posture-associated strain distribution in the articular cartilage. The data facilitate understanding individual knee loading properties and contribute to improve biomechanical 3 models. They lay a base to investigate the relationship between cartilage degeneration patterns in common osteoarthritis and areas at risk of cartilage wear due to mechanical loading in work-related activities. (orig.)

  3. Arthritis self-efficacy scale scores in knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing arthritis self-management education with or without exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Emily; Nyland, John; Henzman, Cameron; McGinnis, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Systematic literature review and meta-analysis. To evaluate studies that used arthritis self-management education alone or with exercise to improve Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale scores of patients with knee osteoarthritis. Increasing self-efficacy may improve patient knee osteoarthritis symptom management and function. MEDLINE (1946-March 2013), CINAHL (1981-March 2013), and PsycINFO (1967-March 2013) databases were searched. Twenty-four studies, including 3163 subjects (women, n = 2547 [80.5%]; mean ± SD age, 65.3 ± 6.5 years), met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis was performed to compare the standardized mean difference effect sizes (Cohen d) of randomized controlled studies that used the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale pain (13 studies, n = 1906), other symptoms (13 studies, n = 1957), and function (5 studies, n = 399) subscales. Cohen d effect sizes were also calculated for cohort studies that used the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale pain (10 studies, n = 1035), other symptoms (9 studies, n = 913), and function (3 studies, n = 141) subscales. Both randomized controlled studies and cohort studies were grouped by intervention type (intervention 1, arthritis self-management education alone; intervention 2, arthritis self-management education with exercise), and effect sizes were compared (Mann-Whitney U tests, Pmanagement education with exercise displayed higher methodological quality scale scores (76.8 ± 13.1 versus 61.6 ± 19.6, P = .03). Statistically significant standardized effect-size differences between intervention 1 and intervention 2 were not observed. Small to moderate effect sizes were observed regardless of whether the intervention included exercise. Exercise interventions used in conjunction with arthritis self-management education programs need to be developed to better enhance the self-efficacy of patients with knee osteoarthritis. Therapy, level 2b-.

  4. The comparison of the effectiveness of conventional therapeutic exercises and Pilates on pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloum, Vahid; Rabiei, Pouya; Rahnama, Nader; Sabzehparvar, Elnaz

    2017-10-22

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of two different interventions on pain and disability in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Forty-one individuals (Mean ± SD: Age 52.1 ± 8.9 years, Height 172.8 ± 6.6 cm, Weight 80.2 ± 6.9 kg) with KOA were randomly allocated into Pilates (N = 14), conventional therapeutic exercise (CTE) (N = 14), and control (N = 13) groups. Joint position sense (JPS), functional performance, pain, and disability were examined using Biodex system, aggregate time of four daily activities, and Lequesne Index. One-Way ANOVA, and Post Hoc Scheffe test were administrated to analyze the data (P Pilates training compared to CTE. It seemed that Pilates training was more effective than the CTE to improve pain and disability in individuals with KOA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Is acupuncture a useful adjunct to physiotherapy for older adults with knee pain?: The "Acupuncture, Physiotherapy and Exercise" (APEX study [ISRCTN88597683

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Nadine

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acupuncture is a popular non-pharmacological modality for treating musculoskeletal pain. Physiotherapists are one of the largest groups of acupuncture providers within the NHS, and they commonly use it alongside advice and exercise. Conclusive evidence of acupuncture's clinical effectiveness and its superiority over sham interventions is lacking. The Arthritis Research Campaign (arc has funded this randomised sham-controlled trial which addresses three important questions. Firstly, we will determine the additional benefit of true acupuncture when used by physiotherapists alongside advice and exercise for older people presenting to primary care with knee pain. Secondly, we will evaluate sham acupuncture in the same way. Thirdly, we will investigate the treatment preferences and expectations of both the participants and physiotherapists participating in the study, and explore the effect of these on clinical outcome. We will thus investigate whether acupuncture is a useful adjunct to advice and exercise for treating knee pain and gain insight into whether this effect is due to specific needling properties. Methods/Design This randomised clinical trial will recruit 350 participants with knee pain to three intervention arms. It is based in 43 community physiotherapy departments in 21 NHS Trusts in the West Midlands and Cheshire regions in England. Patients aged 50 years and over with knee pain will be recruited. Outcome data will be collected by self-complete questionnaires before randomisation, and 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months after randomisation and by telephone interview 2 weeks after treatment commences. The questionnaires collect demographic details as well as information on knee-related pain, movement and function, pain intensity and affect, main functional problem, illness perceptions, self-efficacy, treatment preference and expectations, general health and quality of life. Participants are randomised to receive a

  6. The Effect of Increasing Volume of Exercise on Activation Pattern of Vastus Medialis and Lateralis and its Correlation With Anterior Knee Pain in Karate Elites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safar Cherati, Afsaneh; Lotfian, Sara; Jamshidi, Aliashraf; Sanjari, Mohammad Ali; Razi, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    The effects of exercise volume on the pattern of muscle activity is one of the most important factors in training management and injury risk reduction. In the lower limb, the quadriceps muscle which plays a determining role in performing the stance and other karate techniques could be injured in intensive exercise and may induce anterior knee pain in athletes. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between training volume and muscle activity of vastus medialis and vastus lateralis and its association with anterior knee pain in karate elites. Male and female athletes from national junior and cadet karate team (14 to 18 years) were invited to participate in the study at the beginning and the end of the training camps. Studies involved measurement of electromyographic muscle activity of vastus medialis and vastus lateralis in both lower extremities with surface electromyography device and assessment of movement by electrogoniometery. Muscle activity was recorded in three tests of dachi, walking up and walking down stairs. Simultaneously, anterior knee pain was evaluated using visual analogue scale and anterior knee pain scale questionnaire. Eight athletes of a total number of 23 reported increased ratings of pain in their right knees. No differences in muscle activity were observed in tests of Dachi and stairs between the groups with and without pain. Comparing Dachi task pattern at the beginning and end of training camps, there was no significant difference in pattern of biomechanical movement; however, reducing the amount of muscle activity in early and late phases of tasks was observed in electromyographic assessment. The results showed that performing the same task after a six-week training period, less muscle activity was required in all phases in two groups of tasks, including karate-specific movement (dachi) and activities of daily living (up or down stairs).

  7. Effect of virgin olive oil versus piroxicam phonophoresis on exercise-induced anterior knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhostin-Roohi, Babak; Khoshkhahesh, Faegheh; Bohlooli, Shahab

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of virgin olive oil phonophoresis on female athletes' anterior knee pain (AKP). A double blinded randomized clinical trial was conducted. Ninety-three female athletes suffering from AKP voluntarily participated in this study. Patients were randomly assigned into olive oil (n=31), piroxicam (n=31) or base gel phonophoresis (n=31) groups. At the baseline visit, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire was filled by subjects who were then treated with olive oil, piroxicam or pure phonophoresis for 12 sessions. After 6 and 12 sessions of physiotherapy, subjects filled the questionnaire again. Main outcomes were significant improvement in pain, stiffness, physical function, and total WOMAC scores. Although, there was a significant reduction in symptoms of AKP at the end of the therapy in all groups (pgroup, this improvement was seen after 6 sessions of treatment (pgroup and piroxicam and/or phonophoresis group was observed after 6 sessions of therapy (pvirgin olive oil is as effective as piroxicam gel on lowering WOMAC scores of AKP in female athletes and also has several beneficial properties including faster effect and shorter duration of therapy. The exact mechanism of beneficial action of virgin olive oil on AKP is not clear and requires further studies.

  8. Effect of virgin olive oil versus piroxicam phonophoresis on exercise-induced anterior knee pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Nakhostin-Roohi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of virgin olive oil phonophoresis on female athletes' anterior knee pain (AKP. Materials and Methods: A double blinded randomized clinical trial was conducted. Ninety-three female athletes suffering from AKP voluntarily participated in this study. Patients were randomly assigned into olive oil (n=31, piroxicam (n=31 or base gel phonophoresis (n=31 groups. At the baseline visit, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC questionnaire was filled by subjects who were then treated with olive oil, piroxicam or pure phonophoresis for 12 sessions. After 6 and 12 sessions of physiotherapy, subjects filled the questionnaire again. Main outcomes were significant improvement in pain, stiffness, physical function, and total WOMAC scores. Results: Although, there was a significant reduction in symptoms of AKP at the end of the therapy in all groups (p< 0.05, but in olive oil group, this improvement was seen after 6 sessions of treatment (p< 0.001. A significant difference between olive oil group and piroxicam and/or phonophoresis group was observed after 6 sessions of therapy (p< 0.05. Conclusion: It could be proposed that phonophoresis with virgin olive oil is as effective as piroxicam gel on lowering WOMAC scores of AKP in female athletes and also has several beneficial properties including faster effect and shorter duration of therapy. The exact mechanism of beneficial action of virgin olive oil on AKP is not clear and requires further studies.

  9. Reliability of Concentric, Eccentric and Isometric Knee Extension and Flexion when using the REV9000 Isokinetic Dynamometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Carvalho Froufe Andrade, Alberto César Pereira; Caserotti, Paolo; de Carvalho, Carlos Manuel Pereira

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of isokinetic and ISO knee extensor and flexor muscle strength when using the REV9000 (Technogym) isokinetic dynamometer. Moreover, the reliability of several strength imbalance indices and bilateral ratios were also examined. Twenty-four physic...

  10. No effects of functional exercise therapy on walking biomechanics in patients with knee osteoarthritis: exploratory outcome analyses from a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Marius; Klokker, Louise; Bartholdy, Cecilie; Schjoedt-Jorgensen, Tanja; Bandak, Elisabeth; Bliddal, Henning

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effects of a functional and individualised exercise programme on gait biomechanics during walking in people with knee OA. Sixty participants were randomised to 12 weeks of facility-based functional and individualised neuromuscular exercise therapy (ET), 3 sessions per week supervised by trained physical therapists, or a no attention control group (CG). Three-dimensional gait analyses were used, from which a comprehensive list of conventional gait variables were extracted (totally 52 kinematic, kinetic and spatiotemporal variables). According to the protocol, the analyses were based on the 'Per-Protocol' population (defined as participants following the protocol with complete and valid gait analyses). Analysis of covariance adjusting for the level at baseline was used to determine differences between groups (95% CIs) in the changes from baseline at follow-up. The per-protocol population included 46 participants (24 ET/22 CG). There were no group differences in the analysed gait variables, except for a significant group difference in the second peak knee flexor moment and second peak vertical ground reaction force. While plausible we have limited confidence in the findings due to multiple statistical tests and lack of biomechanical logics. Therefore we conclude that a 12-week supervised individualised neuromuscular exercise programme has no effects on gait biomechanics. Future studies should focus on exercise programmes specifically designed to alter gait patterns, or include other measures of mobility, such as walking on stairs or inclined surfaces. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01545258.

  11. Whole-Body Vibration Exercise for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess the effects of WBV exercise on patients with KOA. Methods. Eight databases including Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, CNKI, and Wanfang were searched up to November 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs of WBV for KOA were eligible. The outcomes were pain intensity, functional performances, self-reported status, adverse events, and muscle strength. A meta-analysis was conducted. Results. Five trials with 168 participants provided data for the meta-analysis. No significant difference was shown in pain intensity and self-reported status between WBV and other forms of exercise. Improvement in functional performance (evaluated by BBS; WMD, 2.96; 95% CI, 1.29 to 4.62; P=0.0005 was greater in WBV group, but the other parameters of functional performance (including 6MWT and TGUG revealed no statistically significant difference. Adverse events were only reported in one trial and no significant difference was discovered in muscle strength. The overall quality of evidence was very low. Conclusion. Currently there is only limited evidence that suggested that WBV is effective in the treatment of KOA. Large, well-designed RCTs with better designs are needed.

  12. Efficacy of intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections and exercise-based rehabilitation programme, administered as isolated or integrated therapeutic regimens for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomanno, Maristella F; Donati, Fabrizio; Careri, Silvia; Bartoli, Matteo; Severini, Gabriele; Milano, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    To assess the efficacy of intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA) injections and exercise-based rehabilitation (EBR) programme, administered as isolated or integrated for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. One hundred sixty-five patients affected by moderate degrees of knee OA were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (HA) underwent three HA injections (one every 2 weeks); group 2 (EBR) underwent 20 treatment sessions in a month of an individualized programme; and group 3 (HA + EBR) received both treatments simultaneously. Primary outcome was the Italian version of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index; secondary outcome was the evaluation of active range of movement (AROM). All patients were evaluated before and 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment. Significance was set at p injections and individualized rehabilitation programmes administered in isolation or in combination are effective in improving knee function and pain relief. The combined treatment showed the greatest pain relief at 1-month follow-up compared to either in isolation. Compared to the previous studies, this is the first study, which proposed an EBR programme tailored to the compartment of the knee joint most involved in the degenerative process. I.

  13. An OMERACT reliability exercise of inflammatory and structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis using ultrasound assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruyn, George Aw; Naredo, Esperanza; Damjanov, Nemanja

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether ultrasonography (US) is reliable for the evaluation of inflammatory and structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Thirteen patients with early knee OA were examined by 11 experienced sonographers during 2 days. Dichotomous and semiqu......OBJECTIVE: To assess whether ultrasonography (US) is reliable for the evaluation of inflammatory and structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Thirteen patients with early knee OA were examined by 11 experienced sonographers during 2 days. Dichotomous...

  14. Extension of knee immobilization delays recovery of histological damages in the anterior cruciate ligament insertion and articular cartilage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Nakajima, Hiromi; Sakane, Masataka

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the influence of knee immobilization period on recovery of histological damages in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insertion and articular cartilage in rabbits. This knowledge is important for determining the appropriate rehabilitation approach for patients with ligament injuries, fracture, disuse atrophy, and degenerative joint disease. [Materials and Methods] Forty-eight male Japanese white rabbits were divided equally into the remobilization and control groups. The remobilization group had the right knee surgically immobilized, and was divided equally into four subgroups according to the duration of immobilization (1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks). After the immobilization was removed, the rabbits moved freely for 8 weeks. The control group underwent sham operation and followed the same time course as the remobilization group. The chondrocyte apoptosis rate and chondrocyte proliferation rate in the ACL insertion and articular cartilage were analyzed after remobilization. [Results] In the ACL insertion, the remobilization group had a higher chondrocyte apoptosis rate than the control group after 8 weeks of immobilization, and a lower chondrocyte proliferation rate than the control group after 4 and 8 weeks of immobilization. In the articular cartilage, the remobilization group had a lower chondrocyte proliferation rate than the control group after 8 weeks of immobilization. After 8 weeks of remobilization, the ACL insertion and articular cartilage are not completely recovered after 4 and 8 weeks of immobilization, respectively. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that 8 weeks of remobilization will result in recovery of the ACL insertion after 2 weeks of knee immobilization, and recovery of the articular cartilage after 4 weeks of knee immobilization. If 8 weeks of immobilization occurs, a remobilization duration of more than 8 weeks may be necessary.

  15. Extension of knee immobilization delays recovery of histological damages in the anterior cruciate ligament insertion and articular cartilage in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Mutsuzaki,, Hirotaka; Nakajima,, Hiromi; Sakane,, Masataka

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the influence of knee immobilization period on recovery of histological damages in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insertion and articular cartilage in rabbits. This knowledge is important for determining the appropriate rehabilitation approach for patients with ligament injuries, fracture, disuse atrophy, and degenerative joint disease. [Materials and Methods] Forty-eight male Japanese white rabbits were divided equally into the remobilization and control groups...

  16. Estimation of 1RM for knee extension based on the maximal isometric muscle strength and body composition

    OpenAIRE

    Kanada, Yoshikiyo; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiura, Yoshito; Arai, Tomoaki; Koyama, Soichiro; Tanabe, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To create a regression formula in order to estimate 1RM for knee extensors, based on the maximal isometric muscle strength measured using a hand-held dynamometer and data regarding the body composition. [Subjects and Methods] Measurement was performed in 21 healthy males in their twenties to thirties. Single regression analysis was performed, with measurement values representing 1RM and the maximal isometric muscle strength as dependent and independent variables, respectively. Furth...

  17. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, H; Hodges, P W; Bliddal, H; Henriksen, M

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals. Twenty-seven healthy untrained volunteers participated in a randomized controlled trial of quadriceps strengthening (3 times per week for 8 weeks). Participants were randomized to perform resistance training either during pain induced by injections of painful hypertonic saline (pain group, n = 13) or during a nonpainful control condition with injection of isotonic saline (control group, n = 14) into the infrapatellar fat pad. The primary outcome measure was change in maximal isokinetic muscle strength in knee extension/flexion (60, 120, and 180 degrees/second). The group who exercised with pain had a significantly larger improvement in isokinetic muscle strength at all angular velocities of knee extension compared to the control group. In knee flexion there were improvements in isokinetic muscle strength in both groups with no between-group differences. Experimental knee joint pain improved the training-induced gain in muscle strength following 8 weeks of quadriceps training. It remains to be studied whether knee joint pain has a positive effect on strength gain in patients with knee pathology. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  18. WITHDRAWN: Exercise for treating anterior cruciate ligament injuries in combination with collateral ligament and meniscal damage of the knee in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trees, Amanda H; Howe, Tracey E; Grant, Margaret; Gray, Heather G

    2011-05-11

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most frequently injured ligament of the knee. The ACL may be damaged in isolation but often other ligaments and menisci are implicated. The injury may be managed surgically or conservatively. Injury causes pain, effusion and inflammation leading to alteration in muscle function. Regaining muscular control is essential if the individual wishes to return to pre-injury level of function and patients will invariably be referred for rehabilitation. To present the best evidence for effectiveness of exercise used in the treatment of ACL injuries in combination with collateral ligament and meniscal damage to the knee in adults, on return to work and pre-injury levels of activity. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (October 2006), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2006, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1996 to October 2006), EMBASE (1980 to October 2006), other databases and reference lists of articles. We included randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials testing exercise programmes designed to treat adults with ACL injuries in combination with collateral ligament and meniscal damage. Included trials randomised participants to receive any combination of the following: no care, usual care, a single-exercise intervention, and multiple-exercise interventions. The primary outcome measures of interest were returning to work and return to pre-injury level of activity post treatment, at six months and one year. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Adverse effects information was collected from the trials. Five trials (243 participants) evaluated different exercise programmes following ACL reconstruction and one trial (100 participants) compared supervised with self-monitored exercises as part of conservative treatment. No study compared the effect of exercise versus

  19. No Exacerbation of Knee Joint Pain and Effusion Following Preoperative Progressive Resistance Training in Patients Scheduled for Total Knee Arthroplasty: Secondary Analyses From a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoffer, Birgit; Dalgas, Ulrik; Maribo, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld; Mechlenburg, Inger

    2017-11-09

    Preoperative progressive resistance training (PRT) is controversial in patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), because of the concern that it may exacerbate knee joint pain and effusion. To examine whether preoperative PRT initiated 5 weeks prior to TKA would exacerbate pain and knee effusion, and would allow a progressively increased training load throughout the training period that would subsequently increase muscle strength. Secondary analyses from a randomized controlled trial. University Hospital and a Regional Hospital. A total of 30 patients who were scheduled for TKA due to osteoarthritis and assigned as the intervention group. Patients underwent unilateral PRT (3 sessions per week). Exercise loading was 12 repetitions maximum (RM) with progression toward 8 RM. The training program consisted of 6 exercises performed unilaterally. Before and after each training session, knee joint pain was rated on an 11-point scale, effusion was assessed by measuring the knee joint circumference, and training load was recorded. The first and last training sessions were initiated by 1 RM testing of unilateral leg press, unilateral knee extension, and unilateral knee flexion. The median pain change score from before to after each training session was 0 at all training sessions. The average increase in knee joint effusion across the 12 training sessions was a mean 0.16 cm ± 0.23 cm. No consistent increase in knee joint effusion after training sessions during the training period was found (P = .21). Training load generally increased, and maximal muscle strength improved as follows: unilateral leg press: 18% ± 30% (P = .03); unilateral knee extension: 81% ± 156% (P knee flexion: 53% ± 57% (P knee joint pain and effusion, despite a substantial progression in loading and increased muscle strength. Concerns for side effects such as pain and effusion after PRT seem unfounded. To be determined. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Moderators of Effects of Internet-Delivered Exercise and Pain Coping Skills Training for People With Knee Osteoarthritis: Exploratory Analysis of the IMPACT Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawford, Belinda J; Hinman, Rana S; Kasza, Jessica; Nelligan, Rachel; Keefe, Francis; Rini, Christine; Bennell, Kim L

    2018-05-09

    Internet-delivered exercise, education, and pain coping skills training is effective for people with knee osteoarthritis, yet it is not clear whether this treatment is better suited to particular subgroups of patients. The aim was to explore demographic and clinical moderators of the effect of an internet-delivered intervention on changes in pain and physical function in people with knee osteoarthritis. Exploratory analysis of data from 148 people with knee osteoarthritis who participated in a randomized controlled trial comparing internet-delivered exercise, education, and pain coping skills training to internet-delivered education alone. Primary outcomes were changes in knee pain while walking (11-point Numerical Rating Scale) and physical function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index function subscale) at 3 and 9 months. Separate regression models were fit with moderator variables (age, gender, expectations of outcomes, self-efficacy [pain], education, employment status, pain catastrophizing, body mass index) and study group as covariates, including an interaction between the two. Participants in the intervention group who were currently employed had significantly greater reductions in pain at 3 months than similar participants in the control group (between-group difference: mean 2.38, 95% CI 1.52-3.23 Numerical Rating Scale units; interaction P=.02). Additionally, within the intervention group, pain at 3 months reduced by mean 0.53 (95% CI 0.28-0.78) Numerical Rating Scale units per unit increase in baseline self-efficacy for managing pain compared to mean 0.11 Numerical Rating Scale units (95% CI -0.13 to 0.35; interaction P=.02) for the control group. People who were employed and had higher self-efficacy at baseline were more likely to experience greater improvements in pain at 3 months after an internet-delivered exercise, education, and pain coping skills training program. There was no evidence of a difference in the effect across

  1. Pain trajectory and exercise-induced pain flares during 8 weeks of neuromuscular exercise in individuals with knee and hip pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, L F; Roos, E M; Bøgesvang, S J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients considering or engaged in exercise as treatment may expect or experience transient increases in joint pain, causing fear of exercise and influencing compliance. This study investigated the pain trajectory during an 8-week neuromuscular exercise (NEMEX) program together with ac...... to educate and balance patient expectation when starting supervised neuromuscular exercise....

  2. Civamide cream 0.075% in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a 12-week randomized controlled clinical trial with a longterm extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Thomas J; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Haselwood, Doug M; Ellison, William T; Ervin, John E; Gordon, Richard D; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Archambault, W Tad; Sampson, Allan R; Fezatte, Heidi B; Phillips, Scott B; Bernstein, Joel E

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of civamide cream 0.075% for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. We conducted a 12-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind study with a 52-week open-label extension. Patients with OA of the knee received either civamide cream 0.075% or a lower dose of civamide cream, 0.01%, as the control. The 3 co-primary endpoints in the double-blind study were the time-weighted average (TWA) of change from baseline to Day 84 in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale, the WOMAC physical function subscale, and the Subject Global Evaluation (SGE). In the 52-week open-label extension study, the Osteoarthritis Pain Score and SGE were assessed. A total of 695 patients were randomized to receive civamide cream 0.075% (n = 351) or civamide cream 0.01% (control; n = 344) in the double-blind study. Significance in favor of civamide cream 0.075% was achieved for the TWA for all 3 co-primary efficacy variables: WOMAC pain (p = 0.009), WOMAC physical function (p < 0.001), and SGE (p = 0.008); and at Day 84 for these 3 variables (p = 0.013, p < 0.001, and p = 0.049, respectively). These analyses accounted for significant baseline-by-treatment interactions. In the 52-week open-label extension, efficacy was maintained. Civamide cream 0.075% was well tolerated throughout the studies. These studies demonstrate the efficacy of civamide cream for up to 1 year of continuous use. Civamide cream, with its lack of systemic absorption, does not have the potential for serious systemic toxicity, in contrast to several other OA treatments.

  3. Measurement of the local muscular metabolism by time-domain near infrared spectroscopy during knee flex-extension induced by functional electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contini, D.; Spinelli, L.; Torricelli, A.; Ferrante, S.; Pedrocchi, A.; Molteni, F.; Ferrigno, G.; Cubeddu, R.

    2009-02-01

    We present a preliminary study that combines functional electrical stimulation and time-domain near infrared spectroscopy for a quantitative measurement of the local muscular metabolism during rehabilitation of post-acute stroke patients. Seven healthy subjects and nine post-acute stroke patients underwent a protocol of knee flex-extension of the quadriceps induced by functional electrical stimulation. During the protocol time-domain near infrared spectroscopy measurement were performed on both left and right muscle. Hemodynamic parameters (concentration of oxy- and deoxy-genated hemoglobin) during baseline did not show any significant differences between healthy subject and patients, while functional performances (knee angle amplitude) were distinctly different. Nevertheless, even if their clinical histories were noticeably different, there was no differentiation among functional performances of patients. On the basis of the hemodynamic parameters measured during the recovery phase, instead, it was possible to identify two classes of patients showing a metabolic trend similar or very different to the one obtained by healthy subjects. The presented results suggest that the combination of functional and metabolic information can give an additional tool to the clinicians in the evaluation of the rehabilitation in post-acute stroke patients.

  4. Total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Henrik M.; Petersen, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful treatment of the osteoarthritic knee, which has increased dramatically over the last 30 years. The indication is a painful osteoarthritic knee with relevant radiographic findings and failure of conservative measures like painkillers and exercise...... surgeon seems to positively influence the rate of surgical complications and implant survival. The painful TKA knee should be thoroughly evaluated, but not revised except if a relevant indication can be established. The most frequent indications for revision are: aseptic loosening, instability, infection...

  5. Late group-based rehabilitation has no advantages compared with supervised home-exercises after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Majbritt; Larsen, Kristian; Madsen, Inger Kirkegård

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to test whether group-based rehabilitation focusing on strength training, education and self-management is more effective than individual, supervised home-training after fast-track total knee arthroplasty (TKA).......This study aimed to test whether group-based rehabilitation focusing on strength training, education and self-management is more effective than individual, supervised home-training after fast-track total knee arthroplasty (TKA)....

  6. EFFECTS OF KINESIOTAPING ALONG WITH QUADRICEPS STRENGTHENING EXERCISES ON PAIN, JOINT RANGE OF MOTION AND FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITIES OF KNEE IN SUBJECTS WITH PATELLOFEMORAL OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Harshitha

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patello femoral Osteoarthritis is the most common degenerative disease in older age group, causing pain, physical disability, and decreased quality of life.As many treatment options available, kinesiotaping is an efficacious treatment for management of pain & disability in patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis. Previous studies have shown that kinesiotaping as well as quadriceps strengthening significantly yields functional benefits. But there is lack of evidence revealing combined effectiveness & effects of kinesiotaping along with quadriceps strengthening in subjects with patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis. Methods: 30 subjects with symptoms of patellofemoral osteoarthritis fulfilled the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned into 2 groups of 15 in each group. Taping along with quadriceps strengthening program is compared to the quadriceps strengthening program alone. Pain were measured by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, knee ROM were measured by Goniometer, Functional status were measured by Western Ontario McMaster Universities index (WOMAC, score. Measurements were taken pre & post intervention. Results: The results indicated that kinesiotaping along with quadriceps strengthening exercises showed there was statistically significant improvement in pain (<0.05, knee ROM (<0.05 and functional activities (<0.05 after 6 weeks compared to quadriceps strengthening alone. Conclusion: Subjects with kinesiotaping along with quadriceps strengthening showed significant improvement in reducing pain, in improving ROM & functional activities at the end of 6th week treatment when compared to subjects with patellofemoral osteoarthritis underwent quadriceps strengthening exercises alone.

  7. Smartphone-based accelerometry is a valid tool for measuring dynamic changes in knee extension range of motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støve, Morten Pallisgaard; Palsson, Thorvaldur Skuli; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Measurement of static joint range of motion is used extensively in orthopaedic and rehabilitative communities to benchmark treatment efficacy. Static measures are, however, insufficient in providing detailed information about patient impairments. Dynamic range of motion measures cou...

  8. 'Nordic' Hamstrings Exercise - Engagement Characteristics and Training Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Iga, J; Fruer, C S; Deighan, Martine A; De Ste Croix, Mark B; James, David V

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the neuromuscular activation characteristics of the hamstrings during the 'Nordic' hamstrings exercise (NHE) and changes in the eccentric strength of the knee flexors with NHE training. Initially, the normalised root mean square electromyographic (EMG) activity of the hamstrings of both limbs during various phases (90-61 degrees, 60-31 degrees and 30-0 degrees of knee extension) of the NHE were determined in 18 soccer players. Subsequently participants were randomly...

  9. Effects of Lumbar Core Stability Exercise Programme on Knee Pain, Range of Motion, and Function Post Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Panchal

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Institutional conventional exercise protocol is effective in reducing pain and improving the ROM post and lumbar core stability exercise programme is effective in improving function, post ACL reconstruction.

  10. Knee extension and flexion muscle power after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon graft or hamstring tendons graft: a cross-sectional comparison 3 years post surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Harald; Silbernagel, Karin

    2008-01-01

    Hamstring muscles play a major role in knee-joint stabilization after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Weakness of the knee extensors after ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (PT) graft, and in the knee flexors after reconstruction with hamstring tendons (HT) graft has been observed ...

  11. Comparison of Static Force Sense of Knee Extension between Women with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome and Healthy Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Salah-Zadeh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Patellofemoaral pain syndrome (PFPS is a common musculoskeletal disorder. Proprioception is important factor in neuromuscular control. Others studies showed that, because of pain and abnormal stresses on soft tissue around joint and Proprioception may be change in these patients. The aim of this study was investigation of sense of quadriceps muscle force accuracy in patients with PFPS. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional and case –control study, thirty four young women with and without PFPS were participated. Biodex isokinetic dynamometer was used to measure isometric torque and sense of quadriceps static force. Force matching with ipsilateral limb was used by determining of reference force levels (20 and 60% of maximal voluntary isometric force (MVIF in 20 and 60 degree of knee flexion and attempting to perception and reproduction of target forces .Absolute error (AE, constant error (CE and variability error (VE were calculated for evaluation sense of force accuracy. Data were analyzed by independent T test and Logistics Regression. Results: There was statistically difference in force reproduction error in 60 degree and 60% MVIF between two groups (P<0.005. Sense of force errors were high in patient group. Conclusion: The results confirmed the past studies and showed that proprioception may be altered in PFPS patients because of changes proprioception afferents, specially for quadriceps muscle receptors.

  12. Estimation of 1RM for knee extension based on the maximal isometric muscle strength and body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada, Yoshikiyo; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiura, Yoshito; Arai, Tomoaki; Koyama, Soichiro; Tanabe, Shigeo

    2017-11-01

    [Purpose] To create a regression formula in order to estimate 1RM for knee extensors, based on the maximal isometric muscle strength measured using a hand-held dynamometer and data regarding the body composition. [Subjects and Methods] Measurement was performed in 21 healthy males in their twenties to thirties. Single regression analysis was performed, with measurement values representing 1RM and the maximal isometric muscle strength as dependent and independent variables, respectively. Furthermore, multiple regression analysis was performed, with data regarding the body composition incorporated as another independent variable, in addition to the maximal isometric muscle strength. [Results] Through single regression analysis with the maximal isometric muscle strength as an independent variable, the following regression formula was created: 1RM (kg)=0.714 + 0.783 × maximal isometric muscle strength (kgf). On multiple regression analysis, only the total muscle mass was extracted. [Conclusion] A highly accurate regression formula to estimate 1RM was created based on both the maximal isometric muscle strength and body composition. Using a hand-held dynamometer and body composition analyzer, it was possible to measure these items in a short time, and obtain clinically useful results.

  13. Muscle Activation of Vastus Medialis Oblique and Vastus Lateralis in Sling-Based Exercises in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Cross-Over Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Dien Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine what changes are caused in the activity of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO and vastus lateralis (VL at the time of sling-based exercises in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS and compare the muscular activations in patients with PFPS among the sling-based exercises. Methods. This was a cross-over study. Sling-based open and closed kinetic knee extension and hip adduction exercises were designed for PFPS, and electromyography was applied to record maximal voluntary contraction during the exercises. The VMO and VL activations and VMO : VL ratios for the three exercises were analyzed and compared. Results. Thirty male (age = 21.19 ± 0.68 y and 30 female (age = 21.12 ± 0.74 y patients with PFPS were recruited. VMO activations during the sling-based open and closed kinetic knee extension exercises were significantly higher (P=0.04 and P=0.001 than those during hip adduction exercises and VMO : VL ratio for the sling-based closed kinetic knee extension and hip adduction exercises approximated to 1. Conclusions. The sling-based closed kinetic knee extension exercise produced the highest VMO activation. It also had an appropriate VMO : VL ratio similar to sling-based hip adduction exercise and had beneficial effects on PFPS.

  14. Impact of the Nordic hamstring and hip extension exercises on hamstring architecture and morphology: implications for injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Matthew N; Duhig, Steven J; Timmins, Ryan G; Williams, Morgan D; Opar, David A; Al Najjar, Aiman; Kerr, Graham K; Shield, Anthony J

    2017-03-01

    The architectural and morphological adaptations of the hamstrings in response to training with different exercises have not been explored. To evaluate changes in biceps femoris long head (BF LH ) fascicle length and hamstring muscle size following 10-weeks of Nordic hamstring exercise (NHE) or hip extension (HE) training. 30 recreationally active male athletes (age, 22.0±3.6 years; height, 180.4±7 cm; weight, 80.8±11.1 kg) were allocated to 1 of 3 groups: (1) HE training (n=10), NHE training (n=10), or no training (control, CON) (n=10). BF LH fascicle length was assessed before, during (Week 5) and after the intervention with a two-dimensional ultrasound. Hamstring muscle size was determined before and after training via MRI. Compared with baseline , BF LH fascicles were lengthened in the NHE and HE groups at mid-training (d=1.12-1.39, p<0.001) and post-training (d=1.77-2.17, p<0.001) and these changes did not differ significantly between exercises (d=0.49-0.80, p=0.279-0.976). BF LH volume increased more for the HE than the NHE (d=1.03, p=0.037) and CON (d=2.24, p<0.001) groups. Compared with the CON group, both exercises induced significant increases in semitendinosus volume (d=2.16-2.50, ≤0.002) and these increases were not significantly different (d=0.69, p=0.239). NHE and HE training both stimulate significant increases in BF LH fascicle length; however, HE training may be more effective for promoting hypertrophy in the BF LH . Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Knee Injuries KidsHealth / For Teens / Knee Injuries What's in ... can do to protect them. What's in a Knee? The knee is a joint , actually the largest ...

  16. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  17. Effect of acute augmented feedback on between limb asymmetries and eccentric knee flexor strength during the Nordic hamstring exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade J. Chalker

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Hamstring strain injuries (HSI are one of the most prevalent and serious injuries affecting athletes, particularly those in team ball sports or track and field. Recent evidence demonstrates that eccentric knee flexor weakness and between limb asymmetries are possible risk factors for HSIs. While eccentric hamstring resistance training, e.g. the Nordic hamstring exercise (NHE significantly increases eccentric hamstring strength and reduces HSI risk, little research has examined whether between limb asymmetries can be reduced with training. As augmented feedback (AF can produce significant acute and chronic increases in muscular strength and reduce injury risk, one way to address the limitation in the eccentric hamstring training literature may be to provide athletes real-time visual AF of their NHE force outputs with the goal to minimise the between limb asymmetry. Methods Using a cross over study design, 44 injury free, male cricket players from two skill levels performed two NHE sessions on a testing device. The two NHE sessions were identical with the exception of AF, with the two groups randomised to perform the sessions with and without visual feedback of each limb’s force production in real-time. When performing the NHE with visual AF, the participants were provided with the following instructions to ‘reduce limb asymmetries as much as possible using the real-time visual force outputs displayed in front them’. Between limb asymmetries and mean peak force outputs were compared between the two feedback conditions (FB1 and FB2 using independent t-tests to ensure there was no carryover effect, and to determine any period and treatment effects. The magnitude of the differences in the force outputs were also examined using Cohen d effect size. Results There was a significant increase in mean peak force production when feedback was provided (mean difference, 21.7 N; 95% CI [0.2–42.3 N]; P = 0.048; d = 0.61 and no significant

  18. Whole-body vibration does not influence knee joint neuromuscular function or proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, R; Minshull, C; Folland, J P

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on knee joint position sense and indices of neuromuscular function, specifically strength, electromechanical delay and the rate of force development. Electromyography and electrically evoked contractions were used to investigate neural and contractile responses to WBV. Fourteen healthy males completed two treatment conditions on separate occasions: (1) 5 × 1 min of unilateral isometric squat exercise on a synchronous vibrating platform [30 Hz, 4 mm peak-to-peak amplitude] (WBV) and (2) a control condition (CON) of the same exercise without WBV. Knee joint position sense (joint angle replication task) and quadriceps neuromuscular function were assessed pre-, immediately-post and 1 h post-exercise. During maximum voluntary knee extensions, the peak force (PF(V)), electromechanical delay (EMD(V)), rate of force development (RFD(V)) and EMG of the quadriceps were measured. Twitch contractions of the knee extensors were electrically evoked to assess EMD(E) and RFD(E). The results showed no influence of WBV on knee joint position, EMD(V), PF(V) and RFD(V) during the initial 50, 100 or 150 ms of contraction. Similarly, electrically evoked neuromuscular function and neural activation remained unchanged following the vibration exercise. A single session of unilateral WBV did not influence any indices of thigh muscle neuromuscular performance or knee joint proprioception. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Long-term exercise therapy resolves ethnic differences in baseline health status in older adults with knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foy, C.G.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Shumaker, S.A.; Messier, S.P.; Pahor, M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether ethnicity was associated with baseline and 18-month health status within a merged sample of older adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA) from the Fitness Arthritis in Seniors Trial and the Arthritis, Diet, and Activity Promotion Trial. DESIGN: Cross-sectional and

  20. Evaluation of the benefit of corticosteroid injection before exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Christensen, Robin; Klokker, Louise

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is the most frequent form of arthritis and a cause of pain and disability. Combined nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments are recommended as the optimal treatment approach, but no evidence supports the recommendation. OBJECTIVE: To assess...

  1. Fatigue and perceptual responses of heavier- and lighter-load isolated lumbar extension resistance exercise in males and females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Stuart

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background There is a lack of research considering acute fatigue responses to high- and low-load resistance training as well as the comparison between male and female responses. Furthermore, limited studies have considered fatigue response testing with the inclusion of perceptions of discomfort and exertion. Methods The present study included males (n = 9; 23.8 ± 6.4 years; 176.7 ± 6.2 cm; 73.9 ± 9.3 kg and females (n = 8; 21.3 ± 0.9 years; 170.5 ± 6.1 cm; 65.5 ± 10.8 kg who were assessed for differences in fatigue (i.e., loss of torque at maximal voluntary contraction (MVC immediately following isolated lumbar extension (ILEX exercise at heavy- (HL and light-(LL loads (80% and 50% MVC, respectively. Participants also reported perceptual measures of effort (RPE-E and discomfort (RPE-D between different resistance training protocols. Results Analysis of variance revealed significantly greater absolute and relative fatigue following LL compared to HL conditions (p < 0.001. Absolute fatigue significantly differed between males and females (p = 0.012, though relative fatigue was not significantly different (p = 0.160. However, effect sizes for absolute fatigue (HL; Males = −1.84, Females = −0.83; LL; Males = −3.11, Females = −2.39 and relative fatigue (HL; Males = −2.17, Females = −0.76; LL; Males = −3.36, Females = −3.08 were larger for males in both HL and LL conditions. RPE-E was maximal for all participants in both conditions, but RPE-D was significantly higher in LL compared to HL (p < 0.001 with no difference between males and females. Discussion Our data suggests that females do not incur the same degree of fatigue as males following similar exercise protocols, and indeed that females might be able to sustain longer exercise duration at the same relative loads. As such females should manipulate training variables accordingly, perhaps performing greater repetitions at a relative load, or using heavier relative

  2. Experimental knee pain reduces muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Mortensen, Sara Rosager; Aaboe, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Pain is the principal symptom in knee pathologies and reduced muscle strength is a common observation among knee patients. However, the relationship between knee joint pain and muscle strength remains to be clarified. This study aimed at investigating the changes in knee muscle strength following...... experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and if these changes were associated with the pain intensities. In a crossover study, 18 healthy subjects were tested on 2 different days. Using an isokinetic dynamometer, maximal muscle strength in knee extension and flexion was measured at angular velocities 0....... Knee pain reduced the muscle strength by 5 to 15% compared to the control conditions (P knee extension and flexion at all angular velocities. The reduction in muscle strength was positively correlated to the pain intensity. Experimental knee pain significantly reduced knee extension...

  3. Acute Postexercise Time Course Responses of Hypertrophic vs. Power-Endurance Squat Exercise Protocols on Maximal and Rapid Torque of the Knee Extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchola, Eric C; Thiele, Ryan M; Palmer, Ty B; Smith, Doug B; Thompson, Brennan J

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a medium-intensity high-volume vs. explosive squat protocol on the postexercise time course responses of maximal and rapid strength of the knee extensors. Seventeen resistance-trained men (mean ± SD: age = 22.0 ± 2.6 years) performed maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the knee extensors before and after performing a squat workout using either a low-intensity fast velocity (LIFV) (5 × 16 at 40% 1 repetition maximum) or a traditional high-intensity slow velocity (TISV) (5 × 8 at 80% 1RM) exercise protocol. For each MVC, peak torque (PT), peak rate of torque development (RTDpeak), absolute (RTDabs), and relative RTD (RTDnorm) at early (0-50 milliseconds) and late (100-200 milliseconds) phases of muscle contraction were examined at pre- (Pre) and post-exercise at 0, 7, 15, and 30 (Post0...30) minutes. There were no intensity × time interactions for any variables (p = 0.098-0.832). Peak torque was greater at Pre than Post0 and Post7 (p = 0.001-0.016) but was not greater than Post15 and Post30 (p = 0.010-0.189). RTDpeak and early absolute RTD (RTD50abs) were greater at Pre than all postexercise time phases (p = 0.001-0.050); however, later absolute RTD (RTD100-200abs) was only greater at Pre than Post0 and Post30 (p = 0.013-0.048). Early relative RTD (RTD50norm) was only higher at Pre compared with Post0 (p = 0.023), whereas no differences were observed for later relative RTD (RTD100-200norm) (p = 0.920-0.990). Low-intensity fast velocity and TISV squat protocols both yielded acute decreases in maximal and rapid strength capacities following free-weight squats, with rapid strength showing slower recovery characteristics than maximal strength.

  4. Muscle Fatigue during Intermittent Exercise in Individuals with Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafeiridis, Andreas; Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Dipla, Konstantina; Salonikidis, Konstantinos; Karra, Chrisanthi; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2010-01-01

    This study examined fatigue profile during intermittent exercise in 10 men with mild to moderate mental retardation (MR) and 10 men without mental retardation (C). They performed 4 x 30 s maximal knee extensions and flexions with 1-min rest on an isokinetic dynamometer. Peak torque of flexors (PTFL) and extensors (PTEX), total work (TW), and…

  5. A multicentre, pragmatic, parallel group, randomised controlled trial to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of three physiotherapy-led exercise interventions for knee osteoarthritis in older adults: the BEEP trial protocol (ISRCTN: 93634563).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Nadine E; Healey, Emma L; Holden, Melanie A; Nicholls, Elaine; Whitehurst, David Gt; Jowett, Susan; Jinks, Clare; Roddy, Edward; Hay, Elaine M

    2014-07-27

    Exercise is consistently recommended for older adults with knee pain related to osteoarthritis. However, the effects from exercise are typically small and short-term, likely linked to insufficient individualisation of the exercise programme and limited attention to supporting exercise adherence over time. The BEEP randomised trial aims to improve patients' short and long-term outcomes from exercise. It will test the overall effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two physiotherapy-led exercise interventions (Individually Tailored Exercise and Targeted Exercise Adherence) to improve the individual tailoring of, and adherence to exercise, compared with usual physiotherapy care. Based on the learning from a pilot study (ISRCTN 23294263), the BEEP trial is a multi-centre, pragmatic, parallel group, individually randomised controlled trial, with embedded longitudinal qualitative interviews. 500 adults in primary care, aged 45 years and over with knee pain will be randomised to 1 of 3 treatment groups delivered by fully trained physiotherapists in up to 6 NHS services. These are: Usual Physiotherapy Care (control group consisting of up to 4 treatment sessions of advice and exercise), Individually Tailored Exercise (an individualised, supervised and progressed lower-limb exercise programme) or Targeted Exercise Adherence (supporting patients to adhere to exercise and to engage in general physical activity over the longer-term). The primary outcomes are pain and function as measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis index. A comprehensive range of secondary outcomes are also included. Outcomes are measured at 3, 6 (primary outcome time-point), 9, 18 and 36 months. Data on adverse events will also be collected. Semi-structured, qualitative interviews with a subsample of 30 participants (10 from each treatment group) will be undertaken at two time-points (end of treatment and 12 to 18 months later) and analysed thematically. This trial will contribute to the

  6. High-intensity stepwise conditioning programme for improved exercise responses and agility performance of a badminton player with knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bob; Mok, Damon; Lee, Winson C C; Lam, Wing Kai

    2015-02-01

    To examine the effect of a high-intensity stepwise conditioning programme combined with multiple recovery measures on physical fitness, agility, and knee pain symptoms of an injured player. A single case study. University-based conditioning training laboratory. One 26-year-old male world-class badminton player (height, 190.0 cm; weight, 79.3 kg; left dominant hand; playing experience, 16 years; former world champion) with patellar tendinosis and calcification of his left knee. The player received seven conditioning sessions over three weeks. During the programme, there was a gradual increase in training duration and load across sessions while cold therapy, manual stretches and massage were administered after each session to minimise inflammation. The training outcome was evaluated with three different testing methods: standard step test, badminton-specific agility test, and tension-pain rating. The conditioning programme reduced knee pain symptoms and improved actual performance and cardiopulmonary fitness during the agility task. The player was able to return to sport and compete within a month. A high-intensity stepwise conditioning programme improved the physical fitness while sufficient recovery measures minimised any possible undesirable effects and promoted faster return to elite level competition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Modified Otago Exercises on Postural Balance, Fear of Falling, and Fall Risk in Older Fallers With Knee Osteoarthritis and Impaired Gait and Balance: A Secondary Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat, Sumaiyah; Ng, Chin Teck; Tan, Pey June; Ramli, Norlisah; Fadzli, Farhana; Rozalli, Faizatul Izza; Mazlan, Mazlina; Hill, Keith D; Tan, Maw Pin

    2018-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is considered an established risk factor for falls. Published studies evaluating secondary falls prevention strategies among individuals with OA are limited. To evaluate the effect of a personalized home-based exercise program to improve postural balance, fear of falling, and falls risk in older fallers with knee OA and gait and balance problems. Randomized controlled trial. University of Malaya Medical Centre. Fallers who had both radiological OA and a Timed Up and Go (TUG) score of over 13.5 seconds. Postural sway (composite sway) was quantified with the Modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance (mCTSIB) under 4 different sensory conditions: eyes open on firm surface, eyes closed on firm surface, eyes open on unstable foam surface, and eyes closed on unstable foam surface. Participants were asked to stand upright and to attempt to hold their position for 10 seconds for each test condition. The average reading for all conditions were calculated. Participants randomized to the intervention arm received a home-based modified Otago Exercise Program (OEP) as part of a multifactorial intervention, whereas control participants received general health advice and conventional treatment. This was a secondary subgroup analysis from an original randomized controlled trial, the Malaysian Falls Assessment and Intervention Trial (MyFAIT) (trial registration number: ISRCTN11674947). Posturography using a long force plate balance platform (Balancemaster, NeuroCom, USA), the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and the short-form Falls Efficacy Scale-International (short FES-I) were assessed at baseline and 6 months. Results of 41 fallers with radiological evidence of OA and impaired TUG (intervention, 17; control, 24) were available for the final analysis. Between-group analysis revealed significant improvements in the Modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance (mCTSIB), Limits of Stability (LOS), and short FES

  8. Exercise and self-management for people with chronic knee, hip or lower back pain: a cluster randomised controlled trial of clinical and cost-effectiveness. Study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Nicola; Cramp, Fiona; Palmer, Shea; Pollock, Jon; Hampson, Lisa; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Green, Colin; Jones, Louise; Phillips, Sonia; Johnson, Liz; Hurley, Mike

    2013-12-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain and osteoarthritis can significantly limit the functional independence of individuals, and given that 25% of the population experience these problems, the socioeconomic impact is immense. Exercise and self-management have proven benefits for these conditions, but most trials tailor interventions for specific joints. Epidemiological data demonstrates that many older people with degenerative joint problems experience pain and functional difficulty in other joints, seeking further healthcare input when these present. Managing multiple joint presentations simultaneously could potentially reduce the need for repeat visits to healthcare professionals as advice is frequently the same for differing site presentations. This single-blind cluster randomised controlled trial will determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of an exercise and self-management intervention delivered to people over-50 with either hip, knee or lower back pain, compared to 'standard' GP care. A qualitative analysis will also establish the acceptability of the intervention. 352 people with chronic degenerative musculoskeletal pain of the hip, knee or lower back will be recruited from primary care. GP surgeries will be randomised to either the intervention or control arms. Participants in the intervention arm will receive a 6-week group exercise and self-management programme facilitated by a physiotherapist in primary care. Participants allocated to the control arm will continue under 'standard' GP care. The primary outcome measure is the Dysfunction Index of the Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment (SMFA). Individual patient responses will be modelled using a mixed effects linear regression, allowing for the clustering effects. Resource use and related intervention costs will be estimated and broader resource use data will be collected using a version of the Client Service Receipt Inventory adapted for musculoskeletal relevance. In addition, a cost

  9. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  10. Subgrouping and TargetEd Exercise pRogrammes for knee and hip OsteoArthritis (STEER OA): a systematic review update and individual participant data meta-analysis protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Melanie A; Burke, Danielle L; Runhaar, Jos; van Der Windt, Danielle; Riley, Richard D; Dziedzic, Krysia; Legha, Amardeep; Evans, Amy L; Abbott, J Haxby; Baker, Kristin; Brown, Jenny; Bennell, Kim L; Bossen, Daniël; Brosseau, Lucie; Chaipinyo, Kanda; Christensen, Robin; Cochrane, Tom; de Rooij, Mariette; Doherty, Michael; French, Helen P; Hickson, Sheila; Hinman, Rana S; Hopman-Rock, Marijke; Hurley, Michael V; Ingram, Carol; Knoop, Jesper; Krauss, Inga; McCarthy, Chris; Messier, Stephen P; Patrick, Donald L; Sahin, Nilay; Talbot, Laura A; Taylor, Robert; Teirlinck, Carolien H; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Walker, Christine; Foster, Nadine E

    2017-12-22

    Knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Therapeutic exercise is a recommended core treatment for people with knee and hip OA, however, the observed effect sizes for reducing pain and improving physical function are small to moderate. This may be due to insufficient targeting of exercise to subgroups of people who are most likely to respond and/or suboptimal content of exercise programmes. This study aims to identify: (1) subgroups of people with knee and hip OA that do/do not respond to therapeutic exercise and to different types of exercise and (2) mediators of the effect of therapeutic exercise for reducing pain and improving physical function. This will enable optimal targeting and refining the content of future exercise interventions. Systematic review and individual participant data meta-analyses. A previous comprehensive systematic review will be updated to identify randomised controlled trials that compare the effects of therapeutic exercise for people with knee and hip OA on pain and physical function to a non-exercise control. Lead authors of eligible trials will be invited to share individual participant data. Trial-level and participant-level characteristics (for baseline variables and outcomes) of included studies will be summarised. Meta-analyses will use a two-stage approach, where effect estimates are obtained for each trial and then synthesised using a random effects model (to account for heterogeneity). All analyses will be on an intention-to-treat principle and all summary meta-analysis estimates will be reported as standardised mean differences with 95% CI. Research ethical or governance approval is exempt as no new data are being collected and no identifiable participant information will be shared. Findings will be disseminated via national and international conferences, publication in peer-reviewed journals and summaries posted on websites accessed by the public and clinicians. CRD42017054049. © Article

  11. Knee arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... debridement; Meniscus repair; Lateral release; Knee surgery; Meniscus - arthroscopy; Collateral ligament - arthroscopy ... pain relief (anesthesia) may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Local anesthesia. Your knee may be numbed ...

  12. Influence of biomechanical characteristics on pain and function outcomes from exercise in medial knee osteoarthritis and varus malalignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennell, Kim L.; Dobson, Fiona; Roos, Ewa M.

    2015-01-01

    and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index). Candidate biomechanical characteristics measured at baseline included: i) visually-observed varus thrust during walking; ii) obesity determined by body mass index; iii) static varus alignment; and iv) isometric quadriceps strength. Data were analysed...... between type of exercise and both varus thrust (p=0.001) and obesity (p=0.023). Neuromuscular exercise was more effective for non-obese participants (mean(95%CI) change=29.5(20.5-38.5)mm) and for those with a varus thrust (mean change=28.7(19.4-38.1)mm), whereas quadriceps strengthening was more effective...... for obese people (mean change=24.7(14.9-34.4)mm) and for those without a varus thrust (mean change=29.4(21.2-37.7)mm). Biomechanical characteristics did not influence the effect of exercise on physical function (p>0.05). Conclusions: These preliminary findings suggest varus thrust and obesity influence...

  13. Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decreased bone density with an increased risk of fracture, and shallow, inefficient breathing. An exercise program needs ... and-Soul (Feb. 2013 issue) (.pdf) Download Document Rehabilitation: Recommendations for Persons with MS (.pdf) Download Brochure ...

  14. Active knee joint flexibility and sports activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, Thomas; Foldspang, Anders; Vestergaard, E

    1999-01-01

    was significantly higher in women than in men and significantly positively associated with weekly hours of swimming and weekly hours of competitive gymnastics. Active knee flexion was significantly positively associated with participation in basketball, and significantly negatively associated with age and weekly......The aim of the study was to estimate active knee flexion and active knee extension in athletes and to investigate the potential association of each to different types of sports activity. Active knee extension and active knee flexion was measured in 339 athletes. Active knee extension...... hours of soccer, European team handball and swimming. The results point to sport-specific adaptation of active knee flexion and active knee extension. Udgivelsesdato: 1999-Apr...

  15. Effects of six weeks of resistance exercise with reciprocal contractions on knee extensors neuromuscular performance : Randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, Euler; Bottaro, Martim; Rodrigues, Pâmella; Souza, Igor Eduardo; Durigan, João; Lima, Ricardo Moreno; Júnior, Silvio Assis Oliveira; Carregaro, Rodrigo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that reciprocal exercise using a pre-Activation of antagonist muscles may increase the agonist neuromuscular performance. OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficiency of two modalities of resistance training (with and without antagonist muscle pre-Activation) during a six week

  16. "Sounds a Bit Crazy, But It Was Almost More Personal:" A Qualitative Study of Patient and Clinician Experiences of Physical Therapist-Prescribed Exercise For Knee Osteoarthritis Via Skype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, R S; Nelligan, R K; Bennell, K L; Delany, C

    2017-12-01

    To explore the experience of patients and physical therapists with Skype for exercise management of knee osteoarthritis (OA). This was a qualitative study. The Donabedian model for quality assessment in health care (structure, process, and outcomes) informed semistructured individual interview questions. The study involved 12 purposively sampled patients with knee OA who received physical therapist-prescribed exercise over Skype, and all therapists (n = 8) who delivered the intervention in a clinical trial were interviewed about their experiences. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. Two investigators undertook coding and analysis using a thematic approach. Six themes arose from both patients and therapists. The themes were Structure: technology (easy to use, variable quality, set-up assistance helpful) and patient convenience (time efficient, flexible, increased access); Process: empowerment to self-manage (facilitated by home environment and therapists focusing on effective treatment) and positive therapeutic relationships (personal undivided attention from therapists, supportive friendly interactions); and Outcomes: satisfaction with care (satisfying, enjoyable, patients would recommend, therapists felt Skype more useful as adjunct to usual practice) and patient benefits (reduced pain, improved function, improved confidence and self-efficacy). A seventh theme arose from therapists regarding process: adjusting routine treatment (need to modify habits, discomfort without hands-on, supported by research environment). Patients and physical therapists described mostly positive experiences using Skype as a service delivery model for physical therapist-supervised exercise management of moderate knee OA. Such a model is feasible and acceptable and has the potential to increase access to supervised exercise management for people with knee OA, either individually or in combination with traditional in-clinic visits. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Noradrenaline spillover during exercise in active versus resting skeletal muscle in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savard, G; Strange, S; Kiens, Bente

    1987-01-01

    Increases in plasma noradrenaline (NA) concentration occur during moderate to heavy exercise in man. This study was undertaken to examine the spillover of NA from both resting and contracting skeletal muscle during exercise. Six male subjects performed one-legged knee-extension so that all...... in the exercising leg than in the resting leg both during 50% and 100% leg exercise. These results suggest that contracting skeletal muscle may contribute to a larger extent than resting skeletal muscle to increasing the level of plasma NA during exercise. Contractile activity may influence the NA spillover from...

  18. Influence of acetaminophen and ibuprofen on in vivo patellar tendon adaptations to knee extensor resistance exercise in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, Chad C; Dickinson, Jared M; Lemoine, Jennifer K

    2011-01-01

    Millions of older individuals consume acetaminophen or ibuprofen daily and these same individuals are encouraged to participate in resistance training. Several in vitro studies suggest that cyclooxygenase-inhibiting drugs can alter tendon metabolism and may influence adaptations to resistance...... training. Thirty-six individuals were randomly assigned to a Placebo (67±2y), Acetaminophen (64±1y; 4000mg(.)d(-1)), or Ibuprofen (64±1y; 1200mg(.)d(-1)) group in a double-blind manner and completed 12-weeks of knee extensor resistance-training. Before and after training in vivo patellar tendon properties......, and this response was not influenced with ibuprofen consumption. Mean tendon CSA increased with training in the Acetaminophen group (3%, p0.05) with training in the Placebo group. These responses were generally uninfluenced by ibuprofen consumption. In the Acetaminophen group, tendon deformation and strain...

  19. Electrode position markedly affects knee torque in tetanic, stimulated contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Taian M; Potenza, Paolo; Gastaldi, Laura; Botter, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how much the distance between stimulation electrodes affects the knee extension torque in tetanic, electrically elicited contractions. Current pulses of progressively larger amplitude, from 0 mA to maximally tolerated intensities, were delivered at 20 pps to the vastus medialis, rectus femoris and vastus lateralis muscles of ten, healthy male subjects. Four inter-electrode distances were tested: 32.5% (L1), 45.0% (L2), 57.5% (L3) and 70% (L4) of the distance between the patella apex and the anterior superior iliac spine. The maximal knee extension torque and the current leading to the maximal torque were measured and compared between electrode configurations. The maximal current tolerated by each participant ranged from 60 to 100 mA and did not depend on the inter-electrode distance. The maximal knee extension torque elicited did not differ between L3 and L4 (P = 0.15) but, for both conditions, knee torque was significantly greater than for L1 and L2 (P torque elicited for L3 and L4 was two to three times greater than that obtained for L1 and L2. The current leading to maximal torque was not as sensitive to inter-electrode distance. Except for L1 current intensity did not change with electrode configuration (P > 0.16). Key results presented here revealed that for a given stimulation intensity, knee extension torque increased dramatically with the distance between electrodes. The distance between electrodes seems therefore to critically affect knee torque, with potential implication for optimising exercise protocols based on electrical stimulation.

  20. Efficacy of pre-operative quadriceps strength training on knee-extensor strength before and shortly following total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Rasmus Skov; Troelsen, Anders; Thorborg, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) report knee pain, limitation in physical activities and low quality of life. The two primary treatments for knee OA are non-surgical treatment (e.g., exercise) and surgery (total knee arthroplasty (TKA)); however, national guidelines recommend non...

  1. Heat generated by knee prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, James W

    2006-01-01

    Temperature sensors were placed in 50 knees in 25 patients who had one or both joints replaced. Temperature recordings were made before walking, after walking, and after cycling. The heat generated in healthy, arthritic, and replaced knees was measured. The knee replacements were done using eight different prostheses. A rotating hinge knee prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 7 degrees C in 20 minutes and 9 degrees C in 40 minutes. An unconstrained ceramic femoral prosthesis articulating with a polyethylene tibial prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 4 degrees C compared with a healthy resting knee. The other designs using a cobalt-chrome alloy and high-density polyethylene had temperature increases of 5 degrees-7 degrees C with exercise. Frictional heat generated in a prosthetic knee is not immediately dissipated and may result in wear, creep, and other degenerative processes in the high-density polyethylene. Extended periods of elevated temperature in joints may inhibit cell growth and perhaps contribute to adverse performance via bone resorption or component loosening. Prosthetic knees generate more heat with activity than healthy or arthritic knees. More-constrained knee prostheses generate more heat than less-constrained prostheses. A knee with a ceramic femoral component generates less heat than a knee with the same design using a cobalt-chromium alloy.

  2. Improved Exercise Tolerance with Caffeine Is Associated with Modulation of both Peripheral and Central Neural Processes in Human Participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Mohr, Magni; Fulford, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    calcium handling and extracellular potassium regulation. Our aims were to investigate how caffeine (i) affects knee extensor PCr kinetics and pH during repeated sets of single-leg knee extensor exercise to task failure and (ii) modulates the interplay between central and peripheral neural processes. We...... hypothesized that the caffeine-induced extension of exercise capacity during repeated sets of exercise would occur despite greater disturbance of the muscle milieu due to enhanced peripheral and corticospinal excitatory output, central motor drive, and muscle contractility. Methods: Nine healthy active young...

  3. Physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Carolyn J; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Physiotherapy, which encompasses a number of modalities, is a non-invasive treatment option in the management of OA. This review summarizes the evidence for commonly used physiotherapy interventions. There is strong evidence to show short-term beneficial effects of exercise on pain and function, although the type of exercise does not seem to influence treatment outcome. Delivery modes, including individual, group or home exercise are all effective, although therapist contact may improve benefits. Attention to improving adherence to exercise is needed to maximize outcomes in the longer-term. Knee taping applied with the aim of realigning the patella and unloading soft tissues can reduce pain. There is also evidence to support the use of knee braces in people with knee OA. Biomechanical studies show that lateral wedge shoe insoles reduce knee load but clinical trials do not support symptomatic benefits. Recent studies suggest individual shoe characteristics also affect knee load and there is current interest in the effect of modified shoe designs. Manual therapy, while not to be used as a stand-alone treatment, may be beneficial. In summary, although the research is not equivocal, there is sufficient evidence to indicate that physiotherapy interventions can reduce pain and improve function in those with knee OA. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2011 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Axial Extension (Posture Exercise)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes our patterns of movement and our breathing efficiency. How to do it: Look straight forward. Tuck ... a Donation Make an Appointment Patient Portal Careers Locations Partnerships Newsroom Calendar Español Follow Us Sign up ...

  5. The quadriceps angle and the incidence of knee injury in indian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a stronger vastus medialis pulls the patella medially resulting in a smaller ... T Puckree (Bsc Physio, Ms (exercise science), Med, PhD (exercise Physiology))1 a govender (B Physio) ... runners into 2 groups with and without knee injuries. Knee.

  6. Muscle metabolism during graded quadriceps exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn W; Stallknecht, Bente; Galbo, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    , oxidation of plasma free fatty acids increases and accordingly oxidation of other fat sources decreases. These findings are in contrast to whole body measurements performed during graded exercise involving a large muscle mass during which fat oxidation peaks at around 60% of .......The aim of the study was to examine local muscle metabolism in response to graded exercise when the involved muscle mass is too small to elicit marked hormonal changes and local blood flow restriction. Nine healthy overnight fasted male subjects performed knee extension exercise with both thighs...... intensity. In conclusion, in the presence of a high blood flow and oxygen supply and only small hormonal changes, total fat oxidation in muscle increases from rest to light exercise, but then remains constant with exercise intensity up to heavy exercise. However, with increasing exercise intensity...

  7. OA Go Away: Development and Preliminary Validation of a Self-Management Tool to Promote Adherence to Exercise and Physical Activity for People with Osteoarthritis of the Hip or Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupin April, Karine; Backman, Catherine; Tugwell, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the face and content validity, construct validity, and test–retest reliability of the OA Go Away (OGA), a personalized self-management tool to promote adherence to exercise and physical activity for people with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. Methods: The face and content validity of OGA version 1.0 were determined via interviews with 10 people with OA of the hip or knee and 10 clinicians. A revised OGA version 2.0 was then tested for construct validity and test–retest reliability with a new sample of 50 people with OA of the hip or knee by comparing key items in the OGA journal with validated outcome measures assessing similar health outcomes and comparing scores on key items of the journal 4–7 days apart. Face and content validity were then confirmed with a new sample of 5 people with OA of the hip or knee and 5 clinicians. Results: Eighteen of 30 items from the OGA version 1.0 and 41 of 43 items from the OGA version 2.0 journal, goals and action plan, and exercise log had adequate content validity. Construct validity and test–retest reliability were acceptable for the main items of the OGA version 2.0 journal. The OGA underwent modifications based on results and participant feedback. Conclusion: The OGA is a novel self-management intervention and assessment tool for people with OA of the hip or knee that shows adequate preliminary measurement properties. PMID:27909359

  8. Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; thor Straten, Eivind Per

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that voluntary exercise leads to an influx of immune cells in tumors and a greater than 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across several mouse models. Improved immunological control of tumor progression may have important clinical implications in the prevention...

  9. The effects of a strength and neuromuscular exercise programme for the lower extremity on knee load, pain and function in obese children and adolescents: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsak, Brian; Artner, David; Baca, Arnold; Pobatschnig, Barbara; Greber-Platzer, Susanne; Nehrer, Stefan; Wondrasch, Barbara

    2015-12-23

    Childhood obesity is one of the most critical and accelerating health challenges throughout the world. It is a major risk factor for developing varus/valgus misalignments of the knee joint. The combination of misalignment at the knee and excess body mass may result in increased joint stresses and damage to articular cartilage. A training programme, which aims at developing a more neutral alignment of the trunk and lower limbs during movement tasks may be able to reduce knee loading during locomotion. Despite the large number of guidelines for muscle strength training and neuromuscular exercises that exist, most are not specifically designed to target the obese children and adolescent demographic. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate a training programme which combines strength and neuromuscular exercises specifically designed to the needs and limitations of obese children and adolescents and analyse the effects of the training programme from a biomechanical and clinical point of view. A single assessor-blinded, pre-test and post-test randomised controlled trial, with one control and one intervention group will be conducted with 48 boys and girls aged between 10 and 18 years. Intervention group participants will receive a 12-week neuromuscular and quadriceps/hip strength training programme. Three-dimensional (3D) gait analyses during level walking and stair climbing will be performed at baseline and follow-up sessions. The primary outcome parameters for this study will be the overall peak external frontal knee moment and impulse during walking. Secondary outcomes include the subscales of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), frontal and sagittal kinematics and kinetics for the lower extremities during walking and stair climbing, ratings of change in knee-related well-being, pain and function and adherence to the training programme. In addition, the training programme will be evaulated from a clinical and health status perspective by

  10. Knee joint stabilization therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, J; Dekker, J; van der Leeden, M; van der Esch, M; Thorstensson, C A; Gerritsen, M; Voorneman, R E; Peter, W F; de Rooij, M; Romviel, S; Lems, W F; Roorda, L D; Steultjens, M P M

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether an exercise program, initially focusing on knee stabilization and subsequently on muscle strength and performance of daily activities is more effective than an exercise program focusing on muscle strength and performance of daily activities only, in reducing activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and instability of the knee joint. A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial involving 159 knee OA patients with self-reported and/or biomechanically assessed knee instability, randomly assigned to two treatment groups. Both groups received a supervised exercise program for 12 weeks, consisting of muscle strengthening exercises and training of daily activities, but only in the experimental group specific knee joint stabilization training was provided. Outcome measures included activity limitations (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index - WOMAC physical function, primary outcome), pain, global perceived effect and knee stability. Both treatment groups demonstrated large (∼20-40%) and clinically relevant reductions in activity limitations, pain and knee instability, which were sustained 6 months post-treatment. No differences in effectiveness between experimental and control treatment were found on WOMAC physical function (B (95% confidence interval - CI) = -0.01 (-2.58 to 2.57)) or secondary outcome measures, except for a higher global perceived effect in the experimental group (P = 0.04). Both exercise programs were highly effective in reducing activity limitations and pain and restoring knee stability in knee OA patients with instability of the knee. In knee OA patients suffering from knee instability, specific knee joint stabilization training, in addition to muscle strengthening and functional exercises, does not seem to have any additional value. Dutch Trial Register (NTR) registration number: NTR1475. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier

  11. Influence of exercise intensity on skeletal muscle blood flow, O2 extraction and O2 uptake on-kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Andrew M; Krustrup, Peter; Wilkerson, Daryl P

    2012-01-01

    Key points Following the start of low-intensity exercise in healthy humans, it has been established that the kinetics of muscle O(2) delivery is faster than, and does not limit, the kinetics of muscle O(2) uptake. Direct data are lacking, however, on the question of whether O(2) delivery might...... limit O(2) uptake kinetics during high-intensity exercise. In this study, we made frequent measurements of muscle blood flow, arterial-to-venous O(2) difference (a- difference) and O(2) uptake following the onset of multiple transitions of both low-intensity and high-intensity knee-extension exercise...... in the same subjects. We show that although blood flow kinetics is slower for high-intensity compared with low-intensity exercise, this does not result in slower O(2) uptake kinetics. These results indicate that muscle O(2) delivery does not limit O(2) uptake during knee-extension exercise in healthy humans....

  12. Exercise Rehabilitation after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keun Ok An

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES Exercise rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction has changed dramatically in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent changes in exercise programs related to ACL rehabilitation. METHODS We conducted a literature review of recently published articles related exercise programs after ACL reconstruction. RESULTS The accelerated rehabilitation program, which allows patients to achieve full extension ofthe knee early in the postoperative period, is now a widely practiced rehabilitation program. A prospective study of rehabilitation programs after ACL reconstruction showed that early joint exercises do not interfere with the healing of grafts. Instead, they alleviate pain, thereby reducing the negative impact. Moreover, according to several biomechanical studies, open kinetic chain exercises are potentially disadvantageous to knee stability. There is no evidence that early weight bearing results in weakening of graft distraction or internal fixation compared with delayed weight bearing. CONCLUSIONS In conclusion, prevention of ACL injuries and rehabilitative exercise training can help to achieve optimal exercise performance while avoiding the risk of sports-related injury.

  13. Adherence to Commonly Prescribed, Home-Based Strength Training Exercises for the Lower Extremity Can Be Objectively Monitored Using the Bandcizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael S; Thorborg, Kristian; Rode, Line A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of automatically stored exercise data from the elastic band sensor compared with those of a gold-standard stretch sensor during exercises commonly used for rehabilitation of the hip and knee. The design was a concurrent validity study....... Participants performed 3 sets of 10 repetitions of 6 exercises with both sensors attached to the same elastic exercise band. These were knee extension, knee flexion, hip abduction and adduction, hip flexion, and hip external rotation. Agreement between methods was calculated for date, time of day, repetitions......, total and single repetition, and contraction phase-specific time under tension (TUT). Files from the elastic band sensor contained identical dates, time of day, and number of repetitions for each exercise set compared with those for the gold standard. Total TUT and total single repetition TUT were...

  14. Impact of resistance exercise program on functional capacity and muscular strength of knee extensor in pre-frail community-dwelling older women: a randomized crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustosa, Lygia P; Silva, Juscélio P; Coelho, Fernanda M; Pereira, Daniele S; Parentoni, Adriana N; Pereira, Leani S M

    2011-01-01

    Frailty syndrome in elderly people is characterized by a reduction of energy reserves and also by a decreased of resistance to stressors, resulting in an increase of vulnerability. The aim of this study was to verify the effect of a muscle-strengthening program with load in pre-frail elder women with regards to the functional capacity, knee extensor muscle strength and their correlation. Thrity-two pre-frail community-dwelling women participated in this study. Potential participants with cognitive impairment (MEEM), lower extremities orthopedic surgery, fractures, inability to walk unaided, neurological diseases, acute inflammatory disease, tumor growth, regular physical activity and current use of immunomodulators were excluded. All partcipants were evaluated by a blinded assessor using: Timed up and go (TUG), 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT) and knee extensor muscle strength (Byodex System 3 Pro® isokinetic dynamometer at angular speeds of 60 and 180(0)/s). The intervention consisted of strengthening exercises of the lower extremities at 70% of 1RM, three times/ week for ten weeks. The statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA and Spearman tests After the intervention, it was observed statistical significance on the work at 180(0)/s (F=12.71, p=0.02), on the power at 180(0)/s (F=15.40, p=0.02) and on the functional capacity (TUG, F=9.54, p=0.01; TC10, F=3.80, p=0.01). There was a good negative and statistically significant correlation between the TUG and work at 60(0)/s, such as the TUG and work at 180(0)/s (r=-0.65, p=0.01; r=-0.72, p=0.01). The intervention improved the muscular power and the functional capacity. The increase of the power correlated with function, which is an important variable of the quality of life in the pre-frail elders. Article registered in the ISRCT register under number ISRCTN62824599.

  15. The effects of a supportive knee brace on leg performance in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuizen, J W; Koene, F M; Oostvogel, H J; von Thiel, T P; Verstappen, F T

    1991-12-01

    Eight healthy volunteers were fitted with a supportive knee brace (Push Brace 'Heavy') to one knee for a duration of four weeks wherein they were tested before, during and after the application to establish the effect of bracing on performance. The tests consisted of isokinetic strength measurement of knee flexion and extension, 60 meter dash, vertical jump height and a progressive horizontal treadmill test until exhaustion (Vmax) with determination of oxygen uptake, heart rate and plasma lactate concentration. Wearing the brace for one day, the performance indicators showed a decline compared with the test before application (base values). Sprint time was 4% longer (p less than 0.01) and Vmax 6% slower (p less than 0.01). Peak torque of knee flexion at 60 and 240 deg.sec-1 was 6% (p less than 0.05) respectively 9% (p less than 0.05) less. Peak extension torque at 60 deg.sec-1 was 9% less (p less than 0.05). While wearing the brace for four weeks, the test performances were practically identical to their base values. After removal of the brace, all test parameters were statistically similar to the base values. Heart rate at submaximal exercise levels was even lower (p less than 0.05). In conclusion, performance in sports with test-like exercise patterns is not affected by the brace tested. Bracing does not "weaken the knee" as it is widely believed in sports practice.

  16. Difference in the recruitment of hip and knee muscles between back squat and plyometric squat jump.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihide Sugisaki

    Full Text Available Athletes who aim to improve both muscular endurance and power often perform exercises that involve similar joint actions under different lifting conditions, such as changes in the load or speed, which are implemented at different times during a periodized exercise program or simultaneously. The prescribed exercises are considered to recruit the same muscles even if the lifting conditions differ to each other. The present study aimed to clarify this by examining whether the recruitment of individual hip and knee muscles during the squat exercise differs between lifting conditions adopted for muscular endurance and power training regimens. Moderately trained men performed back squats (BS, with a load of approximately 60% of one repetition maximum, as a muscular endurance training exercise, and they performed plyometric squat jumping (PSJ for power training. During each exercise, the lower limb joint torques and the recruitment of five hip and knee muscles were determined with inverse-dynamics and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. While the maximal and mean knee joint torques were greater during PSJ than during BS (p<0.01, the T2 values for the quadriceps femoris muscle did not differ between the exercises. In contrast, the T2 values of the gluteus maximus and hip adductor muscles were higher during PSJ (p<0.05 than during BS, although there was no significant difference in the mean hip extension torque between the two exercises. The current results indicate that the individual use of the agonist muscles differs between BS and PSJ, and it does not always correspond with the joint kinetics during the exercises. Therefore, in addition to the exercise type, the lifting condition should also be taken into consideration as a determinant of the major muscles trained during a resistance exercise.

  17. Maximal Strength Performance and Muscle Activation for the Bench Press and Triceps Extension Exercises Adopting Dumbbell, Barbell, and Machine Modalities Over Multiple Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Déborah de Araújo; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Paz, Gabriel A; Bezerra, Ewertton de S; Miranda, Humberto

    2017-07-01

    Farias, DdA, Willardson, JM, Paz, GA, Bezerra, EdS, and Miranda, H. Maximal strength performance and muscle activation for the bench press and triceps extension exercises adopting dumbbell, barbell and machine modalities over multiple sets. J Strength Cond Res 31(7): 1879-1887, 2017-The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation, total repetitions, and training volume for 3 bench press (BP) exercise modes (Smith machine [SMBP], barbell [BBP], and dumbbell [DBP]) that were followed by a triceps extension (TE) exercise. Nineteen trained men performed 3 testing protocols in random order, which included: (P1) SMBP + TE; (P2) BBP + TE; and (P3) DBP + TE. Each protocol involved 4 sets with a 10-repetition maximum (RM) load, immediately followed by a TE exercise that was also performed for 4 sets with a 10RM load. A 2-minute rest interval was adopted between sets and exercises. Surface electromyographic activity was assessed for the pectoralis major (PM), anterior deltoid (AD), biceps brachii (BB), and triceps brachii (TB). The results indicated that significantly higher total repetitions were achieved for the DBP (31.2 ± 3.2) vs. the BBP (27.8 ± 4.8). For the TE, significantly greater volume was achieved when this exercise was performed after the BBP (1,204.4 ± 249.4 kg) and DBP (1,216.8 ± 287.5 kg) vs. the SMBP (1,097.5 ± 193 kg). The DBP elicited significantly greater PM activity vs. the BBP. The SMBP elicited significantly greater AD activity vs. the BBP and DBP. During the different BP modes, the SMBP and BBP elicited significantly greater TB activity vs. the DBP. However, the DBP elicited significantly greater BB activity vs. the SMBP and BBP, respectively. During the succeeding TE exercise, significantly greater activity of the TB was observed when this exercise was performed after the BBP vs. the SMBP and DBP. Therefore, it seems that the variation in BP modes does influence both repetition performance and muscle activation patterns during the

  18. Voluntary drive-dependent changes in vastus lateralis motor unit firing rates during a sustained isometric contraction at 50% of maximum knee extension force.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.J.; Elzinga, M.J.; Verdijk, PW; van Mechelen, W.; de Haan, A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to relate the expected inter-subject variability in voluntary drive of the knee extensor muscles during a sustained isometric contraction to the changes in firing rates of single motor units. Voluntary activation, as established with super-imposed electrical

  19. Comparison of whole-body vibration exercise and plyometric exercise to improve isokinetic muscular strength, jumping performance and balance of female volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Youn; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of whole-body vibration exercise and plyometric exercise on female volleyball players. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomly allocated to two exercise groups (whole-body vibration exercise group and plyometric exercise group). The exercise was conducted three times each week for 8 weeks. Isokinetic muscular strength, jumping performance, and balance were measured before starting the exercise and after finishing the 8 weeks of exercise. [Results] Measurements of isokinetic muscular strength revealed that the whole-body vibration exercise group showed significant increase after the exercise. However, the plyometric exercise group had no significant increase in lumbar flexion, extension, and knee flexion. Measurements of vertical jumping revealed that, the whole-body vibration exercise group had no significant increase after the exercise. However, the plyometric exercise group showed significant increase. Measurements of balance revealed that, the whole-body vibration exercise group showed significant increase. However, the plyometric exercise group showed no significant increase. [Conclusion] Although both whole-body vibration and plyometric exercises are effective intervention methods, the two methods have different effects on the improvement of isokinetic muscular strength, jumping performance, and balance of female volleyball players.

  20. Predictors of long-term effect from education and exercise in patients with knee and hip pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Simonsen, Mikkel Elstrup; Odgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    in pain (p self-efficacy at three months (Beta = 0.304) was a predictor of one-year improvement in EQ-5D (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: The identified predictors highlight the importance of combining education and exercise. This study indicates that good long-term treatment results...... baseline to one year were dependent variables in regression analyses, while changes from baseline to 3 months and absolute results at three months in physical performance (30-second chair stand test) and self-efficacy were predictor variables. RESULTS: A total of 79/82 patients completed the one......-year follow-up. Improvements in pain and EQ-5D at three months were maintained at one year (p self-efficacy from baseline to three months (Beta = -0.369) and 30-second chair stand test (Beta = -0.251) and self-efficacy at three months (Beta = -0.492) were predictors of one-year improvement...

  1. Runner's Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... require a lot of knee bending, such as biking, jumping, or skiing. Runner's knee happens when the ... is out of alignment, activities like running or biking can wear down the cartilage of the kneecap ( ...

  2. Slightly flexed knee position within a standard knee coil: MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y. [Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of positioning the knee slightly flexed within a standard MR knee coil in delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Within the confined space of a commercially available knee coil, knee could bend as much as 30 , average 17 of flexion. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained at both fully extended and slightly flexed positions. Twenty-two normal knees and 18 knees with ACL tears were examined and paired MR images were evaluated by two observers. Compared with knee extension, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 57 % of reviews of full length of the ACL and 53 % of the femoral attachment. In the extended position the anterior margin of the ligament was obscured due to partial averaging with the intercondylar roof. We recommend examining the knee in an achievable flexed position within the standard knee coil. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 6 refs.

  3. Slightly flexed knee position within a standard knee coil: MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y.; Ikeda, K.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of positioning the knee slightly flexed within a standard MR knee coil in delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Within the confined space of a commercially available knee coil, knee could bend as much as 30 , average 17 of flexion. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained at both fully extended and slightly flexed positions. Twenty-two normal knees and 18 knees with ACL tears were examined and paired MR images were evaluated by two observers. Compared with knee extension, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 57 % of reviews of full length of the ACL and 53 % of the femoral attachment. In the extended position the anterior margin of the ligament was obscured due to partial averaging with the intercondylar roof. We recommend examining the knee in an achievable flexed position within the standard knee coil. (orig.)

  4. Effects of diet type and supplementation of glucosamine, chondroitin, and MSM on body composition, functional status, and markers of health in women with knee osteoarthritis initiating a resistance-based exercise and weight loss program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugan Kristin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine whether sedentary obese women with knee OA initiating an exercise and weight loss program may experience more beneficial changes in body composition, functional capacity, and/or markers of health following a higher protein diet compared to a higher carbohydrate diet with or without GCM supplementation. Methods Thirty sedentary women (54 ± 9 yrs, 163 ± 6 cm, 88.6 ± 13 kg, 46.1 ± 3% fat, 33.3 ± 5 kg/m2 with clinically diagnosed knee OA participated in a 14-week exercise and weight loss program. Participants followed an isoenergenic low fat higher carbohydrate (HC or higher protein (HP diet while participating in a supervised 30-minute circuit resistance-training program three times per week for 14-weeks. In a randomized and double blind manner, participants ingested supplements containing 1,500 mg/d of glucosamine (as d-glucosamine HCL, 1,200 mg/d of chondroitin sulfate (from chondroitin sulfate sodium, and 900 mg/d of methylsulfonylmethane or a placebo. At 0, 10, and 14-weeks, participants completed a battery of assessments. Data were analyzed by MANOVA with repeated measures. Results Participants in both groups experienced significant reductions in body mass (-2.4 ± 3%, fat mass (-6.0 ± 6%, and body fat (-3.5 ± 4% with no significant changes in fat free mass or resting energy expenditure. Perception of knee pain (-49 ± 39% and knee stiffness (-42 ± 37% was decreased while maximal strength (12%, muscular endurance (20%, balance indices (7% to 20%, lipid levels (-8% to -12%, homeostasis model assessment for estimating insulin resistance (-17%, leptin (-30%, and measures of physical functioning (59%, vitality (120%, and social function (66% were improved in both groups with no differences among groups. Functional aerobic capacity was increased to a greater degree for those in the HP and GCM groups while there were some trends suggesting that supplementation affected

  5. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abdominal wall inward, exhale as you lift chest area. This can be done with quick short movements, or slow full movements. Repeat 10-15 times, to fatigue... Abdominal Exercise Lay on your back with both knees ... © 2018 North ...

  6. Anterior knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patellofemoral syndrome; Chondromalacia patella; Runner's knee; Patellar tendinitis; Jumper's knee ... kneecap (patella) sits over the front of your knee joint. As you bend or straighten your knee, ...

  7. Knee Pain during Strength Training Shortly following Fast-Track Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt; Kehlet, Henrik; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2014-01-01

    Background Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is unknown how these exercise variables influence knee pain after TKA. Objective To investigate the effect of loading and contraction failure on knee pain during strength training, shortly following TKA. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Consecutive sample of patients from the Copenhagen area, Denmark, receiving a TKA, between November 2012 and April 2013. Participants Seventeen patients, no more than 3 weeks after their TKA. Main outcome measures: In a randomized order, the patients performed 1 set of 4 standardized knee extensions, using relative loads of 8, 14, and 20 repetition maximum (RM), and ended with 1 single set to contraction failure (14 RM load). The individual loadings (kilograms) were determined during a familiarization session >72 hours prior. The patients rated their knee pain during each repetition, using a numerical rating scale (0–10). Results Two patients were lost to follow up. Knee pain increased with increasing load (20 RM: 3.1±2.0 points, 14 RM: 3.5±1.8 points, 8 RM: 4.3±2.5 points, P = 0.006), and repetitions to contraction failure (10% failure: 3.2±1.9 points, 100% failure: 5.4±1.6 points, Pknee pain 60 seconds after the final repetition (2.7±2.4 points) was not different from that recorded before strength training (2.7±1.8 points, P = 0.88). Conclusion Both loading and repetitions performed to contraction failure during knee- extension strength-training, increased post-operative knee pain during strength training implemented shortly following TKA. However, only the increase in pain during repetitions to contraction failure exceeded that defined as clinically relevant, and was very short-lived. Trial Registration Clinical

  8. A Maximum Muscle Strength Prediction Formula Using Theoretical Grade 3 Muscle Strength Value in Daniels et al.’s Manual Muscle Test, in Consideration of Age: An Investigation of Hip and Knee Joint Flexion and Extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Usa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to develop a formula for predicting maximum muscle strength value for young, middle-aged, and elderly adults using theoretical Grade 3 muscle strength value (moment fair: Mf—the static muscular moment to support a limb segment against gravity—from the manual muscle test by Daniels et al. A total of 130 healthy Japanese individuals divided by age group performed isometric muscle contractions at maximum effort for various movements of hip joint flexion and extension and knee joint flexion and extension, and the accompanying resisting force was measured and maximum muscle strength value (moment max, Mm was calculated. Body weight and limb segment length (thigh and lower leg length were measured, and Mf was calculated using anthropometric measures and theoretical calculation. There was a linear correlation between Mf and Mm in each of the four movement types in all groups, excepting knee flexion in elderly. However, the formula for predicting maximum muscle strength was not sufficiently compatible in middle-aged and elderly adults, suggesting that the formula obtained in this study is applicable in young adults only.

  9. Phosphocreatine recovery overshoot after high intensity exercise in human skeletal muscle is associated with extensive muscle acidification and a significant decrease in phosphorylation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Jerzy A; Korzeniewski, Bernard; Kulinowski, Piotr; Zapart-Bukowska, Justyna; Majerczak, Joanna; Jasiński, Andrzej

    2010-09-01

    The phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery overshoot in skeletal muscle is a transient increase of PCr concentration above the resting level after termination of exercise. In the present study [PCr], [ATP], [P(i)] and pH were measured in calf muscle during rest, during plantar flexion exercise until exhaustion and recovery, using the (31)P NMR spectroscopy. A significantly greater acidification of muscle cells and significantly lower phosphorylation potential (DeltaG (ATP)) at the end of exercise was encountered in the group of subjects that evidenced the [PCr] overshoot as well as [ADP] and [P(i)] undershoots than in the group that did not. We postulate that the role of the PCr overshoot-related transiently elevated [ATP]/[ADP(free)] ratio is to activate different processes (including protein synthesis) that participate in repairing numerous damages of the muscle cells caused by intensive exercise-induced stressing factors, such as extensive muscle acidification, a significant decrease in DeltaG (ATP), an elevated level of reactive oxygen species or mechanical disturbances.

  10. The effectiveness of the use of a digital activity coaching system in addition to a two-week home-based exercise program in patients after total knee arthroplasty: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmelink, Karen E M; Zeegers, A V C M; Tönis, Thijs M; Hullegie, Wim; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Staal, J Bart

    2017-07-05

    There is consistent evidence that supervised programs are not superior to home-based programs after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), especially in patients without complications. Home-based exercise programs are effective, but we hypothesize that their effectiveness can be improved by increasing the adherence to physical therapy advice to reach an adequate exercise level during the program and thereafter. Our hypothesis is that an activity coaching system (accelerometer-based activity sensor), alongside a home-based exercise program, will increase adherence to exercises and the activity level, thereby improving physical functioning and recovery. The objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of an activity coaching system in addition to a home-based exercise program after a TKA compared to only the home-based exercise program with physical functioning as outcome. This study is a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Both the intervention (n = 55) and the control group (n = 55) receive a two-week home-based exercise program, and the intervention group receives an additional activity coaching system. This is a hand-held electronic device together with an app on a smartphone providing information and advice on exercise behavior during the day. The primary outcome is physical functioning, measured with the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) after two weeks, six weeks and three months. Secondary outcomes are 1) adherence to the activity level (activity diary); 2) physical functioning, measured with the 2-Minute Walk Test (2MWT) and the Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score; 3) quality of life (SF-36); 4) healthcare use up to one year postoperatively and 5) cost-effectiveness. Data are collected preoperatively, three days, two and six weeks, three months and one year postoperatively. The strengths of the study are the use of both performance-based tests and self-reported questionnaires and the personalized tailored program after TKA given by specialized physical

  11. Effects of contraction duration on low-frequency fatigue in voluntary and electrically induced exercise of quadriceps muscle in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratkevicius, A; Skurvydas, A; Povilonis, E; Quistorff, B; Lexell, J

    1998-04-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate if low-frequency fatigue (LFF) dependent on the duration of repeated muscle contractions and to compare LFF in voluntary and electrically induced exercise. Male subjects performed three 9-min periods of repeated isometric knee extensions at 40% maximal voluntary contraction with contraction plus relaxation periods of 30 plus 60 s, 15 plus 30 s and 5 plus 10 s in protocols 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The same exercise protocols were repeated using feedback-controlled electrical stimulation at 40% maximal tetanic torque. Before and 15 min after each exercise period, knee extension torque at 1, 7, 10, 15, 20, 50 and 100 Hz was assessed. During voluntary exercise, electromyogram root mean square (EMGrms) of the vastus lateralis muscle was evaluated. The 20-Hz torque:100-Hz torque (20:100 Hz torque) ratio was reduced more after electrically induced than after voluntary exercise (P exercise, the decrease in 20:100 Hz torque ratio was gradually (P exercise, the decrease in 20:100 Hz torque ratio and the increase in EMGrms were greater in protocol 1 (P exercise and that the electrically induced exercise produced a more pronounced LFF compared to voluntary exercise of submaximal intensity. It is suggested that compensatory recruitment of faster-contracting motor units is an additional factor affecting the severity of LFF during voluntary exercise.

  12. Joint angles of the ankle, knee, and hip and loading conditions during split squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Pascal; List, Renate; Zemp, Roland; Schellenberg, Florian; Taylor, William R; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify how step length and the front tibia angle influence joint angles and loading conditions during the split squat exercise. Eleven subjects performed split squats with an additional load of 25% body weight applied using a barbell. Each subject's movements were recorded using a motion capture system, and the ground reaction force was measured under each foot. The joint angles and loading conditions were calculated using a cluster-based kinematic approach and inverse dynamics modeling respectively. Increases in the tibia angle resulted in a smaller range of motion (ROM) of the front knee and a larger ROM of the rear knee and hip. The external flexion moment in the front knee/hip and the external extension moment in the rear hip decreased as the tibia angle increased. The flexion moment in the rear knee increased as the tibia angle increased. The load distribution between the legs changed squat execution was varied. Our results describing the changes in joint angles and the resulting differences in the moments of the knee and hip will allow coaches and therapists to adapt the split squat exercise to the individual motion and load demands of athletes.

  13. Effects of therapeutic exercise and hydrotherapy on pain severity and knee range of motion in patients with hemophilia: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Mazloum

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Using hydrotherapy in addition to usual rehabilitation training can result in beneficial effect in terms of pain and knee joint ROM. However, it appears that hydrotherapy is more effective in reducing pain.

  14. Partial knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... good range of motion in your knee. The ligaments in your knee are stable. However, most people with knee arthritis have a surgery called a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Knee replacement is most often done in people age 60 ...

  15. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Jumper's Knee KidsHealth / For Teens / Jumper's Knee What's in this ... continued damage to the knee. How Does the Knee Work? To understand how jumper's knee happens, it ...

  16. Thirty Minutes of Running Exercise Decreases T2 Signal Intensity but Not Thickness of the Knee Joint Cartilage: A 3.0-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanfil, Yiğitcan; Babayeva, Naila; Dönmez, Gürhan; Diren, H Barış; Eryılmaz, Muzaffer; Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Korkusuz, Feza

    2018-04-01

    Objective Recent studies showed a potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which can be used as an additional tool for diagnosing cartilage degeneration in the early stage. We designed a cross-sectional study in order to evaluate knee joint cartilage adaptation to running, using 3.0-T MRI equipped with the 3-dimensional turbo spin echo (VISTA = Volume ISotropic Turbo spin echo Acquisition) software. By this thickness (mm) and signal intensity (mean pixel value) can be quantified, which could be closely related to the fluid content of the knee joint cartilage, before and after running. Methods A total of 22 males, aged 18 to 35 years, dominant (right) and nondominant (left) knees were assessed before and after 30 minutes of running. Cartilage thickness and signal intensity of surfaces of the patella, medial and lateral femoral and tibial condyles were measured. Results Cartilage thickness of the lateral condyle decreased at the dominant knee, while it increased at the medial tibial plateau. Signal intensity decreased at all locations, except the lateral patella in both knees. The most obvious decrease in signal intensity (10.6%) was at the medial tibial plateau from 949.8 to 849.0 of the dominant knee. Conclusion There was an increase in thickness measurements and decrease in signal intensity in medial tibial plateau of the dominant knee after 30 minutes of running. This outcome could be related to fluid outflow from the tissue. Greater reductions in the medial tibial plateau cartilage indicate greater load sharing by these areas of the joint during a 30-minute running.

  17. Epidemiology of jumper's knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, A

    1986-01-01

    Jumper's knee is a typical functional overload injury because it affects those athletes who submit their knee extensor mechanisms to intense and repeated stress, e.g. volleyball and basketball players, high and long jumpers. According to the classification of Perugia and colleagues, it is an insertional tendinopathy affecting, in order of frequency, the insertion of the patellar tendon into the patella (65% of cases), attachment of the quadriceps tendon to the patella (25%) and the attachment of the patellar tendon to the tibial tuberosity (10%). The frequent occurrence of this injury in athletes led to the study of factors that may contribute to its onset and aggravation. These factors are divided into extrinsic (i.e. kind of sport practised and training methods used) and intrinsic (i.e. connected with the somatic and morphological characteristics of the athletes). On the basis of our experience and after a review of the literature it appears, contrary to what has been repeatedly claimed in the past, the extrinsic factors are more important than the intrinsic in the aetiology of jumper's knee. The effect of traumatic incidents and use of elastic kneecap guards should also be considered negligible. The intrinsic causes of jumper's knee, can be sought in the mechanical properties of tendons (resistance, elasticity and extensibility) rather than in morphological or biomechanical abnormalities of the knee extensor mechanism.

  18. Variability of Plyometric and Ballistic Exercise Technique Maintains Jump Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Phillip T; Greig, Matthew; Comfort, Paul; McMahon, John J

    2018-06-01

    Chandler, PT, Greig, M, Comfort, P, and McMahon, JJ. Variability of plyometric and ballistic exercise technique maintains jump performance. J Strength Cond Res 32(6): 1571-1582, 2018-The aim of this study was to investigate changes in vertical jump technique over the course of a training session. Twelve plyometric and ballistic exercise-trained male athletes (age = 23.4 ± 4.6 years, body mass = 78.7 ± 18.8 kg, height = 177.1 ± 9.0 cm) performed 3 sets of 10 repetitions of drop jump (DJ), rebound jump (RJ) and squat jump (SJ). Each exercise was analyzed from touchdown to peak joint flexion and peak joint flexion to take-off. Squat jump was analyzed from peak joint flexion to take-off only. Jump height, flexion and extension time and range of motion, and instantaneous angles of the ankle, knee, and hip joints were measured. Separate 1-way repeated analyses of variance compared vertical jump technique across exercise sets and repetitions. Exercise set analysis found that SJ had lower results than DJ and RJ for the angle at peak joint flexion for the hip, knee, and ankle joints and take-off angle of the hip joint. Exercise repetition analysis found that the ankle joint had variable differences for the angle at take-off, flexion, and extension time for RJ. The knee joint had variable differences for flexion time for DJ and angle at take-off and touchdown for RJ. There was no difference in jump height. Variation in measured parameters across repetitions highlights variable technique across plyometric and ballistic exercises. This did not affect jump performance, but likely maintained jump performance by overcoming constraints (e.g., level of rate coding).

  19. Combined inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandins reduces human skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, Henning; Gemmer, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is an important mediator of tissue vasodilatation, yet the role of the specific substances, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PG), in mediating the large increases in muscle perfusion during exercise in humans is unclear. Quadriceps microvascular blood flow......, respectively (P exercise in humans. These findings demonstrate an important synergistic role of NO and PG for skeletal muscle vasodilatation and hyperaemia during muscular contraction....... was quantified by near infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green in six healthy humans during dynamic knee extension exercise with and without combined pharmacological inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) and PG by L-NAME and indomethacin, respectively. Microdialysis was applied to determine interstitial release...

  20. Impact of exercise selection on hamstring muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Matthew N; Williams, Morgan D; Opar, David A; Al Najjar, Aiman; Kerr, Graham K; Shield, Anthony J

    2017-07-01

    To determine which strength training exercises selectively activate the biceps femoris long head (BF LongHead ) muscle. We recruited 24 recreationally active men for this two-part observational study . Part 1: We explored the amplitudes and the ratios of lateral (BF) to medial hamstring (MH) normalised electromyography (nEMG) during the concentric and eccentric phases of 10 common strength training exercises. Part 2: We used functional MRI (fMRI) to determine the spatial patterns of hamstring activation during two exercises which (1) most selectively and (2) least selectively activated the BF in part 1. Eccentrically, the largest BF/MH nEMG ratio occurred in the 45° hip-extension exercise; the lowest was in the Nordic hamstring (Nordic) and bent-knee bridge exercises. Concentrically, the highest BF/MH nEMG ratio occurred during the lunge and 45° hip extension; the lowest was during the leg curl and bent-knee bridge. fMRI revealed a greater BF (LongHead) to semitendinosus activation ratio in the 45° hip extension than the Nordic (phamstring muscles (p≤0.002). We highlight the heterogeneity of hamstring activation patterns in different tasks. Hip-extension exercise selectively activates the long hamstrings, and the Nordic exercise preferentially recruits the semitendinosus. These findings have implications for strategies to prevent hamstring injury as well as potentially for clinicians targeting specific hamstring components for treatment (mechanotherapy). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Influence of exercise intensity on skeletal muscle blood flow, O2 extraction and O2 uptake on-kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew M; Krustrup, Peter; Wilkerson, Daryl P; Berger, Nicolas J; Calbet, José A; Bangsbo, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Following the start of low-intensity exercise in healthy humans, it has been established that the kinetics of skeletal muscle O2 delivery is faster than, and does not limit, the kinetics of muscle O2 uptake (). Direct data are lacking, however, on the question of whether O2 delivery might limit kinetics during high-intensity exercise. Using multiple exercise transitions to enhance confidence in parameter estimation, we therefore investigated the kinetics of, and inter-relationships between, muscle blood flow (), a– difference and following the onset of low-intensity (LI) and high-intensity (HI) exercise. Seven healthy males completed four 6 min bouts of LI and four 6 min bouts of HI single-legged knee-extension exercise. Blood was frequently drawn from the femoral artery and vein during exercise and , a– difference and were calculated and subsequently modelled using non-linear regression techniques. For LI, the fundamental component mean response time (MRTp) for kinetics was significantly shorter than kinetics (mean ± SEM, 18 ± 4 vs. 30 ± 4 s; P exercise intensities; however, the MRTp for a– difference was significantly shorter for HI compared with LI (17 ± 3 vs. 28 ± 4 s; P exercise and remained unaltered thereafter, with no differences between LI and HI. These results indicate that bulk O2 delivery does not limit kinetics following the onset of LI or HI knee-extension exercise. PMID:22711961

  2. Knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fracture of the kneecap or other bones. Iliotibial band syndrome . Injury to the thick band that runs from your hip to the outside ... of your knee pain. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your provider if: You cannot bear ...

  3. The associations between quadriceps muscle strength, power, and knee joint mechanics in knee osteoarthritis: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Amanda M; Thomas, Abbey C; Armstrong, Charles W; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Tevald, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Abnormal knee joint mechanics have been implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Deficits in muscle function (i.e., strength and power) may contribute to abnormal knee joint loading. The associations between quadriceps strength, power and knee joint mechanics remain unclear in knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to collect peak knee joint angles and moments during the first 50% of stance phase of gait in 33 participants with knee osteoarthritis. Quadriceps strength and power were assessed using a knee extension machine. Strength was quantified as the one repetition maximum. Power was quantified as the peak power produced at 40-90% of the one repetition maximum. Quadriceps strength accounted for 15% of the variance in peak knee flexion angle (P=0.016). Quadriceps power accounted for 20-29% of the variance in peak knee flexion angle (Pknee adduction moment (P=0.05). These data suggest that quadriceps power explains more variance in knee flexion angle and knee adduction moment during gait in knee osteoarthritis than quadriceps strength. Additionally, quadriceps power at multiple loads is associated with knee joint mechanics and therefore should be assessed at a variety of loads. Taken together, these results indicate that quadriceps power may be a potential target for interventions aimed at changing knee joint mechanics in knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  5. Quadriceps strength and anterior knee pain following tibia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tension generated on extension of the knee against a resistance using tensiometer was measured in Newton. The ranges of motion of the knees were documented, as well as Lysholm score which measures activities and document the presence and limitation caused by anterior knee pain. Results: A total of 36 patients ...

  6. The role of knee joint moments and knee impairments on self-reported knee pain during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Megan; Farrokhi, Shawn; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2016-01-01

    The association between high mechanical knee joint loading during gait with onset and progression of knee osteoarthritis has been extensively studied. However, less attention has been given to risk factors related to increased pain during gait. The purpose of this study was to evaluate knee joint moments and clinical characteristics that may be associated with gait-related knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Sixty-seven participants with knee osteoarthritis were stratified into three groups of no pain (n=18), mild pain (n=27), or moderate/severe pain (n=22) based on their self-reported symptoms during gait. All participants underwent three-dimensional gait analysis. Quadriceps strength, knee extension range of motion, radiographic knee alignment and self-reported measures of global pain and function were also quantified. The moderate/severe pain group demonstrated worse global pain (Pknee flexion moments during the midstance phase of gait compared to the no pain group (P=0.02). Additionally, the moderate/severe pain group demonstrated greater varus knee malalignment (P=0.009), which was associated with higher weight acceptance peak knee adduction moments (P=0.003) and worse global pain (P=0.003) and physical function scores (P=0.006). Greater knee flexion moment is present during the midstance phase of gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis and moderate/severe pain during gait. Additionally, greater varus malalignment may be a sign of increased global knee joint dysfunction that can influence many activities of daily living beyond gait. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Unusual Cause of Knee Locking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazi Huri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of partial intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon as an unusual cause of pseudolocking of the knee. A 13-year-old semiprofessional soccer player applied to our clinic with a locked right knee in spite of the therapy applied (cold pack, NSAID, and immobilization in another institution 20 days after the injury. Significant extension loss was observed in his right knee with 30∘–90∘ ROM. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and arthroscopy confirmed the intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon and synovitis. The ruptured part of the tendon was debrided, and the inflammatory tissue around the tendon, which may lead to pseudolocking, was gently removed with a shaver in order to regain the normal ROM. The patient was discharged with full ROM and weight bearing first day after the surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first case demonstrating intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon causing pseudolocking of the knee.

  8. How does knee pain affect trunk and knee motion during badminton forehand lunges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Lin, Cheng-Feng; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Badminton requires extensive lower extremity movement and a precise coordination of the upper extremity and trunk movements. Accordingly, this study investigated motions of the trunk and the knee, control of dynamic stability and muscle activation patterns of individuals with and without knee pain. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain and 17 healthy participants participated in the study and performed forehand forward and backward diagonal lunges. This study showed that those with knee pain exhibited smaller knee motions in frontal and horizontal planes during forward lunge but greater knee motions in sagittal plane during backward lunge. By contrast, in both tasks, the injured group showed a smaller value on the activation level of the paraspinal muscles in pre-impact phase, hip-shoulder separation angle, trunk forward inclination range and peak centre of mass (COM) velocity. Badminton players with knee pain adopt a more conservative movement pattern of the knee to minimise recurrence of knee pain. The healthy group exhibit better weight-shifting ability due to a greater control of the trunk and knee muscles. Training programmes for badminton players with knee pain should be designed to improve both the neuromuscular control and muscle strength of the core muscles and the knee extensor with focus on the backward lunge motion.

  9. Muscle electrical activity during exercises with and without load executed on dry land and in an aquatic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Nayra Paz Santos

    Full Text Available Introduction Muscle activity in the aquatic environment was investigated using electromyographic analyses. The physical properties of water and the resistance used may influence the response of the muscle during exercise. The objective of this study was to evaluate the electrical activity in water and on the floor during flexion and knee extension exercises with and without load and aimed at understanding the muscular response while performing resistance exercises in water. Methods The sample consisted of 14 volunteers between 18 and 35 years old who were subjected to active exercises involving knee flexion and extension with and without load on the floor and in water. Electromyography was performed during the movement. Results A significant increase was found in the electrical activity of the rectus femoris muscle during exercises on the floor. The biceps femoris muscle showed increased electromyographic activity when resistance was used. A significant increase was found in the electrical activity of the rectus femoris muscle compared with exercises with and without load and the moment of rest in immersion. The electrical activity of the rectus and biceps femoris muscles was reduced in exercises with load and without load in a therapy pool compared with on the floor. Conclusion There was a reduction of the electromyographic activity in the aquatic environment compared with that on the ground, which could be attributed to the effects from hot water. Therefore, it is believed that resistance exercises can be performed early in a therapy pool, which will facilitate the prevention and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders.

  10. Muscular and pulmonary O2 uptake kinetics during moderate- and high-intensity sub-maximal knee-extensor exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Peter; Jones, Andrew M.; Wilkerson, Daryl P.

    2009-01-01

    artery to vein and vein to artery). The kinetics of m O2 and p O2 were modelled using non-linear regression. The time constant (tau) describing the phase II p O2 kinetics following the onset of exercise was not significantly different from the mean response time (initial time delay + &tgr) for m O2...... kinetics for LI (30 +/- 3 vs. 30 +/- 3 s) but was slightly higher (P....05; r = -0.01) and HI (33 +/- 3 vs. 27 +/- 3, P>0.05; r = -0.04). MTT was ~17 s just before exercise and decreased to 10 s and 12 s after 5 s of exercise for LI and HI, respectively. These data indicate that the phase II p O2 kinetics reflect m O2 kinetics during exercise but not during recovery where...

  11. Knee Pain during Strength Training Shortly following Fast-Track Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is unkn......BACKGROUND: Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA......). It is unknown how these exercise variables influence knee pain after TKA. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of loading and contraction failure on knee pain during strength training, shortly following TKA. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Consecutive sample of patients from the Copenhagen area, Denmark...... TKA. However, only the increase in pain during repetitions to contraction failure exceeded that defined as clinically relevant, and was very short-lived. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01729520....

  12. Electromyographic analysis of knee push up plus variations: what is the influence of the kinetic chain on scapular muscle activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maenhout, A; Van Praet, K; Pizzi, L; Van Herzeele, M; Cools, A

    2010-11-01

    First, to look for appropriate closed kinetic chain exercises to restore intramuscular imbalance between upper trapezius (UT) and serratus anterior (SA) in overhead athletes. Second, to determine the influence of using diagonal pattern muscle recruitment during knee push up plus (KPP) exercises on scapular electromyographic activity. Single group repeated-measures design. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-two physically active individuals in good general health who did not have a history of neck and/or shoulder injury or surgery nor participated in high-level overhead sports or performed upper limb strength training for more than 5 h/week. Interventions Subjects performed the standard KPP and six variations. Electromyographic activity of the three trapezius parts and the SA. Four exercises with a low UT/SA can be selected for rehabilitation of intramuscular balance: standard KPP, KPP with homolateral leg extension, KPP with a wobble board and homolateral leg extension and one-handed KPP. The use of a wobble board during KPP exercises and performance on one hand has no influence on SA electromyographic activity. Heterolateral leg extension during KPP stimulates lower trapezius activity, whereas homolateral leg extension stimulates SA activity. In case of intramuscular scapular imbalance, some exercises are preferable over others because of their low UT/SA ratio. The use of a kinetic chain approach during KPP exercises influences scapular muscle activity.

  13. Effects of Knee Alignments and Toe Clip on Frontal Plane Knee Biomechanics in Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guangping; Zhang, Songning; Bennett, Hunter J.; Martin, James C.; Crouter, Scott E.; Fitzhugh, Eugene C.

    2018-01-01

    Effects of knee alignment on the internal knee abduction moment (KAM) in walking have been widely studied. The KAM is closely associated with the development of medial knee osteoarthritis. Despite the importance of knee alignment, no studies have explored its effects on knee frontal plane biomechanics during stationary cycling. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of knee alignment and use of a toe clip on the knee frontal plane biomechanics during stationary cycling. A total of 32 participants (11 varus, 11 neutral, and 10 valgus alignment) performed five trials in each of six cycling conditions: pedaling at 80 rpm and 0.5 kg (40 Watts), 1.0 kg (78 Watts), and 1.5 kg (117 Watts) with and without a toe clip. A motion analysis system and a customized instrumented pedal were used to collect 3D kinematic and kinetic data. A 3 × 2 × 3 (group × toe clip × workload) mixed design ANOVA was used for statistical analysis (p < 0.05). There were two different knee frontal plane loading patterns, internal abduction and adduction moment, which were affected by knee alignment type. The knee adduction angle was 12.2° greater in the varus group compared to the valgus group (p = 0.001), yet no difference was found for KAM among groups. Wearing a toe clip increased the knee adduction angle by 0.95º (p = 0.005). The findings of this study indicate that stationary cycling may be a safe exercise prescription for people with knee malalignments. In addition, using a toe clip may not have any negative effects on knee joints during stationary cycling. Key points Varus or valgus alignment did not cause increased frontal-plane knee joint loading, suggesting stationary cycling is a safe exercise. This study supports that using a toe clip did not lead to abnormal frontal-plane knee loading during stationary cycling. Two different knee frontal plane loading patterns, knee abduction and adduction moment, were observed during stationary cycling, which are likely affected by

  14. Cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, R; Ribeiro, F; Oliveira, J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of cryotherapy on joint position sense are not clearly established; however it is paramount to understand its impact on peripheral feedback to ascertain the safety of using ice therapy before resuming exercise on sports or rehabilitation settings. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cryotherapy, when applied over the quadriceps and over the knee joint, on knee position sense. This within-subjects repeated-measures study encompassed fifteen subjects. Knee position sense was measured by open kinetic chain technique and active positioning at baseline and after cryotherapy application. Knee angles were determined by computer analysis of the videotape images. Twenty-minute ice bag application was applied randomly, in two sessions 48 h apart, over the quadriceps and the knee joint. The main effect for cryotherapy application was significant (F (1.14)=7.7, p=0.015) indicating an increase in both absolute and relative angular errors after the application. There was no significant main effect for the location of cryotherapy application, indicating no differences between the application over the quadriceps and the knee joint. In conclusion, cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense in normal knees. This deleterious effect is similar when cryotherapy is applied over the quadriceps or the knee joint. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.New York.

  15. Electromyographic analyses of muscle pre-activation induced by single joint exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júnior, Valdinar A R; Bottaro, Martim; Pereira, Maria C C; Andrade, Marcelino M; P Júnior, Paulo R W; Carmo, Jake C

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether performing a low-intensity, single-joint exercises for knee extensors was an efficient strategy for increasing the number of motor units recruited in the vastus lateralis muscle during a subsequent multi-joint exercises. Nine healthy male participants (23.33+/-3.46 yrs) underwent bouts of exercise in which knee extension and 45 degrees , and leg press exercises were performed in sequence. In the low-intensity bout (R30), 15 unilateral knee extensions were performed, followed by 15 repetitions of the leg presses at 30% and 60% of one maximum repetition load (1-MR), respectively. In the high-intensity bout (R60), the same sequence was performed, but the applied load was 60% of 1-MR for both exercises. A single set of 15 repetitions of the leg press at 60% of 1-MR was performed as a control exercise (CR). The surface electromyographic signals of the vastus lateralis muscle were recorded by means of a linear electrode array. The root mean square (RMS) values were determined for each repetition of the leg press, and linear regressions were calculated from these results. The slopes of the straight lines obtained were then normalized using the linear coefficients of the regression equations and compared using one-way ANOVAs for repeated measures. The slopes observed in the CR were significantly lower than those in the R30 and R60 (precruitment of motor units was more effective when a single-joint exercise preceded the multi-joint exercise. Article registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) under the number ACTRN12609000413224.

  16. KNEE-JOINT LOADING IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: INFLUENCE OF ABDOMINAL AND THIGH FAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Stephen P.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Loeser, Richard F.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Hunter, David J.; DeVita, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee-joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography and total lean and fat mass determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age = 66.3 yr., BMI = 33.5 kg·m−2) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Results Higher total body mass was significantly associated (p ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (p knee extensor moments (p = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (p = 0.0001), shear (p knee extension moment (p = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (p = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (p ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with the knee abduction (p = 0.03) and knee extension moment (p = 0.02). Conclusions Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA. PMID:25133996

  17. Knee joint loading in knee osteoarthritis: influence of abdominal and thigh fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Stephen P; Beavers, Daniel P; Loeser, Richard F; Carr, J Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J; Hunter, David J; Devita, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography, and total lean and fat mass were determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age, 66.3 yr; body mass index, 33.5 kg·m) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Higher total body mass was significantly associated (P ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (P knee extensor moments (P = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (P = 0.0001), shear (P knee extension moment (P = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (P = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found that both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (P ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with knee abduction (P = 0.03) and knee extension moment (P = 0.02). Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA.

  18. An evidence-based walking program among older people with knee osteoarthritis: the PEP (participant exercise preference) pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loew, Laurianne; Brosseau, Lucie; Kenny, Glen P; Durand-Bush, Natalie; Poitras, Stéphane; De Angelis, Gino; Wells, George A

    2017-07-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a common joint problem leading to an increase of pain and a loss of function in older individuals. The main objective of this study was to evaluate if a participant who was randomly assigned to his preferred group improved his adherence to an effective walking program compared to a participant who did not receive his preferred group. This was a 9-month pilot randomized clinical trial, based on a patient treatment preferences design. The 69 eligible participants had a diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis. Participants were randomized to one of two groups: a supervised community-based or unsupervised walking program, based on the Ottawa Panel guidelines. At 6 months, participants who expressed a preference, either for the supervised or unsupervised program, and who were assigned to their preferred choice of program showed significantly higher adherence to walking sessions (supervised 60.7 ± 12.3%, P walking program, while ensuring the maintenance of clinical benefits of walking, among older adults susceptible to avoid or not properly engage in physical activity.

  19. The effects of knee direction, physical activity and age on knee joint position sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relph, Nicola; Herrington, Lee

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has suggested a decline in knee proprioception with age. Furthermore, regular participation in physical activity may improve proprioceptive ability. However, there is no large scale data on uninjured populations to confirm these theories. The aim of this study was to provide normative knee joint position data (JPS) from healthy participants aged 18-82years to evaluate the effects of age, physical activity and knee direction. A sample of 116 participants across five age groups was used. The main outcome measures were knee JPS absolute error scores into flexion and extension, Tegner activity levels and General Practitioner Physical Activity Questionnaire results. Absolute error scores in to knee flexion were 3.6°, 3.9°, 3.5°, 3.7° and 3.1° and knee extension were 2.7°, 2.5°, 2.9°, 3.4° and 3.9° for ages 15-29, 30-44, 45-59, 60-74 and 75 years old respectively. Knee extension and flexion absolute error scores were significantly different when age group data were pooled. There was a significant effect of age and activity level on joint position sense into knee extension. Age and lower Tegner scores were also negatively correlated to joint position sense into knee extension. The results provide some evidence for a decline in knee joint position sense with age. Further, active populations may have heightened static proprioception compared to inactive groups. Normative knee joint position sense data is provided and may be used by practitioners to identify patients with reduced proprioceptive ability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The effects of intra-articular glucocorticoids and exercise on pain and synovitis assessed on static and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, R G C; Henriksen, M; Klokker, L

    2017-01-01

    ) investigate if any of the changes in patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) were associated with changes in MRI-measures of synovitis. DESIGN: We performed a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluating the effects of intra-articular corticosteroid vs placebo injections given......-articular corticosteroids over intra-articular saline when combined with an exercise program for reduction of synovitis in KOA. The improvement in pain and function following the intervention with intra-articular corticosteroids/saline and exercise could not be explained by a decrease in synovitis on MRI indicating other...... pain causing/relieving mechanisms in KOA....

  1. Biomechanics of knee rehabilitation with cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, W D; Blackburn, T A

    1980-01-01

    The bicycle provides quadriceps rehabilitation while controlling the stresses to the knee ligaments. With pedaling on the bicycle, forces are applied to the anterior cruciate ligament, the capsular ligaments, and the posterior structures of the knee joint as the tibial plateau is posteriorly tilted. The knee muscles can modify their forces. Therefore, by controlling the mode of cycling with varying seat heights and pedal positions, the ligaments can be relieved from these forces during the initial stages of the rehabilitative process. An exercise program can then be designed to apply controlled stress to these structures to enhance the healing and recovery processes.

  2. Estudo comparativo entre a aplicação de crioterapia, cinesioterapia e ondas curtas no tratamento da osteoartrite de joelho Comparison of cryotherapy, exercise and short waves in knee osteoarthritis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Lucia Pastore Silva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A osteoartrite é a forma mais prevalente de doença articular. Os agentes físicos como o gelo e o calor podem combater o processo álgico quando corretamente indicados e utilizados. O objetivo deste trabalho foi a comparação de protocolos de tratamento fisioterapêutico, que envolveram o uso de cinesioterapia, crioterapia e ondas curtas, em indivíduos com osteoartrite de joelho. Em um estudo randomizado prospectivo cego foram tratados 25 indivíduos (25 joelhos, de 58 a 78 anos. GRUPO A: cinesioterapia e ondas curtas (n=9. GRUPO B: cinesioterapia e gelo (n=6. GRUPO C: cinesioterapia (grupo controle (n=9. As variáveis analisadas foram: percepção subjetiva de dor (Borg, qualidade funcional (Lequesne, amplitude de movimento, flexibilidade e força muscular. A dor melhorou significativamente somente no grupo B, com qualidade funcional e flexibilidade positiva em todos grupos. O ganho de amplitude foi semelhante nos grupos B e C. Houve manutenção da força flexora nos grupos A e B e ganho nos indivíduos do grupo C. Na musculatura extensora observou-se ganho de força no grupo B e C e perda no grupo A. O melhor protocolo foi aquele que envolveu a aplicação de gelo e cinesioterapia para analgesia; não houve relação de ganho de amplitude, flexibilidade e força associado a termoterapia.Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent form of joint disease. Physical agents such as ice and heat can fight the pain process, when correctly indicated and used. The objective of this study was to compare physiotherapy protocols involving the use of exercise, cryotherapy and short waves in individuals with knee osteoarthritis. In a prospective randomized study, 25 individuals were treated (25 knees, with ages ranging from 58 to 78 years. GROUP A: exercise and short-waves (n=9. GROUP B: exercise and ice (n=6. GROUP C: exercise alone (control (n=9. Analyzed variables were: subjective perception of pain (Borg, functional quality (Lequesne, range of motion

  3. Efeito do intervalo de recuperação entre séries de extensões isocinéticas de joelho em homens jovens destreinados Effect of recovery interval between sets of isokinetic knee extensions among untrained young men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Celes

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito de dois diferentes Intervalos de Recuperação (IR entre séries de extensões isocinéticas de joelho no Pico de Torque (PT e no Trabalho Total (TT em jovens destreinados. MÉTODOS: Dezoito homens (24,22±2,58 anos; 80,42±11,41 kg realizaram três séries de 10 extensões isocinéticas com o joelho direito a 60° e 180°/s. O IR entre as séries foram de 1 e 2 minutos, contrabalanceados entre os dois dias de teste, separados por, no mínimo, 48 horas. A taxa de trabalho-recuperação foi de 1:3 e 1:6 para 60°/s e 1:6 e 1:12 para 180°/s. Os voluntários não participavam de programas de treinamento resistido há pelo menos 6 meses. A análise estatística foi a ANOVA de medidas repetidas 2 x 3 [IR (1 e 2 minutos x série (1ª, 2ª e 3ª]. O nível de significância foi aOBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of two recovery intervals (RIs between sets of isokinetic knee extension exercises on peak torque (PT and total work (TW, among untrained young men. METHODS: Eighteen men (24.22±2.58 years; 80.42±11.41 kg performed three sets of ten isokinetic extensions of the right knee, at 60° and 180°/s. The RIs between the sets were one and two minutes long, spread over two test days separated by a minimum of 48 hours. The work-to-recovery ratio was 1:3 and 1:6 for 60°/s, and 1:6 and 1:12 for 180°/s. The subjects had not participated in any resistance training programs within the last six months. The statistical analysis consisted of 2 x 3 repeated-measures ANOVA [RI (one or two minutes x set (1st, 2nd or 3rd]. The significance level was a<0.05. RESULTS: Neither one minute nor two minutes RIs maintained the PT and TW throughout the three sets (p<0.05. However, at 60°/s, two minutes RIs enabled better PT and TW in the second and third sets than one minute RIs (p<0.05. At 180°/s, two minutes RIs were only better (p<0.05 than one minute RIs for TW in the third set. CONCLUSION: This study indicated that, during an isokinetic

  4. An implementation study of two evidence-based exercise and health education programmes for older adults with osteoarthritis of the knee and hip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, O.R.W de; Hopman-Rock, M.; Tak, E.C.M.P.; Klazinga, N.S.

    2004-01-01

    Implementation studies are recommended to assess the feasibility and effectiveness in real-life of programmes which have been tested in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We report on an implementation study of two evidence-based exercise and health education programmes for older adults with

  5. Effects of daily activity recorded by pedometer on peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak), ventilatory threshold and leg extension power in 30- to 69-year-old Japanese without exercise habit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Guo; Ohta, Toshiki; Ishikawa-Takata, Kazuko; Tabata, Izumi; Miyashita, Mitsumasa

    2003-09-01

    The relationships among walk steps, exercise habits and peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak), ventilatory threshold (VT) and leg extension power (LEP) were examined in 709 apparently healthy Japanese subjects (male 372, female 337) aged 30-69 years. Walk steps were evaluated using a pedometer. VO2peak and VT were assessed by a cycle ergometer test, while LEP was measured with an isokinetic leg extension system (Combi, Anaero Press 3500, Japan). Subjects who participated in exercise three times or more a week demonstrated significantly greater VO2peak and VT when compared with subjects without exercise habits. When a separate analysis was conducted on subjects who exercised fewer than three times per week, we found that the subgroup with the highest number of walk steps showed significantly greater VT in all male subjects and female subjects aged 30-49 years, but a significantly greater VO2peak only in females aged 30-49 years, when compared to the subgroup with the fewest walk steps. These results suggest that although some people exercise less than three times a week, if they are quite active in daily life, such activities might also confer benefits upon their fitness.

  6. Exercise and NSAIDs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Susanne Germann; Miller, Ben F; Hansen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine muscle and tendon protein fractional synthesis rates (FSR) at rest and after a one-legged kicking exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) receiving either placebo or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).......The purpose of this study was to determine muscle and tendon protein fractional synthesis rates (FSR) at rest and after a one-legged kicking exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) receiving either placebo or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)....

  7. Detection of myocardial stunning with gated SPECT and its relationship with location, extension and severity of perfusion defects induced by exercise or pharmacologic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mut, F.; Beretta, M.; Vidal, I.; Rener, A.; Alonso, O.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the relationship between transient ventricular dysfunction detected by gated SPECT with the location, extension and severity of ischemic areas in patients with reversible perfusion defects. Material and Methods: We retrospectively studied 83 patients (61±11 yrs., 61 men, 27 with previous MI) submitted for coronary artery disease (CAD) evaluation with 99mTc-MIBI gated SPECT using a 2-day protocol whose perfusion imaging pattern had been reported positive for myocardial ischemia. Stress test was exercise in 54 cases, dipyridamole in 28 and dobutamine in 1. Previous work from our group demonstrated up to 12% change in LVEF from rest to post-stress in a population with low likelihood of CAD and a normal perfusion pattern. Thus, according to % variation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) from rest to post-stress we further divided the population into 2 subgroups, (A) with less than 12% change in LVEF (n=56) and (B) with more than 12% negative variation (n=27). For evaluation of perfusion, a simplified 7-segment division of the myocardium was used and a combined ischemic score was obtained by multiplying the number of segments with reversible defects by the 1-4 assigned severity score. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding age, gender, stress result (clinical or ECG), number of fixed perfusion defects or rest LVEF. Dipyridamole test was more frequent among patients of group B. Post-stress LVEF was 49±14% for group A and 41±15% for group B, p=0.0125. Combined ischemic score was 6.82±6.5 vs. 11.96±12 respectively, p=0.014. In patients of group A, defects corresponding to the right coronary territory were more frequent, while the left descending artery territory was more commonly affected in group B patients, however this was not statistically significant. Left circumflex territory was equally affected in both groups. Conclusion: Transient ventricular dysfunction after a stress test can be

  8. Effects of Knee Alignments and Toe Clip on Frontal Plane Knee Biomechanics in Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guangping; Zhang, Songning; Bennett, Hunter J; Martin, James C; Crouter, Scott E; Fitzhugh, Eugene C

    2018-06-01

    Effects of knee alignment on the internal knee abduction moment (KAM) in walking have been widely studied. The KAM is closely associated with the development of medial knee osteoarthritis. Despite the importance of knee alignment, no studies have explored its effects on knee frontal plane biomechanics during stationary cycling. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of knee alignment and use of a toe clip on the knee frontal plane biomechanics during stationary cycling. A total of 32 participants (11 varus, 11 neutral, and 10 valgus alignment) performed five trials in each of six cycling conditions: pedaling at 80 rpm and 0.5 kg (40 Watts), 1.0 kg (78 Watts), and 1.5 kg (117 Watts) with and without a toe clip. A motion analysis system and a customized instrumented pedal were used to collect 3D kinematic and kinetic data. A 3 × 2 × 3 (group × toe clip × workload) mixed design ANOVA was used for statistical analysis (p < 0.05). There were two different knee frontal plane loading patterns, internal abduction and adduction moment, which were affected by knee alignment type. The knee adduction angle was 12.2° greater in the varus group compared to the valgus group (p = 0.001), yet no difference was found for KAM among groups. Wearing a toe clip increased the knee adduction angle by 0.95º (p = 0.005). The findings of this study indicate that stationary cycling may be a safe exercise prescription for people with knee malalignments. In addition, using a toe clip may not have any negative effects on knee joints during stationary cycling.

  9. Systemic Exercise-Induced Hypoalgesia Following Isometric Exercise Reduces Conditioned Pain Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsouhibani, Ali; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Hoeger Bement, Marie

    2018-04-03

    Physically active individuals show greater conditioned pain modulation (CPM) compared with less active individuals. Understanding the effects of acute exercise on CPM may allow for a more targeted use of exercise in the management of pain. This study investigated the effects of acute isometric exercise on CPM. In addition, the between-session and within-session reliability of CPM was investigated. Experimental, randomized crossover study. Laboratory at Marquette University. Thirty healthy adults (19.3±1.5 years, 15 males). Subjects underwent CPM testing before and after isometric exercise (knee extension, 30% maximum voluntary contraction for three minutes) and quiet rest in two separate experimental sessions. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at the quadriceps and upper trapezius muscles were assessed before, during, and after ice water immersions. PPTs increased during ice water immersion (i.e., CPM), and quadriceps PPT increased after exercise (P CPM decreased similarly following exercise and quiet rest (P > 0.05). CPM within-session reliability was fair to good (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.43-0.70), and the between-session reliability was poor (ICC = 0.20-0.35). Due to the variability in the systemic exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) response, participants were divided into systemic EIH responders (N = 9) and nonresponders (N = 21). EIH responders experienced attenuated CPM following exercise (P = 0.03), whereas the nonresponders showed no significant change (P > 0.05). Isometric exercise decreased CPM in individuals who reported systemic EIH, suggesting activation of shared mechanisms between CPM and systemic EIH responses. These results may improve the understanding of increased pain after exercise in patients with chronic pain and potentially attenuated CPM.

  10. Effects of Static Stretching and Playing Soccer on Knee Laxity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgart, Christian; Gokeler, Alli; Donath, Lars; Hoppe, Matthias W.; Freiwald, Juergen

    Objective: This study investigated exercise-induced effects of static stretching and playing soccer on anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the knee joint. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University biomechanics laboratory. Participants: Thirty-one athletes were randomly assigned into

  11. Effects of Static Stretching and Playing Soccer on Knee Laxity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgart, Christian; Gokeler, Alli; Donath, Lars; Hoppe, Matthias W.; Freiwald, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated exercise-induced effects of static stretching and playing soccer on anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the knee joint. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University biomechanics laboratory. Participants: Thirty-one athletes were randomly assigned into

  12. Self-monitoring has potential for home exercise programmes in patients with haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, M; Takedani, H; Haga, N; Kubota, M; Ishiyama, M; Ito, S; Nitta, O

    2014-03-01

    Haemophiliacs who have had to keep a physically inactive lifestyle due to bleeding during childhood are likely to have little motivation for exercise. The purpose of this study is to clarify the effectiveness of the self-monitoring of home exercise for haemophiliacs. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with intervention over 8 weeks at four hospitals in Japan. Subjects included 32 male outpatients aged 26-64 years without an inhibitor who were randomly allocated to a self-monitoring group and a control group. Individual exercise guidance with physical activity for improvement of their knee functions was given to both groups. The self-monitoring materials included an activity monitor and a feedback system so that the self-monitoring group could send feedback via the Internet and cellular phone. The self-monitoring was performed by checking exercise adherence and physical activity levels, bleeding history and injection of a coagulation factor. Both groups showed significant improvements in exercise adherence (P self-efficacy (P self-monitoring group compared with those in the control group. No increase in bleeding frequency and pain scale was noted. The self-monitoring of home exercise for haemophilic patients is useful for the improvement of exercise adherence, self-efficacy and knee extension strength. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT LEVELS OF LOCALIZED MUSCLE FATIGUE ON KNEE POSITION SENSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S. Gear

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There is little information available regarding how proprioceptive abilities decline as the amount of exertion increases during exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of different levels of fatigue on knee joint position sense. A repeated measures design was used to examine changes in active joint reposition sense (AJRS prior to and following three levels of fatigue. Eighteen participants performed knee extension and flexion isokinetic exercise until torque output was 90%, 70%, or 50% of the peak hamstring torque for three consecutive repetitions. Active joint reposition sense at 15, 30, or 45 degrees was tested following the isokinetic exercise session. Following testing of the first independent measure, participants were given a 20 minute rest period. Testing procedures were repeated for two more exercise sessions following the other levels of fatigue. Testing of each AJRS test angle was conducted on three separate days with 48 hours between test days. Significant main effect for fatigue was indicated (p = 0.001. Pairwise comparisons indicated a significant difference between the pre-test and following 90% of peak hamstring torque (p = 0.02 and between the pre-test and following 50% of peak hamstring torque (p = 0.02. Fatigue has long been theorized to be a contributing factor in decreased proprioceptive acuity, and therefore a contributing factor to joint injury. The findings of the present study indicate that fatigue may have an effect on proprioception following mild and maximum fatigue.

  14. Early recovery after fast-track Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Stig; Dalsgaard, Jesper; Bjerggaard, Karin

    2012-01-01

    trauma. We investigated changes in leg-extension power (LEP) in the first month after MIS Oxford UKA and its relation to pain, knee motion, functional performance, and knee function. Patients and methods In 35 consecutive Oxford UKA patients, LEP was measured 1 week before and 1 month after surgery...... together with knee motion, knee swelling, the 30-second chair-stand test, and Oxford knee score. Assessment of knee pain at rest and walking was done using a visual analog scale. Results 30 patients were discharged on the day after surgery, and 5 on the second day after surgery. LEP and functional...... performance reached the preoperative level after 1 month. Only slight postoperative knee swelling was observed with rapid restoration of knee flexion and function. A high level of pain during the first postoperative night and day fell considerably thereafter. None of the patients needed physiotherapy...

  15. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review.

  16. The effects of a physical training program on patients with osteoarthritis of the knees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgind, H; Bibow-Nielsen, B; Jensen, B

    1998-01-01

    months. Training focused on general fitness, balance, coordination, stretching, and lower extremity muscle strength, and included a daily home exercise program. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Muscle strength across the knee (extension and flexion), Algofunctional Index (AFI), pain (0 to 10 point scale), walking......; isometric strength improved 21%. By 1 year, AFI had decreased 3.8 points (CI2alpha = .05, 1.0 to 7.0), pain had decreased 2.0 points (CI2alpha = 05, 0.0 to 4.0), and walking speed had increased 13% (CI2alpha = .05, 4% to 23%). There was an increase in the frequency of palpable joint effusions (p

  17. The effect of knee brace and knee sleeve on the proprioception of the knee in young non-professional healthy sportsmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoni, G; Herten, A; Kofler, P; Hasler, M; Nachbauer, W

    2013-12-01

    Proprioception has been defined as the capacity to feel the position of a joint in space as sensed by the central nervous system. Prophylactic knee braces are supposed to help in knee injury prevention not just with a mechanical support of the joint but also improving proprioception. The main aim of this study was to determine the effects of a knee brace and a knee sleeve on knee proprioception. The secondary aim was to determine if different starting angles of the knee and different movement directions influence knee proprioception. We tested a group of twenty healthy male sport students without knee injuries. They were tested with the brace, with the sleeve and without support. The threshold of detection of passive knee movement with a starting knee angle of 30° and 60°, both in flexion and extension was determined. We did not find any statistically significant change in the threshold of detection of passive knee movement wearing the brace or the sleeve compared to the unsupported condition (p=0.462, α=0.05). We found a significantly lower proprioceptive sensitivity starting at the more flexed knee angle (p=0.005, α=0.05) and moving in extension than in the other test situations (p=0.001, α=0.05). Movement direction and starting position appear to influence the threshold of detection of passive knee movement. The results of this study also suggest that knee supports do not influence either positively or negatively knee proprioception of uninjured active subjects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Caffeine intake improves intense intermittent exercise performance and reduces muscle interstitial potassium accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Bangsbo, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The effect of oral caffeine ingestion on intense intermittent exercise performance and muscle interstitial ion concentrations was examined. The study consists of two studies (S1 and S2). In S1 twelve subjects completed the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2) test with prior caffeine (6...... mg/kg b.w.; CAF) or placebo (PLA) intake. In S2 six subjects performed one low intense (20 W) and three intense (50 W) 3-min (separated by 5 min) one-legged knee-extension exercise bouts with (CAF) and without (CON) prior caffeine supplementation for determination of muscle interstitial K(+) and Na...

  19. Exercise training modulates functional sympatholysis and alpha-adrenergic vasoconstrictor responsiveness in hypertensive and normotensive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Gliemann Hybholt, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    were measured before and after 8 weeks of aerobic training (3-4 times/week) in 8 hypertensive (47 ± 2 years) and 8 normotensive untrained individuals (46 ± 1 years) during arterial tyramine infusion, arterial ATP infusion and/or one-legged knee extensions. Before training, exercise hypaeremia and leg......Essential hypertension is linked to an increased sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity and reduced tissue perfusion. We investigated the role of exercise training on functional sympatholysis and postjunctional α-adrenergic responsiveness in individuals with essential hypertension. Leg haemodynamics...... vascular conductance (LVC) were lower in the hypertensive individuals (P Training lowered blood pressure in the hypertensive individuals (P

  20. The effect of a knee ankle foot orthosis incorporating an active knee mechanism on gait of a person with poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazpour, Mokhtar; Chitsazan, Ahmad; Bani, Monireh Ahmadi; Rouhi, Gholamreza; Ghomshe, Farhad Tabatabai; Hutchins, Stephen W

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this case study was to identify the effect of a powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis on the kinematics and temporospatial parameters of walking by a person with poliomyelitis when compared to a knee ankle foot orthosis. A knee ankle foot orthosis was initially manufactured by incorporating drop lock knee joints and custom molded ankle foot orthoses and fitted to a person with poliomyelitis. The orthosis was then adapted by adding electrically activated powered knee joints to provide knee extension torque during stance and also flexion torque in swing phase. Lower limb kinematic and kinetic data plus data for temporospatial parameters were acquired from three test walks using each orthosis. Walking speed, step length, and vertical and horizontal displacement of the pelvis decreased when walking with the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis compared to the knee ankle foot orthosis. When using the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis, the knee flexion achieved during swing and also the overall pattern of walking more closely matched that of normal human walking. The reduced walking speed may have caused the smaller compensatory motions detected when the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis was used. The new powered SCKAFO facilitated controlled knee flexion and extension during ambulation for a volunteer poliomyelitis person.

  1. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000199.htm Knee arthroscopy - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... surgery to treat problems in your knee (knee arthroscopy). You may have been checked for: Torn meniscus. ...

  2. Knee microfracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartilage regeneration - knee ... Three types of anesthesia may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Medicine to relax you, and shots of painkillers to numb the knee Spinal (regional) anesthesia General anesthesia (you will be ...

  3. Preventing Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Newsletter Donate Blog Skip breadcrumb navigation Preventing Knee Injuries Knee injuries in children and adolescent athletes ... this PDF Share this page: WHAT ARE COMMON KNEE INJURIES? Pain Syndromes One of the most common ...

  4. Effect of exercise on insulin action in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Mikines, K J; Galbo, Henrik

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 1 h of dynamic one-legged exercise on insulin action in human muscle was studied in 6 healthy young men. Four hours after one-legged knee extensions, a three-step sequential euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with arterial and bilateral femoral vein catheterization...... was performed. Increased insulin action on glucose uptake was found in the exercised compared with the rested thigh at mean plasma insulin concentrations of 23, 40, and 410 microU/ml. Furthermore, prior contractions directed glucose uptake toward glycogen synthesis and increased insulin effects on thigh O2...... consumption and at some insulin concentrations on potassium exchange. In contrast, no change in insulin effects on limb exchange of free fatty acids, glycerol, alanine or tyrosine were found after exercise. Glycogen concentration in rested vastus lateralis muscle did not increase measurably during the clamp...

  5. Barriers for guideline adherence in knee osteoarthritis care: A qualitative study from the patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitaels, D.; Vankrunkelsven, P.; Desfosses, J.; Luyten, F.; Verschueren, S.; Assche, D. Van; Aertgeerts, B.; Hermens, R.P.

    2017-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Guidelines for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are suboptimally implemented in clinical care. To improve guideline adherence, patients' perceived barriers and facilitators in current care were investigated. METHODS: Eleven patients with knee OA were extensively

  6. Respostas cardiovasculares agudas na extensão do joelho realizada em diferentes formas de execução Respuestas cardiovasculares agudas a la extensión de rodilla realizada en diferentes formas de ejecución Acute cardiovascular responses on knee extension at different performance modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Doederlein Polito

    2004-06-01

    measured through the auscultatory method at the end of each series and during 20 minutes after the exercise, with 5-minute intervals. The two-way ANOVA with repeated measures showed that the percentile variation in relation to the rest situation (D% of the PAS was significantly higher at the 3rd series (UN = 31.7 ± 11.9%; BI = 38.5 ± 10.9% than at the 1st (UN = 19.5 ± 12.5%; BI = 26.0 ± 10.2%. With regard to the PAD, the D% was higher at the 3rd series (UN = 48.5 ± 13.9%; BI = 51.4 ± 13.3% than at the 1st (UN = 30.5 ± 13.0%; BI = 34.9 ± 16.0% and 2nd (UN = 40.9 ± 15.4%; BI = 47.3 ± 12.9%. No differences for FC and DP were observed as well as between the performance modes. After the exercise, no differences between all variables observed were identified. Apparently, the performance mode of the knee unilateral extension would not reflect on the acute cardiovascular responses, during or after the exercise. However, the bilateral performance showed tendency to elevate the values of PAS and DP in relation to the unilateral performance, what should be considered in prescriptions for people who need special cares.

  7. Sex comparisons of non-local muscle fatigue in human elbow flexors and knee extensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Beck, Travis W.; Wages, Nathan P.; Carr, Joshua C.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: To examine non-local muscle fatigue (NLMF) in both contralateral homologous and non-related heterogonous muscles for both sexes. Methods: Ten men and nine women participated in this study. After the familiarization visit, subjects completed four separate randomly sequenced experimental visits, during which the fatiguing interventions (six sets of 30-second maximal isometric contractions) were performed on either their right elbow flexors or knee extensors. Before (Pre-) and after (Post-) the fatiguing interventions, the isometric strength and the corresponding surface electromyographic (EMG) amplitude were measured for the non-exercised left elbow flexors or knee extensors. Results: For the non-exercised elbow flexors, the isometric strength decreased for both sexes (sex combined mean±SE: Pre vs. Post=339.67±18.02 N vs. 314.41±16.37 N; pisometric knee extension strength for men (Pre vs. Post =845.02±66.26 N vs. 817.39±67.64 N; p=0.019), but not for women. Conclusions: The presence of NMLF can be affected by factors such as sex and muscle being tested. Women are less likely to demonstrate NLMF in lower body muscle groups. PMID:29504584

  8. Análise eletromiográfica do quadríceps durante a extensão do joelho em diferentes velocidades Electromyographical analysis of the quadriceps during knee extension at different speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cury Ribeiro

    2005-01-01

    electromyography, the interference of angular speed and different ways of fixing the elastic tube on the quadriceps activity. Ten male subjects without any kind of muscle or joint injury participated in this study. Subjects with a Q angle value out of 10-15° were excluded from this study. The elastic tube was fixed parallel and oblique to the subjects' body. Knee extensions were performed at 60°/sec and 120°/sec. No selective activity of the VMO was found. By comparing the levels of muscular activity, there was an increase of the electromyographic activity level in all portions of the quadriceps at the two angular speeds, only for parallel-fixed elastic tubes. These results suggest a synergic activity between VMO and the other portions of the quadriceps.

  9. Difficulty with learning of exercise instructions associated with 'working memory' dysfunction and frontal glucose hypometabolism in a patient with very mild subcortical vascular dementia with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kenji; Meguro, Kenichi; Tanaka, Naofumi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro

    2013-07-25

    We present a patient with no dementia, depression or apathy, who had difficulty in learning self-exercise instructions. The patient was an 80-year-old right-handed woman who was admitted to a rehabilitation unit to receive postoperative rehabilitation after a femoral neck fracture. She was instructed quadriceps isometric exercises to perform 10 repetitions and to hold each stretch for 10 s. She performed the exercise correctly with motivation, but she had difficulty in learning the number of repetitions and the duration of each stretch. She had no history of cerebrovascular accident and the neurological examination was normal. Neuropsychological testing, MRI and (18)F-fluoro- D-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) were performed to examine the neural mechanisms associated with this difficulty in learning instructions. Neuropsychological tests revealed dysfunction of working memory while other cognitive domains were relatively preserved. Her neuropsychological tests scores were (1) Mini-Mental State Examination: 24 (mild cognitive impairment), (2) Geriatric Depression Scale-15: 2 (no depression), (3) Apathy Scale: 2 (no apathy), (4) digit span forward: 5 (normal), (5) digit span backward: 2 (impaired), (6) visuospatial span forward: 4 (normal), (7) visuospatial span backward: 2 (impaired), (8) frontal assessment battery: 11 (normal), (9) Weigl test: 0 (impaired), (10) trail making test A: 52 s (normal), (11) train making test B: failed (impaired). T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI showed high signal-intensity lesions in the cerebral deep white matter. FDG-PET revealed hypometabolic areas in the bilateral frontal lobes, particularly in the bilateral dorsolateral frontal area, anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. One of the possible neural mechanisms underlying the learning difficulties in this patient may have been partial blockage of the cingulofrontal network by deep white matter lesions.

  10. Combined exercise circuit session acutely attenuates stress-induced blood pressure reactivity in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio R. Moreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the blood pressure (BP responses to cardiovascular stress test after a combined exercise circuit session at moderate intensity. Method: Twenty individuals (10 male/10 fem; 33.4± 6.9 years; 70.2± 15.8 kg; 170.4± 11.5 cm; 22.3± 6.8% body fat were randomized in a different days to control session with no exercise or exercise session consisting of 3 laps of the following circuit: knee extension, bench press, knee flexion, rowing in the prone position, squats, shoulder press, and 5 min of aerobic exercise at 75-85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate and/or 13 on the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion [scale of 6 to 20]. The sets of resistance exercise consisted of 15 repetitions at ~50% of the estimated 1 repetition maximum test. Systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP were measured at rest and during 1h of recovery in both experimental sessions. After that, blood pressure reactivity (BPR was evaluated using the Cold Pressor Test. Results: During 1h of exercise recovery, there was a reduction in SBP (3-6 mmHg and DBP (2-5 mmHg in relation to pre-session rest (p<0.01, while this reduction was not observed in the control session. A decline in BPR (4-7 mmHg; p<0.01 was observed 1h post-exercise session, but not in the control session. Post-exercise reductions in SBP and DBP were significantly correlated with BPR reductions (r=0.50-0.45; p<0.05. Conclusion: A combined exercise circuit session at moderate intensity promoted subsequent post-exercise hypotension and acutely attenuated BPR in response to a cardiovascular stress test. In addition, the post-exercise BP reduction was correlated with BPR attenuation in healthy adults of both genders.

  11. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, Henning; Hodges, P W

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function...... and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals....

  12. Six degree-of-freedom knee joint kinematics in obese individuals with knee pain during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Felson, David T; Li, Guoan; Lewis, Cara L

    2017-01-01

    Knee joint pain is a common symptom in obese individuals and walking is often prescribed as part of management programs. Past studies in obese individuals have focused on standing alignment and kinematics in the sagittal and coronal planes. Investigation of 6 degree-of-freedom (6DOF) knee joint kinematics during standing and gait is important to thoroughly understand knee function in obese individuals with knee pain. This study aimed to investigate the 6DOF knee joint kinematics in standing and during gait in obese patients using a validated fluoroscopic imaging system. Ten individuals with obesity and knee pain were recruited. While standing, the knee was in 7.4±6.3°of hyperextension, 2.8±3.3° of abduction and 5.6±7.3° of external rotation. The femoral center was located 0.7±3.1mm anterior and 5.1±1.5mm medial to the tibial center. During treadmill gait, the sagittal plane motion, i.e., flexion/extension and anterior-posterior translation, showed a clear pattern. Specifically, obese individuals with knee pain maintained the knee in more flexion and more anterior tibial translation during most of the stance phase of the gait cycle and had a reduced total range of knee flexion when compared to a healthy non-obese group. In conclusion, obese individuals with knee pain used hyperextension knee posture while standing, but maintained the knee in more flexion during gait with reduced overall range of motion in the 6DOF analysis.

  13. The cyclops lesion after bicruciate-retaining total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Klaassen, MD, FACS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The cyclops lesion is a localized anterior arthrofibrosis most commonly seen following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The lesion forms at the anterior cruciate ligament insertion creating a painful extension block between femoral intercondylar notch and tibial plateau. We present 2 cases (3 knees in which cyclops lesions appeared atypically following bicruciate-retaining total knee replacement. Two lesions occurred in a single patient following bilateral knee replacement. One lesion occurred in an active sportswoman. All 3 resolved following arthroscopic debridement. We describe the presentation of this unusual complication and suggest keys to its diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Keywords: Cyclops lesion, Bicruciate-retaining, Total knee arthroplasty, Extension deficit

  14. Pain and fear avoidance partially mediate change in muscle strength during resistance exercise in women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Anette; Palstam, Annie; Löfgren, Monika; Ernberg, Malin; Bjersing, Jan; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Gerdle, Björn; Kosek, Eva; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa

    2017-11-21

    Resistance exercise results in health benefits in fibromyalgia. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that mediate change in muscle strength in women with fibromyalgia as a result of resistance exercise. Sixty-seven women with fibromyalgia (age range 25-64 years) were included. Tests of muscle strength and questionnaires related to pain, fear avoidance and physical activity were carried out. Multivariable stepwise regression was used to analyse explanatory factors for change and predictors for final values of knee-extension force, elbow-flexion force and hand-grip force. Change in knee-extension force was explained by fear avoidance beliefs about physical activity at baseline, together with change in pain intensity, knee-extension force at baseline, age and body mass index (BMI) (R2=0.40, p = 0.013). Change in elbow-flexion force was explained by pain intensity at baseline, together with baseline fear avoidance beliefs about physical activity, BMI and elbow-flexion force at baseline (R2 = 0.32, p = 0.043). Change in hand-grip force was explained by hand-grip force at baseline, change in pain intensity and baseline fear avoidance (R2 = 0.37, p = 0.009). Final muscle strength was predicted by the same variables as change, except pain. Pain and fear avoidance are important factors to consider in rehabilitation using resistance exercise for women with fibromyalgia.

  15. No difference in gait between posterior cruciate retention and the posterior stabilized design after total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boom, Lennard G. H.; Halbertsma, Jan P. K.; van Raaij, Jos J. A. M.; Brouwer, Reinoud W.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, knee joint kinematics (e.g. knee flexion/extension) and kinetics (e.g. knee flexion moments) are assessed after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between patients implanted with either a unilateral posterior stabilized (PS) and a posterior cruciate-retaining (PCR) design. It was

  16. Reduced arterial diameter during static exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H L; Mitchell, J H; Friedman, D B

    1995-01-01

    In eight subjects luminal diameter of the resting limb radial and dorsalis pedis arteries was determined by high-resolution ultrasound (20 MHz). This measurement was followed during rest and during 2 min of static handgrip or of one-leg knee extension at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction...... exertion was approximately 15 units after both types of exercise. The dorsalis pedis arterial diameter was 1.50 +/- 0.20 mm (mean and SE) and the radial AD 2.45 +/- 0.12 mm. During both types of contractions the luminal diameters decreased approximately 3.5% within the first 30 s (P

  17. The knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, J.A.; Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation of infection is difficult on the basis of radiographs. A clinical history suggestive of infection, such as excessive prolonged pain, drainage, fever, or a postoperative hematoma, is helpful in assessment. Radiographs may reveal periosteal new bone formation in long-standing cases of infection. Aspiration of the knee may or may not be helpful. Differential Tc-99m and gallium bone scans may be a useful adjunct in difficult cases. The gallium scan should show increased uptake relative to the Tc-99m scan to be considered positive. Bone scanning is not a useful criterion by itself for assessment of loosening

  18. Neuromuscular fatigue during high-intensity intermittent exercise in individuals with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borji, Rihab; Sahli, Sonia; Zarrouk, Nidhal; Zghal, Firas; Rebai, Haithem

    2013-12-01

    This study examined neuromuscular fatigue after high-intensity intermittent exercise in 10 men with mild intellectual disability (ID) in comparison with 10 controls. Both groups performed three maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) of knee extension with 5 min in-between. The highest level achieved was selected as reference MVC. The fatiguing exercise consists of five sets with a maximal number of flexion-extension cycles at 80% of the one maximal repetition (1RM) for the right leg at 90° with 90 s rest interval between sets. The MVC was tested again after the last set. Peak force and electromyography (EMG) signals were measured during the MVC tests. Root Mean Square (RMS) and Median Frequency (MF) were calculated. Neuromuscular efficiency (NME) was calculated as the ratio of peak force to the RMS. Before exercise, individuals with ID had a lower MVC (psport train ID individuals, they should consider this nervous system weakness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses during straight and bent knee cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandroukas, K; Angelopoulou, N; Christoulas, K; Vrabas, I S

    2000-06-01

    This study examined the influence of knee angle on the cardiorespiratory system loading during submaximal and maximal stationary cycle ergometry. Experimental design and participants: eighteen untrained women (age: 21+/-1.88 years, weight: 57+/-5.75 kg, height: 165+/-5.03 cm, values are mean+/-SD) volunteered as subjects and underwent two-cycle ergometer incremental (Jaeger ER900) tests: 1) straight knee (180 degrees), 2) bent knee (140 degrees). oxygen uptake (VO2), ventilation (VE) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were measured continuously during each test using an open circuit spirometry and blood lactate concentration was determined by means of an enzymatic method. Comparing cycling with "straight knee" to cycling with "bent knee" at 50 W, heart rate (HR), V(E) and VO2 were significantly higher (10.6%, 12.5%, 17.8%). At 100 W, blood lactate was significantly lower (10.8%) while VO2 and RER was higher (5.5%, 7.1%). During maximal exercise, the total exercise time was significantly longer (11.2%) and VE, VO2 and HR were significantly higher during cycling with "straight knee" compared to cycling with "bent knee". No significant difference in peak lactate was evident between the two sitting positions. The results of this study indicate that cycling with bent knee requires lower oxygen uptake while pedaling with straight knee is the only way to reach VO2max during cycle testing, since the cardiorespiratory system is fully taxed.

  20. Knee pain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The location of knee pain can help identify the problem. Pain on the front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or ... synovial fluid) that forms behind the knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in ...

  1. Analysis of lower limb force in foot work exercise of Pilates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Neis Machado

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Pilates is a physical exercise method that uses the resistance of springs to modulate the overload from exercises. Objective: To characterize the force versus time curve of the foot work exercise; verify and compare the force applied by the same limb during the foot work exercise against the resistance of two types of springs with different elastic constants, and verify and compare the asymmetry of force applied by right and left lower limbs during the foot work exercise against the resistance of the same type of spring. Methods: Twenty healthy adult individuals familiarized with Pilates were evaluated. Two extensometric force plates adapted to the Reformer apparatus were used. Each participant performed 10 repetitions of the exercise against the resistance of two pairs of springs with different elastic constants. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used with significance levels of p < 0.05. Results: The exercise's standard curve showed that the peak force is reached in the point of maximum hip and knee extension during the execution of the exercise. There were differences between force production by the same limb for different springs (p < 0.001 and between left and right limb when spring with lower elastic constant was used (p = 0.006. No differences were found between right and left limb when spring with higher elastic constant was used (p = 0.108. Conclusion: The knowledge of the force versus time curve and the quantification of unilateral force are important elements in the evaluation and prescription of exercises.

  2. The cyclops lesion after bicruciate-retaining total knee replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Klaassen, Mark A.; Aikins, Jerry L.

    2017-01-01

    The cyclops lesion is a localized anterior arthrofibrosis most commonly seen following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The lesion forms at the anterior cruciate ligament insertion creating a painful extension block between femoral intercondylar notch and tibial plateau. We present 2 cases (3 knees) in which cyclops lesions appeared atypically following bicruciate-retaining total knee replacement. Two lesions occurred in a single patient following bilateral knee replacement. One les...

  3. Estimation of Electrically-Evoked Knee Torque from Mechanomyography Using Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morufu Olusola Ibitoye

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty of real-time muscle force or joint torque estimation during neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES in physical therapy and exercise science has motivated recent research interest in torque estimation from other muscle characteristics. This study investigated the accuracy of a computational intelligence technique for estimating NMES-evoked knee extension torque based on the Mechanomyographic signals (MMG of contracting muscles that were recorded from eight healthy males. Simulation of the knee torque was modelled via Support Vector Regression (SVR due to its good generalization ability in related fields. Inputs to the proposed model were MMG amplitude characteristics, the level of electrical stimulation or contraction intensity, and knee angle. Gaussian kernel function, as well as its optimal parameters were identified with the best performance measure and were applied as the SVR kernel function to build an effective knee torque estimation model. To train and test the model, the data were partitioned into training (70% and testing (30% subsets, respectively. The SVR estimation accuracy, based on the coefficient of determination (R2 between the actual and the estimated torque values was up to 94% and 89% during the training and testing cases, with root mean square errors (RMSE of 9.48 and 12.95, respectively. The knee torque estimations obtained using SVR modelling agreed well with the experimental data from an isokinetic dynamometer. These findings support the realization of a closed-loop NMES system for functional tasks using MMG as the feedback signal source and an SVR algorithm for joint torque estimation.

  4. Leg strength declines with advancing age despite habitual endurance exercise in active older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcell, Taylor J; Hawkins, Steven A; Wiswell, Robert A

    2014-02-01

    Age-associated loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) and strength (dynapenia) is associated with a loss of independence that contributes to falls, fractures, and nursing home admissions, whereas regular physical activity has been suggested to offset these losses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of habitual endurance exercise on muscle mass and strength in active older adults. A longitudinal analysis of muscle strength (≈4.8 years apart) was performed on 59 men (age at start of study: 58.6 ± 7.3 years) and 35 women (56.9 ± 8.2 years) who used endurance running as their primary mode of exercise. There were no changes in fat-free mass although body fat increased minimally (1.0-1.5%). Training volume (km·wk, d·wk) decreased in both the men and women. There was a significant loss of both isometric knee extension (≈5% per year) and knee flexion (≈3.6% per year) strength in both the men and women. However, there was no significant change in either isokinetic concentric or eccentric torque of the knee extensors. Our data demonstrated a significant decline in isometric knee extensor and knee flexor strength although there were no changes in body mass in this group of very active older men and women. Our data support newer exercise guidelines for older Americans suggesting resistance training be an integral component of a fitness program and that running alone was not sufficient to prevent the loss in muscle strength (dynapenia) with aging.

  5. Cosmic ray air showers in the knee energy region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The cosmic ray extensive air showers in the knee energy region have been studied by the North Bengal University array. The differential size spectra at different atmospheric depths show a systematic shift of the knee towards smaller shower size with the increase in atmospheric depth. The measured values of spectral ...

  6. An Evidence-Based Framework for Strengthening Exercises to Prevent Hamstring Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Matthew N; Timmins, Ryan G; Opar, David A; Pizzari, Tania; Ruddy, Joshua D; Sims, Casey; Williams, Morgan D; Shield, Anthony J

    2018-02-01

    Strength training is a valuable component of hamstring strain injury prevention programmes; however, in recent years a significant body of work has emerged to suggest that the acute responses and chronic adaptations to training with different exercises are heterogeneous. Unfortunately, these research findings do not appear to have uniformly influenced clinical guidelines for exercise selection in hamstring injury prevention or rehabilitation programmes. The purpose of this review was to provide the practitioner with an evidence-base from which to prescribe strengthening exercises to mitigate the risk of hamstring injury. Several studies have established that eccentric knee flexor conditioning reduces the risk of hamstring strain injury when compliance is adequate. The benefits of this type of training are likely to be at least partly mediated by increases in biceps femoris long head fascicle length and improvements in eccentric knee flexor strength. Therefore, selecting exercises with a proven benefit on these variables should form the basis of effective injury prevention protocols. In addition, a growing body of work suggests that the patterns of hamstring muscle activation diverge significantly between different exercises. Typically, relatively higher levels of biceps femoris long head and semimembranosus activity have been observed during hip extension-oriented movements, whereas preferential semitendinosus and biceps femoris short head activation have been reported during knee flexion-oriented movements. These findings may have implications for targeting specific muscles in injury prevention programmes. An evidence-based approach to strength training for the prevention of hamstring strain injury should consider the impact of exercise selection on muscle activation, and the effect of training interventions on hamstring muscle architecture, morphology and function. Most importantly, practitioners should consider the effect of a strength training programme on

  7. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  8. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  9. Knee braces - unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most people talk about the arthritis in their knees, they are referring to a type of arthritis ... is caused by wear and tear inside your knee joints. Cartilage, the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions ...

  10. Impacto dos exercícios na capacidade funcional e dor em pacientes com osteoartrite de joelhos: ensaio clínico randomizado Impact of exercise on the functional capacity and pain of patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Mizusaki Imoto de Oliveira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A fraqueza muscular, especialmente do quadríceps, é uma das principais repercussões osteomusculares da osteoartrite de joelho, e os exercícios são considerados uma das principais intervenções no tratamento conservador da doença. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito do fortalecimento do quadríceps femural na capacidade funcional e nos sintomas relacionados à osteoartrite de joelho utilizando o teste Timed Up and Go (TUG, o questionário Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC e o Índice de Lequesne. MÉTODOS: Foram randomizados 100 pacientes, divididos em dois grupos: 1 Grupo Exercício (n = 50, o qual incluiu bicicleta estacionária, alongamento dos músculos isquiotibiais e fortalecimento do músculo quadríceps, e 2 Grupo Orientação (n = 50, que recebeu um manual de orientações a fim de descrever a osteoartrite de joelho e instruir os pacientes a como ajustar o dia a dia de acordo com os sintomas. Os pacientes foram informados sobre os sinais e sintomas da doença e os cuidados durante as atividades de vida diária. O manual não incluiu orientação de exercícios. RESULTADOS: O Grupo Exercício apresentou melhora estatisticamente significante no teste TUG, nos aspectos dor, função e rigidez do questionário WOMAC e no índice Lequesne, quando comparado ao Grupo Orientação. CONCLUSÃO: Exercícios para fortalecimento do quadríceps com duração de oito semanas são efetivos na melhora de dor, função e rigidez em pacientes com osteoartrite de joelho.BACKGROUND: Muscle weakness, especially of the quadriceps muscle, is one of the major musculoskeletal effects of knee osteoarthritis. Exercises are considered one of the main interventions in the conservative treatment of those patients. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of quadriceps strengthening exercises on functional capacity and symptoms related of knee osteoarthritis by use of the Timed Up and Go test (TUG, the Western Ontario and

  11. Neuromuscular Exercise Post Partial Medial Meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of a 12-week, home-based, physiotherapist-guided neuromuscular exercise program on the knee adduction moment (an indicator of mediolateral knee load distribution) in people with a medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy within the past 3-12 months. METHODS......: An assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial including people aged 30-50 years with no to mild pain following medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy was conducted. Participants were randomly allocated to either a 12-week neuromuscular exercise program that targeted neutral lower limb alignment...... or a control group with no exercise. The exercise program included eight individual sessions with one of seven physiotherapists in private clinics, together with home exercises. Primary outcomes were the peak external knee adduction moment during normal pace walking and during a one-leg sit-to-stand. Secondary...

  12. The Influence of Methylsulfonylmethane on Inflammation-Associated Cytokine Release before and following Strenuous Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariè van der Merwe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inflammation is associated with strenuous exercise and methylsulfonylmethane (MSM has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties. Methods. Physically active men were supplemented with either placebo or MSM (3 grams per day for 28 days before performing 100 repetitions of eccentric knee extension exercise. Ex vivo and in vitro testing consisted of evaluating cytokine production in blood (whole blood and isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS, before and through 72 hours after exercise, while in vivo testing included the evaluation of cytokines before and through 72 hours after exercise. Results. LPS stimulation of whole blood after MSM supplementation resulted in decreased induction of IL-1β, with no effect on IL-6, TNF-α, or IL-8. After exercise, there was a reduced response to LPS in the placebo, but MSM resulted in robust release of IL-6 and TNF-α. A small decrease in resting levels of proinflammatory cytokines was noted with MSM, while an acute postexercise increase in IL-10 was observed with MSM. Conclusion. Strenuous exercise causes a robust inflammatory reaction that precludes the cells from efficiently responding to additional stimuli. MSM appears to dampen the release of inflammatory molecules in response to exercise, resulting in a less incendiary environment, allowing cells to still have the capacity to mount an appropriate response to an additional stimulus after exercise.

  13. Resistance Training with Single vs. Multi-joint Exercises at Equal Total Load Volume: Effects on Body Composition, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and Muscle Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Antonio; Gentil, Paulo; Moro, Tatiana; Marcolin, Giuseppe; Bianco, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effects of equal-volume resistance training performed with single-joint (SJ) or multi-joint exercises (MJ) on VO 2 max, muscle strength and body composition in physically active males. Thirty-six participants were divided in two groups: SJ group ( n = 18, 182.1 ± 5.2, 80.03 ± 2.78 kg, 23.5 ± 2.7 years) exercised with only SJ exercises (e.g., dumbbell fly, knee extension, etc.) and MJ group ( n = 18, 185.3 ± 3.6 cm, 80.69 ± 2.98 kg, 25.5 ± 3.8 years) with only MJ exercises (e.g., bench press, squat, etc.). The total work volume (repetitions × sets × load) was equated between groups. Training was performed three times a week for 8 weeks. Before and after the training period, participants were tested for VO 2 max, body composition, 1 RM on the bench press, knee extension and squat. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare post training values between groups, using baseline values as covariates. According to the results, both groups decreased body fat and increased fat free mass with no difference between them. Whilst both groups significantly increased cardiorespiratory fitness and maximal strength, the improvements in MJ group were higher than for SJ in VO 2 max (5.1 and 12.5% for SJ and MJ), bench press 1 RM (8.1 and 10.9% for SJ and MJ), knee extension 1 RM (12.4 and 18.9% for SJ and MJ) and squat 1 RM (8.3 and 13.8% for SJ and MJ). In conclusion, when total work volume was equated, RT programs involving MJ exercises appear to be more efficient for improving muscle strength and maximal oxygen consumption than programs involving SJ exercises, but no differences were found for body composition.

  14. Femoropatellar gliding movement during active stretching of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brossmann, J.; Muhle, C.; Melchert, U.H.; Spielmann, R.P.; Schroeder, C.; Hassenpflug, J.

    1992-01-01

    By means of motion-triggered MRT it has been possible for the first time to demonstrate movements in the patello-femoral joint by means of MRT. Patello-femoral movement was studied during active extension of the knee between 30deg flexion and complete extension. The knees of 5 normal females and 7 normal males were studied together with 2 women with recurrent lateral patellar luxation. In normal women there was an average 16deg (10 to 18deg), in men an average of 12deg (10 to 14deg) of lateralisation of the patella during complete extension of the knee. In 1 patient there was 10deg medial displacement of the patella before extension. In 2 knees with recurrent lateral subluxation there was a 20 and 24deg displacement of the patella. (orig.) [de

  15. [Surgical technique and clinical results of total knee arthroplasty in treating endstage gonarthrosis combined with valgus knee deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingshan; Weng, Xisheng; Lin, Jin; Jin, Jin; Qian, Wenwei

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the surgical technique and the clinical results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in treating end-stage gonarthrosis combined with valgus knee deformity. Between November 1998 and October 2010, 64 patients (72 knees) with end-stage gonarthrosis combined with valgus knee deformity underwent TKA by a medial parapatellar approach. Of the 64 patients, 18 were male and 46 were female with an average age of 62.5 years (range, 23-82 years), including 44 cases (49 knees) of osteoarthritis, 17 cases (20 knees) of rheumatoid arthritis, 2 cases (2 knees) of haemophilic arthritis, and 1 case (1 knee) of post-traumatic arthritis. Bilateral knees were involved in 8 cases, and single knee in 56 cases. The flexion and extension range of motion (ROM) of the knee joint was (82.2 +/- 28.7) degrees; the femur-tibia angle (FTA) was (18.0 +/- 5.8) degrees; according to Knee Society Score (KSS) criterion, the preoperative clinical score was 31.2 +/- 10.1 and functional score was 37.3 +/- 9.0. According to Krackow's classification, there were 65 knees of type I and 7 knees of type II. By medial parapatellar approach, conventional osteotomy and Ranawat soft tissue release were performed in all cases. Prosthesis of preserved posterior cruciate ligament were used in 7 cases (7 knees), posterior stabilize prosthesis in 54 cases (60 knees), constrained prosthesis in 4 cases (5 knees). Incisions healed by first intention in all cases. Peroneal nerve palsy occurred in 1 patient with haemophilic arthritis, severe valgus deformity (FTA was 41 degrees), and flexion contracture (20 degrees), which was cured after 1 year of conservative treatment. Revison surgery was performed in 1 case of deep infection at 2 years after surgery. All the patients were followed up 4.9 years on average (range, 1-13 years). At last follow-up, the FTA was (7.0 +/- 2.5) degrees, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative value (t = 15.502, P = 0.000). The KSS clinical score was 83.0 +/- 6

  16. Knee Arthrodesis After Failure of Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfriedsen, Tinne B; Morville Schrøder, Henrik; Odgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arthrodesis is considered a salvage procedure after failure of a knee arthroplasty. Data on the use of this procedure are limited. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence, causes, surgical techniques, and outcomes of arthrodesis after failed knee arthroplasty...... in a nationwide population. METHODS: Data were extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register. A total of 92,785 primary knee arthroplasties performed in Denmark from 1997 to 2013 were identified by linking the data using....... Differences in cumulative incidence were compared with the Gray test. RESULTS: A total of 164 of the 165 arthrodeses were performed for causes related to failed knee arthroplasty. The 15-year cumulative incidence of arthrodesis was 0.26% (95% confidence interval, 0.21% to 0.31%). The 5-year cumulative...

  17. Comprehensive profile of hip, knee and ankle ranges of motion in professional football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Valenciano, Alejandro; Ayala, Francisco; Vera-García, Francisco J; de Ste Croix, Mark; Hernández-Sánchez, Sergio; Ruiz-Pérez, Iñaki; Cejudo, Antonio; Santonja, Fernando

    2017-10-31

    Limited ranges of motion (ROM) have been considered as a primary risk factor for some football injuries, but only a few studies have analysed differences in lower extremity joints. The main purposes were (a) to describe the lower extremity ROM profile in professional football players; and (b) to examine differences between goalkeepers and outfield players. 82 professional male football players from 4 teams were measured in the 2013 pre-season. Measures of passive hip (flexion with knee flexed [PHFKF] and extended [PHFKE], extension [PHE], abduction [PHA], external [PHER] and internal [PHIR] rotation), knee (flexion [PKF]) and ankle (dorsiflexion with knee flexed [ADFKF] and extended [ADFKE]) ROMs were taken. Magnitude-based inferences exploring differences between player position and limb were made. 46% of all participants showed restricted PHFKE and/or around 30% showed restricted ADFKF ROM values. Contrarily, most players reported normal PHFKF, PHE, PHIR and PHER as well as PKF ROM scores with percentage values close to 100%. Bilateral meaningful differences for PHA, PHIR and PHER were found in approximately 30% of outfield players and goalkeepers. Statistical analysis found trivial differences between players for PHFKE, PHE, PHIR, PHER, ADFKE and ADFKF. However, moderate differences between players were found for PHFKF, PHA and PKF, with goalkeepers demonstrating higher values than outfield players. The findings of this study reinforce the necessity of prescribing exercises aimed at improving PHFKE and ADFKF ROM within everyday football training routines. In addition, as some bilateral deficits were observed, unilateral training should be considered where appropriate.

  18. Home-Based versus Hospital-Based Rehabilitation Program after Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remedios López-Liria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare home-based rehabilitation with the standard hospital rehabilitation in terms of improving knee joint mobility and recovery of muscle strength and function in patients after a total knee replacement. Materials and Methods. A non-randomised controlled trial was conducted. Seventy-eight patients with a prosthetic knee were included in the study and allocated to either a home-based or hospital-based rehabilitation programme. Treatment included various exercises to restore strength and joint mobility and to improve patients’ functional capacity. The primary outcome of the trial was the treatment effectiveness measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC. Results. The groups did not significantly differ in the leg side (right/left or clinical characteristics (P>0.05. After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements (P<0.001 from the baseline values in the level of pain (visual analogue scale, the range of flexion-extension motion and muscle strength, disability (Barthel and WOMAC indices, balance, and walking. Conclusions. This study reveals that the rehabilitation treatments offered either at home or in hospital settings are equally effective.

  19. MR arthrography of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.; Engel, A. Jr.; Stiglbauer, R. Jr.; Prayer, L. Jr.; Hajek, P. Jr.; Imhof, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the diagnostic value of MR arthrography in the assessment of cartilaginous lesions, including osteochondritis dissecans. One hundred thirty-two knees of 125 patients were examined with MR arthrography performed on a 1.5-T magnet with a knee resonator. T1-weighted spin-echo and T2*-weighted three-dimensional gradient-echo sequences were obtained after intraarticular administration of 40 mL of 2-mmol GD-DTPA solution. Seventy-five patients were also imaged without contrast agent. The description of the articular surface was classified into four types: I, normal cartilage surface and thickness; II, surface normal or slightly irregular; III, severe surface irregularities and cartilage defects; and IV, extensive cartilage defects, scar formation. MR findings were correlated with those of arthroscopy/arthrotomy (n = 75)

  20. Pilot study: Effects of drinking hydrogen-rich water on muscle fatigue caused by acute exercise in elite athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoki Kosuke

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle contraction during short intervals of intense exercise causes oxidative stress, which can play a role in the development of overtraining symptoms, including increased fatigue, resulting in muscle microinjury or inflammation. Recently it has been said that hydrogen can function as antioxidant, so we investigated the effect of hydrogen-rich water (HW on oxidative stress and muscle fatigue in response to acute exercise. Methods Ten male soccer players aged 20.9 ± 1.3 years old were subjected to exercise tests and blood sampling. Each subject was examined twice in a crossover double-blind manner; they were given either HW or placebo water (PW for one week intervals. Subjects were requested to use a cycle ergometer at a 75 % maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 for 30 min, followed by measurement of peak torque and muscle activity throughout 100 repetitions of maximal isokinetic knee extension. Oxidative stress markers and creatine kinase in the peripheral blood were sequentially measured. Results Although acute exercise resulted in an increase in blood lactate levels in the subjects given PW, oral intake of HW prevented an elevation of blood lactate during heavy exercise. Peak torque of PW significantly decreased during maximal isokinetic knee extension, suggesting muscle fatigue, but peak torque of HW didn’t decrease at early phase. There was no significant change in blood oxidative injury markers (d-ROMs and BAP or creatine kinease after exercise. Conclusion Adequate hydration with hydrogen-rich water pre-exercise reduced blood lactate levels and improved exercise-induced decline of muscle function. Although further studies to elucidate the exact mechanisms and the benefits are needed to be confirmed in larger series of studies, these preliminary results may suggest that HW may be suitable hydration for athletes.

  1. Kegel Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercised my pelvic muscles ____ times. I spent ____ minutes exercising. At each exercise session, I squeezed my pelvic ... exercised my pelvic muscles ____ times. I spent ____ minutes exercising. At each exercise session, I squeezed my pelvic ...

  2. No exacerbation of knee joint pain and effusion following preoperative progressive resistance training in patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skoffer, Birgit; Dalgas, Ulrik; Maribo, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative progressive resistance training (PRT) is controversial in patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), because of the concern that it may exacerbate knee joint pain and effusion. OBJECTIVE: To examine if preoperative PRT initiated 5 weeks prior to TKA would 1......) exacerbate pain and knee effusion, 2) allow a progressively increased training load throughout the training period that would subsequently increase muscle strength. DESIGN: Secondary analyses from a randomized controlled trial. SETTING: University Hospital and a Regional Hospital. PATIENTS: Thirty patients...... OUTCOME MEASURES: Before and after each training session, knee joint pain rated on an 11-point scale, effusion assessed by measuring the knee joint circumference, and training load were recorded. The first and last training session were initiated by 1RM testing of unilateral leg press, knee extension...

  3. A single bout of resistance exercise can enhance episodic memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Lisa; Hasni, Anita; Shinohara, Minoru; Duarte, Audrey

    2014-11-01

    Acute aerobic exercise can be beneficial to episodic memory. This benefit may occur because exercise produces a similar physiological response as physical stressors. When administered during consolidation, acute stress, both physical and psychological, consistently enhances episodic memory, particularly memory for emotional materials. Here we investigated whether a single bout of resistance exercise performed during consolidation can produce episodic memory benefits 48 h later. We used a one-leg knee extension/flexion task for the resistance exercise. To assess the physiological response to the exercise, we measured salivary alpha amylase (a biomarker of central norepinephrine), heart rate, and blood pressure. To test emotional episodic memory, we used a remember-know recognition memory paradigm with equal numbers of positive, negative, and neutral IAPS images as stimuli. The group that performed the exercise, the active group, had higher overall recognition accuracy than the group that did not exercise, the passive group. We found a robust effect of valence across groups, with better performance on emotional items as compared to neutral items and no difference between positive and negative items. This effect changed based on the physiological response to the exercise. Within the active group, participants with a high physiological response to the exercise were impaired for neutral items as compared to participants with a low physiological response to the exercise. Our results demonstrate that a single bout of resistance exercise performed during consolidation can enhance episodic memory and that the effect of valence on memory depends on the physiological response to the exercise. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Exercise increases pressure pain tolerance but not pressure and heat pain thresholds in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaegter, H B; Hoeger Bement, M; Madsen, A B; Fridriksson, J; Dasa, M; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2017-01-01

    Exercise causes an acute decrease in the pain sensitivity known as exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH), but the specificity to certain pain modalities remains unknown. This study aimed to compare the effect of isometric exercise on the heat and pressure pain sensitivity. On three different days, 20 healthy young men performed two submaximal isometric knee extensions (30% maximal voluntary contraction in 3 min) and a control condition (quiet rest). Before and immediately after exercise and rest, the sensitivity to heat pain and pressure pain was assessed in randomized and counterbalanced order. Cuff pressure pain threshold (cPPT) and pain tolerance (cPTT) were assessed on the ipsilateral lower leg by computer-controlled cuff algometry. Heat pain threshold (HPT) was recorded on the ipsilateral foot by a computer-controlled thermal stimulator. Cuff pressure pain tolerance was significantly increased after exercise compared with baseline and rest (p  0.77) compared with HPT (intraclass correlation = 0.54). The results indicate that hypoalgesia after submaximal isometric exercise is primarily affecting tolerance of pressure pain compared with the pain threshold. These data contribute to the understanding of how isometric exercise influences pain perception, which is necessary to optimize the clinical utility of exercise in management of chronic pain. The effect of isometric exercise on pain tolerance may be relevant for patients in chronic musculoskeletal pain as a pain-coping strategy. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: The results indicate that hypoalgesia after submaximal isometric exercise is primarily affecting tolerance of pressure pain compared with the heat and pressure pain threshold. These data contribute to the understanding of how isometric exercise influences pain perception, which is necessary to optimize the clinical utility of exercise in management of chronic pain. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  5. Rebound boots change lower limb muscle activation and kinematics during different fitness exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossato, Mateus; Dellagrana, Rodolfo André; Dos Santos, Juliane Cristine Lopes; Carpes, Felipe P; Gheller, Rodrigo Ghedini; da Silva, De Angelys de Ceselles Seixas; Bezerra, Ewertton de Souza; Dos Santos, João Otacílio Libardoni

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate electromyography and kinematic parameters of the lower limbs using rebound boots (RB) and barefoot during a gym workout. This information can be helpful to practitioners to schedule rehabilitation and training programs. Ten women (25 ± 9 years) volunteered for the study; inclusion criteria were as follows: subjects must have experienced the use of RB and the analyzed exercises for at least 6 months, and have no previous injuries in the lower limbs. Seven exercises were performed for 30 s with the RB and subsequently barefoot. Data from muscle activation of vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris (BF), lateral gastrocnemius (LG) and 2D kinematics were collected. The use of RB triggered postural changes, characterized by greater hip extension (in 4 of the exercises) and knee extension (in 6 of the exercises) for the landing. RB reduced activation mainly in LG (in 6 of the exercise) while no changes were observed for VL (except in exercise 1) and BF. RB change kinematics and muscle activation suggesting changes in the way the legs absorb and transmit force during jumps. LG was the main muscle affected by the use of RB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dextrose Prolotherapy for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabago, David; Patterson, Jeffrey J.; Mundt, Marlon; Kijowski, Richard; Grettie, Jessica; Segal, Neil A.; Zgierska, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Knee osteoarthritis is a common, debilitating chronic disease. Prolotherapy is an injection therapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain. We conducted a 3-arm, blinded (injector, assessor, injection group participants), randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of prolotherapy for knee osteoarthritis. METHODS Ninety adults with at least 3 months of painful knee osteoarthritis were randomized to blinded injection (dextrose prolotherapy or saline) or at-home exercise. Extra- and intra-articular injections were done at 1, 5, and 9 weeks with as-needed additional treatments at weeks 13 and 17. Exercise participants received an exercise manual and in-person instruction. Outcome measures included a composite score on the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC; 100 points); knee pain scale (KPS; individual knee), post-procedure opioid medication use, and participant satisfaction. Intention-to-treat analysis using analysis of variance was used. RESULTS No baseline differences existed between groups. All groups reported improved composite WOMAC scores compared with baseline status (P dextrose prolotherapy improved more (P <.05) at 52 weeks than did scores for patients receiving saline and exercise (score change: 15.3 ± 3.5 vs 7.6 ± 3.4, and 8.2 ± 3.3 points, respectively) and exceeded the WOMAC-based minimal clinically important difference. Individual knee pain scores also improved more in the prolotherapy group (P = .05). Use of prescribed postprocedure opioid medication resulted in rapid diminution of injection-related pain. Satisfaction with prolotherapy was high. There were no adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Prolotherapy resulted in clinically meaningful sustained improvement of pain, function, and stiffness scores for knee osteoarthritis compared with blinded saline injections and at-home exercises. PMID:23690322

  7. Torze kolenních extenzorových svalů během izometrických cvičení a ruská elektrická stimulace po zranění kolenních vazů Knee extensor muscles' torque during isometric exercises and russian electrical stimulation following a knee ligament injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Płaszewski

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Dobrovolné izometrické cvičení (VOL i neuromuskulární elektrická stimulace (NMES jsou metody rozvoje statické svalové síly. Používají se v programech pro rozvoj síly u zdravých svalů a také pro zotavování svalové funkce za určitých ortopedických podmínek. Obě metody se používají pro zpomalování svalové atrofie a ztráty síly v důsledku imobilizace kolena po zranění (Eriksson & Häggmark, 1979; Ingemann-Hansen & Halkjær-Kristensen, 1985; Johnson, 1988; Wigerstad-Lossing, Tromby, Jonsson, Morelli, Peterson, & Rentröm, 1988. NMES může vyvolat záškuby nebo tetanické svalové kontrakce, a to v závislosti na frekvenci proudových impulsů. Během tetanické stimulace jsou hlavními rysy nácvikových režimů: 1 cyklus zapnutí/vypnutí (pracovní cyklus, tvořený dobou kontrakce a dobou uvolnění; 2 počet kontrakcí; 3 intenzita kontrakcí (dána proudovou amplitudou nebo tolerancí subjektu. Voluntary isometric exercise (VOL and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES are both methods of static muscle strength and girth training. They are applied in strength training programs to healthy muscle as well as for muscle function recovery under certain orthopaedic conditions. Both methods are used to retard muscle atrophy and strength loss resulting from post injury knee immobilization (Eriksson & Häggmark, 1979; Ingemann-Hansen & Halkjær-Kristensen, 1985; Johnson, 1988; Wigerstad-Lossing, Tromby, Jonsson, Morelli, Peterson, & Rentröm, 1988. NMES can elicit twitch or tetanic muscle contractions, determined by current pulse frequency. During tetanic stimulation, the main features of training regimes are: 1 on/off cycle (or duty cycle, made up of the time of contraction plus rest time; 2 the number of contractions; 3 the intensity of contractions (determined by the current amplitude and/or the subject’s tolerance.

  8. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity and blood flow during exercise and muscle ischemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L G; Perko, M; Hanel, B

    1992-01-01

    Changes in middle cerebral artery flow velocity (Vmean), measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound, were used to determine whether increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) or brain activation enhance cerebral perfusion during exercise. We also evaluated the role of "central command......, they support the hypothesis that cerebral perfusion during exercise reflects an increase in brain activation that is independent of MAP, central command, and muscle metaboreceptors but is likely to depend on influence of mechanoreceptors.......," mechanoreceptors, and/or muscle "metaboreceptors" on cerebral perfusion. Ten healthy subjects performed two levels of dynamic exercise corresponding to a heart rate of 110 (range 89-134) and 148 (129-170) beats/min, respectively, and exhaustive one-legged static knee extension. Measurements were continued during 2...

  9. Regulation of human skeletal muscle perfusion and its heterogeneity during exercise in moderate hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka H; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo

    2010-01-01

    , the results show that increased BF during one-leg exercise in moderate hypoxia is confined only to the contracting muscles, and the working muscle hyperemia appears not to be directly mediated by adenosine. Increased flow heterogeneity in noncontracting muscles likely reflects sympathetic nervous constraints...... healthy young men using positron emission tomography during one-leg dynamic knee extension exercise in normoxia and moderate physiological systemic hypoxia (14% O(2) corresponding to approximately 3,400 m of altitude) without and with local adenosine receptor inhibition with femoral artery infusion...... to curtail BF increments in areas other than working skeletal muscles, but this effect is not potentiated in moderate systemic hypoxia during small muscle mass exercise....

  10. Dynamic weight-bearing assessment of pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Christensen, Robin; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    2016-01-01

    -minute-walk-test (6MWT), and 6-min-walk-test with subsequent pain rating (6MWTpain), and once with a transition questionnaire (TRANS-Q) for the patient-reported change in pain after 12 weeks of exercise. Construct validity (baseline-scores) and responsiveness (change-scores) were estimated by Spearman Correlation...... a standing position). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the construct validity, responsiveness, and interpretability of the DAP for knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: One-hundred participants with knee OA were tested twice each with the DAP, the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), six...

  11. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise Cervical Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly ... Committee Exercise Committee Core Strengthening Many popular forms of exercise focus on ...

  12. Effect of weight maintenance on symptoms of knee osteoarthritis in obese patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Robin; Henriksen, Marius; Leeds, Anthony R

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare results of obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) who, after an intensive weight loss regimen, received 1 year of either Dietary support (D), knee-Exercise program (E), or Control (C) "no attention". Methods Randomized, two-phase, parallel-group trial. 192 obese...... of maintenance program. © 2014 American College of Rheumatology....

  13. A 60-year-old obese woman with osteoarthritis of the knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Pia; Riecke, B F; Christensen, R

    2011-01-01

    A case is presented of a 60-year-old woman with concomitant obesity and knee osteoarthritis. The bad knees prevented the patient from exercising; however, with a focused dietary intervention employing food supplements for the first period of 8 weeks, an ordinary low-energy diet for another 8 weeks...

  14. Knee effusion after total knee replacement.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, H. U.

    1993-01-01

    The various causes of effusions in artificial knees can be divided into four groups: implant related, technique related, interface problems, and infection. Diagnosis can be made from the patient's history and a clinical examination. Treatment is usually surgical revision.

  15. THE EFFECTS OF A STRETCH-SHORTENING CYCLE FATIGUE PROTOCOL ON KNEE KINEMATICS DURING RUNNING IN UNTRAINED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsatalas T

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of an intensive stretch shortening-cycle (SSC protocol (100 plyometric jumps on knee kinematics during running on a treadmill in healthy children using 3D kinematics. Twelve healthy and untrained children volunteered. Their mean + age, height and weight was 10,1±0,5 years, 142± 6,1 cm and 37 ±4,6kg, respectively. Muscle damage of lower extremities was caused by 100 maximal intensity plyometric jumps performed as 10 sets of 10 continuous jumps with a 30 second restperiod between sets. Muscle damage indicators [delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS, knee-joint flexion/extension angles during running on a treadmill (speed at 2.8 m/s] were assessed pre-, 0h, 24h, 48h and 72h post exercise. Kinematic data were captured at 100 Hz using a six-camera 3D motion analysis system (VICON 612. Repeated measures one-way ANOVA with five levels were utilised for the parameters. Allmuscle damage indicators revealed significant changes post- compared to pre-exercise data (p<0.05. Kinematic analysis revealed that the 100 plyometric jumps decreased knee-joint angles at different phases of stance (impact, support, push-off phase. These changes were more evident just after (0h the protocol and 48h after this, and remained till 72h post at a great extent (p<0.05. Lastly, children suffered from delayed muscle soreness on their thigh muscles which remained only 24 hours after this (p<0.05. Muscle damage causesalterations in treadmill running in knee kinematics of untrained children probable due to differentiation of their central nervous system running strategy

  16. Postexercise blood flow restriction does not enhance muscle hypertrophy induced by multiple-set high-load resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madarame, Haruhiko; Nakada, Satoshi; Ohta, Takahisa; Ishii, Naokata

    2018-05-01

    To test the applicability of postexercise blood flow restriction (PEBFR) in practical training programmes, we investigated whether PEBFR enhances muscle hypertrophy induced by multiple-set high-load resistance exercise (RE). Seven men completed an eight-week RE programme for knee extensor muscles. Employing a within-subject design, one leg was subjected to RE + PEBFR, whereas contralateral leg to RE only. On each exercise session, participants performed three sets of unilateral knee extension exercise at approximately 70% of their one-repetition maximum for RE leg first, and then performed three sets for RE + PEBFR leg. Immediately after completion of the third set, the proximal portion of the RE + PEBFR leg was compressed with an air-pressure cuff for 5 min at a pressure ranging from 100 to 150 mmHg. If participants could perform 10 repetitions for three sets in two consecutive exercise sessions, the work load was increased by 5% at the next exercise session. Muscle thickness and strength of knee extensor muscles were measured before and after the eight-week training period and after the subsequent eight-week detraining period. There was a main effect of time but no condition × time interaction or main effect of condition for muscle thickness and strength. Both muscle thickness and strength increased after the training period independent of the condition. This result suggests that PEBFR would not be an effective training method at least in an early phase of adaptation to high-load resistance exercise. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor and interleukin-6 response to high-volume mechanically demanding exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbickas, Vaidas; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Snieckus, Audrius; Venckunas, Tomas; Baranauskiene, Neringa; Brazaitis, Marius; Satkunskiene, Danguole; Unikauskas, Alvydas; Skurvydas, Albertas

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to follow circulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in response to severe muscle-damaging exercise. Young healthy men (N = 10) performed a bout of mechanically demanding stretch-shortening cycle exercise consisting of 200 drop jumps. Voluntary and electrically induced knee extension torque, serum BDNF levels, and IL-6 levels were measured before and for up to 7 days after exercise. Muscle force decreased by up to 40% and did not recover by 24 hours after exercise. Serum BDNF was decreased 1 hour and 24 hours after exercise, whereas IL-6 increased immediately and 1 hour after but recovered to baseline by 24 hours after exercise. IL-6 and 100-Hz stimulation torque were correlated (r = -0.64, P exercise. In response to acute, severe muscle-damaging exercise, serum BDNF levels decrease, whereas IL-6 levels increase and are associated with peripheral fatigue. Muscle Nerve 57: E46-E51, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis) KidsHealth / For Parents / Jumper's Knee (Patellar ... prevent continued damage to the knee. How the Knee Works To understand how jumper's knee happens, it ...

  19. Serial casting versus stretching technique to treat knee flexion contracture in children with spina bifida: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Oraibi, S; Tariah, Hashem Abu; Alanazi, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Severe knee contractures that develop soon after muscle imbalance may not improve with stretching exercises and splinting. An alternative treatment is serial casting, which has been used to promote increased range of motion. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of using serial casting and passive stretching approaches to treat knee flexion contracture in children with spina bifida. In a pre/post randomized controlled study, ten participants were included in the serial casting group, while eight participants were included in the passive stretching intervention group. The degree of knee extension was measured at baseline, immediately after intervention, and at a one-year follow-up using a standard goniometer. Both groups showed significant improvements in the degree of flexion contracture at the post-treatment evaluation and the follow-up evaluation. The serial casting group showed significant improvements in knee flexion contracture at the post-treatment evaluation, t (9)=13.4, p casting group compared with passive stretching group in relation to the degree of flexion contracture were found at the immediate post-treatment evaluation, F(1, 15)=246, p=0.0001, and the one-year follow-up evaluation, F (1, 15)=51.5, p=0.0001. The outcomes of this study provide the first evidence that serial casting may be a useful intervention in treating knee flexion contracture in children with spina bifida. However, further investigations into serial casting, as well as investigations into the use of serial casting with other interventions, are warranted.

  20. The pediatric knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Robert C

    2013-03-01

    Knee pain is a common problem in children and adolescents, and MRI of the knee is the most commonly performed pediatric cross-sectional musculoskeletal imaging exam. The purpose of this pictorial review is to highlight differences between adult and pediatric knee imaging with an emphasis on normal developmental variants, injury and disease patterns unique to children and adolescents, and differences in response and presentation to conditions affecting both adults and children.

  1. Imaging of knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Theodore T.

    2005-01-01

    Knee replacement surgery, either with unicompartmental or total systems, is common. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the appearance of normal knee arthroplasty and the appearances of complications such as infection, polyethylene wear, aseptic loosening and particle-induced osteolysis, patellofemoral abnormalities, axial instability, and periprosthetic and component fracture. Knowledge of the potential complications and their imaging appearances will help the radiologist in the diagnostic evaluation of the patient with a painful knee arthroplasty

  2. Imaging of knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Theodore T. [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 825 Northern Blvd., Great Neck, NY 11021 (United States)]. E-mail: TMiller@NSHS.edu

    2005-05-01

    Knee replacement surgery, either with unicompartmental or total systems, is common. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the appearance of normal knee arthroplasty and the appearances of complications such as infection, polyethylene wear, aseptic loosening and particle-induced osteolysis, patellofemoral abnormalities, axial instability, and periprosthetic and component fracture. Knowledge of the potential complications and their imaging appearances will help the radiologist in the diagnostic evaluation of the patient with a painful knee arthroplasty.

  3. Modelling knee flexion effects on joint power absorption and adduction moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Hanatsu; Tatsumi, Ichiroh; Sarashina, Eri; Sparrow, W A; Begg, Rezaul K

    2015-12-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is commonly associated with ageing and long-term walking. In this study the effects of flexing motions on knee kinetics during stance were simulated. Extended knees do not facilitate efficient loading. It was therefore, hypothesised that knee flexion would promote power absorption and negative work, while possibly reducing knee adduction moment. Three-dimensional (3D) position and ground reaction forces were collected from the right lower limb stance phase of one healthy young male subject. 3D position was sampled at 100 Hz using three Optotrak Certus (Northern Digital Inc.) motion analysis camera units, set up around an eight metre walkway. Force plates (AMTI) recorded ground reaction forces for inverse dynamics calculations. The Visual 3D (C-motion) 'Landmark' function was used to change knee joint positions to simulate three knee flexion angles during static standing. Effects of the flexion angles on joint kinetics during the stance phase were then modelled. The static modelling showed that each 2.7° increment in knee flexion angle produced 2.74°-2.76° increments in knee flexion during stance. Increased peak extension moment was 6.61 Nm per 2.7° of increased knee flexion. Knee flexion enhanced peak power absorption and negative work, while decreasing adduction moment. Excessive knee extension impairs quadriceps' power absorption and reduces eccentric muscle activity, potentially leading to knee osteoarthritis. A more flexed knee is accompanied by reduced adduction moment. Research is required to determine the optimum knee flexion to prevent further damage to knee-joint structures affected by osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Valgus-varus motion of the knee in normal level walking and stair climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, B; Stuart, M J; Kienbacher, T; Growney, E S; An, K-N

    1997-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: The knee valgus-varus moment and the knee angles were compared between normal level walking and stair climbing. DESIGN: Ten healthy subjects were tested for ascent, descent, and level walking. BACKGROUND: An understanding of the normal valgus-varus motion of the knee during stair climbing is needed to apply biomechanical analysis of stair climbing as a evaluation tool for knee osteoarthritis patients. METHODS: A motion analysis system, three force plates, and a flight of stairs were used to collect kinematic and kinetic data. The knee angles and moments were calculated from the collected kinematic and kinetic data. RESULTS: The knee varus angle for the maximum knee valgus moments in stair climbing was significantly greater than that in level walking. The knee valgus moment was significantly correlated to ground reaction forces and knee valgus-varus angle during stair climbing and level walking. CONCLUSIONS: There is a coupling between the knee valgus-varus motion and flexion-extension motion. Ground reaction forces are the major contributors to the within-subject variation in the knee valgus-varus moment during stair climbing and level walking. The knee valgus-varus angle is a major contributor to the between-subject variation in the knee valgus moment during stair climbing and level walking.

  5. MRI performed on dedicated knee coils is inaccurate for the measurement of tibial tubercle trochlear groove distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarvold, A.; Pope, A.; Sakthivel, V.K.; Ayer, R.V.

    2014-01-01

    Tibial tubercle trochlear groove distance (TTD) is a significant factor in patello-femoral instability. Initially described on CT scans with the knee in full extension, the measurement has been validated on MR scans. Dedicated knee MRI coils have subsequently superseded both CT and MRI body coils for knee imaging. However, the knee rests in partial flexion within the dedicated knee coil. The objective of this study is to investigate whether images from dedicated knee MRI coils produce different TTD measurements from MR body coils. Thirty-two symptomatic knees (27 patients) had simultaneous knee MR scans performed in both a dedicated knee coil and a body coil. TTD measurements were independently compared to assess whether the coil type used affected TTD. Patients' ages ranged from 10 to 27 years (mean 15 years). Mean TTD in the dedicated knee coil (partially flexed knee) was 11.3 mm compared with 19.9 mm in the body coil (that permits full knee extension). The mean difference was 8.6 mm, which was highly significant (p < 0.0001, unpaired t test). Inter-rater correlation co-efficient was 96 %. Of the knees that recorded a ''normal'' TTD on the dedicated knee coil, 60-100 % recorded a ''pathological'' TTD on body coil images, depending on which diagnostic value for ''normal'' cut-off was used. This study has identified a highly significant difference in TTD measurement when knees are scanned in a dedicated knee coil with the knee partially flexed, compared with an MR body coil. It is critical for surgeons and radiologists managing patello-femoral instability to appreciate this profound difference. TTD measurement taken from knees scanned in dedicated knee coils may lead to patients being falsely re-assured or erroneously denied surgery. (orig.)

  6. [Research progress of three-dimensional digital model for repair and reconstruction of knee joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Lu; Li, Yanlin; Hu, Meng

    2013-01-01

    To review recent advance in the application and research of three-dimensional digital knee model. The recent original articles about three-dimensional digital knee model were extensively reviewed and analyzed. The digital three-dimensional knee model can simulate the knee complex anatomical structure very well. Based on this, there are some developments of new software and techniques, and good clinical results are achieved. With the development of computer techniques and software, the knee repair and reconstruction procedure has been improved, the operation will be more simple and its accuracy will be further improved.

  7. The efficacy and safety of a combination of glucosamine hydrochloride, chondroitin sulfate and bio-curcumin with exercise in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterzi, Silvia; Giordani, Laura; Morrone, Michelangelo; Lena, Emanuela; Magrone, Giovanni; Scarpini, Claudia; Milighetti, Stefano; Pellicciari, Leonardo; Bravi, Marco; Panni, Ilaria; Ljoka, Concetta; Bressi, Federica; Foti, Calogero

    2016-06-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) conservative treatment aims to delay cartilage degeneration; chondroprotective agents are a valid approach in this sense. A commercially available dietary supplement, CartiJoint Forte, containing glucosamine hydrochloride (GH), chondroitin sulfate (CS) and Bio-Curcumin BCM-95®, was used in this trial. The aim of this study was to assess efficacy and safety of CartiJoint Forte combined with physical therapy in treating subjects with knee OA. A multicenter, prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Outpatients referred to the Rehabilitation Departments of two University Hospitals. Fifty-three patients were randomly assigned to an experimental group (N=26) or a control group (N.=27). Experimental subjects received two tablets of CartiJoint Forte each day for 8 weeks, while those in the control group were provided with a placebo. Three subjects dropped out during the course of the study. The two groups both received 20 sessions of physical therapy during the course of the trial. Primary outcome was pain intensity, measured both at motion and at rest, using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). A secondary outcome was an assessment of knee function by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and Lequesne Index, knee ROM, and two inflammation markers (C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate). Each assessment was carried out at baseline (T0), at 8 weeks (T1) and at 12 weeks (T2). VAS at rest was found to be reduced between T0 and T1, as well as between T0 and T2 (F=13.712; P=0.0001), with no differences between groups (F=1.724; P=0.191). VAS at motion revealed a significant "group × time-check" interaction (F=2.491; P=0.032), with increasing effect of time on VAS reduction (F=17.748; P=0.0001). This was most pronounced in the experimental group at 8 weeks (F=3.437; P=0.045). The Lequesne Index showed reductions at T1 and T2 compared to T0 (F=9.535; P=0.0001), along with group effect

  8. Total knee replacement and non-surgical treatment of knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T; Roos, Ewa M; Laursen, Mogens B

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare 2-year outcomes of total knee replacement (TKR) followed by non-surgical treatment to that of non-surgical treatment alone and outcomes of the same non-surgical treatment to that of written advice. DESIGN: In two randomized trials, 200 (mean age 66) adults with moderate...... to severe knee osteoarthritis (OA), 100 eligible for TKR and 100 not eligible for TKR, were randomized to TKR followed by non-surgical treatment, non-surgical treatment alone, or written advice. Non-surgical treatment consisted of 12 weeks of supervised exercise, education, dietary advice, use of insoles......, and pain medication. The primary outcome was the mean score of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales, covering pain, symptoms, activities of daily living (ADL), and quality of life (QOL). RESULTS: Patients randomized to TKR had greater improvements than patients randomized...

  9. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for ten seconds, and repeat six times... Side Bridge On your side with knees bent at 90 ... Repeat 1-5 times or to fatigue... Prone Bridge/Plank Prop up onto elbows and knees. Keep ...

  10. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... keeping your head, shoulders and hips in a straight line. Hold for 10 seconds working towards 30 ... knees. Keep shoulders, hips and knees in a straight line. Hold 10 seconds, working towards 30 seconds. ...

  11. The Accumulative Effect of Concentric‐Biased and Eccentric‐ Biased Exercise on Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses to Subsequent Low‐Intensity Exercise: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin James Peter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the accumulative effect of concentric-biased and eccentric-biased exercise on cardiorespiratory, metabolic and neuromuscular responses to low-intensity exercise performed hours later. Fourteen young men cycled at low-intensity (~60 rpm at 50% maximal oxygen uptake for 10 min before, and 12 h after: concentric-biased, single-leg cycling exercise (CON (performed ~19:30 h and eccentric-biased, double-leg knee extension exercise (ECC (~06:30 h the following morning. Respiratory measures were sampled breath-by-breath, with oxidation values derived from stoichiometry equations. Knee extensor neuromuscular function was assessed before and after CON and ECC. Cardiorespiratory responses during low-intensity cycling were unchanged by accumulative CON and ECC. The RER was lower during low-intensity exercise 12 h after CON and ECC (0.88 ± 0.08, when compared to baseline (0.92 ± 0.09; p = 0.02. Fat oxidation increased from baseline (0.24 ± 0.2 g·min1 to 12 h after CON and ECC (0.39 ± 0.2 g·min1; p = 0.01. Carbohydrate oxidation decreased from baseline (1.59 ± 0.4 g·min-1 to 12 h after CON and ECC (1.36 ± 0.4 g·min1; p = 0.03. These were accompanied by knee extensor force loss (right leg: -11.6%, p < 0.001; left leg: -10.6%, p = 0.02 and muscle soreness (right leg: 2.5 ± 0.9, p < 0.0001; left leg: 2.3 ± 1.2, p < 0.01. Subsequent concentric-biased and eccentric-biased exercise led to increased fat oxidation and decreased carbohydrate oxidation, without impairing cardiorespiration, during low-intensity cycling. An accumulation of fatiguing and damaging exercise increases fat utilisation during low intensity exercise performed as little as 12 h later.

  12. Mechanical factors relate to pain in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Monica R; Costigan, Patrick A; Olney, Sandra J

    2008-07-01

    Pain experienced by people with knee osteoarthritis is related to psychosocial factors and damage to articular tissues and/or the pain pathway itself. Mechanical factors have been speculated to trigger this pain experience; yet mechanics have not been identified as a source of pain in this population. The purpose of this study was to identify whether mechanics could explain variance in pain intensity in people with knee osteoarthritis. Data from 53 participants with physician-diagnosed knee osteoarthritis (mean age=68.5 years; standard deviation=8.6 years) were analyzed. Pain intensity was reported on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. Mechanical measures included weight-bearing varus-valgus alignment, body mass index and isokinetic quadriceps torque. Gait analysis captured the range of adduction-abduction angle, range of flexion-extension angle and external knee adduction moment during level walking. Pain intensity was significantly related to the dynamic range of flexion-extension during gait and body mass index. A total of 29% of the variance in pain intensity was explained by mechanical variables. The range of flexion-extension explained 18% of variance in pain intensity. Body mass index added 11% to the model. The knee adduction moment was unrelated to pain intensity. The findings support that mechanical factors are related to knee osteoarthritis pain. Because limitations in flexion-extension range of motion and body size are modifiable factors, future research could examine whether interventions targeting these mechanics would facilitate pain management.

  13. Above and below knee femoropopliteal VIABAHN®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackles, Christopher; Rundback, John H; Herman, Kevin; David, Yitzchak; Barkarma, Ravit

    2015-04-01

    To assess the clinical outcomes of VIABAHN® stent grafts deployed across the knee to those deployed above the knee. The placement of stent-grafts across the knee joint and extending into the distal popliteal artery has been avoided due to a perceived higher risk of stent fractures, restenosis, and thrombosis due to the unique hemodynamic forces in this region. A retrospective evaluation was conducted of 114 patients in 127 limbs. Patients were divided into two groups based on the location of the distal end of the deployed VIABAHN® stent: above knee (AK) (n=89) in which the VIABAHN® implant ended at or above the femoral condyles and below the knee (BK) (n=38) with extension of the graft into the below knee popliteal segment. Study end points were loss of primary, assisted, and secondary patency. One year primary, assisted, and secondary patency rates in the AK versus BK group were 67.7% vs. 47.2% (P=0.0092), 77.1% vs. 53.7% (P=0.0022), and 86.3% vs. 59.8% (P=0.0035), respectively. Univariate analysis demonstrated an increased relative risk of a primary [RR=2.07 (P=0.001)], assisted [RR=2.34 (P=0.002)], or secondary events [RR=2.98 (P=0.002)] in patients when the stent was placed below the femoral condyles. Major amputations occurred in 10% of AK and 34% of BK patients (P=0.002). VIABAHN® stent grafts have a significantly lower clinical patency and higher rates of amputation when they extend across the knee joint. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. [Knee disarticulation and through-knee amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, R

    2011-10-01

    A knee disarticulation or a through-knee stump is superior compared to a transfemoral stump. The thigh muscles are all preserved, and the muscle balance remains undisturbed. The range of motion of the hip joint is not limited. The bulbous shape of the stump allows full weight bearing at the stump end and can easily be fitted with a prosthesis. An amputee with a bilateral knee disarticulation is able to walk "barefoot". A more distal amputation level, e.g., an ultra-short transtibial amputation, is not possible. Important alternative to transfemoral amputations. Possible for any etiology except for Buerger-Winiwarter's disease. New indications are infected and loosened total knee replacements. Preservation of the knee joint is possible. Knee disarticulation is a very atraumatic procedure, compared to transfemoral amputations. Neither bones nor muscles have to be severed, just skin, ligaments, vessels, and nerves. Even the meniscal cartilages may be left in place to act as axial shock absorbers. The cartilage of the femur is not resected, but only bevelled in case of osteoarthritis. There are no tendon attachments or myoplastic procedures necessary. The patella remains in place and is held in position only by the retinacula. Skin closure must be performed without the slightest tension, and if possible not in the weight-bearing area. Transcondylar amputations across the femoral condyles only are indicated when there are not sufficient soft tissues for wound closure of a knee disarticulation. Alternatives as the techniques of Gritti, Klaes, and Eigler, the shortening of the femur and the Sauerbruch's rotation plasty [14] are presented and discussed. The risk of decubital ulcers is rather high. Correct bandaging of the stump is, therefore, particularly important. Prosthetic fitting is possible 3-6 weeks after surgery. The type of prosthesis depends on the amputee's activity level. The superior performance of amputees with knee disarticulations in sports prove the

  15. Dosimetry of β extensive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas C, E.L.; Lallena R, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we have been studied, making use of the Penelope Monte Carlo simulation code, the dosimetry of β extensive sources in situations of spherical geometry including interfaces. These configurations are of interest in the treatment of the called cranealfaringyomes of some synovia leisure of knee and other problems of interest in medical physics. Therefore, its application can be extended toward problems of another areas with similar geometric situation and beta sources. (Author)

  16. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Rasnick

    Full Text Available Total knee replacement (TKR is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05. No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups.

  17. Does Knee Osteoarthritis Differentially Modulate Proprioceptive Acuity in the Frontal and Sagittal Planes of the Knee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarata, Martha L; Schnitzer, Thomas J; Dhaher, Yasin Y

    2012-01-01

    Objective Impaired proprioception may alter joint loading and contribute to the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Though frontal plane loading at the knee contributes to OA, proprioception and its modulation with OA in this direction have not been examined. The aim of this study was to assess knee proprioceptive acuity in the frontal and sagittal planes in knee OA and healthy participants. We hypothesized that proprioceptive acuity will be decreased in the OA population in both planes of movement. Methods Thirteen persons with knee OA and fourteen healthy age-matched subjects participated. Proprioceptive acuity was assessed in varus, valgus, flexion, and extension using the threshold to detection of passive movement (TDPM). Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess differences in TDPM between subject groups and across movement directions. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess the correlation of TDPM between and within planes of movement. Results TDPM was found to be significantly higher (Pplanes of movement were only weakly correlated, especially in the OA group. Conclusions Consistent differences in TDPM between the OA and control groups across all movement directions suggest a global, not direction-specific, reduction in sensation in knee OA patients. PMID:21547895

  18. Isokinetic and isometric strength in osteoarthrosis of the knee. A comparative study with healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J; Balci, N; Sepici, V; Gener, F A

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic stability of the knee joint depends on the appropriate strength ratio of quadriceps and hamstring muscles. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the maximum peak torque (MPT) and MPT ratios of hamstrings to quadriceps (H/Q) muscles in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Two groups of patients were included in the study. The first group consisted of 30 patients (Group A) with the clinical and radiologic findings of knee OA. The second group consisted of 30 patients (Group B) exhibiting knee joint pain without roentgenologic findings of knee OA. The findings of two patient groups were compared with each other and also with 30 healthy subjects (Group C). Isokinetic (at 60 degrees/s and at 180 degrees/s) and isometric (at 30 degrees and at 60 degrees of knee flexion) tests were performed by the rate-limiting isokinetic dynamometer system. Isokinetic and isometric MPT loss of knee flexors and extensors was found in both patient groups with respect to controls, but MPT ratios of H/Q muscles did not show a statistically significant difference compared with the control group. This may be related to the equal strength loss of knee flexors and knee extensors in patients with knee OA. It is concluded that strengthening exercises of hamstring muscles is as important as quadriceps strengthening in rehabilitation of knee OA.

  19. The influence of a powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis on walking in poliomyelitis subjects: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazpour, Mokhtar; Moradi, Alireza; Samadian, Mohammad; Bahramizadeh, Mahmood; Joghtaei, Mahmoud; Ahmadi Bani, Monireh; Hutchins, Stephen W; Mardani, Mohammad A

    2016-06-01

    Traditionally, the anatomical knee joint is locked in extension when walking with a conventional knee-ankle-foot orthosis. A powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis was developed to provide restriction of knee flexion during stance phase and active flexion and extension of the knee during swing phase of gait. The purpose of this study was to determine differences of the powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis compared to a locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis in kinematic data and temporospatial parameters during ambulation. Quasi-experimental design. Subjects with poliomyelitis (n = 7) volunteered for this study and undertook gait analysis with both the powered and the conventional knee-ankle-foot orthoses. Three trials per orthosis were collected while each subject walked along a 6-m walkway using a calibrated six-camera three-dimensional video-based motion analysis system. Walking with the powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis resulted in a significant reduction in both walking speed and step length (both 18%), but a significant increase in stance phase percentage compared to walking with the conventional knee-ankle-foot orthosis. Cadence was not significantly different between the two test conditions (p = 0.751). There was significantly higher knee flexion during swing phase and increased hip hiking when using the powered orthosis. The new powered orthosis permitted improved knee joint kinematic for knee-ankle-foot orthosis users while providing knee support in stance and active knee motion in swing in the gait cycle. Therefore, the new powered orthosis provided more natural knee flexion during swing for orthosis users compared to the locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis. This orthosis has the potential to improve knee joint kinematics and gait pattern in poliomyelitis subjects during walking activities. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  20. Fun During Knee Rehabilitation: Feasibility and Acceptability Testing of a New Android-Based Training Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Spickschen, Thomas Sanjay; Colcuc, Christian; Hanke, Alexander; Clausen, Jan-Dierk; James, Paul Abraham; Horstmann, Hauke

    2017-01-01

    The initial goals of rehabilitation after knee injuries and operations are to achieve full knee extension and to activate quadriceps muscle. In addition to regular physiotherapy, an android-based knee training device is designed to help patients achieve these goals and improve compliance in the early rehabilitation period. This knee training device combines fun in a computer game with muscular training or rehabilitation. Our aim was to test the feasibility and acceptability of this new device. 50 volunteered subjects enrolled to test out the computer game aided device. The first game was the high-striker game, which recorded maximum knee extension power. The second game involved controlling quadriceps muscular power to simulate flying an aeroplane in order to record accuracy of muscle activation. The subjects evaluated this game by completing a simple questionnaire. No technical problem was encountered during the usage of this device. No subjects complained of any discomfort after using this device. Measurements including maximum knee extension power, knee muscle activation and control were recorded successfully. Subjects rated their experience with the device as either excellent or very good and agreed that the device can motivate and monitor the progress of knee rehabilitation training. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first android-based tool available to fast track knee rehabilitation training. All subjects gave very positive feedback to this computer game aided knee device.

  1. Musculoskeletal MR: knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Glaser, C.; Reiser, M.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive, specific, and accurate noninvasive method for diagnosing internal derangement of the knee. During the past 15 years knowledge of pathologic conditions of the knee had evolved significantly. Beyond the basic principles of imaging knee injuries great impact was made on the understanding of indirect or collateral findings, even in rare diseases. In this article the spectrum of disorders of the knee are reviewed and an overview of the current literature is given. This includes considerations about how to achieve a high-standard MR imaging study of the knee, and principles of imaging anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal tears. A focus is put on distinct diseases including intra-articular and intraosseous ganglion cysts, iliotibial band friction syndrome, transient osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, osteochondritis dissecans, and imaging of the articular cartilage. (orig.)

  2. [CLINICAL APPLICATION OF OXFORD MOBILE-BEARING BIPOLAR PROSTHESIS UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY FOR SINGLE COMPARTMENTAL KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangzeng; Cheng, Shao; Wang, Yisheng

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) in the treatment of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis. Between June 2011 and July 2013, 22 cases of single compartmental knee osteoarthritis were treated by Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA. Of 22 cases, 8 were male and 14 were female with an average age of 65 years (range, 45-80 years); the left knee was involved in 12 cases, and the right knee in 10 cases, with a mean disease duration of 32.5 months (range, 8-90 months). The mean weight was 55.2 kg (range, 50-65 kg), and the mean body mass index was 20.8 kg/m2 (range, 17-25 kg/m2). Osteoarthritis involved in the single knee medial compartment in all patients. Knee society score (KSS) and range of motion (ROM) were measured to evaluate the knee joint function. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients, and there was no complication of infection, bedsore, or deep venous thrombosis. Postoperative follow-up was 2-4 years (mean, 3.2 years). The X-ray films showed good position of prosthesis, no prosthesis dislocation, or periprosthetic infection during follow-up. Knee ROM, KSS function score, and KSS clinical score were significantly improved at 1 week after operation and at last follow-up when compared with preoperative ones (P 0.05). Oxford mobile-bearing bipolar prosthesis UKA is an effective method to treat single compartmental knee osteoarthritis, with the advantages of less trauma, earlier rehabilitation exercise, near physiological state in joint function, and less risk of complications.

  3. Low Level Laser Therapy for chronic knee joint pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Ebihara, Satoru; Ohkuni, Ikuko; Izukura, Hideaki; Harada, Takashi; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Ohshiro, Toshio; Musha, Yoshiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Kubota, Ayako

    2014-12-27

    Chronic knee joint pain is one of the most frequent complaints which is seen in the outpatient clinic in our medical institute. In previous studies we have reported the benefits of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for chronic pain in the shoulder joints, elbow, hand, finger and the lower back. The present study is a report on the effects of LLLT for chronic knee joint pain. Over the past 5 years, 35 subjects visited the outpatient clinic with complaints of chronic knee joint pain caused by the knee osteoarthritis-induced degenerative meniscal tear. They received low level laser therapy. A 1000 mW semi-conductor laser device was used to deliver 20.1 J/cm(2) per point in continuous wave at 830nm, and four points were irradiated per session (1 treatment) twice a week for 4 weeks. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to determine the effects of LLLT for the chronic pain and after the end of the treatment regimen a significant improvement was observed (pknee joint range of motion. Discussions with the patients revealed that it was important for them to learn how to avoid postures that would cause them knee pain in everyday life in order to have continuous benefits from the treatment. The present study demonstrated that 830 nm LLLT was an effective form of treatment for chronic knee pain caused by knee osteoarthritis. Patients were advised to undertake training involving gentle flexion and extension of the knee.

  4. Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee (Nonarthroplasty)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, John; Hunter, David; Irrgang, Jay; Jones, Morgan H.; Levy, Bruce; Marx, Robert; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Watters, William C.; Haralson, Robert H.; Turkelson, Charles M.; Wies, Janet L.; Boyer, Kevin M.; Anderson, Sara; Andre, St. Justin St.; Sluka, Patrick; McGowan, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The clinical practice guideline was explicitly developed to include only treatments less invasive than knee replacement (ie, arthroplasty). Patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee are to be encouraged to participate in self-management educational programs and to engage in self-care, as well as to lose weight and engage in exercise and quadriceps strengthening. The guideline recommends taping for short-term relief of pain as well as analgesics and intra-articular corticosteroids, but not glucosamine and/or chondroitin. Patients need not undergo needle lavage or arthroscopy with débridement or lavage. Patients may consider partial meniscectomy or loose body removal or realignment osteotomy, as conditions warrant. Use of a free-floating interpositional device should not be considered for symptomatic unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee. Lateral heel wedges should not be prescribed for patients with symptomatic medial compartmental osteoarthritis of the knee. The work group was unable either to recommend or not recommend the use of braces with either valgus- or varus-directing forces for patients with medial unicompartmental osteoarthritis; the use of acupuncture or of hyaluronic acid; or osteotomy of the tibial tubercle for isolated symptomatic patellofemoral osteoarthritis. PMID:19726743

  5. Effectiveness of an Articulated Knee Hyperextension Orthosis in Genu Recurvatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul ASRM

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Genu Recurvatum is a deformity of knee joint that tends to push it backwards by excessive extension in tibio-femoral joints. This poses a significant challenge because of technical difficulties and a high incidence of recurrence. This report describes a 63 years old male diagnosed as post-polio residual paralysis who showed excessive genu recurvatum of his left knee during long standing and walking. An Articulated Knee Hyperextension Orthosis (KAFO was tried to check its effectiveness in terms of gait and energy expenditure.

  6. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Lohmander, L Stefan

    2003-01-01

    The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was developed as an extension of the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index with the purpose of evaluating short-term and long-term symptoms and function in subjects with knee injury and osteoarthritis. The KOOS holds five separately scored subscales...... be used for short-term and long-term follow-up of several types of knee injury including osteoarthritis. The measure is relatively new and further use of the instrument will add knowledge and suggest areas that need to be further explored and improved....

  7. Medium-term evaluation of total knee arthroplasty without patellar replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Wanderley Vasconcelos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To mid-term evaluate patients who were submitted to total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing. METHODS: It was realized a retrospective cross-sectional study of patients who were submitted to total knee arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing. In all patients clinical examination was done based on the protocol of the Knee Society Scoring System, which assessed pain, range of motion, stability, contraction, knee alignment and function, and radiological evaluation. RESULTS: A total of 36 patients were evaluated. Of these, 07 were operated only on left knee, 12 only on right knee and 17 were operated bilaterally, totaling 53 knees. Ages ranged from 26 to 84 years. Of the 53 knees evaluated, 33 (62.26% had no pain. The maximum flexion range of motion averaged 104.7°. No knee had difficulty in active extension. As to the alignment for anatomical axis twelve knees (22.64% showed deviation between 0° and 4° varus. Thirty-nine (75.49% knees showed pace without restriction and the femorotibial angle ranged between 3° varus and 13° valgus with an average of 5° valgus. The patellar index ranged from 0.2 to 1.1. CONCLUSION: Total knee arthroplasty whitout patellar resurfacing provides good results in mid-term evaluation.

  8. Efeito de exercícios terapêuticos no equilíbrio de mulheres com osteoartrite de joelho: uma revisão sistemática The effects of therapeutic exercise on the balance of women with knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Silva

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Fornecer evidências relacionadas ao efeito de exercícios terapêuticos sobre o equilíbrio de mulheres com osteoartrite (OA de joelho. MÉTODOS: A busca foi realizada nas bases de dados Pubmed, Medline, Lilacs, SciELO, ISI web of knowledge, PEDro e Colaboração Cochrane. Foram utilizadas as palavras-chave: knee, balance, women, rehabilitation em combinação com osteoarthritis. Foram selecionados ensaios clínicos aleatórios e controlados dos últimos dez anos, em língua inglesa, portuguesa e espanhola. Para verificar a qualidade dos ensaios clínicos selecionados, aplicou-se a Escala PEDro. RESULTADOS: Encontrou-se um total de 20 estudos a partir da busca eletrônica. Desses, apenas nove satisfizeram os critérios de inclusão e foram analisados integralmente. A avaliação da qualidade metodológica dos nove estudos incluídos permitiu classificar oito deles como de alta qualidade metodológica. Os métodos e as intervenções para o equilíbrio variaram amplamente, no entanto a maioria dos estudos encontrou melhora significativa no equilíbrio de mulheres com OA de joelho. CONCLUSÃO: Como os estudos incluídos nesta revisão sistemática têm uma alta qualidade metodológica, pode-se concluir que os exercícios terapêuticos utilizados pelos estudos melhoraram o equilíbrio de mulheres com OA de joelho.OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review was to examine evidence regarding the effects of therapeutic exercise on the balance of women with knee osteoarthritis (OA. METHODS: The search was conducted in Pubmed, Medline, Lilacs, SciELO, ISI web of knowledge, PEDro and the Cochrane Collaboration. We used the keywords: "knee", "balance", "women" and "rehabilitation" in combination with "osteoarthritis". We selected randomized controlled clinical trials published in English, Portuguese and Spanish over the last 10 years. To verify the methodological quality of selected clinical trials, the PEDro Scale was applied. RESULTS: A total of

  9. Pain and fear avoidance partially mediate change in muscle strength during resistance exercise in women with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Larsson

    2017-10-01

    Methods: Sixty-seven women with fibromyalgia (age range 25–64 years were included. Tests of muscle strength and questionnaires related to pain, fear avoidance and physical activity were carried out. Multivariable stepwise regression was used to analyse explanatory factors for change and predictors for final values of knee-extension force, elbow-flexion force and hand-grip force. Results: Change in knee-extension force was explained by fear avoidance beliefs about physical activity at baseline, together with change in pain intensity, knee-extension force at baseline, age and body mass index (BMI (R2=0.40, p = 0.013. Change in elbow-flexion force was explained by pain intensity at baseline, together with baseline fear avoidance beliefs about physical activity, BMI and elbow-flexion force at baseline (R2 = 0.32, p = 0.043. Change in hand-grip force was explained by hand-grip force at baseline, change in pain intensity and baseline fear avoidance (R2 = 0.37, p = 0.009. Final muscle strength was predicted by the same variables as change, except pain. Conclusion: Pain and fear avoidance are important factors to consider in rehabilitation using resistance exercise for women with fibromyalgia.

  10. Muscle performance following an acute bout of plyometric training combined with low or high intensity weight exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneka, Anastasia G; Malliou, Paraskevi K; Missailidou, Victoria; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Fatouros, Ioannis; Gourgoulis, Vassilios; Georgiadis, Elias

    2013-01-01

    To determine the time course of performance responses after an acute bout of plyometric exercise combined with high and low intensity weight training, a 3-group (including a control group), repeated-measures design was employed. Changes in performance were monitored through jumping ability by measuring countermovement and squat jumping, and strength performance assessment through isometric and isokinetic testing of knee extensors (at two different velocities). Participants in both experimental groups performed a plyometric protocol consisting of 50 jumps over 50 cm hurdles and 50 drop jumps from a 50 cm plyometric box. Additionally, each group per