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Sample records for kinetic oxidation mechanism

  1. Kinetics and oxidation mechanisms of polycrystaline niobium

    Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1979-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of annealed niobium was determined by thermogravimetric analysis between 450 and 800 0 C and for oxygen pressures varying from 20 to 700 mmHg. The oxidation kinetics of cold worked and/or irradiated niobium for temperatures between 500 and 700 0 C, with oxygen pressures varying from 100 to 300 mmHg. Was also determined. Using X-ray diffraction it was found that the oxide formed in the range of temperature and oxygen pressure considered in this research is γ-Nb 2 O 5 . Optical and scanning eletronic microscopy showed that for annealed niobium oxidized under 600 0 C there was formation of non-uniform oxide layers, containing cracks and pores, presenting very irregular metal/pentoxide interface. The presence of sub-oxide NbOsub(z) platelets was observed in this interface. This sub-oxide platelets where not observed in annealed oxidized niobium samples over 600 0 C; the oxide layers formed were compact. At 800 0 C and the beginning at 700 0 C the interfaces were quite regular. Through microhardness measurements for the metal near the metal/pentoxide interface, the formation of oxygen solid solution was found and the oxygen diffusion coefficient was calculated. The results showed that at 600 0 C the oxygen diffusion coefficient in cold worked niobium is three times larger than the value obtained for annealed niobium. The results suggest that the reaction between annealed niobium and oxygen undaer 600 0 C is controlled by reaction in interface where the oxide layers are not compacted, parcially due to Nb sub(z) platelets formation.(Author) [pt

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of synthetic CoS oxidation process

    Štrbac N.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigation of kinetics and mechanism for synthetic a-CoS oxidation process are presented in this paper. Based on experimental data obtained using DTA and XRD analysis and constructed PSD diagrams for Co-S-O system, mechanism of synthetic a-CoS oxidation process is suggested. Characteristic kinetic parameters were obtained for experimental isothermal investigations of desulfurization degree using Sharp method.

  3. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of chloramphenicol by 1 ...

    Unknown

    the kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of CAP by. CBT in HClO4 medium at 323 K for elucidating the mechanism of oxidation of this drug. 2. Experimental. Chloramphenicol (Sigma, USA) was purified before use. CBT was prepared and purified as reported ear- lier.10 AnalaR grade chemicals and double distilled.

  4. Ammonia removal in electrochemical oxidation: Mechanism and pseudo-kinetics

    Li Liang; Liu Yan

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigated the mechanism and pseudo-kinetics for removal of ammonia by electrochemical oxidation with RuO 2 /Ti anode using batch tests. The results show that the ammonia oxidation rates resulted from direct oxidation at electrode-liquid interfaces of the anode by stepwise dehydrogenation, and from indirect oxidation by hydroxyl radicals were so slow that their contribution to ammonia removal was negligible under the condition with Cl - . The oxidation rates of ammonia ranged from 1.0 to 12.3 mg N L -1 h -1 and efficiency reached nearly 100%, primarily due to the indirect oxidation of HOCl, and followed pseudo zero-order kinetics in electrochemical oxidation with Cl - . About 88% ammonia was removed from the solution. The removed one was subsequently found in the form of N 2 in the produced gas. The rate at which Cl - lost electrons at the anode was a major factor in the overall ammonia oxidation. Current density and Cl - concentration affected the constant of the pseudo zero-order kinetics, expressed by k = 0.0024[Cl - ] x j. The ammonia was reduced to less than 0.5 mg N L -1 after 2 h of electrochemical oxidation for the effluent from aerobic or anaerobic reactors which treated municipal wastewater. This result was in line with the strict discharge requirements

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of aliphatic primary alcohols by ...

    Unknown

    Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of aliphatic primary alcohols by quinolinium bromochromate. SONU SARASWAT, VINITA SHARMA and K K BANERJI*. Department of Chemistry, JNV University, Jodhpur 342 005, India e-mail: banerjikk@rediffmail.com. MS received 4 December 2001; revised 2 November 2002.

  6. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Coomassie Brilliant Blue ...

    NICOLAAS

    Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Coomassie Brilliant Blue-R dye by Hypochlorite and Role of Acid there in. Srinivasu Nadupalli, Venkata D.B.C. Dasireddy, Neil A. Koorbanally and Sreekantha B. Jonnalagadda*. School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Private.

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings

    Arkharov, V.I.; Yar-Mukhamedov, Sh.Kh.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal stability carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings has been studied depending on the conditions of their formation; the specific features of the mechanism of oxidation at 1200 deg in an air atmosphere have been elucidated. It has been established that kinetics of high temperature oxidation of the coatings depends essentially on the conditions of their formation and on the composition of steel to which the coating is applied. It has been shown that two oxidation mechanisms are possible: by diffusion of the residual chromium through a carbide layer along the carbide grain boundaries outwards or, when there is no residual chromium, by chemical reaction of carbon combustion and oxidation of the liberated chromium. The comparison of oxidation kinetic curves of the samples of 38KhMYuA, 35KhGSA, and DI-22 steels with and without coating has shown that the coatings under study have a better protective effect on 38KhMYuA steel than on 35KhGSA, although without coating oxidability of the first steel is higher than that of the second

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of methane oxidation in supercritical water

    Rofer, C.K.; Streit, G.E.

    1988-10-01

    This project, is a Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) Research and Development task being carried out by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Its objective is to achieve an understanding of the technology for use in scaling up and applying oxidation in supercritical water as a viable process for treating a variety of Department of Energy Defense Programs (DOE-DP) waste streams. This report presents experimental results for the kinetics of the oxidation of methane and methanol in supercritical water and computer modeling results for the oxidation of carbonmonoxide and methane in supercritical water. The experimental and modeling results obtained to date on these one-carbon model compounds indicate that the mechanism of oxidation in supercritical water can be represented by free-radical reactions with appropriate modifications for high pressure and the high water concentration. If these current trends are sustained, a large body of existing literature data on the kinetics of elementary reactions can be utilized to predict the behavior of other compounds and their mixtures. 7 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Coomassie Brilliant Blue ...

    , in aqueous solution by hypochlorite as a function of pH was investigated. While the degradation of dye obeyed pseudo-first-order kinetics, the oxidation of the dye occurred through two competitive reactions facilitated by [OCl–] and [HOCl].

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of chloramphenicol by 1

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) is an antibiotic drug having a wide spectrum of activity. The kinetics of oxidation of chloramphenicol by 1-chlorobenzotriazole (CBT) in HClO4 medium over the temperature range 293-323 K has been investigated. The reaction exhibits first-order kinetics with respect to [CBT]o and zero-order with ...

  11. Oxyhalogen-Sulfur Chemistry: Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation ...

    NICOLAAS

    The oxidation of N-acetylthiourea (ACTU) by acidic bromate has been studied by observing formation of bromine in excess .... kinetics experiments were performed at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C and at an ..... thiourea compounds with potent anti-HIV activity.

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some diols by ...

    Abstract. The kinetics of oxidation of five vicinal and four non-vicinal diols, and two of their monoethers by benzyltrimethylammonium tribromide (BTMAB) have been studied in 3:7 (v/v) acetic acid–water mixture. The vicinal diols yield the carbonyl compounds arising out of the glycol bond fission while the other diols give.

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of tellurium (IV) by periodate in alkaline medium

    Srinivas, K.; Vani, P.; Dikshitulu, L.S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Detailed kinetic study of the oxidation of tellurium (IV) by periodate in alkaline medium has been carried out to compare the mechanisms of oxidation in the acid and alkaline media. It is interesting to note that the rate step involves a two-electron transfer from tellurium (IV) to periodate in alkaline medium although the kinetic pattern is somewhat different from that in the acid medium. 7 refs., 1 tab

  14. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of ZrC

    Rama Rao, G.A.; Venugopal, V.; Sood, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    The oxidation behaviour of sintered ZrC powder was studied under iso and non-isothermal heating conditions under varied oxygen pressures from 0.05 to 0.5 atm and the weight changes during the reaction were followed by thermogravimetry. The sample ignited under oxygen pressure of 1 atm when heated non-isothermally at 5 K/min. The end product was identified by X-ray diffraction method as cubic ZrO 2 at temperatures below 1073 K and monoclinic above that. The rate of the reaction was found to be diffusion controlled. The mechanism of the reaction was discussed in terms of the diffusion of oxygen through the product layer. (author). 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of aliphatic alcohols by ...

    TBATB) in aqueous acetic acid leads to the formation of the corresponding aldehydes. The reaction is first order with respect to TBATB. Michaelis-Menten type kinetics is observed with respect to alcohols. The reaction failed to induce the ...

  16. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide: II. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen sulfide oxidation catalyzed by sulfur

    Steijns, M.; Derks, F.; Verloop, A.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by molecular oxygen have been studied in the temperature range 20–250 °C. The primary reaction product is sulfur which may undergo further oxidation to SO2 at temperatures above 200 °C. From the kinetics of this autocatalytic reaction we

  17. Oxyhalogen-Sulfur Chemistry: Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation ...

    The oxidation of N-acetylthiourea (ACTU) by acidic bromate has been studied by observing formation of bromine in excess bromate conditions. The reaction displays an induction period before formation of bromine. The stoichiometry of the reaction was determined to be 4:3: 4BrO3 ...

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of substituted ...

    Unknown

    Oxidation of meta- and para-substituted benzylamines by cetyltrimethyl- ... method.12 As per this method, the aldimine is hydrolysed to the aldehyde and then ... reactions were studied at constant temperature (± 0⋅1 K) and were followed by .... electronic interaction between the substituent and the reaction centre, (σ+–σ0) is ...

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of glycine by iron(III)

    Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of glycine by iron(III)-1,10-phenanthroline complex has been studied in perchloric acid medium. The reaction is first order with respect to iron(III) and glycine. An increase in (phenanthroline) increases the rate, while increase in [H+] decreases the rate. Hence it can be inferred that the ...

  20. The Kinetics and Mechanism for the Oxidation of Nicotinic Acid by Peroxomonosulfate in Acidic Aqueous Medium

    Agrawal, Anju; Sailani, Riya; Gupta, Beena; Khandelwal, C. L.; Sharma, P. D. [Univ. of Rajasthan, Jaipur (India)

    2012-04-15

    The kinetics of oxidation of nicotinic acid by peroxomonosulfate (PMS) has been studied in acetate buffers. Stoichiometry of the reaction corresponds to the reaction of one mole of the oxidant with a mole of nicotinic acid. N→O product has been confirmed both by UV visible and IR spectroscopy. The reaction is second order viz. first order with respect to each reactant. Activation parameters have also been evaluated. A plausible reaction mechanism is mentioned and the derived kinetic rate law accounts for experimental observations.

  1. The Kinetics and Mechanism for the Oxidation of Nicotinic Acid by Peroxomonosulfate in Acidic Aqueous Medium

    Agrawal, Anju; Sailani, Riya; Gupta, Beena; Khandelwal, C. L.; Sharma, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of nicotinic acid by peroxomonosulfate (PMS) has been studied in acetate buffers. Stoichiometry of the reaction corresponds to the reaction of one mole of the oxidant with a mole of nicotinic acid. N→O product has been confirmed both by UV visible and IR spectroscopy. The reaction is second order viz. first order with respect to each reactant. Activation parameters have also been evaluated. A plausible reaction mechanism is mentioned and the derived kinetic rate law accounts for experimental observations

  2. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Benzyl Alcohol by Benzimidazolium Fluorochromate

    J. Dharmaraja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of benzyl alcohol (BzOH by benzimidazolium fluorochromate (BIFC has been studied in 50% aqueous acetic acid medium at 308 K. The reaction is first order with respect to [oxidant] and [benzyl alcohol]. The reaction is catalysed by hydrogen ions. The decrease in dielectric constant of the medium increases the rate of the reaction. Addition of sodium perchlorate increases the rate of the reaction appreciably. No polymerization with acrylonitrile. The reaction has been conducted at four different temperature and the activation parameters were calculated. From the observed kinetic results a suitable mechanism was proposed.

  3. Mechanism and kinetics of the oxidation of synthetic alpha-NiS

    BOYAN BOYANOV

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The results of an investigation of the mechanism and kinetics of the oxidation process of synthetic a-NiS are presented in this paper. The mechanism of a-NiS oxidation was investigated based on the comparative analysis of DTA–TG–DTG and XRD results, as well as the constructed phase stability diagrams (PSD for the Ni–S–O system. The kinetic investigations of the oxidation process were performed under isothermal conditions (temperature range 823–1073 K. The obtained degrees of desulfurization were used in the calculation process according to the Sharp model and the kinetic parameters, including the activation energies and the rate constants of the characteristic reactions, for the oxidation of a-NiS were determined. These results enabled the formulation of a kinetic equation for the desulfurization process: ‑ln(1−a = k1t = 27.89 exp(–9860/Tt, with an activation energy of 82±4 kJ mol-1, for the first stage of the process and –ln (1 − a = k2t = 1.177 exp(–4810/Tt, with an activation energy of 40±2 kJ mol-1, for the second stage.

  4. Corrosion mechanisms of zirconium alloys - study of the initial oxidation kinetics and of the mechanical behaviour of the metal/oxide system

    Parise, M.

    1996-12-01

    Nuclear fuel claddings are made of zirconium alloys. The conditions of use lead the cladding oxidize outside. The so-formed layers behaves like a thermal barrier and prevents from using oxidized claddings with an oxide thickness larger than 100 μm. The oxidation kinetic is approximately cubic for oxide thicknesses smaller than about 2μm, linear beyond. A kinetic model has been proposed which estimates the post-transition growth rate from the kinetic parameters of the pre-transition state and morphological features of post-transition layers. This work aims at providing the necessary elements to validate this model and studying the layers around the kinetic transition, in order to determine whether the oxidation mechanisms before and after the transition are similar. Thicknesses of the 50 - 500 nm range of the oxide layers are measured by an optical method; pre-transition kinetics are thus precisely determined. The effect of the composition, the thermal treatment and the presence of oxygen in solid solution is studied. The morphological and crystallographic study of the layers show that they exhibit a lot of similarities before and after the kinetic transition. The results concerning the kinetic aspects and the morphology of the post-transition layers point out that the proposed model leads to realistic post-transition growth rates. Furthermore, the kinetic transition corresponds to the appearance of cracks in the oxide layer. The mechanical behaviour of the metal/oxide system has been modelled at different scales. When the specific behaviours of the metal and the oxide are taken into account together with the interface geometry, radial stresses appear, which are high enough to locally open cracks. The appearance and localization of cracks depend on both the interface geometry and the stress distribution in the metal/oxide system. (author)

  5. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Isoleucine by N-Bromophthalimide in Aqueous Perchloric Acid Medium

    N. M. I. Alhaji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of isoleucine with N-bromophthalimide has been studied in perchloric acid medium potentiometrically. The reaction is of first order each in [NBP] and [amino acid] and negative fractional order in [H+]. The rate is decreased by the addition of phthalimide. A decrease in the dielectric constant of the medium increases the rate. Addition of halide ions or acrylonitrile has no effect on the kinetics. Similarly, variation of ionic strength of the medium does not affect the reaction rate. The reaction rate has been determined at different temperatures and activation parameters have been calculated. A suitable mechanism involving hypobromous acid as reactive species has been proposed.

  6. Insights into the Mechanism and Kinetics of Thermo-Oxidative Degradation of HFPE High Performance Polymer.

    Kunnikuruvan, Sooraj; Parandekar, Priya V; Prakash, Om; Tsotsis, Thomas K; Nair, Nisanth N

    2016-06-02

    The growing requisite for materials having high thermo-oxidative stability makes the design and development of high performance materials an active area of research. Fluorination of the polymer backbone is a widely applied strategy to improve various properties of the polymer, most importantly the thermo-oxidative stability. Many of these fluorinated polymers are known to have thermo-oxidative stability up to 700 K. However, for space and aerospace applications, it is important to improve its thermo-oxidative stability beyond 700 K. Molecular-level details of the thermo-oxidative degradation of such polymers can provide vital information to improve the polymer. In this spirit, we have applied quantum mechanical and microkinetic analysis to scrutinize the mechanism and kinetics of the thermo-oxidative degradation of a fluorinated polymer with phenylethenyl end-cap, HFPE. This study gives an insight into the thermo-oxidative degradation of HFPE and explains most of the experimental observations on the thermo-oxidative degradation of this polymer. Thermolysis of C-CF3 bond in the dianhydride component (6FDA) of HFPE is found to be the rate-determining step of the degradation. Reaction pathways that are responsible for the experimentally observed weight loss of the polymer is also scrutinized. On the basis of these results, we propose a modification of HFPE polymer to improve its thermo-oxidative stability.

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of acetanilide by quinquevalent vanadium in acid medium

    Gupta, R.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of acetanilide with vanadium(V) in sulphuric acid medium at constant ionic strength has been studied. The reaction is first order with oxidant. The order of reaction in acetanilide varies from one to zero. The reaction follows an acid catalyzed independent path, exhibiting square dependence in H + . A Bunnett plot indicates that the water acts as a nucleophile. The thermodynamic parameters have been computed. A probable reaction mechanism and rate law consistent with these data are given. (Author)

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of the selective oxidation of primary aliphatic alcohols under phase transfer catalysis

    K. Bijudas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Kinetics of the oxidation of primary aliphatic alcohols has been carried out using phase transferred monochromate in benzene. Tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB and tetrabutylphosphonium bromide (TBPB are used as phase transfer catalysts (PT catalyst. The reaction shows first order dependence on both [alcohol] and [monochromate ion]. The oxidation leads to the formation of corresponding aldehyde and no traces of carboxylic acid has been detected. The reaction mixture failed to induce the polymerization of added acrylonitrile which rules out the presence radical intermediates in the reaction. Various thermodynamic parameters have been evaluated and a suitable mechanism has been proposed.

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of auto- and copper-catalyzed oxidation of 1,4-naphthohydroquinone.

    Yuan, Xiu; Miller, Christopher J; Pham, A Ninh; Waite, T David

    2014-06-01

    Although quinones represent a class of organic compounds that may exert toxic effects both in vitro and in vivo, the molecular mechanisms involved in quinone species toxicity are still largely unknown, especially in the presence of transition metals, which may both induce the transformation of the various quinone species and result in generation of harmful reactive oxygen species. In this study, the oxidation of 1,4-naphthohydroquinone (NH2Q) in the absence and presence of nanomolar concentrations of Cu(II) in 10 mM NaCl solution over a pH range of 6.5-7.5 has been investigated, with detailed kinetic models developed to describe the predominant mechanisms operative in these systems. In the absence of copper, the apparent oxidation rate of NH2Q increased with increasing pH and initial NH2Q concentration, with concomitant oxygen consumption and peroxide generation. The doubly dissociated species, NQ(2-), has been shown to be the reactive species with regard to the one-electron oxidation by O2 and comproportionation with the quinone species, both generating the semiquinone radical (NSQ(·-)). The oxidation of NSQ(·-) by O2 is shown to be the most important pathway for superoxide (O2(·-)) generation with a high intrinsic rate constant of 1.0×10(8)M(-1)s(-1). Both NSQ(·-) and O2(·-) served as chain-propagating species in the autoxidation of NH2Q. Cu(II) is capable of catalyzing the oxidation of NH2Q in the presence of O2 with the oxidation also accelerated by increasing the pH. Both the uncharged (NH2Q(0)) and the mono-anionic (NHQ(-)) species were found to be the kinetically active forms, reducing Cu(II) with an intrinsic rate constant of 4.0×10(4) and 1.2×10(7)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. The presence of O2 facilitated the catalytic role of Cu(II) by rapidly regenerating Cu(II) via continuous oxidation of Cu(I) and also by efficient removal of NSQ(·-) resulting in the generation of O2(·-). The half-cell reduction potentials of various redox couples at neutral p

  10. Kinetics, Mechanism, and Secondary Organic Aerosol Yield of Aqueous Phase Photo-oxidation of α-Pinene Oxidation Products.

    Aljawhary, Dana; Zhao, Ran; Lee, Alex K Y; Wang, Chen; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2016-03-10

    Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) involves atmospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the majority of which are emitted from biogenic sources. Oxidation can occur not only in the gas-phase but also in atmospheric aqueous phases such as cloudwater and aerosol liquid water. This study explores for the first time the aqueous-phase OH oxidation chemistry of oxidation products of α-pinene, a major biogenic VOC species emitted to the atmosphere. The kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and formation of SOA compounds in the aqueous phase of two model compounds, cis-pinonic acid (PIN) and tricarballylic acid (TCA), were investigated in the laboratory; TCA was used as a surrogate for 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA), a known α-pinene oxidation product. Aerosol time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Aerosol-ToF-CIMS) was used to follow the kinetics and reaction mechanisms at the molecular level. Room-temperature second-order rate constants of PIN and TCA were determined to be 3.3 (± 0.5) × 10(9) and 3.1 (± 0.2) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, from which were estimated their condensed-phase atmospheric lifetimes. Aerosol-ToF-CIMS detected a large number of products leading to detailed reaction mechanisms for PIN and MBTCA. By monitoring the particle size distribution after drying, the amount of SOA material remaining in the particle phase was determined. An aqueous SOA yield of 40 to 60% was determined for PIN OH oxidation. Although recent laboratory studies have focused primarily on aqueous-phase processing of isoprene-related compounds, we demonstrate that aqueous formation of SOA materials also occurs from monoterpene oxidation products, thus representing an additional source of biogenically driven aerosol formation.

  11. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Aromatic Aldehydes by Imidazolium Dichromate in Aqueous Acetic Acid Medium

    S. Sheik Mansoor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of benzaldehyde (BA and para-substituted benzaldehydes by imidazolium dichromate (IDC has been studied in aqueous acetic acid medium in the presence of perchloric acid. The reaction is first order each in [IDC], [Substrate] and [H+]. The reaction rates have been determined at different temperatures and the activation parameters calculated. Electron withdrawing substituents are found to increase the reaction and electron releasing substituents are found to retard the rate of the reaction and the rate data obey the Hammett relationship. The products of the oxidation are the corresponding acids. The rate decreases with the increase in the water content of the medium. A suitable mechanism is proposed.

  12. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Diethyl Ether by Chloramine-T in Acidic Medium

    Y. I. Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of diethyl ether (DE with sodium N-chloro-p-toluenesulphonamide (CAT in hydrochloric acid solution has been studied at (313°K.The reaction rate show a first order dependence on [CAT] and fractional order dependence on each [DE] and [H+] .The variation of ionic strength of the medium has no significant effect on the reaction rate , addition of p-toluenesulphonamide (p-TSA affects the reaction rate marginally the rate increased with decreasing dielectric constant of the medium , the stochiometry of the reaction was found to be 1:2 and oxidation products were identified , A Michaelis – Menten type mechanism has been suggested to explain the results.The equilibrium and the decomposition constants of CAT – diethyl ether complex have been evaluated. Thermodynamic parameters were computed by studying reaction at temperatures range ( 308 – 323°K for the rate limiting step and for the observed first order constants by the linear Arrhenius plot. The mechanism proposed and the derived rate law are consistent with observed kinetics.

  13. Kinetics and mechanisms of the oxide film growth on the surface of α-Fe in transitional domains

    Mukhambetov, D.G.; Berber, N.N.; Kargin, D.B.; Chalaya, O.V.

    2003-01-01

    The object of this work was to study the kinetics of the α-Fe surface oxidation with prevailing cubic texture at temperatures of 450-500 deg. C. The basic conformity to natural laws and mechanisms of the two-phase thin oxide films grows are determined. (author)

  14. Oxidative desulfurization: kinetic modelling.

    Dhir, S; Uppaluri, R; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-30

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H(2)O(2) over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel.

  15. Oxidative desulfurization: Kinetic modelling

    Dhir, S.; Uppaluri, R.; Purkait, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H 2 O 2 over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel

  16. Mechanism of pyrogallol red oxidation induced by free radicals and reactive oxidant species. A kinetic and spectroelectrochemistry study.

    Atala, E; Velásquez, G; Vergara, C; Mardones, C; Reyes, J; Tapia, R A; Quina, F; Mendes, M A; Speisky, H; Lissi, E; Ureta-Zañartu, M S; Aspée, A; López-Alarcón, C

    2013-05-02

    Pyrogallol red (PGR) presents high reactivity toward reactive (radical and nonradical) species (RS). This property of PGR, together with its characteristic spectroscopic absorption in the visible region, has allowed developing methodologies aimed at evaluating the antioxidant capacity of foods, beverages, and human fluids. These methods are based on the evaluation of the consumption of PGR induced by RS and its inhibition by antioxidants. However, at present, there are no reports regarding the degradation mechanism of PGR, limiting the extrapolation to how antioxidants behave in different systems comprising different RS. In the present study, we evaluate the kinetics of PGR consumption promoted by different RS (peroxyl radicals, peroxynitrite, nitrogen dioxide, and hypochlorite) using spectroscopic techniques and detection of product by HPLC mass spectrometry. The same pattern of oxidation and spectroscopic properties of the products is observed, independently of the RS employed. Mass analysis indicates the formation of only one product identified as a quinone derivative, excluding the formation of peroxides or hydroperoxides and/or chlorinated compounds, in agreement with FOX's assays and oxygen consumption experiments. Cyclic voltammetry, carried out at different pH's, shows an irreversible oxidation of PGR, indicating the initial formation of a phenoxy radical and a second charge transfer reaction generating an ortho-quinone derivative. Spectroelectrochemical oxidation of PGR shows oxidation products with identical UV-visible absorption properties to those observed in RS-induced oxidation.

  17. Composition dependence of the kinetics and mechanisms of thermal oxidation of titanium-tantalum alloys

    Park, Y.S.; Butt, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of titanium-tantalum alloys was investigated with respective concentrations of each element ranging from 0 to 100 wt.%. Alloys were exposed to argon-20% oxygen at 800 to 1400 C. The slowest oxidation rates were observed in alloys with 5--20% Ta. The oxidation kinetics of alloys containing less than approximately 40% Ta were approximately parabolic. Pure Ta exhibited nearly linear kinetics. Alloys containing 50% or more Ta exhibited paralinear kinetics. The activation energies for oxidation ranged between 232 kJ/mole for pure Ti and 119 kJ/mole for pure Ta, with the activation energies of the alloys falling between these values and generally decreasing with increasing Ta content. The activation energies for oxidation of the end members, Ti and Ta, agree well with published values for the activation energies for diffusion of oxygen in α-Ti and Ta. Scale formation in the alloys was found to be complex exhibiting various layers of Ti-, Ta-, and TiTa-oxides. The outermost layer of the oxidized alloys was predominantly rutile (TiO 2 ). Beneath the TiO 2 grew a variety of other oxides with the Ta content generally increasing with proximity to the metal-oxide interface. It was found that the most oxidation-resistant alloys had compositions falling between Ti-5Ta and Ti-15Ta. Although Ta stabilizes the β-phase of Ti, the kinetics of oxidation appeared to be rate limited by oxygen transport through the oxygen-stabilized α-phase. However, the kinetics are complicated by the formation of a complex oxide, which cracks periodically. Tantalum appears to increase the compositional range of oxygen-stabilized α-phase and reduces both the solubility of oxygen and diffusivity of Ti in the α- and β-phases

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of azo dye destruction in advanced oxidation processes

    Wojnarovits, L.; Palfi, T.; Takacs, E.

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of dye destruction in advanced oxidation processes is discussed on the example of Apollofix Red (Ar-28) radiolysis in aqueous solution. When the reactive intermediate reacts with the color bearing part of the molecule causing with nearly 100% efficiency destruction of the conjugation, the dose dependence, or time dependence of color disappearance is linear. In this case, spectrophotometry can be used to follow-up dye decomposition. Linear dependence was observed when hydrated electrons or hydrogen atoms reacted with the dye. In hydroxyl radical reactions some colored products form with spectra similar to those of the starting dye molecules. For that reason, spectrophotometry gives false result about the intact dye molecule concentration. Analysis by the HPLC reveals logarithmic time dependence in agreement with a theoretical model developed

  19. Oxidative conversion of propane over lithium-promoted magnesia catalyst. I. Kinetics and mechanism

    Leveles, L.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lercher, J.A.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2003-01-01

    Oxidative conversion of lower alkanes over lithium-promoted magnesia catalysts offers a viable alternative for propene and ethene production. The catalytic performance of propane oxidative dehydrogenation and cracking shows yields up to 50% of olefin (propene and ethene). The reaction kinetics were

  20. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of formic and oxalic acids ...

    The oxidation of formic and oxalic acids by benzyltrimethylammonium dichloroiodate (BTMACI), in the presence of zinc chloride, leads to the formation of carbon dioxide. The reaction is first order with respect to BTMACI, zinc chloride and organic acid. Oxidation of deuteriated formic acid indicates the presence of a kinetic ...

  1. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of organic sulphides by 2,2 ...

    Unknown

    In the present article, we report the kinetics of oxidation of thirty-four organic sulphides by BPCC in ..... t-Butyl alcohol. 24⋅0. Acetone. 40⋅7 .... different sensitivity to the electronic demand for the phenomenon being studied. It has the ... 144. Table 5. Temperature dependence for the reaction constants for the oxidation of.

  2. On kinetics and mechanism of' furfural oxidation by ions of heterovalent metals

    Krupenskij, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    Real constants of rate of furfural oxidation by Cu 2+ , Fe 3+ , Ce 4+ , Ag + , Hg 2+ 2 ions are determined, other kinetic and activation parameters of reactions are calculated, constants of stability and other thermodynamic characteristics of furfural complex with cations-oxidizers are found. Schemes of furfural transformations at one- and two-electron oxidation by ions of variable-valency metals are suggested

  3. Kinetics and mechanism of furfural oxidation by ions of heterovalent metals

    Krupenskij, V.I. (Ukhtinskij Industrial' nyj Inst. (USSR))

    1983-01-01

    Real constants of rate of furfural oxidation by Cu/sup 2 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Ce/sup 4 +/, Ag/sup +/, Hg/sup 2 +//sub 2/ ions are determined, other kinetic and activation parameters of reactions are calculated, constants of stability and other thermodynamic characteristics of furfural complex with cations-oxidizers are found. Schemes of furfural transformations at one- and two-electron oxidation by ions of variable-valency metals are suggested.

  4. Degradation of oxcarbazepine by UV-activated persulfate oxidation: kinetics, mechanisms, and pathways.

    Bu, Lingjun; Zhou, Shiqing; Shi, Zhou; Deng, Lin; Li, Guangchao; Yi, Qihang; Gao, Naiyun

    2016-02-01

    The degradation kinetics and mechanism of the antiepileptic drug oxcarbazepine (OXC) by UV-activated persulfate oxidation were investigated in this study. Results showed that UV/persulfate (UV/PS) process appeared to be more effective in degrading OXC than UV or PS alone. The OXC degradation exhibited a pseudo-first order kinetics pattern and the degradation rate constants (k obs) were affected by initial OXC concentration, PS dosage, initial pH, and humic acid concentration to different degrees. It was found that low initial OXC concentration, high persulfate dosage, and initial pH enhanced the OXC degradation. Additionally, the presence of humic acid in the solution could greatly inhibit the degradation of OXC. Moreover, hydroxyl radical (OH•) and sulfate radical (SO4 (-)••) were identified to be responsible for OXC degradation and SO4 (-)• made the predominant contribution in this study. Finally, major intermediate products were identified and a preliminary degradation pathway was proposed. Results demonstrated that UV/PS system is a potential technology to control the water pollution caused by emerging contaminants such as OXC.

  5. Chlorine dioxide oxidation of Escherichia coli in water - A study of the disinfection kinetics and mechanism.

    Ofori, Isaac; Maddila, Suresh; Lin, Johnson; Jonnalagadda, Sreekantha B

    2017-06-07

    This study investigated the kinetics and mechanism of chlorine dioxide (ClO 2 ) inactivation of a Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (ATCC 35218) in oxidant demand free (ODF) water in detail as a function of disinfectant concentration (0.5-5.0 mg/L), water pH (6.5-8.5), temperature variations (4-37°C) and bacterial density (10 5 -10 7 cfu/mL). The effects of ClO 2 on bacterial cell morphology, outer membrane permeability, cytoplasmic membrane disruption and intracellular enzymatic activity were also studied to elucidate the mechanism of action on the cells. Increasing temperature and disinfectant concentration were proportional to the rate of cell killing, but efficacy was found to be significantly subdued at 0.5 mg/L and less dependent on the bacterial density. The bactericidal efficiency was higher at alkaline pH of 8 or above as compared to neutral and slightly acidic pH of 7 and 6.5 respectively. The disinfection kinetic curves followed a biphasic pattern of rapid inactivation within the initial 2 min which were followed by a tailing even in the presence of residual biocide. The curves were adequately described by the C avg Hom model. Transmission Electron Microscopy images of the bacteria cells exposed to lethal concentrations of ClO 2 indicated very little observable morphological damage to the outer membranes of the cells. ClO 2 however was found to increase the permeability of the outer and cytoplasmic membranes leading to the leakage of membrane components such as 260 nm absorbing materials and inhibiting the activity of the intracellular enzyme β-D-galactosidase. It is suggested that the disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane and subsequent efflux of intracellular components result in the inactivation of the Gram-negative bacteria.

  6. Kinetics and mechanisms of thiol-disulfide exchange covering direct substitution and thiol oxidation-mediated pathways.

    Nagy, Péter

    2013-05-01

    Disulfides are important building blocks in the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, serving as inter- and intra-subunit cross links. Disulfides are also the major products of thiol oxidation, a process that has primary roles in defense mechanisms against oxidative stress and in redox regulation of cell signaling. Although disulfides are relatively stable, their reduction, isomerisation, and interconversion as well as their production reactions are catalyzed by delicate enzyme machineries, providing a dynamic system in biology. Redox homeostasis, a thermodynamic parameter that determines which reactions can occur in cellular compartments, is also balanced by the thiol-disulfide pool. However, it is the kinetic properties of the reactions that best represent cell dynamics, because the partitioning of the possible reactions depends on kinetic parameters. This review is focused on the kinetics and mechanisms of thiol-disulfide substitution and redox reactions. It summarizes the challenges and advances that are associated with kinetic investigations in small molecular and enzymatic systems from a rigorous chemical perspective using biological examples. The most important parameters that influence reaction rates are discussed in detail. Kinetic studies of proteins are more challenging than small molecules, and quite often investigators are forced to sacrifice the rigor of the experimental approach to obtain the important kinetic and mechanistic information. However, recent technological advances allow a more comprehensive analysis of enzymatic systems via using the systematic kinetics apparatus that was developed for small molecule reactions, which is expected to provide further insight into the cell's machinery.

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of the deep electrochemical oxidation of sodium diclofenac on a boron-doped diamond electrode

    Vedenyapina, M. D.; Borisova, D. A.; Rosenwinkel, K.-H.; Weichgrebe, D.; Stopp, P.; Vedenyapin, A. A.

    2013-08-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the deep oxidation of sodium diclofenac on a boron-doped diamond electrode are studied to develop a technique for purifying wastewater from pharmaceutical products. The products of sodium diclofenac electrolysis are analyzed using cyclic voltammetry and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. It is shown that the toxicity of the drug and products of its electrolysis decreases upon its deep oxidation.

  8. Electro-oxidation of the dye azure B: kinetics, mechanism, and by-products.

    Olvera-Vargas, Hugo; Oturan, Nihal; Aravindakumar, C T; Paul, M M Sunil; Sharma, Virender K; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the electrochemical degradation of the dye azure B in aqueous solutions was studied by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs), electro-Fenton, and anodic oxidation processes, using Pt/carbon-felt and boron-doped diamond (BDD)/carbon-felt cells with H₂O₂ electrogeneration. The higher oxidation power of the electro-Fenton (EF) process using BDD anode was demonstrated. The oxidative degradation of azure B by the electrochemically generated hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) follows a pseudo-first-order kinetics. The apparent rate constants of the oxidation of azure B by (•)OH were measured according to pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The absolute rate constant of azure B hydroxylation reaction was determined by competition kinetics method and found to be 1.19 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). It was found that the electrochemical degradation of the dye leads to the formation of aromatic by-products which are then oxidized to aliphatic carboxylic acids before their almost mineralization to CO₂ and inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium). The evolution of the TOC removal and time course of short-chain carboxylic acids during treatment were also investigated.

  9. Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Nanocarbon: Insights into the Reaction Mechanism and Kinetics via in Situ Experimental Methods.

    Qi, Wei; Yan, Pengqiang; Su, Dang Sheng

    2018-03-20

    Sustainable and environmentally benign catalytic processes are vital for the future to supply the world population with clean energy and industrial products. The replacement of conventional metal or metal oxide catalysts with earth abundant and renewable nonmetallic materials has attracted considerable research interests in the field of catalysis and material science. The stable and efficient catalytic performance of nanocarbon materials was discovered at the end of last century, and these materials are considered as potential alternatives for conventional metal-based catalysts. With its rapid development in the past 20 years, the research field of carbon catalysis has been experiencing a smooth transition from the discovery of novel nanocarbon materials or related new reaction systems to the atomistic-level mechanistic understanding on the catalytic process and the subsequent rational design of the practical catalytic reaction systems. In this Account, we summarize the recent progress in the kinetic and mechanistic studies on nanocarbon catalyzed alkane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reactions. The paper attempts to extract general concepts and basic regularities for carbon catalytic process directing us on the way for rational design of novel efficient metal-free catalysts. The nature of the active sites for ODH reactions has been revealed through microcalorimetric analysis, ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement, and in situ chemical titration strategies. The detailed kinetic analysis and in situ catalyst structure characterization suggests that carbon catalyzed ODH reactions involve the redox cycles of the ketonic carbonyl-hydroxyl pairs, and the key physicochemical parameters (activation energy, reaction order, and rate/equilibrium constants, etc.) of the carbon catalytic systems are proposed and compared with conventional transition metal oxide catalysts. The proposal of the intrinsic catalytic activity (TOF) provides the

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some vicinal and non ...

    Kinetics of oxidation of five vicinal and four non-vicinal diols, and two of their monoethers, by tetrabutylammonium tribromide (TBATB) has been studied. The vicinal diols yield products arising out of glycol-bond fission, while the non-vicinal diols produce the hydroxycarbonyl compounds. The reaction is first-order with ...

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some α-hydroxy acids by ...

    Unknown

    2004-11-08

    Nov 8, 2004 ... presence of a substantial kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD = 5⋅91 at 298 K). The rates of oxidation ... have been made to correlate rate and structure in this reaction. Mechanistic ... The solvent was glacial acetic acid and temperature was ≈ 298 K. .... glacial acetic acid was evaporated to dryness under reduced ...

  12. Kinetics and mechanisms of the oxidation of cobalt at 600-8000C

    Hsu, H.S.; Yurek, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    Two-phase layered scales comprising CoO and Co 3 O 4 formed on cobalt during oxidation at 600 0 , 700 0 , and 800 0 C and at oxygen partial pressures in the range 0.001-1 atm. The kinetics, which were obtained by thermogravimetric analysis, obeyed a parabolic rate law after an initial, nonparabolic stage of oxidation. The monoxide consisted of relatively large grains (10μ) and the spinel comprised small grains (3μ) for all conditions of oxidation. Grain boundary diffusion of cations played a significant role in the growth of the spinal layer. Thermogravimetric data and the steady-state ratio of the oxide layer thicknesses were employed to calculate the rates of thickening of the individual oxide layers and the rate of oxidation of CoO to Co 3 O 4

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of permanganate oxidation of iota- and lambda-carrageenan polysaccharides as sulfated carbohydrates in acid perchlorate solutions.

    Hassan, Refat M; Fawzy, Ahmed; Ahmed, Gamal A; Zaafarany, Ishaq A; Asghar, Basim H; Takagi, Hideo D; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2011-10-18

    The kinetics of oxidation of iota- and lambda-carrageenan as sulfated carbohydrates by permanganate ion in aqueous perchlorate solutions at a constant ionic strength of 2.0 mol dm(-3) have been investigated spectrophotometrically. The pseudo-first-order plots were found to be of inverted S-shape throughout the entire courses of reactions. The initial rates were found to be relatively slow in the early stages, followed by an increase in the oxidation rates over longer time periods. The experimental observations showed first-order dependences in permanganate and fractional first-order kinetics with respect to both carrageenans concentration for both the induction and autoacceleration periods. The results obtained at various hydrogen ion concentrations showed that the oxidation processes in these redox systems are acid-catalyzed throughout the two stages of oxidation reactions. The added salts lead to the prediction that Mn(III) is the reactive species throughout the autoacceleration periods. Kinetic evidence for the formation of 1:1 intermediate complexes was revealed. The kinetic parameters have been evaluated and tentative reaction mechanisms in good agreement with the kinetic results are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A study of sodium oxide crystallization mechanisms and kinetics in cold traps

    Latge, C.

    1984-04-01

    After showing up the present lack of data on crystallization mechanisms and kinetics, a number of tests were conducted on a sodium test loop equipped with two experimental cold traps. The effects of several geometric and thermohydraulic parameters on purification efficiency were also studied. The test results were used to develop a simulation model. An optimization code based on the model can be used to determine the nucleation and growth kinetics

  15. Electro-oxidation of diclofenac at boron doped diamond: Kinetics and mechanism

    Zhao Xu; Hou Yining; Liu Huijuan; Qiang Zhimin; Qu Jiuhui

    2009-01-01

    Diclofenac is a common anti-inflammatory drug. Its electrochemical degradation at boron doped diamond electrode was investigated in aqueous solution. The degradation kinetics and the intermediate products were studied. Results showed that electro-oxidation was effective in inducing the degradation of diclofenac with 30 mg/L initial concentration, ensuring a mineralization degree of 72% after a 4 h treatment with the applied bias potential of 4.0 V. The effects of applied bias potential and addition of NaCl on diclofenac degradation were investigated. Different degradation mechanisms of diclofenac were involved at various applied bias potentials. With the addition of NaCl, some chlorination intermediates including dichlorodiclofenac were identified, which lead to the total organic carbon increase compared with the electrolysis process without NaCl addition at the reaction initial period. The main intermediates including 2,6-dichlorobenzenamine, 2,5-dihydroxybenzyl alcohol, and benzoic acid are identified at the time of 2 h. 1-(2,6-Dichlorocyclohexa-2,4-dienyl)indolin-2-one were also identified. These intermediates disappeared gradually with the extension of reaction time. Small molecular acids were identified finally. Based on these results, a degradation pathway of diclofenac was proposed.

  16. Electro-oxidation of diclofenac at boron doped diamond: Kinetics and mechanism

    Zhao Xu; Hou Yining; Liu Huijuan; Qiang Zhimin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Qu Jiuhui [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China)], E-Mail: jhqu@mail.rcees.ac.cn

    2009-07-01

    Diclofenac is a common anti-inflammatory drug. Its electrochemical degradation at boron doped diamond electrode was investigated in aqueous solution. The degradation kinetics and the intermediate products were studied. Results showed that electro-oxidation was effective in inducing the degradation of diclofenac with 30 mg/L initial concentration, ensuring a mineralization degree of 72% after a 4 h treatment with the applied bias potential of 4.0 V. The effects of applied bias potential and addition of NaCl on diclofenac degradation were investigated. Different degradation mechanisms of diclofenac were involved at various applied bias potentials. With the addition of NaCl, some chlorination intermediates including dichlorodiclofenac were identified, which lead to the total organic carbon increase compared with the electrolysis process without NaCl addition at the reaction initial period. The main intermediates including 2,6-dichlorobenzenamine, 2,5-dihydroxybenzyl alcohol, and benzoic acid are identified at the time of 2 h. 1-(2,6-Dichlorocyclohexa-2,4-dienyl)indolin-2-one were also identified. These intermediates disappeared gradually with the extension of reaction time. Small molecular acids were identified finally. Based on these results, a degradation pathway of diclofenac was proposed.

  17. Kinetics modeling and reaction mechanism of ferrate(VI) oxidation of benzotriazoles.

    Yang, Bin; Ying, Guang-Guo; Zhang, Li-Juan; Zhou, Li-Jun; Liu, Shan; Fang, Yi-Xiang

    2011-03-01

    Benzotriazoles (BTs) are high production volume chemicals with broad application in various industrial processes and in households, and have been found to be omnipresent in aquatic environments. We investigated oxidation of five benzotriazoles (BT: 1H-benzotriazole; 5MBT: 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole; DMBT: 5,6-dimethyl-1H-benzotriazole hydrate; 5CBT: 5-chloro-1H-benzotriazole; HBT: 1-hydroxybenzotriazole) by aqueous ferrate (Fe(VI)) to determine reaction kinetics as a function of pH (6.0-10.0), and interpreted the reaction mechanism of Fe(VI) with BTs by using a linear free-energy relationship. The pK(a) values of BT and DMBT were also determined using UV-Visible spectroscopic method in order to calculate the species-specific rate constants, and they were 8.37 ± 0.0 and 8.98 ± 0.08 respectively. Each of BTs reacted moderately with Fe(VI) with the k(app) ranged from 7.2 to 103.8 M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7.0 and 24 ± 1 °C. When the molar ratio of Fe(VI) and BTs increased up to 30:1, the removal rate of BTs reached about >95% in buffered milli-Q water or secondary wastewater effluent. The electrophilic oxidation mechanism of the above reaction was illustrated by using a linear free-energy relationship between pH-dependence of species-specific rate constants and substituent effects (σ(p)). Fe(VI) reacts initially with BTs by electrophilic attack at the 1,2,3-triazole moiety of BT, 5MBT, DMBT and 5CBT, and at the N-OH bond of HBT. Moreover, for BT, 5MBT, DMBT and 5CBT, the reactions with the species HFeO(4)(-) predominantly controled the reaction rates. For HBT, the species H(2)FeO(4) with dissociated HBT played a major role in the reaction. The results showed that Fe(VI) has the ability to degrade benzotriazoles in water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Thiol–Disulfide Exchange Covering Direct Substitution and Thiol Oxidation-Mediated Pathways

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Disulfides are important building blocks in the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, serving as inter- and intra-subunit cross links. Disulfides are also the major products of thiol oxidation, a process that has primary roles in defense mechanisms against oxidative stress and in redox regulation of cell signaling. Although disulfides are relatively stable, their reduction, isomerisation, and interconversion as well as their production reactions are catalyzed by delicate enzyme machineries, providing a dynamic system in biology. Redox homeostasis, a thermodynamic parameter that determines which reactions can occur in cellular compartments, is also balanced by the thiol–disulfide pool. However, it is the kinetic properties of the reactions that best represent cell dynamics, because the partitioning of the possible reactions depends on kinetic parameters. Critical Issues: This review is focused on the kinetics and mechanisms of thiol–disulfide substitution and redox reactions. It summarizes the challenges and advances that are associated with kinetic investigations in small molecular and enzymatic systems from a rigorous chemical perspective using biological examples. The most important parameters that influence reaction rates are discussed in detail. Recent Advances and Future Directions: Kinetic studies of proteins are more challenging than small molecules, and quite often investigators are forced to sacrifice the rigor of the experimental approach to obtain the important kinetic and mechanistic information. However, recent technological advances allow a more comprehensive analysis of enzymatic systems via using the systematic kinetics apparatus that was developed for small molecule reactions, which is expected to provide further insight into the cell's machinery. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1623–1641. PMID:23075118

  19. Cu(II)-catalyzed oxidation of dopamine in aqueous solutions: mechanism and kinetics.

    Pham, A Ninh; Waite, T David

    2014-08-01

    Spontaneous oxidation of dopamine (DA) and the resultant formation of free radical species within dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) is thought to bestow a considerable oxidative load upon these neurons and may contribute to their vulnerability to degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). An understanding of DA oxidation under physiological conditions is thus critical to understanding the relatively selective vulnerability of these dopaminergic neurons in PD and may support the development of novel neuro-protective approaches for this disorder. In this study, the oxidation of dopamine (0.2-10μM) was investigated both in the absence and the presence of copper (0.01-0.4μM), a redox active metal that is present at considerable concentrations in the SN, over a range of background chloride concentrations (0.01-0.7M), different oxygen concentrations and at physiological pH7.4. DA was observed to oxidize extremely slowly in the absence of copper and at moderate rates only in the presence of copper but without chloride. The oxidation of DA however was significantly enhanced in the presence of both copper and chloride with the rate of DA oxidation greatest at intermediate chloride concentrations (0.05-0.2M). The variability of the catalytic effect of Cu(II) on DA oxidation at different chloride concentrations can be explained and successfully modeled by appropriate consideration of the reaction of Cu(II) species with DA and the conversion of Cu(I) to Cu(II) through oxygenation. This model suggests that the speciation of Cu(II) and Cu(I) is critically important to the kinetics of DA oxidation and thus the vulnerability to degradation of dopaminergic neuron in the brain milieu. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A study of the kinetics and mechanisms of electrocrystallization of indium oxide on an in situ prepared metallic indium electrode

    Omanovic, S.; Metikos-Hukovic, M.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms and kinetics of nucleation and growth of indium oxide film on an in situ prepared metallic indium electrode was studied in a borate buffer solution of pH 10.0 using cyclic voltammetry and chroanoamperometry techniques. It was shown that the initial stage of nucleation of the oxide film includes a three-dimensional progressive nucleation process, combined with a diffusion-controlled growth of the stable indium oxide crystals. The thermodynamic data obtained indicated a strong tendency of indium to form an indium oxide film on its surface in an aqueous solution. It was found that the rate-determining step in the nucleation and growth process is the surface diffusion of electroactive species. The nucleation rate constant, and the number of nucleation active sites were calculated independently. It was shown that between 2 and 15% of sites on the indium surface act as active nucleation centers, and that each active site represents a critical nucleus

  1. Tantalum high-temperature oxidation kinetics

    Grigor'ev, Yu.M.; Sarkisyan, A.A.; Merzhanov, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetics of heat release and scale growth during tantalum oxidation within 650-1300 deg C temperature range in oxygen-containing media is investigated. Kinetic equations and temperature and pressure dependences of constants are ound Applicability of the kinetic Lorie mechanism for the description of the tantalum oxidation kinetics applicably to rapid-passing processes is shown. It is stated that the process rate (reaction ability) is determined by adsorption desorption factors on the external surface of the ''protective'' oxide for the ''linear'' oxidation stage [ru

  2. The kinetics and mechanism of methanol oxidation on Pt and PtRu catalysts in alkaline and acid media

    JELENA LOVIC

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic of methanol electrochemical oxidation for a series of platinum and platinum–ruthenium catalysts was investigated. A correlation between the beginning of OHad adsorption and methanol oxidation was demonstarated on Pt single crystals and Pt nanocatalyst. The activity of the nano-structured Pt catalyst was compared with single crystal platinum electrodes assuming the Kinoshita model of nanoparticles. The ruthenium-containing catalysts shifted the onset of methanol oxidation to more negative potentials. The effect was more pronounced in acid than in alkaline media. Based on the established diagnostic criteria, the reaction between COad and OHad species according to the Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanism was proposed as the rate determining step in alkaline and acid media on Pt and PtRu catalysts.

  3. Kinetics and mechanism of heterogeneous oxidation of sulfur dioxide by ozone on surface of calcium carbonate

    L. Li

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfate particles play a key role in the air quality and the global climate, but the heterogeneous formation mechanism of sulfates on surfaces of atmospheric particles is not well established. Carbonates, which act as a reactive component in mineral dust due to their special chemical properties, may contribute significantly to the sulfate formation by heterogeneous processes. This paper presents a study on the oxidation of SO2 by O3 on CaCO3 particles. Using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS, the formation of sulfite and sulfate on the surface was identified, and the roles of O3 and water in oxidation processes were determined. The results showed that in the presence of O3, SO2can be oxidized to sulfate on the surface of CaCO3 particles. The reaction is first order in SO2 and zero order in O3. The reactive uptake coefficient for SO2 [(0.6–9.8×1014 molecule cm-3] oxidation by O3 [(1.2–12×1014 molecule cm-3] was determined to be (1.4±0.3×10-7 using the BET area as the reactive area and (7.7±1.6×10-4 using the geometric area. A two-stage mechanism that involves adsorption of SO2 followed by O3 oxidation is proposed and the adsorption of SO2 on the CaCO3 surface is the rate-determining step. The proposed mechanism can well explain the experiment results. The atmospheric implications were explored based on a box model calculation. It was found that the heterogeneous reaction might be an important pathway for sulfate formation in the atmosphere.

  4. Oxidative degradation of triclosan by potassium permanganate: Kinetics, degradation products, reaction mechanism, and toxicity evaluation.

    Chen, Jing; Qu, Ruijuan; Pan, Xiaoxue; Wang, Zunyao

    2016-10-15

    In this study, we systematically investigated the potential applicability of potassium permanganate for removal of triclosan (TCS) in water treatment. A series of kinetic experiments were carried out to study the influence of various factors, including the pH, oxidant doses, temperature, and presence of typical anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), NO3(-)), humic acid (HA), and fulvic acid (FA) on triclosan removal. The optimal reaction conditions were: pH = 8.0, [TCS]0:[KMnO4]0 = 1:2.5, and T = 25 °C, where 20 mg/L of TCS could be completely degraded in 120 s. However, the rate of TCS (20 μg/L) oxidation by KMnO4 ([TCS]0:[KMnO4]0 = 1:2.5) was 1.64 × 10(-3) mg L(-1)·h(-1), lower than that at an initial concentration of 20 mg/L (2.24 × 10(3) mg L(-1)·h(-1)). A total of eleven products were detected by liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) analysis, including phenol and its derivatives, benzoquinone, an organic acid, and aldehyde. Two main reaction pathways involving CO bond cleavage (-C(8)O(7)-) and benzene ring opening (in the less chlorinated benzene ring) were proposed, and were further confirmed based on frontier electron density calculations and point charges. Furthermore, the changes in the toxicity of the reaction solution during TCS oxidation by KMnO4 were evaluated by using both the luminescent bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum and the water flea Daphnia magna. The toxicity of 20 mg/L triclosan to D. magna and P. phosphoreum after 60 min was reduced by 95.2% and 43.0%, respectively. Phenol and 1,4-benzoquinone, the two representative degradation products formed during permanganate oxidation, would yield low concentrations of DBPs (STHMFP, 20.99-278.97 μg/mg; SHAAFP, 7.86 × 10(-4)-45.77 μg/mg) after chlorination and chloramination. Overall, KMnO4 can be used as an effective oxidizing agent for TCS removal in water and wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of statin compounds by advanced oxidation processes: Kinetic considerations and destruction mechanisms

    Razavi, Behnaz; Song, Weihua; Santoke, Hanoz; Cooper, William J.

    2011-03-01

    This study examined the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs) for the destruction of cholesterol lowering statin pharmaceuticals. AO/RPs which utilize the oxidizing hydroxyl radical ( rad OH) and reducing aqueous electron (e -aq), to degrade chemical contaminants are alternatives to traditional water treatment methods, and are alternatives as water reuse becomes more generally implemented. Four major statin pharmaceuticals, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin, were studied, and the absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants with rad OH determined, (6.96±0.16)×10 9, (2.92±0.06)×10 9, (4.16±0.13)×10 9, and (3.13±0.15)×10 9 M -1 s -1, and for e -aq (2.31±0.06)×10 9, (0.45±0.01)×10 9, (1.26±0.01)×10 9, and (0.69±0.02)×10 9 M -1 s -1, respectively. To provide additional information on the radicals formed upon oxidation, transient spectra were measured and the overall reaction efficiency determined. Radical-based destruction mechanisms for destruction of the statins are proposed based on the LC-MS determination of the stable reaction by-products formed using 137Cs γ-irradiation of statin solutions. Knowing the reaction rates, reaction efficiencies and destruction mechanisms of these compounds is essential for the consideration of the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes for the destruction of statins in aqueous systems.

  6. Treatment of statin compounds by advanced oxidation processes: Kinetic considerations and destruction mechanisms

    Razavi, Behnaz; Song Weihua; Santoke, Hanoz; Cooper, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs) for the destruction of cholesterol lowering statin pharmaceuticals. AO/RPs which utilize the oxidizing hydroxyl radical ( · OH) and reducing aqueous electron (e - aq ), to degrade chemical contaminants are alternatives to traditional water treatment methods, and are alternatives as water reuse becomes more generally implemented. Four major statin pharmaceuticals, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin, were studied, and the absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants with · OH determined, (6.96±0.16)x10 9 , (2.92±0.06)x10 9 , (4.16±0.13)x10 9 , and (3.13±0.15)x10 9 M -1 s -1 , and for e - aq (2.31±0.06)x10 9 , (0.45±0.01)x10 9 , (1.26±0.01)x10 9 , and (0.69±0.02)x10 9 M -1 s -1 , respectively. To provide additional information on the radicals formed upon oxidation, transient spectra were measured and the overall reaction efficiency determined. Radical-based destruction mechanisms for destruction of the statins are proposed based on the LC-MS determination of the stable reaction by-products formed using 137 Cs γ-irradiation of statin solutions. Knowing the reaction rates, reaction efficiencies and destruction mechanisms of these compounds is essential for the consideration of the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes for the destruction of statins in aqueous systems.

  7. Treatment of statin compounds by advanced oxidation processes: Kinetic considerations and destruction mechanisms

    Razavi, Behnaz, E-mail: brazavi@uci.ed [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Song Weihua, E-mail: wsong@uci.ed [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Santoke, Hanoz, E-mail: hsantoke@uci.ed [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Cooper, William J., E-mail: wcooper@uci.ed [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    This study examined the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs) for the destruction of cholesterol lowering statin pharmaceuticals. AO/RPs which utilize the oxidizing hydroxyl radical ({sup {center_dot}O}H) and reducing aqueous electron (e{sup -}{sub aq}), to degrade chemical contaminants are alternatives to traditional water treatment methods, and are alternatives as water reuse becomes more generally implemented. Four major statin pharmaceuticals, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin, were studied, and the absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants with {sup {center_dot}O}H determined, (6.96{+-}0.16)x10{sup 9}, (2.92{+-}0.06)x10{sup 9}, (4.16{+-}0.13)x10{sup 9}, and (3.13{+-}0.15)x10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and for e{sup -}{sub aq} (2.31{+-}0.06)x10{sup 9}, (0.45{+-}0.01)x10{sup 9}, (1.26{+-}0.01)x10{sup 9}, and (0.69{+-}0.02)x10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. To provide additional information on the radicals formed upon oxidation, transient spectra were measured and the overall reaction efficiency determined. Radical-based destruction mechanisms for destruction of the statins are proposed based on the LC-MS determination of the stable reaction by-products formed using {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-irradiation of statin solutions. Knowing the reaction rates, reaction efficiencies and destruction mechanisms of these compounds is essential for the consideration of the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes for the destruction of statins in aqueous systems.

  8. Kinetics and mechanisms of the oxidation of iodide and bromide in aqueous solutions by a trans-dioxoruthenium(VI) complex.

    Lam, William W Y; Man, Wai-Lun; Wang, Yi-Ning; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2008-08-04

    The kinetics and mechanisms of the oxidation of I (-) and Br (-) by trans-[Ru (VI)(N 2O 2)(O) 2] (2+) have been investigated in aqueous solutions. The reactions have the following stoichiometry: trans-[Ru (VI)(N 2O 2)(O) 2] (2+) + 3X (-) + 2H (+) --> trans-[Ru (IV)(N 2O 2)(O)(OH 2)] (2+) + X 3 (-) (X = Br, I). In the oxidation of I (-) the I 3 (-)is produced in two distinct phases. The first phase produces 45% of I 3 (-) with the rate law d[I 3 (-)]/dt = ( k a + k b[H (+)])[Ru (VI)][I (-)]. The remaining I 3 (-) is produced in the second phase which is much slower, and it follows first-order kinetics but the rate constant is independent of [I (-)], [H (+)], and ionic strength. In the proposed mechanism the first phase involves formation of a charge-transfer complex between Ru (VI) and I (-), which then undergoes a parallel acid-catalyzed oxygen atom transfer to produce [Ru (IV)(N 2O 2)(O)(OHI)] (2+), and a one electron transfer to give [Ru (V)(N 2O 2)(O)(OH)] (2+) and I (*). [Ru (V)(N 2O 2)(O)(OH)] (2+) is a stronger oxidant than [Ru (VI)(N 2O 2)(O) 2] (2+) and will rapidly oxidize another I (-) to I (*). In the second phase the [Ru (IV)(N 2O 2)(O)(OHI)] (2+) undergoes rate-limiting aquation to produce HOI which reacts rapidly with I (-) to produce I 2. In the oxidation of Br (-) the rate law is -d[Ru (VI)]/d t = {( k a2 + k b2[H (+)]) + ( k a3 + k b3[H (+)]) [Br (-)]}[Ru (VI)][Br (-)]. At 298.0 K and I = 0.1 M, k a2 = (2.03 +/- 0.03) x 10 (-2) M (-1) s (-1), k b2 = (1.50 +/- 0.07) x 10 (-1) M (-2) s (-1), k a3 = (7.22 +/- 2.19) x 10 (-1) M (-2) s (-1) and k b3 = (4.85 +/- 0.04) x 10 (2) M (-3) s (-1). The proposed mechanism involves initial oxygen atom transfer from trans-[Ru (VI)(N 2O 2)(O) 2] (2+) to Br (-) to give trans-[Ru (IV)(N 2O 2)(O)(OBr)] (+), which then undergoes parallel aquation and oxidation of Br (-), and both reactions are acid-catalyzed.

  9. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Triethylene Glycol and Tetraethylene Glycol by Ditelluratoargentate (III in Alkaline Medium

    Jinhuan Shan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of triethylene glycol and tetraethylene glycol by ditelluratoargentate (III (DTA in alkaline liquids has been studied spectrophotometrically in the temperature range of 293.2 K–313.2 K. The reaction rate showed first-order dependence in DTA and fractional order with respect to triethylene glycol or tetraethylene glycol. It was found that the pseudo-first-order rate constant (kobs increased with an increase in concentration of OH− and a decrease in concentration of H4TeO6 2−. There was a negative salt effect and no free radicals were detected. A plausible mechanism involving a two-electron transfer was proposed, and the rate equations derived from the mechanism explained all the experimental results and observations. The activation parameters along with the rate constants of the rate-determining step were calculated.

  10. [Removal Kinetics and Mechanism of Aniline by Manganese-oxide-modified Diatomite].

    Xiao, Shao-dan; Liu, Lu; Jiang, Li-ying; Chen, Jian-meng

    2015-06-01

    A novel rapid green one-step method was developed for the preparation of manganese modified diatomite (Mn-D) by treating roasted diatomite with an acidic permanganate solution. The effects of calcination temperature and mass ratio of KMnO4 and diatomite (p) on aniline removal efficiency of Mn-D were investigated. The removal kinetics and mechanism of aniline by Mn-D were also discussed. The results showed that when the optimal calcination temperature was 450 degrees C, p was 1.6, and the loading amounts of δ-MnO2 was 0.82 g x g(-1), Mn-D had a great performance for aniline removal, and more than 80% of aniline was adsorbed within 10 minutes, accompanied with the release of Mn2+. In acidic conditions, the adsorption process on Mn-D followed pseudo-second-order and was mainly controlled by intra-particle diffusion. The best fitting of the experimental adsorption data was given by the Freundlich equation. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer was applied to identify the reaction intermediates at different times, and azobenzene was found to be the main reaction intermediate in the degradation system. Based on the above observations, the possible degradation pathway of aniline by Mn-D was proposed.

  11. Experimental and theoretical understanding of the gas phase oxidation of atmospheric amides with OH radicals: kinetics, products, and mechanisms.

    Borduas, Nadine; da Silva, Gabriel; Murphy, Jennifer G; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-05-14

    Atmospheric amides have primary and secondary sources and are present in ambient air at low pptv levels. To better assess the fate of amides in the atmosphere, the room temperature (298 ± 3 K) rate coefficients of five different amides with OH radicals were determined in a 1 m(3) smog chamber using online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Formamide, the simplest amide, has a rate coefficient of (4.44 ± 0.46) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1) against OH, translating to an atmospheric lifetime of ∼1 day. N-methylformamide, N-methylacetamide and propanamide, alkyl versions of formamide, have rate coefficients of (10.1 ± 0.6) × 10(-12), (5.42 ± 0.19) × 10(-12), and (1.78 ± 0.43) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1), respectively. Acetamide was also investigated, but due to its slow oxidation kinetics, we report a range of (0.4-1.1) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1) for its rate coefficient with OH radicals. Oxidation products were monitored and quantified and their time traces were fitted using a simple kinetic box model. To further probe the mechanism, ab initio calculations are used to identify the initial radical products of the amide reactions with OH. Our results indicate that N-H abstractions are negligible in all cases, in contrast to what is predicted by structure-activity relationships. Instead, the reactions proceed via C-H abstraction from alkyl groups and from formyl C(O)-H bonds when available. The latter process leads to radicals that can readily react with O2 to form isocyanates, explaining the detection of toxic compounds such as isocyanic acid (HNCO) and methyl isocyanate (CH3NCO). These contaminants of significant interest are primary oxidation products in the photochemical oxidation of formamide and N-methylformamide, respectively.

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of cerium in air at ambient temperature

    Wheeler, D.W.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • XRD and transverse sections suggest Ce_2O_3 forms on Ce before being overlaid by CeO_2. • XRD and oxide thickness measurements both indicate linear oxidation. • Extensive cracking on oxide surface which sustains continuing oxidation. • Electron microscopy has shown features indicative of nodular oxidation. • Oxide growth rate determined to be 0.1 μm day"−"1 under the conditions in this study. - Abstract: This paper describes a study of the oxidation of cerium in air at ambient temperature. Specimens were exposed for up to 60 days, during which they were analysed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) at regular intervals. Both XRD and oxide thickness measurements indicate linear oxidation over the duration of this study. Under the conditions employed in this study, the rate of oxide growth has been determined to be 0.1 μm day"−"1. The oxidation process appears to be assisted by extensive cracking in the oxide layer which acts as a non-protective film for the underlying metal.

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of super-reduced cobalamin and cobinamide species by thiosulfate, sulfite and dithionite.

    Dereven'kov, Ilia A; Salnikov, Denis S; Makarov, Sergei V; Boss, Gerry R; Koifman, Oskar I

    2013-11-21

    We studied the kinetics of reactions of cob(I)alamin and cob(I)inamide with thiosulfate, sulfite, and dithionite by UV-Visible (UV-Vis) and stopped-flow spectroscopy. We found that the two Co(I) species were oxidized by these sulfur-containing compounds to Co(II) forms: oxidation by excess thiosulfate leads to penta-coordinate complexes and oxidation by excess sulfite or dithionite leads to hexa-coordinate Co(II)-SO2(-) complexes. The net scheme involves transfer of three electrons in the case of oxidation by thiosulfate and one electron for oxidation by sulfite and dithionite. On the basis of kinetic data, the nature of the reactive oxidants was suggested, i.e., HS2O3(-) (for oxidation by thiosulfate), S2O5(2-), HSO3(-), and aquated SO2 (for oxidation by sulfite), and S2O4(2-) and SO2(-) (for oxidation by dithionite). No difference was observed in kinetics with cob(i)alamin or cob(i)inamide as reductants.

  14. Kinetics, mechanism, and stoicheiometry of the oxidation of hydroxylamine by nitric acid

    Pembridge, J.R.; Stedman, G.

    1979-01-01

    Hydroxylamine is oxidised by nitric acid to form dinitrogen monoxide and nitrous acid, the proportions varying with reaction conditions. (The chemistry of hydroxylamine in nitric acid is of potential technological interest, since it has been proposed as a reagent for the reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III).) The yield [HNO 2 ]infinity/ [NH 3 OH + ] 0 is a maximum at ca. 4 to 5 mol dm -3 HNO 3 , and is also a function of the hydroxylamine concentration. In 5 mol dm -3 HNO 3 the limiting yield is ca. 0.85 at very low initial hydroxylamine concentrations, but decreases towards zero at higher values of [NH 3 OH + ] 0 . Reaction is only observed at sufficiently high nitric acid concentrations; at 25 0 C the cut-off point is ca. 2.5 mol dm -3 HNO 3 . The reaction is characterised by an induction period, followed by a rapid autocatalytic process. Addition of nitrite eliminates the induction period, while addition of nitrite scavengers completely prevents any reaction. Nitrous acid is an essential catalyst for the reaction, and the initial rate of reaction obeys the equation d[HNO 2 ]/dt = V 0 = k[HNO 2 ][NH 3 OH + ]. Isotopic experiments, using 15 N-enriched hydroxylamine show that virtually all of the N 2 O arises from reaction between HNO 2 and hydroxylamine. The mechanism suggested involves oxidation of un-protonated hydroxylamine by N 2 O 4 to form the nitroxyl diradical HNO; this is then further oxidised to HNO 2 , which reacts with hydroxylamine to form N 2 O. (author)

  15. High temperature mechanisms and kinetics of SiC oxidation under low partial pressures of oxygen: application to the fuel cladding of gas fast reactors

    Hun, N.

    2011-01-01

    Gas Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the different Generation IV concepts under investigation for energy production. SiC/SiC composites are candidates of primary interest for a GFR fuel cladding use, thanks to good corrosion resistance among other properties. The mechanisms and kinetics of SiC oxidation under operating conditions have to be identified and quantified as the corrosion can decrease the mechanical properties of the composite. An experimental device has been developed to study the oxidation of silicon carbide under high temperature and low oxygen partial pressure. The results pointed out that not only parabolic oxidation, but also interfacial reactions and volatilization occur under such conditions. After determining the kinetics of each mechanism, as functions of oxygen partial pressure and temperature, the data are used for the modeling of the composites oxidation. The model will be used to predict the lifetime of the composite in operating conditions. (author) [fr

  16. Degradation of quinoline by wet oxidation - kinetic aspects and reaction mechanisms

    Thomsen, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    The high temperature, high pressure wet oxidation reaction of quinoline has been studied as a function of initial concentration, pH and temperature. At neutral to acidic pH, it is effective in the oxidation of quinoline at 240 degrees C and above, whereas under alkaline conditions the reaction...... is markedly slowed down. The results indicate that the reaction is an auto-catalysed, free radical chain reaction transforming 99% of quinoline to other substances. Of the quinoline. 30-50% was oxidised to CO2 and H2O depending on the initial concentration. Wet oxidation of deuterium-labelled quinoline...

  17. Computational consideration on advanced oxidation degradation of phenolic preservative, methylparaben, in water: mechanisms, kinetics, and toxicity assessments

    Gao, Yanpeng [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Resources Utilization and Protection, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); An, Taicheng, E-mail: antc99@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Resources Utilization and Protection, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Fang, Hansun [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Resources Utilization and Protection, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ji, Yuemeng; Li, Guiying [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Resources Utilization and Protection, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Computational approach is effective to reveal the transformation mechanism of MPB. • MPB degradation was more dependent on the [{sup •} OH] than temperature during AOPs. • O{sub 2} could enhance MPB degradation, but more harmful products were formed. • The risks of MPB products in natural waters should be considered seriously. • The risks of MPB products can be overlooked in AOPs due to short half-time. - Abstract: Hydroxyl radicals ({sup •} OH) are strong oxidants that can degrade organic pollutants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The mechanisms, kinetics, and toxicity assessment of the {sup •} OH-initiated oxidative degradation of the phenolic preservative, methylparaben (MPB), were systematically investigated using a computational approach, as the supplementary information for experimental data. Results showed that MPB can be initially attacked by {sup •} OH via OH-addition and H-abstraction routes. Among these routes, the {sup •} OH addition to the C atom at the ortho-position of phenolic hydroxyl group was the most significant route. However, the methyl-H-abstraction route also cannot be neglected. Further, the formed transient intermediates, OH-adduct ({sup •} MPB-OH{sub 1}) and dehydrogenated radical ({sup •} MPB(-H)α), could be easily transformed to several stable degradation products in the presence of O{sub 2} and {sup •} OH. To better understand the potential toxicity of MPB and its products to aquatic organisms, both acute and chronic toxicities were assessed computationally at three trophic levels. Both MPB and its products, particularly the OH-addition products, are harmful to aquatic organisms. Therefore, the application of AOPs to remove MPB should be carefully performed for safe water treatment.

  18. Comparison of detailed and reduced kinetics mechanisms of silane oxidation in the basis of detonation wave structure problem

    Fedorov, A. V.; Tropin, D. A.; Fomin, P. A.

    2018-03-01

    The paper deals with the problem of the structure of detonation waves in the silane-air mixture within the framework of mathematical model of a nonequilibrium gas dynamics. Detailed kinetic scheme of silane oxidation as well as the newly developed reduced kinetic model of detonation combustion of silane are used. On its basis the detonation wave (DW) structure in stoichiometric silane - air mixture and dependences of Chapman-Jouguet parameters of mixture on stoichiometric ratio between the fuel (silane) and an oxidizer (air) were obtained.

  19. Oxidation kinetics and mechanisms of carbon/carbon composites and their components in water vapour at high temperatures

    Qin, Fei; Peng, Li-na; He, Guo-qiang; Li, Jiang; Yan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 4D-C/C composite was fabricated using carbon fibre and coal tar pitch. • The rate of mass loss and oxidation kinetics parameters of fibres-H 2 O and matrix-H 2 O are obtained. • The rate of mass loss and oxidation kinetics parameters of C/C–H 2 O are obtained. • Oxidation rate of the fibre bundle is greater than the oxidation rate of the matrix. - Abstract: Thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the oxidation kinetics of four-direction carbon/carbon composites and their components (fibres and matrices) in a H 2 O–Ar atmosphere at high temperatures. The oxidation processes were restricted to reaction-limited oxidation. The rate of mass loss was estimated for the four-direction carbon/carbon composites and their components at high temperature. The pressure exponent for the reaction of the carbon/carbon composites with H 2 O was 0.59, and the pre-exponential factor and activation energy for the reactions of H 2 O with the carbon/carbon composites, carbon fibres and matrices were determined

  20. High-temperature oxidation behavior of dense SiBCN monoliths: Carbon-content dependent oxidation structure, kinetics and mechanisms

    Li, Daxin; Yang, Zhihua; Jia, Dechang; Wang, Shengjin; Duan, Xiaoming; Zhu, Qishuai; Miao, Yang; Rao, Jiancun; Zhou, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •The scale growth for all investigated monoliths at 1500 °C cannot be depicted by a linear or parabolic rate law. •The carbon-rich monoliths oxidize at 1500 °C according to a approximately linear weight loss equation. •The excessive carbon in SiBCN monoliths deteriorates the oxidation resistance. •The oxidation resistance stems from the characteristic oxide structures and increased oxidation resistance of BN(C). -- Abstract: The high temperature oxidation behavior of three SiBCN monoliths: carbon-lean SiBCN with substantial Si metal, carbon-moderate SiBCN and carbon-rich SiBCN with excessive carbon, was investigated at 1500 °C for times up to15 h. Scale growth for carbon-lean and −moderate monoliths at 1500 °C cannot be described by a linear or parabolic rate law, while the carbon-rich monoliths oxidize according to a approximately linear weight loss equation. The microstructures of the oxide scale compose of three distinct layers. The passivating layer of carbon and boron containing amorphous SiO 2 and increased oxidation resistance of BN(C) both benefit the oxidation resistance.

  1. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of formic and oxalic acids ...

    Unknown

    The organic acids were commercial products of the highest degree of purity .... reaction is not complete even at high concentration of ZnCl2, and that only the ... activation in the oxidation of oxalic acid suggests the involvement of both the ...

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some neutral and acidic ...

    Unknown

    The effect of solvent composition indicate that the rate of reaction increases with increase in the po- larity of the medium. Addition of ... oxidation of several neutral and acidic α-amino ac- ids by TBATB in aqueous acetic acid solution, and the mechanistic aspects are discussed in this paper. 2. Experimental. 2.1 Materials.

  3. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of thiocyanate ion by di-m ...

    phenanthroline)dimanganese(III,IV) perchlorate in acid medium has been investigated. The reaction follows first order in both the oxidant and the reductant. The reaction is catalysed by hydrogen ion and the rate dependence given as k2 = a + b[H+].

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of L-leucine by alkaline ...

    oxidative products were identified by spot test and GC-MS. The reaction ... Amino acids can undergo many types ... cases because of its limited solubility and stability in aqueous ... anism of this drug by DPC, there was a need for under-.

  5. Heterogeneous reactions of carbonyl sulfide on mineral oxides: mechanism and kinetics study

    Y. Liu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous reactions of carbonyl sulfide (OCS on the typical mineral oxides in the mineral dust particles were investigated using a Knudsen cell flow reactor and a diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy. The reaction pathway for OCS on mineral dust was identified based on the gaseous products and surface species. The hydrolysis of OCS and succeeding oxidation of intermediate products readily took place on α-Al2O3, MgO, and CaO. Reversible and irreversible adsorption of OCS were observed on α-Fe2O3 and ZnO, respectively, whereas no apparent uptake of OCS by SiO2 and TiO2 was observed. The reactivity of OCS on these oxides depends on both the basicity of oxides and the decomposition reactivity of oxides for H2S. Based on the individual uptake coefficients and chemical composition of authentic mineral dust, the uptake coefficient (γBET of mineral dust was estimated to be in the range of 3.84×10−7–2.86×10−8. The global flux of OCS due to heterogeneous reactions and adsorption on mineral dust was estimated at 0.13–0.29 Tg yr−1, which is comparable to the annual flux of OCS for its reaction with ·OH.

  6. Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism

    Jung, Ou Sik; Park, Youn Yeol

    1996-12-01

    This book is about chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism. It consists of eleven chapters, which deal with reaction and reaction speed on reaction mechanism, simple reaction by rate expression, reversible reaction and simultaneous reaction, successive reaction, complicated reaction mechanism, assumption for reaction mechanism, transition state theory, successive reaction and oscillating reaction, reaction by solution, research method high except kinetics on reaction mechanism, high reaction of kinetics like pulsed radiolysis.

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some vicinal and non ...

    Unknown

    2.1 Materials. The diols and monoethers used were commercial products (BDH or Fluka) and were ..... charge separation takes place in the transition state of the reaction. ... The following mechanism (scheme 1) accounts for the observed data.

  8. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Oxidation of Four Small Alkyl Esters in Laminar Premixed Flames

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Westmoreland, P R; Dryer, F L; Chaos, M; Osswald, P; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K; Cool, T A; Wang, J; Yang, B; Hansen, N; Kasper, T

    2008-02-08

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism has been developed for a group of four small alkyl ester fuels, consisting of methyl formate, methyl acetate, ethyl formate and ethyl acetate. This mechanism is validated by comparisons between computed results and recently measured intermediate species mole fractions in fuel-rich, low pressure, premixed laminar flames. The model development employs a principle of similarity of functional groups in constraining the H atom abstraction and unimolecular decomposition reactions in each of these fuels. As a result, the reaction mechanism and formalism for mechanism development are suitable for extension to larger oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels, together with an improved kinetic understanding of the structure and chemical kinetics of alkyl ester fuels that can be extended to biodiesel fuels. Variations in concentrations of intermediate species levels in these flames are traced to differences in the molecular structure of the fuel molecules.

  9. Enzymatic oxidation of rutin by horseradish peroxidase: kinetic mechanism and identification of a dimeric product by LC-Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Savic, Sasa; Vojinovic, Katarina; Milenkovic, Sanja; Smelcerovic, Andrija; Lamshoeft, Marc; Petronijevic, Zivomir

    2013-12-15

    Flavonoid oxidation is important issue in food processing and quality. The kinetic mechanism of enzymatic oxidation of rutin by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied. Rutin oxidation reaction was followed by recording of spectral changes over the time at 360 nm. The studied oxidation is mostly enzymatic and less part non-enzymatic. The reaction with HRP has a higher rate compared with the reaction without of HRP, whereby is part of non-enzymatic reaction about 10% of the total reaction. Kinetic parameters were determined from graphics of linear Michaelis-Menten equation, and it was found that investigated reactions of rutin oxidation by HRP take place in a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. High resolution HPLC-MS analysis of the mixture of oxidized products of rutin revealed the presence of rutin dimer. Because of widely distribution of rutin as well as presence of peroxidases and hydrogen peroxide in fresh foods identification of this enzymatic modification product can be beneficial for foods quality and safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Oxidation kinetics of corium pool

    Sulatsky, A.A., E-mail: andrei314@mail.ru [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Smirnov, S.A. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Kotova, S.Yu. [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Fischer, M.; Hellmann, S. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Tromm, W.; Miassoedov, A. [Forschungzentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), Karlsruhe (Germany); Bottomley, D. [EUROPÄISCHE KOMMISSION, Joint Research Centre Institut für Transurane (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Piluso, P. [CEA Cadarache-DEN/DTN/STRI, St.Paul-lez-Durance (France); Barrachin, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et Sûreté Nucléaire, St.Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • The analysis of experimental data on molten corium oxidation was been carried out. • The analysis has revealed the main factors influencing the oxidation kinetics. • The analysis was used for developing a qualitative analytical model. • The numerical modeling has confirmed the results of experimental data analysis. -- Abstract: Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies of oxidation kinetics of an open surface corium pool have been reported. The experiments have been carried out within OECD MASCA program and ISTC METCOR, METCOR-P and EVAN projects. It has been shown that the melt oxidation is controlled by an oxidant supply to the melt free surface from the atmosphere, not by the reducer supply from the melt. The project experiments have not detected any input of the zirconium oxidation kinetics into the process chemistry. The completed analysis puts forward a simple analytical model, which gives an explanation of the main features of melt oxidation process. The numerical modeling results are in good agreement with experimental data and theoretical considerations.

  11. Oxidation kinetics of corium pool

    Sulatsky, A.A.; Smirnov, S.A.; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Kotova, S.Yu.; Fischer, M.; Hellmann, S.; Tromm, W.; Miassoedov, A.; Bottomley, D.; Piluso, P.; Barrachin, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The analysis of experimental data on molten corium oxidation was been carried out. • The analysis has revealed the main factors influencing the oxidation kinetics. • The analysis was used for developing a qualitative analytical model. • The numerical modeling has confirmed the results of experimental data analysis. -- Abstract: Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies of oxidation kinetics of an open surface corium pool have been reported. The experiments have been carried out within OECD MASCA program and ISTC METCOR, METCOR-P and EVAN projects. It has been shown that the melt oxidation is controlled by an oxidant supply to the melt free surface from the atmosphere, not by the reducer supply from the melt. The project experiments have not detected any input of the zirconium oxidation kinetics into the process chemistry. The completed analysis puts forward a simple analytical model, which gives an explanation of the main features of melt oxidation process. The numerical modeling results are in good agreement with experimental data and theoretical considerations

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of RuIII catalysed oxidation of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-naphthalene (tetralin) by CeIV in aqueous nitric acid medium

    Vijaya Bhaskar Rao, N.; Anand Rao, M.

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of Ru III catalysed oxidation of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (tetralin) by Ce IV in aqueous nitric acid to tetralone under the conditions (TL) > > (Ce IV ) at different temperatures (30-50 deg C) have been studied in 3.0 mol dm -3 nitric acid medium. The experimentally observed rate law conforms to -d(Ce IV )/dt = kK(Ce IV )(TL)(Ru III )/l + K(TL) + K(Ru III ). (author)

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of OsOsub(4) catalyzed oxidation of chalcones by Cesub(4) in aqueous acetic sulfuric acid media

    Srinivasulu, P.V.; Adinarayana, M.; Sethuram, B.; Rao, T.N.

    1985-01-01

    Kinetics of OsOsub(4) catalyzed oxidation of chalcones by Cesup(4+) was studied in aqueous acetic-sulfuric acid medium in the temperature range 313 to 338 K. The order in oxidant is zero while the order with respect to substrate and catalyst are each fractional. The rate of the reaction decreased with increase in percentage of acetic acid while [Hsup(+)] had practically no effect on the rate. The rates of various substituted chalcones are given. A mechanism in which formation of a cyclic ester between chalcone and OsOsub(4) in a fast step followed by its decomposition in a rate-determining step is envisaged. (author)

  14. Kinetics and Mechanism of Electron Transfer Reaction: Oxidation of Sulfanilic Acid by N-Chloro-p-Toluene Sulfonamide in Acid Perchlorate Medium

    Sailani, Riya; Bhasin, Meneka; Khandelwal, C. L.; Sharma, P. D. [Univ. of Rajasthan, Jaipur (India)

    2014-01-15

    The kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of sulfanilic acid by N-chloro-p-toluene sulfonamide (chloramine-T) have been studied in acid medium. The species of chloramine-T were analysed on the basis of experimental observations and predominantly reactive species was taken into account for proposition of most plausible reaction mechanism. The derived rate law (1) conforms to such a mechanism. All kinetic parameters were evaluated. Activation parameters such as energy and entropy of activation were calculated to be (61.67 ± 0.47) kJ mol{sup -1} and (-62.71 ± 2.48) JK{sup -1}mol{sup -1} respectively employing Eyring equation.

  15. KINETICS AND MECHANISM OF REACTION OF ACIDIC ...

    The kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of two phenoxazine dyes namely Nile blue (7-amino-3-diethylamino-8,9-benzo phenoxazine chloride, NB+) and Meldola\\'s blue (3- dimethylamino-8,9-benzo phenoxazine chloride, MB+) with acidic chlorite and hypochlorous acid have been investigated using a UV-visible and a ...

  16. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some substituted aldonitrones by quinolinium chlorochromate in aqueous DMF medium in the absence and presence of oxalic acid

    GOVINDASAMY RAJARAJAN

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the oxidation of aldonitrones (nitrone by quinolinium chlorochromate (QCC was determined in 50 % DMF–water in the absence and presence of oxalic acid in order to study the effect of oxalic acid. It was considered worthwhile to investigate whether it undergoes co-oxidation or just functions as a catalyst in the reaction. The reaction was followed iodometrically. Under the employed experimental conditions, the reaction is first order each with respect to concentration of nitrone, QCC, and oxalic acid and fractional order with respect to H+ concentration. There was no discernible effect with increasing in ionic strength but the rate of oxidation decreased with decreasing dielectric constant of the medium. Addition of MnSO4 had a significant and acrylonitrile no effect on the reaction rate. A mechanism involving protonated nitrone and QCC as the reactive oxidant is proposed. The activation parameters were calculated and are presented.

  17. NEW INSIGTHS ON THE KINETICS AND MECHANISM OF THE ELECTROCHEMICAL OXIDATION OF DICLOFENAC IN NEUTRAL AQUEOUS MEDIUM

    Cid-Cerón, M.M.; Guzmán-Hernández, D.S.; Ramírez-Silva, M.T.; Galano, A.; Romero-Romo, M.; Palomar-Pardavé, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • DCF electrochemical oxidation was studied from aqueous solution with a CPE. • Both stagnant and forced convection conditions were considered. • We found DCF electrochemical oxidation is a mass transfer-controlled process. • An EC mechanism was found where the electrodic is quasi-reversible. • C reaction provokes the breaking up the DCF through the nitrogen atom. • DCF diffusion coefficient was experimental and theoretically calculated. - Abstract: The diclofenac (DCF) electrochemical oxidation mechanism was studied through: linear voltammetry (LV), chronoamperometry (CA) sampled-current voltammetry (SCV), potentiostatic coulometry (PC) cyclic voltammetry (CV) under stagnant conditions and linear voltammetry under forced convection conditions (FCLV) over a carbon paste electrode (CPE) from an aqueous medium containing 0.1 M phosphate buffer at pH 7. It was found that the DCF electrochemical oxidation involves an EC mechanism, where the electrochemical reaction is carried out through a one electron-exchange while the chemical reaction involves breaking up the DCF through the nitrogen atom, thereby generating the fragments 2,6 dichloroaniline and 2-(2hydroxyprop-2-enyl)phenol. Reverting the potential scan in the cathodic direction at different scan rates and regardless of its rate, after the oxidation peak, it was found that it was possible to reduce only 38% of the DCF oxidized. The spectrophotometric study carried out during different macro-electrolysis periods allowed observing that the current decrease of the oxidation peak coupled to the DCF absorption (at 270 nm), together with the development of a new spectrophotometric absorption maximum (450 nm), all confirm the EC mechanism proposed. With the use of several experimental techniques (CA, LV and FCLV) and theoretical ones using the Stokes–Einstein approach, the DCF diffusion coefficient was determined, this being in average 8.1 × 10"−"6 cm"2 s"−"1.

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of 1-hydroxymethyl-eta/sup 3/-allypalladium chloride by p-benzoquinone in aqueous solutions

    Belov, A.P.; Kalabin, S.M.; Statsenko, O.N.

    1988-03-01

    /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy was used to show that the primary product of the oxidation of the eta/sup 3/-allyl complex of palladium, (based on 1,3-butadiene-1-hydroxymethyl-eta/sup 3/-allylpalladium chloride), by the action of p-benzoquinone in acid aqueous solutions is 4-chloro-2-buten-1-o1. The reaction kinetics were studied colorimetrically. It was found that the rate of reaction is described by a kinetic equation of the second order (first with respect to each of the reagents). It was shown that the second order rate constant increases nonlinearly with increase in the concentration of the chloride ions and hydrogen ions, and tends to a constant value in the region of high concentrations of these ions. The values of the activation parameters and the isotopic kinetic effect were determined. The kinetic equation and the mechanism of the reaction studied were compared with those of the oxidation processes of unsubstituted eta/sup 3/-allyl complexes of palladium.

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of uranium(III) by aqueous acidic solutions of iodine and bromine

    Adegite, A.; Egboh, H.; Ojo, J.F.; Olieh, R.

    1977-01-01

    The rates of oxidation of U 3+ by I 2 and Br 2 in aqueous acidic solutions have been investigated. The rate equations for iodine and bromine are shown, together with the corresponding activation parameters. An excellent correlation has been obtained between the rates of uranium(III) reduction of some oxidants, including iodine and bromine, and the free energies of these reactions. Since these other non-halogen reactions go via the outer-sphere mechanism, it is concluded that at least the first step in the two-step oxidation of U 3+ by Br 2 , I 2 , or [I 3 ] - is outer sphere. The homonuclear exchange rate constant ksub(ex) for U 3+ + U 4+ is deduced to be 1.66 +- 0.16 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . (author)

  20. Near-ambient X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and kinetic approach to the mechanism of carbon monoxide oxidation over lanthanum substituted cobaltites

    Hueso, J. L.; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Cabalerro, Alfonso; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustin Rodriguez; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-07-31

    We have studied the oxidation of carbon monoxide over a lanthanum substituted perovskite (La0.5Sr0.5CoO3-d) catalyst prepared by spray pyrolysis. Under the assumption of a first-order kinetics mechanism for CO, it has been found that the activation energy barrier of the reaction changes from 80 to 40 kJ mol-1 at a threshold temperature of ca. 320 oC. In situ XPS near-ambient pressure ( 0.2 torr) shows that the gas phase oxygen concentration over the sample decreases sharply at ca. 300 oC. These two observations suggest that the oxidation of CO undergoes a change of mechanism at temperatures higher than 300 oC.

  1. Atmospheric Oxidation Mechanism and Kinetic Studies for OH and NO3 Radical-Initiated Reaction of Methyl Methacrylate

    Rui Gao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism for OH and NO3 radical-initiated oxidation reactions of methyl methacrylate (MMA was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT molecular orbital theory. Geometrical parameters of the reactants, intermediates, transition states, and products were fully optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level. Detailed oxidation pathways were presented and discussed. The rate constants were deduced by the canonical variational transition-state (CVT theory with the small-curvature tunneling (SCT correction and the multichannel Rice-Ramspergere-Kassele-Marcus (RRKM theory, based on the potential energy surface profiles over the general atmospheric temperature range of 180–370 K. The calculated results were in reasonable agreement with experimental measurement.

  2. Nonlinear oxidation kinetics of nickel cermets

    Galinski, Henning; Bieberle-Huetter, Anja; Rupp, Jennifer L.M.; Gauckler, Ludwig J.

    2011-01-01

    The oxidation of a cermet of screen-printed nickel (Ni) and gadolinia-doped ceria (CGO) with an approximate median porosity of 50 vol.% has been studied via in situ X-ray diffraction and focused ion beam nanotomography in the temperature range 773-848 K. The oxidation kinetics of Ni to NiO is found to be highly nonlinear with an apparent activation energy of 2.8(2) eV in this temperature range. The nonlinear oxidation kinetics found is in good agreement with theoretical works on oxide growth driven by nonlinear inbuilt fields. Stress-induced Kirkendall void formation has been identified as the physical process that enhances the oxidation of Ni/CGO cermets. Compressive stresses within the Ni matrix result from the thermal expansion mismatch of Ni and CGO and cause plastic deformation as they exceed the yield stress of the Ni matrix. The pore size distribution of Kirkendall voids formed has been measured by FIB nanotomography and shows a significant temperature dependence. It is shown that even one cycle of reoxidation changes irreversibly the microstructure of the cermet which can be interpreted as the onset and main contribution to the mechanical degradation of the cermet.

  3. Mechanism and kinetic properties for the OH-initiated atmospheric oxidation degradation of 9,10-Dichlorophenanthrene.

    Dang, Juan; Shi, Xiangli; Zhang, Qingzhu; Hu, Jingtian; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-02-01

    Chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ClPAHs) have become a serious environmental concern due to their widespread occurrence and dioxin-like toxicities. In this work, the mechanism of the OH-initiated atmospheric oxidation degradation of 9,10-dichlorophenanthrene (9,10-Cl₂Phe) was investigated by using high-accuracy quantum chemistry calculations. The rate constants of the crucial elementary reactions were determined by the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theory. The theoretical results were compared with the available experimental data. The main oxidation products are a group of ring-retaining and ring-opening compounds including chlorophenanthrols, 9,10-dichlorophenanthrene-3,4-dione, dialdehydes, chlorophenanthrenequinones, nitro-9,10-Cl₂Phe and epoxides et al. The overall rate constant of the OH addition reaction is 2.35 × 10(-12)cm(3) molecule(-1)s(-1) at 298 K and 1 atm. The atmospheric lifetime of 9,10-Cl₂Phe determined by OH radicals is about 5.05 days. This study provides a comprehensive investigation of the OH-initiated oxidation degradation of 9,10-Cl₂Phe and should contribute to clarifying its atmospheric fate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanism and kinetic properties for the OH-initiated atmospheric oxidation degradation of 9,10-Dichlorophenanthrene

    Dang, Juan; Shi, Xiangli; Zhang, Qingzhu, E-mail: zqz@sdu.edu.cn; Hu, Jingtian; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-02-01

    Chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ClPAHs) have become a serious environmental concern due to their widespread occurrence and dioxin-like toxicities. In this work, the mechanism of the OH-initiated atmospheric oxidation degradation of 9,10-dichlorophenanthrene (9,10-Cl{sub 2}Phe) was investigated by using high-accuracy quantum chemistry calculations. The rate constants of the crucial elementary reactions were determined by the Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus (RRKM) theory. The theoretical results were compared with the available experimental data. The main oxidation products are a group of ring-retaining and ring-opening compounds including chlorophenanthrols, 9,10-dichlorophenanthrene-3,4-dione, dialdehydes, chlorophenanthrenequinones, nitro-9,10-Cl{sub 2}Phe and epoxides et al. The overall rate constant of the OH addition reaction is 2.35 × 10{sup −12} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup −1} s{sup −1} at 298 K and 1 atm. The atmospheric lifetime of 9,10-Cl{sub 2}Phe determined by OH radicals is about 5.05 days. This study provides a comprehensive investigation of the OH-initiated oxidation degradation of 9,10-Cl{sub 2}Phe and should contribute to clarifying its atmospheric fate. - Highlights: • We studied a comprehensive mechanism of OH-initiated degradation of 9,10-Cl{sub 2}Phe. • The atmospheric lifetime of 9,10-Cl{sub 2}Phe determined by OH radical is about 5.05 d. • The rate constants of the crucial elementary steps were evaluated. • Water plays an important role in the formation of nitro-9,10-Cl{sub 2}Phe.

  5. Study of the oxidation kinetics of the MA 956 superalloy

    Garcia-Alonso, M.C.; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J.L.; Escudero, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    This work deals with the oxidation kinetics of the MA 956 superalloy in the temperature range of 800-1,200 degree centigree for up to 200 h exposure. During oxidation the alloy develops a fine, compact and very well adhered α-alumina layer, the thickness of which increases with increasing time and temperature. The oxidation kinetics obeys a sub parabolic type behaviour. The scale growth seems to occur by two different oxidation mechanisms; above 1,050 degree centigree, the oxidation process would be controlled by α-alumina, and below 900 degree centigree by γ-alumina. (Author) 17 refs

  6. Kinetics of oxidic phase dissolution in acids

    Gorichev, I.G.; Kipriyanov, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    The critical analysis of the experimental data on dissolution kinetics of metal oxides (BeO, V 2 O 5 , UO 2 , Nb 2 O 5 , Ta 2 O 5 etc.) in acid media is carried out. Kinetic peculiarities of oxide dissolution are explained on the basis of the notions of electron- proton theory. It is established that the surface nonstoichiometric ccomposition of oxide phase and potential jump, appearing on the interface of the oxide-electrolyte phase are the important factors, determining the dissolution rate of a solid phase. The dissolution rate of metal oxides is limited by the transition of protons into the solid oxide phase. Morphological models of heterogeneous kinetics are used when explaining kinetic regularities of oxide dissolution process [ru

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of uranium (IV) by hypochlorous acid in aqueous acidic perchlorate media

    Silverman, R.A.; Gordon, G.

    1976-01-01

    The oxidation of uranium(IV) by hypochlorous acid has been studied in aqueous sodium perchlorate--perchloric acid solutions. The reaction U 4 + + 2HOCl = UO 2 2 + + Cl 2 (aq) + 2H + proceeds appropriate to the rate law --d[U(IV)]/dt = k 0 . [U 4+ ][HOCl][H + ] -1 . At 25 0 and 3 M ionic strength, k 0 is 1.08 +- 0.07 sec -1 . Over the 1--25 0 temperature range, ΔH 2+ is 18.4 +- 0.1 kcal mole -1 , and ΔS 2+ is 3.1 +- 0.4 eu. The inverse hydrogen ion dependence of the rate law is explained by a rapid preequilibrium, in which a proton is lost from one of the reactants. A uranyl-like activated complex, [H 2 UO 2 Cl 3+ ] 2+ , is suggested, with one proton likely to be residing on each oxygen atom. Evidence is presented that the mechanism involves a two-electron transfer, with the intermediate chloride ion rapidly reacting with hypochlorous acid to form chlorine. The uranium(IV)-hypochlorous acid reaction plays an important role in the oxidation of uranium(IV) by aqueous chlorine solutions. The magnitude of this role was seriously underestimated by previous investigators

  8. A new kinetic model based on the remote control mechanism to fit experimental data in the selective oxidation of propene into acrolein on biphasic catalysts

    Abdeldayem, H.M.; Ruiz, P.; Delmon, B. [Unite de Catalyse et Chimie des Materiaux Divises, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium); Thyrion, F.C. [Unite des Procedes Faculte des Sciences Appliquees, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium)

    1998-12-31

    A new kinetic model for a more accurate and detailed fitting of the experimental data is proposed. The model is based on the remote control mechanism (RCM). The RCM assumes that some oxides (called `donors`) are able to activate molecular oxygen transforming it to very active mobile species (spillover oxygen (O{sub OS})). O{sub OS} migrates onto the surface of the other oxide (called `acceptor`) where it creates and/or regenerates the active sites during the reaction. The model contains tow terms, one considering the creation of selective sites and the other the catalytic reaction at each site. The model has been tested in the selective oxidation of propene into acrolein (T=380, 400, 420 C; oxygen and propene partial pressures between 38 and 152 Torr). Catalysts were prepared as pure MoO{sub 3} (acceptor) and their mechanical mixtures with {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4} (donor) in different proportions. The presence of {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4} changes the reaction order, the activation energy of the reaction and the number of active sites of MoO{sub 3} produced by oxygen spillover. These changes are consistent with a modification in the degree of irrigation of the surface by oxygen spillover. The fitting of the model to experimental results shows that the number of sites created by O{sub SO} increases with the amount of {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4}. (orig.)

  9. A coupled transport and solid mechanics formulation with improved reaction kinetics parameters for modeling oxidation and decomposition in a uranium hydride bed.

    Salloum, Maher N.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of reacting flows in porous media has become particularly important with the increased interest in hydrogen solid-storage beds. An advanced type of storage bed has been proposed that utilizes oxidation of uranium hydride to heat and decompose the hydride, releasing the hydrogen. To reduce the cost and time required to develop these systems experimentally, a valid computational model is required that simulates the reaction of uranium hydride and oxygen gas in a hydrogen storage bed using multiphysics finite element modeling. This SAND report discusses the advancements made in FY12 (since our last SAND report SAND2011-6939) to the model developed as a part of an ASC-P&EM project to address the shortcomings of the previous model. The model considers chemical reactions, heat transport, and mass transport within a hydride bed. Previously, the time-varying permeability and porosity were considered uniform. This led to discrepancies between the simulated results and experimental measurements. In this work, the effects of non-uniform changes in permeability and porosity due to phase and thermal expansion are accounted for. These expansions result in mechanical stresses that lead to bed deformation. To describe this, a simplified solid mechanics model for the local variation of permeability and porosity as a function of the local bed deformation is developed. By using this solid mechanics model, the agreement between our reacting bed model and the experimental data is improved. Additionally, more accurate uranium hydride oxidation kinetics parameters are obtained by fitting the experimental results from a pure uranium hydride oxidation measurement to the ones obtained from the coupled transport-solid mechanics model. Finally, the coupled transport-solid mechanics model governing equations and boundary conditions are summarized and recommendations are made for further development of ARIA and other Sandia codes in order for them to sufficiently implement the model.

  10. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction of Coherently Synchronized Oxidation and Dehydrogenation of Cyclohexane by Hydrogen Peroxide

    Aghamammadova S.

    2016-01-01

    Based on this experimental researches, the complex reaction, consisting of parallel-sequential oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions, which are coherently synchronized, proceeds during the process of cyclohexane oxidation with biomimetic catalyst. Depending on the reaction parameters it is possible to deliberately adjust the direction of oxidation reaction and reaction rate.

  11. Analysis of kinetic reaction mechanisms

    Turányi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Chemical processes in many fields of science and technology, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, environmental modelling, process engineering, and systems biology, can be described by detailed reaction mechanisms consisting of numerous reaction steps. This book describes methods for the analysis of reaction mechanisms that are applicable in all these fields. Topics addressed include: how sensitivity and uncertainty analyses allow the calculation of the overall uncertainty of simulation results and the identification of the most important input parameters, the ways in which mechanisms can be reduced without losing important kinetic and dynamic detail, and the application of reduced models for more accurate engineering optimizations. This monograph is invaluable for researchers and engineers dealing with detailed reaction mechanisms, but is also useful for graduate students of related courses in chemistry, mechanical engineering, energy and environmental science and biology.

  12. The oxidation kinetics of zircaloy - 4 under isothermal conditions

    Santos, A.M.M. dos; Cardoso, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of zircaloy-4 tubes was studied by means of isothermal tests in the temperature interval 500 0 C to 900 0 C. Dry oxygen and water steam, were used as oxidant agents. The results show that the oxidation kinetics law exhibits a behaviour from cubic to parabolic in the range of the time and temperatures of the experiment. Dry oxygen shows a stronger oxidation effect than water steam. A special mechanical test to study the embrittlement effect in the small samples of zircaloy tubes was used. (Author) [pt

  13. Equilibrium, kinetics and mechanism of Au3+, Pd2+ and Ag+ ions adsorption from aqueous solutions by graphene oxide functionalized persimmon tannin.

    Wang, Zhongmin; Li, Xiaojuan; Liang, Haijun; Ning, Jingliang; Zhou, Zhide; Li, Guiyin

    2017-10-01

    In this study, a novel bio-adsorbent (PT-GO) was prepared by functionalization persimmon tannin (PT) with graphene oxide (GO) and the effective adsorption behaviors of Au 3+ , Pd 2+ and Ag + ions from aqueous solution was investigated. The PT-GO was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Zeta potential. Many influence factors such as pH value, bio-adsorbent dosage, initial concentration of metal ions and contact time were optimized. The maximum adsorption capacity for Au 3+ , Pd 2+ and Ag + was 1325.09mg/g, 797.66mg/g and 421.01mg/g, respectively. The equilibrium isotherm for the adsorption of Au 3+ and Ag + on PT-GO were found to obey the Langmuir model, while the Freundlich model fitted better for Pd 2+ . The adsorption process of Au 3+ , Pd 2+ presented relatively fast adsorption kinetics with pseudo-second-order equation as the best fitting model, while the pseudo-first-order kinetic model was suitable for describing the adsorption of Ag + . Combination of ion exchange, electrostatic interaction and physical adsorption was the mechanism for adsorption of Au 3+ , Pd 2+ and Ag + onto PT-GO bio-adsorbent. Therefore, the PT-GO bio-adsorbent would be an ideal adsorbent for removal of precious metal ions and broaden the potential applications of persimmon tannin in environmental research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Kinetics and oxidative mechanism for H2O2-enhanced iron-mediated aeration (IMA) treatment of recalcitrant organic compounds in mature landfill leachate

    Deng Yang; Englehardt, James D.

    2009-01-01

    A hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 )-enhanced iron (Fe 0 )-mediated aeration (IMA) process has been recently demonstrated to effectively remove organic wastes from mature landfill leachate. In this paper, the kinetics and oxidative mechanisms of the enhanced IMA treatment were studied. Bench-scale full factorial tests were conducted in an orbital shaker reactor for treatment of a mature leachate with an initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 900-1200 mg/L. At the maximum aeration rate (8.3 mL air/min mL sample), process variables significantly influencing the rates of H 2 O 2 decay and COD removal were pH (3.0-8.0), initial H 2 O 2 doses (0.21-0.84 M), and Fe 0 surface area concentrations (0.06-0.30 m 2 /L). Empirical kinetic models were developed and verified for the degradation of H 2 O 2 and COD. High DO maintained by a high aeration rate slowed the H 2 O 2 self-decomposition, accelerated Fe 0 consumption, and enhanced the COD removal. In hydroxyl radical (OH·) scavenging tests, the rate of removal of glyoxylic acid (target compound) was not inhibited by the addition of para-chlorobenzoic acid (OH· scavenger) at pH 7.0-7.5, ruling out hydroxyl radical as the principal oxidant in neutral-weakly basic solution. These experimental results show that this enhanced IMA technology is a potential alternative for the treatment of high strength recalcitrant organic wastewaters.

  15. Kinetics and oxidative mechanism for H2O2-enhanced iron-mediated aeration (IMA) treatment of recalcitrant organic compounds in mature landfill leachate.

    Deng, Yang; Englehardt, James D

    2009-09-30

    A hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-enhanced iron (Fe(0))-mediated aeration (IMA) process has been recently demonstrated to effectively remove organic wastes from mature landfill leachate. In this paper, the kinetics and oxidative mechanisms of the enhanced IMA treatment were studied. Bench-scale full factorial tests were conducted in an orbital shaker reactor for treatment of a mature leachate with an initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 900-1200 mg/L. At the maximum aeration rate (8.3 mL air/min mL sample), process variables significantly influencing the rates of H(2)O(2) decay and COD removal were pH (3.0-8.0), initial H(2)O(2) doses (0.21-0.84 M), and Fe(0) surface area concentrations (0.06-0.30 m(2)/L). Empirical kinetic models were developed and verified for the degradation of H(2)O(2) and COD. High DO maintained by a high aeration rate slowed the H(2)O(2) self-decomposition, accelerated Fe(0) consumption, and enhanced the COD removal. In hydroxyl radical (OH*) scavenging tests, the rate of removal of glyoxylic acid (target compound) was not inhibited by the addition of para-chlorobenzoic acid (OH* scavenger) at pH 7.0-7.5, ruling out hydroxyl radical as the principal oxidant in neutral-weakly basic solution. These experimental results show that this enhanced IMA technology is a potential alternative for the treatment of high strength recalcitrant organic wastewaters.

  16. Kinetics and oxidative mechanism for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-enhanced iron-mediated aeration (IMA) treatment of recalcitrant organic compounds in mature landfill leachate

    Deng Yang, E-mail: yang.deng@upr.edu [Department of Civil Engineering and Surveying, University of Puerto Rico, PO BOX 9041, Mayaguez, PR 00681 (Puerto Rico); Englehardt, James D. [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of Miami, PO BOX 248294, Coral Gables, FL 33124-0630 (United States)

    2009-09-30

    A hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-enhanced iron (Fe{sup 0})-mediated aeration (IMA) process has been recently demonstrated to effectively remove organic wastes from mature landfill leachate. In this paper, the kinetics and oxidative mechanisms of the enhanced IMA treatment were studied. Bench-scale full factorial tests were conducted in an orbital shaker reactor for treatment of a mature leachate with an initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 900-1200 mg/L. At the maximum aeration rate (8.3 mL air/min mL sample), process variables significantly influencing the rates of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decay and COD removal were pH (3.0-8.0), initial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} doses (0.21-0.84 M), and Fe{sup 0} surface area concentrations (0.06-0.30 m{sup 2}/L). Empirical kinetic models were developed and verified for the degradation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and COD. High DO maintained by a high aeration rate slowed the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} self-decomposition, accelerated Fe{sup 0} consumption, and enhanced the COD removal. In hydroxyl radical (OH{center_dot}) scavenging tests, the rate of removal of glyoxylic acid (target compound) was not inhibited by the addition of para-chlorobenzoic acid (OH{center_dot} scavenger) at pH 7.0-7.5, ruling out hydroxyl radical as the principal oxidant in neutral-weakly basic solution. These experimental results show that this enhanced IMA technology is a potential alternative for the treatment of high strength recalcitrant organic wastewaters.

  17. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    Gutman, D. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  18. Growth Kinetics and Oxidation Mechanism of ALD TiN Thin Films Monitored by In Situ Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    Van Hao, B.; Groenland, A.W.; Aarnink, Antonius A.I.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) was employed to investigate the growth of atomic layer deposited (ALD) TiN thin films from titanium chloride (TiCl4) and ammonia (NH3) and the followed oxidation in dry oxygen. Two regimes were found in the growth including a transient stage prior to a linear regime.

  19. Kinetics of Oxidation of Fe–6Si

    Lashin, Abdel Rahman; Schneeweiss, Oldřich; Svoboda, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 5-6 (2008), s. 359-374 ISSN 0030-770X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1041404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : iron silicon * Mössbauer spectroscopy * XRD * iron oxides * oxidation kinetics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.359, year: 2008

  20. Generalized kinetic model of reduction of molecular oxidant by metal containing redox

    Kravchenko, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Present work is devoted to kinetics of reduction of molecular oxidant by metal containing redox. Constructed generalized kinetic model of redox process in the system solid redox - reagent solution allows to perform the general theoretical approach to research and to obtain new results on kinetics and mechanism of interaction of redox with oxidants.

  1. Studies of the kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of uranium by dry and moist air. A model for determining the oxidation rate over a wide range of temperatures and water vapour pressures

    McGillivray, G.W. (Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom)); Geeson, D.A. (Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom)); Greenwood, R.C. (Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    The rate of oxidation of uranium metal by moist air has been measured at temperatures from 115 to 350 C and water vapour pressures from 0 to 47 kPa (350 Torr). From this and from previously reported data, a model has been developed which allows the rate of uranium oxidation to be calculated at any particular combination of temperature and water vapour pressure of interest, in the range 0-350 C and 0-101.3 kPa (760 Torr). The model is based on the assumption that the surface concentration of water determines the rate of reaction and that the adsorption of water onto the oxide follows a Langmuir type isotherm. Theoretical plots of rate as a function of water vapour pressure and Arrhenius plots derived from the model have been shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. The model assumes separate contributions to the overall observed rate from oxygen and water vapour. Surface studies have been carried out using SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry). Depth profiling of the oxide produced by isotopically labelled reagents ([sup 18]O[sub 2] and H[sup 18][sub 2]O), has shown that oxygen from both reactants is incorporated into the oxide layer in the ratio predicted by the kinetic model. This supports a mechanism in which oxygen and water vapour produce separate diffusing species (possibly O[sup 2-] and OH[sup -]). (orig.)

  2. Studies of the kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of uranium by dry and moist air A model for determining the oxidation rate over a wide range of temperatures and water vapour pressures

    McGillivray, G. W.; Geeson, D. A.; Greenwood, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The rate of oxidation of uranium metal by moist air has been measured at temperatures from 115 to 350°C and water vapour pressures from 0 to 47 kPa (350 Torr). From this and from previously reported data, a model has been developed which allows the rate of uranium oxidation to be calculated at any particular combination of temperature and water vapour pressure of interest, in the range 0-350°C and 0-101.3 kPa (760 Torr). The model is based on the assumption that the surface concentration of water determines the rate of reaction and that the adsorption of water onto the oxide follows a Langmuir type isotherm. Theoretical plots of rate as a function of water vapour pressure and Arrhenius plots derived from the model have been shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. The model assumes separate contributions to the overall observed rate from oxygen and water vapour. Surface studies have been carried out using SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry). Depth profiling of the oxide produced by isotopically labelled reagents ( 18O 2 and H 218O), has shown that oxygen from both reactants is incorporated into the oxide layer in the ratio predicted by the kinetic model. This supports a mechanism in which oxygen and water vapour produce separate diffusing species (possibly O 2- and OH -).

  3. Mechanisms of wet oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    Baxter, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    A research programme is currently under way at BNL and MEL to investigate the possible use of Hydrogen Peroxide with metal ion catalysts as a wet oxidation treatment system for CEGB organic radioactive wastes. The published literature relating to the kinetics and mechanism of oxidation and decomposition reactions of hydrogen peroxide is reviewed and the links with practical waste management by wet oxidation are examined. Alternative wet oxidation systems are described and the similarities to the CEGB research effort are noted. (author)

  4. Ab initio and kinetic modeling studies of formic acid oxidation

    Marshall, Paul; Glarborg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of formic acid (HOCHO) in flames has been developed, based on theoretical work and data from literature. Ab initio calculations were used to obtain rate coefficients for reactions of HOCHO with H, O, and HO2. Modeling predictions with the mechanism...

  5. KINETICS OF THE OXIDATION OF VITAMIN C

    Sitti Rahmawati

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin C or ascorbic acid is needed by the human body but it is already damaged by the rise in temperature due to be oxidized to L-dehydroascorbic acid. This research aims to determine the kinetics of oxidation of ascorbic acid due to an increase if temperature (40-80 °C and to design an ascorbic acid oxidation reaction laboratory module to be applied in the senior high school reaction kinetics curriculum. The determination of the kinetics of the oxidation of ascorbic acid applies the integral and half-change time methods, while the concentration of the remained ascorbic acid in sixty minute intervals is determined by iodimetric titration method. Decomposition of ascorbic acid was measured at 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 °C. The results of this research indicate that at 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 °C the kinetics of the oxidation of ascorbic acid is a first-order reaction with rate constants of 4.55 x 10-4, 5.85 x 10-4, 8.4 x 10-4, 1.1 x 10-3 and 1.015 x 10-3 min-1, respectively. Pre-exponential factor or the frequency of collisions is a factor which is a measure of the collision rate. The activation energy and the pre-exponential factor for the oxidation of ascorbic acid were found to be 20.73 kJ.mol-1 and 1.372 min-1. The procedure used in this study was modified into a laboratory module will be applied in the teaching of reaction kinetics at the senior high school level.

  6. Kinetics and Mechanism of Paracetamol Oxidation by Chromium(VI in Absence and Presence of Manganese(II and Sodiumdodecyl Sulphate

    Maqsood Ahmad Malik

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of paracetamol oxidation are first order each in [paracetamol] and [HClO4]. The kinetic study shows that the oxidation proceeds in two steps. The effects of anionic micelles of sodiumdodecyl sulphate (SDS and complexing agents (ethylenediammine tetraacetic acid (EDTA and 2,2′-bipyridyl (bpy were also studied. Fast kinetic spectrophotometric method has been described for the determination of paracetamol. The method is based on the catalytic effect of manganese(II on the oxidation of paracetamol by chromium(VI in the presence of HClO4 (= 0.23 mol dm−3. Optimum reaction time is 4 to 6 minutes at a temperature of 30∘C. The addition of manganese(II ions largely decreased the absorbance of chromium(VI at 350 nm. This reaction can be utilized for the determination of paracetamol in drugs.

  7. Kinetics of Photoelectrochemical Oxidation of Methanol on Hematite Photoanodes

    2017-01-01

    The kinetics of photoelectrochemical (PEC) oxidation of methanol, as a model organic substrate, on α-Fe2O3 photoanodes are studied using photoinduced absorption spectroscopy and transient photocurrent measurements. Methanol is oxidized on α-Fe2O3 to formaldehyde with near unity Faradaic efficiency. A rate law analysis under quasi-steady-state conditions of PEC methanol oxidation indicates that rate of reaction is second order in the density of surface holes on hematite and independent of the applied potential. Analogous data on anatase TiO2 photoanodes indicate similar second-order kinetics for methanol oxidation with a second-order rate constant 2 orders of magnitude higher than that on α-Fe2O3. Kinetic isotope effect studies determine that the rate constant for methanol oxidation on α-Fe2O3 is retarded ∼20-fold by H/D substitution. Employing these data, we propose a mechanism for methanol oxidation under 1 sun irradiation on these metal oxide surfaces and discuss the implications for the efficient PEC methanol oxidation to formaldehyde and concomitant hydrogen evolution. PMID:28735533

  8. Oxidation kinetics of (B6O) boron oxide

    Makarov, V.S.; Solov'ev, N.E.; Ugaj, Ya.A.

    1987-01-01

    Reactivity of B 6 O to oxygen is investigated. It is shown that the process of B 6 O oxidation in the air in the temperature range 760-1150 K results in the maximum transformation degree equal to 0.35. At the initial stages oxidation proceeds in kinetic regime, at final stages - in diffusion one, and high viscosity of B 2 O 3 probably affects the oxidation process

  9. High temperature oxidation kinetics of dysprosium particles

    Jaques, Brian J.; Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: DarrylButt@BoiseState.edu

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • The oxidation behavior of dysprosium particles was studied from 500 to 1000 °C. • Activation energy in initial region found as 8–25 kJ/mol, depending on atmosphere. • Activation energy in intermediate region found as 80–95 kJ/mol. • The oxide grows at the metal–oxide interface. • Generally, the formed oxide behaved as a p-type semiconductor. - Abstract: Rare earth elements have been recognized as critical materials for the advancement of many strategic and green technologies. Recently, the United States Department of Energy has invested many millions of dollars to enhance, protect, and forecast their production and management. The work presented here attempts to clarify the limited and contradictory literature on the oxidation behavior of the rare earth metal, dysprosium. Dysprosium particles were isothermally oxidized from 500 to 1000 °C in N{sub 2}–(2%, 20%, and 50%) O{sub 2} and Ar–20% O{sub 2} using simultaneous thermal analysis techniques. Two distinct oxidation regions were identified at each isothermal temperature in each oxidizing atmosphere. Initially, the oxidation kinetics are very fast until the reaction enters a slower, intermediate region of oxidation. The two regions are defined and the kinetics of each are assessed to show an apparent activation energy of 8–25 kJ/mol in the initial region and 80–95 kJ/mol in the intermediate oxidation reaction region. The effects of varying the oxygen partial pressure on the reaction rate constant are used to show that dysprosium oxide (Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}) generally acts as a p-type semiconductor in both regions of oxidation (with an exception above 750 °C in the intermediate region)

  10. Oxidation kinetics and soot formation

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K.

    1983-01-01

    The research objective is to clarify the role of aromaticity in the soot nucleation process by determining the relative importance of phenyl radical/molecular oxygen and benzene/atomic oxygen reactions in the complex combustion of aromatic compounds. Three sets of chemical flow reactor experiments have been designed to determine the relative importance of the phenyl radical/molecular oxygen and benzene/atomic oxygen reactions. The essential elements of these experiments are 1) the use of cresols and anisole formed during the high temperature oxidation of toluene as chemical reaction indicators; 2) the in situ photolysis of molecular oxygen to provide an oxygen atom perturbation in the reacting aromatic system; and 3) the high temperature pyrolysis of phenol, the cresols and possibly anisole.

  11. Kinetics and mechanisms of the oxidation of alcohols and hydroxylamines by hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by methyltrioxorhenium, MTO, and the oxygen binding properties of cobalt Schiff base complexes

    Zauche, Timothy [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Catalysis is a very interesting area of chemistry, which is currently developing at a rapid pace. A great deal of effort is being put forth by both industry and academia to make reactions faster and more productive. One method of accomplishing this is by the development of catalysts. Enzymes are an example of catalysts that are able to perform reactions on a very rapid time scale and also very specifically; a goal for every man-made catalyst. A kinetic study can also be carried out for a reaction to gain a better understanding of its mechanism and to determine what type of catalyst would assist the reaction. Kinetic studies can also help determine other factors, such as the shelf life of a chemical, or the optimum temperature for an industrial scale reaction. An area of catalysis being studied at this time is that of oxygenations. Life on this earth depends on the kinetic barriers for oxygen in its various forms. If it were not for these barriers, molecular oxygen, water, and the oxygenated materials in the land would be in a constant equilibrium. These same barriers must be overcome when performing oxygenation reactions on the laboratory or industrial scale. By performing kinetic studies and developing catalysts for these reactions, a large number of reactions can be made more economical, while making less unwanted byproducts. For this dissertation the activation by transition metal complexes of hydrogen peroxide or molecular oxygen coordination will be discussed.

  12. Adsorption mechanism and kinetics of azo dye chemicals on oxide nanotubes: a case study using porous CeO_2 nanotubes

    Wu, Junshu; Wang, Jinshu; Du, Yucheng; Li, Hongyi; Jia, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxide nanotubes are believed to be promising materials with adsorption functionality for water purification due to their synergistic effect of the overall microscale morphology for easy separation and nanoscale surface characters providing enough surface active absorption sites. This work shows the synthesis of uniform hierarchical porous CeO_2 nanotubes via nanowire-directed templating method and describes the adsorption behavior of CeO_2 nanotubes for a typical azo dye Congo red which has resistance to oxidation and decoloration in natural conditions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra provided the evidence that Congo red was successfully coated on the surface of CeO_2 nanotubes by both bidentate-type bridge link of Ce"4"+ cations from sulfonate SO_3"− groups and the electrostatic attraction between the protonated surface generated by oxygen vacancies and dissociated sulfonate groups. The adsorption kinetic data fitted well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation, whereas the Langmuir isotherm equation exhibited better correlation with the experimental data. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity from the isothermal model was 362.32 mg/g. In addition, the prepared CeO_2 nanotubes exhibited good recyclability and reusability as highly efficient adsorbents for Congo red removal after regeneration. These favorable performances enable the obtained CeO_2 nanotubes to be promising materials for dye removal from aqueous solution.Graphical AbstractCeO_2 nanotubes composed of crystallized nanoparticles exhibit well adsorption ability for a typical azo dye Congo red.

  13. A physiologically based kinetic model for bacterial sulfide oxidation.

    Klok, Johannes B M; de Graaff, Marco; van den Bosch, Pim L F; Boelee, Nadine C; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2013-02-01

    In the biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide removal from gas streams, a variety of oxidation products can be formed. Under natron-alkaline conditions, sulfide is oxidized by haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria via flavocytochrome c oxidoreductase. From previous studies, it was concluded that the oxidation-reduction state of cytochrome c is a direct measure for the bacterial end-product formation. Given this physiological feature, incorporation of the oxidation state of cytochrome c in a mathematical model for the bacterial oxidation kinetics will yield a physiologically based model structure. This paper presents a physiologically based model, describing the dynamic formation of the various end-products in the biodesulfurization process. It consists of three elements: 1) Michaelis-Menten kinetics combined with 2) a cytochrome c driven mechanism describing 3) the rate determining enzymes of the respiratory system of haloalkaliphilic sulfide oxidizing bacteria. The proposed model is successfully validated against independent data obtained from biological respiration tests and bench scale gas-lift reactor experiments. The results demonstrate that the model is a powerful tool to describe product formation for haloalkaliphilic biomass under dynamic conditions. The model predicts a maximum S⁰ formation of about 98 mol%. A future challenge is the optimization of this bioprocess by improving the dissolved oxygen control strategy and reactor design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Kinetic Studies of Catalytic Oxidation of Cyclohexene Using ...

    acer

    Kinetic Studies of Catalytic Oxidation of Cyclohexene Using Chromium VI Oxide in. Acetic Acid ... respect to the oxidant using pseudo-order approximation method. .... making the concentration of the cyclohexene in ..... on Titanium Silicate.

  15. Kinetics of oxidation of H2 and reduction of H2O in Ni-YSZ based solid oxide cells

    Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of H2O and oxidation of H2 was studied in a Ni-YSZ electrode supported Solid Oxide Cells produced at DTU Energy conversion (former Risø DTU). Polarisation (i-V) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic characterisation show that the kinetics for reduction of H 2O is slower compared...... to oxidation of H2. The kinetic differences cannot be explained by the reaction mechanisms which are similar in the two cases but are rather an effect of the thermodynamics. The preliminary analysis performed in this study show that the slow kinetic for reduction is partly related to the endothermic nature...... of the reaction, cooling the active electrode, thereby leading to slower kinetics at low current densities. Likewise, the increased kinetic for oxidation was found to be related to the exothermic nature of the reaction, heating the active electrode, and thereby leading to faster kinetics. At higher current...

  16. Probing the oxidation kinetics of small permalloy particles

    Dong, Xiaolei; Song, Xiao; Yin, Shiliu; Shirolkar, Mandar M.; Li, Ming; Wang, Haiqian

    2017-01-01

    The oxidation of permalloys is important to apply in a wide range. The oxidation and diffusion mechanisms of small permalloy particles with different Fe content are studied by using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and microstructure characterizations. Fe 2 O 3 /(Ni, Fe) 3 O 4 plays a key role in the morphology evolution and diffusion mechanisms of small NiFe particles upon oxidation. The activation energies of grain boundary diffusion for the NiFe alloys increase from 141 kJ/mol to 208 kJ/mol as the Fe content increases from 0 to ~50 wt%. We have developed a diffusion process resolved temperature programed oxidation (PR-TPO) analysis method. Three diffusion mechanisms have been recognized by using this method: In addition to the grain boundary diffusion and lattice diffusion, our TGA analysis suggests that the phase conversion from Fe 2 O 3 to (Ni, Fe) 3 O 4 induces diffusion change and affects the diffusion process at the intermediate temperature. Relevant oxidation kinetics and diffusion mechanisms are discussed. - Graphical abstract: The oxidation mechanisms of small Permalloy particles with different Fe content is studied by using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and microstructure characterizations. The activation energies of grain boundary diffusion for the NiFe alloys increases from 140 kJ/mol to 208 kJ/mol as the Fe content increases from 0 to 50 wt% as determined by TGA. We have developed a diffusion process resolved temperature programed oxidation (DPR-TPO) analysis method, and three diffusion mechanisms have been recognized by using this method: In addition to the well-known grain boundary diffusion and lattice diffusion, we found that the phase conversion from Fe 2 O 3 to (Ni, Fe) 3 O 4 will induce diffusion changes and affect the diffusion process at the intermediate temperature. The diffusion processes can be characterized by the corresponding characteristic peak temperatures in temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) analysis. This work not only

  17. Modelling of elementary kinetics of H2 and CO oxidation on ceria pattern cells

    Patel, HC; Tabish, AN; Aravind, PV

    2015-01-01

    Elementary kinetic mechanisms of fuel oxidation on ceria have not been dealt with in detail in literature. An elementary kinetic model is developed considering charge transfer and adsorption steps for electrochemical H 2 and CO oxidation on ceria. The reaction chemistry is solved by fitting previously obtained impedance spectra for H 2 and CO oxidation on ceria. The rate determining step is found to be the charge transfer rather than the adsorption for both H 2 and CO. A method is presented to extend the kinetics obtained from pattern anodes to macroscopic simulations in which the activation overvoltage can be calculated on the basis of elementary kinetics.

  18. Theoretical perspectives on the mechanism and kinetics of the OH radical-initiated gas-phase oxidation of PCB126 in the atmosphere

    Dang, Juan; Shi, Xiangli; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) primarily exist in the gas phase in air and may undergo atmospheric oxidation degradations, particularly the oxidation reaction initiated by OH radicals. In this work, the mechanism of the OH radical-initiated atmospheric oxidation of the most toxic PCB congener 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) was investigated by using quantum chemistry methods. The rate constants of the crucial elementary reactions were estimated by the Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus (RRKM) theory. The oxidation products of the reaction of PCB126 with OH radicals include 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl-ols, chlorophenols, 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran, 2,3,4,6,7-pentachlorodibenzofuran, dialdehydes, 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachloro-5′-nitro-biphenyl, and 4,5-dichloro-2-nitrophenol. Particularly, the formation of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) from the atmospheric oxidation of PCBs is revealed for the first time. The overall rate constant of the OH addition reaction is 2.52 × 10 −13 cm 3 molecule −1 s −1 at 298 K and 1 atm. The atmospheric lifetime of PCB126 determined by OH radicals is about 47.08 days which indicates that PCB126 can be transported long distances from local to global scales. - Highlights: • A comprehensive mechanism of OH-initiated oxidation of PCB126 was investigated. • The formation of PCDFs from the oxidation of PCBs is determined for the first time. • The rate constants for key elementary reactions were estimated by the RRKM theory. • The atmospheric lifetime of PCB126 determined by OH radicals is about 47.08 days

  19. KINETICS AND MECHANISMS OF NOx - CHAR REDUCTION

    Suuberg, E.M.

    1998-06-19

    This study was undertaken in order to improve understanding of several aspects of the NO-carbon reaction. This reaction is of practical importance in combustion systems, but its close examination also provides some fundamental insight into oxidizing gas-carbon reactions. As part of this study, a comprehensive literature review of earlier work on this reaction has been published (Aarna and Suuberg, Fuel, 1997, 76, 475-491). It has been thought for some time that the kinetics of the NO-carbon reaction are unusual, in that they often show a two-regime Arrhenius behavior. It has, however, turned out during this work that NO is not alone in this regard. In this laboratory, we also uncovered evidence of two kinetic regime behavior in CO{sub 2} gasification. In another laboratory, a former colleague has identified the same behavior in N{sub 2}O. The low temperature reaction regime always shows an activation energy which is lower than that in the high temperature regime, leaving little doubt that a shift in mechanism, as opposed to transport limitations, dictates the behavior. The activation energy of the low temperature regime of these reactions is typically less than 100 kJ/mol, and the activation energy of the high temperature regime is generally considerably in excess of this value. In this study, we have resolved some apparent inconsistencies in the explanation of the low temperature regime, whose rate has generally been ascribed to desorption-controlled processes. Part of the problem in characterization of the different temperature regimes is that they overlap to a high degree. It is difficult to probe the low temperature regime experimentally, because of slow relaxation of the surface oxides in that regime. Using careful experimental techniques, we were able to demonstrate that the low temperature regime is indeed characterized by zero order in NO, as it must be. A separate study is being carried out to model the behavior in this regime in NO and in other gases, and

  20. Adsorption mechanism and kinetics of azo dye chemicals on oxide nanotubes: a case study using porous CeO{sub 2} nanotubes

    Wu, Junshu; Wang, Jinshu, E-mail: wangjsh@bjut.edu.cn; Du, Yucheng; Li, Hongyi; Jia, Xinjian [Beijing University of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-07-15

    Metal oxide nanotubes are believed to be promising materials with adsorption functionality for water purification due to their synergistic effect of the overall microscale morphology for easy separation and nanoscale surface characters providing enough surface active absorption sites. This work shows the synthesis of uniform hierarchical porous CeO{sub 2} nanotubes via nanowire-directed templating method and describes the adsorption behavior of CeO{sub 2} nanotubes for a typical azo dye Congo red which has resistance to oxidation and decoloration in natural conditions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra provided the evidence that Congo red was successfully coated on the surface of CeO{sub 2} nanotubes by both bidentate-type bridge link of Ce{sup 4+} cations from sulfonate SO{sub 3}{sup −} groups and the electrostatic attraction between the protonated surface generated by oxygen vacancies and dissociated sulfonate groups. The adsorption kinetic data fitted well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation, whereas the Langmuir isotherm equation exhibited better correlation with the experimental data. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity from the isothermal model was 362.32 mg/g. In addition, the prepared CeO{sub 2} nanotubes exhibited good recyclability and reusability as highly efficient adsorbents for Congo red removal after regeneration. These favorable performances enable the obtained CeO{sub 2} nanotubes to be promising materials for dye removal from aqueous solution.Graphical AbstractCeO{sub 2} nanotubes composed of crystallized nanoparticles exhibit well adsorption ability for a typical azo dye Congo red.

  1. Oxidation mechanisms occurring in wines

    Oliveira, Carla Maria; Ferreira, António César Silva; Freitas, Victor De; Silva, Artur M. S.

    2011-01-01

    The present review aims to show the state of the art on the oxidation mechanisms occurring in wines, as well as the methods to monitor, classify and diagnose wine oxidation. Wine oxidation can be divided in enzymatic oxidation and non-enzymatic oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation almost entirely occurs in grape must and is largely correlated with the content of hydroxycinnamates, such as caffeoyltartaric acid and paracoumaroyltartaric acid, and flavan-3-ols. Non-enzymatic oxidation, al...

  2. Influence of oxalic acid on the dissolution kinetics of manganese oxide

    Godunov, E. B.; Artamonova, I. V.; Gorichev, I. G.; Lainer, Yu. A.

    2012-11-01

    The kinetics and electrochemical processes of the dissolution of manganese oxides with various oxidation states in sulfuric acid solutions containing oxalate ion additives is studied under variable conditions (concentration, pH, temperature). The parameters favoring a higher degree of the dissolution of manganese oxides in acidic media are determined. The optimal conditions are found for the dissolution of manganese oxides in acidic media in the presence of oxalate ions. The mechanism proposed for the dissolution of manganese oxides in sulfuric acid solutions containing oxalic acid is based on the results of kinetic and electrochemical studies. The steps of the dissolution mechanism are discussed.

  3. The optimization, kinetics and mechanism of m-cresol degradation via catalytic wet peroxide oxidation with sludge-derived carbon catalyst

    Wang, Yamin [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wei, Huangzhao; Zhao, Ying [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Wenjing [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, Chenglin, E-mail: clsun@dicp.ac.cn [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • The sludge derived carbon modified with 0 °C acid was used as catalyst in CWPO. • RSM was used to optimize CWPO reaction conditions of m-cresol for the first time. • The kinetic model was disclosed to be correlated with residue target concentration. • The proposed degradation pathways of m-cresol were well proven by DFT method. - Abstract: The sludge-derived carbon catalyst modified with 0 °C HNO{sub 3} solution was tested in catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of m-cresol (100 mg L{sup −1}) with systematical mathematical models and theoretical calculation for the first time. The reaction conditions were optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) as T = 60 °C, initial pH = 3.0, C{sub 0,H2O2(30%)} = 1.20 g L{sup −1} (lower than the stoichiometric amount of 1.80 g L{sup −1}) and C{sub cat} = 0.80 g L{sup −1}, with 96% of m-cresol and 47% of TOC converted after 16 min and 120 min of reaction, respectively, and ξ (mg TOC/g H{sub 2}O{sub 2} fed) = 83.6 mg/g. The end time of the first kinetic period in m-cresol model was disclosed to be correlated with the fixed residue m-cresol concentration of about 33%. Furthermore, the kinetic constants in models of TOC and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exactly provide convincing proof of three-dimensional response surfaces analysis by RSM, which showed the influence of the interaction between organics and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on effective H{sub 2}O{sub 2} utilization. The reaction intermediates over time were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometer based on kinetics analysis. Four degradation pathways for m-cresol were proposed, of which the possibility and feasibility were well proven by frontier molecule orbital theory and atomic charge distribution via density functional theory method.

  4. Kinetics of molybdenite oxidizing leaching in alkali medium by ozone

    Medvedev, A.S.; Sokratova, N.B.; Litman, I.V.; Zelikman, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of investigation of the process kinetics proposed is a model of oxidizing leaching of molybdenite in alkali medium while ozonization of the solution by ozoneair mixture. A kinetic equation is derived, that describes experimental data satisfactorily

  5. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between [ 14 C]NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols

  6. Oxidation kinetics and mechanisms of four-direction carbon/carbon composites and their components in carbon dioxide at high temperature

    Qin, Fei; Peng, Li-na; He, Guo-qiang; Li, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Four-direction C/C composite was fabricated using carbon fibres and coal tar pitches. •Large-sized bulk matrix was prepared using same process as matrix of C/C composites. •A and E a of C/C, bulk matrix and fibres in CO 2 were determined, respectively. •Pressure exponent n was 0.62 in C/C–CO 2 . -- Abstract: Thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the oxidation kinetics of four-direction carbon/carbon composites and their components (fibres and matrix) in a CO 2 atmosphere at high temperature. The ablation processes were restricted to reaction-limited oxidation. The mass loss rate was estimated for the four-direction carbon/carbon composites and their components within the temperature of range of 600–1400 °C. The pressure exponent for the reaction of carbon/carbon composites and CO 2 was 0.62, and the pre-exponential factor and activation energy for the reactions of CO 2 and the carbon/carbon composites, carbon fibres and matrix were determined, respectively

  7. Oxidation kinetics of Si and SiGe by dry rapid thermal oxidation, in-situ steam generation oxidation and dry furnace oxidation

    Rozé, Fabien; Gourhant, Olivier; Blanquet, Elisabeth; Bertin, François; Juhel, Marc; Abbate, Francesco; Pribat, Clément; Duru, Romain

    2017-06-01

    The fabrication of ultrathin compressively strained SiGe-On-Insulator layers by the condensation technique is likely a key milestone towards low-power and high performances FD-SOI logic devices. However, the SiGe condensation technique still requires challenges to be solved for an optimized use in an industrial environment. SiGe oxidation kinetics, upon which the condensation technique is founded, has still not reached a consensus in spite of various studies which gave insights into the matter. This paper aims to bridge the gaps between these studies by covering various oxidation processes relevant to today's technological needs with a new and quantitative analysis methodology. We thus address oxidation kinetics of SiGe with three Ge concentrations (0%, 10%, and 30%) by means of dry rapid thermal oxidation, in-situ steam generation oxidation, and dry furnace oxidation. Oxide thicknesses in the 50 Å to 150 Å range grown with oxidation temperatures between 850 and 1100 °C were targeted. The present work shows first that for all investigated processes, oxidation follows a parabolic regime even for thin oxides, which indicates a diffusion-limited oxidation regime. We also observe that, for all investigated processes, the SiGe oxidation rate is systematically higher than that of Si. The amplitude of the variation of oxidation kinetics of SiGe with respect to Si is found to be strongly dependent on the process type. Second, a new quantitative analysis methodology of oxidation kinetics is introduced. This methodology allows us to highlight the dependence of oxidation kinetics on the Ge concentration at the oxidation interface, which is modulated by the pile-up mechanism. Our results show that the oxidation rate increases with the Ge concentration at the oxidation interface.

  8. Kinetics and reaction mechanism for aminolysis of benzyl 4-pyridyl carbonate in H2O: Effect of modification of nucleofuge from 2-pyridyl oxide to 4-pyridyl oxide on reactivity and reaction mechanism

    Kang, Ji Sun; Um, Ikhwan

    2012-01-01

    Pseudo-first-order rate constants k amine have been measured spectrophotometrically for the reactions of benzyl 4-pyridyl carbonate 6 with a series of alicyclic secondary amines in H 2 O at 25.0.deg.C. The plots of k amine vs. [amine] curve upward, indicating that the reactions proceed through a stepwise mechanism with two intermediates, a zwitterionic tetrahedral intermediate T ± and its deprotonated form T - . This contrasts to the report that the corresponding reactions of benzyl 2-pyridyl carbonate 5 proceed through a forced concerted pathway. The k amine values for the reactions of 6 have been dissected into the second-order rate constant Kk 2 and the third order rate constant Kk 3 . The Brφnsted-type plots are linear with β nuc = 0.94 and 1.18 for Kk 2 and Kk 3 , respectively. The Kk 2 for the reaction of 6 is smaller than the second-order rate constant k N for the corresponding reaction of 5, although 4-pyridyl oxide in 6 is less basic and a better nucleofuge than 2-pyridyl oxide in 5

  9. Mechanisms and kinetics models for ultrasonic waste activated sludge disintegration.

    Wang, Fen; Wang, Yong; Ji, Min

    2005-08-31

    Ultrasonic energy can be applied as pre-treatment to disintegrate sludge flocs and disrupt bacterial cells' walls, and the hydrolysis can be improved, so that the rate of sludge digestion and methane production is improved. In this paper, by adding NaHCO3 to mask the oxidizing effect of OH, the mechanisms of disintegration are investigated. In addition, kinetics models for ultrasonic sludge disintegration are established by applying multi-variable linear regression method. It has been found that hydro-mechanical shear forces predominantly responsible for the disintegration, and the contribution of oxidizing effect of OH increases with the amount of the ultrasonic density and ultrasonic intensity. It has also been inferred from the kinetics model which dependent variable is SCOD+ that both sludge pH and sludge concentration significantly affect the disintegration.

  10. Kinetic mechanism for modeling of electrochemical reactions.

    Cervenka, Petr; Hrdlička, Jiří; Přibyl, Michal; Snita, Dalimil

    2012-04-01

    We propose a kinetic mechanism of electrochemical interactions. We assume fast formation and recombination of electron donors D- and acceptors A+ on electrode surfaces. These mediators are continuously formed in the electrode matter by thermal fluctuations. The mediators D- and A+, chemically equivalent to the electrode metal, enter electrochemical interactions on the electrode surfaces. Electrochemical dynamics and current-voltage characteristics of a selected electrochemical system are studied. Our results are in good qualitative agreement with those given by the classical Butler-Volmer kinetics. The proposed model can be used to study fast electrochemical processes in microsystems and nanosystems that are often out of the thermal equilibrium. Moreover, the kinetic mechanism operates only with the surface concentrations of chemical reactants and local electric potentials, which facilitates the study of electrochemical systems with indefinable bulk.

  11. Study of internal oxidation kinetics of molybdenum base alloys

    Krushinskij, Yu.Yu.; Belyakov, B.G.; Belomyttsev, M.Yu.

    1989-01-01

    Metallographic and microdurometric method as well as new technique were used to study kinetics of internal oxidation (IO). It is shown that study of IO kinetics on the base of metallographic measurements of layers depth is not correct because it is related with insufficient sensitivity of the method. IO kinetics under conditions of formation of molybdenum oxide layer on saturated material surface as well as IO of alloy with high carbon content were investigated. Oxide film formation does not affect the IO kinetics; decarburization observed along with oxidation increases the apparent activation energy and K exponent on time dependence of diffusion layer depth

  12. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing, E-mail: wbzhang@whu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China)

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  13. Kinetics of ethylcyclohexane pyrolysis and oxidation: An experimental and detailed kinetic modeling study

    Wang, Zhandong

    2015-07-01

    Ethylcyclohexane (ECH) is a model compound for cycloalkanes with long alkyl side-chains. A preliminary investigation on ECH (Wang et al., Proc. Combust. Inst., 35, 2015, 367-375) revealed that an accurate ECH kinetic model with detailed fuel consumption mechanism and aromatic growth pathways, as well as additional ECH pyrolysis and oxidation data with detailed species concentration covering a wide pressure and temperature range are required to understand the ECH combustion kinetics. In this work, the flow reactor pyrolysis of ECH at various pressures (30, 150 and 760Torr) was studied using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) and gas chromatography (GC). The mole fraction profiles of numerous major and minor species were evaluated, and good agreement was observed between the PIMS and GC data sets. Furthermore, a fuel-rich burner-stabilized laminar premixed ECH/O2/Ar flame at 30Torr was studied using synchrotron VUV PIMS. A detailed kinetic model for ECH high temperature pyrolysis and oxidation was developed and validated against the pyrolysis and flame data performed in this work. Further validation of the kinetic model is presented against literature data including species concentrations in jet-stirred reactor oxidation, ignition delay times in a shock tube, and laminar flame speeds at various pressures and equivalence ratios. The model well predicts the consumption of ECH, the growth of aromatics, and the global combustion properties. Reaction flux and sensitivity analysis were utilized to elucidate chemical kinetic features of ECH combustion under various reaction conditions. © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  14. Kinetics of reactions of chromium, molybdenum and tungsten hexacarbonyls with hydroxylamine and trimethylamine oxide

    Maksakov, V.A.; Ershova, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    Mechanism of M(CO) 6 (M = Cr, Mo, W) reaction with hydroxylamine was studied. On the basis of kinetic data it was ascertained that as a result of the reaction CO oxidation to CO 2 and intramolecular transfer of amine formed to the central atom of metal occur. Mechanisms of M(CO) 6 reactions with hydroxylamine and trimethylamine oxide are compared

  15. Preliminary Study on the Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Naphthol Green B by Dichromate Ion in Aqueous Hydrochloric Acid Medium

    Bako Myek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the oxidation of naphthol green B (NGB3- by Cr2O7 2- has been studied in aqueous hydrochloric acid medium at an ionic strength, I = 0.50 mol dm-3 (NaCl, H+ =1.0  10-4 mol dm-3 (HCl and T = 25  1C. The redox reaction displayed a stoichiometry of 1:1 and obeys the rate law: -dNGB3-/dt = k2NGB3-]Cr2O7 2- . The second order rate constant increases with increase in acid concentration and in the ionic strength of reaction medium. The rates of reaction displayed a positive salt effect. Addition of acrylonitrile to a partially reacted mixture in the presence of excess methanol did not lead to gel formation. Added cations and anions inhibited the naphthol green B - Cr2O7 2- reaction. Results of the Michaelis – Menten plot gave no evidence of intermediate complex formation during the course of the reaction. Based on the results obtained, the reaction is believed to proceed through the outersphere mechanistic pathway.

  16. Redox kinetics and mechanism in silicate melts

    Cochain, B.

    2009-12-01

    This work contributes to better understand iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate melts. It was conducted on compositions in both Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -FeO and Na 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -FeO systems. The influence of boron-sodium and aluminum-sodium substitutions and iron content on properties and structure of glasses and on the iron redox kinetics has been studied by Raman, Moessbauer and XANES spectroscopies at the B and Fe K-edges. In borosilicate glasses, an increase in iron content or in the Fe 3+ /ΣFe redox state implies a structural rearrangement of the BO 4 species in the glass network whereas the BO 3 and BO 4 relative proportions remain nearly constant. In all studied glasses and melts, Fe 3+ is a network former in tetrahedral coordination, unless for aluminosilicates of ratio Al/Na≥1 where Fe 3+ is a network modifier in five-fold coordination. Near Tg, diffusion of network modifying cations controls the iron redox kinetics along with a flux of electron holes. At liquidus temperatures, oxygen diffusion is considered to be the mechanism that governs redox reactions. This study shows the role played by the silicate network polymerization on the redox kinetics. In borosilicate melts, iron redox kinetics depends on the boron speciation between BO 3 and BO 4 that depends itself on the sodium content. Furthermore, an increase in the network-former/network-modifier ratio implies a decrease in oxygen diffusion that results in a slowing down of the redox kinetics. The obtained results allow a description of the iron redox kinetics for more complex compositions as natural lavas or nuclear waste model glasses. (author)

  17. Experimental investigation on oxidation kinetics of germanium by ozone

    Wang, Xiaolei, E-mail: wangxiaolei@ime.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhao, Zhiqian; Xiang, Jinjuan [Key Laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Wenwu, E-mail: wangwenwu@ime.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhang, Jing, E-mail: zhangj@ncut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Microelectronics Department, North China University of Technology, Beijing 100041 (China); Zhao, Chao; Ye, Tianchun [Key Laboratory of Microelectronics Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Kinetics mechanism of Ge surface oxidation by ozone at low temperature is experimentally investigated. • The growth process contains initially linear growth region and following parabolic growth region. • The GeO{sub x} thickness vs. oxidation time plot obeys the well-known Deal-Grove or linear parabolic model. • The linear growth region includes the oxidation of two topmost Ge layers, and the oxidation of third layer and following layers of Ge is diffusion limited. • The activation energies for linear and parabolic regions are 0.04 and 0.55 eV, respectively. - Abstract: Oxidation kinetics of germanium surface by ozone at low temperature (≤400 °C) is experimentally investigated. The growth process contains two regions: initial linear growth region and following parabolic growth region. The GeO{sub x} thickness vs. oxidation time plot obeys the well-known Deal-Grove or linear parabolic model. The linear growth region contains reaction of oxygen atoms with surface bond and back bonds of outmost Ge layer. And the activation energy is experimentally estimated to be 0.06 eV. Such small activation energy indicates that the linear growth region is nearly barrier-less. The parabolic growth region starts when the oxygen atoms diffuse into back bonds of second outmost Ge layers. And the activation energy for this process is found to be 0.54 eV. Furthermore, in the ozone oxidation it is not O{sub 3} molecules but O radicals that go through the GeO{sub x} film.

  18. Kinetics of Oxidation of Aliphatic Alcohols by Potassium Dichromate ...

    The kinetics of oxidation of four aliphatic alcohols in acidic aqueous and micellar media were investigated. The reaction was found to be first-order with respect to both alcohol and oxidant. Pseudo-first-order kinetics were found to be perfectly applicable with ethanol, 1-propanol and 2-propanol while deviation was observed ...

  19. Some current problems in oxidation kinetics

    Benson, S. W.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data in low temperature and high temperature oxidations are examined from the point of view of reported quantitative inconsistencies. Activation energies for tBuO2 metathesis reactions with alkanes appear to be 7 kcal/mole higher than for comparable reactions of HO2. Related isomerization reactions are examined in the light of these differences without reaching any simple conclusions. The Russell mechanism for a 6-membered, cyclic, transition state for termination of primary and secondary alkyl peroxy radicals is shown to be either inconsistent with thermochemical data, or else unique to solution reactions. Addition reactions of O3 with olefins and acetylenes are shown thermochemically to have the possibility of following concerted and biradical pathways, respectively. Recent data showing strong inhibition by PbO coated surfaces of both oxidation and pyrolysis of i-C4H10 are examined in terms of mechanism.

  20. Fabrication of novel ternary Au/CeO2@g-C3N4 nanocomposite: kinetics and mechanism investigation of 4-nitrophenol reduction, and benzyl alcohol oxidation

    Kohantorabi, Mona; Gholami, Mohammad Reza

    2018-06-01

    Au nanoparticles supported on cerium oxide/graphitic carbon nitride (CeO2@g-C3N4) was synthesized and used as heterogeneous catalyst in redox reaction. The catalyst was characterized by different techniques such as FT-IR, XRD, FE-SEM, EDS, TEM, BET, TGA, and ICP. The as-prepared ternary nanocomposite was used as an effective catalyst for the reduction of toxic 4-nitrophenol to useful 4-aminophenol by NaBH4. The rate constant value of reduction reaction reached up to 0.106 s-1 by Au/CeO2@g-C3N4, which was 3.8, and 8.8 times higher than that of Au@CeO2 (0.028 s-1), and Au@g-C3N4 (0.012 s-1) nanocomposites, respectively. The superior catalytic performance of as-prepared catalyst in 4-NP reduction can be attributed to synergistic effect between Au nanoparticles and CeO2@g-C3N4 support, and efficient electron transfer. The reduction reaction was carried out at different temperatures, and the energy of activation ({Ea}), and thermodynamic parameters including, activation of entropy (Δ S^ ≠), enthalpy (Δ H^ ≠), and Gibbs free energy (Δ G^ ≠) were determined. Additionally, the mechanism of reaction was studied in details, and equilibrium constants of 4-NP ( K 4-NP), and {BH}4^{ - } ({K_{{BH}4^{{ - }} }}) were calculated using Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. Furthermore, this nanocomposite exhibited excellent catalytic activity in oxidation of benzyl alcohol by molecular oxygen as a green oxidant. This study revealed that the ternary Au/CeO2@g-C3N4 nanocomposite is an attractive candidate for catalytic applications.

  1. Atmospheric oxidation mechanism of toluene.

    Wu, Runrun; Pan, Shanshan; Li, Yun; Wang, Liming

    2014-06-26

    The atmospheric oxidation mechanism of toluene initiated by OH radical addition is investigated by quantum chemistry calculations at M06-2X, G3MP2-RAD, and ROCBS-QB3 levels and by kinetics calculation by using transition state theory and unimolecular reaction theory coupled with master equation (RRKM-ME). The predicted branching ratios are 0.15, 0.59, 0.05, and 0.14 for OH additions to ipso, ortho, meta, and para positions (forming R1-R4 adducts), respectively. The fate of R2, R4, and R1 is investigated in detail. In the atmosphere, R2 reacts with O2 either by irreversible H-abstraction to form o-cresol (36%), or by reversible recombination to R2-1OO-syn and R2-3OO-syn, which subsequently cyclize to bicyclic radical R2-13OO-syn (64%). Similarly, R4 reacts with O2 with branching ratios of 61% for p-cresol and 39% for R4-35OO-syn, while reaction of R1 and O2 leads to R1-26OO-syn. RRKM-ME calculations show that the reactions of R2/R4 with O2 have reached their high-pressure limits at 760 Torr and the formation of R2-16O-3O-s is only important at low pressure, i.e., 5.4% at 100 Torr. The bicyclic radicals (R2-13OO-syn, R4-35OO-syn, and R1-26OO-syn) will recombine with O2 to produce bicyclic alkoxy radicals after reacting with NO. The bicyclic alkoxy radicals would break the ring to form products methylglyoxal/glyoxal (MGLY/GLY) and their corresponding coproducts butenedial/methyl-substituted butenedial as proposed in earlier studies. However, a new reaction pathway is found for the bicyclic alkoxy radicals, leading to products MGLY/GLY and 2,3-epoxybutandial/2-methyl-2,3-epoxybutandial. A new mechanism is proposed for the atmospheric oxidation mechanism of toluene based on current theoretical and previous theoretical and experimental results. The new mechanism predicts much lower yield of GLY and much higher yield of butenedial than other atmospheric models and recent experimental measurements. The new mechanism calls for detection of proposed products 2

  2. Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for hydrocarbon fuels

    Montgomery, C.J.; Cremer, M.A.; Heap, M.P.; Chen, J-Y.; Westbrook, C.K.; Maurice, L.Q.

    1999-01-01

    Using CARM (Computer Aided Reduction Method), a computer program that automates the mechanism reduction process, a variety of different reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for ethylene and n-heptane have been generated. The reduced mechanisms have been compared to detailed chemistry calculations in simple homogeneous reactors and experiments. Reduced mechanisms for combustion of ethylene having as few as 10 species were found to give reasonable agreement with detailed chemistry over a range of stoichiometries and showed significant improvement over currently used global mechanisms. The performance of reduced mechanisms derived from a large detailed mechanism for n-heptane was compared to results from a reduced mechanism derived from a smaller semi-empirical mechanism. The semi-empirical mechanism was advantageous as a starting point for reduction for ignition delay, but not for PSR calculations. Reduced mechanisms with as few as 12 species gave excellent results for n-heptane/air PSR calculations but 16-25 or more species are needed to simulate n-heptane ignition delay

  3. The oxidation kinetics and the structure of the oxide film on Zircaloy before and after the kinetic transition

    Arima, T.; Masuzumi, T.; Furuya, H.; Idemitsu, K.; Inagaki, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 have been measured using a micro-balance technique in CO-CO 2 gas mixtures between 450 deg. C and 600 deg. C. Oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 obeyed a cubic rate law with time at 450-600 deg. C up to 24 h. At 600 deg. C, the kinetic transition occurred after about 36 h. After the transition, oxidation kinetics obeyed a linear rate law. X-ray diffraction patterns for the samples oxidized at 600 deg. C showed that the volume fraction of tetragonal phase of zirconia decreased with time until the kinetic transition occurred and was almost constant after that. In addition, stresses in the oxide films were found to be larger for the pre-transition samples than for the post-transition ones. (authors)

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of thermal processes of nonreversible decomposition of the system N2O4-NO

    Nesterenko, V.B.; Nichipor, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to kinetics and mechanism of decomposition of nitrogen oxide in gaseous phase at devated pressures and temperature, decomposition of N 2 O 4 -NO system under flow conditions, as well as to kinetics and mechanism of formation of nitrons oxide. 37 refs.; 13 figs.; 13 tabs

  5. Exploring the chemical kinetics of partially oxidized intermediates by combining experiments, theory, and kinetic modeling.

    Hoyermann, Karlheinz; Mauß, Fabian; Olzmann, Matthias; Welz, Oliver; Zeuch, Thomas

    2017-07-19

    Partially oxidized intermediates play a central role in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. In this perspective, we focus on the chemical kinetics of alkoxy radicals, peroxy radicals, and Criegee intermediates, which are key species in both combustion and atmospheric environments. These reactive intermediates feature a broad spectrum of chemical diversity. Their reactivity is central to our understanding of how volatile organic compounds are degraded in the atmosphere and converted into secondary organic aerosol. Moreover, they sensitively determine ignition timing in internal combustion engines. The intention of this perspective article is to provide the reader with information about the general mechanisms of reactions initiated by addition of atomic and molecular oxygen to alkyl radicals and ozone to alkenes. We will focus on critical branching points in the subsequent reaction mechanisms and discuss them from a consistent point of view. As a first example of our integrated approach, we will show how experiment, theory, and kinetic modeling have been successfully combined in the first infrared detection of Criegee intermediates during the gas phase ozonolysis. As a second example, we will examine the ignition timing of n-heptane/air mixtures at low and intermediate temperatures. Here, we present a reduced, fuel size independent kinetic model of the complex chemistry initiated by peroxy radicals that has been successfully applied to simulate standard n-heptane combustion experiments.

  6. Kinetic study of the alkaline metals oxidation by dry oxygen

    Touzain, Ph.

    1967-06-01

    The oxidation of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and sodium-potassium alloys by dry oxygen is studied at several temperatures and in the oxygen pressure range 40 to 400 mmHg. One distinguishes three different oxidation behaviours (inflammation, ignition and slow combustion) whose zones are precised in function of the temperature. The slow oxidation kinetic laws, the composition of oxides and the motive of oxides colorations are determined. At least, the experimental data are construed theoretically. (author) [fr

  7. Kinetics of the gas-phase tritium oxidation reaction

    Failor, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Homogeneous gas-phase kinetics of tritium oxidation (2T 2 + O 2 →2T 2 O) have been studied with a model that accounts explicitly for radiolysis of the major species and the kinetics of the subsequent reactions of ionic, excited-state, and neutral species. Results from model calculations are given for 10 -4 -1.0 mol% T 2 in O 2 (298 K, 1 atm). As the reaction evolves three different mechanisms control T 2 O production, each with a different overall rate expression and a different order with respect to the T 2 concentration. The effects of self-radiolysis of pure T 2 on the tritium oxidation reaction were calculated. Tritium atoms, the primary product of T 2 self-radiolysis, altered the oxidation mechanism only during the first few seconds following the initiation of the T 2 -O 2 reaction. Ozone, an important intermediate in T 2 oxidation, was monitored in-situ by U.V. absorption spectroscopy for 0.01-1.0 mol% T 2 an 1 atm O 2 . The shape of the experimental ozone time profile agreed with the model predictions. As predicted, the measured initial rate of ozone production varied linearly with initial T 2 concentration ([T 2 ] 0.6 o ), but at an initial rate one-third the predicted value. The steady-state ozone concentration ([O 3 ]ss) was predicted to be dependent on [T 2 ] 0.3 o , but the measured value was [T 2 ] 0.6 o , resulting in four times higher [O 3 ]ss than predicted for a 1.0% T 2 -O 2 mixture. Adding H 2 to the T 2 -O 2 mixture, to provide insight into the differences between the radiolytic and chemical behavior of the tritium, produced a greater decrease in [O 3 ]ss than predicted. Adjusting the reaction cell surface-to-volume ratio showed implications of minor surface removal of ozone

  8. Kinetic Studies of Catalytic Oxidation of Cyclohexene Using ...

    Cyclohexene was oxidized using chromium (VI) oxide (CrO3) in pure acetic acid medium. The products of oxidation were analysed using simple qualitative analysis, IR spectroscopy and Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Kinetics studies were carried out to determine the order of reaction, rate constant and ...

  9. AFFECTS OF MECHANICAL MILLING AND METAL OXIDE ADDITIVES ON SORPTION KINETICS OF 1:1 LiNH2/MgH2 MIXTURE

    Erdy, C.; Anton, D.; Gray, J.

    2010-12-08

    The destabilized complex hydride system composed of LiNH{sub 2}:MgH{sub 2} (1:1 molar ratio) is one of the leading candidates of hydrogen storage with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 8.1 wt%. A low sorption enthalpy of {approx}32 kJ/mole H{sub 2} was first predicted by Alapati et al. utilizing first principle density function theory (DFT) calculations and has been subsequently confirmed empirically by Lu et al. through differential thermal analysis (DTA). This enthalpy suggests that favorable sorption kinetics should be obtainable at temperatures in the range of 160 C to 200 C. Preliminary experiments reported in the literature indicate that sorption kinetics are substantially lower than expected in this temperature range despite favorable thermodynamics. Systematic isothermal and isobaric sorption experiments were performed using a Sievert's apparatus to form a baseline data set by which to compare kinetic results over the pressure and temperature range anticipated for use of this material as a hydrogen storage media. Various material preparation methods and compositional modifications were performed in attempts to increase the kinetics while lowering the sorption temperatures. This paper outlines the results of these systematic tests and describes a number of beneficial additions which influence kinetics as well as NH{sub 3} formation.

  10. Affects of Mechanical Milling and Metal Oxide Additives on Sorption Kinetics of 1:1 LiNH2/MgH2 Mixture

    Donald L. Anton

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The destabilized complex hydride system composed of LiNH2:MgH2 (1:1 molar ratio is one of the leading candidates of hydrogen storage with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 8.1 wt%. A low sorption enthalpy of ~32 kJ/mole H2 was first predicted by Alapati et al. utilizing first principle density function theory (DFT calculations and has been subsequently confirmed empirically by Lu et al. through differential thermal analysis (DTA. This enthalpy suggests that favorable sorption kinetics should be obtainable at temperatures in the range of 160 °C to 200 °C. Preliminary experiments reported in the literature indicate that sorption kinetics are substantially lower than expected in this temperature range despite favorable thermodynamics. Systematic isothermal and isobaric sorption experiments were performed using a Sievert’s apparatus to form a baseline data set by which to compare kinetic results over the pressure and temperature range anticipated for use of this material as a hydrogen storage media. Various material preparation methods and compositional modifications were performed in attempts to increase the kinetics while lowering the sorption temperatures. This paper outlines the results of these systematic tests and describes a number of beneficial additions which influence kinetics as well as NH3 formation.

  11. Radio-Oxidation in Polyolefins: Non-Stationary Kinetic Conditions

    Dely, N.

    2006-01-01

    be found in order to establish analytical expressions of the temporal evolution of [P degree] and [POO degree]. The time evolution obtained analytically is in total agreement with the exact numerical solution. We want to emphasize that the analytical approximations show that the different parameters governing the build-up period are very simply linked to some kinetic constants of the radio-oxidation mechanism. This clearly shows that time-resolved experiments are a very attractive approach for determining accurately the kinetic parameters governing radio-oxidation

  12. Reduced Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms for JP-8 Combustion

    Montgomery, Christopher J; Cannon, S. M; Mawid, M. A; Sekar, B

    2002-01-01

    Using CARM (Computer Aided Reduction Method), a computer program that automates the mechanism reduction process, six different reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for JP-8 combustion have been generated...

  13. Improved Understanding of In Situ Chemical Oxidation. Technical Objective I: Contaminant Oxidation Kinetics Contaminant Oxidation Kinetics

    2009-05-01

    methyl tert butyl ether NAPL non-aqueous phase liquid NOD natural oxidant demand •OH hydroxide radical Ox oxidant O3 ozone PCE...and persulfate; and Technical Objective 2, assess how soil properties (e.g., soil mineralogy , natural carbon content) affect oxidant mobility and...to develop a general description of kobs vs. T because there are many reactions that can contribute to the concentration of the reactive intermediate

  14. Kinetics of tetravalent plutonium oxidation by cerium (4)

    Nikitina, G P; Shumakov, V G; Egorova, V P

    1975-01-01

    Stoichiometry and kinetics of the Pu(4) + Ce(4) reaction is studied by spectrophotometric method at 5-30 deg C in nitric acid solutions (..mu..=(HNO/sub 3/)+(NaNO/sub 3/) = 1.0 - 5.7; (Ce(4)) = 5.10/sup -5/ - 1.2.10/sup -3/ g-ion/1, (Pu(4)) =1.10/sup -5/ - 8.5.10/sup -4/ g-ion/1. Oxidation of one Pu(4) ion to a hexavalent state requires two Ce(4) ions. The plutonium oxidation is not complicated by by-processes. Reverse Ce(3) + PuO/sub 2//sup +/ reaction does not contribute essentially to the process at (Ce(3)) 2.6.10/sup -2/ g-ion/1. The reaction rate obeys the kinetic equation - d(Pu(4))/dt = ksub(eff)(Pu(4))(Ce(4))/a sub(+-HNO/sub 3/). The thermodynamical activation parameters are found for solutions at the varied nitric acid concentrations:..delta..Gsup(not equal) = 17.0+-0.2 and ..delta..Hsup(not equal) = 21.8+-2 kcal/mole(..mu..=1.0); ..delta..Gsup(not equal) = 19.1+-0.1 and ..delta..Hsup(not equal) = 23.1+-1 kcal/mole(..mu..=4.9). The reaction mechanism is discussed in terms of the theory of absolute reaction rates and the model of long-range charge transfer.

  15. Laboratory Studies of Hydrocarbon Oxidation Mechanisms

    Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.; Wallington, T. J.; Burkholder, J. B.; Bertman, S. B.; Chen, W.

    2001-12-01

    The oxidation of hydrocarbon species (alkanes, alkenes, halogenated species, and oxygenates of both natural and anthropogenic origin) in the troposphere leads to the generation of numerous potentially harmful secondary pollutants, such as ozone, organic nitrates and acids, and aerosols. These oxidations proceed via the formation of alkoxy radicals, whose complex chemistry controls the ultimate product distributions obtained. Studies of hydrocarbon oxidation mechanisms are ongoing at NCAR and Ford, using environmental chamber / FTIR absorption systems. The focus of these studies is often on the product distributions obtained at low temperature; these studies not only provide data of direct relevance to the free/upper troposphere, but also allow for a more fundamental understanding of the alkoxy radical chemistry (eg., from the determination of the Arrhenius parameters for unimolecular processes, and the quantification of the extent of the involvement of chemical activation in the alkoxy radical chemistry). In this paper, data will be presented on some or all of the following topics: kinetics/mechanisms for the reactions of OH with the unsaturated species MPAN, acrolein, and crotonaldehyde; the mechanism for the oxidation of ethyl chloride and ethyl bromide; and the mechanism for the reaction of OH with acetone and acetaldehyde at low temperature. The relevance of the data to various aspects of tropospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  16. Cyclopentane combustion chemistry. Part I: Mechanism development and computational kinetics

    Rachidi, Mariam El

    2017-06-23

    Cycloalkanes are significant constituents of conventional fossil fuels, in which they are one of the main contributors to soot formation, but also significantly influence the ignition characteristics below ∼900K. This paper discusses the development of a detailed high- and low-temperature oxidation mechanism for cyclopentane, which is an important archetypical cycloalkane. The differences between cyclic and non-cyclic alkane chemistry, and thus the inapplicability of acyclic alkane analogies, required the detailed theoretical investigation of the kinetics of important cyclopentane oxidation reactions as part of the mechanism development. The cyclopentyl+O reaction was investigated at the UCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in a time-dependent master equation framework. Comparisons with analogous cyclohexane or non-cyclic alkane reactions are presented. Our study suggests that beyond accurate quantum chemistry the inclusion of pressure dependence and especially that of formally direct kinetics is crucial even at pressures relevant for practical application.

  17. Cyclopentane combustion chemistry. Part I: Mechanism development and computational kinetics

    Rachidi, Mariam El; Mehl, Marco; Pitz, William J.; Mohamed, Samah; Sarathy, Mani

    2017-01-01

    Cycloalkanes are significant constituents of conventional fossil fuels, in which they are one of the main contributors to soot formation, but also significantly influence the ignition characteristics below ∼900K. This paper discusses the development of a detailed high- and low-temperature oxidation mechanism for cyclopentane, which is an important archetypical cycloalkane. The differences between cyclic and non-cyclic alkane chemistry, and thus the inapplicability of acyclic alkane analogies, required the detailed theoretical investigation of the kinetics of important cyclopentane oxidation reactions as part of the mechanism development. The cyclopentyl+O reaction was investigated at the UCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in a time-dependent master equation framework. Comparisons with analogous cyclohexane or non-cyclic alkane reactions are presented. Our study suggests that beyond accurate quantum chemistry the inclusion of pressure dependence and especially that of formally direct kinetics is crucial even at pressures relevant for practical application.

  18. The kinetics of oxygen and SO2 consumption by red wines. What do they tell about oxidation mechanisms and about changes in wine composition?

    Carrascón, Vanesa; Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Meudec, Emmanuelle; Sommerer, Nicolas; Fernandez-Zurbano, Purificación; Ferreira, Vicente

    2018-02-15

    This work seeks to understand the kinetics of O 2 and SO 2 consumption of air-saturated red wine as a function of its chemical composition, and to describe the chemical changes suffered during the process in relation to the kinetics. Oxygen Consumption Rates (OCRs) are faster with higher copper and epigallocatechin contents and with higher absorbance at 620nm and slower with higher levels of gallic acid and catechin terminal units in tannins. Acetaldehyde Reactive Polyphenols (ARPs) may be key elements determining OCRs. It is confirmed that SO 2 is poorly consumed in the first saturation. Phenylalanine, methionine and maybe, cysteine, seem to be consumed instead. A low SO 2 consumption is favoured by low levels of SO 2 , by a low availability of free SO 2 caused by a high anthocyanin/tannin ratio, and by a polyphenolic profile poor in epigallocatechin and rich in catechin-rich tannins. Wines consuming SO 2 efficiently consume more epigallocatechin, prodelphinidins and procyanidins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The reaction mechanism of the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas: a transient kinetic study over rhodium and a comparison with platinum

    Mallens, E.P.J.; Hoebink, J.H.B.J.; Marin, G.B.M.M.

    1997-01-01

    The partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas over rhodium sponge has been investigated by admitting pulses of pure methane and pure oxygen as well as mixtures of methane and oxygen to rhodium sponge at temperatures from 873 to 1023 K. Moreover, pulses of oxygen followed by methane and vice

  20. Cure kinetics and chemorheology of EPDM/graphene oxide nanocomposites

    Allahbakhsh, Ahmad [Department of Polymer Engineering, Islamic Azad University, South Tehran Branch, 17776-13651 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mazinani, Saeedeh, E-mail: s.mazinani@aut.ac.ir [Amirkabir Nanotechnology Research Institute (ANTRI), Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kalaee, Mohammad Reza [Department of Polymer Engineering, Islamic Azad University, South Tehran Branch, 17776-13651 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sharif, Farhad [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Graphene oxide content and dispersion as effective parameters on cure kinetics. • Graphene oxide as an effective controlling factor of crosslink density. • Interaction of graphene oxide with curing system (ZnO) during curing process. - Abstract: In this study, the effect of graphene oxide on cure behavior of ethylene–propylene–diene rubber (EPDM) nanocomposite is studied. In this regard, the cure kinetics of nanocomposite is studied employing different empirical methods. The required activation energy of nth-order cure process shows about 160 kJ/mol increments upon 5 phr graphene oxide loading compared to 1 phr graphene oxide loading. However, the required activation energy is significantly reduced followed by incorporation of graphene oxide in nanocomposites compared to neat EPDM sample. Furthermore, the effect of graphene oxide on structural properties of nanocomposites during the cure process is studied using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry techniques. As the results show, graphene oxide interestingly affects the structure of zinc oxide during the vulcanization process. This behavior could be probably related to high tendency of zinc oxide to react with oxidized surface of graphene oxide.

  1. Investigation of the kinetics of the reactions of oxidation, nitration, and hydrogenation of uranium

    Adda, Y.

    1955-06-01

    Various physico-chemical methods have been used to investigate the kinetics of the oxidation hydridation and nitridation of uranium. The experimental results show that the kinetics of these reactions are influenced by many factors also the Pilling and Bedworth rule is valid only under very limited conditions. The disagreement between this rule and the experimental results could be explained by the existence of numerous mechanical faults in the compounds obtained by the dry corrosion of the metal. (author) [fr

  2. Oxidation kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by permanganate.

    Forsey, Steven P; Thomson, Neil R; Barker, James F

    2010-04-01

    The reactivity of permanganate towards polycyclic aromatics hydrocarbons (PAHs) is well known but little kinetic information is available. This study investigated the oxidation kinetics of a selected group of coal tar creosote compounds and alkylbenzenes in water using permanganate, and the correlation between compound reactivity and physical/chemical properties. The oxidation of naphthalene, phenanthrene, chrysene, 1-methylnaphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, carbazole isopropylbenzene, ethylbenzene and methylbenzene closely followed pseudo first-order reaction kinetics. The oxidation of pyrene was initially very rapid and did not follow pseudo first-order kinetics at early times. Fluoranthene was only partially oxidized and the oxidation of anthracene was too fast to be captured. Biphenyl, dibenzofuran, benzene and tert-butylbenzene were non-reactive under the study conditions. The oxidation rate was shown to increase with increasing number of polycyclic rings because less energy is required to overcome the aromatic character of a polycyclic ring than is required for benzene. Thus the rate of oxidation increased in the series naphthalenepermanganate. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxidation behaviour of Zr-Ce alloys. Kinetic and microstructure aspects

    Rouillon, Ludovic

    1996-01-01

    As Zircaloy alloys are used for fuel rods in pressurized water nuclear reactors, this research thesis aims at studying and improving corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys while maintaining their mechanical properties. It more precisely deals with the kinetic and microstructure aspects of the external corrosion of the cladding by the coolant. In the case of Zircaloys, this corrosion is characterized by a kinetic transition from an initially parabolic to a linear regime. This research aims at intervening on this transition by elaborating zirconium alloys containing an element which stabilizes zirconia, in this case cerium. After having reported a bibliographical study on sheath oxidation, on parameters which influence sheath oxidation kinetics, on zirconia stabilization by doping elements, on the interest of lanthanide oxides, the author reports a feasibility study on the use of cerium (choice and preparation, sintered ceramic characterization, annealing of stabilized zirconia), reports a metallurgical study of Zr-Ce alloys, reports the study of the oxidation behaviour of these alloys (in autoclave, in presence of oxygen, under oxygen and then water) and the characterization of the microstructures of the oxide layers. He finally discusses the relationship between microstructure and oxidation kinetics, the role of cerium in the oxidation process, and the role of water in the oxidation process [fr

  4. Epoxide hydrolase-catalyzed enantioselective conversion of trans-stilbene oxide: Insights into the reaction mechanism from steady-state and pre-steady-state enzyme kinetics

    Archelas, A.; Zhao, W.; Faure, B.; Iacazio, G.; Kotík, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 591, FEB 2016 (2016), s. 66-75 ISSN 0003-9861 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Catalytic mechanism * Epoxide hydrolase * Electrophilic catalysis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.165, year: 2016

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of Prussian blue formation

    R.K. Adhikamsetty

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of reaction between ferrocyanide and ferric ions under acidic conditions was studied at fixed ionic strength (0.1 M and (25 plus or minus 0.1 oC by using the stopped flow technique, under limiting conditions of [ferrocyanide] and with other reactants in excess. The reaction had first-order dependence on ferrocyanide, Fe(III and H+ ion concentrations and had negative salt effect. On the basis of the experimental findings, a plausible mechanism for the formation of soluble form of Prussian blue (KFe{Fe(CN6}x H2O and rate law are proposed. The activation parameters for the title reaction are estimated. A relatively low energy of activation (23 kJ mol-1 and high negative entropy of activation (-231 J K-1 mol-1 agree well with the proposed mechanism and configuration of complex ion leading to the formation of insoluble Prussian blue, Fe4{Fe(CN6}3 y H2O.

  6. Mechanism and kinetics of hydrated electron diffusion

    Tay, Kafui A.; Coudert, Francois-Xavier; Boutin, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the mechanism and kinetics of hydrated electron diffusion. The electron center of mass is found to exhibit Brownian-type behavior with a diffusion coefficient considerably greater than that of the solvent. As previously postulated by both experimental and theoretical works, the instantaneous response of the electron to the librational motions of surrounding water molecules constitutes the principal mode of motion. The diffusive mechanism can be understood within the traditional framework of transfer diffusion processes, where the diffusive step is akin to the exchange of an extramolecular electron between neighboring water molecules. This is a second-order process with a computed rate constant of 5.0 ps -1 at 298 K. In agreement with experiment the electron diffusion exhibits Arrhenius behavior over the temperature range of 298-400 K. We compute an activation energy of 8.9 kJ mol -1 . Through analysis of Arrhenius plots and the application of a simple random walk model it is demonstrated that the computed rate constant for exchange of an excess electron is indeed the phenomenological rate constant associated with the diffusive process

  7. Port wine oxidation management: a multiparametric kinetic approach.

    Martins, Rui Costa; Monforte, Ana Rita; Silva Ferreira, António

    2013-06-05

    Port wine is a flagship fortified wine of Portugal, which undergoes a particularly long aging period, developing a dynamic sensory profile over time, responsible for several wine categories, which is dependent upon the type of aging (bottle or barrel). Therefore, the quality of the product is dependent upon the chemical mechanisms occurring during the aging process, such as oxidation or Maillard reactions. To attain the desired quality management, it is necessary to understand how technological parameters, such as temperature or oxygen exposure, affect the kinetics of the formation of key odorants, such as sotolon. There is a lack of information about the impact of the storage conditions (oxygen and temperature) on Port wine quality. In this study, the effect of these two parameters were investigated to increase the knowledge database concerning aging management of Port wines. It was found that sotolon formation is highly dependent upon oxygen and temperature. There is however a synergistic effect between these two parameters that could significantly increase the concentration. The kinetic parameters of oxygen, sotolon, and other compounds related to Port aging (cis- and trans-5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,3-dioxan, 2-furfural, 5-hydroxy-methyl-furfural, and 5-methyl-furfural) are also reported. Kinetic models with Monte Carlo simulations, where the oxygen permeability dispersion and temperature are the parameters under evaluation, were applied. On the basis of the modeling predictions, it would seem that the temperature of a cellar would have a more significant impact on the Port wines stored in containers where the oxygen intake is higher (barrels) when compared to containers with low oxygen permeability (bottles using cork stoppers).

  8. Reaction Mechanism Generator: Automatic construction of chemical kinetic mechanisms

    Gao, Connie W.; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.; West, Richard H.

    2016-06-01

    Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) constructs kinetic models composed of elementary chemical reaction steps using a general understanding of how molecules react. Species thermochemistry is estimated through Benson group additivity and reaction rate coefficients are estimated using a database of known rate rules and reaction templates. At its core, RMG relies on two fundamental data structures: graphs and trees. Graphs are used to represent chemical structures, and trees are used to represent thermodynamic and kinetic data. Models are generated using a rate-based algorithm which excludes species from the model based on reaction fluxes. RMG can generate reaction mechanisms for species involving carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen. It also has capabilities for estimating transport and solvation properties, and it automatically computes pressure-dependent rate coefficients and identifies chemically-activated reaction paths. RMG is an object-oriented program written in Python, which provides a stable, robust programming architecture for developing an extensible and modular code base with a large suite of unit tests. Computationally intensive functions are cythonized for speed improvements.

  9. Oxidation kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by permanganate

    Forsey, S.P.; Thomson, N.R.; Barker, J.F. [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2010-04-15

    The reactivity of permanganate towards polycyclic aromatics hydrocarbons (PAHs) is well known but little kinetic information is available. This study investigated the oxidation kinetics of a selected group of coal tar creosote compounds and alkylbenzenes in water using permanganate, and the correlation between compound reactivity and physical/chemical properties. The oxidation of naphthalene, phenanthrene, chrysene, 1-methylnaphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, carbazole isopropylbenzene, ethylbenzene and methylbenzene closely followed pseudo first-order reaction kinetics. The oxidation of pyrene was initially very rapid and did not follow pseudo first-order kinetics at early times. Fluoranthene was only partially oxidized and the oxidation of anthracene was too fast to be captured. Biphenyl, dibenzofuran, benzene and tert-butylbenzene were non-reactive under the study conditions. The oxidation rate was shown to increase with increasing number of polycyclic rings because less energy is required to overcome the aromatic character of a polycyclic ring than is required for benzene. Thus the rate of oxidation increased in the series naphthalene < phenanthrene < pyrene. The rate of side chain reactivity is controlled by the C-H bond strength. For the alkyl substituted benzenes an excellent correlation was observed between the reaction rate coefficients and bond dissociation energies, but for the substituted PAHs the relationship was poor. A trend was found between the reaction rate coefficients and the calculated heats of complexation indicating that significant ring oxidation occurred in addition to side chain oxidation. Clar's aromatic sextet theory was used to predict the relative stability of arenes towards ring oxidation by permanganate.

  10. Thorium oxide dissolution kinetics for hydroxide and carbonate complexation

    Jardin, R.; Curran, V.; Czerwinski, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine the kinetics and thermodynamics of thorium oxide dissolution in the environment. Solubility is important because it establishes an upper concentration limit on the concentration of a dissolved radionuclide in solution L1. While understanding the behavior of thorium fuels in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is most applicable, a more rigorous study of thorium solubility over a wide pH range was performed so that the data could also be used to model the behavior of thorium fuels in any environmental system. To achieve this, the kinetics and thermodynamics of thorium oxide dissolution under both pure argon and argon with P CO2 of 0. 1 were studied under the full pH range available in each atmosphere. In addition, thorium oxide powder remnants were studied after each experiment to examine structural changes that may affect kinetics

  11. A feasible kinetic model for the hydrogen oxidation on ruthenium electrodes

    Rau, M.S.; Gennero de Chialvo, M.R.; Chialvo, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen oxidation reaction (hor) was studied on a polycrystalline ruthenium electrode in H 2 SO 4 solution at different rotation rates (ω). The experimental polarization curves recorded on steady state show the existence of a maximum current with a non-linear dependence of the current density on ω 1/2 . On the basis of the Tafel-Heyrovsky-Volmer kinetic mechanism, coupled with a process of inhibition of active sites by the reversible electroadsorption of hydroxyl species, it was possible to appropriately describe the origin of the maximum current. The corresponding set of kinetic parameters was also calculated from the correlation of the experimental results with the proposed kinetic model.

  12. Perturbation of parabolic kinetics resulting from the accumulation of stress in protective oxide layers

    Evans, H.E.; Norfolk, D.J.; Swan, T.

    1978-01-01

    A frequent observation in metal oxidation is the development of subparabolic kinetics, variously described as cubic or quartic. Although a number of detailed mechanisms have been proposed to account for this effect, none seem generally applicable. A model is presented of the oxidation process which is divorced from such restrictions. It is argued that deviations from parabolic behavior occur as a result of the concurrent development of stresses within the oxide. It is shown that the presence of stress fields can influence significantly the rate of transport of vacancy defects within the oxide such that tensile stresses produce positive deviations and compressive stresses, negative deviations from parabolic behavior. The model is applied in detail to Zircaloy-2 oxidation at 773 0 K. It is predicted that the kinetics should be insensitive to the oxygen potential of the environment and this has been confirmed by previous experimental work. 31 refs

  13. Destruction of microcystins (cyanotoxins) by UV-254 nm-based direct photolysis and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): influence of variable amino acids on the degradation kinetics and reaction mechanisms.

    He, Xuexiang; de la Cruz, Armah A; Hiskia, Anastasia; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; O'Shea, Kevin; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2015-05-01

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) are the most frequently detected group of cyanobacterial toxins. This study investigated the degradation of common MC variants in water, MC-LR, MC-RR, MC-YR and MC-LA, by UV-254 nm-based processes, UV only, UV/H2O2, UV/S2O8(2-) and UV/HSO5(-). Limited direct photolysis of MCs was observed, while the addition of an oxidant significantly improved the degradation efficiency with an order of UV/S2O8(2-) > UV/HSO5(-) > UV/H2O2 at the same initial molar concentration of the oxidant. The removal of MC-LR by UV/H2O2 appeared to be faster than another cyanotoxin, cylindrospermopsin, at either the same initial molar concentration or the same initial organic carbon concentration of the toxin. It suggested a faster reaction of MC-LR with hydroxyl radical, which was further supported by the determined second-order rate constant of MCs with hydroxyl radical. Both isomerization and photohydration byproducts were observed in UV only process for all four MCs; while in UV/H2O2, hydroxylation and diene-Adda double bond cleavage byproducts were detected. The presence of a tyrosine in the structure of MC-YR significantly promoted the formation of monohydroxylation byproduct m/z 1061; while the presence of a second arginine in MC-RR led to the elimination of a guanidine group and the absence of double bond cleavage byproducts. It was therefore demonstrated in this study that the variable amino acids in the structure of MCs influenced not only the degradation kinetics but also the preferable reaction mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Improved Understanding of In Situ Chemical Oxidation Contaminant Oxidation Kinetics

    2007-12-01

    natural oxidant demand •OH hydroxide radical Ox oxidant O3 ozone PCE perchloroethylene HSO5− peroxymonosulfate PNDA p...properties (e.g., soil mineralogy , natural carbon content) affect oxidant mobility and stability in the subsurface, and develop a standardized natural...chlorinated ethenes For contaminant oxidation by activated S2O82−, it is more difficult to develop a general description of kobs vs. T because there are

  15. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  16. Thermal oxidative degradation kinetics of agricultural residues using distributed activation energy model and global kinetic model.

    Ren, Xiu'e; Chen, Jianbiao; Li, Gang; Wang, Yanhong; Lang, Xuemei; Fan, Shuanshi

    2018-08-01

    The study concerned the thermal oxidative degradation kinetics of agricultural residues, peanut shell (PS) and sunflower shell (SS). The thermal behaviors were evaluated via thermogravimetric analysis and the kinetic parameters were determined by using distributed activation energy model (DAEM) and global kinetic model (GKM). Results showed that thermal oxidative decomposition of two samples processed in three zones; the ignition, burnout, and comprehensive combustibility between two agricultural residues were of great difference; and the combustion performance could be improved by boosting heating rate. The activation energy ranges calculated by the DAEM for the thermal oxidative degradation of PS and SS were 88.94-145.30 kJ mol -1 and 94.86-169.18 kJ mol -1 , respectively. The activation energy obtained by the GKM for the oxidative decomposition of hemicellulose and cellulose was obviously lower than that for the lignin oxidation at identical heating rate. To some degree, the determined kinetic parameters could acceptably simulate experimental data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Reverse Stability Kinetics of Meat Pigment Oxidation in Aqueous Extract from Fresh Beef.

    Frelka, John C; Phinney, David M; Wick, Macdonald P; Heldman, Dennis R

    2017-12-01

    The use of kinetic models is an evolving approach to describing quality changes in foods during processes, including storage. Previous studies indicate that the oxidation rate of myoglobin is accelerated under frozen storage conditions, a phenomenon termed reverse stability. The goal of this study was to develop a model for meat pigment oxidation to incorporate the phenomenon of reverse stability. In this investigation, the model system was an aqueous extract from beef which was stored under a range of temperatures, both unfrozen and frozen. The kinetic analysis showed that in unfrozen solutions, the temperature dependence of oxidation rate followed Arrhenius kinetics. However, under in frozen solutions the rate of oxidation increased with decreasing temperature until reaching a local maximum around -20 °C. The addition of NaCl to the model system increased oxidation rates at all temperatures, even above the initial freezing temperature. This observation suggests that this reaction is dependent on the ionic strength of the solution as well as temperature. The mechanism of this deviant kinetic behavior is not fully understood, but this study shows that the interplay of temperature and composition on the rate of oxidation of meat pigments is complicated and may involve multiple mechanisms. A better understanding of the kinetics of quality loss in a meat system allows for a re-examination of the current recommendations for frozen storage. The deviant kinetic behavior observed in this study indicates that the relationship between quality loss and temperature in a frozen food is not as simple as once thought. Product-specific recommendations could be implemented in the future that would allow for a decrease in energy consumption without a significant loss of quality. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  18. Mathematical modelling of the kinetics of aerosol oxidation of sulfur dioxide upon electron-beam purification of power-plant flue gases from nitrogen and sulfur oxides

    Gerasimov, G.Ya.; Gerasimova, T.S.; Fadeev, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    A kinetic model of SO 2 oxidation in flue gases, irradiated with accelerated electron flux is proposed. The model comprises an optimized mechanism of gas phase radiation chemical oxidation of NO and SO 2 , kinetics circuit of SO 2 and NH 3 thermal interaction, kinetic models of volumetric condensation of water and sulfuric acid vapors and liquid-phase oxidation of SO 2 in aerosol drops, produced in the course of volumetric condensation. Calculation results are in a satisfactory agreement with experimental data. (author)

  19. Mechanism of nitric acid reduction and kinetic modelling

    Sicsic, David; Balbaud-Celerier, Fanny; Tribollet, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In France, the recycling of nuclear waste fuels involves the use of hot concentrated nitric acid. The understanding and prediction of the behaviour of the structural materials (mainly austenitic stainless steels) requires the determination and modelling of the nitric acid reduction process. Nitric acid is indirectly reduced by an autocatalytic mechanism depending on the cathodic overpotential and acid concentration. This mechanism has been widely studied. All the authors agree on its autocatalytic nature, characterized by the predominant role of the reduction products. It is also generally admitted that neither nitric acid nor the nitrate ion is the electro-active species. However, the nature of the electro-active species, the place where the catalytic species regenerates and the thermodynamic and kinetic behaviour of the reaction intermediates remain uncertain. The aim of this study was to clarify some of these uncertainties by performing an electrochemical investigation of the reduction of 4 M nitric acid at 40 C at an inert electrode (platinum or gold). An inert electrode was chosen as the working electrode in a first step to avoid its oxidation and focus the research on the reduction mechanism. This experimental work enabled us to suggest a coherent sequence of electrochemical and chemical reactions. Kinetic modelling of this sequence was then carried out for a gold rotating disk electrode. A thermodynamic study at 25 C allowed the composition of the liquid and gaseous phases of nitric acid solutions in the concentration range 0.5-22 M to be evaluated. The kinetics of the reduction of 4 M nitric acid was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chrono-amperometry at an inert electrode at 40 C. The coupling of chrono-amperometry and FTIR spectroscopy in the gaseous phase led to the identification of the gaseous reduction products as a function of the cathodic overpotential. The results showed that the reduction process is autocatalytic for potentials between 0

  20. Experimental Study and Mathematical Modeling of Self-Sustained Kinetic Oscillations in Catalytic Oxidation of Methane over Nickel.

    Lashina, Elena A; Kaichev, Vasily V; Saraev, Andrey A; Vinokurov, Zakhar S; Chumakova, Nataliya A; Chumakov, Gennadii A; Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I

    2017-09-21

    The self-sustained kinetic oscillations in the oxidation of CH 4 over Ni foil have been studied at atmospheric pressure using an X-ray diffraction technique and mass spectrometry. It has been shown that the regular oscillations appear under oxygen-deficient conditions; CO, CO 2 , H 2 , and H 2 O are detected as the products. According to in situ X-ray diffraction measurements, nickel periodically oxidizes to NiO initiating the reaction-rate oscillations. To describe the oscillations, we have proposed a five-stage mechanism of the partial oxidation of methane over Ni and a corresponding three-variable kinetic model. The mechanism considers catalytic methane decomposition, dissociative adsorption of oxygen, transformation of chemisorbed oxygen to surface nickel oxide, and reaction of adsorbed carbon and oxygen species to form CO. Analysis of the kinetic model indicates that the competition of two processes, i.e., the oxidation and the carbonization of the catalyst surface, is the driving force of the self-sustained oscillations in the oxidation of methane. We have compared this mechanism with the detailed 18-stage mechanism described previously by Lashina et al. (Kinetics and Catalysis 2012, 53, 374-383). It has been shown that both kinetic mechanisms coupled with a continuous stirred-tank reactor model describe well the oscillatory behavior in the oxidation of methane under non-isothermal conditions.

  1. Determination of oxygen diffusion kinetics during thin film ruthenium oxidation

    Coloma Ribera, R.; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Yakshin, Andrey; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    In situ X-ray reflectivity was used to reveal oxygen diffusion kinetics for thermal oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium thin films and accurate determination of activation energies for this process. Diffusion rates in nanometer thin RuO2 films were found to show Arrhenius behaviour. However, a

  2. Oxidation Kinetics of Copper: An Experiment in Solid State Chemistry.

    Ebisuzaki, Y.; Sanborn, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics in metals and the role defects play in diffusion-controlled reactions are discussed as background for a junior/senior-level experiment in the physical or inorganic chemistry laboratory. Procedures used and typical data obtained are provided for the experiment. (JN)

  3. Kinetics of oxidation of nickel(II) aza macrocycles by ...

    The kinetics of the oxidation of nickel (II) hexaaza and nickel (II) pentaaza macrocycles by the peroxydisulphate anion, S2O8 2-, were studied in aqueous media. Effect of H on reaction rate was also studied. The rate increases with increase of S2OO8 2- concentration. Rates are almost independent of acid between H 4 ...

  4. Simplified kinetic models of methanol oxidation on silver

    Andreasen, A.; Lynggaard, H.; Stegelmann, C.

    2005-01-01

    Recently the authors developed a microkinetic model of methanol oxidation on silver [A. Andreasen, H. Lynggaard, C. Stegelmann, P. Stoltze, Surf. Sci. 544 (2003) 5-23]. The model successfully explains both surface science experiments and kinetic experiments at industrial conditions applying...

  5. Determination of oxygen diffusion kinetics during thin film ruthenium oxidation

    Coloma Ribera, R., E-mail: r.colomaribera@utwente.nl; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F. [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2015-08-07

    In situ X-ray reflectivity was used to reveal oxygen diffusion kinetics for thermal oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium thin films and accurate determination of activation energies for this process. Diffusion rates in nanometer thin RuO{sub 2} films were found to show Arrhenius behaviour. However, a gradual decrease in diffusion rates was observed with oxide growth, with the activation energy increasing from about 2.1 to 2.4 eV. Further exploration of the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor for diffusion process revealed that oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium joins the class of materials that obey the Meyer-Neldel rule.

  6. A kinetic study of the enhancement of solution chemiluminescence of glyoxylic acid oxidation by manganese species.

    Otamonga, Jean-Paul; Abdel-Mageed, Amal; Agater, Irena B; Jewsbury, Roger A

    2015-08-01

    In order to study the mechanism of the enhancement of solution chemiluminescence, the kinetics of the decay of the oxidant and the chemiluminescence emission were followed for oxidations by permanganate, manganese dioxide sol and Mn(3+) (aq) of glyoxylic acid, using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. Results are reported for the glyoxylic acid oxidized under pseudo first-order conditions and in an acidic medium at 25 °C. For permanganate under these conditions, the decay is sigmoidal, consistent with autocatalysis, and for manganese dioxide sol and Mn(3+) it is pseudo first order. The effects of the presence of aqueous formaldehyde and Mn(2+) were observed and a fit to a simple mechanism is discussed. It is concluded that chemiluminescent enhancement in these systems is best explained by reaction kinetics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Kinetic and reaction pathways of methanol oxidation on platinum

    McCabe, R.W.; McCready, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Methanol oxidation kinetics were measured on Pt wires in a flow reactor at pressures between 30 and 130 Pa. The kinetics were measured as a function of oxygen-to-methanol equivalence ratio phi and wire temperature. In methanol-lean feeds (phi 2 CO, CO 2 , and H 2 O were the only products; in methanol-rich feeds (phi > 1), CO, H 2 , H 2 CO, CO 2 , and H 2 O were observed. Experiments with 18 O 2 showed that the principal methanol oxidation pathway does not involve C-O bond dissociation. However, the 18 O 2 experiments, together with other features of the methanol oxidation data, also provided evidence for a minor oxidation pathway (accounting for less than 1% of the product CO 2 ) which proceeds through a carbon intermediate. A mathematical model is presented which describes the principal CH 3 OH oxidation pathway as a series reaction involving adsorbed H 2 CO and CO intermediates. Consistent with experimental results, the model predicts that inhibition by adsorbed CO should be weaker for CH 3 OH and H 2 CO oxidation than for CO oxidation. 34 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of alkenes and silanes by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) and a novel application of electrospray mass spectrometry to study the hydrolysis of MTO

    Tan, Haisong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-11-08

    Conjugated dienes were oxidized by hydrogen peroxide with methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) as catalyst. Methylrhenium bis-peroxide was the major reactive catalyst present. Hydroxyalkenes and trisubstituted silane were also tested. Mechanisms for each of these reactions are presented.

  9. Analysis of the kinetics of methanol oxidation in a porous Pt-Ru anode

    Sun, Yan-Ping; Xing, Lei [Chemical Engineering Department, Taiyuan University of Technology, Shanxi 030024 (China); Scott, Keith [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Merz Court, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-01

    A kinetic model of a porous Pt-Ru anode for methanol oxidation is presented. It was based on the dual-site mechanism for methanol oxidation and used to predict anode performance and the influence of species adsorption on the overall oxidation (macro-) kinetics. The performance of the porous Pt-Ru anode depended on the parameters of the intrinsic chemical kinetics of methanol oxidation and physical parameters such as electrode thickness, surface area, effective diffusion and charge transfer coefficients and concentration of methanol and temperature. The model was solved by using the finite difference method with a subroutine for solving a set of nonlinear algebraic equations in each step. Surface coverage ratio distributions of adsorbed species, effectiveness of the porous electrode and macro-polarisation curves were obtained. The simulated polarisation curves were compared to experimental polarisation data for methanol oxidation on Pt-Ru porous anodes at different temperatures and methanol concentrations. The intrinsic kinetic parameters were regressed from the corresponding experimental data. The predicted polarisation curves calculated by the model, were consistent with experimental polarisation data at lower current densities. The departure of experimental data from the predicted polarisation curves at high concentration and high apparent current densities was believed to be due to two-phase flow in the electrode. (author)

  10. Kinetics of FeII-polyaminocarboxylate oxidation by molecular oxygen

    Wilson, Jessica M.; Farley, Kevin J.; Carbonaro, Richard F.

    2018-03-01

    Complexation of iron by naturally-occurring and synthetic organic ligands has a large effect on iron oxidation and reduction rates which in turn affect the aqueous geochemistry of many other chemical constituents. In this study, the kinetics of FeII oxidation in the presence of the polyaminocarboxylate synthetic chelating agents ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and trimethylenediamine-N,N,N‧,N‧-tetraacetic acid (TMDTA) was investigated over the pH range 5.50-8.53. Batch oxidation experiments in the presence of molecular oxygen were conducted using a 2:1 M concentration ratio of polyaminocarboxylate (ligand, L) to FeII. The experimental data resembled first order kinetics for the oxidation of FeII-L to FeIII-L and observed rate constants at pH 6.0 were comparable to rate constants for the oxidation of inorganic FeII. Similar to other structurally-similar FeII-polyaminocarboxylate complexes, oxidation rates of FeII-EGTA and FeII-TMDTA decrease with increasing pH, which is the opposite trend for the oxidation of FeII complexed with inorganic ligands. However, the oxidation rates of FeII complexed with EGTA and TMDTA were considerably lower (4-5 orders of magnitude) than FeII complexed to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The distinguishing feature of the slower-reacting complexes is that they have a longer backbone between diamine functional groups. An analytical equilibrium model was developed to determine the contributions of the species FeIIL2- and FeII(H)L- to the overall oxidation rate of FeII-L. Application of this model indicated that the protonated FeII(H)L species are more than three orders of magnitude more reactive than FeIIL2-. These rate constants were used in a coupled kinetic equilibrium numerical model where the ligand to iron ratio (TOTL:TOTFe) and pH were varied to evaluate the effect on the FeII oxidation rate. Overall, increasing TOTL:TOTFe for EGTA and TMDTA enhances FeII oxidation rates at lower pH and inhibits FeII oxidation

  11. Force-dominated non-equilibrium oxidation kinetics of tantalum

    Kar, Prasenjit; Wang, Ke; Liang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Using a combined electrochemical and mechanical manipulation technique, we compared the equilibrium and non-equilibrium oxidation processes and states of tantalum. Experimentally, a setup was developed with an electrochemical system attached to a sliding mechanical configuration capable of friction force measurement. The surface chemistry of a sliding surface, i.e., tantalum, was modified through the electrolyte. The mechanically applied force was fixed and the dynamics of the surface was monitored in situ through a force sensor. The formation of non-equilibrium oxidation states of tantalum was found in oxidation limiting environment of acetic acid. An oxidative environment of deionized water saturated with KCl was used as comparison. We proposed a modified Arrhenius-Eyring equation in which the mechanical factor was considered. We found that the mechanical energy induced the non-stable-state reactions leading to metastable oxidation states of tantalum. This equation can be used to predict mechanochemical reactions that are important in many industrial applications

  12. Oxidation kinetics of hazelnut oil treated with ozone

    H. Uzun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the oxidation kinetics of hazelnut oil ozonated in different treatment periods (1, 5, 60 and 180 min. The kinetic rate constant (k was taken as the inverse of oxidation onset time (To observing a linear relationship from the plot of lnTo to isothermal temperatures (373, 383, 393, and 403 K carried out at differential scanning calorimetry. Kinetic parameters, activation energy (Ea, activation enthalpy (ΔH‡ and entropy (ΔS‡ were calculated based on the Arrhenius equation and activated complex theory. k values showed an exponential rise with the increase of ozone treatment time. The increase in k correlated well with the increase in the peroxide and free fatty acid values of all samples. Ea and ∆H‡ of the ozone treated oils showed a reducing trend and reflected an increased oxidation sensitivity after ozone treatment. Consistently, an increase in ∆S‡ indicated a faster oxidation reaction with an increase in ozone exposure time. However, no significant difference was observed in k, Ea, ΔH‡, ΔS‡ (p < 0.05 as a function of storage period, after the hazelnut oil was treated with ozone for 1 min.

  13. Developments in kinetic modelling of chalcocite particle oxidation

    Jaervi, J; Ahokainen, T; Jokilaakso, A [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Materials Processing and Powder Metallurgy

    1998-12-31

    A mathematical model for simulating chalcocite particle oxidation is presented. Combustion of pure chalcocite with oxygen is coded as a kinetic module which can be connected as a separate part of commercial CFD-package, PHOENICS. Heat transfer, fluid flow and combustion phenomena can be simulated using CFD-calculation together with the kinetic model. Interaction between gas phase and particles are taken into account by source terms. The aim of the kinetic model is to calculate the particle temperature, contents of species inside the particle, oxygen consumption and formation of sulphur dioxide. Four oxidation reactions are considered and the shrinking core model is used to describe the rate of the oxidation reactions. The model is verified by simulating the particle oxidation reactions in a laboratory scale laminar-flow furnace under different conditions and the model predicts the effects of charges correctly. In the future, the model validation will be done after experimental studies in the laminar flow-furnace. (author) 18 refs.

  14. Isothermal Kinetics of Catalyzed Air Oxidation of Diesel Soot

    R. Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To comply with the stringent emission regulations on soot, diesel vehicles manufacturers more and more commonly use diesel particulate filters (DPF. These systems need to be regenerated periodically by burning soot that has been accumulated during the loading of the DPF. Design of the DPF requires rate of soot oxidation. This paper describes the kinetics of catalytic oxidation of diesel soot with air under isothermal conditions. Kinetics data were collected in a specially designed mini-semi-batch reactor. Under the high air flow rate assuming pseudo first order reaction the activation energy of soot oxidation was found to be, Ea = 160 kJ/ mol. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 14th June 2010, Revised: 18th July 2010, Accepted: 9th August 2010[How to Cite: R. Prasad, V.R. Bella. (2010. Isothermal Kinetics of Catalyzed Air Oxidation of Diesel Soot. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 5(2: 95-101. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.2.796.95-101][DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.2.796.95-101 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/796]Cited by in: ACS 1 |

  15. Developments in kinetic modelling of chalcocite particle oxidation

    Jaervi, J.; Ahokainen, T.; Jokilaakso, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Materials Processing and Powder Metallurgy

    1997-12-31

    A mathematical model for simulating chalcocite particle oxidation is presented. Combustion of pure chalcocite with oxygen is coded as a kinetic module which can be connected as a separate part of commercial CFD-package, PHOENICS. Heat transfer, fluid flow and combustion phenomena can be simulated using CFD-calculation together with the kinetic model. Interaction between gas phase and particles are taken into account by source terms. The aim of the kinetic model is to calculate the particle temperature, contents of species inside the particle, oxygen consumption and formation of sulphur dioxide. Four oxidation reactions are considered and the shrinking core model is used to describe the rate of the oxidation reactions. The model is verified by simulating the particle oxidation reactions in a laboratory scale laminar-flow furnace under different conditions and the model predicts the effects of charges correctly. In the future, the model validation will be done after experimental studies in the laminar flow-furnace. (author) 18 refs.

  16. Oxidation kinetics of hazelnut oil treated with ozone

    Uzun, H.; Ibanoglu, E.

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates the oxidation kinetics of hazelnut oil ozonated in different treatment periods (1, 5, 60 and 180 min). The kinetic rate constant (k) was taken as the inverse of oxidation onset time (To) observing a linear relationship from the plot of ln To to isothermal temperatures (373, 383, 393, and 403 K) carried out at differential scanning calorimetry. Kinetic parameters, activation energy (Ea), activation enthalpy (ΔH‡) and entropy (ΔS‡) were calculated based on the Arrhenius equation and activated complex theory. k values showed an exponential rise with the increase of ozone treatment time. The increase in k correlated well with the increase in the peroxide and free fatty acid values of all samples. Ea and ΔH‡ of the ozone treated oils showed a reducing trend and reflected an increased oxidation sensitivity after ozone treatment. Consistently, an increase in ΔS‡ indicated a faster oxidation reaction with an increase in ozone exposure time. However, no significant difference was observed in k, Ea, ΔH‡, ΔS‡ (p < 0.05) as a function of storage period, after the hazelnut oil was treated with ozone for 1 min. [es

  17. Hydrodenitrogenation mechanism of aromatic amines. Kinetic study and simulation

    D'Araujo, P.A.P.

    1994-06-01

    The decomposition of model molecules reacting alone or in competition was studied in a fixed bed reactor at 623 K and 7 MPa over a sulfided NiMo/Al 2 O 3 catalyst. The inhibiting effect of H 2 S and some nitrogen molecules, namely quinoline type compounds plays a major role in the transformation of anilines intermediates. On the other hand H 2 S acts as a cocatalyst and promote carbon-nitrogen bond cleavage, specially at low H 2 S partial pressure. When the H 2 S partial pressure is greater than the nitrogen compound partial pressure an inhibiting effect of H 2 S occurs and its promoting effect on carbon-nitrogen bond cleavage is cancelled. Hydrogen has a positive but moderate effect in hydrogenation steps. The mechanism of carbon-nitrogen bond scission depends on the structure of the nitrogen molecule namely on the hybridization of the carbon atom bearing the nitrogen atom. If the carbon a with respect to the nitrogen is monosubstituted the mechanism is essentially a nucleophilic substitution. When the degree of substitution increases the elimination mechanism becomes more important and the two mechanisms are in competition. With a sulfided catalyst, H 2 S from the gas phase doesn't change the importance of each mechanism, it just increases the rate of the reaction. In the presence of an oxide catalyst the contribution of the two mechanisms change. This result shows the importance of the sulphur species from the surface. Using isotopic exchange we could demonstrate that the sites able to dissociate H 2 S and H 2 are the same, and that the dissociation is of heterolytic nature. The kinetic modeling of hydrotreatment reactions using the CHEMKIN/SURFACE CHEMKIN package seems to be a convenient method in order to understand the kinetic and mechanistic phenomena in hydrodenitrogenation. The preliminary simulations in the case of 2.6 diethylaniline showed that only one type of site is not sufficient in order to account for the experimental results. Further simulations

  18. Kinetic mechanism of DNA polymerase I (Klenow)

    Kuchta, R.D.; Mizrahi, V.; Benkovic, P.A.; Johnson, K.A.; Benkovic, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    The minimal kinetic scheme for DNA polymerization catalyzed by the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I (KF) from Escherichia coli has been determined with short DNA oligomers of defined sequence, labeled with [ 32 P]-nucleotides. A key feature of this scheme is a minimal two-step sequence that interconverts the ternary KF-DNA/sub n/-dNTP and KF-DNA/sub n+1/-PP/sub i/ complexes. The rate is not limited by the actual polymerization but by a separate step, possibly important in ensuring fidelity. Evidence for this sequence is supplied by the observation of biphasic kinetics in single-turnover pyrophosphorolysis experiments (the microscopic reverse of polymerization). Data analysis then provides an estimate of the internal equilibrium constant. The dissociations of DNA, dNTP, and PP/sub i/ from the various binary and ternary complexes were measured by partitioning (isotope-trapping) experiments. The rate constant for DNA dissociation from KF is sequence dependent and is rate limiting during nonprocessive DNA synthesis. The combination of single-turnover (both directions) and isotope-trapping experiments provides sufficient information to permit a quantitative evaluation of the kinetic scheme for specific DNA sequences

  19. Development of Kinetics for Soot Oxidation at High Pressures Under Fuel-Lean Conditions

    Lighty, JoAnn [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Vander Wal, Randy [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2014-04-21

    The focus of the proposed research was to develop kinetic models for soot oxidation with the hope of developing a validated, predictive, multi-­scale, combustion model to optimize the design and operation of evolving fuels in advanced engines for transportation applications. The work focused on the relatively unstudied area of the fundamental mechanism for soot oxidation. The objectives include understanding of the kinetics of soot oxidation by O2 under high pressure which require: 1) development of intrinsic kinetics for the surface oxidation, which takes into account the dependence of reactivity upon nanostructure and 2) evolution of nanostructure and its impact upon oxidation rate and 3) inclusion of internal surface area development and possible fragmentation resulting from pore development and /or surface oxidation. These objectives were explored for a variety of pure fuel components and surrogate fuels. This project was a joint effort between the University of Utah (UU) and Pennsylvania State University (Penn State). The work at the UU focuses on experimental studies using a two-­stage burner and a high- pressure thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Penn State provided HRTEM images and guidance in the fringe analysis algorithms and parameter quantification for the images. This report focuses on completion done under supplemental funding.

  20. Evolution of zirconium-based precipitates during oxidation and irradiation of Zr alloys (impact on the oxidation kinetics of Zr alloys)

    Pecheur, Dominique

    1993-01-01

    As the oxidation of the zircaloy sheath is one of the factors which limit the lifetime of nuclear fuel rods, this research thesis aims at a better knowledge of the involved oxidation mechanisms and to improve the oxidation resistance in order to increase rod lifetime. Oxidation test performed in autoclave to study zirconium alloy oxidation without irradiation showed that oxidation kinetics is significantly higher under irradiation. This difference is attributed to a different evolution of the sheath material under irradiation. Thus, this research focused on the role of precipitates in the oxidation process of zirconium alloys, and on the impact of their amorphization on this oxidation. After a detailed description of the context and of the various implemented experimental means, the author presents the results obtained on a reference material on the one hand, and on a material irradiated by ions or neutrons on the other hand. More particularly, the author studied in these both cases the introduction of precipitates in the oxide layer by transmission electronic microscopy, and oxidation kinetics obtained in autoclave on these two types of material. He reports the analysis of the introduction of precipitates in the oxide layer formed on the reference material. He proposes interpretations for the evolutions of structure and of chemical compositions of precipitates in the oxide layer. These observations are then correlated with oxidation kinetics in these alloys. Finally, the author discusses results of oxidation tests obtained on materials irradiated by ions and by neutrons [fr

  1. Thermoactivated persulfate oxidation of pesticide chlorpyrifos in aquatic system: kinetic and mechanistic investigations.

    Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Ya; Ying, Rongrong; Wang, Guoqing; Long, Tao; Li, Jianhua; Lin, Yusuo

    2017-04-01

    The widespread occurrence of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in the environment poses risks to both ecologic system as well as human health. This study investigated the oxidation kinetics of chlorpyrifos (CP), one of the typical OPPs, by thermoactivated persulfate (PS) oxidation process, and evaluated the influence of key kinetic factors, such as PS concentrations, pH, temperature, bicarbonate, and chloride ions. The reaction pathways and mechanisms were also proposed based on products identification by LC-MS techniques. Our results revealed that increasing initial PS concentration and temperature favored the decomposition of CP, whereas the oxidation efficiency was not affected by pH change ranging from 3 to 11. Bicarbonate was found to play a detrimental role on CP removal rates, while chloride showed no effect. The oxidation pathways including initial oxidation of P=S bond to P=O, dechlorination, dealkylation, and the dechlorination-hydroxylation were proposed, and the detailed underlying mechanisms were also discussed. Molecular orbital (MO) calculations indicated that P=S bond was the most favored oxidation site of the molecule. The toxicity of reaction solution was believed to increase due to the formation of products with P=O structures. This work demonstrates that OPPs can readily react with SO 4 ·- and provides important information for further research on the oxidation of these contaminants.

  2. Comparison of the Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of As-Cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al. Part 1; Oxidation Kinetics

    Raj. Sai V.

    2008-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation kinetics of as-cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al in air were studied between 773 and 1173 K under atmospheric pressure. These observations reveal that Cu- 17%Cr-5%Al oxidizes at significantly slower rates than Cu-17%Cr. The rate constants for the alloys were determined from generalized analyses of the data without an a priori assumption of the nature of the oxidation kinetics. Detailed analyses of the isothermal thermogravimetric weight change data revealed that Cu-17%Cr exhibited parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 165.9 9.5 kJ mol-1. In contrast, the oxidation kinetics for the Cu-17%Cr- 5%Al alloy exhibited a parabolic oxidation kinetics during the initial stages followed by a quartic relationship in the later stages of oxidation. Alternatively, the oxidation behavior of Cu-17%CR- 5%Al could be better represented by a logarithmic relationship. The parabolic rate constants and activation energy data for the two alloys are compared with literature data to gain insights on the nature of the oxidation mechanisms dominant in these alloys.

  3. Comparison of the Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of As-Cast Cu-17 Percent Cr and Cu-17 Percent Cr-5 Percent Al. Part 1; Oxidation Kinetics

    Raj, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation kinetics of as-cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al in air were studied between 773 and 1173 K under atmospheric pressure. These observations reveal that Cu-17%Cr-5%Al oxidizes at significantly slower rates than Cu-17%Cr. The rate constants for the alloys were determined from generalized analyses of the data without an a priori assumption of the nature of the oxidation kinetics. Detailed analyses of the isothermal thermogravimetric weight change data revealed that Cu-17%Cr exhibited parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 165.9+/-9.5 kJ/mol. In contrast, the oxidation kinetics for the Cu-17%Cr-5%Al alloy exhibited a parabolic oxidation kinetics during the initial stages followed by a quartic relationship in the later stages of oxidation. Alternatively, the oxidation behavior of Cu-17%CR-5%Al could be better represented by a logarithmic relationship. The parabolic rate constants and activation energy data for the two alloys are compared with literature data to gain insights on the nature of the oxidation mechanisms dominant in these alloys.

  4. Reaction mechanisms of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of organic compounds

    Froehaug, Astrid Elisabeth

    1995-12-31

    This thesis reports a study of the mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of saturated hydrocarbons, ethers, alkenes and alcohols. Several methods were used. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidations of adamantane and cis-decalin were studied in CCl{sub 4}-CH{sub 3}CN-H{sub 2}O and in acetone-water. The rate of reaction was found to be moderately influenced by the polarity of the solvent. Solvent properties other than the polarity were also found to influence the reaction rates. From the oxidations of adamantane and adamantane-1,3,5,7-d{sub 4} two primary kinetic deuterium isotope effects were found. These were comparable with the deuterium isotope effects found for the analogous oxidations of cis-decalin and cis-decalin-d{sub 18}. The results seem to exclude both a one step hydride abstraction reaction mechanism and a one step concerted mechanism, as well as a scheme where two such mechanisms compete. The observations may be explained by a two step reaction mechanism consisting of a pre-equilibrium with formation of a substrate-RuO{sub 4} complex followed by a concerted rate determining reaction. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidation of ethers was of kinetic second order with a small enthalpy of activation and a large negative entropy of activation. Oxidation of cyclopropylmethyl methyl ether gave methyl cyclopropanecarboxylate, no rearranged products were observed. On RuO{sub 4} oxidations in CCl{sub 4} with NaIO{sub 4} as stoichiometric oxidant, no chlorinated products were observed. Several observations not in agreement with a hydride or a hydrogen abstraction mechanism may be explained by assuming that the reaction proceeds by either a concerted reaction or by a reversible oxidative addition of the ether to RuO{sub 4} followed by a slow concerted step. 228 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  5. Acid-catalyzed kinetics of indium tin oxide etching

    Choi, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Seong-Oh; Hilton, Diana L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Centre for Biomimetic Sensor Science, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Drive, 637553 (Singapore); Cho, Nam-Joon, E-mail: njcho@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Centre for Biomimetic Sensor Science, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Drive, 637553 (Singapore); School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, 637459 (Singapore)

    2014-08-28

    We report the kinetic characterization of indium tin oxide (ITO) film etching by chemical treatment in acidic and basic electrolytes. It was observed that film etching increased under more acidic conditions, whereas basic conditions led to minimal etching on the time scale of the experiments. Quartz crystal microbalance was employed in order to track the reaction kinetics as a function of the concentration of hydrochloric acid and accordingly solution pH. Contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy experiments determined that acid treatment increases surface hydrophilicity and porosity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments identified that film etching is primarily caused by dissolution of indium species. A kinetic model was developed to explain the acid-catalyzed dissolution of ITO surfaces, and showed a logarithmic relationship between the rate of dissolution and the concentration of undisassociated hydrochloric acid molecules. Taken together, the findings presented in this work verify the acid-catalyzed kinetics of ITO film dissolution by chemical treatment, and support that the corresponding chemical reactions should be accounted for in ITO film processing applications. - Highlights: • Acidic conditions promoted indium tin oxide (ITO) film etching via dissolution. • Logarithm of the dissolution rate depended linearly on the solution pH. • Acid treatment increased ITO surface hydrophilicity and porosity. • ITO film etching led to preferential dissolution of indium species over tin species.

  6. Iron-Mediated Oxidation of Methoxyhydroquinone under Dark Conditions: Kinetic and Mechanistic Insights.

    Yuan, Xiu; Davis, James A; Nico, Peter S

    2016-02-16

    Despite the biogeochemical significance of the interactions between natural organic matter (NOM) and iron species, considerable uncertainty still remains as to the exact processes contributing to the rates and extents of complexation and redox reactions between these important and complex environmental components. Investigations on the reactivity of low-molecular-weight quinones, which are believed to be key redox active compounds within NOM, toward iron species, could provide considerable insight into the kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving NOM and iron. In this study, the oxidation of 2-methoxyhydroquinone (MH2Q) by ferric iron (Fe(III)) under dark conditions in the absence and presence of oxygen was investigated within a pH range of 4-6. Although Fe(III) was capable of stoichiometrically oxidizing MH2Q under anaerobic conditions, catalytic oxidation of MH2Q was observed in the presence of O2 due to further cycling between oxygen, semiquinone radicals, and iron species. A detailed kinetic model was developed to describe the predominant mechanisms, which indicated that both the undissociated and monodissociated anions of MH2Q were kinetically active species toward Fe(III) reduction, with the monodissociated anion being the key species accounting for the pH dependence of the oxidation. The generated radical intermediates, namely semiquinone and superoxide, are of great importance in reaction-chain propagation. The kinetic model may provide critical insight into the underlying mechanisms of the thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of metal-organic interactions and assist in understanding and predicting the factors controlling iron and organic matter transformation and bioavailability in aquatic systems.

  7. Influence of ammonium nitrate on kinetics and mechanism of thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates

    Karelin, A.I.; Lobas, O.P.; Zhiganov, A.N.; Vasil'ev, K.F.; Zhiganova, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of ammonium nitrate on the mechanism and kinetics of dehydration and thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates was studied. An appreciable influence of the nitrate ion content in the samples of ammonium polyuranates on the development of thermal stability has been noted. The kinetic parameters of the thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates have been evaluated. A mechanism of the dehydration and thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates in the presence of ammonium nitrate has been proposed. It was shown that increase in the content of ammonium nitrate in the precipitate of ammonium polyuranates leads to a decrease in the specific surface of uranoso-uranic oxide

  8. Investigation of ammonium nitrate effect on kinetics and mechanism of thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates

    Karelin, A.I.; Lobas, O.P.; Zhiganov, A.N.; Vasil'ev, K.F.; Zhiganova, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made on ammonium nitrate effect on the mechanism and kinetics of dehydration and thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates. Sufficient effect of nitrate ion content in ammonium polyuranate samples on their thermal stability was noted. Kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates were evaluated. Mechanism of dehydration and thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates in the presence of ammonium nitrate was suggested. It was shown that increase of ammonium nitrate content in ammonium polyuranate precipitate resulted to reduction of the specific surface of prepared uranium mixed oxide

  9. Kinetics of bromide catalysed oxidation of dextrose by cerium (IV) in aqueous sulphuric acid solution

    Sharma, J.; Sah, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    Kinetics of bromide catalysed oxidation of dextrose by Ce IV in aqueous sulphuric acid medium show first order dependence each in dextrose and cerium(IV). The reaction rate decreases on increasing the concentration of hydrogen ion. The increase in [HSO 4 - ] or [SO 4 2- ] decreases the rate. The bromide ion shows positive catalytic effect on the reaction rate. The value of activation energy has been calculated and a suitable mechanism confirming to the kinetic data is proposed. (author). 3 refs., 3 tabs

  10. Oxidation of phenyl alanine by pyridinium chlorochromate in acidic DMF–water medium: A kinetic study

    B.L. Hiran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of phenyl alanine by pyridinium chlorochromate in DMF–water (70:30% mixture in presence of perchloric acid leads to the formation of corresponding aldehyde. The reaction is of first order each in [PCC], [HClO4] and [AA]. Michaelis–Menten type kinetics was observed with phenyl alanine. The reaction rates were determined at different temperatures [25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50 °C] and the activation parameters were calculated. The reaction does not induce polymerization of acrylonitrile. With an increase in the amount of DMF in its aqueous mixture, the rate increases. A suitable mechanism for the reaction was postulated.

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrolysis of benzimidazolylcarbamates

    Norberto, F. P.; Santos, S. P.; Iley, J.; Silva, D. B.; Corte Real, M.

    2007-01-01

    Synthesis of new 2-aminobenzimidazole-1-carbamates was accomplished by carbamoylation of 2-aminobenzimidazole using different substituted phenyl chloroformates. The aqueous hydrolysis of the new compounds was examined in the pH range 1-13 at 25 ºC. The evaluated kinetic parameters led to the conclusion that up to pH 4 reaction proceeds by a bimolecular attack of water to the N-protonated substrate. This is the first time this behavior is described for carbamates, and can be ascribed to the hi...

  12. Kinetics of Oxidation of Some Amino Acids by N-Chlorosaccharin in Aqueous Acetic Acid Medium

    N. A. Mohamed Farook

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of some amino acids namely, glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, arginine, and histidine, (AA by N-chlorosaccharin (NCSA in aqueous acetic acid medium in the presence of perchloric acid have been investigated. The observed rate of oxidation is first order in [AA], [NCSA] and of inverse fractional order in [H+]. The main product of the oxidation is the corresponding aldehyde. The ionic strength on the reaction rate has no significant effect. The effect of changing the dielectric constant of the medium on the rate indicates the reaction to be of dipole-dipole type. Hypochlorous acid has been postulated as the reactive oxidizing species. The reaction constants involved in the mechanism are derived. The activation parameters are computed with respect to slow step of the mechanism.

  13. The kinetic of photoreactions in zinc oxide microrods

    Fiedot, M.; Rac, O.; Suchorska-Woźniak, P.; Nawrot, W.; Teterycz, H.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide is the oldest sensing material used in the chemical resistive gas sensors which allow to detect many gases, such as carbon oxide, nitrogen oxides and other. This material is also widely used in medicine and daily life as antibacterial agent. For this reason this semiconductor is often synthesized on the polymer substrates such as foils and textiles. In presented results zinc oxide was deposited on the surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) foil to obtain antibacterial material. As synthesis method chemical bath deposition was chosen. The growth of zinc oxide structures was carried out in water solution of zinc nitrate (V) and hexamethylenetetramine in 90°C during 9 h. Because antibacterial properties of ZnO are strongly depended on photocatalytic and electric properties of this semiconductor impedance spectroscopy measurements were carried out. During the measurements material was tested with and without UV light to determinate the kinetic of photoreactions in zinc oxide. Moreover the composite was analyzed by XRD diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The X-ray analysis indicated that obtained material has the structure of wurtzite which is typical of zinc oxide. SEM images showed that on the PET foil microrods of ZnO were formed. The impedance spectroscopy measurements of ZnO layer showed that in UV light significant changes in the conductivity of the material are observed.

  14. The kinetic of photoreactions in zinc oxide microrods

    Fiedot, M; Rac, O; Suchorska-Woźniak, P; Nawrot, W; Teterycz, H

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide is the oldest sensing material used in the chemical resistive gas sensors which allow to detect many gases, such as carbon oxide, nitrogen oxides and other. This material is also widely used in medicine and daily life as antibacterial agent. For this reason this semiconductor is often synthesized on the polymer substrates such as foils and textiles. In presented results zinc oxide was deposited on the surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) foil to obtain antibacterial material. As synthesis method chemical bath deposition was chosen. The growth of zinc oxide structures was carried out in water solution of zinc nitrate (V) and hexamethylenetetramine in 90°C during 9 h. Because antibacterial properties of ZnO are strongly depended on photocatalytic and electric properties of this semiconductor impedance spectroscopy measurements were carried out. During the measurements material was tested with and without UV light to determinate the kinetic of photoreactions in zinc oxide. Moreover the composite was analyzed by XRD diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The X-ray analysis indicated that obtained material has the structure of wurtzite which is typical of zinc oxide. SEM images showed that on the PET foil microrods of ZnO were formed. The impedance spectroscopy measurements of ZnO layer showed that in UV light significant changes in the conductivity of the material are observed

  15. Oxidation kinetics of amorphous AlxZr1−x alloys

    Weller, K.; Wang, Z.M.; Jeurgens, L.P.H.; Mittemeijer, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of amorphous Al x Zr 1−x alloys (solid solution) has been studied as function of the alloy composition (0.26 ≤ x ≤ 0.68) and the oxidation temperature (350 °C ≤ T ≤ 400 °C; at constant pO 2  = 1 × 10 5  Pa) by a combinatorial approach using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) depth profiling, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Thermal oxidation of the am-Al x Zr 1−x alloys results in the formation of an amorphous oxide overgrowth with a thermodynamically preferred singular composition, corresponding to a constant Al ox /Zr ox ratio of 0.5. Both the solubility and the diffusivity of oxygen in the am-Al x Zr 1−x alloy substrate increase considerably with increasing Zr content, in particular for Zr contents above 49 at.% Zr. Strikingly, the oxidation kinetics exhibit a transition from parabolic oxide growth kinetics for Al-rich am-Al x Zr 1−x alloys (x ≥ 0.51) to linear oxide growth kinetics for Zr-rich am-Al x Zr 1−x alloys (x < 0.35). The underlying oxidation mechanism is discussed. It is concluded that the oxidation kinetics of the amorphous Al x Zr 1−x alloys for 0.26 ≤ x ≤ 0.68 and 350 °C ≤ T ≤ 400 °C are governed by: (i) the atomic mobilities of O and Al in the alloy substrate at the reacting oxide/alloy interface, (ii) the solubility of O in the substrate and (iii) the compositional constraint due to the thermodynamically preferred formation of an amorphous oxide phase of singular composition.

  16. Kinetics of Chronic Oxidation of NBG-17 Nuclear Graphite by Water Vapor

    Contescu, Cristian I [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burchell, Timothy D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report presents the results of kinetic measurements during accelerated oxidation tests of NBG-17 nuclear graphite by low concentration of water vapor and hydrogen in ultra-high purity helium. The objective is to determine the parameters in the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) equation describing the oxidation kinetics of nuclear graphite in the helium coolant of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). Although the helium coolant chemistry is strictly controlled during normal operating conditions, trace amounts of moisture (predictably < 0.2 ppm) cannot be avoided. Prolonged exposure of graphite components to water vapor at high temperature will cause very slow (chronic) oxidation over the lifetime of graphite components. This behavior must be understood and predicted for the design and safe operation of gas-cooled nuclear reactors. The results reported here show that, in general, oxidation by water of graphite NBG-17 obeys the L-H mechanism, previously documented for other graphite grades. However, the characteristic kinetic parameters that best describe oxidation rates measured for graphite NBG-17 are different than those reported previously for grades H-451 (General Atomics, 1978) and PCEA (ORNL, 2013). In some specific conditions, certain deviations from the generally accepted L-H model were observed for graphite NBG-17. This graphite is manufactured in Germany by SGL Carbon Group and is a possible candidate for the fuel elements and reflector blocks of HTGR.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of DNA repair

    Meldrum, R.A.; Wharton, C.W.; Shall, S.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments are described in which the feasibility of using caged dideoxy and other nucleoside triphosphate analogues for trapping breaks induced by u.v. radiation damage to mammalian cell DNA is evaluated. These nucleotide analogues that have a photolabile 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl-protecting group attached to the γ-phosphate are placed in situ by permeabilizing cells by exposure to hypo-osmotic medium. The nucleoside triphosphate is released by a 351 nm u.v. laser pulse whence it may incorporate in the growing chain of DNA induced by the excision-repair process and terminate chain elongation. If the photoreleased dideoxynucleoside trisphosphate is isotopically labelled in the α-phosphate position the break is trapped and labelled. Incorporation of radioactivity into trichloroacetic acid insoluble material in these experiments confirms their potential for use in studies of the kinetics of mammalian cell DNA repair. (author)

  18. Chemisorption of CO and mechanism of CO oxidation on supported platinum nanoclusters

    Allian, Ayman Daoud; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Fujdala, Kyle L.; Hao, Xianghong; Truex., Timothy J.; Cai, Juan; Buda, Corneliu; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic, isotopic, and infrared studies on well-defined dispersed Pt clusters are combined here with first-principle theoretical methods on model cluster surfaces to probe the mechanism and structural requirements for CO oxidation catalysis

  19. Oxidation kinetics of CVD silicon carbide and silicon nitride

    Fox, Dennis S.

    1992-01-01

    The long-term oxidation behavior of pure, monolithic CVD SiC and Si3N4 is studied, and the isothermal oxidation kinetics of these two materials are obtained for the case of 100 hrs at 1200-1500 C in flowing oxygen. Estimates are made of lifetimes at the various temperatures investigated. Parabolic rate constants for SiC are within an order of magnitude of shorter exposure time values reported in the literature. The resulting silica scales are in the form of cristobalite, with cracks visible after exposure. The oxidation protection afforded by silica for these materials is adequate for long service times under isothermal conditions in 1-atm dry oxygen.

  20. Oxygen Reduction Kinetics Enhancement on a Heterostructured Oxide Surface for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Crumlin, Ethan J.

    2010-11-04

    Heterostructured interfaces of oxides, which can exhibit transport and reactivity characteristics remarkably different from those of bulk oxides, are interesting systems to explore in search of highly active cathodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we show that the ORR of ∼85 nm thick La0.8Sr0.2CoO3-δ (LSC113) films prepared by pulsed laser deposition on (001)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates is dramatically enhanced (∼3-4 orders of magnitude above bulk LSC113) by surface decorations of (La 0.5Sr0.5)2CoO4±δ (LSC214) with coverage in the range from ∼0.1 to ∼15 nm. Their surface and atomic structures were characterized by atomic force, scanning electron, and scanning transmission electron microscopy, and the ORR kinetics were determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Although the mechanism for ORR enhancement is not yet fully understood, our results to date show that the observed ORR enhancement can be attributed to highly active interfacial LSC113/LSC214 regions, which were shown to be atomically sharp. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. Oxygen Reduction Kinetics Enhancement on a Heterostructured Oxide Surface for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mutoro, Eva; Ahn, Sung-Jin; la O’ , Gerardo Jose; Leonard, Donovan N.; Borisevich, Albina; Biegalski, Michael D.; Christen, Hans M.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Heterostructured interfaces of oxides, which can exhibit transport and reactivity characteristics remarkably different from those of bulk oxides, are interesting systems to explore in search of highly active cathodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we show that the ORR of ∼85 nm thick La0.8Sr0.2CoO3-δ (LSC113) films prepared by pulsed laser deposition on (001)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates is dramatically enhanced (∼3-4 orders of magnitude above bulk LSC113) by surface decorations of (La 0.5Sr0.5)2CoO4±δ (LSC214) with coverage in the range from ∼0.1 to ∼15 nm. Their surface and atomic structures were characterized by atomic force, scanning electron, and scanning transmission electron microscopy, and the ORR kinetics were determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Although the mechanism for ORR enhancement is not yet fully understood, our results to date show that the observed ORR enhancement can be attributed to highly active interfacial LSC113/LSC214 regions, which were shown to be atomically sharp. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  2. Oxidation Kinetics of Cast TiAl3

    Smialek, J. L.; Humphrey, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation kinetics of the TiAl3 compound over a wide temperature range is documented, and these rates are related to exclusive alpha-Al2O3 scale growth. The specific weight change vs time curves are shown. Two abnormalities are immediately apparent. One is that a rapid initial uptake of oxygen occurs at times less than 5 h, followed by a lower oxidation rate at longer times, for tests at 900 C and below. The other is that the final weight changes for the 700, 800, and 900 C tests are not in the sequence expected with respect to temperature. Isothermal oxidation of drop cast TiAl above 1000 C was found to exhibit parabolic oxidation controlled by protective alpha-Al2O3 scale formation. TiAl is the only phase in the binary Ti-Al system that forms exclusive scales of alpha-Al2O3 in isothermal oxidation. High anomalous rates at short times and at temperatures below 1000 C resulted from the internal oxidation of a second phase of aluminum.

  3. Kinetic study on anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to denitrification.

    Yu, Hou; Kashima, Hiroyuki; Regan, John M; Hussain, Abid; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2017-09-01

    Monod kinetic parameters provide information required for kinetic analysis of anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to denitrification (AOM-D). This information is critical for engineering AOM-D processes in wastewater treatment facilities. We first experimentally determined Monod kinetic parameters for an AOM-D enriched culture and obtained the following values: maximum specific growth rate (μ max ) 0.121/d, maximum substrate-utilization rate (q max ) 28.8mmol CH 4 /g cells-d, half maximum-rate substrate concentration (K s ) 83μΜ CH 4 , growth yield (Y) 4.76gcells/mol CH 4 , decay coefficient (b) 0.031/d, and threshold substrate concentration (S min ) 28.8μM CH 4 . Clone library analysis of 16S rRNA and mcrA gene fragments suggested that AOM-D reactions might have occurred via the syntrophic interaction between denitrifying bacteria (e.g., Ignavibacterium, Acidovorax, and Pseudomonas spp.) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanobacterium spp.), supporting reverse methanogenesis-dependent AOM-D in our culture. High μ max and q max , and low K s for the AOM-D enrichment imply that AOM-D could play a significant role in mitigating atmospheric methane efflux. In addition, these high kinetic features suggest that engineered AOM-D systems may provide a sustainable alternative to nitrogen removal in wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. ESR study into mechanism of heterogeneous-catalytic oxidation on oxides

    Topchieva, K V; Loginov, A Yu; Kostikov, S V [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR)

    1977-12-11

    The role of radical particles in heterogeneous-catalytic oxidation of H/sub 2/; CO; SO/sub 2/; NH/sub 3/; C/sub 3/H/sub 6/ on the rare earth oxides (yttrium, lanthanum, magnesium and scandium oxides) and alkaline earth metal oxides was studied by the ESR method. The conclusion was made about the great reactivity of the peroxide structures O/sub 2//sup -/ in the oxidation catalysis in comparison to other formulas of chemisorption oxigen on oxides. The kinetic investigations are chemisorption oxigen on oxides. The kinetic investigations are carried out on the change of the concentration of paramagnetic particles O/sub 2/ during the catalysis. On the basis of the received data the conclusion is made about the reaction process of catalytic oxidation on rare and alkaline-earth oxides according to radical-chain mechanism with the formation of radical particles O/sub 2//sup -/, CO/sub 3//sup -/, SO/sub 4//sup -/, CO/sub 2//sup -/ as interediate products.

  5. Nitrogen metabolism and kinetics of ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Martens-Habbena, Willm; Stahl, David A

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of ammonia-oxidizing mesophilic and thermophilic Group I archaea changed the century-old paradigm that aerobic ammonia oxidation is solely mediated by two small clades of Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria. Group I archaea are extremely diverse and ubiquitous in marine and terrestrial environments, accounting for 20-30% of the microbial plankton in the global oceans. Recent studies indicated that many of these organisms carry putative ammonia monooxygenase genes and are more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in most natural environments suggesting a potentially significant role in the nitrogen cycle. The isolation of Nitrosopumilus maritimus strain SCM1 provided the first direct evidence that Group I archaea indeed gain energy from ammonia oxidation. To characterize the physiology of this archaeal nitrifier, we developed a respirometry setup particularly suited for activity measurements in dilute microbial cultures with extremely low oxygen uptake rates. Here, we describe the setup and review the kinetic experiments conducted with N. maritimus and other nitrifying microorganisms. These experiments demonstrated that N. maritimus is adapted to grow on ammonia concentrations found in oligotrophic open ocean environments, far below the survival threshold of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The described setup and experimental procedures should facilitate physiological studies on other nitrifying archaea and oligotrophic microorganisms in general. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Kinetics and Mechanistic Study of Permanganate Oxidation of Fluorenone Hydrazone in Alkaline Medium

    Ahmed Fawzy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation kinetics of fluorenone hydrazone (FH using potassium permanganate in alkaline medium were measured at a constant ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm−3 and at 25°C using UV/VIS spectrophotometer. A first-order kinetics has been monitored in the reaction of FH with respect to [permanganate]. Less-than-unit order dependence of the reaction on [FH] and [OH−] was revealed. No pronounced effect on the reaction rate by increasing ionic strength was recorded. Intervention of free radicals was observed in the reaction. The reaction mechanism describing the kinetic results was illustrated which involves formation of 1 : 1 intermediate complex between fluorenone hydrazones and the active species of permanganate. 9H-Fluorenone as the corresponding ketone was found to be the final oxidation product of fluorenone hydrazone as confirmed by GC/MS analysis and FT-IR spectroscopy. The expression rate law for the oxidation reaction was deduced. The reaction constants and mechanism have been evaluated. The activation parameters associated with the rate-limiting step of the reaction, along with the thermodynamic quantities of the equilibrium constants, have been calculated and discussed.

  7. Kinetics of transuranium element oxidation-reduction reactions in solution

    Gourisse, D.

    1966-09-01

    A review of the kinetics of U, Np, Pu, Am oxidation-reduction reactions is proposed. The relations between the different activation thermodynamic functions (compensatory effect, formal entropy of the activated complex, magnitude of reactions velocities) are considered. The effects of acidity, ionic strength deuterium and mixed solvents polarity on reactions rates are described. The effect of different anions on reactions rates are explained by variations of the reaction standard free energy and variations of the activation free energy (coulombic interactions) resulting from the complexation of dissolved species by these anions. (author) [fr

  8. Oxidation kinetics of zirconium nitride. I. Planar symmetry

    Desmaison, Jean; Billy, Michel

    1976-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of ZrNsub(0.93) plates was investigated at temperatures in the range 625-800 deg C in oxygen over the pressure range 10-730 torr. The reaction product consists of monoclinic zirconia accompanied with trace amounts of cubic or tetragonal zirconia. Although the kinetic results are well interpreted by a Prout and Tompkins type model. The morphological observations suggest a transformation governed by a phase boundary reaction, this being confirmed by the oxygen pressure dependence on the rate law [fr

  9. Oxidation kinetics of common Kilka (Clupeonella cultiventris caspia) oil in presence of bene oils' unsaponifiable matter.

    Pazhouhanmehr, Samaneh; Farhoosh, Reza; Sharif, Ali; Esmaeilzadeh Kenari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation mechanisms and kinetics of the purified common Kilka (Clupeonella cultiventris caspia) triacylglycerols (PKO) as affected by 1-1.5% (w/w) of unsaponifiable matters of bene kernel (UKO) and hull (UHO) oils were studied and compared with that of 100 mg/kg of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and α-tocopherol in the Rancimat test at 50-70 °C. There were good correlations between the oxidative stability index (OSI) and time required to reach a 50%-increase in PV (t50). The frequency factor (A) and activation energy (Ea) were correlated well with the values of entropy and enthalpy, respectively. The values of free energy of activation (ΔG(++)) could describe the values of t50 or OSI well. Kinetic data indicated that the UKO with higher contents of tocopherols and tocotrienols, and terpenoid compounds was more effective than the UHO on the PKO stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Zirconium metal-water oxidation kinetics. I. Thermometry

    Cathcart, J.V.; McElroy, D.L.; Pawel, R.E.; Perkins, R.A.; Williams, R.K.; Yurek, G.J.

    1976-02-01

    A description is given of the thermometry techniques used in the Zirconium Metal--Water Oxidation Kinetics Program. Temperature measurements in the range 900 to 1500 0 C are made in three experimental systems: two oxidation apparatuses and the annealing furnace used in a corollary study of the diffusion of oxygen in β-Zircaloy. Carefully calibrated Pt vs Pt--10 percent Rh thermocouples are employed in all three apparatuses, while a Pt--6 percent Rh vs Pt-- 30 percent Rh thermocouple and an optical pyrometer are used in addition in the annealing furnace. Features of the experimental systems pertaining to thermocouple installation, temperature control, emf measurements, etc. are described, and potential temperature-measurement error sources are discussed in detail. The accuracy of the temperature measurements is analyzed

  11. Effect of ionization on the oxidation kinetics of aluminum nanoparticles

    Zheng, Yao-Ting; He, Min; Cheng, Guang-xu; Zhang, Zaoxiao; Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Wang, Zhengdong

    2018-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) of the observed stepwise oxidation of core-shell structured Al/Al2O3 nanoparticles is presented. Different from the metal ion hopping process in the Cabrera-Mott model, which is assumed to occur only at a certain distance from the oxide layer, the MD simulation shows that Al atoms jump over various interfacial gaps directly under the thermal driving force. The energy barrier for Al ionization is found to be increased along with the enlargement of interfacial gap. A mechanism of competition between thermal driving force and ionization potential barrier is proposed in the interpretation of stepwise oxidation behavior.

  12. Oxidation kinetics and auger microprobe analysis of some oxidized zirconium alloys

    Ploc, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics at 300 o C in dry oxygen of 0.5 wt% binary alloys of iron, nickel, and chromium in zirconium were determined for several surface preparations. Further, chemical profiles of the oxides as they existed on the matrix and on the precipitates were obtained by sputtering and Auger electron analysis. The appearance of 'breakaway' oxidation was controlled by the surface finish of the alloy, a variable that could be used to eliminate the phenomenon for all alloys except the Zr/Ni binary, which required β-quenching to accomplish the same purpose. (author)

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of dimethylzinc pyrolysis

    Lambert-Pacht, I.

    1964-05-01

    We have studied the pyrolysis of dimethyl-zinc in sealed bulbs between 250 and 400 Celsius degrees with and without cyclohexane, one or other of the reactants being completely deuterated. We have thus shown that the following mechanism occurs: -1) CH 3 Zn CH 3 → CH 3 + Zn CH 3 , -2) CH 3 + C 6 H 12 → CH 4 + C 6 H 11 , -3) 2 CH 3 Zn → (CH 3 Zn) 2 which decomposes to give methane. We have calculated the activation energy for step I: E I = 45.5 ± 3.3 kCal/mole. The study of the reaction in the absence of cyclohexane has made it possible to show that it is not a chain reaction; also the lower limit of the activation energy for the reaction: -4) CH 3 + CH 3 Zn CH 3 → CH 4 + CH 2 Zn CH 3 , has been calculated. It has been found that E 4 ≥ 15 kCal/mole. (author) [fr

  14. Kinetics of lactate turnover and oxidation in man

    Searle, G.L.; Shames, D.; Cavalieri, R.R.; DeGrazia, J.; Zarcone, V.; Porte, D. Jr.; Bagdade, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    The turnover and oxidation of lactic acid have been studied in man by means of 14 C-lactic acid, 14 C-glucose, and 14 C-alanine. The use of these labels in separate studies has enabled us to describe a complete scheme for the kinetics of lactic acid in man. We have determined that lactate arises from a minimum of two sources in overnight fasted man. 66% of lactate at this time arises from the metabolism of glucose while approximately 15% is derived from alanine. These sources and others unidentified supply lactate to the body pool at a rate of approximately 95 mg per kg per h. The disposal of this quantity of lactate is achieved through a minimum of three routes. Approximately 57% of the lactate turnover is oxidized to carbon dioxide, 15% is reduced to glucose, and approximately 25% is converted to alanine. The quantitative changes in the kinetics of this system that are brought on by fasting add an interesting dimension to the system. In agreement with the concepts of fuel economy in fasting the contribution of glucose carbon to lactic acid falls and, in turn, the contribution of lactate carbon to body glucose rises. The study of additional permutations of this system suggest that lactate, with pyruvate, is in the main stream of the intermediary metabolism of the body. The authors suggest that the study of this system offers promise of a fuller understanding of the derangements of metabolic disease. (author)

  15. In-Situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes

    2010-12-28

    DATES COVERED (From - To) 1/29/10-9/30/10 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE In situ optical studies of oxidation/reduction kinetics on SOFC cermet anodes 5a...0572 In-situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Montana State University...of Research In-situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes Principal Investigator Robert Walker Organization

  16. Zirconium metal-water oxidation kinetics. III. Oxygen diffusion in oxide and alpha Zircaloy phases

    Pawel, R.E.

    1976-10-01

    The reaction of Zircaloy in steam at elevated temperature involves the growth of discrete layers of oxide and oxygen-rich alpha Zircaloy from the parent beta phase. The multiphase, moving boundary diffusion problem involved is encountered in a number of important reaction schemes in addition to that of Zircaloy-oxygen and can be completely (albeitly ideally) characterized through an appropriate model in terms of oxygen diffusion coefficients and equilibrium concentrations for the various phases. Conversely, kinetic data for phase growth and total oxygen consumption rates can be used to compute diffusion coefficients. Equations are developed that express the oxygen diffusion coefficients in the oxide and alpha phases in terms of the reaction rate constants and equilibrium solubility values. These equations were applied to recent experimental kinetic data on the steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4 to determine the effective oxygen diffusion coefficients in these phases over the temperature range 1000--1500 0 C

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of polymerization of methyl methacrylate ...

    Unknown

    Kinetics and mechanism of polymerization of methyl methacrylate initiated by stibonium ylide. A K SRIVASTAVA and AJEY KUMAR CHAURASIA. Department of Chemistry, H B Technological Institute, Kanpur 208 002, India e-mail: akspolym@rediffmail.com. MS received 6 September 2002; revised 25 July 2003. Abstract.

  18. Performance of the periodic pulse technique--4. Periodic pulse reaction kinetics of oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutyraldehyde

    Hattori, T.; Ii, M.; Murakami, Y.

    1980-07-01

    The periodic pulse method was used to study the reaction mechanism and kinetics of the oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutyraldehyde (IBA) by following the formation rates of methacrolein (MA), carbon monoxide and dioxide (CO/sub x/), and other products (P) as a function of pulse widths and reactant partial pressures at 350/sup 0/C over a 2:3 antimony oxide/molybdenum trioxide catalyst. The results were consistent with a mechanism according to which IBA reacts with oxygen retained by the catalyst to form MA, causing reduction of the catalyst. The IBA also adsorbed on the surface as an oxygenated species which either reacted with gas-phase oxygen to form CO/sub x/ or desorbed as an oxygenated P. The reduced catalyst surface was reoxidized by oxygen adsorption. Implications of catalyst tailoring for increased MA yields by improving the redox mechanism and inhibiting the surface reactions, are discussed.

  19. Reassessing the atmospheric oxidation mechanism of toluene

    Ji, Yuemeng; Zhao, Jun; Terazono, Hajime; Misawa, Kentaro; Levitt, Nicholas P.; Li, Yixin; Lin, Yun; Peng, Jianfei; Wang, Yuan; Duan, Lian; Pan, Bowen; Zhang, Fang; Feng, Xidan; An, Taicheng; Marrero-Ortiz, Wilmarie

    2017-01-01

    Photochemical oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons leads to tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, with profound implications for air quality, human health, and climate. Toluene is the most abundant aromatic compound under urban environments, but its detailed chemical oxidation mechanism remains uncertain. From combined laboratory experiments and quantum chemical calculations, we show a toluene oxidation mechanism that is different from the one adopted in current atmo...

  20. Kinetics of 25-hydroperoxycholesterol formation during photo-oxidation of crystalline cholesterol.

    Medina-Meza, Ilce Gabriela; Rodriguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa; Lercker, Giovanni; Barnaba, Carlo; García, Hugo Sergio

    2014-06-01

    25-Hydroxycholesterol (25-OH), a side-chain product of cholesterol oxidation, has emerged as one of the important issues in food chemistry and biochemistry, because of its involvement in several human pathologies. This oxysterol is derived from both enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways. However, the latter mechanism has been scarcely studied in either food or model systems. In this work, a kinetic model was developed to evaluate the formation of 25-OH and its precursor 25-hydroperoxycholesterol (25-OOH) during photo-oxidation of cholesterol for 28 days under fluorescent light. 25-OOH was estimated by an indirect method, using thin-layer chromatography coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Peroxide value (POV) and cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) were determined. POV showed a hyperbolic behavior, typical of a crystalline system in which the availability of cholesterol is the limiting factor. Further reactions of hydroperoxides were followed; in particular, after photo-oxidation, 25-OOH (0.55 mg g(-1) ) and 25-OH (0.08 mg g(-1) ) were found in cholesterol, as well as seven other oxysterols, including 7-hydroxy and 5,6-epoxy derivatives. The application of kinetic models to the data showed good correlation with theoretical values, allowing derivation of the kinetic parameters for each oxidation route. The results of this work confirm that cholesterol in the crystalline state involves different oxidation patterns as compared to cholesterol in solution. Moreover, the numerical fit proved that hydroperoxidation is the rate-limiting step in 25-OH formation. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Kinetics of Oxidation of Metochlopramide withChloramine-T in HClO4 Medium

    K. M. Meenakshi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of metochlopramide hydrochloride (MCP with sodium N-chloro p-toluenesulfonamide (CAT in perchloric acid solution has been studied at 313K. The reaction rate shows a first order dependence on [CAT], fractional order on [MCP] and inverse fractional order on [H+]. There is a negative effect of dielectric constant of the solvent. The addition of the reduction product of CAT has no significant effect on the rate. The rate remained unchanged with the variation in the ionic strength of the medium. The reaction fails to induce the polymerization of acrylonitrile. Thermodynamic parameters have been computed by Arrhenius plot. The stoichiometry of the reaction was found to be 1:2 and oxidation products were identified. The Michaelis-Menten type of kinetics has been proposed. CH3C6H4SO2NHCl have been assumed to be the reactive oxidizing species. Thermodynamic parameters were computed by studying reactions at different temperatures. A mechanism consistent with observed kinetics is proposed.

  2. Effects of oxidation in the mechanical behavior of zircaloy-4 tubes

    Santos, A.M.M. dos.

    1981-07-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of zircaloy-4 is isothermally studied utilizing discontinous gravimetric method under two different oxidizing conditions, using gaseous oxigen and steam. The total weight gain during oxidation occurs in two different way: formation of oxide and solid solution. A mechanical test for studying the effect of embrittlement due to the absorption of oxygen in small zircalloy tubes have been developed. (Author) [pt

  3. The protonation state around TyrD/TyrD• in photosystem II is reflected in its biphasic oxidation kinetics.

    Sjöholm, Johannes; Ho, Felix; Ahmadova, Nigar; Brinkert, Katharina; Hammarström, Leif; Mamedov, Fikret; Styring, Stenbjörn

    2017-02-01

    The tyrosine residue D2-Tyr160 (Tyr D ) in photosystem II (PSII) can be oxidized through charge equilibrium with the oxygen evolving complex in PSII. The kinetics of the electron transfer from Tyr D has been followed using time-resolved EPR spectroscopy after triggering the oxidation of pre-reduced Tyr D by a short laser flash. After its oxidation Tyr D is observed as a neutral radical (Tyr D • ) indicating that the oxidation is coupled to a deprotonation event. The redox state of Tyr D was reported to be determined by the two water positions identified in the crystal structure of PSII [Saito et al. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 7690]. To assess the mechanism of the proton coupled electron transfer of Tyr D the oxidation kinetics has been followed in the presence of deuterated buffers, thereby resolving the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of Tyr D oxidation at different H/D concentrations. Two kinetic phases of Tyr D oxidation - the fast phase (msec-sec time range) and the slow phase (tens of seconds time range) were resolved as was previously reported [Vass and Styring (1991) Biochemistry 30, 830]. In the presence of deuterated buffers the kinetics was significantly slower compared to normal buffers. Furthermore, although the kinetics were faster at both high pH and pD values the observed KIE was found to be similar (~2.4) over the whole pL range investigated. We assign the fast and slow oxidation phases to two populations of PSII centers with different water positions, proximal and distal respectively, and discuss possible deprotonation events in the vicinity of Tyr D . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of styrene epoxidation by chlorite: role of chlorine dioxide.

    Leigh, Jessica K; Rajput, Jonathan; Richardson, David E

    2014-07-07

    An investigation of the kinetics and mechanism for epoxidation of styrene and para-substituted styrenes by chlorite at 25 °C in the pH range of 5-6 is described. The proposed mechanism in water and water/acetonitrile includes seven oxidation states of chlorine (-I, 0, I, II, III, IV, and V) to account for the observed kinetics and product distributions. The model provides an unusually detailed quantitative mechanism for the complex reactions that occur in mixtures of chlorine species and organic substrates, particularly when the strong oxidant chlorite is employed. Kinetic control of the reaction is achieved by the addition of chlorine dioxide to the reaction mixture, thereby eliminating a substantial induction period observed when chlorite is used alone. The epoxidation agent is identified as chlorine dioxide, which is continually formed by the reaction of chlorite with hypochlorous acid that results from ClO produced by the epoxidation reaction. The overall stoichiometry is the result of two competing chain reactions in which the reactive intermediate ClO reacts with either chlorine dioxide or chlorite ion to produce hypochlorous acid and chlorate or chloride, respectively. At high chlorite ion concentrations, HOCl is rapidly eliminated by reaction with chlorite, minimizing side reactions between HOCl and Cl2 with the starting material. Epoxide selectivity (>90% under optimal conditions) is accurately predicted by the kinetic model. The model rate constant for direct reaction of styrene with ClO2(aq) to produce epoxide is (1.16 ± 0.07) × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1) for 60:40 water/acetonitrile with 0.20 M acetate buffer. Rate constants for para substituted styrenes (R = -SO3(-), -OMe, -Me, -Cl, -H, and -NO2) with ClO2 were determined. The results support the radical addition/elimination mechanism originally proposed by Kolar and Lindgren to account for the formation of styrene oxide in the reaction of styrene with chlorine dioxide.

  5. Kinetics of Oxidation of 3-Benzoylpropionic Acid by N-Bromoacetamide in Aqueous Acetic Acid Medium

    N. A. Mohamed Farook

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of 3-benzoylpropionic acid (KA with N-bromoacetamide (NBA have been studied potentiometrically in 50:50 (v/v aqueous acetic acid medium at 298 K The reaction was first order each with respect to [KA], [NBA] and [H+]. The main product of the oxidation is the corresponding carboxylic acid. The rate decreases with the addition of acetamide, one of the products of the reaction. Variation in ionic strength of the reaction medium has no significant effect on the rate of oxidation. But the rate of the reaction is enhanced by lowering the dielectric constant of the reaction medium. A mechanism consistent with observed results have been proposed and the related rate law was deduced.

  6. Reaction kinetics of oxygen on single-phase alloys, oxidation of nickel and niobium alloys

    Lalauze, Rene

    1973-01-01

    This research thesis first addresses the reaction kinetics of oxygen on alloys. It presents some generalities on heterogeneous reactions (conventional theory, theory of jumps), discusses the core reaction (with the influence of pressure), discusses the influence of metal self-diffusion on metal oxidation kinetics (equilibrium conditions at the interface, hybrid diffusion regime), reports the application of the hybrid diffusion model to the study of selective oxidation of alloys (Wagner model, hybrid diffusion model) and the study of the oxidation kinetics of an alloy forming a solid solution of two oxides. The second part reports the investigation of the oxidation of single phase nickel and niobium alloys (phase α, β and γ)

  7. Kinetic parameters and TL mechanism in cadmium tetra borate phosphor

    Annalakshmi, O.; Jose, M.T.; Sridevi, J.; Venkatraman, B.; Amarendra, G.; Mandal, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    Polycrystalline powder samples of cadmium tetra borate were synthesized by a simple solid state sintering technique and gamma irradiated sample showed a simple Thermoluminescence (TL) glow peak around 460 K. The TL kinetic parameters of gamma irradiated phosphor were determined by initial rise (IR), isothermal decay (ID), peak shape (PS), variable heating rate (VHR) and glow curve de-convolution method. The kinetic parameters such as activation energy (E), frequency factor (s) and order of kinetics (b) were calculated by IR, ID, PS and VHR methods are in the order of ∼1.05 eV, 10 9 –10 12 s −1 and 1.58, respectively. From the results of TL and PL emission studies carried out on the phosphor revealed that the defect centers related to TL is different from that for PL. EPR measurements were carried out to identify the defect centers formed in cadmium tetra borate phosphor on gamma irradiation. Based on EPR studies the mechanism for TL process in cadmium tetra borate is proposed in this paper -- Highlights: • Polycrystalline powder samples of undoped cadmium tetra borate synthesized. • Cadmium tetra borate phosphor exhibits a dosimetric peak at 458 K. • Kinetic parameters of the trap responsible for TL evaluated. • TL mechanism is proposed from TL to EPR correlation studies

  8. Kinetic parameters and TL mechanism in cadmium tetra borate phosphor

    Annalakshmi, O. [Radiological Safety Division, Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Jose, M.T., E-mail: mtj@igcar.gov.in [Radiological Safety Division, Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Sridevi, J. [Central Leather Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Chennai 600 020, Tamilnadhu (India); Venkatraman, B. [Radiological Safety Division, Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Amarendra, G. [Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Mandal, A.B. [Central Leather Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Chennai 600 020, Tamilnadhu (India)

    2014-03-15

    Polycrystalline powder samples of cadmium tetra borate were synthesized by a simple solid state sintering technique and gamma irradiated sample showed a simple Thermoluminescence (TL) glow peak around 460 K. The TL kinetic parameters of gamma irradiated phosphor were determined by initial rise (IR), isothermal decay (ID), peak shape (PS), variable heating rate (VHR) and glow curve de-convolution method. The kinetic parameters such as activation energy (E), frequency factor (s) and order of kinetics (b) were calculated by IR, ID, PS and VHR methods are in the order of ∼1.05 eV, 10{sup 9}–10{sup 12} s{sup −1} and 1.58, respectively. From the results of TL and PL emission studies carried out on the phosphor revealed that the defect centers related to TL is different from that for PL. EPR measurements were carried out to identify the defect centers formed in cadmium tetra borate phosphor on gamma irradiation. Based on EPR studies the mechanism for TL process in cadmium tetra borate is proposed in this paper -- Highlights: • Polycrystalline powder samples of undoped cadmium tetra borate synthesized. • Cadmium tetra borate phosphor exhibits a dosimetric peak at 458 K. • Kinetic parameters of the trap responsible for TL evaluated. • TL mechanism is proposed from TL to EPR correlation studies.

  9. Internal oxidation as a mechanism for steam generator tube degradation

    Gendron, T.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Scott, P.M. [Framatome, Paris (France); Bruemmer, S.M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Thomas, L.E. [Washington State Univ., School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Pullman, WA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Internal oxidation has been proposed as a plausible mechanism for intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of alloy 600 steam generator tubing. This theory can reconcile the main thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of the observed cracking in hydrogenated primary water. Although secondary-side IG attack or IGSCC is commonly attributed to the presence of strong, caustic or acidic solutions, more recent evidence suggests that this degradation takes place in a near neutral environment, possibly dry polluted steam. As a result, internal oxidation is also a feasible mechanism for secondary side degradation. The present paper reviews experimental work conducted in an attempt to determine the validity of this mechanism. The consequences for the expected behaviour of alloys 690 and 800 replacement materials are also described. (author)

  10. Internal oxidation as a mechanism for steam generator tube degradation

    Gendron, T.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Scott, P.M. [Framatome, Paris (France); Bruemmer, S.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, Washington (United States); Thomas, L.E. [Washington State Univ., School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Pullman, WA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Internal oxidation has been proposed as a plausible mechanism for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of alloy 600 steam generator tubing. This theory can reconcile the main thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of the observed cracking in hydrogenated primary water. Although secondary side IG attack or IGSCC is commonly attributed to the presence of strong caustic or acidic solutions, more recent evidence suggests that this degradation takes place in a near-neutral environment, possibly dry polluted steam. As a result, internal oxidation is also a feasible mechanism for secondary side degradation. The present paper reviews experimental work carried out in an attempt to determine the validity of this mechanism. The consequences for the expected behaviour of alloys 690 and 800 replacement materials are also described. (author)

  11. Internal oxidation as a mechanism for steam generator tube degradation

    Gendron, T.S.; Scott, P.M.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Thomas, L.E.

    1998-01-01

    Internal oxidation has been proposed as a plausible mechanism for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of alloy 600 steam generator tubing. This theory can reconcile the main thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of the observed cracking in hydrogenated primary water. Although secondary side IG attack or IGSCC is commonly attributed to the presence of strong caustic or acidic solutions, more recent evidence suggests that this degradation takes place in a near-neutral environment, possibly dry polluted steam. As a result, internal oxidation is also a feasible mechanism for secondary side degradation. The present paper reviews experimental work carried out in an attempt to determine the validity of this mechanism. The consequences for the expected behaviour of alloys 690 and 800 replacement materials are also described. (author)

  12. Study of water vapour adsorption kinetics on aluminium oxide materials

    Livanova, Alesya; Meshcheryakov, Evgeniy; Reshetnikov, Sergey; Kurzina, Irina

    2017-11-01

    Adsorbents on the basis of active aluminum oxide are still of demand on the adsorbent-driers market. Despite comprehensive research of alumina adsorbents, and currently is an urgent task to improve their various characteristics, and especially the task of increasing the sorption capacity. In the present work kinetics of the processes of water vapours' adsorption at room temperature on the surface of desiccant samples has been studied. It was obtained on the basis of bayerite and pseudoboehmite experimentally. The samples of pseudoboehmite modified with sodium and potassium ions were taken as study objects. The influence of an adsorbent's grain size on the kinetics of water vapours' adsorption was studied. The 0.125-0.25 mm and 0.5-1.0 mm fractions of this sample were used. It has been revealed that the saturation water vapor fine powder (0.125-0.25 mm) is almost twofold faster in comparison with the sample of fraction 0.5-1.0 mm due to the decrease in diffusion resistance in the pores of the samples when moving from the sample of larger fraction to the fine-dispersed sample. It has been established that the adsorption capacity of the pseudoboehmite samples, modified by alkaline ions, is higher by ˜40 %, than for the original samples on the basis of bayerite and pseudoboehmite.

  13. The kinetic study of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide

    Cantrel, L.; Chopin, J.

    1996-01-01

    Iodine chemistry is one of the most important subjects of research in the field of reactor safety because this element can form volatile species which represent a biological hazard for environment. As the iodine and the peroxide are both present in the sump of the containment in the event of a severe accident on a light water nuclear reactor, it can be important to improve the knowledge on the reaction of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of iodine by hydrogen peroxide has been studied in acid solution using two different analytical methods. The first is a UV/Vis spectrophotometer which records the transmitted intensity at 460 nm as a function of time to follow the decrease of iodine concentration, the second is an amperometric method which permits to record the increase of iodine+1 with time thanks to the current of reduction of iodine+1 to molecular iodine. The iodine was generated by Dushman reaction and the series of investigations were made at 40 o C in a continuous stirring tank reactor. The influence of the initial concentrations of iodine, iodate, hydrogen peroxide, H + ions has been determined. The kinetics curves comprise two distinct chemical phases both for molecular iodine and for iodine+1. The relative importance of the two processes is connected to the initial concentrations of [I 2 ], [IO 3 - ], [H 2 O 2 ] and [H + ]. A rate law has been determined for the two steps for molecular iodine. (author) figs., tabs., 22 refs

  14. Nitrous oxide production kinetics during nitrate reduction in river sediments.

    Laverman, Anniet M; Garnier, Josette A; Mounier, Emmanuelle M; Roose-Amsaleg, Céline L

    2010-03-01

    A significant amount of nitrogen entering river basins is denitrified in riparian zones. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of nitrate and carbon concentrations on the kinetic parameters of nitrate reduction as well as nitrous oxide emissions in river sediments in a tributary of the Marne (the Seine basin, France). In order to determine these rates, we used flow-through reactors (FTRs) and slurry incubations; flow-through reactors allow determination of rates on intact sediment slices under controlled conditions compared to sediment homogenization in the often used slurry technique. Maximum nitrate reduction rates (R(m)) ranged between 3.0 and 7.1microg Ng(-1)h(-1), and affinity constant (K(m)) ranged from 7.4 to 30.7mg N-NO(3)(-)L(-1). These values were higher in slurry incubations with an R(m) of 37.9microg Ng(-1)h(-1) and a K(m) of 104mg N-NO(3)(-)L(-1). Nitrous oxide production rates did not follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and we deduced a rate constant with an average of 0.7 and 5.4ng Ng(-1)h(-1) for FTR and slurry experiments respectively. The addition of carbon (as acetate) showed that carbon was not limiting nitrate reduction rates in these sediments. Similar rates were obtained for FTR and slurries with carbon addition, confirming the hypothesis that homogenization increases rates due to release of and increasing access to carbon in slurries. Nitrous oxide production rates in FTR with carbon additions were low and represented less than 0.01% of the nitrate reduction rates and were even negligible in slurries. Maximum nitrate reduction rates revealed seasonality with high potential rates in fall and winter and low rates in late spring and summer. Under optimal conditions (anoxia, non-limiting nitrate and carbon), nitrous oxide emission rates were low, but significant (0.01% of the nitrate reduction rates). Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Zirconium metal-water oxidation kinetics. V. Oxidation of Zircaloy in high pressure steam

    Pawel, R.E.; Cathcart, J.V.; Campbell, J.J.; Jury, S.H.

    1977-12-01

    A series of scoping tests to determine the influence of steam pressure on the isothermal oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 PWR tubing was undertaken. The oxidation experiments were conducted in flowing steam at 3.45, 6.90, and 10.34 MPa (500, 1000, and 1500 psi) at 905 0 C (1661 0 F), and at 3.45 and 6.90 MPa at 1101 0 C (2014 0 F). A comparison of the results of these experiments with those obtained for oxidation in steam at atmospheric pressure under similar conditions indicated that measurable enhancement of the oxidation rate occurred with increasing pressure at 905 0 C, but not at 1100 0 C

  16. Study of photo-oxidative reactivity of sunscreening agents based on photo-oxidation of uric acid by kinetic Monte Carlo simulation

    Moradmand Jalali, Hamed; Bashiri, Hadis; Rasa, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the mechanism of free radical production by light-reflective agents in sunscreens (TiO 2 , ZnO and ZrO 2 ) was obtained by applying kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The values of the rate constants for each step of the suggested mechanism have been obtained by simulation. The effect of the initial concentration of mineral oxides and uric acid on the rate of uric acid photo-oxidation by irradiation of some sun care agents has been studied. The kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results agree qualitatively with the existing experimental data for the production of free radicals by sun care agents. - Highlights: • The mechanism and kinetics of uric acid photo-oxidation by irradiation of sun care agents has been obtained by simulation. • The mechanism has been used for free radical production of TiO 2 (rutile and anatase), ZnO and ZrO 2 . • The ratios of photo-activity of ZnO to anastase, rutile and ZrO have been obtained. • By doubling the initial concentrations of mineral oxide, the rate of reaction was doubled. • The optimum ratio of initial concentration of mineral oxides to uric acid has been obtained

  17. Study of photo-oxidative reactivity of sunscreening agents based on photo-oxidation of uric acid by kinetic Monte Carlo simulation

    Moradmand Jalali, Hamed; Bashiri, Hadis, E-mail: hbashiri@kashanu.ac.ir; Rasa, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, the mechanism of free radical production by light-reflective agents in sunscreens (TiO{sub 2}, ZnO and ZrO{sub 2}) was obtained by applying kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The values of the rate constants for each step of the suggested mechanism have been obtained by simulation. The effect of the initial concentration of mineral oxides and uric acid on the rate of uric acid photo-oxidation by irradiation of some sun care agents has been studied. The kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results agree qualitatively with the existing experimental data for the production of free radicals by sun care agents. - Highlights: • The mechanism and kinetics of uric acid photo-oxidation by irradiation of sun care agents has been obtained by simulation. • The mechanism has been used for free radical production of TiO{sub 2} (rutile and anatase), ZnO and ZrO{sub 2}. • The ratios of photo-activity of ZnO to anastase, rutile and ZrO have been obtained. • By doubling the initial concentrations of mineral oxide, the rate of reaction was doubled. • The optimum ratio of initial concentration of mineral oxides to uric acid has been obtained.

  18. Experimental kinetic study and modeling of calcium oxide carbonation

    Rouchon, L.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, major contributors to the greenhouse effect, are considered as the main cause of global warming. So, decrease of CO 2 emitted by large industrial combustion sources or power plants, is an important scientific goal. One of the approaches is based on CO 2 separation and capture from flue gas, followed by sequestration in a wide range of geological formations. In this aim, CO 2 is captured by sorbents like calcium oxide (CaO) in multi-cycle process of carbonation/de-carbonation. However, it was shown that the most important limitations of such process are related to the reversibility of reaction. CaO rapidly loses activity towards CO 2 , so the maximum extent of carbonation decreases as long as the number of cycles increases. In order to well understand the processes and parameters influencing the capture capacity of CaO-based sorbents, it appears important to get details on the kinetic law governing the reaction, which have not been really studied up to now. To investigate this reaction, CaO carbonation kinetics was followed by means of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) on divided materials. Special care was given to the validation of the usual kinetic assumptions such as steady state and rate-determining step assumptions. The aim was to obtain a model describing the reaction in order to explain the influence of intensive variables such as carbonation temperature and CO 2 partial pressure. TGA curves obtained under isothermal and isobaric conditions showed an induction period linked to the nucleation process and a strong slowing down of the reaction rate once a given fractional conversion was reached. Both phenomena were observed to depend on carbonation temperature and CO 2 partial pressure. To explain these results, the evolution of texture and microstructure of the solid during the reaction was regarded as essential. Reaction at the grain scale induces a volume increase from CaO to CaCO 3 which causes a change in the

  19. Analysis of the laser oxidation kinetics process of In-In(2)O(3) MTMO photomasks by laser direct writing.

    Xia, Feng; Zhang, Xinzheng; Wang, Meng; Liu, Qian; Xu, Jingjun

    2015-11-02

    One kind of novel grayscale photomask based on Metal-transparent-metallic-oxides (MTMOs) system fabricated by laser direct writing was demonstrated recently. Here, a multilayer oxidation model of In-In(2)O(3) film with a glass substrate was proposed to study the pulsed laser-induced oxidation mechanism. The distribution of the electromagnetic field in the film is calculated by the transfer matrix method. Temperature fields of the model are simulated based on the heat transfer equations with the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. The oxidation kinetics process is studied based on the laser-induced Cabrera-Mott theory. The simulated oxidation processes are consistent with the experimental results, which mean that our laser-induced oxidation model can successfully interpret the fabrication mechanism of MTMO grayscale photomasks.

  20. Determination of equilibration kinetics of oxide electrode materials using a manometric method

    Badwal, S.P.S.; Jiang, S.P.; Love, J.; Nowotny, J.; Rekas, M.

    1998-01-01

    The gas/solid equilibration kinetics for electrode oxide materials, such as (La 0.8 Sr 0.2 )MnO 3 , using a manometric method, was determined. The reaction kinetics between oxygen and the oxide material was monitored using the measurements of the P(O 2 ) changes during isothermic experiments of oxidation and reduction. The procedure of the determination will be described and relevant kinetic equations was derived. The equilibration kinetic data obtained can be used to determine the chemical diffusion coefficient. Copyright (1998) Australasian Ceramic Society

  1. Oxidation Kinetics of Ferritic Alloys in High-Temperature Steam Environments

    Parker, Stephen S.; White, Josh; Hosemann, Peter; Nelson, Andrew

    2018-02-01

    High-temperature isothermal steam oxidation kinetic parameters of several ferritic alloys were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The oxidation kinetic constant ( k) was measured as a function of temperature from 900°C to 1200°C. The results show a marked increase in oxidation resistance compared to reference Zircaloy-2, with kinetic constants 3-5 orders of magnitude lower across the experimental temperature range. The results of this investigation supplement previous findings on the properties of ferritic alloys for use as candidate cladding materials and extend kinetic parameter measurements to high-temperature steam environments suitable for assessing accident tolerance for light water reactor applications.

  2. Kinetics studies of oxidation of niacinamide by alkaline potassium permanganate

    Sandipsingh Gour

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of niacinamide in alkaline media is carried out using potassium permanganate as a oxiding agent. The reaction was monitored using UV-Visible spectrophotometer at 525 nm. It was found to be zero order with respect to oxidant,, fractional order with respect to hydrogen ion concentration and first order with respect to substrate. The thermodynamic parameters(were determinied . The average (?G# was found to be 87.60 KJ/mol. The values ?S# was found to be -0.2132 KJ/mole and energy of activation was found to be 23.95 KJ/mole. A suitable mechanism is proposed based on the experimental conditions.

  3. Statistical model for grain boundary and grain volume oxidation kinetics in UO2 spent fuel

    Stout, R.B.; Shaw, H.F.; Einziger, R.E.

    1989-09-01

    This paper addresses statistical characteristics for the simplest case of grain boundary/grain volume oxidation kinetics of UO 2 to U 3 O 7 for a fragment of a spent fuel pellet. It also presents a limited discussion of future extensions to this simple case to represent the more complex cases of oxidation kinetics in spent fuels. 17 refs., 1 fig

  4. Contribution to the identification of the processes kinetically limiting of the zirconium alloys oxidation; characterization of the oxide films formed at high temperature by solids electrochemistry

    Vermoyal, J.J.

    2000-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of zirconium alloys used for cladding tubes has been extensively studied under several oxidation conditions (temperature, steam, dry air, oxygen...) in order to clarify the mechanism(s) of oxide growth and breakdown. Oxidation rate is generally assumed to be controlled by oxygen diffusion inwards the oxide layer. Nevertheless, several experimental facts, such as acceleration or inhibition of corrosion rate in coupling conditions, suggest that electrochemical processes are involved as a rate determining step. This work is an attempt to shed light about the rate-limiting-mechanism of two zirconium alloys oxidation: Zircaloy-4 (Zy-4) and Zr-Nb(1%)O(0,13%). Impedance spectroscopy characterizations of oxide films formed in high temperature water and studied in gaseous atmosphere clearly show the difference of electrical properties between the two alloys. The in situ electrochemical and thermogravimetric investigations in gaseous medium, and the polarization effects on oxidation and hydridation of Zr alloys in PWRs conditions indicate that oxygen diffusion can be considered as the limiting kinetic step for Zy-4 oxidation. On the contrary, the acceleration of oxide growth on Zr-Nb(1%)O(0,13%) under anodic polarization in PWRs conditions (360 deg C) suggests that either the electronic conductivity in the oxide or an interfacial process at least partially control the oxidation rate. Catalytic effects observed in gaseous medium when noble metals increase the oxygen reduction rate would tend to corroborate the oxidation control of this alloy by an interfacial mechanism. An electrochemical description and a heterogeneous kinetics approach based on a diffusion-interfacial process as rate determining step are then proposed. (author)

  5. Smouldering Combustion of Soil Organic Matter: Inverse Modelling of the Thermal and Oxidative Degradation Kinetics

    Huang, Xinyan; Rein, Guillermo

    2013-04-01

    Smouldering combustion of soil organic matter (SOM) such as peatlands leads to the largest fires on Earth and posses a possible positive feedback mechanism to climate change. In this work, a kinetic model, including 3-step chemical reactions and 1-step water evaporation is proposed to describe drying, pyrolysis and oxidation behaviour of peat. Peat is chosen as the most important type of SOM susceptible to smoudering, and a Chinese boreal peat sample is selected from the literature. A lumped model of mass loss based on four Arrhenius-type reactions is developed to predict its thermal and oxidative degradation under a range of heating rates. A genetic algorithm is used to solve the inverse problem, and find a group of kinetic and stoichiometric parameters for this peat that provides the best match to the thermogravimetric (TG) data from literature. A multi-objective fitness function is defined using the measurements of both mass loss and mass-loss rate in inert and normal atmospheres under a range of heating rates. Piece-wise optimization is conducted to separate the low temperature drying (450 K). Modelling results shows the proposed 3-step chemistry is the unique simplest scheme to satisfy all given TG data of this particular peat type. Afterward, this kinetic model and its kinetic parameters are incorporated into a simple one-dimensional species model to study the relative position of each reaction inside a smoulder front. Computational results show that the species model agrees with experimental observations. This is the first time that the smouldering kinetics of SOM is explained and predicted, thus helping to understanding this important natural and widespread phenomenon.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of the conversion of a coordinated thiol to a coordinated disulfide by the one-equivalent oxidants neptunium(VI) and cobalt(III) in aqueous perchloric acid

    Woods, M.; Karbwang, J.; Sullivan, J.C.; Deutsch, E.

    1976-01-01

    Reaction of excess (2-mercaptoethylamine-N,S)bis(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III), I, with the 1-equiv oxidant Np(VI) (or Co 3+ (aq)) in aqueous perchloric acid media is shown to lead to (2-aminoethyl-N 2-ammonioethyl disulfide-S 1 ) bis(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III), II, according to the stoichiometry 5H + + 2I + Np(VI) → II + Co 2+ (aq) + Np(V) + 2enH 2 2+ . This reaction follows the rate law -d[I]/dt = k'' [I] [oxidant]. For Np(VI) as oxidant k'' is independent of [H + ]; at 25 0 C, μ = 1.00 M (LiClO 4 ), k'' = k 0 = 2842 +- 15 M -1 s -1 , ΔH 0 * = 7.57 +- 0.08 kcal/mol, and ΔS 0 * = -17.4 +- 0.3 eu. For Co 3+ (aq) as oxidant, k'' = k 0 + k/sub -1/[H + ] -1 where the inverse acid path is taken to reflect oxidation by CoOH 2+ (aq); at 25 0 C, μ = 1.00 M (LiClO 4 ), k 0 = 933 +- 32 M -1 s -1 , k/sub -1/ = 1152 +- 22 s -1 , ΔH 0 * = 12.5 +- 0.7 kcal/mol, ΔH*/sub -1/ = 18.0 +- 0.4 kcal/mol, ΔS 0 *= -3.1 +- 2.4 eu, and ΔS*/sub -1/ = 15.8 +- 1.2 eu. It is proposed that the conversion of I to II proceeds by initial 1-equiv oxidation of the coordinated thiol, reaction of the resultant coordinated thiol radical (RS.) with additional I to form a relatively stable radical ion dimer (RSSR. - ), and then internal electron transfer within the dimer to yield Co 2+ (aq) and II which contains a coordinated disulfide. The possible generality of this mechanism and its relevance to biological metal-thiol-disulfide interactions are noted

  7. Kinetic study of the hydration of propylene oxide in the presence of heterogeneous catalyst

    Akyalcin Sema

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the hydration of propylene oxide was studied using a pressurized batch reactor for both uncatalyzed and heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Lewatit MonoPlus M500/HCO3 - was used as heterogeneous catalyst, which showed better performance than Dowex Marathon A/HCO3 -. The effects of the parameters, namely internal and external diffusion resistances, temperature, catalyst loading and mole ratios of reactants, on the reaction rate were studied. The uncatalyzed and heterogeneously catalyzed reactions were proven to follow a series-parallel irreversible homogeneous mechanism. The temperature dependencies of the rate constants appearing in the rate expressions were determined.

  8. Oxidation of Methionine by Tripropylammonium Fluorochromate-A Kinetic and Mechanistic Study

    S. Sheik Mansoor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of methionine (Met by tripropylammonium fluorochromate (TriPAFC has been studied in the presence of chloroacetic acid in aqueous acetic acid medium. The reaction is first order with respect to methionine, TriPAFC and acid. The reaction rate has been determined at different temperatures and activation parameters calculated. With an increase in the amount of acetic acid in its aqueous mixture, the rate increases. The reaction does not induce polymerization of acrylonitrile. A suitable mechanism has been proposed.

  9. Growth kinetics of tin oxide nanocrystals in colloidal suspensions under hydrothermal conditions

    Lee, Eduardo J.H.; Ribeiro, Caue; Longo, Elson; Leite, Edson R.

    2006-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions of tin oxide nanocrystals were synthesized at room temperature by the hydrolysis reaction of tin chloride (II), in an ethanolic solution. The coarsening kinetics of such nanocrystals was studied by submitting the as-prepared suspensions to hydrothermal treatments at temperatures of 100, 150 and 200 deg. C for periods between 60 and 12,000 min. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize the samples (i.e. distribution of nanocrystal size, average particle radius and morphology). The results show that the usual Ostwald ripening coarsening mechanism does not fit well the experimental data, which is an indicative that this process is not significant for SnO 2 nanocrystals, in the studied experimental conditions. The morphology evolution of the nanocrystals upon hydrothermal treatment indicates that growth by oriented attachment (OA) should be significant. A kinetic model that describes OA growth is successfully applied to fit the data

  10. A novel mechanism of oxidative genotoxicity

    The genotoxicity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is well established. The underlying mechanism involves oxidation of DNA by ROS. However, we have recently shown that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the major mediator of oxidative stress, can also cause genomic damage indirectly. Thus, H2O2 at pathologically relevant ...

  11. Kinetics and mechanism for degradation of dichlorvos by permanganate in drinking water treatment.

    Liu, Chao; Qiang, Zhimin; Adams, Craig; Tian, Fang; Zhang, Tao

    2009-08-01

    The degradation kinetics and mechanism of dichlorvos by permanganate during drinking water treatment were investigated. The reaction of dichlorvos with permanganate was of second-order overall with negligible pH dependence and an activation energy of 29.5 kJ x mol(-1). At pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C, the rate constant was 25.2+/-0.4M(-1)s(-1). Dichlorvos was first degraded to trimethyl phosphate (TMP) and dimethyl phosphate (DMP) simultaneously which approximately accounted for or=95% with respect to phosphorus mass, respectively. Further oxidation of DMP generated a final byproduct, monomethyl phosphate (MMP). MMP was for the first time identified as a major byproduct in chemical oxidation of dichlorvos. The kinetic model based on degradation mechanism and determined reaction rate constants allowed us to predict the evolution of dichlorvos and its byproduct concentrations during permanganate pre-oxidation process at water treatment plants. These results suggest that even though the dichlorvos concentration in surface water complies with the surface water quality standards of China (50 microg L(-1)), its concentration after conventional water treatment will most probably exceed the drinking water quality standards (1 microg L(-1)). Moreover, luminescent bacteria test shows that the acute toxicity of dichlorvos solution evidently increased after permanganate oxidation.

  12. GENERAL EQUATIONS OF CARBONIZATION OF EUCALYPTUS SPP KINETIC MECHANISMS

    Túlio Jardim Raad

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a set of general equations related to kinetic mechanism of wood compound carbonization: hemicelluloses, cellulose and lignin was obtained by Avrami-Eroffev and Arrhenius equations and Thermogravimetry of Eucalyptus cloeziana, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Corymbia citriodora, Eucalyptus urophylla and Eucalyptus grandis samples, TG-Isothermal and TG-Dynamic. The different thermal stabilities and decomposition temperature bands of those species compounds were applied as strategy to obtain the kinetic parameters: activation energy, exponential factor and reaction order. The kinetic model developed was validated by thermogravimetric curves from carbonization of others biomass such as coconut. The kinetic parameters found were - Hemicelluloses: E=98,6 kJmol, A=3,5x106s-1 n=1,0; - Cellulose: E=182,2 kJmol, A=1,2x1013s-1 n=1,5; - Lignin: E=46,6 kJmol, A=2,01s-1 n=0,41. The set of equations can be implemented in a mathematical model of wood carbonization simulation (with heat and mass transfer equations with the aim of optimizing the control and charcoal process used to produce pig iron.

  13. Kinetic investigations of quinoline oxidation by ferrate(VI).

    Luo, Zhiyong; Li, Xueming; Zhai, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Quinoline is considered as one of the most toxic and carcinogenic compounds and is commonly found in industrial wastewaters, which require treatment before being discharged. Removal of quinoline by the use of an environmentally friendly oxidant, potassium ferrate(VI) (K2FeO4), was assessed by studying the kinetics of the oxidation of quinoline by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) as a function of pH (8.53-10.53) and temperature (21-36°C) in this work. The reaction of quinoline with Fe(VI) was found to be first order in Fe(VI), half order in quinoline, and 1.5 order overall. The observed rate constant at 28°C decreased non-linearly from 0.5334 to 0.2365 M(-0.5) min(-1) with an increase in pH from 8.53 to 10.03. Considering the equilibria of Fe(VI) and quinoline, the reaction between quinoline and Fe(VI) contained two parallel reactions under the given pH conditions. The individual rate constants of these two reactions were determined. The results indicate that the protonated species of Fe(VI) reacts more quickly with quinoline than the deprotonated form of Fe(VI). The reaction activation energy Ea was obtained to be 51.44 kJ·mol(-1), and it was slightly lower than that of conventional chemical reaction. It reveals that the oxidation of quinoline by Fe(VI) is feasible in the routine water treatment.

  14. Kinetics of catalyzed tritium oxidation in air at ambient temperature

    Sherwood, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Tritium/air oxidation kinetic data are derived from measurements carried out with three catalysts. All experiments were carried out at room temperature - a regime that provides a severe test for catalyst effectiveness. Each catalyst consists of a high-surface-area substrate in pelletized form, onto which precious metal has been dispersed. The metal/substrate combinations investigated are: platinum/alumina, palladium/kaolin, and paladium/zeolite. Each of the dispersed-metal catalysts is extremely effective in promoting tritium oxidation in comparison with self-catalyzed atmospheric conversion; equivalent first-order rate constants are higher by roughly nine orders of magnitude. Electron-microprobe scans reveal that the dispersed metal is deposited near the outer surface of the catalyst, with metal concentration decreasing exponentially from the pellet surface. The platinum-based catalyst is more effective than the palladium catalysts on a surface-area basis by about a factor of three. Rate coefficients are determined from concentration decay following a spike injection of tritium into an air-filled enclosure processed by recirculation through an oxidation/adsorption system. The catalytic reaction is first-order in tritium concentration in the range 10 to 10 5 μCi/m 3 (4 ppt-40 ppB). Addition of hydrogen carrier gas is unnecessary. Catalytic activity for all three catalysts declines with time of exposure to air after activation, following a power-law decay with an exponent of -1/2. Reactivation with hot hydrogen gas effectively restores initial catalytic activity

  15. Steam oxidation of ferritic steels: kinetics and microestructure

    Aríztegui, A.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The ferritic 2.25Cr–1Mo steel has been subjected to isothermal and non-isothermal oxidation treatments in water steam at several temperatures ranging from 550 to 700 °C for up to 56 days. Under isothermal conditions this steel follows a parabolic oxidation kinetics, with an activation energy of 324 kJ mol–1. This value corresponds to an apparent activation energy for the global process, which includes both outward diffusion of Fe cations and inward diffusion of oxygen. The oxidation products present in the oxide scales, which were characterised by X-ray diffraction and SEM, are in total agreement with the Fe-O phase diagram. Thus, magnetite is the most stable oxide at low temperatures and wustite starts to form above 570 °C. Further studies of the effect of cooling rate have shown that wustite formed at 700 °C transforms into magnetite during a slow cooling, whereas a rapid cooling inhibits this transformation to a certain extent. For non-isothermal oxidation treatments consisting of a holding period at 550 °C followed by a single or double 4 hours exposure at 700 °C, the oxidation process seems to occur in sequence, thus presenting an additive effect of the oxidation treatments carried out at each temperature. This effect was observed both, for the type of oxide grown, and for the kinetics of the process. Microscopic observations of the oxide scales formed after the various oxidation treatments revealed that the oxide scales are constituted by sublayers of distinct microstructure and chemical composition changing from their surface to the substrate interface.

    Se han realizado tratamientos de oxidación isotermos y no isotermos a un acero ferrítico 2,25Cr–1Mo en vapor de agua, a temperaturas comprendidas entre 550 y 700 °C y tiempos de hasta 56 días. En condiciones isotermas, este acero tiene una cinética de oxidación parabólica, con una energía de activación de 324 kJ mol–1. Este valor corresponde a una energía de

  16. Mechanical properties of phosphorene nanoribbons and oxides

    Hao, Feng; Chen, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical properties of phosphorene nanoribbons and oxides are investigated by using density functional theory. It is found that the ideal strength of nanoribbon decreases in comparison with that of 2D phosphorene. The Young's modulus of armchair nanoribbon has a remarkable size effect because of the edge relaxations. The analysis of the stress-strain relation indicates that, owing to chemisorbed oxygen atoms, the ideal strength and Young's modulus of 2D phosphorene oxide are greatly reduced along the zigzag direction, especially upon high oxidation ratios. In addition, strain and oxidation have significant impacts on phonon dispersion

  17. Mechanical properties of phosphorene nanoribbons and oxides

    Hao, Feng [Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Chen, Xi, E-mail: xichen@columbia.edu [International Center for Applied Mechanics, SV Laboratory, School of Aerospace, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2015-12-21

    Mechanical properties of phosphorene nanoribbons and oxides are investigated by using density functional theory. It is found that the ideal strength of nanoribbon decreases in comparison with that of 2D phosphorene. The Young's modulus of armchair nanoribbon has a remarkable size effect because of the edge relaxations. The analysis of the stress-strain relation indicates that, owing to chemisorbed oxygen atoms, the ideal strength and Young's modulus of 2D phosphorene oxide are greatly reduced along the zigzag direction, especially upon high oxidation ratios. In addition, strain and oxidation have significant impacts on phonon dispersion.

  18. Kinetic studies of oxidation of {gamma}-AlON-TiN composites

    Zhang Zuotai; Wang Xidong; Li Wenchao

    2005-01-25

    The present article deals with the investigation of the oxidation kinetics of {gamma}-aluminum oxynitride-Titanium Nitride composites (AlON-TiN) in the temperature range of 1100-1300 deg. C by thermogravimetry. Oxidation experiments with AlON-TiN composite plates have been carried out in air both in isothermal and nonisothermal modes. The results showed that the rate of oxidation was negligible below 1000 deg. C, and showed an increase with increasing temperature at higher temperature. Both isothermal studies as well as experiments with ramped temperature clearly indicated that the mechanism of the reaction changes around 1400 deg. C. In the nonisothermal mode, the oxidation curve showed an increased reaction rate in this temperature range. Oxidation of AlON-TiN composite results in {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} at a low temperature and Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} at higher temperature. The buildup of the product layer leads to diffusion controlled kinetics. In the nonisothermal experiments, the phase transformation from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2}, to a Al{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} product layer at higher temperature would lead to crack formation, thereby leading to direct chemical reaction. From the experiments for the isothermal oxidation of AlON-TiN composite plates, the overall reactions are separated into three stages: chemistry reaction-controlling stage; chemical reaction- and diffusion-mixed-controlled stage; diffusion-controlled stage. The apparent activation energy for the experiments were calculated to be 10.109, 2.19 and 5.614 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively, in the above three stages.

  19. Oxidation of coals in the course of mechanical treatment

    A.G. Proidakov; G.A. Kalabin [Irkutsk State University, Irkutsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-04-15

    The results of a study of coal oxidation under stationary conditions and during mechanical treatment are presented. A considerable increase in the reaction rate constants of coal oxidation during mechanical treatment because of oxidative mechanical degradation was found.

  20. The kinetics for ammonium and nitrite oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine.

    Wan, Xinyu; Xiao, Pengying; Zhang, Daijun; Lu, Peili; Yao, Zongbao; He, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics for ammonium (NH4(+)) oxidation and nitrite (NO2(-)) oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) were studied by respirometry using the nitrifying sludge from a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor. Modified models were used to estimate kinetics parameters of ammonia and nitrite oxidation under the effect of hydroxylamine. An inhibition effect of hydroxylamine on the ammonia oxidation was observed under different hydroxylamine concentration levels. The self-inhibition coefficient of hydroxylamine oxidation and noncompetitive inhibition coefficient of hydroxylamine for nitrite oxidation was estimated by simulating exogenous oxygen-uptake rate profiles, respectively. The inhibitive effect of NH2OH on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria was stronger than on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. This work could provide fundamental data for the kinetic investigation of the nitrification process.

  1. Understanding the Broad Substrate Repertoire of Nitroreductase Based on Its Kinetic Mechanism*

    Pitsawong, Warintra; Hoben, John P.; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2014-01-01

    The oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase from Enterobacter cloacae (NR) catalyzes two-electron reduction of nitroaromatics to the corresponding nitroso compounds and, subsequently, to hydroxylamine products. NR has an unusually broad substrate repertoire, which may be related to protein dynamics (flexibility) and/or a simple non-selective kinetic mechanism. To investigate the possible role of mechanism in the broad substrate repertoire of NR, the kinetics of oxidation of NR by para-nitrobenzoic acid (p-NBA) were investigated using stopped-flow techniques at 4 °C. The results revealed a hyperbolic dependence on the p-NBA concentration with a limiting rate of 1.90 ± 0.09 s−1, indicating one-step binding before the flavin oxidation step. There is no evidence for a distinct binding step in which specificity might be enforced. The reduction of p-NBA is rate-limiting in steady-state turnover (1.7 ± 0.3 s−1). The pre-steady-state reduction kinetics of NR by NADH indicate that NADH reduces the enzyme with a rate constant of 700 ± 20 s−1 and a dissociation constant of 0.51 ± 0.04 mm. Thus, we demonstrate simple transient kinetics in both the reductive and oxidative half-reactions that help to explain the broad substrate repertoire of NR. Finally, we tested the ability of NR to reduce para-hydroxylaminobenzoic acid, demonstrating that the corresponding amine does not accumulate to significant levels even under anaerobic conditions. Thus E. cloacae NR is not a good candidate for enzymatic production of aromatic amines. PMID:24706760

  2. Atmospheric Oxidation Mechanism of Furfural Initiated by Hydroxyl Radicals.

    Zhao, Xiaocan; Wang, Liming

    2017-05-04

    Furfural is emitted into the atmosphere because of its potential applications as an intermediate to alkane fuels from biomass, industrial usages, and biomass burning. The kinetic and mechanistic information on the furfural chemistry is necessary to assess the fate of furfural in the atmosphere and its impact on the air quality. Here we studied the atmospheric oxidation mechanisms of furfural initiated by the OH radicals using quantum chemistry and kinetic calculations. The reaction of OH and furfural was initiated mainly by OH additions to C 2 and C 5 positions, forming R2 and R5 adducts, which could undergo rapid ring-breakage to form R2B and R5B, respectively. Our calculations showed that these intermediate radicals reacted rather slowly with O 2 under the atmospheric conditions because the additions of O 2 to these radicals are only slightly exothermic and highly reversible. Alternatively, these radicals would react directly with O 3 , NO 2 , HO 2 /RO 2 , etc. Namely, the atmospheric oxidation of furfural would unlikely result in ozone formation. Under typical atmospheric conditions, the main products in OH-initiated furfural oxidation include 2-oxo-3-pentene-1,5-dialdehyde, 5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone, 4-oxo-2- butenoic acid, and 2,5-furandione. These compounds will likely stay in the gas phase and are subject to further photo-oxidation.

  3. The kinetic study of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide

    Cantrel, L [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, IPNS, CEN Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Chopin, J [Laboratoire d` Electrochimie Inorganique, ENSSPICAM, Marseille (France)

    1996-12-01

    Iodine chemistry is one of the most important subjects of research in the field of reactor safety because this element can form volatile species which represent a biological hazard for environment. As the iodine and the peroxide are both present in the sump of the containment in the event of a severe accident on a light water nuclear reactor, it can be important to improve the knowledge on the reaction of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of iodine by hydrogen peroxide has been studied in acid solution using two different analytical methods. The first is a UV/Vis spectrophotometer which records the transmitted intensity at 460 nm as a function of time to follow the decrease of iodine concentration, the second is an amperometric method which permits to record the increase of iodine+1 with time thanks to the current of reduction of iodine+1 to molecular iodine. The iodine was generated by Dushman reaction and the series of investigations were made at 40{sup o}C in a continuous stirring tank reactor. The influence of the initial concentrations of iodine, iodate, hydrogen peroxide, H{sup +} ions has been determined. The kinetics curves comprise two distinct chemical phases both for molecular iodine and for iodine+1. The relative importance of the two processes is connected to the initial concentrations of [I{sub 2}], [IO{sub 3}{sup -}], [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] and [H{sup +}]. A rate law has been determined for the two steps for molecular iodine. (author) figs., tabs., 22 refs.

  4. The kinetics of nonequilibrium chain plasma-chemical oxidation in heterogeneous media

    Deminskii, M.A.; Potapkin, B.V.; Rusanov, V.D.

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of low-impurity components in air mixtures under heterogeneous conditions was studied. The principal kinetic features of the process were determined on the basis of theoretical analysis of plasma-chemical oxidation in heterogeneous media. The analysis also showed that low concentrations of impurities in liquid aerosol particles can be efficiently oxidized via a chain process induced by reactive species formed in the gas

  5. NDMA formation by chloramination of ranitidine: Kinetics and mechanism

    Le Roux, Julien

    2012-10-16

    The kinetics of decomposition of the pharmaceutical ranitidine (a major precursor of NDMA) during chloramination was investigated and some decomposition byproducts were identified by using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The reaction between monochloramine and ranitidine followed second order kinetics and was acid-catalyzed. Decomposition of ranitidine formed different byproducts depending on the applied monochloramine concentration. Most identified products were chlorinated and hydroxylated analogues of ranitidine. In excess of monochloramine, nucleophilic substitution between ranitidine and monochloramine led to byproducts that are critical intermediates involved in the formation of NDMA, for example, a carbocation formed from the decomposition of the methylfuran moiety of ranitidine. A complete mechanism is proposed to explain the high formation yield of NDMA from chloramination of ranitidine. These results are of great importance to understand the formation of NDMA by chloramination of tertiary amines. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Kinetic modelling and mechanism of dye adsorption on unburned carbon

    Wang, S.B.; Li, H.T. [Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Textile dyeing processes are among the most environmentally unfriendly industrial processes by producing coloured wastewaters. The adsorption method using unburned carbon from coal combustion residue was studied for the decolourisation of typical acidic and basic dyes. It was discovered that the unburned carbon showed high adsorption capacity at 1.97 x 10{sup -4} and 5.27 x 10{sup -4} mol/g for Basic Violet 3 and Acid Black 1, respectively. The solution pH, particle size and temperature significantly influenced the adsorption capacity. Higher solution pH favoured the adsorption of basic dye while reduced the adsorption of acid dye. The adsorption of dye increased with increasing temperature but decreased with increasing particle size. Sorption kinetic data indicated that the adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption mechanism consisted of two processes, external diffusion and intraparticle diffusion, and the external diffusion was the dominating process.

  7. Kinetic Modeling of a Heterogeneous Fenton Oxidative Treatment of Petroleum Refining Wastewater

    Basheer Hasan, Diya'uddeen; Abdul Raman, Abdul Aziz; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2014-01-01

    The mineralisation kinetics of petroleum refinery effluent (PRE) by Fenton oxidation were evaluated. Within the ambit of the experimental data generated, first-order kinetic model (FKM), generalised lumped kinetic model (GLKM), and generalized kinetic model (GKM) were tested. The obtained apparent kinetic rate constants for the initial oxidation step (k 2′), their final oxidation step (k 1′), and the direct conversion to endproducts step (k 3′) were 10.12, 3.78, and 0.24 min−1 for GKM; 0.98, 0.98, and nil min−1 for GLKM; and nil, nil, and >0.005 min−1 for FKM. The findings showed that GKM is superior in estimating the mineralization kinetics. PMID:24592152

  8. Simulation of uranium oxides reduction kinetics by hydrogen. Reactivities of germination and growth

    Brun, C.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to simulate the reduction by hydrogen of the tri-uranium octo-oxide U 3 O 8 (obtained by uranium trioxide calcination) into uranium dioxide. The kinetics curves have been obtained by thermal gravimetric analysis, the hydrogen and steam pressures being defined. The geometrical modeling which has allowed to explain the trend of the kinetics curves and of the velocity curves is an anisotropic germination-growth modeling. The powder is supposed to be formed of spherical grains with the same radius. The germs of the new UO 2 phase appear at the surface of the U 3 O 8 grains with a specific germination frequency. The growth reactivity is anisotropic and is very large in the tangential direction to the grains surface. Then, the uranium dioxide growths inside the grain and the limiting step is the grain surface. The variations of the growth reactivity and of the germination specific frequency in terms of the gases partial pressures and of the temperature have been explained by two different mechanisms. The limiting step of the growth mechanism is the desorption of water in the uranium dioxide surface. Concerning the germination mechanism the limiting step is a water desorption too but in the tri-uranium octo-oxide surface. The same geometrical modeling and the same germination and growth mechanisms have been applied to the reduction of a tri-uranium octo-oxide obtained by calcination of hydrated uranium trioxide. The values of the germination specific frequency of this solid are nevertheless weaker than those of the solid obtained by direct calcination of the uranium trioxide. (O.M.)

  9. Pairing mechanism in oxide superconductors

    Hirsch, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    A useful way to learn about the pairing mechanism that is responsible for high T c superconductivity is to study properties of model Hamiltonians on small systems. The goal is to find the simplest model that can describe the essential physics of high T c superconductivity. The authors have used Monte Carlo simulation and exact diagonalization techniques to study properties of systems of up to 64 sites. Their results show that spin fluctuations and other spin related mechanisms induced by a Hubbard on-site repulsion U are not likely to give rise to pairing, neither in one nor in multiple band models. In contrast, charge fluctuations in a model with both strong U and V (repulsion between Cu and O) are shown to give rise to pairing and it is suggested that this model provides a plausible mechanism for high T c superconductivity

  10. Determination of kinetics and stoichiometry of chemical sulfide oxidation in wastewater of sewer networks

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Vollertsen, Jes; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2003-01-01

    A method for determination of kinetics and stoichiometry of chemical sulfide oxidation by dissolved oxygen (DO) in wastewater is presented. The method was particularly developed to investigate chemical sulfide oxidation in wastewater of sewer networks at low DO concentrations. The method is based...... be considered constant during the course of the experiments although intermediates accumulated. This was explained by an apparent slow oxidation rate of the intermediates. The method was capable of determining kinetics and stoichiometry of chemical sulfide oxidation at DO concentrations lower than 1 g of O2 m...... on continuous measurement of the reactants allowing the kinetics to be determined at varying reactant concentrations during the course of the experiment. The kinetics determined was simulated by a rate equation. The precision of the method was assessed in terms of the standard deviation of the kinetic...

  11. Oxidative kinetics of amino acids by peroxydisulfate: Effect of dielectric constant

    Khalid, Mohammad A. A.

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of alanine, asparagines, cysteine, glutamic acid, lysine, phenylalanine and serine by peroxydisulfate ion have been studied in aqueous acidic (sulfuric acid) medium at the temperature range 60-80C. The rate shows first order dependence on peroxydisulfate concentration and zero order dependence on amino acid concentration. The rate law observed is: -d [S2O82-] /dt = Kobs [S2O82-] [amino acid]0. An autocatalytic effect has been observed in amino acids oxidation due to formation of Schiff's base between the formed aldehyde and parent amino acid. A decrease in the dielectric constant of the medium-adding acetic acid (5-15% v/v) results in a decrease in the rate in all cases studied. Reactions were carried out at different temperature (60-80C) and the thermodynamics parameters have been calculated. The logarithm of the rate constant is linearly interrelated to the square root of the ionic strength. (author)

  12. Kinetic and mechanistic evaluation of tetrahydroborate ion electro-oxidation at polycrystalline gold

    Iotov, Philip I.; Kalcheva, Sasha V.; Bond, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    The anodic oxidation of tetrahydroborate ion is studied in NaOH at stationary and rotating polycrystalline Au disk electrodes. Linear sweep and cyclic voltammetry are applied varying the scan and rotation rate from 0.005 to 51.200 V s -1 and from 52.3 to 314.1 rad s -1 , correspondingly. The effects of variation of BH 4 - and NaOH concentrations as well as of the potential limits of the ranges studied have been initially followed. Most of the experiments have been carried out with 10.9 mM NaBH 4 in 1.04 M NaOH at 293 K in the potential range from -1.300 to 0.900 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). It is found that 6 electrons are exchanged in the overall oxidation transformation. The kinetic analysis of the processes determining the two anodic peaks recorded under static conditions at scan rates lower than 0.500 V s -1 shows that 1.4 electrons are exchanged in the potential range of the first one (at ca -0.5 V), while the rate of the second one (at ca +0.3 V) is determined by a quasi-reversible 1-electron transfer reaction. A kinetic evidence for the participation of surface bound intermediates in the electro-oxidation process is provided. Two additional well outlined anodic peaks are recorded in the aforementioned potential range under specific experimental conditions. A quasi-8 electron mechanism involving four oxidation and hydrolysis steps is advanced to explain the experimental results. It accounts for the involvement of borohydride oxidation species and the Au + /Au 3+ mediator couple.

  13. Estimating kinetic mechanisms with prior knowledge I: Linear parameter constraints.

    Salari, Autoosa; Navarro, Marco A; Milescu, Mirela; Milescu, Lorin S

    2018-02-05

    To understand how ion channels and other proteins function at the molecular and cellular levels, one must decrypt their kinetic mechanisms. Sophisticated algorithms have been developed that can be used to extract kinetic parameters from a variety of experimental data types. However, formulating models that not only explain new data, but are also consistent with existing knowledge, remains a challenge. Here, we present a two-part study describing a mathematical and computational formalism that can be used to enforce prior knowledge into the model using constraints. In this first part, we focus on constraints that enforce explicit linear relationships involving rate constants or other model parameters. We develop a simple, linear algebra-based transformation that can be applied to enforce many types of model properties and assumptions, such as microscopic reversibility, allosteric gating, and equality and inequality parameter relationships. This transformation converts the set of linearly interdependent model parameters into a reduced set of independent parameters, which can be passed to an automated search engine for model optimization. In the companion article, we introduce a complementary method that can be used to enforce arbitrary parameter relationships and any constraints that quantify the behavior of the model under certain conditions. The procedures described in this study can, in principle, be coupled to any of the existing methods for solving molecular kinetics for ion channels or other proteins. These concepts can be used not only to enforce existing knowledge but also to formulate and test new hypotheses. © 2018 Salari et al.

  14. The kinetics of iodide oxidation by the manganese oxide mineral birnessite

    Fox, P.M.; Davis, J.A.; Luther, G. W.

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of iodide (I-) and molecular iodine (I2) oxidation by the manganese oxide mineral birnessite (??-MnO2) was investigated over the pH range 4.5-6.25. I- oxidation to iodate (IO3-) proceeded as a two-step reaction through an I2 intermediate. The rate of the reaction varied with both pH and birnessite concentration, with faster oxidation occurring at lower pH and higher birnessite concentration. The disappearance of I- from solution was first order with respect to I- concentration, pH, and birnessite concentration, such that -d[I-]/dt = k[I-][H+][MnO2], where k, the third order rate constant, is equal to 1.08 ?? 0.06 ?? 107 M-2 h-1. The data are consistent with the formation of an inner sphere I- surface complex as the first step of the reaction, and the adsorption of I- exhibited significant pH dependence. Both I2, and to a lesser extent, IO3- sorbed to birnessite. The results indicate that iodine transport in mildly acidic groundwater systems may not be conservative. Because of the higher adsorption of the oxidized I species I2 and IO3-, as well as the biophilic nature of I2, redox transformations of iodine must be taken into account when predicting I transport in aquifers and watersheds.

  15. A first principles study of the oxidation energetics and kinetics of realgar

    Renock, Devon; Becker, Udo

    2010-08-01

    Quantum-mechanical calculations allow resolving and quantifying in detail important aspects of reaction mechanisms such as spin transitions and oxygen dissociation that can be the major rate-limiting steps in redox processes on sulfide and oxide surfaces. In addition, this knowledge can help experimentalists in setting up the framework of rate equations that can be used to describe the kinetics of, e.g., oxidation processes. The unique molecular crystal structure of realgar, As 4S 4 clusters held together by van der Waals bonds, allows for a convenient quantum-mechanical (q.m.) cluster approach to investigate the thermodynamics and kinetic pathways of oxidation. The interaction of As 4S 4 clusters with oxygen and co-adsorbed ions provides a model system for understanding the molecular-scale processes that underpin empirically-derived rate expressions, and provides clues to the oxidation mechanisms of other sulfides and oxides. Two activated processes are shown to dominate the kinetics of oxidation by molecular oxygen: (i) a paramagnetic 3O to diamagnetic 1O spin transition and (ii) oxygen dissociation on the surface, in that order. The activation energies for the spin transition and O 2 dissociation step were determined to be 1.1 eV (106 kJ/mol) and 0.9 eV (87 kJ/mol), respectively, if molecular oxygen is the only reactant on the surface. In the case of As 4S 4, q.m. calculations reveal that 3O transfers its spin to the cluster and forms a low-spin, peroxo intermediate on the surface before dissociating. The adsorption of a hydroxide ion on the surface proximate to the 3O adsorption site changes the adsorption mechanism by lowering the activation energy barriers for both the spin transition (0.30 eV/29 kJ/mol) and the O 2 dissociation step (0.72 eV/69 kJ/mol). Thus, while spin transition is rate limiting for oxidation with O 2 alone, dissociation becomes the rate-limiting step for oxidation with co-adsorption of OH -. First-principles, periodic calculations of the

  16. Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Ethyl Levulinate Oxidation in a Jet-Stirred Reactor

    Wang, Jui-Yang

    2017-06-01

    A jet-stirred reactor was designed and constructed in the Clean Combustion Research Center (CCRC) at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST); was validated with n-heptane, iso-octane oxidation and cyclohexene pyrolysis. Different configurations of the setup have been tested to achieve good agreement with results from the literature. Test results of the reactor indicated that installation of a pumping system at the downstream side in the experimental apparatus was necessary to avoid the reoccurrence of reactions in the sampling probe. Experiments in ethyl levulinate oxidation were conducted in the reactor under several equivalence ratios, from 600 to 1000 K, 1 bar and 2 s residence time. Oxygenated species detected included methyl vinyl ketone, levulinic acid and ethyl acrylate. Ethylene, methane, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide were further quantified with a gas chromatography, coupled with a flame ionization detector and a thermal conductivity detector. The ethyl levulinate chemical kinetic model was first developed by Dr. Stephen Dooley, Trinity College Dublin, and simulated under the same conditions, using the Perfect-Stirred Reactor code in Chemkin software. In comparing the simulation results with experimental data, some discrepancies were noted; predictions of ethylene production were not well matched. The kinetic model was improved by updating several classes of reactions: unimolecular decomposition, H-abstraction, C-C and C-O beta-scissions of fuel radicals. The updated model was then compared again with experimental results and good agreement was achieved, proving that the concerted eliminated reaction is crucial for the kinetic mechanism formulation of ethyl levulinate. In addition, primary reaction pathways and sensitivity analysis were performed to describe the role of molecular structure in combustion (800 and 1000 K for ethyl levulinate oxidation in the jet-stirred reactor).

  17. Influence of radiational oxidation on the kinetics of electrization of polypropylene by electron irradiation

    Rozno, A.G.; Romanov, A.V.; Sukhov, N.L.; Gromov, V.V.; Ershov, B.G.

    1992-01-01

    Kinetics of volumetric electric charge and accumulation of paramagnetic centres (PMC) in polypropylene (PP) of two crystal modifications, subjected to radiational oxidation were studied. A correlation between volumetric charge and PMC in radiationally oxidation PP was detected. Considerable influence of crystal phase on the processes of charging and radiational oxidation was revealed

  18. Evaluation of the kinetic oxidation of aqueous volatile organic compounds by permanganate

    Mahmoodlu, M.G.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; Hartog, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The use of permanganate solutions for in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a well-established groundwater remediation technology, particularly for targeting chlorinated ethenes. The kinetics of oxidation reactions is an important ISCO remediation design aspect that affects the efficiency and oxidant

  19. A new quantitative analysis on nitriding kinetics in the oxidized Zry-4 at 900-1200 .deg. C

    Park, Sanggi [ACT Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Two major roles of nitrogen on the zirconium based cladding degradation were identified: mechanical degradation of the cladding, and the additional chemical heat release. It has long been known that accelerated oxidation can occur in air due to the nitrogen. In addition, significant uptake of nitrogen can also occur. The nitriding of pre-oxidized zirconium based alloys leads to micro porous and less coherent oxide scales. This paper aims to quantitatively investigate the nitriding mechanism and kinetics by proposing a new methodology that is coupled with the mass balance analysis and the optical microscope image processing analysis. A new quantitative analysis methodology is described in chapter 2 and the investigation of the nitriding kinetics is performed in chapter 3. The experimental details are previously reported in. Previously only qualitative analysis was performed in, and hence the quantitative analysis will be performed in this paper. In this paper, the nitriding kinetics and mechanism were quantitatively analyzed by the new proposed analysis methods: the mass balance analysis and the optical microscope image processing analysis. Using these combined methods, the mass gain curves and the optical microscopes are analyzed in very detail, and the mechanisms of nitriding accelerated, stabilized and saturated behaviors were well understood. This paper has two very distinctive achievements as follows: 1) Development of very effective quantitative analysis methods only using two main results of oxidation tests: No detailed analytical sample measurements (e.g. TEM, EPMA and so on.) were required. These methods can effectively reduce the cost and effort of the post-test investigation. 2) The first identification of the nitriding behaviors and its very accurate analysis in a quantitative way. Based on this quantitative analysis results on the nitriding kinetics, these new findings will contribute significantly the understanding the air oxidation behaviors and model

  20. Oxidation kinetic changes of UO2 by additive addition and irradiation

    You, Gil-Sung; Kim, Keon-Sik; Min, Duck-Kee; Ro, Seung-Gy

    2000-01-01

    The kinetic changes of air-oxidation of UO 2 by additive addition and irradiation were investigated. Several kinds of specimens, such as unirradiated-UO 2 , simulated-UO 2 for spent PWR fuel (SIMFUEL), unirradiated-Gd-doped UO 2 , irradiated-UO 2 and -Gd-doped UO 2 , were used for these experiments. The oxidation results represented that the kinetic patterns among those samples are remarkably different. It was also revealed that the oxidation kinetics of irradiated-UO 2 seems to be more similar to that of unirradiated-Gd-doped UO 2 than that of SIMFUEL

  1. Kinetics and mechanism of the low-temperature yttrium-aluminium garnet synthesis

    Ivakin, Yu.D.; Danchevskaya, M.N.; Yanchenko, P.A.; Murav'eva, G.P.

    2000-01-01

    Kinetics and formation mechanism of finely crystalline yttrium-aluminium garnet (YAG) during hydrothermal and hot steam treatment of stoichiometric mixture of oxides in the range of temperature 200-400 Deg C and pressures of 1.5-26 MPa were studied. It is ascertained that formation of YAG occurs via intermediate stage of Y(OH) 3 structure formation, whereas the aluminia component is X-ray amorphous. Kinetics of YAG formation is described by the equation of solid phase transformation with the limiting stage of nucleation. The YAG formed contains 7-5 % of water, which corresponds to hydrogarnet structure. Unit cell parameters of the YAG samples synthesized are somewhat high and after heating up to 1200 Deg C they decrease [ru

  2. Finite element modelling of the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 with a controlled metal-oxide interface and the influence of growth stress

    Zumpicchiat, Guillaume; Pascal, Serge; Tupin, Marc; Berdin-Méric, Clotilde

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: We developed two finite element models of zirconium-based alloy oxidation using the CEA Cast3M code to simulate the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4: the diffuse interface model and the sharp interface model. We also studied the effect of stresses on the oxidation kinetics. The main results are: • Both models lead to parabolic oxidation kinetics in agreement with the Wagner’s theory. • The modellings enable to calculate the stress distribution in the oxide as well as in the metal. • A strong effect of the hydrostatic stress on the oxidation kinetics has been evidenced. • The stress gradient effect changes the parabolic kinetics into a sub-parabolic law closer to the experimental kinetics because of the stress gradient itself, but also because of the growth stress increase with the oxide thickness. - Abstract: Experimentally, zirconium-based alloys oxidation kinetics is sub-parabolic, by contrast with the Wagner theory which predicts a parabolic kinetics. Two finite element models have been developed to simulate this phenomenon: the diffuse interface model and the sharp interface model. Both simulate parabolic oxidation kinetics. The growth stress effects on oxygen diffusion are studied to try to explain the gap between theory and experience. Taking into account the influence of the hydrostatic stress and its gradient into the oxygen flux expression, sub-parabolic oxidation kinetics have been simulated. The sub-parabolic behaviour of the oxidation kinetics can be explained by a non-uniform compressive stress level into the oxide layer.

  3. To the problem on formation kinetics of absorption and polylayer films in anodic oxidation of cadmium in alkali hydroxides. Kinetics of irreversible absorption of oxide

    Grachev, D.K.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt is made to substantiate the formation of adsorption and polylayer films on cadmium electrode during its oxidation in KOH diluted solutions based on the interpretation of data from methods of the potential control. Using relaxation methods (voltammetry and chronoammetry) the conditions were determined at which irreversible abd sorption kinetics of the passivating oxide turns out to dominate the anodic dissolution process in the KOH 1-0.1 N solutions. Parts of monolayer and polylayer surface filling are shown. Kinetics of monolayer oxide growth is interpreted based on the Temkin-Zeldovich type equation for irreversible adsorption process. Ways of the kinetic equation precision are discussed for its full correspondence with the experiment obtained

  4. Ru (III) Catalyzed Oxidation of Aliphatic Ketones by N-Bromosuccinimide in Aqueous Acetic Acid: A Kinetic Study

    Giridhar Reddy, P.; Ramesh, K.; Shylaja, S.; Rajanna, K. C.; Kandlikar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Kinetics of Ru (III) catalyzed oxidation of aliphatic ketones such as acetone, ethyl methyl ketone, diethyl ketone, iso-butylmethyl ketone by N-bromosuccinimide in the presence of Hg(II) acetate have been studied in aqueous acid medium. The order of [N-bromosuccinimide] was found to be zero both in catalyzed as well as uncatalyzed reactions. However, the order of [ketone] changed from unity to a fractional one in the presence of Ru (III). On the basis of kinetic features, the probable mechanisms are discussed and individual rate parameters evaluated. PMID:22654610

  5. Kinetics of high-temperature oxidation of (Ti,Ta)(C,N)-based cermets

    Chicardi, E.; Córdoba, J.M.; Gotor, F.J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The kinetic of high-temperature oxidation of (Ti,Ta)(C,N)-Co cermets was studied. • A parabolic oxidation kinetic was determined in cermets between 700 °C and 1200 °C. • This parabolic kinetic behaviour is due to the existence of a protective layer. • The protective layer formed was a complex Ti_xTa_1_−_xO_2 oxide with rutile structure. • The oxidation rate is controlled by the Ti and O_2 diffusion through the Ti_xTa_1_−_xO_2. - Abstract: The kinetics of the high-temperature oxidation of titanium–tantalum carbonitride-based cermets with different Ti/Ta ratios was studied. Isothermal oxidation tests were conducted under static air for 48 h at temperatures between 700 °C and 1200 °C. The oxidation satisfied the parabolic kinetics, characteristic of the existence of a protective oxide layer. The apparent activation energy suggests the rate-controlling process during oxidation is the simultaneous inward and outward diffusion of oxygen and titanium, respectively, through the formed protective layer, consisting mainly of a rutile phase. A higher Ta(V) content in the rutile decreased the oxygen diffusivity due to the reduction of oxygen vacancy concentration.

  6. Uranium dioxide sintering Kinetics and mechanisms under controlled oxygen potentials

    Freitas, C.T. de.

    1980-06-01

    The initial, intermediate, and final sintering stages of uranium dioxide were investigated as a function of stoichiometry and temperature by following the kinetics of the sintering reaction. Stoichiometry was controlled by means of the oxygen potential of the sintering atmosphere, which was measured continuously by solid-state oxygen sensors. Included in the kinetic study were microspheres originated from UO 2 gels and UO 2 pellets produced by isostatic pressing ceramic grade powders. The microspheres sintering behavior was examined using hot-stage microscopy and a specially designed high-temperature, controlled atmosphere furnace. This same furnace was employed as part of an optical dilatometer, which was utilized in the UO 2 pellet sintering investigations. For controlling the deviations from stoichiometry during heat treatment, the oxygen partial pressure in the sintering atmosphere was varied by passing the gas through a Cu-Ti-Cu oxygen trap. The trap temperature determined the oxygen partial pressure of the outflowing mixture. Dry hydrogen was also used in some of the UO sub(2+x) sintering experiments. The determination of diametrial shrinkages and sintering indices was made utilizing high-speed microcinematography and ultra-microbalance techniques. It was observed that the oxygen potential has a substantial influence on the kinetics of the three sintering stages. The control of the sintering atmosphere oxygen partial pressure led to very fast densification of UO sub(2+x). Values in the interval 95.0 to 99.5% of theoretical density were reached in less than one minute. Uranium volume diffusion is the dominant mechanism in the initial and intermediate sintering stages. For the final stage, uranium grain boundary diffusion was found to be the main sintering mechanism. (Author) [pt

  7. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  8. Kinetic determinations of accurate relative oxidation potentials of amines with reactive radical cations.

    Gould, Ian R; Wosinska, Zofia M; Farid, Samir

    2006-01-01

    Accurate oxidation potentials for organic compounds are critical for the evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of their radical cations. Except when using a specialized apparatus, electrochemical oxidation of molecules with reactive radical cations is usually an irreversible process, providing peak potentials, E(p), rather than thermodynamically meaningful oxidation potentials, E(ox). In a previous study on amines with radical cations that underwent rapid decarboxylation, we estimated E(ox) by correcting the E(p) from cyclic voltammetry with rate constants for decarboxylation obtained using laser flash photolysis. Here we use redox equilibration experiments to determine accurate relative oxidation potentials for the same amines. We also describe an extension of these experiments to show how relative oxidation potentials can be obtained in the absence of equilibrium, from a complete kinetic analysis of the reversible redox kinetics. The results provide support for the previous cyclic voltammetry/laser flash photolysis method for determining oxidation potentials.

  9. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    Gorman, Brian P [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  10. Kinetic studies of sulfide mineral oxidation and xanthate adsorption

    Mendiratta, Neeraj K.

    2000-10-01

    Sulfide minerals are a major source of metals; however, certain sulfide minerals, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are less desirable. Froth flotation is a commonly used separation technique, which requires the use of several reagents to float and depress different sulfide minerals. Xanthate, a thiol collector, has gained immense usage in sulfide minerals flotation. However, some sulfides are naturally hydrophobic and may float without a collector. Iron sulfides, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are few of the most abundant minerals, yet economically insignificant. Their existence with other sulfide minerals leads to an inefficient separation process as well as environmental problems, such as acid mine drainage during mining and processing and SO 2 emissions during smelting process. A part of the present study is focused on understanding their behavior, which leads to undesired flotation and difficulties in separation. The major reasons for the undesired flotation are attributed to the collectorless hydrophobicity and the activation with heavy metal ions. To better understand the collectorless hydrophobicity of pyrite, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) of freshly fractured pyrite electrodes was used to study the oxidation and reduction of the mineral. The EIS results showed that the rate of reaction increases with oxidation and reduction. At moderate oxidizing potentials, the rate of reaction is too slow to replenish hydrophilic iron species leaving hydrophobic sulfur species on the surface. However, at higher potentials, iron species are replaced fast enough to depress its flotation. Effects of pH and polishing were also explored using EIS. Besides collectorless hydrophobicity, the activation of pyrrhotite with nickel ions and interaction with xanthate ions makes the separation more difficult. DETA and SO2 are commonly used as pyrrhotite depressants; however, the mechanism is not very well understood. Contact angle measurements, cyclic voltammetry and Tafel

  11. Study of photo-oxidative reactivity of sunscreening agents based on photo-oxidation of uric acid by kinetic Monte Carlo simulation.

    Moradmand Jalali, Hamed; Bashiri, Hadis; Rasa, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, the mechanism of free radical production by light-reflective agents in sunscreens (TiO2, ZnO and ZrO2) was obtained by applying kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The values of the rate constants for each step of the suggested mechanism have been obtained by simulation. The effect of the initial concentration of mineral oxides and uric acid on the rate of uric acid photo-oxidation by irradiation of some sun care agents has been studied. The kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results agree qualitatively with the existing experimental data for the production of free radicals by sun care agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Kinetics of abiotic nitrous oxide production via oxidation of hydroxylamine by particulate metals in seawater

    Cavazos, A. R.; Taillefert, M.; Glass, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    The oceans are a significant of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. Current models of global oceanic N2­O flux focus on microbial N2O cycling and often ignore abiotic reactions, such as the thermodynamically favorable oxidation of the nitrification intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) by Mn(IV) or Fe(III). At circumneutral pH, NH2OH oxidation is more thermodynamically favorable via Mn(IV) than Fe(III) reduction. We characterized the kinetics of NH2OH oxidation in synthetic ocean water at pH 5.1-8.8 using microsensor electrodes to measure real-time N2O production. N2O production rates and yield were greater when NH2OH was oxidized by Mn(IV) than Fe(III). Accordingly, the reduction of Mn(IV) was first order with respect to NH2OH whereas the reduction of Fe(III) was zero order with respect to NH2OH. Interestingly, the order of the reaction with respect to Mn(IV) appears to be negative whereas the reaction is second order with respect to Fe(III). The inverse order with respect to Mn(IV) may be due to the aggregation of particles in seawater, which decreases their surface area and changes their reactivity. Finally, the reaction is first order with respect to protons with Fe(III) as the oxidant but zero order with Mn(IV). The stronger effect of the pH on the reaction with Fe(III) as the oxidant compared to Mn(IV) reflects the stoichiometry of these two reactions, as each mole of N2O produced by Fe(III) reduction consumes eight protons while each mole of N2O produced with Mn(IV) as the oxidant requires only four protons. Our data show that abiotic NH2OH oxidation by Mn(IV) or Fe(III) particles may represent a significant source of N2O in seawater. These findings suggest that abiotic N2O production in marine waters may be significant in areas of the oceans where particulate metals originating from aerosols, dust, or rivers may react with NH2OH released from ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms.

  13. Training-induced acceleration of oxygen uptake kinetics in skeletal muscle: the underlying mechanisms.

    Zoladz, J A; Korzeniewski, B; Grassi, B

    2006-11-01

    It is well known that the oxygen uptake kinetics during rest-to-work transition (V(O2) on-kinetics) in trained subjects is significantly faster than in untrained individuals. It was recently postulated that the main system variable that determines the transition time (t(1/2)) of the V(O2) on-kinetics in skeletal muscle, at a given moderate ATP usage/work intensity, and under the assumption that creatine kinase reaction works near thermodynamic equilibrium, is the absolute (in mM) decrease in [PCr] during rest-to-work transition. Therefore we postulate that the training-induced acceleration of the V(O2) on-kinetics is a marker of an improvement of absolute metabolic stability in skeletal muscles. The most frequently postulated factor responsible for enhancement of muscle metabolic stability is the training-induced increase in mitochondrial proteins. However, the mechanism proposed by Gollnick and Saltin (1982) can improve absolute metabolic stability only if training leads to a decrease in resting [ADP(free)]. This effect is not observed in many examples of training causing an acceleration of the V(O2) on-kinetics, especially in early stages of training. Additionally, this mechanism cannot account for the significant training-induced increase in the relative (expressed in % or as multiples of the resting values) metabolic stability at low work intensities, condition in which oxidative phosphorylation is not saturated with [ADP(free)]. Finally, it was reported that in the early stage of training, acceleration in the V(O2) on-kinetics and enhancement of muscle metabolic stability may precede adaptive responses in mitochondrial enzymes activities or mitochondria content. We postulate that the training-induced acceleration in the V(O2) on-kinetics and the improvement of the metabolite stability during moderate intensity exercise in the early stage of training is mostly caused by an intensification of the "parallel activation" of ATP consumption and ATP supply pathways

  14. Catalytic routes and oxidation mechanisms in photoreforming of polyols

    Sanwald, Kai E.; Berto, Tobias F.; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Gutiérrez, Oliver Y.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2016-12-01

    Photocatalytic reforming of biomass-derived oxygenates leads to H2 generation and evolution of CO2 via parallel formation of organic intermediates through anodic oxidations on a Rh/TiO2 photocatalyst. The reaction pathways and kinetics in the photoreforming of C3–C6 polyols were explored. Polyols are converted via direct and indirect hole transfer pathways resulting in (i) oxidative rupture of C–C bonds, (ii) oxidation to a-oxygen functionalized aldoses and ketoses (carbonyl group formation) and (iii) light-driven dehydration. Direct hole transfer to chemisorbed oxygenates on terminal Ti(IV)-OH groups, generating alkoxy-radicals that undergo ß-C–C-cleavage, is proposed for the oxidative C–C rupture. Carbonyl group formation and dehydration are attributed to indirect hole transfer at surface lattice oxygen sites [Ti_ _ _O_ _ _Ti] followed by the generation of carbon-centered radicals. Polyol chain length impacts the contribution of the oxidation mechanisms favoring the C–C bond cleavage (internal preferred over terminal) as the dominant pathway with higher polyol carbon number.

  15. Growth kinetics and morphology of plasma electrolytic oxidation coating on aluminum

    Erfanifar, Eliyas; Aliofkhazraei, Mahmood, E-mail: maliofkh@gmail.com; Fakhr Nabavi, Houman; Sharifi, Hossein; Rouhaghdam, Alireza Sabour

    2017-01-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) was carried out on AA1190 aluminum alloy in mixed silicate-phosphate-based electrolyte in order to fabricate ceramic coating under constant current density. The variations of PEO coating duration with kinetics, surface roughness, amount and size of discharge channels were studied with respect to PEO processing time. The growth mechanism of the ceramic coating was described considering a variation of volume and diameters of discharge channels and pancakes during the PEO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), and roughness tester were used to study the plasma discharge channels of the PEO coatings. In addition, the effect of alumina nanoparticles in the electrolyte as the suspension was studied on the geometric parameters of discharge channels. It seems that the nanoparticles are adsorbed to the locations of erupted molten oxide, where the dielectric breakdown occurs. Nanoparticles were embedded in the dense oxide layer and were adsorbed at the walls of voids and coatings surface. As a result, they caused significant changes in roughness parameters of the samples containing nanoparticles compared to those without nanoparticles. The obtained results showed that growth kinetics followed a linear trend with respect to PEO coating duration. It was also observed that in the absence of alumina nanoparticles, the average volume of the pancakes is 150% greater than the ones fabricated in the suspension of nanoparticles. Besides, increasing the PEO coating duration leads to adsorbing more nanoparticles on the coating surface, filling the voids, and flattening the surface, and alterations in R{sub v}, R{sub sk}, and R{sub lo} parameters. Correlation between the diameter of discharge channel (d{sub c}) and thickness of the pancake (h) also showed a linear relation. - Highlights: • Precise calculation of thickness of pancake with AFM. • Study of different roughness parameters for PEO coating. • Calculation

  16. Kinetic studies of isooctane partial oxidation over a nickel-based catalyst

    Ibrahim, Hussameldin; Idem, Raphael; Aboudheir, Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    The production of hydrogen (H 2 ) for fuel cell applications in mobile vehicles by reforming technologies such as partial oxidation of various fossil fuels has gained much attention recently. In this study, the production of H 2 by the catalytic partial oxidation of isooctane ((C 8 H 18 ) used here as a surrogate for gasoline) was investigated over alumina (AI 2 O 3 )supported nickel (Ni) catalyst. The work investigated the kinetics of the partial oxidation of isooctane over a stable Ni/□-AI 2 O 3 catalyst in the range of 863 to 913 K, at atmospheric pressure, W/F i c8 in the range of 1.97 to 8.58 g h mol - 1, and molar feed ratio in the range of 2.0 to 8.0 experiments to obtain kinetic data were performed in a 12.7 mm diameter Inconel micro-reactor housed in an electrically controlled furnace. The chemical reaction was then modeled using rate models developed from the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-hougen-Watson (LHHW) and Eley-Rideal (ER) formulations. The model parameters were estimated using an adaptive Gauss-Newton and Marquardi-Levenberg minimization algorithm. Rival models were screened for their thermodynamic consistency and physicochemical significance of estimated parameters. Langmuir-Hinshelwood-hougen-Watson mechanism requiring the dissociative adsorption of isooctane and oxygen on two different sites appeared to be the most likely pathway for the partial oxidation reaction of isooctane. Reaction order with respect to isooctane indicates the strong coverage of nickel by isooctane. The activation energy of 73±3.1 kJ mol - 1 estimated from the LHHW model is consistent with the trend observed with lower hydrocarbons.(Author)

  17. Growth kinetics and morphology of plasma electrolytic oxidation coating on aluminum

    Erfanifar, Eliyas; Aliofkhazraei, Mahmood; Fakhr Nabavi, Houman; Sharifi, Hossein; Rouhaghdam, Alireza Sabour

    2017-01-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) was carried out on AA1190 aluminum alloy in mixed silicate-phosphate-based electrolyte in order to fabricate ceramic coating under constant current density. The variations of PEO coating duration with kinetics, surface roughness, amount and size of discharge channels were studied with respect to PEO processing time. The growth mechanism of the ceramic coating was described considering a variation of volume and diameters of discharge channels and pancakes during the PEO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), and roughness tester were used to study the plasma discharge channels of the PEO coatings. In addition, the effect of alumina nanoparticles in the electrolyte as the suspension was studied on the geometric parameters of discharge channels. It seems that the nanoparticles are adsorbed to the locations of erupted molten oxide, where the dielectric breakdown occurs. Nanoparticles were embedded in the dense oxide layer and were adsorbed at the walls of voids and coatings surface. As a result, they caused significant changes in roughness parameters of the samples containing nanoparticles compared to those without nanoparticles. The obtained results showed that growth kinetics followed a linear trend with respect to PEO coating duration. It was also observed that in the absence of alumina nanoparticles, the average volume of the pancakes is 150% greater than the ones fabricated in the suspension of nanoparticles. Besides, increasing the PEO coating duration leads to adsorbing more nanoparticles on the coating surface, filling the voids, and flattening the surface, and alterations in R v , R sk , and R lo parameters. Correlation between the diameter of discharge channel (d c ) and thickness of the pancake (h) also showed a linear relation. - Highlights: • Precise calculation of thickness of pancake with AFM. • Study of different roughness parameters for PEO coating. • Calculation the amount of

  18. First-order hydrothermal oxidation kinetics of digested sludge compared with raw sludge.

    Shanableh, A; Imteaz, M

    2008-09-01

    This article presents an assessment of the first-order hydrothermal oxidation kinetics of a selected digested sludge at subcritical ( 374 degrees C) temperatures in the range of 250-460 degrees C. Furthermore, the results were compared with reported oxidation kinetics of raw sludge treated under identical experimental conditions. In the assessment, oxidation was considered to proceed in two steps: (1) decomposition of the particulate, or non-filterable, chemical oxygen demand (PCOD); followed by (2) ultimate oxidation and removal of the total, particulate and soluble, COD. The accumulation and removal of soluble COD (SCOD) was determined from the difference between the rates of sludge decomposition and ultimate oxidation. Using results from batch and continuous-flow hydrothermal treatment experiments, the reacting organic ingredients were separated into groups according to the ease or difficulty at which they were decomposed or removed, with Arrhenius-type activation energy levels assigned to the different groups. The analysis confirmed that within the treatment range of 75% to more than 97% COD removal, the oxidation kinetics of the digested and raw sludges were nearly identical despite differences in the proportions of their original organic ingredients. The original organic ingredients were mostly removed above 75% COD removal, and the oxidation kinetics appeared to be dominated by the removal of acetic acid, an intermediate by-product which constituted 50% to more than 80% of the remaining COD. Furthermore, the oxidation kinetics of both sludge types were consistent with reported first-order oxidation kinetics of pure acetic acid solutions. The resulting kinetic models adequately represented hydrothermal oxidation of digested sludge, in terms of COD and PCOD removals, as well as accumulation and removal of the soluble SCOD.

  19. Kinetic Studies on the Selective Oxidation of Benzyl Alcohols in Organic Medium under Phase Transfer Catalysis

    K. Bijudas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic studies on the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and substituted benzyl alcohols in benzene as the reaction medium have been studied by using potassium dichromate under phase transfer catalysis (PTC. The phase transfer catalysts (PT catalysts used were tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB and tetrabutylphosphonium bromide (TBPB.  Benzyl alcohols were selectively oxidised to corresponding benzaldehydes in good yield (above 90%.  The order of reactivity among the studied benzyl alcohols is p - OCH3 > p - CH3 > - H > p - Cl.  Plots of log k2 versus Hammett's substituent constant (s has been found to be curve shaped and this suggests that there should be a continuous change in transition state with changes in substituent present in the substrate from electron donating to electron withdrawing. A suitable mechanism has been suggested in which the rate determining step involves both C - H bond cleavage and C - O bond formations in concerted manner. © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.Received: 16th March 2014; Revised: 18th May 2014; Accepted: 18th May 2014[How to Cite: Bijudas, K., Bashpa, P., Nair, T.D.R. (2014. Kinetic Studies on the Selective Oxidation of Benzyl Alcohol and Substituted Benzyl Alcohols in Organic Medium under Phase Transfer Catalysis. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9 (2: 142-147. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.2.6476.142-147][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.2.6476.142-147] 

  20. Kinetics of oxidation of bilirubin and its protein complex by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions

    Solomonov, A. V.; Rumyantsev, E. V.; Antina, E. V.

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study of oxidation reactions of bilirubin and its complex with albumin was carried out in aqueous solutions under the action of hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen at different pH values. Free radical oxidation of the pigment in both free and bound forms at pH 7.4 was shown not to lead to the formation of biliverdin, but to be associated with the decomposition of the tetrapyrrole chromophore into monopyrrolic products. The effective and true rate constants of the reactions under study were determined. It was assumed that one possible mechanism of the oxidation reaction is associated with the interaction of peroxyl radicals and protons of the NH groups of bilirubin molecules at the limiting stage with the formation of a highly reactive radical intermediate. The binding of bilirubin with albumin was found to result in a considerable reduction in the rate of the oxidation reaction associated with the kinetic manifestation of the protein protection effect. It was found that the autoxidation of bilirubin by molecular oxygen with the formation of biliverdin at the intermediate stage can be observed with an increase in the pH of solutions.

  1. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase*

    Mishanina, Tatiana V.; Yadav, Pramod K.; Ballou, David P.; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be −123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  2. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-09

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering with the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Smeltz, Andrew D.; Zvinevich, Yury; Gounder, Rajamani; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on…

  4. Oxidation of L-cystine by chromium(VI) - a kinetic study | Kumar ...

    The kinetics of the title reaction was studied spectrophotometrically in HClO4 medium at 380 nm. The data suggested that the order with respect to cystine is fractional, whereas chromium(VI) follows first order kinetics. The reaction was second order in [H+]. Cysteic acid was found to be the main product of oxidation.

  5. Mechanism and kinetics of dithiobenzoate-mediated RAFT polymerization. I. The current situation

    Barner-Kowollik, C.; Buback, M.; Charleux, B.; Coote, M.L.; Drache, M.; Fukuda, T.; Goto, A.; Klumperman, B.; Lowe, A.B.; McLeary, J.B.; Moad, G.; Monteiro, M.J.; Sanderson, R.D.; Tonge, M.P.; Vana, P.

    2006-01-01

    Investigations into the kinetics and mechanism of dithiobenzoate-mediated Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerizations, which exhibit nonideal kinetic behavior, such as induction periods and rate retardation, are comprehensively reviewed. The appreciable uncertainty in the

  6. Kinetic, mechanistic, and spectroscopic studies of permanganate oxidation of azinylformamidines in acidic medium, with autocatalytic behavior of manganese(II

    Basim H. Asghar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of permanganate oxidation of two substituted azinylformamidines (Azn-Fs, namely N,N-dimethyl-N′-(pyridin-2-ylformamidine (Py and N,N-dimethyl-N′-(pyrimidin-2-ylformamidine (Pym, in sulfuric acid were investigated using conventional spectrophotometry. Kinetic evidence for the formation of 1:1 intermediate complexes between the oxidant and substrates was obtained. The reactions of both substrates with permanganate showed similar kinetics, i.e. first order in [MnO4−]0 and fractional-first-order with respect to both [Azn-F]0 and [H+]. The initial product, Mn2+, was found to autocatalyze the oxidation process. Changes in the ionic strength and dielectric constant of the medium had no significant effect on the rate. The final oxidation products of Py and Pym were identified as 2-aminopyridine and 2-aminopyrimidine, respectively, in addition to dimethylamine and carbon dioxide. A plausible reaction mechanism is suggested and the reaction constants involved in the mechanism were evaluated.

  7. Gas-Phase Photocatalytic Oxidation of Dimethylamine: The Reaction Pathway and Kinetics

    Anna Kachina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation (PCO and thermal catalytic oxidation (TCO of dimethylamine (DMA on titanium dioxide was studied in a continuous flow simple tubular reactor. Volatile PCO products of DMA included ammonia, formamide, carbon dioxide, and water. Ammonia was further oxidized in minor amounts to nitrous oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Effective at 573 K, TCO resulted in the formation of ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water. The PCO kinetic data fit well to the monomolecular Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, whereas TCO kinetic behaviour matched the first-order process. No deactivation of the photocatalyst during the multiple long-run experiments was observed.

  8. Kinetics of the oxidation of Ba2YCu3O/sub x/ ceramics

    O'Bryan, H.M.; Gallagher, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of dense and porous samples of Ba 2 YCu 3 O/sub x/ ceramic have been determined by gravimetric analysis at 400--700 0 C. At 600 0 C and above, the rate decreases as the thickness of the oxidized layer increases. At 500 0 C and below, the kinetics show a linear relation that indicates that the oxidized layer does not protect the ceramic. Dilatometric, microscopic, and high-temperature x-ray data suggest that fractures in the oxide layer at the lower temperatures are caused by the large volume decrease that accompanies the change in oxygen stoichiometry

  9. Influence of temperature on oxidation mechanisms of fiber-textured AlTiTaN coatings.

    Khetan, Vishal; Valle, Nathalie; Duday, David; Michotte, Claude; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule; Choquet, Patrick

    2014-03-26

    The oxidation kinetics of AlTiTaN hard coatings deposited at 265 °C by DC magnetron sputtering were investigated between 700 and 950 °C for various durations. By combining dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (D-SIMS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations of the different oxidized coatings, we were able to highlight the oxidation mechanisms involved. The TEM cross-section observations combined with XRD analysis show that a single amorphous oxide layer comprising Ti, Al, and Ta formed at 700 °C. Above 750 °C, the oxide scale transforms into a bilayer oxide comprising an Al-rich upper oxide layer and a Ti/Ta-rich oxide layer at the interface with the coated nitride layer. From the D-SIMS analysis, it could be proposed that the oxidation mechanism was governed primarily by inward diffusion of O for temperatures of ≤700 °C, while at ≥750 °C, it is controlled by outward diffusion of Al and inward diffusion of O. Via a combination of structural and chemical analysis, it is possible to propose that crystallization of rutile lattice favors the outward diffusion of Al within the AlTiTa mixed oxide layer with an increase in the temperature of oxidation. The difference in the mechanisms of oxidation at 700 and 900 °C also influences the oxidation kinetics with respect to oxidation time. Formation of a protective alumina layer decreases the rate of oxidation at 900 °C for long durations of oxidation compared to 700 °C. Along with the oxidation behavior, the enhanced thermal stability of AlTiTaN compared to that of the TiAlN coating is illustrated.

  10. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphate immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater into surface water

    van der Grift, B.; Rozemeijer, J. C.; Griffioen, J.; van der Velde, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The retention of phosphorus in surface waters through co-precipitation of phosphate with Fe-oxyhydroxides during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II) rich groundwater is not well understood. We developed an experimental field set-up to study Fe(II) oxidation and P immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater into surface water in an agricultural experimental catchment of a small lowland river. We physically separated tube drain effluent from groundwater discharge before it entered a ditch in an agricultural field. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling of groundwater, tube drain water, exfiltrated groundwater, and surface water, we investigated Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and P immobilization processes. The oxidation rate inferred from our field measurements closely agreed with the general rate law for abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) by O2. Seasonal changes in climatic conditions affected the Fe(II) oxidation process. Lower pH and lower temperatures in winter (compared to summer) resulted in low Fe oxidation rates. After exfiltration to the surface water, it took a couple of days to more than a week before complete oxidation of Fe(II) is reached. In summer time, Fe oxidation rates were much higher. The Fe concentrations in the exfiltrated groundwater were low, indicating that dissolved Fe(II) is completely oxidized prior to inflow into a ditch. While the Fe oxidation rates reduce drastically from summer to winter, P concentrations remained high in the groundwater and an order of magnitude lower in the surface water throughout the year. This study shows very fast immobilization of dissolved P during the initial stage of the Fe(II) oxidation process which results in P-depleted water before Fe(II) is completely depleted. This cannot be explained by surface complexation of phosphate to freshly formed Fe-oxyhydroxides but indicates the formation of Fe(III)-phosphate precipitates. The formation of Fe(III)-phosphates at redox gradients

  11. High-temperature steam oxidation kinetics of the E110G cladding alloy

    Király, Márton; Kulacsy, Katalin; Hózer, Zoltán; Perez-Feró, Erzsébet; Novotny, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    In the course of recent years, several experiments were performed at MTA EK (Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences) on the isothermal high-temperature oxidation of the improved Russian cladding alloy E110G in steam/argon atmosphere. Using these data and designing additional supporting experiments, the oxidation kinetics of the E110G alloy was investigated in a wide temperature range, between 600 °C and 1200 °C. For short durations (below 500 s) or high temperatures (above 1065 °C) the oxidation kinetics was found to follow a square-root-of-time dependence, while for longer durations and in the intermediate temperature range (800–1000 °C) it was found to approach a cube-root-of-time dependence rather than a square-root one. Based on the results a new best-estimate and a conservative oxidation kinetics model were created. - Highlights: • Steam oxidation kinetics of E110G was studied at MTA EK based on old and new data. • New best-estimate and conservative steam oxidation kinetics were proposed for E110G. • The exponent of oxidation time changed depending on oxidation temperature. • A simple exponential curve was used instead of Arrhenius-type curve for the factor.

  12. Behaviour of defective CANDU fuel: fuel oxidation kinetic and thermodynamic modelling

    Higgs, J.

    2005-01-01

    The thermal performance of operating CANDU fuel under defect conditions is affected by the ingress of heavy water into the fuel element. A mechanistic model has been developed to predict the extent of fuel oxidation in defective fuel and its affect on fuel thermal performance. A thermodynamic treatment of such oxidized fuel has been performed as a basis for the boundary conditions in the kinetic model. Both the kinetic and thermodynamic models have been benchmarked against recent experimental work. (author)

  13. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphorus immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface

    van der Grift, Bas; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Griffioen, Jasper; van der Velde, Ype

    2014-05-01

    Eutrophication of freshwater environments following diffuse nutrient loads is a widely recognized water quality problem in catchments. Fluxes of non-point P sources to surface waters originate from surface runoff and flow from soil water and groundwater into surface water. The availability of P in surface waters is controlled strongly by biogeochemical nutrient cycling processes at the soil-water interface. The mechanisms and rates of the iron oxidation process with associated binding of phosphate during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II) bearing groundwater are among the key unknowns in P retention processes in surface waters in delta areas where the shallow groundwater is typically pH-neutral to slightly acid, anoxic, iron-rich. We developed an experimental field set-up to study the dynamics in Fe(II) oxidation and mechanisms of P immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface in an agricultural experimental catchment of a small lowland river. We physically separated tube drain effluent from groundwater discharge before it entered a ditch in an agricultural field. The exfiltrating groundwater was captured in in-stream reservoirs constructed in the ditch. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling of groundwater, tube drain water, exfiltrated groundwater, and ditch water, we quantified Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and P immobilization processes across the seasons. This study showed that seasonal changes in climatic conditions affect the Fe(II) oxidation process. In winter time the dissolved iron concentrations in the in-stream reservoirs reached the levels of the anaerobic groundwater. In summer time, the dissolved iron concentrations of the water in the reservoirs are low, indicating that dissolved Fe(II) is completely oxidized prior to inflow into the reservoirs. Higher discharges, lower temperatures and lower pH of the exfiltrated groundwater in winter compared to summer shifts the location of the redox transition zone

  14. Kinetic investigation of the catalytic mechanism for bovine liver mitochondrial monoamine oxidase

    Walker, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic behavior of the oxidative deamination reaction catalyzed by bovine liver mitochondrial monoamine oxidase was investigated with a series of ring-substituted benzylamines. Oxidation rates were fastest with the meta isomers. Dalziel coefficients were consistent with a mechanism involving a ternary complex for all substrates tested. Alterations in the Michaelis constant for oxygen were similar in magnitude to those for the rate of catalysis. Deuterium and tritium isotope effects were determined to obtain more detailed information on the mechanism of catalysis. Large deuterium isotope effects expressed on k cat were obtained for all substrates. Determination of the tritium isotope effect for benzylamine allowed the calculation of an intrinsic isotope effect of 6.5 and a secondary isotope effect of 1.17. Steady-state experiments were supplemented with pre-steady-state kinetic techniques. Rates of flavin reduction were faster than that of turnover. The deuterium isotope effect obtained for the rate of flavin reduction was 7-15 for the various substrates. The observed isotope effect was found to be an appropriate estimate for the intrinsic isotope effect

  15. Mechanisms and kinetics of granulated sewage sludge combustion.

    Kijo-Kleczkowska, Agnieszka; Środa, Katarzyna; Kosowska-Golachowska, Monika; Musiał, Tomasz; Wolski, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates sewage sludge disposal methods with particular emphasis on combustion as the priority disposal method. Sewage sludge incineration is an attractive option because it minimizes odour, significantly reduces the volume of the starting material and thermally destroys organic and toxic components of the off pads. Additionally, it is possible that ashes could be used. Currently, as many as 11 plants use sewage sludge as fuel in Poland; thus, this technology must be further developed in Poland while considering the benefits of co-combustion with other fuels. This paper presents the results of experimental studies aimed at determining the mechanisms (defining the fuel combustion region by studying the effects of process parameters, including the size of the fuel sample, temperature in the combustion chamber and air velocity, on combustion) and kinetics (measurement of fuel temperature and mass changes) of fuel combustion in an air stream under different thermal conditions and flow rates. The combustion of the sludge samples during air flow between temperatures of 800 and 900°C is a kinetic-diffusion process. This process determines the sample size, temperature of its environment, and air velocity. The adopted process parameters, the time and ignition temperature of the fuel by volatiles, combustion time of the volatiles, time to reach the maximum temperature of the fuel surface, maximum temperature of the fuel surface, char combustion time, and the total process time, had significant impacts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Kinetic studies on the degradation of crystal violet by the Fenton oxidation process.

    Wu, H; Fan, M M; Li, C F; Peng, M; Sheng, L J; Pan, Q; Song, G W

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of dye crystal violet (CV) by Fenton oxidation process was investigated. The UV-Vis spectrogram has shown that CV can be degraded effectively by Fenton oxidation process. Different system variables namely initial H(2)O(2) concentration, initial Fe(2 + ) concentration and reaction temperature, which have effect on the degradation of CV by Fenton oxidation process, have been studied systematically. The degradation kinetics of CV was also elucidated based on the experimental data. The degradation of CV obeys the first-order reaction kinetics. The kinetic model can be described as k=1.5 exp(-(7.5)/(RT))[H(2)O(2)](0)(0.8718)[Fe(2+)](0)(0.5062). According to the IR spectrogram, it is concluded that the benzene ring of crystal violet has been destroyed by Fenton oxidation. The result will be useful in treating dyeing wastewater containing CV by Fenton oxidation process.

  17. Oxidation mechanism of Fe–16Cr alloy as SOFC interconnect in dry/wet air

    Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Li-Jun; Li, Fu-Shen; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •A special thermodynamic description corresponding to the kinetics was applied. •We reported the relationships of degradation time with temperature and moisture. •”Turning time” in the Fe–16Cr alloy oxidation kinetic model was given. •The oxidation mechanism of Fe–16Cr alloy in the wet air was discussed. -- Abstract: Experimental study on the oxidation corrosions of Fe–16Cr alloy was carried out at 800–1100 °C under dry/wet air conditions. Faster oxidation rate was observed at higher temperature and water vapor content. The degradation time t d between two stages in oxidation process showed an exponential relationship with elevating corrosion temperature in dry air, and a linear relationship with the water content in the case of water vapor introduced to the system. The mechanism of oxidation corrosions of Fe–16Cr alloy was suggested by the Real Physical Picture (RPP) model. It was found that the break-away oxidation in stage II was controlled by diffusion at initial both in dry and wet air, then became linear with the exposure time, which implied that the oxidation rate was then controlled by chemical reaction of the interface between the metal and the oxidized scale. Moreover, the effect of water in the oxidation process is not only to supply more oxygen into system, but also to modify the structures of oxide scale due to the existence of hydrogen atom, which results in the accelerated corrosions

  18. Mechanisms and kinetic profiles of superoxide-stimulated nitrosative processes in cells using a diaminofluorescein probe.

    Damasceno, Fernando Cruvinel; Facci, Rômulo Rodrigues; da Silva, Thalita Marques; Toledo, José Carlos

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we examined the mechanisms and kinetic profiles of intracellular nitrosative processes using diaminofluorescein (DAF-2) as a target in RAW 264.7 cells. The intracellular formation of the fluorescent, nitrosated product diaminofluorescein triazol (DAFT) from both endogenous and exogenous nitric oxide (NO) was prevented by deoxygenation and by cell membrane-permeable superoxide (O2(-)) scavengers but not by extracellular bovine Cu,Zn-SOD. In addition, the DAFT formation rate decreased in the presence of cell membrane-permeable Mn porphyrins that are known to scavenge peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) but was enhanced by HCO3(-)/CO2. Together, these results indicate that nitrosative processes in RAW 264.7 cells depend on endogenous intracellular O2(-) and are stimulated by ONOO(-)/CO2-derived radical oxidants. The N2O3 scavenger sodium azide (NaN3) only partially attenuated the DAFT formation rate and only with high NO (>120 nM), suggesting that DAFT formation occurs by nitrosation (azide-susceptible DAFT formation) and predominantly by oxidative nitrosylation (azide-resistant DAFT formation). Interestingly, the DAFT formation rate increased linearly with NO concentrations of up to 120-140 nM but thereafter underwent a sharp transition and became insensitive to NO. This behavior indicates the sudden exhaustion of an endogenous cell substrate that reacts rapidly with NO and induces nitrosative processes, consistent with the involvement of intracellular O2(-). On the other hand, intracellular DAFT formation stimulated by a fixed flux of xanthine oxidase-derived extracellular O2(-) that also occurs by nitrosation and oxidative nitrosylation increased, peaked, and then decreased with increasing NO, as previously observed. Thus, our findings complementarily show that intra- and extracellular O2(-)-dependent nitrosative processes occurring by the same chemical mechanisms do not necessarily depend on NO concentration and exhibit different unusual kinetic profiles with

  19. Structural and silver/vanadium ratio effects on silver vanadium phosphorous oxide solution formation kinetics: impact on battery electrochemistry.

    Bock, David C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Esther S

    2015-01-21

    The detailed understanding of non-faradaic parasitic reactions which diminish battery calendar life is essential to the development of effective batteries for use in long life applications. The dissolution of cathode materials including manganese, cobalt and vanadium oxides in battery systems has been identified as a battery failure mechanism, yet detailed dissolution studies including kinetic analysis are absent from the literature. The results presented here provide a framework for the quantitative and kinetic analyses of the dissolution of cathode materials which will aid the broader community in more fully understanding this battery failure mechanism. In this study, the dissolution of silver vanadium oxide, representing the primary battery powering implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), is compared with the dissolution of silver vanadium phosphorous oxide (Ag(w)VxPyOz) materials which were targeted as alternatives to minimize solubility. This study contains the first kinetic analyses of silver and vanadium solution formation from Ag0.48VOPO4·1.9H2O and Ag2VP2O8, in a non-aqueous battery electrolyte. The kinetic results are compared with those of Ag2VO2PO4 and Ag2V4O11 to probe the relationships among crystal structure, stoichiometry, and solubility. For vanadium, significant dissolution was observed for Ag2V4O11 as well as for the phosphate oxide Ag0.49VOPO4·1.9H2O, which may involve structural water or the existence of multiple vanadium oxidation states. Notably, the materials from the SVPO family with the lowest vanadium solubility are Ag2VO2PO4 and Ag2VP2O8. The low concentrations and solution rates coupled with their electrochemical performance make these materials interesting alternatives to Ag2V4O11 for the ICD application.

  20. The investigation of the kinetics of hydrochemical oxidation of metal sulphides with the aim of determination of the optimal conditions for the selective extraction of molybdenum from ores

    Lutsik V.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the oxidation of molybdenyte, pyrite and sphalerite in solutions of nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium hypochlorite was studied by the rotating disk method. The influence of the molar concentration of reagent, pH of solution, temperature, disk rotation frequency, and duration of measurements on the specific rate of hydrochemical oxidation of sulpfides was determined. The kinetic models allowing to calculate the dissolution rate of sulphides when these parameters change simultaneously were obtained. The conditions of kinetically and diffusion-controlled processes were detected. The details of mechanism of the studied processes were revealed. The nature of intermediate solid products, the reasons and the conditions of their formation as well as the character of their influence on the kinetics of dissolution processes were determined. The probable schemes of interactions corresponding to the observable kinetic dependences were offered. The conditions of the effective and selective molybdenum leaching directly from ore without its concentration were found.

  1. Thermodynamic controls on the kinetics of microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation.

    Larson, Lance N; Sánchez-España, Javier; Kaley, Bradley; Sheng, Yizhi; Bibby, Kyle; Burgos, William D

    2014-08-19

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a major worldwide environmental threat to surface and groundwater quality. Microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation could be exploited for cost-effective AMD treatment; however, its use is limited because of uncertainties associated with its rate and ability to remove Fe from solution. We developed a thermodynamic-based framework to evaluate the kinetics of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation. We measured the kinetics of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation at five sites in the Appalachian Coal Basin in the US and three sites in the Iberian Pyrite Belt in Spain and found that the fastest rates of Fe(II) oxidation occurred at the sites with the lowest pH values. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the Gibbs free energy of Fe(II) oxidation (ΔG(oxidation)) was also most negative at the sites with the lowest pH values. We then conducted two series of microbial Fe(II) oxidation experiments in laboratory-scale chemostatic bioreactors operated through a series of pH values (2.1-4.2) and found the same relationships between Fe(II) oxidation kinetics, ΔG(oxidation), and pH. Conditions that favored the fastest rates of Fe(II) oxidation coincided with higher Fe(III) solubility. The solubility of Fe(III) minerals, thus plays an important role on Fe(II) oxidation kinetics. Methods to incorporate microbial low-pH Fe(II) oxidation into active and passive AMD treatment systems are discussed in the context of these findings. This study presents a simplified model that describes the relationship between free energy and microbial kinetics and should be broadly applicable to many biogeochemical systems.

  2. Wet oxidation of glycerol into fine organic acids: catalyst selection and kinetic evaluation

    J. E. N. Brainer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The liquid phase oxidation of glycerol was performed producing fine organic acids. Catalysts based on Pt, Pd and Bi supported on activated carbon were employed to perform the conversion of glycerol into organic acids at 313 K, 323 K and 333 K, under atmospheric pressure (1.0 bar, in a mechanically agitated slurry reactor (MASR. The experimental results indicated glycerol conversions of 98% with production of glyceric, tartronic and glycolic acids, and dihydroxyacetone. A yield of glyceric acid of 69.8%, and a selectivity of this compound of 70.6% were reached after 4 h of operation. Surface mechanisms were proposed and rate equations were formulated to represent the kinetic behavior of the process. Selective formation of glyceric acid was observed, and the kinetic parameter values indicated the lowest activation energy (38.5 kJ/mol for its production reaction step, and the highest value of the adsorption equilibrium constant of the reactant glycerol (10-4 dm³/mol.

  3. Effect of strain on bond-specific reaction kinetics during the oxidation of H-terminated (111) Si

    Gokce, Bilal; Aspnes, David E.; Gundogdu, Kenan

    2011-01-01

    Although strain is used in semiconductor technology for manipulating optical, electronic, and chemical properties of semiconductors, the understanding of the microscopic phenomena that are affected or influenced by strain is still incomplete. Second-harmonic generation data obtained during the air oxidation of H-terminated (111) Si reveal the effect of compressive strain on this chemical reaction. Even small amounts of strain manipulate the reaction kinetics of surface bonds significantly, with tensile strain enhancing oxidation and compressive strain retarding it. This dramatic change suggests a strain-driven charge transfer mechanism between Si-H up bonds and Si-Si back bonds in the outer layer of Si atoms.

  4. Mechanism of the oxidation of diphenylamine compounds

    Pankratov, A.N.; Shmakov, S.L.; Mushtakova, S.P.; Gribov, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    A spectrophotometric, radiospectroscopic, and quantum chemical study of the oxidation of compounds of the diphenylamine series in acid medium has made it possible to establish a common reaction scheme for amines with different types of substituents and to determine certain details of the reaction mechanism: the participation of protonated amine molecules in the interaction with the oxidizing agent; intermediate formation of radical cations of the type of diphenylamine and N,N'-diarylbenzidine; the concrete directions of the dimerization of radical cations of diarylamines with the participation of the para-carbon atoms of the aromatic rings

  5. Oxidation Kinetics and Strength Degradation of Carbon Fibers in a Cracked Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Halbig, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental results and oxidation modeling will be presented to discuss carbon fiber susceptibility to oxidation, the oxidation kinetics regimes and composite strength degradation and failure due to oxidation. Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation rates of carbon fiber and of a pyro-carbon interphase. The analysis was used to separately obtain activation energies for the carbon constituents within a C/SiC composite. TGA was also conducted on C/SiC composite material to study carbon oxidation and crack closure as a function of temperature. In order to more closely match applications conditions C/SiC tensile coupons were also tested under stressed oxidation conditions. The stressed oxidation tests show that C/SiC is much more susceptible to oxidation when the material is under an applied load where the cracks are open and allow for oxygen ingress. The results help correlate carbon oxidation with composite strength reduction and failure.

  6. Kinetic study of methanol oxidation on Pt2Ru3/C catalyst in the alkaline media

    A. V. TRIPKOVIC

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of acridine orange (AO with double-stranded (ds The electrochemical oxidation of methanol in NaOH solution was examined on a thin film Pt2Ru3/C electrode. The XRD pattern revealed that the Pt2Ru3 alloy consisted of a solid solution of Ru in Pt and a small amount of Ru or a solid solution of Pt in Ru. It was shown that in alkaline solution, the difference in activity between Pt/C and Pt2Ru3/C is significantly smaller than in acid solution. It is proposed that the reaction follows a quasi bifunctional mechanism. The kinetic parameters indicated that the chemical reaction between adsorbed COad and OHad species could be the rate limiting step.

  7. A kinetic model of the oxidative dissolution of brannerite, UTi2O6

    Thomas, B.S.; Zhang, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The aqueous dissolution of synthetic brannerite (UTi 2 O 6 ) in an open atmosphere has been investigated. Previous data in the literature have been combined with new experimental work, dealing with the release of uranium from brannerite as a function of solution pH and aqueous carbonate species, in oxygenated solutions. From these data we have developed a conceptual model for uranium release from brannerite consisting of two reaction steps: oxidation of surface uranium(IV) atoms, and subsequent detachment of U(VI) atoms into solution, which is catalysed by surface coordination with protons (acidic media) or carbonate species (alkaline media in equilibrium with the atmosphere). A kinetic rate law is derived for this simple reaction mechanism and fitted to experimental data. The resulting predictive equation for uranium release qualitatively describes the pH-dependent behaviour observed in experiment, and quantitatively gives an upper limit for uranium release from brannerite over a range of conditions and experiment types. (orig.)

  8. Mechanism of oxidation of L-methionine by iron(III)-1,10 ...

    Unknown

    Abstract. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of L-methionine by iron(III)–1,10- phenanthroline complex have been studied in perchloric acid medium. The reaction is first order each in iron(III) and methionine. Increase in [phenanthroline] increases the rate while increase in [HClO4] decreases it. While the reactive species ...

  9. The initial oxidation of epsilon-Fesub2Nsub1-x: growth kinetics

    Graat, Peter C.J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    1999-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of epsilon-Fe2N1-x, subjected either to a sputter cleaning pretreatment or a sputter cleaning and an additional annealing pretreatment, at P-O2 = 1 x 10(-4) Pa and at temperatures ranging from 300 to 500 K, was investigated with ellipsometry. The initial oxidation rate of s...

  10. Mechanism of UO2 selfdisintegration by oxidation

    Ohai, D.; Furtuna, I.; Dumitrescu, I.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The paper present the results of the study of UO 2 sintered pellets oxidation, part of FIPRED (Fission Product Release from Debris Bed) Project. The FIPRED Project is dedicated to the study the fission products release from irradiated pellets existing in debris bed. The product release is produced by oxidative self disintegration of sintered pellets at air ingress and it depends on temperature. The experimental program covered experiments of 300-1000 deg. C in air diluted with nitrogen at different oxygen concentrations. The experiments were performed using the SETARAM thermo gravimetric equipment and the FIPRED EQ equipment designed and manufactured especially for this type of experiment. The powders (fragments), resulted from UO 2 pellets self disintegration, were characterized by sieving and SEM. The self disintegration mechanism was demonstrated using the experimental results obtained and thermodynamical data of uranium oxides. (authors)

  11. Mechanism of water oxidation by trivalent ruthenium trisdipyridyl complex

    Moravskij, A.P.; Khannanov, N.K.; Khramov, A.V.; Shafirovich, V.Ya.

    1983-01-01

    Results of kinetic investigation of water oxidation reaction with photogenerated single-electron oxidizer-trisdipyridyl complex of Ru(3) are presented. CoCl 2 x6H 2 O within the concentration range of [Co 2+ ] 0 =5x10 -7 - 5x10 -5 M was used as a reaction catalyst. The method of stopped flow with spectrophotometric recording was used in order to control the reaction kinetics

  12. Mechanistic Investigation of Oxidation of Phenylpropanolamine with N-Bromobenzenesulfonamide in Alkaline Medium: A Kinetic Approach

    Ningegowda Prasad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of phenylpropanolamine (PPA with sodium N-bromobenzenesulfonamide or bromamine-B (BAB has been investigated in alkaline medium at 308 K. The oxidation reaction obeys the rate law, – d[BAB]/dt = k [BAB] [PPA]x [OH-], where x is less than unity. The variation of ionic strength of the medium, addition of the reduction product, benzenesulfonamide, and chloride ion had no pronounced effect on the reaction rate. Decrease of dielectric permittivity of the medium by increasing the CH3CN content increased the rate. The reaction was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters have been evaluated from the Arrhenius plot. The stiochiometry of the reaction was found to be 1:1, and the oxidation product of phenylpropanolamine was identified as benzaldehyde and ethylideneamine. The rate decreased in D2O medium and the normal isotope effect k' (H2O / k' (D2O is 2.18. Proton inventory studies have been made in H2O - D2O mixtures. Formation and decomposition constant of BAB-PPA complexes in the reaction scheme have been determined. The conjugate acid, C6H5SO2NHBr is assumed to be the reactive species. The proposed mechanism and the derived rate law are consistent with the observed experimental results.

  13. Oxidation of Tetracaine Hydrochloride by Chloramine-B in Acid Medium: Kinetic Modeling

    Jayachamarajapura Pranesh Shubha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetracaine hydrochloride (TCH is one of the potent local anaesthetics. A kinetic study of oxidation of tetracaine hydrochloride by sodium N-chlorobenzenesulfonamide (chloramine-B or CAB has been carried in HClO4 medium at 303 K. The rate shows first-order dependence on [CAB]o, shows fractional–order dependence on [substrate]o, and is self-governing on acid concentration. Decrease of dielectric constant of the medium, by adding methanol, increased the rate. Variation of ionic strength and addition of benzenesulfonamide or NaCl have no significant effect on the rate. The reaction was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters have been evaluated. The stoichiometry of the reaction was found to be 1 : 5 and the oxidation products were identified by spectral analysis. The conjugate free acid C6H5SO2NHCl of CAB is postulated as the reactive oxidizing species. The observed results have been explained by plausible mechanism and the related rate law has been deduced.

  14. Kinetic modeling of antimony(III) oxidation and sorption in soils.

    Cai, Yongbing; Mi, Yuting; Zhang, Hua

    2016-10-05

    Kinetic batch and saturated column experiments were performed to study the oxidation, adsorption and transport of Sb(III) in two soils with contrasting properties. Kinetic and column experiment results clearly demonstrated the extensive oxidation of Sb(III) in soils, and this can in return influence the adsorption and transport of Sb. Both sorption capacity and kinetic oxidation rate were much higher in calcareous Huanjiang soil than in acid red Yingtan soil. The results indicate that soil serve as a catalyst in promoting oxidation of Sb(III) even under anaerobic conditions. A PHREEQC model with kinetic formulations was developed to simulate the oxidation, sorption and transport of Sb(III) in soils. The model successfully described Sb(III) oxidation and sorption data in kinetic batch experiment. It was less successful in simulating the reactive transport of Sb(III) in soil columns. Additional processes such as colloid facilitated transport need to be quantified and considered in the model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Kinetic Studies on the Oxidation of Some para and meta-Substituted Cinnamic Acids by Pyridinium Bromochromate in the Presence of Oxalic Acid (A Co-oxidation Study

    G. Vanangamudi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of cinnamic acids by pyridinium bromochromate (PBC in the presence of oxalic acid has been studied in acetic acid-water (60:40% medium. The reaction shows unit order dependence each with respect to oxidant as well as oxalic acid [OX], the order with respect to [H+] and [CA] are fractional. The reaction is acid catalyzed and a low dielectric constant favours the reaction. Increase the ionic strength has no effect on the reaction rate. In the case of substituted cinnamic acids the order with respect to substrate vary depending upon the nature of the substituent present in the ring. In general, the electron withdrawing substituents retard the rate while the electron releasing substituents enhance the rate of reaction. From the kinetic data obtained the activation parameters have been computed and a suitable mechanism has been proposed.

  16. A computational environment for creating and testing reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms

    Montgomery, C.J.; Swensen, D.A.; Harding, T.V.; Cremer, M.A.; Bockelie, M.J. [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (USA)

    2002-02-01

    This paper describes software called computer assisted reduced mechanism problem solving environment (CARM-PSE) that gives the engineer the ability to rapidly set up, run and examine large numbers of problems comparing detailed and reduced (approximate) chemistry. CARM-PSE integrates the automatic chemical mechanism reduction code CARM and the codes that simulate perfectly stirred reactors and plug flow reactors into a user-friendly computational environment. CARM-PSE gives the combustion engineer the ability to easily test chemical approximations over many hundreds of combinations of inputs in a multidimensional parameter space. The demonstration problems compare detailed and reduced chemical kinetic calculations for methane-air combustion, including nitrogen oxide formation, in a stirred reactor and selective non-catalytic reduction of NOx, in coal combustion flue gas.

  17. Phase-field modeling of corrosion kinetics under dual-oxidants

    Wen, You-Hai; Chen, Long-Qing; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2012-04-01

    A phase-field model is proposed to simulate corrosion kinetics under a dual-oxidant atmosphere. It will be demonstrated that the model can be applied to simulate corrosion kinetics under oxidation, sulfidation and simultaneous oxidation/sulfidation processes. Phase-dependent diffusivities are incorporated in a natural manner and allow more realistic modeling as the diffusivities usually differ by many orders of magnitude in different phases. Simple free energy models are then used for testing the model while calibrated free energy models can be implemented for quantitative modeling.

  18. Reassessing the atmospheric oxidation mechanism of toluene

    Ji, Yuemeng; Zhao, Jun; Terazono, Hajime; Misawa, Kentaro; Levitt, Nicholas P.; Li, Yixin; Lin, Yun; Peng, Jianfei; Wang, Yuan; Duan, Lian; Pan, Bowen; Zhang, Fang; Feng, Xidan; An, Taicheng; Marrero-Ortiz, Wilmarie; Secrest, Jeremiah; Zhang, Annie L.; Shibuya, Kazuhiko; Molina, Mario J.; Zhang, Renyi

    2017-08-01

    Photochemical oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons leads to tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, with profound implications for air quality, human health, and climate. Toluene is the most abundant aromatic compound under urban environments, but its detailed chemical oxidation mechanism remains uncertain. From combined laboratory experiments and quantum chemical calculations, we show a toluene oxidation mechanism that is different from the one adopted in current atmospheric models. Our experimental work indicates a larger-than-expected branching ratio for cresols, but a negligible formation of ring-opening products (e.g., methylglyoxal). Quantum chemical calculations also demonstrate that cresols are much more stable than their corresponding peroxy radicals, and, for the most favorable OH (ortho) addition, the pathway of H extraction by O2 to form the cresol proceeds with a smaller barrier than O2 addition to form the peroxy radical. Our results reveal that phenolic (rather than peroxy radical) formation represents the dominant pathway for toluene oxidation, highlighting the necessity to reassess its role in ozone and SOA formation in the atmosphere.

  19. Revised mechanism of Boyland-Sims oxidation.

    Marjanović, Budimir; Juranić, Ivan; Cirić-Marjanović, Gordana

    2011-04-21

    New computational insights into the mechanism of the Boyland-Sims oxidation of arylamines with peroxydisulfate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) in an alkaline aqueous solution are presented. The key role of arylnitrenium cations, in the case of primary and secondary arylamines, and arylamine dications and immonium cations, in the case of tertiary arylamines, in the formation of corresponding o-aminoaryl sulfates, as prevalent soluble products, and oligoarylamines, as prevalent insoluble products, is proposed on the basis of the AM1 and RM1 computational study of the Boyland-Sims oxidation of aniline, ring-substituted (2-methylaniline, 3-methylaniline, 4-methylaniline, 2,6-dimethylaniline, anthranilic acid, 4-aminobenzoic acid, sulfanilic acid, sulfanilamide, 4-phenylaniline, 4-bromoaniline, 3-chloroaniline, and 2-nitroaniline) and N-substituted anilines (N-methylaniline, diphenylamine, and N,N-dimethylaniline). Arylnitrenium cations and sulfate anions (SO(4)(2-)) are generated by rate-determining two-electron oxidation of primary and secondary arylamines with S(2)O(8)(2-), while arylamine dications/immonium cations and SO(4)(2-) are initially formed by two-electron oxidation of tertiary arylamines with S(2)O(8)(2-). The subsequent regioselectivity-determining reaction of arylnitrenium cations/arylamine dications/immonium cations and SO(4)(2-), within the solvent cage, is computationally found to lead to the prevalent formation of o-aminoaryl sulfates. The formation of insoluble precipitates during the Boyland-Sims oxidation of arylamines was also computationally studied.

  20. Investigation kinetics mechanisms of adsorption malachite green onto activated carbon

    Onal, Y.; Akmil-Basar, C.; Sarici-Ozdemir, C.

    2007-01-01

    Lignite was used to prepare activated carbon (T3K618) by chemical activation with KOH. Pore properties of the activated carbon such as BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and pore diameter were characterized by t-plot based on N 2 adsorption isotherm. BET surface area of activated carbon is determined as 1000 m 2 /g. Adsorption capacity of malachite green (MG) onto T3K618 activated carbon was investigated in a batch system by considering the effects of various parameters like initial concentration (100, 150 and 200 mg/L) and temperature (25, 40 and 50 deg. C). The adsorption process was relatively fast and equilibrium was reached after about 20 min for 100, 150 mg/L at all adsorption temperature. Equilibrium time for 200 mg/L was determined as 20 min and 40 min at 298, 313 and 323 K, respectively. Simple mass and kinetic models were applied to the experimental data to examine the mechanisms of adsorption and potential rate controlling steps such as external mass transfer, intraparticle diffusion. Pseudo second-order model was found to explain the kinetics of MG adsorption most effectively. It was found that both mass transfer and pore diffusion are important in determining the adsorption rates. The intraparticle diffusion rate constant, external mass transfer coefficient, film and pore diffusion coefficient at various temperatures were evaluated. The activation energy (E a ) was determined as 48.56, 63.16, 67.93 kJ/mol for 100, 150, 200 mg/L, respectively. The Langmiur and Freundlich isotherm were used to describe the adsorption equilibrium studies at different temperatures. Langmiur isotherm shows better fit than Freundlich isotherm in the temperature range studied. The thermodynamic parameters, such as ΔG o , ΔS and ΔH o were calculated. The thermodynamics of dyes-T3K618 system indicates endothermic process

  1. Growth mechanisms of oxide scales on ODS alloys in the temperature range 1000-1100deg C

    Quadakkers, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    After a short overview of the production, microstructure and mechanical properties of nickel- and iron-based oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys, the oxidation properties of this class of materials is extensively discussed. The excellent oxidation resistance of ODS alloys is illustrated by comparing their behaviour with conventional chromia and alumina forming wrought alloys of the same base composition. ODS alloys exhibit improved scale adherence, decreased oxide growth rates, enhanced selective oxidation and decreased oxide grain size compared to corresponding non-ODS alloys. It is shown, that these experimental observations can be explained by a change in oxide growth mechanism. The presence of the oxide dispersion reduces cation diffusion in the scale, causing the oxides on the ODS alloys to grow mainly by oxygen grain boundary transport. As oxide grain size increases with time, the oxide growth kinetics obey a sub-parabolic time dependence especially in the case of the alumina forming iron-based ODS alloy. (orig.) [de

  2. Kinetics of oxidation of the alloy-MR-47VP with nitrogen dioxide

    Vasil'eva, A.G.; Rakova, N.N.; Vladimirskaya, I.N.; Kabanova, O.V.; Miklyaev, A.D.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetic dependences of oxidation of MR-47VP grade molybdenum-rhenium alloy with nitrogen dioxide have been examined within the temperature range of 350 to 550 deg C. It has been shown that the processes take place in the transition region. The specific oxidation rate of the alloy with the nitrogen dioxide is but small, and it is comparable as to its value with the specific rate of its oxidation in oxygen under identical conditions

  3. The oxidation kinetics for sublimates formed during niobium electron-beam remelting

    Chumarev, V.M.; Gulyaeva, R.I.; Mar'evich, V.P.; Upolovnikova, A.G.; Udoeva, L.Yu.

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation of sublimates of Nb-Al electron beam remelting is investigated under conditions of isothermal and continuous heating in the air. It is stated that basic oxidation products are niobium and aluminium oxides, as well as aluminium niobates of variable composition of Al 2 O 3 · mNb 2 O 5 . The more aluminium enriched sublimates possess an increased resistance to oxidation. Formed in sublimates NbAl 3 intermetallic compound features the highest heat resistance. Oxidation parameters are determined by the method of nonisothermic kinetics. It is noted that the running processes exhibit a multistage nature and are limited by internal diffusion [ru

  4. Heterogeneous Oxidation of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol: Kinetics of Changes to the Amount and Oxidation State of Particle-Phase Organic Carbon.

    Kroll, Jesse H; Lim, Christopher Y; Kessler, Sean H; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-11-05

    Atmospheric oxidation reactions are known to affect the chemical composition of organic aerosol (OA) particles over timescales of several days, but the details of such oxidative aging reactions are poorly understood. In this study we examine the rates and products of a key class of aging reaction, the heterogeneous oxidation of particle-phase organic species by the gas-phase hydroxyl radical (OH). We compile and reanalyze a number of previous studies from our laboratories involving the oxidation of single-component organic particles. All kinetic and product data are described on a common basis, enabling a straightforward comparison among different chemical systems and experimental conditions. Oxidation chemistry is described in terms of changes to key ensemble properties of the OA, rather than to its detailed molecular composition, focusing on two quantities in particular, the amount and the oxidation state of the particle-phase carbon. Heterogeneous oxidation increases the oxidation state of particulate carbon, with the rate of increase determined by the detailed chemical mechanism. At the same time, the amount of particle-phase carbon decreases with oxidation, due to fragmentation (C-C scission) reactions that form small, volatile products that escape to the gas phase. In contrast to the oxidation state increase, the rate of carbon loss is nearly uniform among most systems studied. Extrapolation of these results to atmospheric conditions indicates that heterogeneous oxidation can have a substantial effect on the amount and composition of atmospheric OA over timescales of several days, a prediction that is broadly in line with available measurements of OA evolution over such long timescales. In particular, 3-13% of particle-phase carbon is lost to the gas phase after one week of heterogeneous oxidation. Our results indicate that oxidative aging represents an important sink for particulate organic carbon, and more generally that fragmentation reactions play a major

  5. A second dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (Type A) of the human pathogen Enterococcus faecalis: expression, purification, and steady-state kinetic mechanism.

    Marcinkeviciene, J; Jiang, W; Locke, G; Kopcho, L M; Rogers, M J; Copeland, R A

    2000-05-01

    We report the identification, expression, and characterization of a second Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase A) from the human pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. The enzyme consists of a polypeptide chain of 322 amino acids that shares 68% identity with the cognate type A enzyme from the bacterium Lactococcus lactis. E. faecalis DHODase A catalyzed the oxidation of l-dihydroorotate while reducing a number of substrates, including fumarate, coenzyme Q(0), and menadione. The steady-state kinetic mechanism has been determined with menadione as an oxidizing substrate at pH 7.5. Initial velocity and product inhibition data suggest that the enzyme follows a two-site nonclassical ping-pong kinetic mechanism. The absorbance of the active site FMN cofactor is quenched in a concentration-dependent manner by titration with orotate and barbituric acid, two competitive inhibitors with respect to dihydroorotate. In contrast, titration of the enzyme with menadione had no effect on FMN absorbance, consistent with nonoverlapping binding sites for dihyroorotate and menadione, as suggested from the kinetic mechanism. The reductive half-reaction has been shown to be only partially rate limiting, and an attempt to evaluate the slow step in the overall reaction has been made by simulating orotate production under steady-state conditions. Our data indicate that the oxidative half-reaction is a rate-limiting segment, while orotate, most likely, retains significant affinity for the reduced enzyme, as suggested by the product inhibition pattern. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. Efficient removal of cobalt from aqueous solution by zinc oxide nanoparticles. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    Khezami, L.; Modwi, A. [Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic Univ. (IMSIU), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Chemistry; Taha, Kamal K. [Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic Univ. (IMSIU), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Chemistry; Univ. of Bahri, Khartoum (Sudan). College of Applied and Industrial Sciences

    2017-08-01

    This article deals with the removal of cobalt ions using zinc oxide nanopowder. The nanomaterial was prepared via the sol-gel method under supercritical drying. The nanomaterial was characterised via XRD, SEM, EDX, FTIR, and BET surface area techniques. The kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamic studies of the metal ions adsorption on the nanomaterial were conducted in batch mode experiments by varying some parameters such as pH, contact time, initial ion concentrations, nanoparticles dose, and temperature. The data revealed significant dependence of the adsorption process on concentration, and the temperature was found to enhance the adsorption rate indicating an endothermic nature of the adsorption. The adsorption complied well with the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The adsorption process was found to match the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The ZnO nanoparticles could successfully remove up to 125 mg.g{sup -1} of Co(II) ions at elevated temperature. The metal ions adsorption could be described as an endothermic, spontaneous physisorption process. A mechanism for the metal ions adsorption was proposed.

  7. Efficient removal of cobalt from aqueous solution by zinc oxide nanoparticles. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    Khezami, L.; Modwi, A.; Taha, Kamal K.; Univ. of Bahri, Khartoum

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the removal of cobalt ions using zinc oxide nanopowder. The nanomaterial was prepared via the sol-gel method under supercritical drying. The nanomaterial was characterised via XRD, SEM, EDX, FTIR, and BET surface area techniques. The kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamic studies of the metal ions adsorption on the nanomaterial were conducted in batch mode experiments by varying some parameters such as pH, contact time, initial ion concentrations, nanoparticles dose, and temperature. The data revealed significant dependence of the adsorption process on concentration, and the temperature was found to enhance the adsorption rate indicating an endothermic nature of the adsorption. The adsorption complied well with the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The adsorption process was found to match the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The ZnO nanoparticles could successfully remove up to 125 mg.g -1 of Co(II) ions at elevated temperature. The metal ions adsorption could be described as an endothermic, spontaneous physisorption process. A mechanism for the metal ions adsorption was proposed.

  8. [Oxidation behavior and kinetics of representative VOCs emitted from petrochemical industry over CuCeOx composite oxides].

    Chen, Chang-Wei; Yu, Yan-Ke; Chen, Jin-Sheng; He, Chi

    2013-12-01

    CuCeOx composite catalysts were synthesized via coprecipitation (COP-CuCeO,) and incipient impregnation (IMP-CuCeOx) methods, respectively. The physicochemical properties of the samples were characterized by XRD, low-temperature N2 sorption, H2-TPR and O2-TPD. The influences of reactant composition and concentration, reaction space velocity, O2 content, H2O concentration, and catalyst type on the oxidation behaviors of benzene, toluene, and n-hexane emitted from petrochemical industry were systematically investigated. In addition, the related kinetic parameters were model fitted. Compared with IMP-CuCeOx, COP-CuCeOx had well-dispersed active phase, better low-temperature reducibility, and more active surface oxygen species. The increase of reactant concentration was unfavorable for toluene oxidation, while the opposite phenomenon could be observed in n-hexane oxidation. The inlet concentration of benzene was irrelevant to its conversion under high oxidation rate. The introduction of benzene obviously inhibited the oxidation of toluene and n-hexane, while the presence of toluene had a positive effect on beuzene conversion. The presence of n-hexane could promote the oxidation of toluene, while toluene had a negative influence on e-hexane oxidation. Both low space velocity and high oxygen concentration were beneficial for the oxidation process, and the variation of oxygen content had negligible effect on n-hexane and henzene oxidation. The presence of H2O noticeably inhibited the oxidation of toluene, while significantly accelerated the oxidation procedure of henzene and n-hexane. COP-CuCeOx had superior catalytic performance for toluene and benzene oxidation, while IMP-CuCeOx showed higher n-hexane oxidation activity under dry condition. The oxidation behaviors under different conditions could be well fitted and predicted by the pseudo first-order kinetic model.

  9. Sorption mechanisms of metals to graphene oxide

    Showalter, Allison R; Bunker, Bruce A; Duster, Thomas A; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Na, Chongzheng; Fein, Jeremy B

    2016-01-01

    Environmental toxic metal contamination remediation and prevention is an ongoing issue. Graphene oxide is highly sorptive for many heavy metals over a wide pH range under different ionic strength conditions. We present x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy results investigating the binding environment of Pb(II), Cd(II) and U(VI) ions onto multi-layered graphene oxide (MLGO). Analysis indicates that the dominant sorption mechanism of Pb to MLGO changes as a function of pH, with increasing inner sphere contribution as pH increases. In contrast, the sorption mechanism of Cd to MLGO remains constant under the studied pH range. This adsorption mechanism is an electrostatic attraction between the hydrated Cd +2 ion and the MLGO surface. The U(VI), present as the uranyl ion, changes only subtly as a function of pH and is bound to the surface via an inner sphere bond. Knowledge of the binding mechanism for each metal is necessary to help in optimizing environmental remediation or prevention in filtration systems. (paper)

  10. Carbonate-mediated Fe(II) oxidation in the air-cathode fuel cell: a kinetic model in terms of Fe(II) speciation.

    Song, Wei; Zhai, Lin-Feng; Cui, Yu-Zhi; Sun, Min; Jiang, Yuan

    2013-06-06

    Due to the high redox activity of Fe(II) and its abundance in natural waters, the electro-oxidation of Fe(II) can be found in many air-cathode fuel cell systems, such as acid mine drainage fuel cells and sediment microbial fuel cells. To deeply understand these iron-related systems, it is essential to elucidate the kinetics and mechanisms involved in the electro-oxidation of Fe(II). This work aims to develop a kinetic model that adequately describes the electro-oxidation process of Fe(II) in air-cathode fuel cells. The speciation of Fe(II) is incorporated into the model, and contributions of individual Fe(II) species to the overall Fe(II) oxidation rate are quantitatively evaluated. The results show that the kinetic model can accurately predict the electro-oxidation rate of Fe(II) in air-cathode fuel cells. FeCO3, Fe(OH)2, and Fe(CO3)2(2-) are the most important species determining the electro-oxidation kinetics of Fe(II). The Fe(II) oxidation rate is primarily controlled by the oxidation of FeCO3 species at low pH, whereas at high pH Fe(OH)2 and Fe(CO3)2(2-) are the dominant species. Solution pH, carbonate concentration, and solution salinity are able to influence the electro-oxidation kinetics of Fe(II) through changing both distribution and kinetic activity of Fe(II) species.

  11. Kinetics and Mechanism of Bioactivation via S-Oxygenation of Anti-Tubercular Agent Ethionamide by Peracetic Acid.

    Chipiso, Kudzanai; Logan, Isabelle E; Eskew, Matthew W; Omondi, Benard; Simoyi, Reuben H

    2016-10-11

    The kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of the important antitubercular agent, ethionamide, ETA (2-ethylthioisonicotinamide), by peracetic acid (PAA) have been studied. It is effectively a biphasic reaction with an initial rapid first phase of the reaction which is over in about 5 s and a second slower phase of the reaction which can run up to an hour. The first phase involves the addition of a single oxygen atom to ethionamide to form the S-oxide. The second phase involves further oxidation of the S-oxide to desulfurization of ETA to give 2-ethylisonicotinamide. In contrast to the stability of most organosulfur compounds, the S-oxide of ETA is relatively stable and can be isolated. In conditions of excess ETA, the stoichiometry of the reaction was strictly 1:1: CH 3 CO 3 H + Et(C 5 H 4 )C(═S)NH 2 → CH 3 CO 2 H + Et(C 5 H 4 )C(═NH)SOH. In this oxidation, it was apparent that only the sulfur center was the reactive site. Though ETA was ultimately desulfurized, only the S-oxide was stable. Electrospray ionization (ESI) spectral analysis did not detect any substantial formation of the sulfinic and sulfonic acids. This suggests that cleavage of the carbon-sulfur bond occurs at the sulfenic acid stage, resulting in the formation of an unstable sulfur species that can react further to form more stable sulfur species. In this oxidation, no sulfate formation was observed. ESI spectral analysis data showed a final sulfur species in the form of a dimeric sulfur monoxide species, H 3 S 2 O 2 . We derived a bimolecular rate constant for the formation of the S-oxide of (3.08 ± 0.72) × 10 2 M -1 s -1 . Oxidation of the S-oxide further to give 2-ethylisonicotinamide gave zero order kinetics.

  12. Less Stress : Oxidative stress and glutathione kinetics in preterm infants

    D. Rook (Denise)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDue to immature antioxidant defenses, preterm infants are at susceptible to oxidative stress, which is associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity and periventricular leukomalacia. The general aim of this thesis was to study oxidative stress in preterm infants

  13. Effect of Humic Acid on As Redox Transformation and Kinetic Adsorption onto Iron Oxide Based Adsorbent (IBA

    Hoda Fakour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the importance of adsorption kinetics and redox transformation of arsenic (As during the adsorption process, the present study elucidated natural organic matter (NOM effects on As adsorption-desorption kinetics and speciation transformation. The experimental procedures were conducted by examining interactions of arsenate and arsenite with different concentrations of humic acid (HA as a model representative of NOM, in the presence of iron oxide based adsorbent (IBA, as a model solid surface in three environmentally relevant conditions, including the simultaneous adsorption of both As and HA onto IBA, HA adsorption onto As-presorbed IBA, and As adsorption onto HA-presorbed IBA. Experimental adsorption-desorption data were all fitted by original and modified Lagergren pseudo-first and -second order adsorption kinetic models, respectively. Weber’s intraparticle diffusion was also used to gain insight into the mechanisms and rate controlling steps, which the results suggested that intraparticle diffusion of As species onto IBA is the main rate-controlling step. Different concentrations of HA mediated the redox transformation of As species, with a higher oxidation ability than reduction. The overall results indicated the significant effect of organic matter on the adsorption kinetics and redox transformation of As species, and consequently, the fate, transport and mobility of As in different environmentally relevant conditions.

  14. A Model of Reduced Kinetics for Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species for N-Heptane

    Harstad, Kenneth G.; Bellan, Josette

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of elementary or skeletal oxidation kinetics to a subgroup of tractable reactions for inclusion in turbulent combustion codes has been the subject of numerous studies. The skeletal mechanism is obtained from the elementary mechanism by removing from it reactions that are considered negligible for the intent of the specific study considered. As of now, there are many chemical reduction methodologies. A methodology for deriving a reduced kinetic mechanism for alkane oxidation is described and applied to n-heptane. The model is based on partitioning the species of the skeletal kinetic mechanism into lights, defined as those having a carbon number smaller than 3, and heavies, which are the complement of the species ensemble. For modeling purposes, the heavy species are mathematically decomposed into constituents, which are similar but not identical to groups in the group additivity theory. From analysis of the LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) skeletal mechanism in conjunction with CHEMKIN II, it is shown that a similarity variable can be formed such that the appropriately non-dimensionalized global constituent molar density exhibits a self-similar behavior over a very wide range of equivalence ratios, initial pressures and initial temperatures that is of interest for predicting n-heptane oxidation. Furthermore, the oxygen and water molar densities are shown to display a quasi-linear behavior with respect to the similarity variable. The light species ensemble is partitioned into quasi-steady and unsteady species. The reduced model is based on concepts consistent with those of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) in which functional forms are used to replace the small scales eliminated through filtering of the governing equations; in LES, these small scales are unimportant as far as the overwhelming part of dynamic energy is concerned. Here, the scales thought unimportant for recovering the thermodynamic energy are removed. The concept is tested by

  15. Effect of environmental factors on the kinetics of insulin fibril formation: elucidation of the molecular mechanism.

    Nielsen, L; Khurana, R; Coats, A; Frokjaer, S; Brange, J; Vyas, S; Uversky, V N; Fink, A L

    2001-05-22

    In the search for the molecular mechanism of insulin fibrillation, the kinetics of insulin fibril formation were studied under different conditions using the fluorescent dye thioflavin T (ThT). The effect of insulin concentration, agitation, pH, ionic strength, anions, seeding, and addition of 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS), urea, TMAO, sucrose, and ThT on the kinetics of fibrillation was investigated. The kinetics of the fibrillation process could be described by the lag time for formation of stable nuclei (nucleation) and the apparent rate constant for the growth of fibrils (elongation). The addition of seeds eliminated the lag phase. An increase in insulin concentration resulted in shorter lag times and faster growth of fibrils. Shorter lag times and faster growth of fibrils were seen at acidic pH versus neutral pH, whereas an increase in ionic strength resulted in shorter lag times and slower growth of fibrils. There was no clear correlation between the rate of fibril elongation and ionic strength. Agitation during fibril formation attenuated the effects of insulin concentration and ionic strength on both lag times and fibril growth. The addition of ANS increased the lag time and decreased the apparent growth rate for insulin fibril formation. The ANS-induced inhibition appears to reflect the formation of amorphous aggregates. The denaturant, urea, decreased the lag time, whereas the stabilizers, trimethylamine N-oxide dihydrate (TMAO) and sucrose, increased the lag times. The results indicated that both nucleation and fibril growth were controlled by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. A kinetic model, involving the association of monomeric partially folded intermediates, whose concentration is stimulated by the air-water interface, leading to formation of the critical nucleus and thence fibrils, is proposed.

  16. Kinetics, mechanism and thermodynamics of bisulfite-aldehyde adduct formation

    Olson, T.M.; Boyce, S.D.; Hoffmann, M.R.

    1986-04-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of bisulfite addition to benzaldehyde were studied at low pH in order to assess the importance of this reaction in stabilizing S(IV) in fog-, cloud-, and rainwater. Previously, the authors established that appreciable concentrations of the formaldehyde-bisulfite adduct (HMSA) are often present in fogwater. Measured HMSA concentrations in fogwater often do not fully account for observed excess S(IV) concentrations, however, so that other S(IV)-aldehyde adducts may be present. Reaction rates were determined by monitoring the disappearance of benzaldehyde by U.V. spectrophotometry under pseudo-first order conditions, (S(IV))/sub T/ >>(phi-CHO)/sub T/, in the pH range 0 - 4.4 at 25/sup 0/C. The equilibrium constant was determined by dissolving the sodium salt of the addition compound in a solution adjusted to pH 3.9, and measuring the absorbance of the equilibrated solution at 250 nm. A literature value of the extinction coefficient for benzaldehyde was used to calculate the concentration of free benzaldehyde. All solutions were prepared under an N/sub 2/ atmosphere using deoxygenated, deionized water and ionic strength was maintained at 1.0 M with sodium chloride.

  17. Atmospheric chemistry of CH3O(CF2CF2O)(n)CH3 (n=1-3): Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation initiated by Cl atoms and OH radicals, IR spectra, and global warmin potentials

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Hurley, MD; Wallington, TJ

    2004-01-01

    Smog chambers equipped with FTIR spectrometers were used to study the Cl atom and OH radical initiated oxidation of CH3O(CF2CF2O)(n)CH3 (n = 1-3) in 720 +/- 20 Torr of air at 296 +/- 3 K. Relative rate techniques were used to measure k(Cl + CH3O(CF2CF2O)(n)CH3) (3.7 +/- 10.7) x 10(-13) and k......(OH + CH3O(CF2CF2O)(n)CH3) = (2.9 +/- 0.5) x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) leading to an estimated atmospheric lifetime of 2 years for CH3O(CF2CF2O),CH3. The Cl initiated oxidation of CH3O(CF2CF2O),CH3 in air diluent gives CH3O(CF2CF2O)(n)C(O)H in a yield which is indistinguishable from 100 Further...... oxidation leads to the diformate, H(O)CO(CF2CF2O)(n)C(O)H. A rate constant of k(Cl + CH3O(CF2CF2O)(n)CHO) = (1.81 +/- 0.36) x 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s-1 was determined. Quantitative infrared spectra for CH3O(CF2CF2O)(n)CH3 (n = 1-3) were recorded and used to estimate halocarbon global warming potentials...

  18. Kinetic mechanism of the decomposition of dimethyltin dichloride

    Mol, van A.M.B.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Spee, C.I.M.A.; Schouten, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Results are reported of a study of the intrinsic kinetics of gas phase reactions. For this purpose a reactor system is designed in such a way that concentration and temperature variations throughout the reactor can be neglected enabling investigation of intrinsic reaction kinetics. The gas phase

  19. Kinetics of ethylcyclohexane pyrolysis and oxidation: An experimental and detailed kinetic modeling study

    Wang, Zhandong; Zhao, Long; Wang, Yu; Bian, Huiting; Zhang, Lidong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Yuyang; Sarathy, Mani; Qi, Fei

    2015-01-01

    species were evaluated, and good agreement was observed between the PIMS and GC data sets. Furthermore, a fuel-rich burner-stabilized laminar premixed ECH/O2/Ar flame at 30Torr was studied using synchrotron VUV PIMS. A detailed kinetic model for ECH high

  20. Kinetic Investigations on Pd(II) Catalyzed Oxidation of Some Amino ...

    Kinetic investigations on Pd(II) catalyzed oxidation of dl-serine and dl-threonine by acidic solution of potassium bromate in the presence of mercuric acetate, as a scavenger have been made in the temperature range of 30–45°C. The rate shows zero order kinetics in bromate [BrO3‾] and order of reaction is one with respect ...

  1. Effect of zinc additions on oxide rupture strain and repassivation kinetics of iron-based alloys in 288 C water

    Angeliu, T.M.; Andresen, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of Zn water chemistry additions on the mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Fe-based alloys in water at 288 C was evaluated in terms of the slip-dissolution model. In this model, an increase in the oxide film rupture strain or surface film repassivation kinetics improved resistance to IGSCC. The oxide rupture strain of type 304L (UNS S30403) stainless steel (SS) increased up to a factor of two in deaerated and 200 ppb oxygenated, high-purity water ( 300 h of exposure. Repassivation kinetics experiments showed Zn additions of ∼ 100 ppb increased the repassivation rate of an Fe-12% Cr alloys up to a factor of two in various deaerated water environments at 288 C. Life prediction modeling revealed that the combination of a more ductile oxide film and faster repassivation kinetics resulted in a reduction in the overall crack growth rate (CGR) by at least a factor of four. This factor of improvement was consistent with data from compact tension experiments in similar environments where CGR decreased as the Zn addition increased, with a greater decrease in CGR realized at lower pre-Zn CGR

  2. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O 2 and Ar-20%O 2 were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates

  3. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion.

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-04-22

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O{sub 2} and Ar-20%O{sub 2} were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates.

  4. Kinetic isotope effects in reaction of ferment oxidation of tritium-labelled D-galactosamine

    Akulov, G.P.; Korsakova, N.A.

    1992-01-01

    Primary, secondary and intramolecular kinetic isotopic effects in reaction of ferment oxidation of D-galactosamine labelled by tritium in position 6, were measured. When comparing values of the effects with previously obtained results for similar reaction D-[6- 3 H]galactose, it was ascertained that the presence of aminogroup in galactopyranosyl mainly affects kinetics of substrate-ferment complex formation stage. The possibility to use kinetic isotope effects for increase in molar activity of D-galactosamine, labelled by tritium in position 6, is shown

  5. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis oxidation of carbon monoxide

    Khawaja, Y.; Sadiq, A.

    1987-10-01

    An irreversible kinetic surface-reaction model, based upon the reaction of carbon monoxide nd oxygen on a catalyst surface is investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulation. The adsorbed molecules/atoms on the surface undergo both first and second order kinetic phase transitions. The first order transition is found to occur at x/sub/co=x/sub/2=0.5255 with an error bar of 0.0003, where x/sub/co is the concentration of carbon monoxide in the gas phase. The time evolution of this catalytic reaction is studied both analytically and by computer simulation. Slightly above x/sub/2, the oxygen coverage relaxation time for the oxygen is found to diverage as the inverse of 3.54 times the absolute of the difference of x/sub/2 and x/sub/co. (orig./A.B.)

  6. The catalytic oxidation of 1-butene over bismuth molybdate catalysts : V. The kinetics of the oxidation: A. Pulse reaction kinetics; exploratory experiments for a kinetic investigation

    Keizer, K.; Batist, P.A.; Schuit, G.C.A.

    1969-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidn. of 1-butene with O on three types of bismuth molybdate catalysts were investigated in pulse expts. For all the catalysts mentioned the kinetics can be expressed by a first-order dependency on the butene pressure and a zero-order dependency on the O pressure. A slight deviation

  7. Mechanism-Based Design of Green Oxidation Catalysts

    Rybak-Akimova, Elena [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2015-03-16

    situation. Growing families of synthetic iron complexes that resemble active sites of metalloenzymes produce metal-based intermediates (rather than hydroxyl radicals) in reactions with oxygen donors. These complexes are very promising for selective oxygen and peroxide activation. In order to understand the mechanisms of metal-based small molecule activation, kinetically competent metal-oxygen intermediates must be identified. One of the grand challenges identified by the Department of Energy workshop "Catalysis for Energy" is understanding mechanisms and dynamics of catalyzed reactions. The research summarized herein focuses on detailed characterization of the formation and reactivity of various iron-peroxo- and iron-oxo intermediates that are involved in catalysis. Rates of rapid reactions were studied at low temperatures by a specialized technique termed cryogenic stopped-flow spectrophotometry. These measurements identified reaction conditions which favor the formation of catalytically competent oxidants. Chemical structures of reactive complexes was determined, and new, efficient catalysts for hydrocarbon oxidation were synthesized. Importantly, these catalysts are selective, they promote oxidation of hydrocarbons at a specific site. The catalysts are also efficient and robust, hundreds of cycles of substrate oxidation occur within minutes at room temperature. Furthermore, they enable utilization of environmentally friendly oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide, which produces water as the only byproduct. Mechanistic insights uncovered the role of various acid-containing additives in catalytic oxidations. Proton delivery to the active catalytic sites facilitated oxidations, similarly to the catalytic pathways in metal-containing enzymes. Under certain conditions, two metals in one complex can act in concert, modeling the reactivity of a bacterial enzyme which converts methane into methanol. In related studies, a family of nickel complexes that react with carbon dioxide at

  8. Kinetics of Oxidation of Aliphatic Alcohols by Potassium Dichromate ...

    NICO

    2011-10-10

    Oct 10, 2011 ... 1Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ibb University, Ibb 7027, Yemen. 2Department of Chemistry ... The presence of TX-100 enhanced the rate of the ... oxidation of alcohols, namely, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol.

  9. Kinetic study on electrochemical oxidation of catechols in the ...

    glassy carbon electrode in different experimental conditions. The electrogenerated ... cancer activities.5 Catechols can be easily oxidized electrochemically to ... from unity and approaches to zero in basic solution. This behavior is related to the ...

  10. Oxidation kinetics of a Pb-64 at.% In single-phase alloy

    Zhang, M.X.; Chang, Y.A.; Marcotte, V.C.

    1991-01-01

    The solid-state oxidation kinetics of a Pb-64 at.% IN(50 wt.%) single-phase alloy were studied from room temperature to 150C using AES (Auger Electron Spectroscopy) depth profiling technique. The general oxidation behavior of this alloy is different from that of a Pb-3 at.% In alloy but similar to that of a Pb-30 at.% In alloy. The oxide formed on this alloy is almost pure In oxide (In 2 O 3 ) with the possible existence of some In suboxide near the oxide/alloy interface. At room temperature, oxidation of the alloy follows a direct logarithmic law, and the results can be described by the model proposed previously by Zhang, Chang, and Marcotte. At temperatures higher than 75C, rapid oxidation occurred initially followed by a slower parabolic oxidation at longer time. These data were described quantitatively by the model which assumes the existence of short-circuit diffusion in addition to lattice diffusion in the oxide as proposed by Smeltzer, Haering, and Kirkaldy. The effects of alloy composition in the oxidation kinetics of (pb, In) alloy are also examined by comparing the data for Pb-3, 30, and 64 at.% In alloys

  11. Kinetics and Mechanistic Chemistry of Oxidation of Butacaine Sulfate by Chloramine-B in Acid Medium

    Shubha, Jayachamarajapura Pranesh; Kotabagi, Vinutha; Puttaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Butacaine sulfate is an ester of p-aminobenzoic acid which has been widely used as a local anaesthetic and it is a long standing agent particularly for spinal anaesthesia. For this reason, a kinetic study of oxidation of butacaine sulfate by sodium N-chlorobenzenesulfonamide (chloramine-B or CAB) has been carried out in HClO 4 medium at 303 K in order to explore this redox system mechanistic chemistry. The rate shows a first-order dependence on both [CAB] o , and [substrate] o , and a fractional-order dependence on acid concentration. Decrease of dielectric constant of the medium, by adding methanol, increases the rate of the reaction. Variation of ionic strength and addition of benzenesulfonamide or NaCl have no significant effect on the rate. The reaction was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters have been evaluated. The stoichiometry of the reaction has been found to be 1:2 and the oxidation products have been identified by spectral analysis. The observed results have been explained by plausible mechanism and the related rate law has been deduced

  12. Catecholase activity of dicopper(II)-bispidine complexes: stabilities and structures of intermediates, kinetics and reaction mechanism.

    Born, Karin; Comba, Peter; Daubinet, André; Fuchs, Alexander; Wadepohl, Hubert

    2007-01-01

    A mechanism for the oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (dtbc) with dioxygen to the corresponding quinone (dtbq), catalyzed by bispidine-dicopper complexes (bispidines are various mono- and dinucleating derivatives of 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane with bis-tertiary-amine-bispyridyl or bis-tertiary-amine-trispyridyl donor sets), is proposed on the basis of (1) the stoichiometry of the reaction as well as the stabilities and structures [X-ray, density functional theory (B3LYP, TZV)] of the bispidine-dicopper(II)-3,4,5,6-tetrachlorcatechol intermediates, (2) formation kinetics and structures (molecular mechanics, MOMEC) of the end-on peroxo-dicopper(II) complexes and (3) kinetics of the stoichiometric (anaerobic) and catalytic (aerobic) copper-complex-assisted oxidation of dtbc. This involves (1) the oxidation of the dicopper(I) complexes with dioxygen to the corresponding end-on peroxo-dicopper(II) complexes, (2) coordination of dtbc as a bridging ligand upon liberation of H(2)O(2) and (3) intramolecular electron transfer to produce dtbq, which is liberated, and the dicopper(I) catalyst. Although the bispidine complexes have reactivities comparable to those of recently published catalysts with macrocyclic ligands, which seem to reproduce the enzyme-catalyzed process in various reaction sequences, a strikingly different oxidation mechanism is derived from the bispidine-dicopper-catalyzed reaction.

  13. Chemo-enzymatic Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of 4-methylcyclohexanone via kinetic resolution of racemic carboxylic acids: direct access to enantioenriched lactone.

    Drożdż, Agnieszka; Chrobok, Anna

    2016-01-21

    A new method for the asymmetric chemo-enzymatic Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of prochiral 4-methylcyclohexanone to (R)-4-methylcaprolactone in the presence of (±)-4-methyloctanoic acid, Candida Antarctica lipase B and 30% aq. H2O2 has been developed. A mechanism for the asymmetric induction based on kinetic resolution of racemic carboxylic acids is proposed.

  14. Kinetics and mechanisms of interactions of nitrogen and carbon monoxide with liquid niobium

    Park, H.G.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of interactions of N 2 and CO with liquid niobium were investigated in the temperature range of 2,700 to 3,000 K in samples levitated in N 2 /Ar and CO/Ar streams. The nitrogen absorption and desorption processes were found to be second-order with respect to nitrogen concentration, indicating that the rate controlling step is either the adsorption of nitrogen molecules on the liquid surface or dissociation of absorbed nitrogen molecules into adsorbed atoms. The carbon and oxygen dissolution in liquid niobium from CO gas is an exothermic process and the solubilities of carbon and oxygen (C Ce , C Oe in at%) are related to the temperature and the partial pressure of CO. The reaction CO → [C] + [O] along with the evaporation of niobium oxide takes place during C and O dissolution, whereas C and O desorption occurs via CO evolution only

  15. Kinetics of aerobic oxidation of volatile sulfur compounds in wastewater and biofilm from sewers

    Rudelle, Elise Alice; Vollertsen, Jes; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the kinetics of aerobic chemical and biological oxidation of selected odorous volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) by wastewater and biofilm from sewers. The VSCs included methyl mercaptan (MeSH), ethyl mercaptan (EtSH), dimethyl sulfide (DMS......-spot downstream of a force main and the other was a gravity sewer transporting young aerobic wastewater. The kinetics of VSC oxidation for both wastewater and suspended biofilm samples followed a first-order rate equation. The average values of the reaction rate constants demonstrated the following order...... in the aerobic wastewater....

  16. Oxidation kinetics of a continuous carbon phase in a nonreactive matrix

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Cawley, James D.; Parthasarathy, Triplicane A.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical solutions of and experimental results on the oxidation kinetics of carbon in a pore are presented. Reaction rate, reaction sequence, oxidant partial pressure, total system pressure, pore/crack dimensions, and temperature are analyzed with respect to the influence of each on an overall linear-parabolic rate relationship. Direct measurement of carbon recession is performed using two microcomposite model systems oxidized in the temperature range of 700 to 1200 C, and for times to 35 h. Experimental results are evaluated using the derived analytical solutions. Implications on the oxidation resistance of continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites containing a carbon constituent are discussed.

  17. Exploring the kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of four-electron electrochemical reactions: electrocatalysis of oxygen evolution by metal oxides and biological systems.

    Wang, Vincent C-C

    2016-08-10

    Finding fundamental and general mechanisms for electrochemical reactions, such as the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) from water and reduction of CO2, plays vital roles in developing the desired electrocatalysts for facilitating solar fuel production. Recently, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have shown that there is a universal scaling relation of adsorption energy between key intermediate species, HO(ad) and HOO(ad), on the surface of metal oxides as OER electrocatalysts. In this paper, a kinetic and thermodynamic model for the four-electron electrochemical reaction based on previous OER mechanisms proposed by DFT calculations is developed to further investigate the electrocatalytic properties over a wide range of metal oxides and photosystem II. The OER activity of metal oxides (i.e. electrocatalytic current) calculated from the DFT-calculated equilibrium potentials with kinetic properties, such as the rate constants for interfacial electron transfer and catalytic turnover, can lead to a volcano-shaped trend that agrees with the results observed in experiments. In addition, the kinetic aspects of the impact on the electrocatalysts are evaluated. Finally, comparing the results of metal oxides and photosystem II, and fitting experimental voltammograms give further insights into kinetic and thermodynamic roles. Here, the general guidelines for designing OER electrocatalysts with unified kinetic and thermodynamic properties are presented.

  18. Molybdenum Disilicide Oxidation Kinetics in High Temperature Steam

    Wood, Elizabeth Sooby [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parker, Stephen Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Andrew Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-07

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign is currently supporting a range of experimental efforts aimed at the development and qualification of ‘accident tolerant’ nuclear fuel forms. One route to enhance the accident tolerance of nuclear fuel is to replace the zirconium alloy cladding, which is prone to rapid oxidation in steam at elevated temperatures, with a more oxidation-resistant cladding. Several cladding replacement solutions have been envisaged. The cladding can be completely replaced with a more oxidation resistant alloy, a layered approach can be used to optimize the strength, creep resistance, and oxidation tolerance of various materials, or the existing zirconium alloy cladding can be coated with a more oxidation-resistant material. Molybdenum is one candidate cladding material favored due to its high temperature creep resistance. However, it performs poorly under autoclave testing and suffers degradation under high temperature steam oxidation exposure. Development of composite cladding architectures consisting of a molybdenum core shielded by a molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2) coating is hypothesized to improve the performance of a Mo-based cladding system. MoSi2 was identified based on its high temperature oxidation resistance in O2 atmospheres (e.g. air and “wet air”). However, its behavior in H2O is less known. This report presents thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) results for MoSi2 exposed to 670-1498 K water vapor. Synthetic air (80-20%, Ar-O2) exposures were also performed, and those results are presented here for a comparative analysis. It was determined that MoSi2 displays drastically different oxidation behavior in water vapor than in dry air. In the 670-1498 K temperature range, four distinct behaviors are observed. Parabolic oxidation is exhibited in only 670

  19. Fundamental and semi-global kinetic mechanisms for hydrocarbon combustion. Final report, March 1977-October 1980

    Dryer, F L; Glassman, I; Brezinsky, K

    1981-03-01

    Over the past three and one half years, substantial research efforts of the Princeton Fuels Research Group have been directed towards the development of simplified mechanisms which would accurately describe the oxidation of hydrocarbons fuels. The objectives of this combustion research included the study of semi-empirical modeling (that is an overall description) of the chemical kinetic mechanisms of simple hydrocarbon fuels. Such fuels include the alkanes: ethane, propane, butane, hexane and octane as well as the critically important alkenes: ethene, propene and butene. As an extension to this work, the study of the detailed radical species characteristics of combustion systems was initiated as another major aspect of the program, with emphasis on the role of the OH and HO/sub 2/ radicals. Finally, the studies of important alternative fuel problems linked the program to longer range approaches to the energy supply question. Studies of alternative fuels composed the major elements of this area of the program. The efforts on methanol research were completed, and while the aromatics aspects of the DOE work have been a direct extension of efforts supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, they represented a significant part of the overall research effort. The emphasis in the proposed program is to provide further fundamental understanding of the oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels which will be useful in guiding engineering approaches. Although the scope of program ranges from the fundamentals of chemical kinetics to that of alternative fuel combustion, the objective in mind is to provide insight and guidance to the understanding of practical combustion environments. The key to our approach has been our understanding of the fundamental combustion chemistry and its relation to the important practical combustion problems which exist in implementing energy efficient, alternate fuels technologies.

  20. Kinetics of the reduction of uranium oxide catalysts

    Heynen, H.W.G.; Camp-van Berkel, M.M.; Bann, H.S. van der

    1977-01-01

    The reduction of uranium oxide and uranium oxide on alumina catalysts by ethylbenzene and by hydrogen has been studied in a thermobalance. Ethylbenzene mole fractions between 0.0026 and 0.052 and hydrogen mole fractions between 0.1 and 0.6 were applied at temperatures of 425--530 0 C. During the reduction the uranium oxides are converted into UO 2 . The rate of reduction of pure uranium oxide appears to be constant in the composition region UO/sub 2.6/-UO/sub 2.25/. The extent of this region is independent of the concentration of the reducing agents and of the reaction temperature. The constant rate is explained in terms of a constant oxygen pressure which is in equilibrium with the two solid phases, U 3 O/sub 8-x/ and U 4 O 9 . The reduction rate is first order in hydrogen and zero order in ethylbenzene with activation energies of 120 and 190 kJ mol -1 , respectively. Oxygen diffusion through the lattice is probably not rate limiting. The reduction behavior of uranium oxide on alumina is different from that of pure uranium oxide; the rate of reduction continuously decreases with increasing degree of reduction. An explanation for this behavior has been given by visualizing this catalyst as a set of isolated uranium oxide crystallites with a relative wide variation of diameters, in an alumina matrix. At the beginning of the reduction, carbon dioxide and water are the only reaction products. Thereafter, benzene is found as well and, finally, at U/O ratios below 2.25, styrene also appears in the reactor outlet

  1. KINETIC STUDY OF SELECTIVE GAS-PHASE OXIDATION OF ISOPROPANOL TO ACETONE USING MONOCLINIC ZRO2 AS A CATALYST

    Mohammad Sadiq

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia was prepared by a precipitation method and calcined at 723 K, 1023 K, and 1253 K in order to obtain monoclinic zirconia. The prepared zirconia was characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, surface area and pore size analyzer, and particle size analyzer. Monoclinic ZrO2 as a catalyst was used for the gas-phase oxidation of isopropanol to acetone in a Pyrex-glass-flow-type reactor with a temperature range of 443 K - 473 K. It was found that monoclinic ZrO2 shows remarkable catalytic activity (68% and selectivity (100% for the oxidation of isopropanol to acetone. This kinetic study reveals that the oxidation of isopropanol to acetone follows the L-H mechanism.

  2. Kinetic Studies of Oxidative Coupling of Methane Reaction on Model Catalysts

    Khan, Abdulaziz M.

    2016-01-01

    the process to be commercialized despite the fact that great number of attempts to prepare catalysts were conducted so that it can be economically viable. Due to these limitations, understanding the mechanism and kinetics of the reaction can be utilized

  3. Oxidation kinetics of zircaloy-4 in the temperature range correspondent to alpha phase

    Medeiros, L.F.

    1975-12-01

    Oxidation kinetics of Zry-4 in the alpha phase is isothermally studied in the temperature range from 600 0 C to 800 0 C, by continuous and discontinuous gravimetric methods. The total mass gain during the oxidation takes place by two distinct ways: oxide formation and solid solution formation. The first one has been studied by microscopy: the latter by microhardness. The oxygen diffusion coefficients in the zirconium are experimentally determined by microhardness measurements and are compared with those obtained by the oxide layer thickness and by oxygen mass in the oxide. The oxygen diffusion coefficients in the oxide are obtained too by oxide layer thickness and by oxygen diffusivities in the alpha phase and compared with literature. (author)

  4. A computational study on kinetics, mechanism and thermochemistry ...

    level procedure employing the optimization at .... for a better understanding of mechanistic pathways, kinetics and thermochemistry we must rely on quantum chemical methods. The aim of this paper is to have .... The search was made along.

  5. Mechanism and kinetics of mineral weathering under acid conditions

    Anbeek, C.

    1994-01-01

    This study deals with the relationships between crystal structure, grain diameter, surface morphology and dissolution kinetics for feldspar and quartz under acid conditions.

    Intensively ground samples from large, naturally weathered mineral fragments are frequently used in

  6. NDMA formation by chloramination of ranitidine: Kinetics and mechanism

    Le Roux, Julien; Gallard, Hervé ; Croue, Jean-Philippe; Papot, Sé bastien; Deborde, Marie

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of decomposition of the pharmaceutical ranitidine (a major precursor of NDMA) during chloramination was investigated and some decomposition byproducts were identified by using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass

  7. Mechanistic, kinetic, and processing aspects of tungsten chemical mechanical polishing

    Stein, David

    This dissertation presents an investigation into tungsten chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). CMP is the industrially predominant unit operation that removes excess tungsten after non-selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) during sub-micron integrated circuit (IC) manufacture. This work explores the CMP process from process engineering and fundamental mechanistic perspectives. The process engineering study optimized an existing CMP process to address issues of polish pad and wafer carrier life. Polish rates, post-CMP metrology of patterned wafers, electrical test data, and synergy with a thermal endpoint technique were used to determine the optimal process. The oxidation rate of tungsten during CMP is significantly lower than the removal rate under identical conditions. Tungsten polished without inhibition during cathodic potentiostatic control. Hertzian indenter model calculations preclude colloids of the size used in tungsten CMP slurries from indenting the tungsten surface. AFM surface topography maps and TEM images of post-CMP tungsten do not show evidence of plow marks or intergranular fracture. Polish rate is dependent on potassium iodate concentration; process temperature is not. The colloid species significantly affects the polish rate and process temperature. Process temperature is not a predictor of polish rate. A process energy balance indicates that the process temperature is predominantly due to shaft work, and that any heat of reaction evolved during the CMP process is negligible. Friction and adhesion between alumina and tungsten were studied using modified AFM techniques. Friction was constant with potassium iodate concentration, but varied with applied pressure. This corroborates the results from the energy balance. Adhesion between the alumina and the tungsten was proportional to the potassium iodate concentration. A heuristic mechanism, which captures the relationship between polish rate, pressure, velocity, and slurry chemistry, is presented

  8. Kinetics of plasma oxidation of germanium-tin (GeSn)

    Wang, Wei; Lei, Dian; Dong, Yuan; Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Jisheng; Gong, Xiao; Tok, Eng-Soon; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2017-12-01

    The kinetics of plasma oxidation of GeSn at low temperature is investigated. The oxidation process is described by a power-law model where the oxidation rate decreases rapidly from the initial oxidation rate with increasing time. The oxidation rate of GeSn is higher than that of pure Ge, which can be explained by the higher chemical reaction rate at the GeSn-oxide/GeSn interface. In addition, the Sn atoms at the interface region exchange positions with the underlying Ge atoms during oxidation, leading to a SnO2-rich oxide near the interface. The bandgap of GeSn oxide is extracted to be 5.1 ± 0.2 eV by XPS, and the valence band offset at the GeSn-oxide/GeSn heterojunction is found to be 3.7 ± 0.2 eV. Controlled annealing experiments demonstrate that the GeSn oxide is stable with respect to annealing temperatures up to 400 °C. However, after annealing at 450 °C, the GeO2 is converted to GeO, and desorbs from the GeSn-oxide/GeSn, leaving behind Sn oxide.

  9. Electrode Kinetics and Gas Conversion in Solid Oxide Cells

    Njodzefon, Jean-Claude

    The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) converts hydrogen, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon fuels (directly) into electricity with very high efficiencies and has demonstrated almost comparable performance when operated in reverse mode as a solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). In this case electrical (and...... thermal) energy is stored as chemical energy of reaction products. To this end, the cells are fed with steam (H2O electrolysis), carbon dioxide (CO2 electrolysis) or a mixture of both (H2O/CO2 co-electrolysis) and of course electrical (ΔG) and thermal (TΔS) energies for the splitting of reactant compounds...... of the solid oxide cell (SOC) and independent of polarization mode (fuel cell mode or electrolysis mode), the current flowing through the cell is limited by processes such as adsorption and desorption of reactants or products, diffusion through the porous electrodes, activation or charge transfer...

  10. Pyrolysis and thermal oxidation kinetics of sugar mill press mud

    Gangavati, P.B.; Safi, M.J.; Singh, A.; Prasad, B.; Mishra, I.M.

    2005-01-01

    Press mud, a solid waste obtained from the sugar mills, has the potential of energy generation through pyrolysis and gasification. The paper reports its proximate and ultimate analyses, deformation and fusion ash temperatures, lower and higher heating values, physico-chemical and thermal degradation in nitrogen and air atmospheres. The thermal degradation was conducted in a thermogravimetric analyzer from room temperature to 900 deg C at heating rates of 20 and 40 K min -1 . The thermogravimetric, derivative thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses were carried out to determine the rate of volatiles evolution, the effect of heating rates on the thermal degradation characteristics and to determine the global mass loss kinetics of thermal degradation. The thermal degradation was found to occur in several distinct phases: each phase giving volatile evolution in an independent parallel lump. Each decomposition phase was modeled by a single irreversible reaction with respect to the solid mass. Global mass loss kinetics was also determined for the entire decomposition process, as if occurring in one single step. The integral and differential techniques were used for the determination of kinetic parameters. Using the method of Agrawal and Sivasubramanian [R.K. Agrawal, M.S. Sivasubramanian, AIChE J. 33 (1987) 7] for the total degradation zone, the orders of reaction were found in the range of 1.00-2.50 in both the atmospheres (i.e. nitrogen and air) and the activation energy in the range of 27.84-33.44 and 57.41-88.92 kJ mol -1 in nitrogen and air, respectively. The pre-exponential factor was found in the range of 32.1-95.1 and 5.10 x 10 4 to 5.46 x 10 9 min -1 in nitrogen and air atmospheres, respectively

  11. A kinetic model of municipal sludge degradation during non-catalytic wet oxidation.

    Prince-Pike, Arrian; Wilson, David I; Baroutian, Saeid; Andrews, John; Gapes, Daniel J

    2015-12-15

    Wet oxidation is a successful process for the treatment of municipal sludge. In addition, the resulting effluent from wet oxidation is a useful carbon source for subsequent biological nutrient removal processes in wastewater treatment. Owing to limitations with current kinetic models, this study produced a kinetic model which predicts the concentrations of key intermediate components during wet oxidation. The model was regressed from lab-scale experiments and then subsequently validated using data from a wet oxidation pilot plant. The model was shown to be accurate in predicting the concentrations of each component, and produced good results when applied to a plant 500 times larger in size. A statistical study was undertaken to investigate the validity of the regressed model parameters. Finally the usefulness of the model was demonstrated by suggesting optimum operating conditions such that volatile fatty acids were maximised. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ammonia oxidation kinetics and temperature sensitivity of a natural marine community dominated by Archaea

    Horak, Rachel E A; Qin, Wei; Schauer, Andy J; Armbrust, E Virginia; Ingalls, Anitra E; Moffett, James W; Stahl, David A; Devol, Allan H

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal ammonia oxidizers (AOAs) are increasingly recognized as prominent members of natural microbial assemblages. Evidence that links the presence of AOA with in situ ammonia oxidation activity is limited, and the abiotic factors that regulate the distribution of AOA natural assemblages are not well defined. We used quantitative PCR to enumerate amoA (encodes α-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) abundances; AOA amoA gene copies greatly outnumbered ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and amoA transcripts were derived primarily from AOA throughout the water column of Hood Canal, Puget Sound, WA, USA. We generated a Michaelis–Menten kinetics curve for ammonia oxidation by the natural community and found that the measured Km of 98±14 nmol l−1 was close to that for cultivated AOA representative Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1. Temperature did not have a significant effect on ammonia oxidation rates for incubation temperatures ranging from 8 to 20 °C, which is within the temperature range for depths of measurable ammonia oxidation at the site. This study provides substantial evidence, through both amoA gene copies and transcript abundances and the kinetics response, that AOA are the dominant active ammonia oxidizers in this marine environment. We propose that future ammonia oxidation experiments use a Km for the natural community to better constrain ammonia oxidation rates determined with the commonly used 15NH4+ dilution technique. PMID:23657360

  13. Development and Validation of Chemical Kinetic Mechanism Reduction Scheme for Large-Scale Mechanisms

    Poon, Hiew Mun; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin

    2014-01-01

    This work is an extension to a previously reported work on chemical kinetic mechanism reduction scheme for large-scale mechanisms. Here, Perfectly Stirred Reactor (PSR) was added as a criterion of data source for mechanism reduction instead of using only auto-ignition condition. As a result......) simulations were performed to study the spray combustion phenomena within a constant volume bomb. Both non-reacting and reacting conditions were applied in this study. Liquid and vapor penetration lengths were replicated for non-reacting diesel spray. For reacting diesel spray, both ignition delay and lift......-off length were simulated. The simulation results were then compared to the experimental data of Sandia National Laboratories and No. 2 Diesel Fuel (D2) was designated as the reference fuel. Both liquid and vapor penetrations for non-reacting condition were well-matched, while ignition delay was advanced...

  14. Thermoluminescence of magnesium oxide and its trapping kinetics

    Nagpal, J.S.; Kathuria, S.P.

    1984-01-01

    MgO (Norton), on u.v. and γ irradiation, exhibits TL glow peaks around 88, 150, 172, 195 and 250degC (heating rate 55degC min -1 ). TL emission is observed around 340, 390, 445 and 705 nm and can be attributed to the impurities Fe 3+ and Cr 3+ , which act as luminescence centers. ESR studies rule out any participation of Mn 2+ ions. The glow peak around 88degC has E = 1.055 eV, s = 4.3 x 10 13 s -1 and has order of kinetics b = 1.7. (author)

  15. Determination of Model Kinetics for Forced Unsteady State Operation of Catalytic CH4 Oxidation

    Effendy Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic oxidation of methane for abating the emission vented from coal mine or natural gas transportation has been known as most reliable method. A reverse flow reactor operation has been widely used to oxidize this methane emission due to its capability for autothermal operation and heat production. The design of the reverse flow reactor requires a proper kinetic rate expression, which should be developed based on the operating condition. The kinetic rate obtained in the steady state condition cannot be applied for designing the reactor operated under unsteady state condition. Therefore, new approach to develop the dynamic kinetic rate expression becomes indispensable, particularly for periodic operation such as reverse flow reactor. This paper presents a novel method to develop the kinetic rate expression applied for unsteady state operation. The model reaction of the catalytic methane oxidation over Pt/-Al2O3 catalyst was used with kinetic parameter determined from laboratory experiments. The reactor used was a fixed bed, once-through operation, with a composition modulation in the feed gas. The switching time was set at 3 min by varying the feed concentration, feed flow rate, and reaction temperature. The concentrations of methane in the feed and product were measured and analysed using gas chromatography. The steady state condition for obtaining the kinetic rate expression was taken as a base case and as a way to judge its appropriateness to be applied for dynamic system. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction rate model was developed. The time period during one cycle was divided into some segments, depending on the ratio of CH4/O2. The experimental result shows that there were kinetic regimes occur during one cycle: kinetic regime controlled by intrinsic surface reaction and kinetic regime controlled by external diffusion. The kinetic rate obtained in the steady state operation was not appropriate when applied for unsteady state operation

  16. Oxidation mechanism of porous Zr_2Fe used as a hydrogen getter

    Cohen, Dror; Nahmani, Moshe; Rafailov, Genadi; Attia, Smadar; Shamish, Zorik; Landau, Miron; Merchuk, Jose; Zeiri, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    We determined the oxidation mechanism of porous ST-198, which mainly comprises Zr_2Fe. Oxidation kinetics depended on temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and oxidation extent. The passivation role of oxidation in hydrogen scavenging is probably due to the development of a surface oxide, independent of oxygen concentration. Zr_2Fe would be a superior hydrogen getter in oxygen-contaminated environments at high temperatures, as most oxygen will be consumed at the outer shell by mass transfer limitations, protecting the bulk of the getter for hydrogen scavenging. - Highlights: • Porous Zr_2Fe–O_2 interactions are characterized in detail. • Gettering efficiency at low temperature is hampered by oxide layer formation. • Gettering is better at high temperatures as outer shell consumes maximum oxygen.

  17. On the mechanism of hydrogen-promoted gold-catalyzed CO oxidation

    Quinet, Elodie

    2009-12-10

    The kinetics of CO oxidation, H2 oxidation and preferential CO oxidation (PrOx) over Au/Al2O3 catalysts have been investigated. The catalysts with the smallest particles (∼2 nm) are the most active for all three reactions. As previously observed, the presence of H2 greatly promotes CO oxidation, which becomes faster than CO-free H2 oxidation at low temperature. From these results and on the basis of previous works, we propose a complete PrOx mechanism. The reaction involves Au-OOH, Au-OH and Au-H intermediates, also involved in H2 oxidation, and benefits from the presence of low-coordination sites. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. On the mechanism of hydrogen-promoted gold-catalyzed CO oxidation

    Quinet, Elodie; Piccolo, Laurent; Morfin, Franck; Avenier, Priscilla; Diehl, Fabrice; Caps, Valerie; Rousset, Jean Luc

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of CO oxidation, H2 oxidation and preferential CO oxidation (PrOx) over Au/Al2O3 catalysts have been investigated. The catalysts with the smallest particles (∼2 nm) are the most active for all three reactions. As previously observed, the presence of H2 greatly promotes CO oxidation, which becomes faster than CO-free H2 oxidation at low temperature. From these results and on the basis of previous works, we propose a complete PrOx mechanism. The reaction involves Au-OOH, Au-OH and Au-H intermediates, also involved in H2 oxidation, and benefits from the presence of low-coordination sites. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Electrode kinetics of ethanol oxidation on novel CuNi alloy supported catalysts synthesized from PTFE suspension

    Sen Gupta, S.; Datta, J.

    An understanding of the kinetics and mechanism of the electrochemical oxidation of ethanol is of considerable interest for the optimization of the direct ethanol fuel cell. In this paper, the electro-oxidation of ethanol in sodium hydroxide solution has been studied over 70:30 CuNi alloy supported binary platinum electrocatalysts. These comprised mixed deposits of Pt with Ru or Mo. The electrodepositions were carried out under galvanostatic condition from a dilute suspension of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) containing the respective metal salts. Characterization of the catalyst layers by scanning electron microscope (SEM)-energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) indicated that this preparation technique yields well-dispersed catalyst particles on the CuNi alloy substrate. Cyclic voltammetry, polarization study and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to investigate the kinetics and mechanism of ethanol electro-oxidation over a range of NaOH and ethanol concentrations. The relevant parameters such as Tafel slope, charge transfer resistance and the reaction orders in respect of OH - ions and ethanol were determined.

  20. Kinetic and geometric aspects of solid oxide fuel cell electrodes

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Skaarup, Steen

    1996-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the main factors controlling the performance of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes, emphasizing the most widely chosen anodes and cathodes, Ni-YSZ and LSM-YSZ. They are often applied as composites (mixtures) of the electron conducting electrode material...

  1. Kinetics and correlation analysis of reactivity in the oxidation of ...

    The oxidation of a number of monosubstituted aryl methyl, alkyl phenyl, dialkyl, and diphenyl sulfides by butyltriphenylphosphonium dichromate (BTPPD), to the corresponding sulfoxides, is first order with respect to BTPPD and is second order with respect to sulfide. The reaction is catalysed by hydrogen ions and the ...

  2. Kinetic investigation of vanadium (V)/(IV) redox couple on electrochemically oxidized graphite electrodes

    Wang, Wenjun; Wei, Zengfu; Su, Wei; Fan, Xinzhuang; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei; Zeng, Chaoliu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The VO_2"+/VO"2"+ redox reaction of the electrode could be facilitated to some extent with the increasing anodic corrosion. • A real reaction kinetic equation for the oxidation of VO"2"+ on the electrochemically oxidized electrode has been firstly obtained. • The establishment of the kinetic equation is conducive to predict polarization behaviors of the electrodes in engineering application. - Abstract: The morphology, surface composition, wettability and the kinetic parameters of the electrochemically oxidized graphite electrodes obtained under different anodic polarization conditions have been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurements, steady-state polarization and cyclic voltammetry (CV) tests, with an attempt to investigate the inherent correlation between the physicochemical properties and the kinetic characteristics for carbon electrodes used in an all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). When the anodic polarization potential raises up to 1.8 V vs. SCE, the anodic corrosion of the graphite might happen and a large number of oxygen-containing functional groups generate. The VO_2"+/VO"2"+ redox reaction can be facilitated and the reaction reversibility tends to become better with the increasing anodic potential, possibly owing to the increased surface oxides and the resulting improved wettability of the electrode. Based on this, a real reaction kinetic equation for the oxidation of VO"2"+ has been obtained on the electrode polarized at 1.8 V vs. SCE and it can be also well used to predict the polarization behavior of the oxidized electrode in vanadium (IV) acidic solutions.

  3. Kinetic studies of potassium permanganate adsorption by activated carbon and its ability as ethylene oxidation material

    Aprilliani, F.; Warsiki, E.; Iskandar, A.

    2018-03-01

    Generally, ethylene production in many horticultural products has been seen to be detrimental to the quality during storage and distribution process. For this reason, removing ethylene from storage or distribution atmosphere is needed to maintain the quality. One of the technologies that can be applied is the use of potassium permanganate (KMnO4). KMnO4 is an active compound that can be used as an oxidizing agent on ethylene removal process. KMnO4 is not recommended for direct used application. As the result, additional material is required to impregnate the potassium permanganate. The inert materials used are commercial activated carbon. Activated carbon is chosen because it has high surface area. The purpose of this research is to determine kinetics adsorption and oxidation model of ethylene removal material. The kinetics adsorption was determined using the pseudo-first and second-order kinetic models. The data on adsorption process show that the second-order equation is more suitable to express the adsorption process on this research. The analyzing of the ethylene oxidation capacity increased with time until it reaches an optimal value. The ethylene oxidation rate is able to be estimated by the formula r = 0.1967 [C2H4]0.99 [KMnO4]0.01; MSE = 0.44 %. The actual and estimation data of ethylene oxidation show that the model is fitted to describe the actual ethylene oxidation under same experimental conditions.

  4. Cholesterol photo-oxidation: A chemical reaction network for kinetic modeling.

    Barnaba, Carlo; Rodríguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa; Lercker, Giovanni; García, Hugo Sergio; Medina-Meza, Ilce Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    In this work we studied the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) methyl esters on cholesterol photo-induced oxidation. The oxidative routes were modeled with a chemical reaction network (CRN), which represents the first application of CRN to the oxidative degradation of a food-related lipid matrix. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, T-I), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, T-II) and a mixture of both (T-III) were added to cholesterol using hematoporphyrin as sensitizer, and were exposed to a fluorescent lamp for 48h. High amounts of Type I cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) were recovered (epimers 7α- and 7β-OH, 7-keto and 25-OH), as well as 5β,6β-epoxy. Fitting the experimental data with the CRN allowed characterizing the associated kinetics. DHA and EPA exerted different effects on the oxidative process. DHA showed a protective effect to 7-hydroxy derivatives, whereas EPA enhanced side-chain oxidation and 7β-OH kinetic rates. The mixture of PUFAs increased the kinetic rates several fold, particularly for 25-OH. With respect to the control, the formation of β-epoxy was reduced, suggesting potential inhibition in the presence of PUFAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of a 1-hour single bout of moderate-intensity exercise on fat oxidation kinetics.

    Chenevière, Xavier; Borrani, Fabio; Ebenegger, Vincent; Gojanovic, Boris; Malatesta, Davide

    2009-12-01

    The present study aimed to examine the effects of a prior 1-hour continuous exercise bout (CONT) at an intensity (Fat(max)) that elicits the maximal fat oxidation (MFO) on the fat oxidation kinetics during a subsequent submaximal incremental test (IncrC). Twenty moderately trained subjects (9 men and 11 women) performed a graded test on a treadmill (Incr), with 3-minute stages and 1-km.h(-1) increments. Fat oxidation was measured using indirect calorimetry and plotted as a function of exercise intensity. A mathematical model (SIN) including 3 independent variables (dilatation, symmetry, and translation) was used to characterize the shape of fat oxidation kinetics and to determine Fat(max) and MFO. On a second visit, the subjects performed CONT at Fat(max) followed by IncrC. After CONT performed at 57% +/- 3% (means +/- SE) maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2max)), the respiratory exchange ratio during IncrC was lower at every stage compared with Incr (P rates from 35% to 70% Vo(2max) (P .05), whereas symmetry tended to be greater in IncrC (P = .096). This study showed that the prior 1-hour continuous moderate-intensity exercise bout increased Fat(max), MFO, and fat oxidation rates over a wide range of intensities during the postexercise incremental test. Moreover, the shape of the postexercise fat oxidation kinetics tended to have a rightward asymmetry.

  6. Comparison of NBG-18, NBG-17, IG-110 and IG-11 oxidation kinetics in air

    Lee, Jo Jo; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2018-03-01

    The oxidation rates of several nuclear-grade graphites, NBG-18, NBG-17, IG-110 and IG-11, were measured in air using thermogravimetry. Kinetic parameters and oxidation behavior for each grade were compared by coke type, filler grain size and microstructure. The thickness of the oxidized layer for each grade was determined by layer peeling and direct density measurements. The results for NBG-17 and IG-11 were compared with those available in the literature and our recently reported results for NBG-18 and IG-110 oxidation in air. The finer-grained graphites IG-110 and IG-11 were more oxidized than medium-grained NBG-18 and NBG-17 because of deeper oxidant penetration, higher porosity and higher probability of available active sites. Variation in experimental conditions also had a marked effect on the reported kinetic parameters by several studies. Kinetic parameters such as activation energy and transition temperature were sensitive to air flow rates as well as sample size and geometry.

  7. Oxidation of zirconium alloys in steam: influence of tetragonal zirconia on oxide growth mechanism

    Godlewski, J.

    1990-07-01

    The oxidation of zirconium alloys in presence of steam, presents after a 'parabolic' growth law, an acceleration of the oxidation velocity. This phenomenon limits the use of zirconium alloys as nuclear fuel cladding element. In order to determine the physico-chemical process leading to this kinetic transition, two approaches have been carried out: the first one has consisted to determine the composition of the oxide layer and its evolution with the oxidation time; and the second one to determine the oxygen diffusion coefficients in the oxide layers of pre- and post-transition as well as their evolution with the oxidation time. The composition of the oxide layers has been determined by two analyses techniques: the X-ray diffraction and the laser Raman spectroscopy. This last method has allowed to confirm the presence of tetragonal zirconium oxide in the oxide layers. Analyses carried out by laser Raman spectroscopy on oxides oblique cuttings have revealed that the tetragonal zirconium oxide is transformed in monoclinic phase during the kinetic transition. A quantitative approach has allowed to corroborate the results obtained by these two techniques. In order to determine the oxygen diffusion coefficients in the oxides layers, two diffusion treatments have been carried out: 1)under low pressure with D 2 18 O 2 ) under high pressure in an autoclave with H 2 18 O. The oxygen 18 concentration profiles have been obtained by two analyses techniques: the nuclear microprobe and the secondary ions emission spectroscopy. The obtained profiles show that the mass transport is made by the volume and particularly by the grain boundaries. The corresponding diffusion coefficients have been calculated with the WHIPPLE and LE CLAIRE solution. The presence of tetragonal zirconium oxide, its relation with the kinetic transition, and the evolution of the diffusion coefficients with the oxidation time, are discussed in terms of internal stresses in the oxide layer and of the oxide layer

  8. The surface oxidation kinetics of zirconium-niobium alloys and aα-Fe with prevailing cubical texture

    Mukhambetov, D.G.; Kargin, D.B.; Chalaya, O. V.; Berber, N.N.

    2002-01-01

    It is known, that the kinetics of oxidation of zirconium at formed heating is characterized by two consecutive stages. At the initial stage the thin protecting film will be derived. The relation of its depth from time h (t) is described predominantly by parabolic law. Some time later there can be a transition to the linear law of oxidation. The time moment divided these areas on the kinetic relation is called as a point of break. The film is formed at the second stage, has a developed grid of pores or cracks, can be flake away and be crumbled by losing its protective properties. At the oxidation of the surface shells of the heat generating elements and the technological channels of atomic boilers both stages are proceeded simultaneously. This phenomenon is called modular corrosion. Its consequences can be dangerous for the equipment. Its mechanism is not clear till now. Similar dependencies h(t), with the break point, beginning from which the thin film is transformed into the thick one were found by us at the oxidation α-Fe with prevailing cubical texture. The task of the work was to study the oxide film growth laws in order to clarify the mechanisms of transition of the thin film into the oxide layer on the α-Fe surface and Zr-Nb alloy modular corrosion emergence. Low-carbonate steel with contents 99.43 % of α-Fe was used as a model object of our research. In the texture of the steel surface planar direction [100] was prevalent. Its part accounted for about 40 %. The isothermal air oxidation was carried out in the interval of 450-500 deg. C . Phase composition of the film was determined with X-ray diffraction. The mathematical treatment of the dependencies h(t) obtained by experiment showed that the kinetics of the film growth can be conditionally divided into 4-stages. The initial stage is described by function logarithmic function, the other stages - by the power mode h n =A n ·t, namely, the second stage - is described by function close to cubical (n≅3

  9. Kinetics of reactions of oxidation of carbon by carbon dioxide and water steam at high temperatures and low pressures

    Boulangier, Francois

    1956-01-01

    The first objective of this research thesis was to obtain new and reliable experimental results about the reaction kinetics of the oxidation of carbon by carbon dioxide and water steam, and to avoid some disturbing phenomena, for example and more particularly the appearance of electric discharges beyond 1900 K initiated by the filament thermoelectric emission. The author tried to identify the mechanism of the accelerating effect. It appears that previous experiments had been performed only in these disturbed conditions. At the lowest temperatures, the author highlighted the existence of a surface contamination by the desorption products from the apparatus [fr

  10. Oxidation kinetics of crystal violet by potassium permanganate in acidic medium

    Khan, Sameera Razi; Ashfaq, Maria; Mubashir; Masood, Summyia

    2016-05-01

    The oxidation kinetics of crystal violet (a triphenylmethane dye) by potassium permanganate was focused in an acidic medium by the spectrophotometric method at 584 nm. The oxidation reaction of crystal violet by potassium permanganate is carried out in an acidic medium at different temperatures ranging within 298-318 K. The kinetic study was carried out to investigate the effect of the concentration, ionic strength and temperature. The reaction followed first order kinetics with respect to potassium permanganate and crystal violet and the overall rate of the reaction was found to be second order. Thermodynamic activation parameters like the activation energy ( E a), enthalpy change (Δ H*), free energy change (Δ G*), and entropy change (Δ S*) have also been evaluated.

  11. Oxidative kinetic resolution of racemic alcohols catalyzed by chiral ferrocenyloxazolinylphosphine-ruthenium complexes.

    Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki; Yamauchi, Akiyoshi; Onodera, Gen; Uemura, Sakae

    2003-07-25

    Oxidative kinetic resolution of racemic secondary alcohols by using acetone as a hydrogen acceptor in the presence of a catalytic amount of [RuCl(2)(PPh(3))(ferrocenyloxazolinylphosphine)] (2) proceeds effectively to recover the corresponding alcohols in high yields with an excellent enantioselectivity. When 1-indanol is employed as a racemic alcohol, the oxidation proceeds quite smoothly even in the presence of 0.0025 mol % of the catalyst 2 to give an optically active 1-indanol in good yield with high enantioselectivity (up to 94% ee), where turnover frequency (TOF) exceeds 80,000 h(-1). From a practical viewpoint, the kinetic resolution is investigated in a large scale, optically pure (S)-1-indanol (75 g, 56% yield, >99% ee) being obtained from racemic 1-indanol (134 g) by employing this kinetic resolution method twice.

  12. The hydrogen evolution and oxidation kinetics during overdischarging of sealed nickel-metal hydride batteries

    Ayeb, A.; Otten, W.M.; Mank, A.J.G.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen evolution and oxidation kinetics in NiMH batteries have been investigated under temperature-controlled, steady-state, overdischarging conditions within a temperature range of 10 and 50°C and at discharging currents of 1–330 mA (0.0009 to 0.3 C rate). In situ Raman spectroscopic analyses

  13. Effect of ambient air pressure on the oxidation kinetics of Fe–6 at.% Si alloy

    Lashin, Abdel Rahman; Schneeweiss, Oldřich; Houbaert, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 9 (2008), s. 2580-2587 ISSN 0010-938X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1041404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Iron-silicon * Mössbauer spectroscopy * XRD * Oxidation kinetics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.293, year: 2008

  14. Investigation on CO catalytic oxidation reaction kinetics of faceted perovskite nanostructures loaded with Pt

    Yin, S. M.

    2017-01-18

    Perovskite lead titanate nanostructures with specific {111}, {100} and {001} facets exposed, have been employed as supports to investigate the crystal facet effect on the growth and CO catalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles. The size, distribution and surface chemical states of Pt on the perovskite supports have been significantly modified, leading to a tailored conversion temperature and catalytic kinetics towards CO catalytic oxidation.

  15. Kinetic investigation of the oxidation of N-alkyl anilines by ...

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 112; Issue 6. Kinetic investigation of the oxidation of N-alkyl anilines by peroxomonophosphoric acid in anionic surfactant sodium lauryl sulphate. G P Panigrahi Jagannath Panda. Physical and Theoretical Volume 112 Issue 6 December 2000 pp 615-622 ...

  16. Kinetic Study of Hydroxyl and Sulfate Radical-Mediated Oxidation of Pharmaceuticals in Wastewater Effluents.

    Lian, Lushi; Yao, Bo; Hou, Shaodong; Fang, Jingyun; Yan, Shuwen; Song, Weihua

    2017-03-07

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as hydroxyl radical (HO • )- and sulfate radical (SO 4 •- )-mediated oxidation, are alternatives for the attenuation of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in wastewater effluents. However, the kinetics of these reactions needs to be investigated. In this study, kinetic models for 15 PPCPs were built to predict the degradation of PPCPs in both HO • - and SO 4 •- -mediated oxidation. In the UV/H 2 O 2 process, a simplified kinetic model involving only steady state concentrations of HO • and its biomolecular reaction rate constants is suitable for predicting the removal of PPCPs, indicating the dominant role of HO • in the removal of PPCPs. In the UV/K 2 S 2 O 8 process, the calculated steady state concentrations of CO 3 •- and bromine radicals (Br • , Br 2 •- and BrCl •- ) were 600-fold and 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than the concentrations of SO 4 •- , respectively. The kinetic model, involving both SO 4 •- and CO 3 •- as reactive species, was more accurate for predicting the removal of the 9 PPCPs, except for salbutamol and nitroimidazoles. The steric and ionic effects of organic matter toward SO 4 •- could lead to overestimations of the removal efficiencies of the SO 4 •- -mediated oxidation of nitroimidazoles in wastewater effluents.

  17. Development of the kinetic model of platinum catalyzed ammonia oxidation in a microreactor

    Rebrov, E.V.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Schouten, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    The ammonia oxidation reaction on supported polycrystalline platinum catalyst was investigated in an aluminum-based microreactor. An extensive set of reactions was included in the chemical reactor modeling to facilitate the construction of a kinetic model capable of satisfactory predictions for a

  18. Enzyme catalyzed oxidative gelation of sugar beet pectin: Kinetics and rheology

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Chronakis, Ioannis S.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    Sugar beet pectin (SBP) is a marginally utilized co-processing product from sugar production from sugar beets. In this study, the kinetics of oxidative gelation of SBP, taking place via enzyme catalyzed cross-linking of ferulic acid moieties (FA), was studied using small angle oscillatory...

  19. Investigation on CO catalytic oxidation reaction kinetics of faceted perovskite nanostructures loaded with Pt

    Yin, S. M.; Duanmu, J. J.; Zhu, Yihan; Yuan, Y. F.; Guo, S. Y.; Yang, J. L.; Ren, Z. H.; Han, G. R.

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite lead titanate nanostructures with specific {111}, {100} and {001} facets exposed, have been employed as supports to investigate the crystal facet effect on the growth and CO catalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles. The size, distribution and surface chemical states of Pt on the perovskite supports have been significantly modified, leading to a tailored conversion temperature and catalytic kinetics towards CO catalytic oxidation.

  20. Kinetics of the partial oxidation of methanol over a Fe-Mo catalyst

    Deshmukh, S.A.R.K.; Sint Annaland, van M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The intrinsic steady-state kinetics of the partial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde over a commercial Fe-Mo catalyst has been studied experimentally in a differentially operated reactor at temperatures of 230–260 °C, over a wide range of methanol and oxygen concentrations. The principal

  1. Kinetics of the partial oxidation of methanol over a Fe-Mo catalyst

    Deshmukh, S.A.R.K.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The intrinsic steady-state kinetics of the partial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde over a commercial Fe-Mo catalyst has been studied experimentally in a differentially operated reactor at temperatures of 230¿260 °C, over a wide range of methanol and oxygen concentrations. The principal

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of nitrobenzene hydrogenation to phenylhydroxylamine in rhenium thiocomplexes solutions

    Korenyako, G.I.; Belousov, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made on kinetics of nitrobenzene hydrogenation to phenylhydroxylamine in dimethylformamide solutions of rhenium thiocomplexes. The mechanism of hydrogenation was suggested. Formation of hydride catalyst complex represents the first stage of the process. Kinetic equation derived on the basis of suggested mechanism corresponds satisfactorily with experimental results. Thermodynamic parameters of separate process stages calculated on the basis of equilibrium constant values testify as well to the benefit of suggested mechanism

  3. Study of the oxidation kinetics of the nickel-molybdenum alloy

    Gouillon, Marie-Josephe

    1974-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the oxidation of a nickel-molybdenum alloy in the high-nickel-content part of this alloy. After a bibliographical study on the both metals, the author proposes a physical model based on observed phenomena and based on experimental results. Based on a thermodynamic study, the author compares the stability of the different oxides which may be formed, and reports a prediction of oxides obtained on the alloy during oxidation. Qualitative and quantitative studies have been performed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with electronic microprobe analysis to investigate morphological characteristics on oxidation films. A kinetic study by thermogravimetry shows a decrease of the alloy oxidation rate with respect to that of pure nickel at temperatures lower than 800 degrees C. This result is interpreted by the intervention of two opposed diffusion phenomena which act against each other [fr

  4. High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior and Kinetics of Forged 12Cr-MoVW Steel

    Kim Yong Hwan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation kinetics of forged 12Cr-MoVW steel was investigated in an air (N2+O2 atmosphere at 873-1073 K (Δ50 K using thermogravimetric analysis. The oxidized samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, and the surface and cross-sectional morphologies were examined using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The forged 12Cr-MoVW steel samples exhibited parabolic behavior and a low oxidation rate compared with their as-cast counterparts. A protective oxide layer was uniformly formed at relatively low temperature (≤973 K for the forged samples, which thus exhibited better oxidation resistance than the as-cast ones. These oxides are considered solid-solution compounds such as (Fe, Cr2O3.

  5. Thermoluminescence of magnesium oxide and its trapping kinetics

    Nagpal, J.S. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Div. of Radiological Protection); Kathuria, S.P. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Health Physics Div.)

    1984-06-01

    MgO (Norton), on u.v. and ..gamma.. irradiation, exhibits TL glow peaks around 88, 150, 172, 195 and 250degC (heating rate 55degC min/sup -1/). TL emission is observed around 340, 390, 445 and 705 nm and can be attributed to the impurities Fe/sup 3 +/ and Cr/sup 3 +/, which act as luminescence centers. ESR studies rule out any participation of Mn/sup 2 +/ ions. The glow peak around 88degC has E = 1.055 eV, s = 4.3 x 10/sup 13/s/sup -1/ and has order of kinetics b = 1.7.

  6. Kinetics of YBa2Cu3O6+γ oxidation

    Mozhaev, A.P.; Chernyaev, S.V.; Udal'tsova, T.I.; Kotov, N.M.

    1992-01-01

    Kinetics of the processes taking place during thermal treatment of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+γ samples and change in oxygen nonstoichiometry, related to the processes, were studied. The coefficient of oxygen diffusion was determined (D=D 0 x exp x (-E α /RT) a = 118 kJ/mol, D 0 = 4x10 -6 m 2 /s), which gave a satisfactory description of behaviour of powders and ceramics with the density below 5200 kg/m 3 . It is shown that in the course of annealing of denser samples considerable deviations of the calculated curves γ(T) from the experimental ones are observed. The deviations mentioned can be explained by the appearance of closed porosity and additional diffusion impediments

  7. Grain growth kinetics in uranium-plutonium mixed oxides

    Sari, C.

    1986-01-01

    Grain growth rates were investigated in uranium-plutonium mixed oxide specimens with oxygen-to-metal ratios 1.97 and 2.0. The specimens in the form of cylindrical pellets were heated in a temperature gradient similar to that existing in a fast reactor. The results are in agreement with the cubic rate law. The mean grain size D(μm) after annealing for time t (min) is represented by D 3 -D 0 3 =1.11x10 12 . exp(-445870/RT).t and D 3 -D 0 3 =2.55x10 9 .exp(-319240/RT).t for specimens with overall oxygen-to-metal ratios 1.97 and 2.0, respectively (activation energies expressed in J/mol). An example for the influence of the oxygen-to-metal ratio on the grain growth in mixed oxide fuel during operation in a fast reactor is also given. (orig.)

  8. Self-limited kinetics of electron doping in correlated oxides

    Chen, Jikun; Zhou, You; Jiang, Jun; Shi, Jian; Ramanathan, Shriram; Middey, Srimanta; Chakhalian, Jak; Chen, Nuofu; Chen, Lidong; Shi, Xun; Döbeli, Max

    2015-01-01

    Electron doping by hydrogenation can reversibly modify the electrical properties of complex oxides. We show that in order to realize large, fast, and reversible response to hydrogen, it is important to consider both the electron configuration on the transition metal 3d orbitals, as well as the thermodynamic stability in nickelates. Specifically, large doping-induced resistivity modulations ranging several orders of magnitude change are only observed for rare earth nickelates with small ionic radii on the A-site, in which case both electron correlation effects and the meta-stability of Ni 3+ are important considerations. Charge doping via metastable incorporation of ionic dopants is of relevance to correlated oxide-based devices where advancing approaches to modify the ground state electronic properties is an important problem

  9. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    Totemeier, Terry C.; Pahl, Robert G.; Frank, Steven M.

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2, Ar-9%O 2, and Ar-20%O 2. Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125°C and 150°C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride.

  10. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    Totemeier, T.C.; Pahl, R.G.; Frank, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from zero power physics reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2 , Ar-9%O 2 , and Ar-20%O 2 . Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125 C and 150 C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride. (orig.)

  11. Kinetic Studies on State of the Art Solid Oxide Cells

    Njodzefon, Jean-Claude; Graves, Christopher R.; Hjelm, Johan

    2014-01-01

    of the technology, cell optimization and eventual commercialisation requires a sound understanding of the mechanisms that affect performance and stability. These mechanisms depend on operation conditions like temperature, gas composition, fuel utilisation and current load as well as on gradients along cell...

  12. Renormalizing the kinetic energy operator in elementary quantum mechanics

    Coutinho, F A B [Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Sao Paulo e LIM 01-HCFMUSP, 05405-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Amaku, M [Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05508-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: coutinho@dim.fm.usp.br

    2009-09-15

    In this paper, we consider solutions to the three-dimensional Schroedinger equation of the form {psi}(r) = u(r)/r, where u(0) {ne} 0. The expectation value of the kinetic energy operator for such wavefunctions diverges. We show that it is possible to introduce a potential energy with an expectation value that also diverges, exactly cancelling the kinetic energy divergence. This renormalization procedure produces a self-adjoint Hamiltonian. We solve some problems with this new Hamiltonian to illustrate its usefulness.

  13. Renormalizing the kinetic energy operator in elementary quantum mechanics

    Coutinho, F A B; Amaku, M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider solutions to the three-dimensional Schroedinger equation of the form ψ(r) = u(r)/r, where u(0) ≠ 0. The expectation value of the kinetic energy operator for such wavefunctions diverges. We show that it is possible to introduce a potential energy with an expectation value that also diverges, exactly cancelling the kinetic energy divergence. This renormalization procedure produces a self-adjoint Hamiltonian. We solve some problems with this new Hamiltonian to illustrate its usefulness.

  14. Comparative evaluation of thermal oxidative decomposition for oil-plant residues via thermogravimetric analysis: Thermal conversion characteristics, kinetics, and thermodynamics.

    Chen, Jianbiao; Wang, Yanhong; Lang, Xuemei; Ren, Xiu'e; Fan, Shuanshi

    2017-11-01

    Thermal oxidative decomposition characteristics, kinetics, and thermodynamics of rape straw (RS), rapeseed meal (RM), camellia seed shell (CS), and camellia seed meal (CM) were evaluated via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TG-DTG-DSC curves demonstrated that the combustion of oil-plant residues proceeded in three stages, including dehydration, release and combustion of organic volatiles, and chars oxidation. As revealed by combustion characteristic parameters, the ignition, burnout, and comprehensive combustion performance of residues were quite distinct from each other, and were improved by increasing heating rate. The kinetic parameters were determined by Coats-Redfern approach. The results showed that the most possible combustion mechanisms were order reaction models. The existence of kinetic compensation effect was clearly observed. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔG, ΔS) at peak temperatures were calculated through the activated complex theory. With the combustion proceeding, the variation trends of ΔH, ΔG, and ΔS for RS (RM) similar to those for CS (CM). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CSP-based chemical kinetics mechanisms simplification strategy for non-premixed combustion: An application to hybrid rocket propulsion

    Ciottoli, Pietro P.

    2017-08-14

    A set of simplified chemical kinetics mechanisms for hybrid rocket applications using gaseous oxygen (GOX) and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) is proposed. The starting point is a 561-species, 2538-reactions, detailed chemical kinetics mechanism for hydrocarbon combustion. This mechanism is used for predictions of the oxidation of butadiene, the primary HTPB pyrolysis product. A Computational Singular Perturbation (CSP) based simplification strategy for non-premixed combustion is proposed. The simplification algorithm is fed with the steady-solutions of classical flamelet equations, these being representative of the non-premixed nature of the combustion processes characterizing a hybrid rocket combustion chamber. The adopted flamelet steady-state solutions are obtained employing pure butadiene and gaseous oxygen as fuel and oxidizer boundary conditions, respectively, for a range of imposed values of strain rate and background pressure. Three simplified chemical mechanisms, each comprising less than 20 species, are obtained for three different pressure values, 3, 17, and 36 bar, selected in accordance with an experimental test campaign of lab-scale hybrid rocket static firings. Finally, a comprehensive strategy is shown to provide simplified mechanisms capable of reproducing the main flame features in the whole pressure range considered.

  16. Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism

    Tingting Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNAdamage, then to investigate the possible mechanism.Methods: The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde(MDA. The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro,including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation, •O2- scavenging (pyrogallolautoxidation, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays.Results: Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-inducedDNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 μM. It also increased its radical-scavengingpercentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in•OH scavenging, •O2- scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 μM, 34.05±0.87 μM, 9.69±0.53 μM, 2.43±0.14μM, and 1.49±0.16 μM, respectively.Conclusion: Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damagepossibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging approach, which is assumed to behydrogen atom (H• and/or single electron (e donation (HAT/SET pathways. In the HATpathway, the 3’,4’-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an importantrole, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form.

  17. A Comparison of Kinetic Energy and Momentum in Special Relativity and Classical Mechanics

    Riggs, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic energy and momentum are indispensable dynamical quantities in both the special theory of relativity and in classical mechanics. Although momentum and kinetic energy are central to understanding dynamics, the differences between their relativistic and classical notions have not always received adequate treatment in undergraduate teaching.…

  18. Study the oxidation kinetics of uranium using XRD and Rietveld method

    Zhang Yanzhi; Guan Weijun; Wang Qinguo; Wang Xiaolin; Lai Xinchun; Shuai Maobing, E-mail: yanzhizh@163.com [China Academy of Engineering Physics, PO Box 919-71, Mianyang, Sichuan, 621900 (China)

    2010-03-15

    The surface oxidation of uranium metal has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rietveld method in the range of 50{approx}300deg. C in air. The oxidation processes are analyzed by XRD to determine the extent of surface oxidation and the oxide structure. The dynamics expression for the formation of UO{sub 2} was derived. At the beginning, the dynamic expression was nonlinear, but switched to linear subsequently for uranium in air and humid oxygen. That is, the growth kinetics of UO{sub 2} can be divided into two stages: nonlinear portion and linear portion. Using the kinetic data of linear portion, the activation energy of reaction between uranium and air was calculated about 46.0 kJ/mol. However the content of oxide as a function of time was linear in humid helium ambience. Contrast the dynamics results, it prove that the absence of oxygen would accelerate the corrosion rate of uranium in the humid gas. We can find that the XRD and Rietveld method are a useful convenient method to estimate the kinetics and thermodynamics of solid-gas reaction.

  19. Study the oxidation kinetics of uranium using XRD and Rietveld method

    Zhang, Yanzhi; Guan, Weijun; Wang, Qinguo; Wang, Xiaolin; Lai, Xinchun; Shuai, Maobing

    2010-03-01

    The surface oxidation of uranium metal has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rietveld method in the range of 50~300°C in air. The oxidation processes are analyzed by XRD to determine the extent of surface oxidation and the oxide structure. The dynamics expression for the formation of UO2 was derived. At the beginning, the dynamic expression was nonlinear, but switched to linear subsequently for uranium in air and humid oxygen. That is, the growth kinetics of UO2 can be divided into two stages: nonlinear portion and linear portion. Using the kinetic data of linear portion, the activation energy of reaction between uranium and air was calculated about 46.0 kJ/mol. However the content of oxide as a function of time was linear in humid helium ambience. Contrast the dynamics results, it prove that the absence of oxygen would accelerate the corrosion rate of uranium in the humid gas. We can find that the XRD and Rietveld method are a useful convenient method to estimate the kinetics and thermodynamics of solid-gas reaction.

  20. Characteristics of SME biodiesel-fueled diesel particle emissions and the kinetics of oxidation.

    Jung, Heejung; Kittelson, David B; Zachariah, Michael R

    2006-08-15

    Biodiesel is one of the most promising alternative diesel fuels. As diesel emission regulations have become more stringent, the diesel particulate filter (DPF) has become an essential part of the aftertreatment system. Knowledge of kinetics of exhaust particle oxidation for alternative diesel fuels is useful in estimating the change in regeneration behavior of a DPF with such fuels. This study examines the characteristics of diesel particulate emissions as well as kinetics of particle oxidation using a 1996 John Deere T04045TF250 off-highway engine and 100% soy methyl ester (SME) biodiesel (B100) as fuel. Compared to standard D2 fuel, this B100 reduced particle size, number, and volume in the accumulation mode where most of the particle mass is found. At 75% load, number decreased by 38%, DGN decreased from 80 to 62 nm, and volume decreased by 82%. Part of this decrease is likely associated with the fact that the particles were more easily oxidized. Arrhenius parameters for the biodiesel fuel showed a 2-3times greater frequency factor and approximately 6 times higher oxidation rate compared to regular diesel fuel in the range of 700-825 degrees C. The faster oxidation kinetics should facilitate regeneration when used with a DPF.

  1. Microsecond reaction kinetics and catalytic mechanism of bacterial cytochrome oxidases

    Paulus, A.

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental biochemical research is of crucial importance for a complete and detailed
    understanding of what drives enzyme activity and how enzyme kinetic properties are
    optimized towards survival of the host organism. When cells fail to produce a fully functional
    enzyme, the organism’s

  2. Renormalizing the Kinetic Energy Operator in Elementary Quantum Mechanics

    Coutinho, F. A. B.; Amaku, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider solutions to the three-dimensional Schrodinger equation of the form [psi](r) = u(r)/r, where u(0) [is not equal to] 0. The expectation value of the kinetic energy operator for such wavefunctions diverges. We show that it is possible to introduce a potential energy with an expectation value that also diverges, exactly…

  3. Heterogeneous oxidation of saturated organic aerosols by hydroxyl radicals: uptake kinetics, condensed-phase products, and particle size change

    I. J. George

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics and reaction mechanism for the heterogeneous oxidation of saturated organic aerosols by gas-phase OH radicals were investigated under NOx-free conditions. The reaction of 150 nm diameter Bis(2-ethylhexyl sebacate (BES particles with OH was studied as a proxy for chemical aging of atmospheric aerosols containing saturated organic matter. An aerosol reactor flow tube combined with an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS was used to study this system. Hydroxyl radicals were produced by 254 nm photolysis of O3 in the presence of water vapour. The kinetics of the heterogeneous oxidation of the BES particles was studied by monitoring the loss of a mass fragment of BES with the ToF-AMS as a function of OH exposure. We measured an initial OH uptake coefficient of γ0=1.3 (±0.4, confirming that this reaction is highly efficient. The density of BES particles increased by up to 20% of the original BES particle density at the highest OH exposure studied, consistent with the particle becoming more oxidized. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis showed that the major particle-phase reaction products are multifunctional carbonyls and alcohols with higher molecular weights than the starting material. Volatilization of oxidation products accounted for a maximum of 17% decrease of the particle volume at the highest OH exposure studied. Tropospheric organic aerosols will become more oxidized from heterogeneous photochemical oxidation, which may affect not only their physical and chemical properties, but also their hygroscopicity and cloud nucleation activity.

  4. Detailed kinetic modeling study of n-pentanol oxidation

    Heufer, Karl Alexander; Sarathy, Mani; Curran, Henry J.; Davis, Alexander C.; Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J.

    2012-01-01

    To help overcome the world's dependence upon fossil fuels, suitable biofuels are promising alternatives that can be used in the transportation sector. Recent research on internal combustion engines shows that short alcoholic fuels (e.g., ethanol or n-butanol) have reduced pollutant emissions and increased knock resistance compared to fossil fuels. Although higher molecular weight alcohols (e.g., n-pentanol and n-hexanol) exhibit higher reactivity that lowers their knock resistance, they are suitable for diesel engines or advanced engine concepts, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), where higher reactivity at lower temperatures is necessary for engine operation. The present study presents a detailed kinetic model for n-pentanol based on modeling rules previously presented for n-butanol. This approach was initially validated using quantum chemistry calculations to verify the most stable n-pentanol conformation and to obtain C-H and C-C bond dissociation energies. The proposed model has been validated against ignition delay time data, speciation data from a jet-stirred reactor, and laminar flame velocity measurements. Overall, the model shows good agreement with the experiments and permits a detailed discussion of the differences between alcohols and alkanes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  5. Detailed kinetic modeling study of n-pentanol oxidation

    Heufer, Karl Alexander

    2012-10-18

    To help overcome the world\\'s dependence upon fossil fuels, suitable biofuels are promising alternatives that can be used in the transportation sector. Recent research on internal combustion engines shows that short alcoholic fuels (e.g., ethanol or n-butanol) have reduced pollutant emissions and increased knock resistance compared to fossil fuels. Although higher molecular weight alcohols (e.g., n-pentanol and n-hexanol) exhibit higher reactivity that lowers their knock resistance, they are suitable for diesel engines or advanced engine concepts, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), where higher reactivity at lower temperatures is necessary for engine operation. The present study presents a detailed kinetic model for n-pentanol based on modeling rules previously presented for n-butanol. This approach was initially validated using quantum chemistry calculations to verify the most stable n-pentanol conformation and to obtain C-H and C-C bond dissociation energies. The proposed model has been validated against ignition delay time data, speciation data from a jet-stirred reactor, and laminar flame velocity measurements. Overall, the model shows good agreement with the experiments and permits a detailed discussion of the differences between alcohols and alkanes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Electrochemical oxidation of COD from real textile wastewaters: Kinetic study and energy consumption.

    Zou, Jiaxiu; Peng, Xiaolan; Li, Miao; Xiong, Ying; Wang, Bing; Dong, Faqin; Wang, Bin

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, the electrochemical oxidation of real wastewaters discharged by textile industry was carried out using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode. The effect of operational variables, such as applied current density (20-100 mA·cm -2 ), NaCl concentration added to the real wastewaters (0-3 g·L -1 ), and pH value (2.0-10.0), on the kinetics of COD oxidation and on the energy consumption was carefully investigated. The obtained experimental results could be well matched with a proposed kinetic model, in which the indirect oxidation mediated by electrogenerated strong oxidants would be described through a pseudo-first-order kinetic constant k. Values of k exhibited a linear increase with increasing applied current density and decreasing pH value, and an exponential increase with NaCl concentration. Furthermore, high oxidation kinetics resulted in low specific energy consumption, but this conclusion was not suitable to the results obtained under different applied current density. Under the optimum operational conditions, it only took 3 h to complete remove the COD in the real textile wastewaters and the specific energy consumption could be as low as 11.12 kWh·kg -1  COD. The obtained results, low energy consumption and short electrolysis time, allowed to conclude that the electrochemical oxidation based on BDD anodes would have practical industrial application for the treatment of real textile wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Novel Method of Mechanical Oxidation of CNT for Polymer Nanocomposite Application: Evaluation of Mechanical, Dynamic Mechanical, and Rheological Properties

    Priyanka Pandey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach of oxidation of carbon nanotubes has been used to oxidize the CNTs. A comparative aspect of the mechanical oxidation and acid oxidation process has been established. FTIR analysis and titration method have shown the higher feasibility of the mechanical oxidation method to oxidize the CNTs. Comparatively less damage to the CNTs has been observed in case of mechanically oxidized as compared to acid oxidized CNTs. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites reinforced with the acid oxidized CNT (ACNT and mechanically oxidized CNTs (McCNT were analyzed and relatively higher properties in the nanocomposites reinforced with McCNT were noticed. The less degree of entanglement in the McCNTs was noticed as compared to ACNTs. The dynamic mechanical analysis of the nanocomposites revealed much improved load transfer capability in the McCNT reinforced composites. Further, the rheological properties of the nanocomposites revealed the higher performance of McCNT reinforced composites.

  8. The effects of iron(II) on the kinetics of arsenic oxidation and sorption on manganese oxides.

    Wu, Yun; Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L

    2015-11-01

    In this study, As(III) oxidation kinetics by a poorly-crystalline phyllomanganate (δ-MnO2) in the presence and absence of dissolved Fe(II) was investigated using stirred-flow and batch experiments. Chemically synthetic δ-MnO2 was reacted with four influent solutions, containing the same As(III) concentration but different Fe(II) concentrations, at pH 6. The results show an initial rapid As(III) oxidation by δ-MnO2, which is followed by an appreciably slow reaction after 8h. In the presence of Fe(II), As(III) oxidation is inhibited due to the competitive oxidation of Fe(II) as well as the formation of Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides on the δ-MnO2 surface. However, the sorption of As(III), As(V) and Mn(II) are increased, for the newly formed Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides provide additional sorption sites. This study suggests that the competitive oxidation of Fe(II) and consequently the precipitation of Fe(III) compounds on the δ-MnO2 surface play an important role in As(III) oxidation and As sequestration. Understanding these processes would be helpful in developing in situ strategies for remediation of As-contaminated waters and soils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Kinetics and mechanisms of iron redox reactions in silicate melts: The effects of temperature and alkali cations

    Magnien, V.; Pinet, O. [CEA VALRHO, SCDV/LEBV, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France); Magnien, V.; Neuville, D. R.; Roux, J.; Richet, P. [IPGP, CNRS, Physique des Mineraux et Magmas, F-75252 Paris 05, (France); Cormier, L. [Univ Paris 06, IMPMC, F-75015 Paris, (France); Hazemann, J. L. [CNRS, Inst Neel, F-38043 Grenoble, (France); De Ligny, D. [Univ Lyon 1, LMLC, CNRS, UMR 5620, F-69622 Villeurbanne, (France); Pascarelli, S. [European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, F-38043 Grenoble, (France); Vickridge, I. [Univ Paris 06, INSP, F-75015 Paris, (France)

    2008-07-01

    The kinetics and the mechanisms of iron redox reactions in molten Fe-bearing pyroxene compositions have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) experiments at the iron K-edge. The former experiments have been made only near the glass transition whereas the latter have also been performed from about 1300 to 2100 K. The same kinetics are observed with both techniques. They are described by characteristic times that depend primarily on temperature and not on the initial redox state. At high temperatures, where both kinds of reactions could be investigated, these times are similar for oxidation and reduction. From these characteristic times we have calculated as a function of temperature and composition a parameter termed effective redox diffusivity. For a given melt, the diffusivities follow two distinct Arrhenius laws, which indicate that the mechanisms of the redox reaction are not the same near the glass transition and at high temperatures. As is now well established, diffusion of divalent cations is the dominant mechanism at low temperatures but the enhanced kinetics observed for alkali-bearing melts indicate that Li{sup +} and Na{sup +} also participate in ionic transport. At super-liquidus temperatures, in contrast, diffusion of oxygen represents the dominant mechanism. (authors)

  10. Dose dependent oxidation kinetics of lipids in fish during irradiation processing

    Tukenmez, I.; Ersen, M.S.; Bakioglu, A.T.; Bicer, A.; Pamuk, V.

    1997-01-01

    Kinetic aspects of the development of lipid oxidation in complex foods as fish in the course of irradiation were analyzed with respect to the associated formation of malonaldehyde (MA) through the reactions modified so as to be consistent with those in complex foods as fish. Air-packed anchovy (Engraulis encrasicholus) samples in polyethylene pouches were irradiated at the doses of 1, 2, 5, 10, 15,20 and 25 kGy at 20 o C in a Cs-137 gamma irradiator of 1.806 kGy/h dose rate. Immediately after each irradiation, MA contents of irradiated and unirradiated samples were determined by thiobarbituric acid test. Based on the MA formation, a kinetic model to simulate the apparent oxidation of lipid in fish as a function of irradiation dose was derived from the rate equations consistent with modified reactions. Kinetic parameters and simulation were related to conditions of lipid oxidation, and associated rancidity state of fish with respect to the doses applied in different irradiation-preservation processes. Numerical values of kinetic parameters based on the MA formation were found as a threshold dose of 0.375 kGy, an apparent yield of 1.871 μmol/kg kGy, and a maximum attainable concentration of 15.853 μmol/kg which may be used for process control and dosimetry. (author)

  11. On-the-Fly Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Aqueous Phase Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    Guo, Xin; Minakata, Daisuke; Crittenden, John

    2015-08-04

    We have developed an on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model to predict the degradation mechanisms and fates of intermediates and byproducts that are produced during aqueous-phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The on-the-fly KMC model is composed of a reaction pathway generator, a reaction rate constant estimator, a mechanistic reduction module, and a KMC solver. The novelty of this work is that we develop the pathway as we march forward in time rather than developing the pathway before we use the KMC method to solve the equations. As a result, we have fewer reactions to consider, and we have greater computational efficiency. We have verified this on-the-fly KMC model for the degradation of polyacrylamide (PAM) using UV light and titanium dioxide (i.e., UV/TiO2). Using the on-the-fly KMC model, we were able to predict the time-dependent profiles of the average molecular weight for PAM. The model provided detailed and quantitative insights into the time evolution of the molecular weight distribution and reaction mechanism. We also verified our on-the-fly KMC model for the destruction of (1) acetone, (2) trichloroethylene (TCE), and (3) polyethylene glycol (PEG) for the ultraviolet light and hydrogen peroxide AOP. We demonstrated that the on-the-fly KMC model can achieve the same accuracy as the computer-based first-principles KMC (CF-KMC) model, which has already been validated in our earlier work. The on-the-fly KMC is particularly suitable for molecules with large molecular weights (e.g., polymers) because the degradation mechanisms for large molecules can result in hundreds of thousands to even millions of reactions. The ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that describe the degradation pathways cannot be solved using traditional numerical methods, but the KMC can solve these equations.

  12. Elementary kinetic modelling applied to solid oxide fuel cell pattern anodes and a direct flame fuel cell system

    Vogler, Marcel

    2009-05-27

    In the course of this thesis a model for the prediction of polarisation characteristics of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) was developed. The model is based on an elementary kinetic description of electrochemical reactions and the fundamental conservation principles of mass and energy. The model allows to predict the current-voltage relation of an SOFC and offers ideal possibilities for model validation. The aim of this thesis is the identification of rate-limiting processes and the determination of the elementary pathway during charge transfer. The numerical simulation of experiments with model anodes allowed to identify a hydrogen transfer to be the most probable charge-transfer reaction and revealed the influence of diffusive transport. Applying the hydrogen oxidation kinetics to the direct flame fuel cell system (DFFC) showed that electrochemical oxidation of CO is possible based on the same mechanism. Based on the quantification of loss processes in the DFFC system, improvements on cell design, predicting 80% increase of efficiency, were proposed. (orig.)

  13. CH4/air homogeneous autoignition: A comparison of two chemical kinetics mechanisms

    Tingas, Efstathios Al.; Manias, Dimitris M.; Sarathy, Mani; Goussis, Dimitris A.

    2018-01-01

    Reactions contributing to the generation of the explosive time scale that characterise autoignition of homogeneous stoichiometric CH4/air mixture are identified using two different chemical kinetics models; the well known GRI-3.0 mechanism (53

  14. Compact Kinetic Mechanisms for Petroleum-Derived and Alternative Aviation Fuels, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To be useful for computational combustor design and analysis using tools like the National Combustion Code (NCC), low-dimensional chemical kinetic mechanisms for...

  15. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of aliphatic alcohols by ...

    Unknown

    distilled. All other reagents were commercial products and were purified by the usual ..... charge separation takes place in the transition state of the reaction. ... correlation separately with Taft's 18 α* and Es. The correlation with σ* accounts for.

  16. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Coomassie Brilliant Blue ...

    NICOLAAS

    ... a chlorinating agent. (for swimming pools and in wastewater treatment) and also in ..... The large negative entropy values (DS‡) of –191.9 and –204.6 J K–1. RESEARCH .... molecule splits the amine portion of I6 from the rest of the molecule ...

  17. Model-fitting approach to kinetic analysis of non-isothermal oxidation of molybdenite

    Ebrahimi Kahrizsangi, R.; Abbasi, M. H.; Saidi, A.

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics of molybdenite oxidation was studied by non-isothermal TGA-DTA with heating rate 5 d eg C .min -1 . The model-fitting kinetic approach applied to TGA data. The Coats-Redfern method used of model fitting. The popular model-fitting gives excellent fit non-isothermal data in chemically controlled regime. The apparent activation energy was determined to be about 34.2 kcalmol -1 With pre-exponential factor about 10 8 sec -1 for extent of reaction less than 0.5

  18. nonlinear kinetics and mechanism of nile blue reaction

    Prof. S.B. Jonnalagadda

    under varied oxidative and reducing media is pivotal in their applications as dyes ..... implicate Runge-Kutta method, which solves differential equations .... The authors acknowledge the financial support received from the University of Durban-.

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of polymerization of methyl methacrylate ...

    Homopolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) was carried out in the presence of triphenylstibonium 1,2,3,4-tetraphenyl-cyclopentadienylide as an initiator in dioxane at 65°C ± 0·1°C. The system follows non-ideal radical kinetics ( ∝ [M]1.4 [I]0.44) due to primary radical termination as well as degradative ...

  20. Experimental and Chemical Kinetic Modeling Study of Dimethylcyclohexane Oxidation and Pyrolysis

    Eldeeb, Mazen A.

    2016-08-30

    A combined experimental and chemical kinetic modeling study of the high-temperature ignition and pyrolysis of 1,3-dimethylcyclohexane (13DMCH) is presented. Ignition delay times are measured behind reflected shock waves over a temperature range of 1049–1544 K and pressures of 3.0–12 atm. Pyrolysis is investigated at average pressures of 4.0 atm at temperatures of 1238, 1302, and 1406 K. By means of mid-infrared direct laser absorption at 3.39 μm, fuel concentration time histories are measured under ignition and pyrolytic conditions. A detailed chemical kinetic model for 13DMCH combustion is developed. Ignition measurements show that the ignition delay times of 13DMCH are longer than those of its isomer, ethylcyclohexane. The proposed chemical kinetic model predicts reasonably well the effects of equivalence ratio and pressure, with overall good agreement between predicted and measured ignition delay times, except at low dilution levels and high pressures. Simulated fuel concentration profiles agree reasonably well with the measured profiles, and both highlight the influence of pyrolysis on the overall ignition kinetics at high temperatures. Sensitivity and reaction pathway analyses provide further insight into the kinetic processes controlling ignition and pyrolysis. The work contributes toward improved understanding and modeling of the oxidation and pyrolysis kinetics of cycloalkanes.