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Sample records for kicker magnet heating

  1. SLC kicker magnet limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassel, R.; Donaldson, A.; Mattison, T.; Bowden, G.; Weaver, J.; Bulos, F.; Fiander, D.

    1991-01-01

    The SLC Damping Ring kicker magnets requires a fast magnetic field rise time of 58 nsec, a peak field of 800 gauss, a pulse amplitude stability of 0.01%, and a reasonable operational lifetime. The original kicker magnets designed by SLAC and at Fermi were not able to fulfill the SLC kicker requirements. Extensive studies were conducted to determine the limitation in the magnets, response of the ferrite in kicker magnet, and the modifications needed to improve the kicker magnet performance. The paper details the SLAC and Fermi kicker magnets limitation of performance

  2. Kicker Magnet and Pulser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulos, Fatin [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-03-04

    The SLC Project utilizes several fast kicker magnets. Their requirements vary somewhat, however, the cooling rings kickers have the most stringent requirements. In this note we describe the design of the positron ring kickers, and the reasons that led to it.

  3. Measurement and analysis of SPS kicker magnet heating and outgassing with Different Bunch Spacing

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Cornelis, K; Ducimetière, L; Mahner, E; Papotti, G; Rumolo, G; Senaj, V; Shaposhnikova, E

    2010-01-01

    Fast kicker magnets are used to inject beam into and eject beam out of the CERN SPS accelerator ring. These kickers are generally ferrite loaded transmission line type magnets with a rectangular shaped aperture through which the beam passes. Unless special precautions are taken the impedance of the ferrite yoke can provoke significant beam induced heating, over several hours, even above the Curie temperature of the ferrite. At present the nominal bunch spacing in the SPS is 25 ns, however for an early stage of LHC operation it is preferable to have 50 ns bunch spacing. Machine Development (MD) studies have been carried out with an inter-bunch spacing of 25 ns, 50 ns or 75 ns. For some of the SPS kicker magnets the 75 ns bunch spacing resulted in considerable beam induced heating. In addition the MDs showed that 50 ns bunch spacing could result in a very rapid pressure rise in the kicker magnet and thus cause an interlock. This paper discusses the MD observations of the SPS kickers and analyses the available d...

  4. Kicker magnet design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, the kicker magnet is studied by use of the program POISSON. For using the dc-code POISSON in the ac problem of the kicker magnet, an approximation of the ac effects is made, this simplifying the ac problem into a dc problem. The study of the magnet is taken in two steps: assuming the γ of the ferrite material is fixed in the calculation to get a preliminary design of the magnet; using the real B /minus/ H curve of the CMD5005 ferrite material in the calculation to get the final design of the magnet. The stored energy, the excitation curve and the excitation efficiency of the kicker magnet are also discussed. 10 figs., 7 tabs

  5. SPS injection kicker magnet

    CERN Document Server

    1975-01-01

    One of the first-generation SPS injection kicker magnets. Lifting the tank-lid reveals the inner structure. For a more detailed description see 7502072X. See also 7502074X and Annual Report 1975, p.162. To the left: Roland Tröhler; to the right: Giacomo Busetta.

  6. Beam-dump kicker magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Odian, A.; Tomlin, B.

    1983-01-01

    The beam-dump kicker magnets are located in the final focus region and, in conjunction with septum magnets, extract the beams after they have passed the interaction point (IP) and direct them to their respective dumps. Two schemes for these kickers have been under consideration; ferrite transmission line magnets utilizing technology common with damping rings and positron target kickers, and current loop magnets which are possible only for the dump kickers, where the rise time of the magnetic pulse can be comparatively longer; approximately 400 nanoseconds as compared with 50 nanoseconds for the others. A prototype ferrite kicker has been built and is undergoing tests. Since the current loop requires lower voltage and power plus some additional savings in cost, we decided to build and test a prototype. This note describes in detail an optimized design for the current loop magnets and their associated pulse circuitry

  7. The LHC injection kicker magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Ducimetière, Laurent; Barnes, M J; Wait, G D

    2003-01-01

    Proton beams will be injected into LHC at 450 GeV by two kicker magnet systems, producing magnetic field pulses of approximately 900 ns rise time and up to 7.86 s flat top duration. One of the stringent design requirements of these systems is a flat top ripple of less than ± 0.5%. Both injection systems are composed of 4 travelling wave kicker magnets of 2.7 m length each, powered by pulse forming networks (PFN's). To achieve the required kick strength of 1.2 Tm, a low characteristic impedance has been chosen and ceramic plate capacitors are used to obtain 5 Omega. Conductive stripes in the aperture of the magnets limit the beam impedance and screen the ferrite. The electrical circuit has been designed with the help of PSpice computer modelling. A full size magnet prototype has been built and tested up to 60 kV with the magnet under ultra high vacuum (UHV). The pulse shape has been precision measured at a voltage of 15 kV. After reviewing the performance requirements the paper presents the magnet...

  8. Upgrade of the LHC Injection Kicker Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Baglin, V; Bregliozzi, G; Caspers, F; Calatroni, S; Day, H; Ducimetière, L; Garlaschè, M; Gomes Namora, V; Jimenez, J M; Magnin, N; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Salvant, B; Taborelli, M; Uythoven, J; Weterings, W

    2013-01-01

    Two LHC injection kicker systems, each comprising 4 magnets per ring, produce a kick of 1.3 T·m with a rise-time of less than 900 ns and a flattop ripple of less than ±0.5%. A beam screen is placed in the aperture of each magnet, to provide a path for the image current of the LHC beam and screen the ferrite yoke against wake fields. The screen consists of a ceramic tube with conductors in the inner wall. The initially implemented beam screen ensured a low rate of electrical breakdowns and an adequately low beam coupling impedance. Operation with increasingly higher intensity beams, stable for many hours at a time, has resulted in substantial heating of the ferrite yoke, sometimes requiring cool-down over several hours before the LHC can be refilled. During the long shutdown in 2013/2014 all eight kicker magnets will be upgraded with an improved beam screen and an increased emissivity of the vacuum tank. In addition equipment adjacent to the injection kickers and various vacuum components will be modified to...

  9. HL-LHC kicker magnet (MKI)

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2018-01-01

    HL-LHC kicker magnet (MKI): last vacuum test, preparation for transport to LHC transfer line in underground tunnel.The LHC injection kicker systems (MKIs) generate fast field pulses to inject the clockwise rotating beam at Point 2 and the anti-clockwise rotating beam at Point 8: there are eight MKI magnets installed in total. Each MKI magnet contains a high purity alumina tube: if an MKI magnet is replaced this tube requires conditioning with LHC beam: until it is properly conditioned, there can be high vacuum pressure due to the beam. This high pressure can also cause electrical breakdowns in the MKI magnets. A special coating (Cr2O3) has been applied to the inside of the alumina tube of an upgraded MKI magnet – this is expected to greatly reduce the pressure rise with beam. In addition, HL-LHC beam would result in excessive heating of the MKI magnets: the upgraded design includes modifications that will reduce heating, and move the power deposition to parts that will be easier to cool. Experience during 2...

  10. Wake field in matched kicker magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Y.

    1979-01-01

    Coherent transverse instability observed in KEK booster proton synchrotron has been reported previously. This instability is induced by the interaction of the beam with kicker magnet for the fast beam extraction. To understand the mechanism completely, it is necessary to know the wake field in detail. Here, the wake field or induced current in the kicker magnet which is terminated with matched resistance is considered

  11. H5 fast-kicker-magnet pulser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, W.; Ghoshroy, S.; Cottingham, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    The fast extraction kicker magnet for the AGS is powered by a novel pulse generator. A pulse forming network (PFN) is discharged into nearly 100% mismatched load. The pulser delivers a current pulse of 3000 amperes peak pulse with a 2% flat-top ripple into a 1.4 μ H single turn ferrite core magnet. The pulse is 2.8 μsec wide with a 180 nsec rise time, at a 0.5 to 1.5 pps repetition rate. The pulse rise time is required to provide clean extraction of the 28 GeV proton beam by bringing the kicker magnet field up to 1.25 kG within the 220 nsec space between proton bunches in the machine. The pulser is mounted adjacent to the kicker magnet in the AGS ring. The thyratron's characteristics are not affected by the ionizing radiation environment during operation of the AGS

  12. Operational experience of the upgraded LHC injection kicker magnets during Run 2 and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M. J.; Adraktas, A.; Bregliozzi, G.; Goddard, B.; Ducimetière, L.; Salvant, B.; Sestak, J.; Vega Cid, L.; Weterings, W.; Vallgren, C. Yin

    2017-07-01

    During Run 1 of the LHC, one of the injection kicker magnets caused occasional operational delays due to beam induced heating with high bunch intensity and short bunch lengths. In addition, there were also sporadic issues with vacuum activity and electrical flashover of the injection kickers. An extensive program of studies was launched and significant upgrades were carried out during Long Shutdown 1 (LS 1). These upgrades included a new design of beam screen to reduce both beam coupling impedance of the kicker magnet and the electric field associated with the screen conductors, hence decreasing the probability of electrical breakdown in this region. This paper presents operational experience of the injection kicker magnets during the first years of Run 2 of the LHC, including a discussion of faults and kicker magnet issues that limited LHC operation. In addition, in light of these issues, plans for further upgrades are briefly discussed.

  13. In situ baking method for degassing of a kicker magnet in accelerator beam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Junichiro; Ogiwara, Norio; Yanagibashi, Toru; Kinsho, Michikazu; Yasuda, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors propose a new in situ degassing method by which only kicker magnets in the accelerator beam line are baked out without raising the temperature of the vacuum chamber to prevent unwanted thermal expansion of the chamber. By simply installing the heater and thermal radiation shield plates between the kicker magnet and the chamber wall, most of the heat flux from the heater directs toward the kicker magnet. The result of the verification test showed that each part of the kicker magnet was heated to above the target temperature with a small rise in the vacuum chamber temperature. A graphite heater was selected in this application to bake-out the kicker magnet in the beam line to ensure reliability and easy maintainability of the heater. The vacuum characteristics of graphite were suitable for heater operation in the beam line. A preliminary heat-up test conducted in the accelerator beam line also showed that each part of the kicker magnet was successfully heated and that thermal expansion of the chamber was negligibly small

  14. In situ baking method for degassing of a kicker magnet in accelerator beam line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Junichiro, E-mail: kamiya.junichiro@jaea.go.jp; Ogiwara, Norio; Yanagibashi, Toru; Kinsho, Michikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, J-PARC Center, Ooaza Shirakata 2-4, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yasuda, Yuichi [SAKAGUCHI E.H VOC CORP., Sakura Dai-san Kogyodanchi 1-8-6, Osaku, Sakura, Chiba 285-0802 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    In this study, the authors propose a new in situ degassing method by which only kicker magnets in the accelerator beam line are baked out without raising the temperature of the vacuum chamber to prevent unwanted thermal expansion of the chamber. By simply installing the heater and thermal radiation shield plates between the kicker magnet and the chamber wall, most of the heat flux from the heater directs toward the kicker magnet. The result of the verification test showed that each part of the kicker magnet was heated to above the target temperature with a small rise in the vacuum chamber temperature. A graphite heater was selected in this application to bake-out the kicker magnet in the beam line to ensure reliability and easy maintainability of the heater. The vacuum characteristics of graphite were suitable for heater operation in the beam line. A preliminary heat-up test conducted in the accelerator beam line also showed that each part of the kicker magnet was successfully heated and that thermal expansion of the chamber was negligibly small.

  15. The kicker magnet system for TRISTAN Accumulation Ring injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Satoh, K.; Nakayama, H.

    1994-12-01

    The injection of electron beams to TRISTAN Accumulation Ring (AR) was started in November 1983 and the positron injection started in November 1985. For the injection of electron and positron beams to AR, the unique kicker system was developed. In the kicker power supply the charging to the main capacitor was done with the resonant charge system together with the auxiliary charging unit. The impedance matching circuit was added to the kicker magnet for getting the required current form with least reflecting oscillation. In this paper we report the performance of this kicker system. (author)

  16. CONSTRUCTION AND POWER TEST OF THE EXTRACTION KICKER MAGNET FOR SNS ACCUMULATOR RING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAI, C.; HAHN, H.; HSEUH, H.; LEE, Y.; MENG, W.; MI, J.; SANDBERG, J.; TODD, R.

    2005-01-01

    Two extraction kicker magnet assemblies that contain seven individual pulsed magnet modules each will kick the proton beam vertically out of the SNS accumulator ring into the aperture of the extraction Lambertson septum magnet. The proton beam then travels to the 1.4 MW SNS target assembly. The 14 kicker magnets and major components of the kicker assembly have been fabricated in BNL. The inner surfaces of the kicker magnets were coated with TiN to reduce the secondary electron yield. All 14 PFN power supplies have been built, tested and delivered to OWL. Before final installation, a partial assembly of the kicker system with three kicker magnets was assembled to test the functions of each critical component in the system. In this paper we report the progress of the construction of the kicker components, the TIN coating of the magnets, the installation procedure of the magnets and the full power test of the kicker with the PFN power supply

  17. Design of kicker magnet and power supply unit for synchrotron beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ju.

    1991-03-01

    To inject beams from the positron accumulator ring (PAR) into the synchrotron, a pulsed kicker magnet is used. The specifications of this kicker magnet and the power supply unit are listed and discussed in this report

  18. Development of the kicker magnet system for the IHEP accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, V.N.; Kurnaev, O.V.; Sychev, V.A.; Trofimov, Yu.D.

    1982-01-01

    The KM-14 kicker magnet intended for joint operation with the KM-16 kicker magnet in the U-70 accelerator fast beam extraction system is described. The main characteristics and specific features of the magnet, pulse generators and power supplies are considered. The total aperture type KM-14 magnet (aperture height is equal to 100 mm, its width amounts 150 mm) consists of four modules which are supplied in pair-parallel by two pulse generators. The length of each module is 0.56 m, the field in a gap amounts 0.045 Tl. Joint use of the KM-14 and KM-16 magnets provides beam shooting into bending septum magnet when operating with the booster and beam extraction in the direction of the storage-accelerator complex

  19. In situ degassing of the kicker magnet in J-PARC RCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Junichiro; Ogiwara, Norio; Hikichi, Yusuke; Yanagibashi, Toru; Kinsho, Michikazu

    2015-01-01

    The usual way to reduce outgassing from a device in vacuum is to heat up a whole vacuum chamber containing the device. However, the situation, where this method can be applied, is limited due to the heat expansion of the chamber. Especially in accelerators, where the vacuum chambers are connected with nearby beam pipes, this normal bake-out method may not be applied. If a heat source and heat shields are appropriately installed inside the chamber, heat flux is directed to the device. Therefore the device can be baked out without raising the temperature of the vacuum chamber. One candidate for such bake-out method to be applied is kicker magnets in J-PARC RCS, which are installed in large vacuum chambers. We performed the heating tests with some types of heaters in order to examine the effectiveness of this method and to decide the material and configuration of the heater. As a result, the graphite heater was selected for in-situ bake-out of the kickers in the RCS beam line. Using the method, the each material of kicker magnet was heated up above 100degC with keeping the temperature rise of the vacuum chamber below 30degC. (author)

  20. Some fast beam kicker magnet systems at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Cassel, R.L.; Donaldson, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider requires very fast rise and fall times from its kicker magnets. The damping rings and positron source need either one or two bunches deflected from two or three that are separated in time by about 59 ns. The final focus region kicker magnets need a rise time of less than 700 ns and each one deflects only one bunch. This paper discusses the design and characteristics of a thyratron-switched, castor-oil-filled, coaxial, Blumlein line used for one bunch kicking. It discharges a 118 ns (at the base), 50 kV, 3 kA pulse into a 33 cm long, ferrite-loaded, kicker magnet of rectangular coaxial-line geometry, which in turn is terminated by a matched load. Reference is made to a Fermilab (FNAL) designed magnet and a dual-thyratron pulsar that will deflect two serial bunches in or out of the electron ring. Also, a brief description of the final focus magnet is given. Work is continuing on the various subsystem components to decrease the pulse rise and fall time, flattop ripple and jitter and to reduce some of the sources of noise and hv breakdown

  1. Some fast beam kicker magnet systems at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Cassel, R.L.; Donaldson, A.R.; Genova, L.F.; Grant, J.A.; Mihalka, A.M.; Sukiennicki, B.A.; Tomlin, W.T.; Veldhuizen, F.T.; Walz, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider requires very fast rise and fall times from its kicker magnets. The damping rings and positron source need either one or two bunches deflected from two or three that are separated in time by about 59 ns. The final focus region kicker magnets need a rise time of less than 700 ns and each one deflects only one bunch. This paper discusses the design and characteristics of a thyratron-switched, castor-oil-filled, coaxial, Blumlein line used for one bunch kicking. It discharges a 118 ns (at the base), 50 kV, 3 kA pulse into a 33 cm long, ferrite-loaded, kicker magnet of rectangular coaxial-line geometry, which in turn is terminated by a matched load. Reference is made to a Fermilab (FNAL) designed magnet and a dual-thyratron pulser that deflects two serial bunches in or out of the electron ring. Also, a brief description of the final focus magnet is given

  2. Cooling of the LHC Injection Kicker Magnet Ferrite Yoke: Measurements and Future Proposals

    CERN Document Server

    Sobiech, Z; Bouleghlimat, S; Ducimetière, L; Garlaschè, M; Kramer, T; Namora, V; Noulibos, R; Sillanoli, Y; Weterings, W

    2014-01-01

    LHC operation with high intensity beam, stable for many hours, resulted in significant heating of the ferrite yoke of the LHC Injection Kicker Magnets. For one kicker magnet the ferrite yoke approached its Curie temperature. As a result of a long thermal time-constant the yoke can require several hours to cool sufficiently to allow re-injection of beam, thus limiting the running efficiency of the LHC. The beam screen, which screens the ferrite yoke from wakefields, has been upgraded to limit ferrite heating. In addition it is important to improve the cooling of the ferrite yoke: one method is to increase the internal emissivity of the cylindrical vacuum tank, in which the kicker magnet is installed. This paper describes a method developed for measuring the emissivity of the inside of the tanks, which has been benchmarked against measurements of the ferrite yoke temperature during heat treatment in an oven and transient thermal simulations. Conclusions are drawn regarding an ion bombardment technique evaluated...

  3. The Beam Screen for the LHC Injection Kicker Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, MJ; Ducimetière, L; Garrel, N; Kroyer, T

    2006-01-01

    The two LHC injection kicker magnet systems must each produce a kick of 1.2 T.m with a flattop duration variable up to 7.86 ìs, and rise and fall times of less than 0.9 ìs and 3 ìs, respectively. Each system is composed of four 5 Ù transmission line kicker magnets with matched terminating resistors and pulse forming networks (PFN). The LHC beam has a high intensity, hence a beam screen is required in the aperture of the magnets This screen consists of a ceramic tube with conducting ?stripes? on the inner wall. The stripes provide a path for the image current of the beam and screen the magnet ferrites against Wake fields. The stripes initially used gave adequately low beam impedance however stripe discharges occured during pulsing of the magnet: hence further development of the beam screen was undertaken. This paper presents options considered to meet the often conflicting needs for low beam impedance, shielding of the ferrite, fast field rise time and good electrical and vacuum behaviour.

  4. A magnetically switched kicker for proton extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, J.; Biggs, J.

    1989-03-01

    The application of magnetic current amplification and switching techniques to the generation of precise high current pulses for switching magnets is described. The square loop characteristic of Metglas tape wound cores at high excitation levels provides excellent switching characteristics for microsecond pulses. The rugged and passive nature of this type pulser makes it possible to locate the final stages of amplification at the load for maximum efficiency. 12 refs., 8 figs

  5. Beam impedance of ferrite kicker magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelker, F.; Lambertson, G.

    1989-03-01

    We have measured the longitudinal beam impedance of a typical pulsed magnet that will be used in the Advanced Light Source. The magnets are of a ferrite window-frame design with a single plate conductor on each side. Two separate power supplies are used to drive current in opposite directions in the two conductors. The continuity of the ferrite yoke is interrupted by two copper plates 1 mm thick in the center of the top and bottom of the window frame. This increases the reluctance of the magnetic path, and thus decreases the flux which couples the beam. The measurements were made by exciting a 1/8'' rod along the beam path through the magnet. This makes a 185 ohm transmission line, and it was terminated in a resistive divider at the exit end. A 3 GHz network analyzer was used to measure S 21 through the magnet, and longitudinal beam impedance was calculated from this data. The impedance is dominated by two low frequency resonances in the magnet winding and drive current. 8 figs

  6. Fast and reliable kicker magnets for the SLC damping rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattison, T.S.; Cassel, R.L.; Donaldson, A.R.; Gross, G.

    1995-01-01

    The design, construction, and operation of a kicker magnet with superior electromagnetic performance and greatly improved radiation tolerance is described. A short flux return of high mu ferrite improves the field strength and linearity with current, and novel metallic field-confining structures minimize the inductance. An 8-cell structure with capacitance integrated into each cell makes the magnet a nearly perfect transmission line. The capacitor dielectric is 1 cm thick alumina-loaded epoxy, processed to eliminate air voids, and cast in a multiple step procedure developed to circumvent epoxy shrinkage. The magnet operates with pulses of up to 40 kV and 3.2 kA at 120 Hz, with magnet transit times of less than 35 nsec and field rise and fall times of less than 60 nsec

  7. NuMI proton kicker extraction magnet termination resistor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, S.R.; Jensen, C.C.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The temperature stability of the kicker magnet termination resistor assembly directly affects the field flatness and amplitude stability. Comprehensive thermal enhancements were made to the existing Main Injector resistor assembly design to satisfy NuMI performance specifications. Additionally, a fluid-processing system utilizing Fluorinert{reg_sign} FC-77 high-voltage dielectric was built to precisely control the setpoint temperature of the resistor assembly from 70 to 120F, required to maintain constant resistance during changing operational modes. The Fluorinert{reg_sign} must be continually processed to remove hazardous breakdown products caused by radiation exposure to prevent chemical attack of system components. Design details of the termination resistor assembly and Fluorinert{reg_sign} processing system are described. Early performance results will be presented.

  8. Beam Induced Ferrite Heating of the LHC Injection Kickers and Proposals for Improved Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Calatroni, S; Day, H; Ducimetière, L; Garlaschè, M; Gomes Namora, V; Mertens, V; Sobiech, Z; Taborelli, M; Uythoven, J; Weterings, W

    2013-01-01

    The two LHC injection kicker systems produce an integrated field strength of 1.3 T·m with a flattop duration variable up to 7860 ns, and rise and fall times of less than 900 ns and 3000 ns, respectively. A beam screen is placed in the aperture of each magnet, which consists of a ceramic tube with conductors in the inner wall. The conductors provide a path for the beam image current and screen the ferrite yoke against wakefields. Recent LHC operation, with high intensity beam stable for many hours, resulted in significant heating of both the ferrite yoke and beam impedance reduction ferrites. For one kicker magnet the ferrite yoke approached its Curie temperature. As a result of a long thermal time-constant the ferrite yoke can require several hours to cool sufficiently to allow re-injection of beam, thus limiting the running efficiency of the LHC. Thermal measurement data has been analysed, a thermal model developed and emissivity measurements carried out. Various measures to improve the ferrite cooling have...

  9. Effect of saturating ferrite on the field in a prototype kicker magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.; Wait, G.D.

    1994-06-01

    The field rise for kicker magnets is often specified between 1% and 99% of full strength. Three-gap thyratrons are frequently used as switches for kicker magnet systems. These thyratrons turn on in three stages: the collapse of voltage across one gap causes a displacement current to flow in the parasitic capacitance of off-state gap(s). The displacement current flows in the external circuit and can thus increase the effective rise-time of the field in the kicker magnet. One promising method of decreasing the effect of the displacement current involves the use of saturating ferrites. Another method for achieving the specified rise-time and 'flatness' for the kick strength is to utilize speed-up networks in the electrical circuit. Measurements have been carried out on a prototype kicker magnet with a speed-up network and various geometries of saturating ferrite. Measurements and PSpice calculations are presented. (author)

  10. Analysis of the electrical noise from the APS kicker magnet power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carwardine, J.A.; Wang, J.

    1995-01-01

    The APS kicker magnet power supplies deliver damped sinusoidal currents in excess of 2400A peak with a half-period of 300ns to the kicker magnets. Conducted and radiated electromagnetic interference (EMI) is created by this system in the low megahertz range. This interference affects a number of beam diagnostics in the APS injector. The sources and coupling mechanisms for the EMI generated by this system are described and solutions discussed

  11. AN OVERVIEW OF HIGH VOLTAGE DIELECTRIC MATERIAL FOR TRAVELING WAVE KICKER MAGNET APPLICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZHANG, W.; SANDBERG, J.; TUOZZOLO, J.; CASSEL, R.; DUCIMETIERE, L.; JENSEN, C.; BARNES, M.; WAIT, G.; WANG, J.

    2002-01-01

    Pulsed high power fast kickers are being used to change beam trajectories in particle accelerators. The fast rise and fall time of pulse waveform demands a transmission line structure for the kicker deflector design. The ideal design will be parallel metal plates. However, it uses very long straight sections to achieve the required deflection. In accelerators with constrained straight sections, high permeability materials such as ferrite have to be used to gain deflection efficiency. The transmission line kicker magnet is also referred as traveling wave kicker magnet. Its construction is based on distributed 1-C cells along the longitudinal direction. The magnetic cells and capacitive cells are interleaved to simulate the characteristic impedance of a transmission line to minimize pulse reflection, and provide adequate frequency bandwidth to transmit the kicker pulse with fast rise and fall time. The magnetic cells are usually made of ferrite ceramics, but the capacitive cells have been made with different materials. For traveling wave kickers with higher impedance, the parallel plate vacuum capacitor has been used in CERN and KEK design. Others have used ceramic capacitors, printed circuit boards, and high permittivity ceramics as the capacitive cell. The high dielectric material has the advantage of compactness for low impedance kicker magnet construction. It continues to be very attractive for future kicker magnet applications. The high voltage phenomena associated with high dielectric ceramic materials have been widely reported in many industrial application areas. Their implication in the traveling wave magnet application has to be well understood. In this presentation, the areas requiring further quantitative study will be outlined

  12. Particle kickers

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    These devices are designed to provide a current pulse of 5000 Amps which will in turn generate a fast magnetic pulse that steers the incoming beam into the LHC. Today, the comprehensive upgrade of the LHC injection kicker system is entering its final stages. The upgraded system will ensure the LHC can be refilled without needing to wait for the kicker magnets to cool, thus enhancing the performance of the whole accelerator.   An upgraded kicker magnet in its vacuum tank, with an upgraded beam screen. The LHC is equipped with two kicker systems installed at the injection points (near points 2 and 8, see schematic diagram) where the particle beams coming from the SPS are injected into the accelerator’s orbit. Each system comprises four magnets and four pulse generators in which the field rises to 0.12 Tesla in less than 900 nanoseconds and for a duration of approximately 8 microseconds. Although the injection kickers only pulse 12 times to fill the LHC up with beam, the LHC beam circ...

  13. Analysis of ferrite heating of the LHC injection kickers and proposals for future reduction of temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Garrel, N; Goddard, B; Mertens, V; Weterings, W

    2012-01-01

    The two LHC injection kicker magnet (MKI) systems must produce a kick of 1.3 T.m with a flat top duration variable up to 7860 ns, and rise and fall times of less than 900 ns and 3000 ns, respectively. A beam screen is placed in the aperture of the magnets: the screen consists of a ceramic tube with conductors on the inner wall. The conductors provide a path for the image current of the high intensity LHC beam and screen the ferrite against wake fields. The conductors initially used gave adequately low beam coupling impedance however screen conductor discharges occurred during pulsing of the magnet; hence an alternative design with fewer screen conductors was implemented to meet the often conflicting requirements for low beam coupling impedance, fast magnetic field rise-time and good high voltage behaviour. During 2011 the LHC was operated with high intensity beam, coasting for many hours at a time, resulting in heating of the ferrite yoke of the MKIs. This paper presents an analysis of thermal measurement dat...

  14. One magnet module of the full-aperture kicker

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    Nine such modules, in a single vacuum tank, form the complete kicker. Ferrite rings (not visible), in conjunction with the capacitance between the plates, create the electrical equivalent of a transmission line. A fast 40 kV pulse is applied, and field rise times of 70-80 nanoseconds can be obtained.

  15. SPEAR 3 INJECTION KICKER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The design of the SPEAR 3 injection kicker system is presented. This system will include three kicker magnets and their associated pulsers. The magnet design is based on the DELTA kicker magnets, which present a low RF impedance to the beam, and are relatively straight-forward to construct. The pulsers use cascaded IGBT stages that are based on the modulator pulsers developed by a SLAC/LLNL collaboration for the NLC. Design considerations and the results of prototype tests will be discussed

  16. Magnetic Waveform Measurements of the PS Injection Kicker KFA45 and Future Emittance Growth Estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Forte, Vincenzo; Ferrero Colomo, Alvaro; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    In the framework of the LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) project [1], this document summarises the beam-based measurement of the magnetic waveform of the PS injection kicker KFA45 [2], from data collected during several Machine Development (MD) sessions in 2016 and 2017. In the first part of the document, the measurement methodology is introduced and the results presented and compared with the specification required for a clean transfer of the bunches coming from the PSB after the upgrade. These measurements represent, to date, the only way to reconstruct the magnetic waveform. In the second part, kicker magnetic waveform PSpice®[3] simulations are compared and tuned to the measurements. Finally the simulated (validated through measurements) waveforms are used to estimate the future expected emittance growth for the different PS injection schemes, both for (LIU target) LHC and fixed target beams.

  17. High Voltage Performance of the Beam Screen of the LHC Injection Kicker Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, MJ; Bregliozzi, G; Calatroni, S; Costa Pinto, P; Day, H; Ducimetière, L; Kramer, T; Namora, V; Mertens, V; Taborelli, M

    2014-01-01

    The LHC injection kicker magnets include beam screens to shield the ferrite yokes against wakefields resulting from the high intensity beam. The screening is provided by conductors lodged in the inner wall of a ceramic support tube. The design of the beam screen has been upgraded to overcome limitations and permit LHC operation with increasingly higher bunch intensity and short bunch lengths: the new design also significantly reduces the electric field associated with the screen conductors, decreasing the probability of electrical breakdown. The high voltage conditioning process for the upgraded kicker magnets is presented and discussed. In addition a test setup has been utilized to study flashover, on the inner wall of the ceramic tube, as a function of both applied voltage and vacuum pressure: results from the test setup are presented.

  18. A preliminary design of the Los Alamos fast Kicker Magnet Pulser and Power Supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winje, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The technical design of the Kicker Magnet Pulser and Power Supply is based on the switching of a precharged pulse forming network (pfn) into a matched load. Provisions are made through the selection of the main switch tube to accommodate loads that are not matched to the pfn impedance. The paper includes a description of the major components of the power supply and a summary of the performance parameters. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Thermal analysis of the LHC injection kicker magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, L.; Abánades, A.; Barnes, M. J.; Vlachodimitropoulos, V.; Weterings, W.

    2017-07-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider LHC is equipped with two fast pulsed magnet systems (MKIs) that inject particle beams coming from the injector chain. Operation with high intensity beams for many hours can lead to significant beam induced heating of the ferrite yokes of the MKIs. When the ferrite exceeds the Curie temperature of 125°C it loses its magnetic properties, preventing further injection until the ferrite cools down, potentially causing a delay of several hours. Hence important upgrades of the beam-screen were implemented after Run 1 of LHC. However, the High-Luminosity (HL) LHC will be operated with significantly higher intensity beams and hence additional measures are required to limit the ferrite temperature. These magnets operate under ultra-high vacuum conditions: convection is negligible and, as a result of low emissivity of the inside of the vacuum tanks, thermal radiation is limited. A detailed study of the thermal behaviour of these magnets is reported and compared with measurements. In addition several options to improve cooling of the ferrites are presented and analysed.

  20. Mechanical design of ceramic beam tube braze joints for NOvA kicker magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ader, C.R.; Reilly, R.E.; Wilson, J.H.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    The NO?A Experiment will construct a detector optimized for electron neutrino detection in the existing NuMI neutrino beam. The NuMI beam line is capable of operating at 400 kW of primary beam power and the upgrade will allow up to 700 kW. Ceramic beam tubes are utilized in numerous kicker magnets in different accelerator rings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Kovar flanges are brazed onto each beam tube end, since kovar and high alumina ceramic have similar expansion curves. The tube, kovar flange, end piece, and braze foil alloy brazing material are stacked in the furnace and then brazed. The most challenging aspect of fabricating kicker magnets in recent years have been making hermetic vacuum seals on the braze joints between the ceramic and flange. Numerous process variables can influence the robustness of conventional metal/ceramic brazing processes. The ceramic-filler metal interface is normally the weak layer when failure does not occur within the ceramic. Differences between active brazing filler metal and the moly-manganese process will be discussed along with the applicable results of these techniques used for Fermilab production kicker tubes.

  1. Calibration Measurements of the LHC Beam Dumping System Extraction Kicker Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Uythoven, J; Ducimetière, L; Goddard, B; Gräwer, G; Olivieri, F; Pereira, L; Vossenberg, Eugène B

    2006-01-01

    The LHC beam dumping system must protect the LHC machine from damage by reliably and safely extracting and absorbing the circulating beams when requested. Two sets of 15 extraction kicker magnets form the main active part of this system. They have been produced, tested and calibrated by measuring the integrated magnetic field and the magnet current at different beam energies. The calibration data have been analysed, and the critical parameters are compared with the specifications. Implications for the configuration, control and operation of the beam dumping system are discussed.

  2. Reduction of outgas from the components of the J-PARC kicker magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Junichiro; Ogiwara, Norio; Kinsho, Michikazu; Takayanagi, Tomohiro

    2005-01-01

    The extraction kickers in Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) are installed in the vacuum chamber against electrical discharge. Therefore, outgas from the components have large effects on the vacuum system of the accelerator. We have succeeded in reducing the outgas from the components, which are made of ferrite core and aluminum alloy, by baking them before construction of the magnet. The ferrite cores were baked at 200degC in the vacuum about 300 hours, while the components made of aluminum alloy at 150degC about 70 hours. Main outgas from both materials was known to be water by mass spectroscopy, and the pressure after baking has been decreased by two or three order of magnitude. We also report the reduction method for outgas while the magnet is stored in. (author)

  3. Study for a failsafe trigger generation system for the Large Hadron Collider beam dump kicker magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Rampl, M

    1999-01-01

    The 27 km-particle accelerator Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will be completed at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) in 2005, will work with extremely high beam energies (~334 MJ per beam). Since the equipment and in particular the superconducting magnets must be protected from damage caused by these high energy beams the beam dump must be able to absorb this energy very reliable at every stage of operation. The kicker magnets that extract the particles from the accelerator are synchronised with the beam by the trigger generation system. This thesis is a first study for this electronic module and its functions. A special synchronisation circuit and a very reliable electronic switch were developed. Most functions were implemented in a Gate-Array to improve the reliability and to facilitate modifications during the test stage. This study also comprises the complete concept for the prototype of the trigger generation system. During all project stages reliability was always the main determin...

  4. Optimization of speed-up network component values for the 30 Ω resistively terminated prototype kicker magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.; Wait, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    Kicker magnets are required for all ring-to-ring transfers in the 5 rings of the proposed KAON factory synchrotron. The kick must rise from 1% to 99% of full strength during the time interval of gaps created in the beam (80 ns to 160 ns) so that the beam can be extracted with minimum losses. In order to achieve the specified rise-time and open-quote flatness close-quote for the kick it is necessary to utilize speed-up networks, comprising a capacitor and a resistor, in the electrical circuit. Speed-up networks may be connected electrically on both the input and output of the kicker magnet. In addition it is advantageous to connect a open-quote speed-up close-quote network on the input of the resistive terminator(s). A sequence which may minimize the number of mathematical simulations required to optimize the values of the 8 possible speed-up components is presented. PE2D has been utilized to determine inductance and capacitance values for the resistive terminator; this data has been used in PSpice transient analyses. Results of the PE2D predictions are also presented. The research has culminated in a predicted kick rise time (1% to 99%) of less than 50 ns for a TRIUMF 10 cell prototype kicker magnet. The proposed improvements are currently being implemented on our prototype kicker system

  5. RHIC ABORT KICKER WITH REDUCED COUPLING IMPEDANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAHN, H.; DAVINO, D.

    2002-01-01

    Kicker magnets typically represent the most important contributors to the transverse impedance budget of accelerators and storage rings. Methods of reducing the impedance value of the SNS extraction kicker presently under construction and, in view of a future performance upgrade, that of the RHIC abort kicker have been thoroughly studied at this laboratory. In this paper, the investigation of a potential improvement from using ferrite different from the BNL standard CMD5005 is reported. Permeability measurements of several ferrite types have been performed. Measurements on two kicker magnets using CMD5005 and C2050 suggest that the impedance of a magnet without external resistive damping, such as the RHIC abort kicker, would benefit

  6. Wideband Precision Current Transformer for the Magnet Current of the Beam Extraction Kicker Magnet of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gräwer, G

    2004-01-01

    The LHC beam extraction system is composed of 15 fast kicker magnets per beam to extract the particles in one turn of the collider and to safely dispose them on external absorbers. Each magnet is powered by a separate pulse generator. The generator produces a magnet current pulse with 3 us rise time, 20 kA amplitude and 1.8 ms fall time, of which 90 us are needed to dump the beam. The beam extraction system requires a high level of reliability. To detect any change in the magnet current characteristics, which might indicate a slow degradation of the pulse generator, a high precision wideband current transformer will be installed. For redundancy reasons, the results obtained with this device will be cross-checked with a Rogowski coil, installed adjacent to the transformer. A prototype transformer has been successfully tested at nominal current levels and showed satisfactory results compared with the output of a high frequency resistive coaxial shunt. The annular core of the ring type transformer is composed of...

  7. SNS EXTRACTION KICKER POWER SUPPLY PROTOTYPE TEST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MI, J.L.; SANDBERG, J.; SANDERS, R.; SOUKAS, A.; ZHANG, W.

    2000-01-01

    The SNS (Spallation Neutron Source) accumulator ring Extraction System consists of a Fast kicker and a Lambertson Septum magnet. The proposed design will use 14 kicker magnets powered by an Extraction Kicker Power Supply System. They will eject the high power beam from the SNS accumulator ring into RTBT (Ring to Target Beam Tunnel) through a Lambertson Septum magnet. This paper describes some test results of the SNS Extraction Kicker power supply prototype. The high repetition rate of 60 pulse per second operation is the challenging part of the design. In the prototype testing, a 3 kA damp current of 700ns pulse-width, 200 nS rise time and 60 Hz repetition rate at 32 kV PFN operation voltage has been demonstrated. An Extraction kicker power supply system design diagram is depicted

  8. SSC kicker impedances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, E.P.; Wang, T.F.

    1985-01-01

    The longitudinal and transverse complex impedances Z/sub l//n and Z/sub t/, respectively, have been calculated for both the SSC injection and abort kickers. The calculations assumed that no attempt was made to shield the beam from the kickers. We took the injection and abort kickers to be as specified. The injection kickers were ferrite with a single-turn design, and the abort kickers were of a ''window-frame design'' with tape wound cores

  9. Design and test of the RHIC CMD10 abort kicker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Mi, J.; Meng, W.; Montag, C.; Pai, C.; Sandberg, J.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. E.; Zhang, W.

    2015-01-01

    In recent RHIC operational runs, planned and unplanned pre-fire triggered beam aborts have been observed that resulted in quenches of SC main ring magnets, indicating a weakened magnet kick strength due to beam-induced ferrite heating. An improvement program was initiated to reduce the longitudinal coupling impedance with changes to the ferrite material and the eddy-current strip geometry. Results of the impedance measurements and of magnet heating tests with CMD10 ferrite up to 190°C are reported. All 10 abort kickers in the tunnel have been modified and were provided with a cooling system for the RUN 15.

  10. Single-bunch kicker pulser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, W.W.

    1983-01-01

    The single-bunch kicker magnet is powered by a capacitor discharge pulser. The ferrite-core magnet is used to kick out one of twelve proton bunches circulating in the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) into the experimental area. The magnet current pulse has a half-sinusoid shape, with a peak current of 2800 A. The pulse current rises and falls to zero, with minimum undershoot, in 410 nsec to minimize effects on adjacent bunches. The magnet inductance is 1.0 μHy. The pulser is mounted on the kicker magnet in the AGS ring, and is exposed to ionizing radiation. The HVDC power supply, controls, monitoring, and auxiliary circuits are housed approximately 300 feet away external to the ring. A two-gap thyratron is used to discharge the energy storage capacitor. Two hydrogen diodes are series connected to function as an inverse diode

  11. Single-bunch kicker pulser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, W.W.

    1983-01-01

    The single-bunch kicker magnet is powered by a capacitor discharge pulser. The ferrite-core magnet is used to kick out one of twelve proton bunches circulating in the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) into the experimental area. The magnet current pulse has a half-sinusoid shape, with a peak current of 2800 A. The pulse current rises and falls to zero, with minimum undershoot, in 410 nsec to minimize effects on adjacent bunches. The magnet inductance is 1.0 ..mu..Hy. The pulser is mounted on the kicker magnet in the AGS ring, and is exposed to ionizing radiation. The HVDC power supply, controls, monitoring, and auxiliary circuits are housed approximately 300 feet away external to the ring. A two-gap thyratron is used to discharge the energy storage capacitor. Two hydrogen diodes are series connected to function as an inverse diode.

  12. Dual Power Supplies for PEP-II Injection Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Olszewski, Joseph; Iverson, Richard; Kulikov, Artem; Pappas, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Originally the PEP-II injection kickers where powered by one power supply. Since the kicker magnets where not perfectly matched, the stored beam got excited by about 7% of the maximum kicker amplitude. This led to luminosity losses which were especially obvious for trickle injection when the detector is on for data taking. Therefore two independant power supplies with thyratrons in the tunnel next to the kicker magnet were installed. This also reduces the necessary power by about a factor of five since there are no long cables that have to be charged. The kickers are now independantly adjustable to eliminate any non-closure of the kicker system and therefore excitation of the stored beam. Setup, commissioning and fine tuning of this system are discussed.

  13. Dual Power Supplies for PEP-II Injection Kickers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, J; Decker, F.-J.; Iverson, R.H.; Kulikov, A.; Pappas, C.; /SLAC

    2005-05-25

    Originally the PEP-II injection kickers were powered by one power supply. Since the kicker magnets where not perfectly matched, the stored beam got excited by about 7% of the maximum kicker amplitude. This led to luminosity losses which were especially obvious for trickle injection when the detector is on for data taking. Therefore two independent power supplies with thyratrons in the tunnel next to the kicker magnet were installed. This also reduces the necessary power by about a factor of four since there are no long cables that have to be charged. The kickers are now independently adjustable to eliminate any non-closure of the kicker system and therefore excitation of the stored beam. Setup, commissioning and fine tuning of this system are discussed.

  14. Dual Power Supplies for PEP-II Injection Kickers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszewski, J; Decker, F.-J.; Iverson, R.H.; Kulikov, A.; Pappas, C.; SLAC

    2005-01-01

    Originally the PEP-II injection kickers were powered by one power supply. Since the kicker magnets where not perfectly matched, the stored beam got excited by about 7% of the maximum kicker amplitude. This led to luminosity losses which were especially obvious for trickle injection when the detector is on for data taking. Therefore two independent power supplies with thyratrons in the tunnel next to the kicker magnet were installed. This also reduces the necessary power by about a factor of four since there are no long cables that have to be charged. The kickers are now independently adjustable to eliminate any non-closure of the kicker system and therefore excitation of the stored beam. Setup, commissioning and fine tuning of this system are discussed

  15. Accelerator Technology: Injection and Extraction Related Hardware: Kickers and Septa

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Mertens, V

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the the Section '8.7 Injection and Extraction Related Hardware: Kickers and Septa' of the Chapter '8 Accelerator Technology' with the content: 8.7 Injection and Extraction Related Hardware: Kickers and Septa 8.7.1 Fast Pulsed Systems (Kickers) 8.7.2 Electrostatic and Magnetic Septa

  16. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirol, L.D.

    1987-02-11

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation. 5 figs.

  17. Development of an in situ bake-out method of outgassing reduction of kicker ferrite cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Junichiro; Ogiwara, Norio; Nishikawa, Masaaki; Hikichi, Yusuke; Yanagibashi, Toru; Suganuma, Kazuaki

    2012-01-01

    The usual way for reduce outgassing of a large structure in vacuum is to bake the whole vacuum chamber containing the structure. However, this method needs a huge heater capacity and there are limits caused by the heat expansion of the chamber. The solution is to raise the temperature of the structure inside without heating the vacuum chamber. This is achieved by installing a heat source inside the chamber and by inserting the heat shield between the structure and the chamber walls to direct the heat to the structure. In the particle accelerator field, it is often required to reduce outgassing of structures inside vacuum chambers. One example is a kicker magnet, which is installed in a vacuum chamber and consists mainly of ferrite and aluminum alloy. As known from former experience the main outgassing component from ferrite is water. We applied the above mentioned method to the outgassing reduction of such a kicker. We are able to direct most of the heat flow toward the kicker magnet by inserting the heat shielding plates and thus outgassing was successfully reduced. (author)

  18. Kicker thyratron experience from SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.R.; Cassel, R.L.; Mattison, T.S.; Reginato, L.L.

    1991-05-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has five fast kickers for the damping ring injectors, extractors, and the electron extractor for the positron target that use multi-gap Deuterium-filled thyratrons. The thyratrons operate with 30 to 70 kV anode voltages and 1 to 5 kA currents, to deliver pulses to kicker magnets with ∼ 30 ns rise times, up to ∼ 150 ns pulse widths, at 120 Hz. Operating and lifetime experience with several types of thyratrons and support electronics are discussed. Floating driver and power supply electronics were replaced by a ferrite choke isolator to allow grounding of the cathode support electronics with a commensurate increase in operating reliability. The construction of a 100 ns Blumlein enabled detailed measurements of the switching times for all SLC thyratrons under similar conditions. In the final focus area, the kickers dump the SLC beams after the e + e - collisions. These thyratrons function with 15 kV anode voltages and up to 2 kA currents to produce 1/2 sine pulses with ∼ 300 ns rise times, ∼ 550 ns FWHM, at 120 Hz. Operating experience with these thyratrons will also be presented. 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  19. New beam-based and direct magnetic waveform measurements of the BTx.KFA10(20) vertical recombination kickers and induced emittance blow-up simulations at 1.4 and 2 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Forte, Vincenzo; Borburgh, Jan; Sermeus, Luc; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    In the framework of the LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) project [1], this document summarises a new reconstruction methodology for the measurement of the magnetic waveforms of the vertical re-combination kickers BT1.KFA10, BT4.KFA10 and BT2.KFA20, from data collected during several Machine Development (MD) sessions. The reconstruction has been performed in order to verify the LIU specification of the recombination kickers, which is required for a clean transfer of the longer bunches coming from the PSB after the upgrade. A beam-based methodology was developed to measure the transient magnetics dynamics of the kicker where the bunch length is comparable to the rise and/or fall times. These measurements represent a valuable way to reconstruct the mag-netic waveform of the kickers where removing them to make direct probe measurements is time consuming. A benchmarking of the beam-based measurements with field probe measurements is presented, together with realistic simulations of the vertical emittance blow-up at 1...

  20. Calculation of Metallization Resistivity and Thickness for MedAustron Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Stadlbauer, T

    2011-01-01

    The MedAustron facility, to be built in Wiener Neustadt (Austria), will provide protons and ions for both cancer therapy and research [1]. Different types of kicker magnets will be used in the facility. The kicker magnets are outside machine vacuum: each kicker magnet has a ceramic beam chamber whose inner surface is metalized. The resistivity and thickness of the metallization are chosen such that the induced eddy currents, resulting from the pulsed kicker magnetic field, do not unduly affect the rise/fall times or homogeneity of the magnetic field. A comparison of an analytical calculation and measurement is reported for the effect of metallization of a ceramic chamber in an existing kicker system at CERN. Conclusions concerning the metallization of the ceramic chambers for the MedAustron kicker magnets are presented.

  1. Some calculations for the RHIC kicker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claus, J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper starts with a brief discussion of the design of the RHIC injection kicker magnets which calls for longitudinal and capacitive sections of the same order as the aperture, not much larger nor much smaller. This makes accurate analytical prediction of their behavior very difficult. In order to gain at least some qualitative insight of that behavior, the author preformed calculations which are based on the actual dimensions of the kickers but which neglect the end effects of the individual sections. The effects of the sectionalization are therefore exaggerated relative to reality in the results

  2. Stripline kicker for integrable optics test accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antipov, Sergey A.; Didenko, Alexander; Lebedev, Valeri; Valishev, Alexander

    2016-06-30

    We present a design of a stripline kicker for Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). For its experimental program IOTA needs two full-aperture kickers, capable to create an arbitrary controllable kick in 2D. For that reason their strengths are variable in a wide range of amplitudes up to 16 mrad, and the pulse length 100 ns is less than a revolution period for electrons. In addition, the kicker should have a physical aperture of 40 mm for a proposed operation with proton beam, and an outer size of 70 mm to fit inside existing quadrupole magnets to save space in the ring. Computer simulations using CST Microwave Studio show high field uniformity and wave impedance close to 50 {\\Omega}.

  3. The RHIC injection fast kicker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, E.B.; Pappas, G.C.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; Zhang, W.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the injection kicker is to provide the ultimate deflection to the incoming beam from the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The beam is kicked in the vertical direction to place it on the equilibrium orbit of RHIC. Each bunch in the AGS is transferred separately, and stacked box-car fashion in the appropriate RHIC rf bucket. In order to achieve the required deflection angle four magnets powered by four pulsers will be used for each ring of RHIC. When the bunches are stacked in RHIC the last few rf buckets are left unfilled in order to provide a gap in the beam to facilitate the ejection or beam abort process. This also means there is not a severe constraint on the fall-time of the injection kicker. One prototype pulser has been built and tested. Much of the development effort has gone into the magnet design. Although lumped ferrite magnets are simpler to build and require less power to reach full field, a transmission line magnet was developed because of the very fast rise-time requirement and the tolerances imposed on the field variation and ripple

  4. The PEP II injection kicker system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappas, G.C.; Donaldson, A.R.; Williams, D.

    1997-07-01

    PEP II or the B Factory consists of two asymmetric storage rings. The injection energy for electrons is 9 GeV, while that for positrons is 3.1 GeV. The bend angle into the high energy ring (HER) is 0.35 m-rad, and the angle into the low energy ring (LER) is 0.575 m-rad. The magnetic length for the HER kicker is 0.85 m, and 0.55 m for the LER kicker. The field produced by the magnet is therefore 123.5 G for the HER, and 132 G for the LER. Each ring has a kicker magnet upstream of the injection line which is used to distort the orbit of the stored beam. An identical magnet downstream of the injection line is used to restore the orbit of the stored beam and inject the incoming beam. The two magnets are driven in parallel by the modulator. The apeture of the magnets is 3.86x3.46 cm (HxV). Therefore the current required to drive the HER is 863 A, while for the LER it is 756 A. The inductance of the magnet is approximately 1.4 uH/m. The current pulse is a critically damped sinusoid with a rise time of less than 300 ns. A kicker system has been designed which can be used for injection of both beams by varying the charge of voltage. The modulator uses a conjugate circuit to match the impedance of the magnet, and coupling to the beam chamber

  5. RHIC injection kicker impedance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mane, V.; Peggs, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Zhang, W.

    1995-01-01

    The longitudinal impedance of the RHIC injection kicker is measured using the wire method up to a frequency of 3 GHz. The mismatch between the 50 ohm cable and the wire and pipe system is calibrated using the TRL calibration algorithm. Various methods of reducing the impedance, such as coated ceramic pipe and copper strips are investigated

  6. Experience with Kicker Beam Coupling Reduction Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Gaxiola, Enrique; Caspers, Friedhelm; Ducimetière, Laurent; Kroyer, Tom

    2005-01-01

    SPS beam impedance is still one of the worries for operation with nominal LHC beam over longer periods, once the final configuration will be installed in 2006. Several CERN SPS kickers suffer from significant beam induced ferrite heating. In specific cases, for instance beam scrubbing, the temperature of certain ferrite yokes went beyond the Curie point. Several retrofit impedance reduction techniques have been investigated theoretically and with practical tests. We report on experience gained during the 2004 SPS operation with resistively coated ceramic inserts in terms of kicker heating, pulse rise time, operating voltage, and vacuum behaviour. For another technique using interleaved metallic stripes we observed significant improvements in bench measurements. Advantages and drawbacks of both methods and potential combinations of them are discussed and simulation as well as measured data are shown. Prospects for further improvements beyond 2006 are briefly outlined.

  7. Dynamic devices - pickups and kickers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambertson, G.

    1986-08-01

    A given configuration of electrodes may be used either as a pickup or as a kicker; that duality is addressed. Some general relations between longitudinal and transverse effects and between the respones as pickup and as kicker are derived. Dynamic effects are seen to be entirely determined by the longitudinal electric fields in the direction of the beam current when the electrode is excited as a kicker. Response functions that serve as figures of merit are defined. The responses of specific examples of pickups and kickers are analyzed. An approach to the calculation of the transverse variation of coupling over the electrode aperture is preented

  8. Magnetic heating in the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiuderi, C.

    1981-01-01

    The observational evidence for magnetic heating in the solar corona is presented. The possible ways of investigating theoretically the nature of the heating processes are critically discussed. Merits and disadvantages of the basic mechanisms so far proposed are reviewed. Finally, a preliminary application of the magnetic heating concept to stellar coronae is presented. (orig.)

  9. Fast Kicker for High Current Beam Manipulation in Large Aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Gambaryan, V

    2017-01-01

    The pulsed deflecting magnet (kicker) project was worked out in Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The kicker design parameters are: impulsive force, 1 mT*m; pulse edge, 5 ns; impulse duration, 200 ns. The unconventional approach is that the plates must be replaced by a set of cylinders. The obtained magnet construction enables the field homogeneity to be controlled by changing current magnitudes in cylinders. Furthermore, we demonstrated the method of field optimization. In addition, measurement technique for the harmonic components was considered and the possibility of control harmonic components value was demonstrated.

  10. AA, stochastic precooling kicker

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The freshly injected antiprotons were subjected to fast stochastic "precooling", while a shutter shielded the deeply cooled antiproton stack from the violent action of the precooling kicker. In this picture, the injection orbit is to the left, the stack orbit to the far right, the separating shutter is in open position. After several seconds of precooling (in momentum and in the vertical plane), the shutter was opened briefly, so that by means of RF the precooled antiprotons could be transferred to the stack tail, where they were subjected to further cooling in momentum and both transverse planes, until they ended up, deeply cooled, in the stack core. The fast shutter, which had to open and close in a fraction of a second was an essential item of the cooling scheme and a mechanical masterpiece. Here the shutter is in the open position. The precooling pickups were of the same design, with the difference that the kickers had cooling circuits and the pickups not. 8401150 shows a precooling pickup with the shutte...

  11. THE RHIC BEAM ABORT KICKER SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1999-01-01

    THE ENERGY STORED IN THE RHIC BEAM IS ABOUT 200 KJ PER RING AT DESIGN ENERGY AND INTENSITY. TO PREVENT QUENCHING OF THE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS OR MATERIAL DAMAGE, THE BEAM WILL BE SAFELY DISPOSED OF BY AN INTERNAL BEAM ABORT SYSTEM, WHICH INCLUDES THE KICKER MAGNETS, THE PULSED POWER SUPPLIES, AND THE DUMP ABSORBER. DISPOSAL OF HEAVY IONS, SUCH AS GOLD, IMPOSES DESIGN CONSTRAINTS MORE SEVERE THAN THOSE FOR PROTON BEAMS OF EQUAL INTENSITY. IN ORDER TO MINIMIZE THE THERMAL SHOCK IN THE CARBON-FIBER DUMP BLOCK, THE BUNCHES MUST BE LATERALLY DISPERSED

  12. Design of fast kickers for the ISABELLE beam abort system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawrocky, R.J.; Montemurro, P.A.; Baron, J.

    1981-01-01

    The ISA beam abort (extraction) system must be highly efficient, in the sense of producing minimum beam loss, and reliable to prevent serious damage to accelerator components by the circulating high-energy beams. Since the stored beams will be debunched, the low-loss requirement can be met only with ultra-thin extraction septa and/or fast-acting kickers. This paper examines the design of the ISA extraction kickers subject to a set of extraction channel constraints and a given maximum working voltage. Expressions are derived for determining system parameters for both a lumped parameter magnet and a delay-line magnet. Using these relationships, design parameters are worked out for several possible system configurations. The paper also describes the construction of a full-scale prototype module of the kicker and summarizes the preliminary test results obtained with the module

  13. Measurement scheme of kicker impedances via beam-induced voltages of coaxial cables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shobuda, Yoshihiro, E-mail: yoshihiro.shobuda@j-parc.jp [J-PARC Center, JAEA and KEK, 2-4 Shirakata Shirane, Tokaimura, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Irie, Yoshiro [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Toyama, Takeshi; Kamiya, Junichiro [J-PARC Center, JAEA and KEK, 2-4 Shirakata Shirane, Tokaimura, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Watanabe, Masao [Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, 3-2-2 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda, Tokyo 100-8959 (Japan)

    2013-06-11

    A new theory, which satisfies the causality condition, is developed to describe impedances of kicker magnets with coaxial cables. The theoretical results well describe measurement results, which are obtained by standard wire methods. On the other hand, when beams pass through the kicker, voltages are induced at the terminals of coaxial cables. In other words, by analyzing the voltages, the kicker impedance for the beams can be obtained. The observed impedances are consistent with the theoretical results. The theory describes the impedance for non-relativistic beams, as well. The theoretical, simulation and measurement results indicate that the horizontal kicker impedance is drastically reduced by the non-relativistic effect. -- Highlights: ► We develop an innovative method to measure kicker impedance including power cable. ► By analyzing voltages at the ends of coaxial cables, the impedance is derived. ► The horizontal impedance is reduced as the beam becomes non-relativistic.

  14. A Retrofit Technique for Kicker Beam-Coupling Impedance Reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Kroyer, T; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Kurennoy, S

    2004-01-01

    The reduction of the impedance of operational ferrite kicker structures may be desirable in order to avoid rebuilding such a device. Often resistively coated ceramic plates or tubes are installed for this purpose but at the expense of available aperture. Ceramic U-shaped profiles with a resistive coating fitting between the ellipse of the beam and the rectangular kicker aperture have been used to significantly reduce the impedance of the magnet, while having a limited effect on the available physical aperture. Details of this method, constraints, measurements and simulation results as well as practical aspects are presented and discussed.

  15. Kickers and power supplies for the Fermilab Tevatron I antiproton source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, T.; Bartoszek, L.; Tilles, E.; Petter, J.; McCarthy, J.

    1985-05-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source Accumulator and Debuncher rings require 5 kickers in total. These range in design from conventional ferrite delay line type magnets, with ceramic beam tubes to mechanically complex shuttered kickers situated entirely in the Accumulator Ring's 10 -10 torr vacuum. Power supplies are thyratron switched pulse forming networks that produce microsecond width pulses of several kiloamps with less than 30 nanoseconds rise and fall times. Kicker and power supply design requirements for field strength, vacuum, rise and fall time, timing and magnetic shielding of the stacked beam in the accumulator by the eddy current shutter will be discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Magnetic heat pump flow director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Frank S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A fluid flow director is disclosed. The director comprises a handle body and combed-teeth extending from one side of the body. The body can be formed of a clear plastic such as acrylic. The director can be used with heat exchangers such as a magnetic heat pump and can minimize the undesired mixing of fluid flows. The types of heat exchangers can encompass both heat pumps and refrigerators. The director can adjust the fluid flow of liquid or gas along desired flow directions. A method of applying the flow director within a magnetic heat pump application is also disclosed where the comb-teeth portions of the director are inserted into the fluid flow paths of the heat pump.

  17. Magnetic Heat Pump Containing Flow Diverters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Frank S.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed magnetic heat pump contains flow diverters for suppression of undesired flows. If left unchecked, undesired flows mix substantial amounts of partially heated and partially cooled portions of working fluid, effectively causing leakage of heat from heated side to cooled side. By reducing leakage of heat, flow diverters increase energy efficiency of magnetic heat pump, potentially offering efficiency greater than compressor-driven refrigerator.

  18. Simulation study of electron cloud build up in the SPS MKD kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Rumolo, G

    2009-01-01

    During the 2008 run, an unusual behavior characterizing pressure and temperature increase in some of the dump kickers of the SPS was noticed. In particular, it was observed that 1) the MKDV2 kicker would exhibit maximum heating with 75 ns spaced LHC beams and 2) the pressure rise was specially critical in MKDV1 in presence of 50 ns spaced LHC beams [1]. While the anomalous heating of MKDV2 with 75 ns beams could be tentatively explained by the denser beam current spectrum that would more likely hit one of the kicker impedance peaks, the fast pressure rise in MKDV1 with 50 ns spaced beams was ascribed to a surface effect, namely beam induced multipacting leading to electron cloud formation. This report summarizes a simulation study that was done in order to check whether the electron cloud behavior in the dump kickers could explain the experimental observations.

  19. Literature search on Kickers and Septa for the Amsterdam Pulse Stretcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijt, J.; Linden, A. v.d.

    1988-01-01

    Literature search has yielded a qualitative and quantitative view on kickers. Quantitatively specifications on designs in literature have been collected. The UPDATE-kickers have been given the following specs: deflection angle 2 mrad, pulsewidth 2 μs, falltime 70 ns, available length about 2 m. Undertaken is a comparison of characteristic parameters: kick strength (energy x angle), pulse characteristics (pulsewidth/falltime) and required peak power. Realisation of the pulse characteristics will impose the greatest requirements on the UPDATE-kicker design. The comparison has shown correspondence with two ferrite kicker designs (CERN-CPS and ELSA), the Los Alamos TEM-kicker and the electrostatic kicker from Saskatoon. On account of the relative simplicity of construction and pulse forming network the Saskatoon kicker has been chosen as the starting point for a design study. Design calculations will proceed from a length of 1.6 m and a gap of 4 cm between two parallel plates at a potential difference of 50 kV. Literature search on septa resulted in an overview on septum magnets and electrostatic wire septa. 72 refs.; 14 figs.; 2 tabs

  20. The beam-kicker system of the synchrotron Saturne. Magnetic field and particle orbit computations. Experimental results (1963); Le percuteur de faisceau de Saturne. Calcul du champ magnetique et des trajectoires. Verifications experimentales (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouttefangeas, M; Katz, A; Rastoix, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    In this report is briefly described the beam-kicker system of the synchrotron Saturne. An analysis of its operation based on the sampling method is given, as well as two methods for computing toe magnetic field produced by a set of endless conductors in the neighbourhood of a conducting shield where eddy currents are circulating. The first method leads to the resolution of a bi-dimensional Laplace equation with first kind boundary conditions (Dirichlet problem); the second one translates to electromagnetism the electrical images method currently used in electrostatics and yields the magnetic field as the sum of a triple series expansion in the general case of a set of conductors located in a parallelepipedal box. Finally are given the results obtained in computing on IBM 7090 the perturbation of the particle motion due to the beam-kicker. These results are compared with the experimental data. (authors) [French] Ce rapport decrit brievement le dispositif percuteur de faisceau mis en place sur le synchrotron Saturne. On y trouvera une analyse de se fonctionnement a partir de la theorie des echantillonnages. On indique egalment deux methodes de calcul du champ magnetique produit par un system de conducteurs indefinis en presence d'un blindage conducteur parcouru par des courants de Foucault: la premiere se ramene a la resolution d'une equation de Laplace a deux dimensions avec des conditions aux limites de premiere espece (probleme de Dirichlet), la seconde transpose en electromagnetisme la methode des images electriques classique en electrostatique et permet d'exprimer le champ magnetique sous la forme de la somme d'une serie triple dans le cas general d'un systeme de conducteurs contenus dans un blindage parallelepipedique. Pour terminer, on mentionne les resultats du calcul numerique de la perturbation de la trajectoire des particules sous l'effet du percuteur et on compare ces resultats aux resultats experimentaux. (auteurs)

  1. Abort kicker power supply systems at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafczyk, G.; Dugan, G.; Harrison, M.; Koepke, K.; Tilles, E.

    1985-01-01

    Over the past several years, Fermilab has been operating with a single turn proton abort system in both the superconducting Tevatron and the conventional Main Ring. The abort kicker power supply for this system discharges a lumped capacitance into the inductive magnet load, causing the beam to enter the abort channel. A unique feature of this design is the high voltage, high current diode assembly used to clip the recharge of the capacitor bank. This allows the current to decay slowly with the L/R time constant of the magnet and diode series combination. Special attention will be given to the diode characteristics needed for this passive switching element. Operational experience and proposed upgrades will be given for the two operational systems

  2. Numerical routine for magnetic heat pump cascading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filonenko, Konstantin; Lei, Tian; Engelbrecht, Kurt

    Heat pumps use low-temperature heat absorbed from the energy source to create temperature gradient (TG) across the energy sink. Magnetic heat pumps (MHP) can perform this function through operating active magnetic regeneration (AMR) cycle. For building heating, TGs of up to a few K might...

  3. Damping Ring Kickers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulos, Fatin [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tomlin, Bill T. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Weaver, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-03-04

    The principle of the design of these magnets was discussed in CN-72. Fig. 1 shows what the total system looks like. Such a system was completed last January and since then we have been evaluating its performance.

  4. The Abort Kicker System for the PEP-II Storage Rings at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delamare, Jeffrey E

    2003-01-01

    The PEP-II project has two storage rings. The HER (High Energy Ring) has up to 1.48 A of election beam at 9 GeV, and the LER (Low Energy Ring) has up to 2.14 A of positron beam at 3.1 GeV. To protect the HER and LER beam lines in the event of a ring component failure, each ring has an abort kicker system which directs the beam into a dump when a failure is detected. Due to the high current of the beams, the beam kick is tapered from 100% to 80% in 7.33 (micro)S (the beam transit time around the ring). This taper distributes the energy evenly across the window which separates the ring from the beam dump such that the window is not damaged. The abort kicker trigger is synchronized with the ion clearing gap of the beam allowing for the kicker field to rise from 0-80% while there is no beam in the kicker magnet. Originally the kicker system was designed for a rise time of 370nS [1], but because the ion clearing gap was reduced in half, so was the rise time requirement for the kicker. This report discusses the design of the system interlocks, diagnostics, and modulator with the modifications necessary to accommodate an ion clearing gap of 185nS

  5. The Abort Kicker System for the PEP-II Storage Rings at SLAC.

    CERN Document Server

    Delamare, J E

    2003-01-01

    The PEP-II project has two storage rings. The HER (High Energy Ring) has up to 1.48 A of election beam at 9 GeV, and the LER (Low Energy Ring) has up to 2.14 A of positron beam at 3.1 GeV. To protect the HER and LER beam lines in the event of a ring component failure, each ring has an abort kicker system which directs the beam into a dump when a failure is detected. Due to the high current of the beams, the beam kick is tapered from 100% to 80% in 7.33 (micro)S (the beam transit time around the ring). This taper distributes the energy evenly across the window which separates the ring from the beam dump such that the window is not damaged. The abort kicker trigger is synchronized with the ion clearing gap of the beam allowing for the kicker field to rise from 0-80% while there is no beam in the kicker magnet. Originally the kicker system was designed for a rise time of 370nS [1], but because the ion clearing gap was reduced in half, so was the rise time requirement for the kicker. This report discusses the des...

  6. Impedance of a slotted-pipe kicker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Feng [Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics

    1996-08-01

    This paper introduces the principle of a new slotted kicker simply, which is made by using vacuum pipe itself with proper slits as current conductors, and then, presents a rough estimation of its longitudinal and transverse impedance, respectively. Calculation shows that its impedance is reduced significantly compared to our present air-coil kicker. (author)

  7. A review of magnetic heat pump technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barclay, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The area of technology classified as heat pumps generally refers to refrigerators, heat pumps and heat engines. This review is restricted to the literature on magnetic refrigerators and magnetic heat pumps which are referred to interchangeably. Significant progress has been made on the development of engineering prototypes of cryogenic, nonregenerative magnetic refrigerators utilizing conductive heat transfer in the 0.1 K to 20 K temperature range. Advances have also been made in analysis of regenerative magnetic refrigerators and heat pumps utilizing the active magnetic regeneration (AMR) concept. Units based on AMR are being modeled, designed and/or built to operate in various temperature ranges including 1.8-4.5 K, 4-15 K, 15-85 K, and 270-320 K. The near room temperature units have been scaled to 50 kW as both refrigerators and heat pumps. The progress of magnetic refrigeration over the last three years is summarized and discussed

  8. The magnetic fluid for heat transfer applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, K.; Jeyadevan, B.; Neveu, S.; Koganezawa, H.

    2002-01-01

    Real-time visual observation of boiling water-based and ionic magnetic fluids (MFs) and heat transfer characteristics in heat pipe using ionic MF stabilized by citrate ions (JC-1) as working liquid are reported. Irrespective of the presence or absence of magnetic field water-based MF degraded during boiling. However, the degradation of JC-1 was avoided by heating the fluid in magnetic field. Furthermore, the heat transfer capacity of JC-1 heat pipe under applied magnetic field was enhanced over the no field case

  9. Dealing with abort kicker prefire in the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Baishev, I.S.; Mokhov, N.V.; Parker, B.; Richardson, R.D.; Zhou, J.

    1993-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider uses a single-turn extraction abort system to divert the circulating beam to a massive graphite absorber at normal termination of the operating cycle or in case of any of a number of predefined fault modes. The Collider rings must be designed to be tolerant to abort extraction kicker prefires and misfires because of the large circulating beam energy. We have studied the consequences of beam loss in the accelerator due to such prefires and misfires in terms of material heating and radiation generation using full scale machine simulations and Monte-Carlo energy deposition calculations. Some results from these calculations as well as possible protective measures for minimizing the damaging effects of kicker prefire and misfire are discussed in this paper

  10. PSR extraction kicker system improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardek, T.W.

    1991-01-01

    A program to improve the reliability of hardware required to operate the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring has been under way for the past three years. The extraction kicker system for the PSR was identified as one candidate for improvement. Pulse modulators produce 50kV pulses 360 nsec in length at up to 24-Hz pulse repetition rate and drive two 4-meter-long stripline electrodes. Sources of difficulty with this system included short width switch tube lifetime, drive cable electrical breakdown, high-voltage connector failure, and occasional electrode breakdown. This paper discusses modifications completed on this system to correct these difficulties. 2 refs., 3 figs

  11. Comparison of the Window-Frame RHIC-abort kicker with C-type Kicker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoupas, N.; McMahan, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    The high intensity proton bunches (~2.5x10 11 p/bunch ) circulating in RHIC increase the temperature of the ferrite-made RHIC-abort-kickers above the Curie point; as a result, the kickers cannot provide the required field to abort the beam at the beam dump. A team of experts in the CAD department worked on modifying the design of the window-frame RHIC-abort kicker to minimize the hysteresis losses responsible for the increase of the ferrite's temperature. In this technical note we report some results from the study of two possible modifications of the window-frame RHIC-abort kicker, and we compare these results with those of a propose C-type RHIC-abort kicker. We also include an Appendix where we describe a method which may further reduce the hysteresis losses of the window-frame kicker.

  12. The Booster to AGS beam transfer fast kicker systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.; Bunicci, J.; Soukas, A.V.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1992-01-01

    The Brookhaven AGS Booster has a very successful commissioning period in June 1991. The third phase of that commissioning was a beam extraction test. The Booster extraction fast kicker (F3) deflected a 1.2 GeV proton beam from the Booster circulating orbit into the extraction septum aperture, partially down the extraction line to a temporary beam stop. Now, the Booster is committed to the AGS operations program for both heavy ion and proton beams. Thus, the Booster extraction and the corresponding AGS injection systems must operate routinely up to a pulse repetition frequency of 7.5 Hertz, and up to a beam energy of 1.5 Gev. The injection fast kicker is located in the A5 section of the AGS ring and is used to deflect the proton or heavy ion beam into its final AGS closed orbit. A distinctive feature of the AGS injection fast kicker modulators is the tail-bitting function required for proton beam injection. This enables the system to produce a fast current fall time to go along with the high current pulse amplitude with a fast rise time. The AGS injection fast kicker system has three pulse modulators, and each modulator consists of two thyratrons. The main PFN thyratrons switch on the current, and the tail bitting thyratrons are used to force the magnet current to decrease rapidly. Two digital pulse delay generators are used to align the main thyratrons and the tail bitting thyratrons respectively. The system has been tested and installed. The final commissioning of the Booster to AGS beam transfer line and injection is currently being undertaken. In this article, the system design, realization techniques and performance data will be presented

  13. Development of heat-resistant magnetic sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaya, Shigeru; Arakawa, Hisashi; Keyakida, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    A heat-resistant flux gate magnetic sensor has been developed. Permendur, which has high Curie point, is employed as the magnetic core material and the detection method of the external magnetic field is modified. The characteristics of the developed magnetic sensor up to 500degC were evaluated. The sensor output increased linearly with the external magnetic field in the range of ±5 G and the standard deviation at 500degC was about 0.85G. (author)

  14. AA injection kicker in its tank

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    For single-turn injection of the antiprotons, a septum at the end of the injection line made the beam parallel to the injection orbit, and a quarter of a betatron-wavelength downstream a fast kicker corrected the angle. Kicker type: lumped delay line. PFN voltage 56 kV. Bending angle 7.5 mrad; kick-strength 0.9 Tm; fall-time 95%-5% in 150 ns. The injection orbit is to the left, the stack orbit to the far right. A fast shutter near the central orbit had to be closed before the kicker fired, so as to protect the stack core from being shaken by the kicker's fringe field. The shutter is shown in closed position.

  15. Design and simulation of fast pulsed kicker/bumper units for the positron accumulator ring at APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ju; Volk, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    In the design of fast pulsed kicker/burner units for a positron accumulator ring (PAR) at APS, different pulse forming networks (PFN) are considered and different structures for the magnet are studied and simulated. Three fast pulsed kicker/bumper magnets are required in PAR for the beam injection and/or extraction at 450 MeV. These magnets have the same design because they have identical specifications and are expected to produce identical magnetic fields. Each kicker/bumper magnet is required to generate a magnetic field of 0.06 T with rise-time of 80 ns, a flat-top of 80 ns and a fall-time of 80 ns. This paper describes some design considerations and computer simulation results of different designs

  16. An Over-damped Cavity Longitudinal Kicker for the PEP-II LER

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, P

    2003-01-01

    Both rings of PEP-II use drift tube kickers in the longitudinal bunch-by-bunch feedback system. Efforts are now underway to increase the stored beam currents and luminosity of PEP-II, and beam-induced heating of these structures, particularly in the Low Energy Ring (LER) is of concern. An alternative kicker design based on the over-damped cavity kicker, first developed by INFN-Frascati is being built for PEP-II. This low loaded Q (or wide bandwidth) structure is fed by a network of ridged waveguides coupled to a simple pill-box cavity. Beam induced RF power is also coupled out of the cavity to external loads, so that the higher order modes (HOMs) excited in the structure are well-damped. This paper details the kicker design for PEP-II and discusses some of the design trade-offs between shunt impedance and bandwidth, as well as the influence of the feedthroughs on the kicker parameters. Estimates of the expected power deposition in the cavity are also provided.

  17. Numerical routine for magnetic heat pump cascading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filonenko, Konstantin; Lei, Tian; Engelbrecht, Kurt

    Heat pumps use low-temperature heat absorbed from the energy source to create temperature gradient (TG) across the energy sink. Magnetic heat pumps (MHP) can perform this function through operating active magnetic regeneration (AMR) cycle. For building heating, TGs of up to a few K might...... and 3 K. Changing the number of MHPs, we optimized input parameters to achieve maximum heating powers. We have found that both maximum heating power and COP decrease together with number of heat pumps, but the TGs and the temperature span can be largely increased. References [1] M. Tahavori et al., “A...... be necessary, which is hardly achievable with a single MHP and such techniques as cascading are required. Series and parallel cascading increase the AMR span and heating power, respectively, but do not change TG. Therefore, the intermediate type of cascading was proposed with individual MHPs separately...

  18. An Improved Beam Screen for the LHC Injection Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Ducimetière, L; Garrel, N; Kroyer, T

    2007-01-01

    The two LHC injection kicker magnet systems must produce a kick of 1.3 T.m with a flattop duration variable up to 7860 ns, and rise and fall times of less than 900 ns and 3000 ns, respectively. Each system is composed of two resonant charging power supplies (RCPSs) and four 5 WW transmission line kicker magnets with matched terminating resistors and pulse forming networks (PFNs). A beam screen is placed in the aperture of the magnets: the screen consists of a ceramic tube with conductors on the inner wall. The conductors provide a path for the image current of the, high intensity, LHC beam and screen the ferrite against Wake fields. The conductors initially used gave adequately low beam coupling impedance however inter-conductor discharges occurred during pulsing of the magnet: an alternative design was discharge free at the nominal operating voltage but the impedance was too high for the ultimate LHC beam. This paper presents the results of a new development undertaken to meet the often conflicting requireme...

  19. Pulse shape adjustment for the SLC damping ring kickers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattison, T.; Cassel, R.; Donaldson, A.; Fischer, H.; Gough, D.

    1991-05-01

    The difficulties with damping ring kickers that prevented operation of the SLAC Linear Collider in full multiple bunch mode have been overcome by shaping the current pulse to compensate for imperfections in the magnets. The risetime was improved by a peaking capacitor, with a tunable inductor to provide a locally flat pulse. The pulse was flattened by an adjustable droop inductor. Fine adjustment was provided by pulse forming line tuners driven by stepping motors. Further risetime improvement will be obtained by a saturating ferrite pulse sharpener. 4 refs., 3 figs

  20. Practical and efficient magnetic heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G. V.

    1978-01-01

    Method for pumping heat magnetically at room temperature is more economical than existing refrigeration systems. Method uses natural magneto-thermal effect of gadolinium metal to establish temperature gradient across length of tube. Regenerative cyclic process in which gadolinium sample is magnetized and gives off heat at one end of tube, and then is demagnetized at other end to absorb heat has established temperature gradients of 144 degrees F in experiments near room temperature. Other materials with large magnetothermal effects can be used below room temperature. Possible commercial applications include freeze-drying and food processing, cold storage, and heating and cooling of buildings, plants, and ships.

  1. Pulsed modulator power supply for the g-2 muon storage ring injection kicker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mi, J.; Lee, Y. Y.; Morse, W. M.; Pai, C. I.; Pappas, G. C.; Sanders, R.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Warburton, D.; Zapasek, R.; Jungmann, K.; Roberts, L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the pulse modulator power supplies used to drive the kicker magnets that inject the muon beam into the g-2 storage ring that has been built at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three modulators built into coaxial structures consisting of a series circuit of an energy storage

  2. Transient Analysis of a Magnetic Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental heat pump that uses a rare earth element as the refrigerant is modeled using NASTRAN. The refrigerant is a ferromagnetic metal whose temperature rises when a magnetic field is applied and falls when the magnetic field is removed. The heat pump is used as a refrigerator to remove heat from a reservoir and discharge it through a heat exchanger. In the NASTRAN model the components modeled are represented by one-dimensional ROD elements. Heat flow in the solids and fluid are analyzed. The problem is mildly nonlinear since the heat capacity of the refrigerant is temperature-dependent. One simulation run consists of a series of transient analyses, each representing one stroke of the heat pump. An auxiliary program was written that uses the results of one NASTRAN analysis to generate data for the next NASTRAN analysis.

  3. Abort kicker power supply systems at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafczyk, G.; Dugan, G.; Harrison, M.; Koepke, K.; Tilles, E.

    1985-06-01

    Over the past several years, Fermilab has been operating with a single turn proton abort system in both the superconducting Tevatron and the conventional Main Ring. The abort kicker power supply for this system discharges a lumped capacitance into the inductive magnet load, causing the beam to enter the abort channel. The characteristics of this current waveform are defined by the requirements of the machine operation. The standard fixed target running mode calls for 12 booster batches of beam which leaves a rotating gap in the beams of approx.1.8 μs. The current waveform is required to rise to 90% of I/sub max/ in this time to avoid beam loss from partially deflected beam. Aperture limitations in both the accelerator and the abort channel demand that the current in the magnets stays above this 90% I/sub max/ for the 21 μs needed to ensure all the beam has left the machine. The 25 mm displacement needed to cleanly enter the abort channel at 1 TeV corresponds to a maximum current in each of the 4 modules of approx.20 kA. Similar constraints are needed for the Main Ring and Tevatron antiproton abort systems. A unique feature of this design is the high voltage, high current diode assembly used to clip the recharge of the capacitor bank. This allows the current to decay slowly with the L/R time constant of the magnet and diode series combination. Special attention is given to the diode characteristics needed for this passive switching element. Operational experience and proposed upgrades are given for the two operational systems. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  4. Abort kicker power supply systems at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafczyk, G.; Dugan, G.; Harrison, M.; Koepke, K.; Tilles, E.

    1985-01-01

    Over the past several years, Fermilab has been operating with a single turn proton abort system in both the superconducting Tevatron and the conventional Main Ring. The abort kicker power supply for this system discharges a lumped capacitance into the inductive magnet load, causing the beam to enter the abort channel. The characteristics of this current waveform are defined by the requirements of the machine operation. The standard fixed target running mode calls for 12 booster batches of beam which leaves a rotating gap in the beam of about1.8 μs. The current waveform is required to rise to 90% of I /SUB max/ in this time to avoid beam loss from partially deflected beam. Aperture limitations in both the accelerator and the abort channel demand that the current in the magnets stays above this 90% I for the 21 μs needed to ensure all the beam has /SUP max/ left the machine. The 25 mm displacement needed to cleanly enter the abort channel at 1 TeV corresponds to a maximum current in each of the 4 modules of about20 kA. Similar constraints are needed for the Main Ring and Tevatron antiproton abort systems. A unique feature of this design is the high voltage, high current diode assembly used to clip the recharge of the capacitor bank. This allows the current to decay slowly with the L/R time constant of the magnet and diode series combination. Special attention will be given to the diode characteristics needed for this passive switching element. Operational experience and proposed upgrades will be given for the two operational systems

  5. Magnetic induced heating of nanoparticle solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S. Hunyadi [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Brown, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Coopersmith, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Fulmer, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Sessions, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Ali, M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-12-02

    Magnetic induced heating of nanoparticles (NP) provides a useful advantage for many energy transfer applications. This study aims to gain an understanding of the key parameters responsible for maximizing the energy transfer leading to nanoparticle heating through the use of simulations and experimental results. It was found that magnetic field strength, NP concentration, NP composition, and coil size can be controlled to generate accurate temperature profiles in NP aqueous solutions.

  6. Nanoscale magnetic heat pumps and engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, G.E.W.; Bretzel, S.; Brataas, A.; Tserkovnyak, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We present the linear-response matrix for a sliding domain wall in a rotatable magnetic nanowire, which is driven out of equilibrium by temperature and voltage bias, mechanical torque, and magnetic field. An expression for heat-current-induced domain-wall motion is derived. Application of Onsager’s

  7. Heat transfer in a magnet C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sircilli Neto, F.; Passaro, A.; Borges, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    The cooling systems of nuclear reactors for spacial applications include direct current electromagnetic pumps, which are used to circulate the coolant fluid thru the reactor core. In this work, the transfer of the heat generated by the electrical current in a magnet C excitation coils, which is used in a prototype pump, was evaluated. Considering the processes of heat transfer by conduction, natural convection and radiation, the results of simulation with the codes HEATING5 and AUTHEATS indicate the utilization of the 180 sup(0)C thermal class conductor for a working Joule power of 4 10 sup(4) W/m sup(3) in each magnet coil. (author)

  8. From a magnet to a heat pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navickaité, Kristina; Neves Bez, Henrique; Engelbrecht, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is the thermal response of a magnetic material to an applied magnetic field. Magnetic cooling is a promising alternative to conventional vapor compression technology in near room temperature applications and has experienced significant developments over the last five...... years. Although further improvements are necessary before the technology can be commercialized. Researchers were mainly focused on the development of materials and optimization of a flow system in order to increase the efficiency of magnetic heat pumps. The project, presented in this paper, is devoted...... to the improvement of heat pump and cooling technologies through simple tests of prospective regenerator designs. A brief literature review and expected results are presented in the paper. It is mainly focused on MCE technologies and provides a brief introduction to the magnetic cooling as an alternative...

  9. Very fast kicker for accelerator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishanov, B.I.; Podgorny, F.V.; Shiltsev, V.D.

    1996-11-01

    We describe a very fast counter traveling wave kicker with a full pulse width of about 7 ns. Successful test experiment has been done with hi-tech semiconductor technology FET pulse generator with a MHz- range repetition rates and maximum kick strength of the order of 3 G·m. Further. increase of the strength seems to be quite possible with the FET pursers, that makes the kicker to be very useful tool for bunch-by-bunch injection/extraction and other accelerator applications

  10. Magnetic heat pumping near room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic heat pumping can be made practical at room temperature by using a ferromagnetic material with a Curie point at or near operating temperature and an appropriate regenerative thermodynamic cycle. Measurements are performed which show that gadolinium is a resonable working material and it is found that the application of a 7-T magnetic field to gadolinium at the Curie point (293 K) causes a heat release of 4 kJ/kg under isothermal conditions or a temperature rise of 14 K under adiabatic conditions. A regeneration technique can be used to lift the load of the lattice and electronic heat capacities off the magnetic system in order to span a reasonable temperature difference and to pump as much entropy per cycle as possible

  11. Numerical simulation of magnetic heat pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smaili, A.; Masson, C.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents a numerical method for performance predictions of magnetic heat pump (MHP) devices. Such devices consist primarily of a magnetic regenerator (solid refrigerant media) and circulating fluid. Unlike conventional gas-cycles, MHP devices function according to thermomagnetic cycles which do not require neither compressor nor expander. In this paper, the flow field throughout the regenerator is described by continuity and unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The heat transfer between fluid and solid is introduced by considering the corresponding energy equations. The proposed mathematical model has been solved using a control volume finite element method. The fully implicit scheme is used for time discretization. Simulation results including heating capacity and coefficient of performance are presented for a given MHP cycle. Mainly, the effects of cycle frequency, mass flow rate and the magnetic regenerator mass are investigated. (author)

  12. Plasma heating in a variable magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kichigin, G. N., E-mail: king@iszf.irk.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The problem of particle acceleration in a periodically variable magnetic field that either takes a zero value or passes through zero is considered. It is shown that, each time the field [0]passes through zero, the particle energy increases abruptly. This process can be regarded as heating in the course of which plasma particles acquire significant energy within one field period. This mechanism of plasma heating takes place in the absence of collisions between plasma particles and is analogous to the mechanism of magnetic pumping in collisional plasma considered by Alfven.

  13. The LEB to MEB transfer kicker system prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappas, C.; Wilson, M.; Anderson, D.

    1994-01-01

    The design requirements for the Low Energy Booster (LEB) extraction kicker system at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) were to deflect a 12 GeV/c beam through an angle of 1.5 mrad. The circumference of the LEB was 540 M. This resulted in a 0.06 T-m integrated field, of 1.8 μs width with a 1% to 99% rise time of less than 80 ns and allowable pulse ripple of less than ±1%. The repetition frequency was 10 Hz and the allowable timing jitter was 2 ns. The field was required to be uniform over a 2x4 cm area to ±2.5%. The requirements for the Medium Energy Booster (MEB) injection kicker were similar except that a 99% to 1% pulse fall time of less than 2 μs was needed. Prototypes of the pulsed power system and magnet to meet these requirements were built and tested at the SSCL. This paper describes the results of that testing

  14. Spiral kicker for the beam abort system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    A brief study was carried out to determine the feasibility of a special kicker to produce a damped spiral beam at the beam dump for the beam abort system. There appears to be no problem with realizing this concept at a reasonably low cost.

  15. Spiral kicker for the beam abort system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    A brief study was carried out to determine the feasibility of a special kicker to produce a damped spiral beam at the beam dump for the beam abort system. There appears to be no problem with realizing this concept at a reasonably low cost

  16. Dilution kicker for the SPS beam dump

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    In order to reduce thermal stress on the SPS dump material, the fast-ejected beam was swept horizontally across the dump. This was done with the "dilution kicker" MKDH, still in use at the time of writing. The person on the left is Manfred Mayer. See also 7404072X.

  17. Kicker for the SLC electron damping ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartelson, L.; Crawford, C.; Dinkel, J.; Kerns, Q.; Howell, J.; Snowdon, S.; Walton, J.

    1987-01-01

    The SLC electron damping ring requires two kickers each providing a 5 mr kick at 1.2 GEV to pairs of electron bunches spaced 61.63 nsec apart. The exact shape of the kick is unimportant, but the specification applies to the field the bunches see

  18. Operational experience with the Fermilab 150 GeV injection kicker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trendler, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Fermilab E17 injection kicker has been in operation for more than 12000 filament hours and has logged almost 350,000 pulses since commissioning without major failure. The kicker system uses EEV 1193B and 1193C double-ended thyratrons in the MAIN, CLIP and DUMP configuration. In typical operation, the pulser produces 4800 A, 20 μs pulses at a charging voltage of 60kV and is capable of operating at a 80kV charging voltage. Any failure of the injection process can cause the Tevatron cryogenic magnets to quench. This includes any misfires of the injection kicker. Considerable effort was made to maximize reliability and provide interlocks to limit the problems that could happen from injection kicker misfires. The operating experience and reliability of the EEV thyratron will be discussed. Also, the use of the fiber optics, unique charging power supplies, and unusual digital interlocks and the role they play in improved reliability will be discussed

  19. Lubricant reflow after laser heating in heat assisted magnetic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haoyu; Mendez, Alejandro Rodriguez; Xiong, Shaomin; Bogy, David B.

    2015-05-01

    In heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) technology for hard disk drives, the media will be heated to about 500 °C during the writing process in order to reduce its magnetic coercivity and thus allow data writing with the magnetic head transducers. The traditional lubricants such as Z-dol and Z-tetraol may not be able to perform in such harsh heating conditions due to evaporation, decomposition and thermal depletion. However, some of the lubricant depletion can be recovered due to reflow after a period of time, which can help to reduce the chance of head disk interface failure. In this study, experiments of lubricant thermal depletion and reflow were performed using a HAMR test stage for a Z-tetraol type lubricant. Various lubricant depletion profiles were generated using different laser heating conditions. The lubricant reflow process after thermal depletion was monitored by use of an optical surface analyzer. In addition, a continuum based lubrication model was developed to simulate the lubricant reflow process. Reasonably good agreement between simulations and experiments was achieved.

  20. Reduction of Surface Flashover of the Beam Screen of the LHC Injection Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Calatroni, S; Caspers, F; Ducimetière, L; Gomes Namora, V; Mertens, V; Noulibos, R; Taborelli, M; Teissandier, B; Uythoven, J; Weterings, W

    2013-01-01

    The LHC injection kicker magnets include beam screens to shield the ferrite yokes against wake fields resulting from the high intensity beam. The screening is provided by conductors lodged in the inner wall of a ceramic support tube. LHC operation with increasingly higher bunch intensity and short bunch lengths, requires improved ferrite screening. This will be implemented by additional conductors; however these must not compromise the good high-voltage behaviour of the kicker magnets. Extensive studies have been carried out to better satisfy the often conflicting requirements for low beam coupling impedance, fast magnetic field rise-time, ultra-high vacuum and good high voltage behaviour. A new design is proposed which significantly reduces the electric field associated with the screen conductors. Results of high voltage tests are also presented.

  1. Literature file on 'fast kickers and septa', componenets for deflection and separation of particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, A. van der.

    1988-11-01

    The File consists of classified and numbered articles from the literature on the following subjects: 1 - Kickers: fast switching (electro-)magnetic or electrostatic components for small deflection; 2 - Septum Magnets: both small and great deflecting components, with the purpose to create or bridge over space between the deflected beam and the other, unperturbed beam; 3 - Electrostatic Septa: low loss, beam splitting components which give small deflection for the extracted part of the beam and no perturbation for the rest of the beam. The articles have been classified per institute or laboratory, eventually with further classification per project. The classified articles are then numbered chronologically. Extension of the File is still possible. The contents of the articles are summarized by means of catchwords. Specifications of the described kickers, septum magnets and electrostatic septa are represented in a tabular form

  2. Heating efficiency in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deatsch, Alison E.; Evans, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermic treatment of cancers have gained significant attention in recent years. In magnetic hyperthermia, three independent mechanisms result in thermal energy upon stimulation: Néel relaxation, Brownian relaxation, and hysteresis loss. The relative contribution of each is strongly dependent on size, shape, crystalline anisotropy, and degree of aggregation or agglomeration of the nanoparticles. We review the effects of each of these physical mechanisms in light of recent experimental studies and suggest routes for progress in the field. Particular attention is given to the influence of the collective behaviors of nanoparticles in suspension. A number of recent studies have probed the effect of nanoparticle concentration on heating efficiency and have reported superficially contradictory results. We contextualize these studies and show that they consistently indicate a decrease in magnetic relaxation time with increasing nanoparticle concentration, in both Brownian- and Néel-dominated regimes. This leads to a predictable effect on heating efficiency and alleviates a significant source of confusion within the field. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. • Heating depends on individual properties and collective properties. • We review recent studies with respect to loss mechanisms. • Collective behavior is a key source of confusion in the field. • We contextualize recent studies to elucidate consistencies and alleviate confusion

  3. Effective Induction Heating around Strongly Magnetized Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislyakova, K. G.; Fossati, L.; Johnstone, C. P.; Noack, L.; Lüftinger, T.; Zaitsev, V. V.; Lammer, H.

    2018-05-01

    Planets that are embedded in the changing magnetic fields of their host stars can experience significant induction heating in their interiors caused by the planet’s orbital motion. For induction heating to be substantial, the planetary orbit has to be inclined with respect to the stellar rotation and dipole axes. Using WX UMa, for which the rotation and magnetic axes are aligned, as an example, we show that for close-in planets on inclined orbits, induction heating can be stronger than the tidal heating occurring inside Jupiter’s satellite Io; namely, it can generate a surface heat flux exceeding 2 W m‑2. An internal heating source of such magnitude can lead to extreme volcanic activity on the planet’s surface, possibly also to internal local magma oceans, and to the formation of a plasma torus around the star aligned with the planetary orbit. A strongly volcanically active planet would eject into space mostly SO2, which would then dissociate into oxygen and sulphur atoms. Young planets would also eject CO2. Oxygen would therefore be the major component of the torus. If the O I column density of the torus exceeds ≈1012 cm‑2, the torus could be revealed by detecting absorption signatures at the position of the strong far-ultraviolet O I triplet at about 1304 Å. We estimate that this condition is satisfied if the O I atoms in the torus escape the system at a velocity smaller than 1–10 km s‑1. These estimates are valid also for a tidally heated planet.

  4. The PEP-II abort kicker system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamare, J de; Donaldson, A.; Kulikov, A. Lipari, J.

    1997-07-01

    The PEP-II project has two storage rings. The HER (High Energy Ring) has up to 1.48 A of electron beam at 9 GeV, and the LER (Low Energy Ring) has up to 2.14 A of positron beam at 3.1 GeV. To protect the HER and LER beam lines in the event of a ring component failure, each ring has an abort kicker system which directs the beam into a dump when a failure is detected. Due to the high current of the beams, the beam kick is tapered from 100% to 80% in 7.33 uS (the beam transit time around the time). This taper distributes the energy evenly across the window which separates the ring from the beam dump such that the window is not damaged. The abort kicker trigger is synchronized with the ion clearing gap of the beam allowing for the kicker field to rise from 0-80% in 370 nS. This report discusses the design of the system controls, interlocks, power supplies, and modulator

  5. High voltage measurements on a prototype PFN for the LHC injection kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Carlier, E; Ducimetière, L; Schröder, G; Vossenberg, Eugène B

    1999-01-01

    Two LHC injection kicker magnet systems must produce a kick of 1.3 T.m each with a flattop duration of 4.25 mu s or 6.5 mu s, a rise time of 900 ns, and a fall time of 3 mu s. The ripple in the field must be less than +or-0.5The electrical circuit of the complete system has been simulated with PSpice. The model includes a 66 kV resonant charging power supply (RCPS), a 5 Omega pulse forming network (PFN), a terminated 5 Omega kicker magnet, and all known parasitic quantities. Component selection for the PEN was made on the basis of models in which a theoretical field ripple of less than +or-0.1as attained. A prototype 66 kV RCPS was built at TRIUMF and shipped to CERN. A prototype 5 Omega system including a PFN, thyratron switches, and terminating resistors, was built at CERN. The system (without a kicker magnet) was assembled as designed without trimming of any PFN component values. The PFN was charged to 60 kV via the RCPS operating at 0.1 Hz. The thyratron timing was adjusted to provide a 30 kV, 5.5 mu s du...

  6. Magnetic fields in laser heated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiranoff, F.; Brackbill, J.; Colombant, D.; Grandjouan, N.

    1984-01-01

    With a fixed-ion code for the study of self-generated magentic fields in laser heated plasmas, the inhibition of thermal transport and the effect of the Nernst term are modeled for a KrF laser. For various values of the flux limiter, the response of a foil to a focused laser is calculated without a magnetic field and compared with the response calculated with a magnetic field. The results are: The Nernst term convects the magnetic field to densities above critical as found by Nishiguchi et al. (1984), but the field does not strongly inhibit transport into the foil. The field is also transported to sub-critical densities, where it inhibits thermal diffusion and enhance lateral transport by convection

  7. Electrostatic injection kicker for the KEK digital accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Adachi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An electrostatic injection kicker (ES-Kicker has been developed and installed in the KEK digital accelerator, which is a synchrotron aimed at accelerating all ion species. The ES-Kicker kicks an injected ion beam horizontally into the ring orbit and consists of two main electrodes for electric field generation and three intermediate electrodes to correct field homogeneity. In our single-turn injection scheme, the circulating beam and the injected beam both pass through the electrode aperture of the kicker, so the kicker field must be turned off before arrival of the first circulating beam. The ES-Kicker is therefore operated in a pulse mode. This means that the excitation circuit for the ES-Kicker must be carefully designed, since the falling edge of the electric field is strongly affected by parasitic capacitance of this circuit, and any remaining field may disturb the circulating beam. This paper describes performance of the ES-Kicker on the basis of simulations and measurement results.

  8. Heat pipe cooling of power processing magnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, I. G.; Chester, M.

    1979-01-01

    The constant demand for increased power and reduced mass has raised the internal temperature of conventionally cooled power magnetics toward the upper limit of acceptability. The conflicting demands of electrical isolation, mechanical integrity, and thermal conductivity preclude significant further advancements using conventional approaches. However, the size and mass of multikilowatt power processing systems may be further reduced by the incorporation of heat pipe cooling directly into the power magnetics. Additionally, by maintaining lower more constant temperatures, the life and reliability of the magnetic devices will be improved. A heat pipe cooled transformer and input filter have been developed for the 2.4 kW beam supply of a 30-cm ion thruster system. This development yielded a mass reduction of 40% (1.76 kg) and lower mean winding temperature (20 C lower). While these improvements are significant, preliminary designs predict even greater benefits to be realized at higher power. This paper presents the design details along with the results of thermal vacuum operation and the component performance in a 3 kW breadboard power processor.

  9. Thermal Studies on the SPS Wideband Transverse Feedback Kicker

    CERN Document Server

    Roggen, Toon; Hofle, Wolfgang; Montesinos, Eric; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    As part of the SPS wideband transverse feedback system in the framework of the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU) project, a wideband kicker design is being proposed. Vertical beam instabilities due to intensity dependent effects (electron cloud instability (ECI) and transverse mode coupling instability (TMCI)) are potentially suppressed by using a feedback system driving such a kicker system. One of the options for a kicker is a one meter long slotted-coaxial kicker, providing a substantial vertical kick strength (10ˉ5 –10ˉ4 eV.s/m) over a bandwidth ranging from nearly DC to 1 GHz. The necessary kick strength requires a total power of 4 kW. This note describes thermal studies that assisted in the material choice of the feedthroughs of the slotted-coaxial kicker and guided the design choices.

  10. A New Kicker for the TLS Longitudinal Feedback System

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, Wai-Keung; Dehler, Micha; Hsu, Kuo-Tung; Hsu, San-Yuang; Jung Chou Ping; Wei Chen, Cheng; Yang Chen Huan; Yang Tze Te

    2005-01-01

    A new longitudinal kicker that is modified from the Swiss Light Source (SLS) design to fit into the TLS storage ring. It will be served as the actuator in the longitudinal multi-bunch feedback control loop. Beam coupling impedance has been calculated by Gdfidl with a PC cluster. Previous to the installation of this new kicker, bench measurement has been performed in the laboratory to characterize this new kicker. The experimental setups for bandwidth and coaxial wire measurement of longitudinal coupling impedance and their corresponding test results will be reported. As a cross check, bead-pull measurement has also been done to verify the beam coupling measurement by coaxial wire method at the kicker center frequency. Longitudinal field profile of the accelerating mode along the beam path has also been mapped. High order cavity modes of the kicker have also been observed and their effects on the beam are evaluated.

  11. Test of very fast kicker for TESLA damping ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishanov, B.I.; Podgorny, F.V.; Shiltsev, V.D.

    1997-04-01

    We describe a very fast kicker with unique combination of high repetition rate and short pulse width. Constructionally, the device is a symmetrical counter traveling wave stripline kicker fed by semiconductor high-voltage pulse generator. Experimentally tested kicker has a full pulse width of about 7 ns, 1.4 MHz repetition rate and maximum kick strength of the order of 3 G·m. Recent achievements in high-voltage semiconductor field-effect transistors (FET) technology and goal-specific optimization of the kicker parameters allow many-fold increase of the strength, and the kicker can be very useful tool for bunch-by-bunch injection/extraction and other accelerator applications. 4 refs., 3 figs

  12. Magnetization process of heat assisted magnetic recording by micro-magnetic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiiki, Kazuo; Motojima, Hisanori

    2010-01-01

    Magnetization reversal in a uniform magnetic field and one bit recording process by a thin film head in the heat assisted magnetic recording system of TbFeCo medium are studied by using the micro-magnetic simulation and the heat equation. The Landau-Lifsitz-Gilbert equation is solved for magnetic parameters at temperatures as the time goes by. It is found that magnetization proceeds as a progressive wave, although this behaviour may not limit the recording speed. The recording bit is expanded by the thermal fluctuation. The expansion can be suppressed as the medium thickness increases, because the thermal fluctuation is small in the thick medium. So the control of the medium thickness is important very much to achieve a high-density heat-assisted recording.

  13. Heating ability and biocompatibility study of silica-coated magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 38; Issue 6. Heating ability and biocompatibility study of silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles as heating mediators for magnetic hyperthermia and magnetically triggered drug delivery systems. Meysam Soleymani Mohammad Edrissi. Volume 38 Issue 6 October 2015 ...

  14. Specific heat in diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babanlı, A. M.; Ibragimov, B. G.

    2017-11-01

    In the present paper, we have calculated the specific heat and magnetization of a quantum ring of a diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) material in the presence of magnetic field. We take into account the effect of Rashba spin-orbital interaction, the exchange interaction and the Zeeman term on the specific heat. We have calculated the energy spectrum of the electrons in diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum ring. Moreover we have calculated the specific heat dependency on the magnetic field and Mn concentration at finite temperature of a diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum ring.

  15. Investigation of an Ultrafast Harmonic Resonant RF Kicker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yulu [Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China)

    2016-10-01

    An Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) based multi-turn electron Circulator Cooler Ring (CCR) is envisaged in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) to cool the ion bunches with high energy (55 MeV), high current (1.5 A), high repetition frequency (476.3 MHz), high quality magnetized electron bunches. A critical component in this scheme is a pair of ultrafast kickers for the exchange of electron bunches between the ERL and the CCR. The ultrafast kicker should operate with the rise and fall time in less than 2.1 ns, at the repetition rate of ~10s MHz, and should be able to run continuously during the whole period of cooling. These -and-fall time being combined together, are well beyond the state-of-art of traditional pulsed power supplies and magnet kickers. To solve this technical challenge, an alternative method is to generate this high repetition rate, fast rise-and-fall time short pulse continuous waveform by summing several finite number of (co)sine waves at harmonic frequencies of the kicking repetition frequency, and these harmonic modes can be generated by the Quarter Wave Resonater (QWR) based multifrequency cavities. Assuming the recirculator factor is 10, 10 harmonic modes (from 47.63 MHz to 476.3 MHz) with proper amplitudes and phases, plus a DC offset are combined together, a continuous short pulse waveform with the rise-and-fall time in less than 2.1 ns, repetition rate of 47.63 MHz waveform can be generated. With the compact and matured technology of QWR cavities, the total cost of both hardware development and operation can be reduced to a modest level. Focuse on the technical scheme, three main topics will be discussed in this thesis: the synthetization of the kicking pulse, the design and optimization of the deflecting QWR multi-integer harmonic frequency resonator and the fabrication and bench measurements of a half scale copper prototype. In the kicking pulse synthetization part, we begin with the Fourier Series expansion of an ideal

  16. The PS Booster's ejection kicker: full house.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1971-01-01

    The modules of the Booster's four-storied full-aperture kicker pretty much fill their vacuum tank (front cover removed). In the original 800 MeV version, the delay-type modules were pulsed at 30 kV from a Pulse-Forming-Network (PFN), yielding a field risetime as short as 60 ns. The fieldstrength was 0.1 T at a current of 1200 A. The modules are made from steel plates and ferrite slabs. The ferrite's high initial outgassing rate presented a serious vacuum problem for a long time.

  17. Design of an Inductive Adder for the FCC injection kicker pulse generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woog, D.; Barnes, M. J.; Ducimetière, L.; Holma, J.; Kramer, T.

    2017-07-01

    The injection system for a 100 TeV centre-of-mass collider is an important part of the Future Circular Collider (FCC) study. Due to issues with conventional kicker systems, such as self-triggering and long term availability of thyratrons and limitations of HV-cables, innovative design changes are planned for the FCC injection kicker pulse generator. An inductive adder (IA) based on semiconductor (SC) switches is a promising technology for kicker systems. Its modular design, and the possibility of an active ripple suppression are significant advantages. Since the IA is a complex device, with multiple components whose characteristics are important, a detailed design study and construction of a prototype is necessary. This paper summarizes the system requirements and constraints, and describes the main components and design challenges of the prototype IA. It outlines the results from simulations and measurements on different magnetic core materials as well as on SC switches. The paper concludes on the design choices and progress for the prototype to be built at CERN.

  18. Considerations on a new fast extraction kicker concept for SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M

    2010-01-01

    An alternative extraction kicker concept is investigated for the SPS, based on open C-type kickers and a fast-bumper system. The beam is moved into the kicker gap some tens of ms before extraction. The concept is illustrated in detail with the LSS4 extraction from the SPS – very similar parameters and considerations apply to LSS6. A similar concept could also be conceived for injection but is more difficult due to the larger beam size. The technical issues are presented and the potential impact on the machine impedance outlined.

  19. Electron heat transport in stochastic magnetic layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, M.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Capes, H.; Grosman, A.

    1999-06-01

    Progress in the theoretical understanding of the local behaviour of the temperature field in ergodic layer was done in the framework of quasi-linear approach but this quasi-linear theory was not complete since the resonant modes coupling (due to stochasticity) was neglected. The stochastic properties of the magnetic field in the ergodic zone are now taken into account by a non-linear coupling of the temperature modes. The three-dimension heat transfer modelling in the ergodic-divertor configuration is performed by quasi-linear (ERGOT1) and non-linear (ERGOT2) numerical codes. The formalism and theoretical basis of both codes are presented. The most important effect that can be simulated with non-linear code is the averaged temperature profile flattening that occurs in the ergodic zone and the barrier creation that appears near the separatrix during divertor operation. (A.C.)

  20. The new control system of the SPS injection kicker

    CERN Document Server

    Antoine, A; Marchand, A; Verhagen, H

    2002-01-01

    The SPS accelerator will be used as injector for the LHC and has to be adapted to the LHC requirements. The tight specification on beam blow-up and bunch spacing in the SPS has required an upgrade program of the SPS injection kicker in order to obtain a reduction of the magnetic field ripple to less than ± 0.5% and of the magnet current rise time to less than 145 ns. In this context, the slow control part has been entirely rebuilt on the basis of off-the-shelf industrial components. A hierarchical architecture based on a SIEMENS S7-400 master programmable logic controller interconnected through PROFIBUS-DP to S7-300 deported and decentralised I/Os has been implemented. Integration of in-house specific G-64 hardware systems inside this industrial environment has been done through a PROFIBUS-DP to G-64 intelligent interface based on an OEM fieldbus mezzanine board on one side and an FPGA implementing the required functionality on the other. Simultaneously, the fast timing system has been completely reshuffled ...

  1. An induction heating device using planar coil with high amplitude alternating magnetic fields for magnetic hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zuhe; Zhuo, Zihang; Cai, Dongyang; Wu, Jian'an; Wang, Jie; Tang, Jintian

    2015-01-01

    Induction heating devices using the induction coil and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are the way that the magnetic hyperthermia is heading. To facilitate the induction heating of in vivo magnetic nanoparticles in hyperthermia experiments on large animals. An induction heating device using a planar coil was designed with a magnetic field frequency of 328 kHz. The coil's magnetic field distribution and the device's induction heating performance on different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were measured. The alternating magnetic field produced in the axis position 165 mm away from the coil center is 40 Gs in amplitude; magnetic nanoparticles with a concentration higher than 80 mg. mL-1 can be heated up rapidly. Our results demonstrate that the device can be applied not only to in vitro and in small animal experiments of magnetic hyperthermia using MNPs, but also in large animal experiments.

  2. Recent advances in kicker pulser technology for linear induction accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y. J.; Cook, E.; Davis, B.; Dehope, W. J.; Yen, B.

    1999-01-01

    Recent progress in the development and understanding of linear induction accelerator have produced machines with 10s of MeV of beam energy and multi-kiloampere currents. Near-term machines, such as DARHT-2, are envisioned with microsecond pulselengths. Fast beam kickers, based on cylindrical electromagnetic stripline structures, will permit effective use of these extremely high-energy beams in an increasing number of applications. In one application, radiography, kickers were an essential element in resolving temporal evolution of hydrodynamic events by cleaving out individual pulses from long, microsecond beams. Advanced schemes are envisioned where these individual pulses are redirected through varying length beam lines and suitably recombined for stereographic imaging or tomographic reconstruction. Recent advances in fast kickers and their pulsed power technology are described. Kicker pulsers based on both planar triode and all solid-state componentry are discussed and future development plans are presented

  3. Electromagnetic simulations of simple models of ferrite loaded kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Zannini, Carlo; Salvant, B; Metral, E; Rumolo, G

    2010-01-01

    The kickers are major contributors to the CERN SPS beam coupling impedance. As such, they may represent a limitation to increasing the SPS bunch current in the frame of an intensity upgrade of the LHC. In this paper, CST Particle Studio time domain electromagnetic simulations are performed to obtain the longitudinal and transverse impedances/wake potentials of simplified models of ferrite loaded kickers. The simulation results have been successfully compared with some existing analytical expressions. In the transverse plane, the dipolar and quadrupolar contributions to the wake potentials have been estimated from the results of these simulations. For some cases, simulations have also been benchmarked against measurements on PS kickers. It turns out that the large simulated quadrupolar contributions of these kickers could explain both the negative total (dipolar+quadrupolar) horizontal impedance observed in bench measurements and the positive horizontal tune shift measured with the SPS beam.

  4. Slot-type pickup/kicker for AA stochastic cooling

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    A "slotted transmission line" was used for both pickups and kickers of the stochastic cooling systems of the AA. They served for the cooling of the high-density antiproton stack, in momentum and both transverse planes. In the beginning, in a single band, 1-2 GHz, later in 2 bands, 2-4 and 4-8 GHz. View down the centre of a pickup or kicker. See also 7906189, 7906190, 7906583.

  5. Experimental investigation of an active magnetic regenerative heat circulator applied to self-heat recuperation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotani, Yui; Kansha, Yasuki; Ishizuka, Masanori; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation into an active magnetic regenerative (AMR) heat circulator based on self-heat recuperation technology, was conducted to evaluate its energy saving potential in heat circulation. In an AMR heat circulator, magnetocaloric effect is applied to recuperate the heat exergy of the process fluid. The recuperated heat can be reused to heat the feed process fluid and realize self-heat recuperation. In this paper, AMR heat circulator has newly been constructed to determine the amount of heat circulated when applied to self-heat recuperation and the energy consumption of the heat circulator. Gadolinium and water was used as the magnetocaloric working material and the process fluid, respectively. The heat circulated amount was determined by measuring the temperature of the process fluid and gadolinium. The net work input for heat circulation was obtained from the magnetizing and demagnetizing forces and the distance travelled by the magnetocaloric bed. The results were compared with the minimum work input needed for heat circulation derived from exergy loss during heat exchange. It was seen that the experimentally obtained value was close to the minimum work input needed for heat circulation. - Highlights: • AMR heat circulator has newly been constructed for experimental evaluation. • Heat circulation in the vicinity of Curie temperature was observed. • Energy consumption of an AMR heat circulator has been measured. • Energy saving for processes near Curie temperature of working material was seen

  6. An IGBT Driven Slotted Beam Pipe Kicker for SPEAR III Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The SPEAR III injection kicker system is composed of three kicker magnets, K1, K2, and K3. These magnets, along with the power modulators to drive them constitute an injection system which will be used to deflect an incoming electron beam with an energy of 3.3 GeV by an angle of 2.5 mrad for K1 and K3, and 1 mrad for K2. The pulse shape of the magnetic field in the three magnets must be matched in order to preserve a closed orbit. The pulse duration is required to be less than 780 ns, with rise and fall times of less than 375 ns, and a pulse repetition frequency of 10 Hz. The aperture of all three magnets is 60 x 34 mm in an 8 inch vacuum vessel. The magnetic length is 1.2 m for K1 and K3, and 0.6 m for K2 [1]. The magnet design employs a slotted beam pipe which is shorted at one end. A solid state IGBT based, induction type of modulator drives the magnets. Modulators for K1 and K3 consist of eight 4.5 kV, 600 A IGBTs, and eight Finemet magnet cores with four 22.5 Ohm output cables to drive 2381 A into the magnets. The modulator for K2 uses four IGBTs and cores, and 8 output cables to produce a 2619 A pulse. Cables of length greater than one half the pulse width must be used in order to avoid reflections from the shorted magnet. The design charge voltage for the modulators is 20 kV for K1 and K3. This paper describes the magnet and modulator design, as and presents test data from a prototype system

  7. Heat flux anomalies in Antarctica revealed from satellite magnetic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maule, Cathrine Fox; Purucker, Michael E.; Olsen, Nils

    2005-01-01

    a method that uses satellite magnetic data to estimate the heat flux underneath the Antarctic ice sheet. We found that the heat flux underneath the ice sheet varies from 40 to 185 megawatts per square meter and that areas of high heat flux coincide with known current volcanism and some areas known to have...

  8. Magnetic properties of heat treated bacterial ferrihydrite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaev, D.A.; Krasikov, A.A.; Dubrovskiy, A.A.; Popkov, S.I.; Stolyar, S.V.; Bayukov, O.A.; Iskhakov, R.S.; Ladygina, V.P.; Yaroslavtsev, R.N.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic properties of ferrihydrite nanoparticles, which are products of vital functions of Klebsiella oxitoca bacteria, have been studied. The initial powder containing the nanoparticles in an organic shell was subjected to low-temperature (T=160 °C) heat treatment for up to 240 h. The bacterial ferrihydrite particles exhibit a superparamagnetic behavior. Their characteristic blocking temperature increases from 26 to 80 K with the heat treatment. Analysis of the magnetization curves with regard to the magnetic moment distribution function and antiferromagnetic contribution shows that the low-temperature heat treatment enhances the average magnetic moment of a particle; i.e., the nanoparticles coarsen, probably due to their partial agglomeration during heat treatment. It was established that the blocking temperature nonlinearly depends on the particle volume. Therefore, a model was proposed that takes into account both the bulk and surface magnetic anisotropy. Using this model, the bulk and surface magnetic anisotropy constants K V ≈1.7×10 5 erg/cm 3 and K S ≈0.055 erg/cm 2 have been determined. The effect of the surface magnetic anisotropy of ferrihydrite nanoparticles on the observed magnetic hysteresis loops is discussed. - Highlights: • Ferrihydrite nanoparticles of biogenic origin are obtained. • Magnetic characterization reveals superparamagnetic behavior. • The blocking temperature increases upon the low-temperature (T=160 °C) heat treatment. • The blocking temperature nonlinearly depends on the particle volume. • The bulk and surface magnetic anisotropy constants have been determined.

  9. Magnetic nanofluid properties as the heat transfer enhancement agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roszko Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper was to investigate an influence of various parameters on the heat transfer processes with strong magnetic field utilization. Two positions of experimental enclosure in magnetic environment, two methods of preparation and three different concentrations of nanoparticles (0.0112, 0.056 and 0.112 vol.% were taken into account together with the magnetic field strength. Analysed nanofluids consisted of distilled water (diamagnetic and Cu/CuO particles (paramagnetic of 40–60 nm size. The nanofluids components had different magnetic properties what caused complex interaction of forces’ system. The heat transfer data and fluid flow structure demonstrated the influence of magnetic field on the convective phenomena. The most visible consequence of magnetic field application was the heat transfer enhancement and flow reorganization under applied conditions.

  10. Heat analysis of the magnetic limiter plate for JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ninomiya, Hiromasa; Shimizu, Masatsugu; Ohta, Mitsuru

    1977-03-01

    Heat analysis has been made of the magnetic limiter plate for JT-60. Test materials of the magnetic limiter plate are molybdenum, graphite, pyrolytic graphite and silicon carbide. It is assumed in calculation of the heat analysis that 10MW is deposited on the 2 cm wide surface of the magnetic limiter plate in about 10 sec. The magnetic limiter plate of pyrolytic graphite is a stack of pyrolytic graphite sheets, heat input is in the deposition plane to take advantage of the large heat conductivity along this plane. Pyrolytic graphite is the best in terms of temperature rise. The temperature of molybdenum and graphite rise up to 1800 0 C and 620 0 C, respectively, in an deposition of 10 MWx10sec. Silicon carbide is not suitable for the magnetic limiter plate. Because the plasma of the JT-60 discharges every 10 min, the average heat flux decreases to 17 w/cm 2 during the each interval. When the magnetic limiter plate has the above heat inflow, a maximum of above 1000 0 C occurs at the edge far from the joint to the thick ring of the vacuum vessel. To reduce heat load of the magnetic limiter plate, an alternating current (2 -- 5Hz) is superposed on the magnetic limiter coil current. The intersection of separatrix line and magnetic limiter plate then moves cyclically more than 10 cm. Concerning temperature distribution of the multi-groove magnetic limiter plate, its dimensions are determined by the limitation in vapor pressure to prevent the impurity inflow. (auth.)

  11. A two-stage heating scheme for heat assisted magnetic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shaomin; Kim, Jeongmin; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang; Bogy, David

    2014-05-01

    Heat Assisted Magnetic Recording (HAMR) has been proposed to extend the storage areal density beyond 1 Tb/in.2 for the next generation magnetic storage. A near field transducer (NFT) is widely used in HAMR systems to locally heat the magnetic disk during the writing process. However, much of the laser power is absorbed around the NFT, which causes overheating of the NFT and reduces its reliability. In this work, a two-stage heating scheme is proposed to reduce the thermal load by separating the NFT heating process into two individual heating stages from an optical waveguide and a NFT, respectively. As the first stage, the optical waveguide is placed in front of the NFT and delivers part of laser energy directly onto the disk surface to heat it up to a peak temperature somewhat lower than the Curie temperature of the magnetic material. Then, the NFT works as the second heating stage to heat a smaller area inside the waveguide heated area further to reach the Curie point. The energy applied to the NFT in the second heating stage is reduced compared with a typical single stage NFT heating system. With this reduced thermal load to the NFT by the two-stage heating scheme, the lifetime of the NFT can be extended orders longer under the cyclic load condition.

  12. Design of barrier bucket kicker control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Fa-Fu; Wang, Yan-Yu; Yin, Jun; Zhou, De-Tai; Shen, Guo-Dong; Zheng, Yang-De.; Zhang, Jian-Chuan; Yin, Jia; Bai, Xiao; Ma, Xiao-Li

    2018-05-01

    The Heavy-Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) contains two synchrotrons: the main cooler storage ring (CSRm) and the experimental cooler storage ring (CSRe). Beams are extracted from CSRm, and injected into CSRe. To apply the Barrier Bucket (BB) method on the CSRe beam accumulation, a new BB technology based kicker control system was designed and implemented. The controller of the system is implemented using an Advanced Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) Machine (ARM) chip and a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) chip. Within the architecture, ARM is responsible for data presetting and floating number arithmetic processing. The FPGA computes the RF phase point of the two rings and offers more accurate control of the time delay. An online preliminary experiment on HIRFL was also designed to verify the functionalities of the control system. The result shows that the reference trigger point of two different sinusoidal RF signals for an arbitrary phase point was acquired with a matched phase error below 1° (approximately 2.1 ns), and the step delay time better than 2 ns were realized.

  13. Feasibility analysis of reciprocating magnetic heat pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, A. V.; Hartley, J. G.; Shelton, Sam V.; Smith, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    A reciprocating gadolinium core in a regeneration fluid column in the warm bore of a superconducting solenoidal magnet is considered for magnetic refrigeration in 3.517 MW (1000 ton) applications. A procedure is presented to minimize the amount of superconducting cable needed in the magnet design. Estimated system capital costs for an ideal magnetic refrigerator of this type become comparable to conventional chillers as the frequency of reciprocation approaches 10 Hertz. A 1-D finite difference analysis of a regenerator cycling at 0.027 Hertz is presented which exhibits some of the features seen in the experiments of G. V. Brown.

  14. Effect of heat treatment on structure and magnetic properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fe46Co35Ni19/CNTs nanocomposites have been prepared by an easy two-step route including adsorption and heat treatment processes. We investigated the effect of heat treatment conditions on structure, morphology, nanoparticle sizes and magnetic properties of the Fe46Co35Ni19 alloy nanoparticles attached on the ...

  15. SPS Injection and Beam Quality for LHC Heavy Ions With 150 ns Kicker Rise Time

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, Brennan; Ducimetière, Laurent; Kotzian, Gerd; Uythoven, Jan; Velotti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    As part of the LHC Injectors Upgrade project for LHC heavy ions, the SPS injection kicker system rise time needs reduction below its present 225 ns. One technically challenging option under consideration is the addition of fast Pulse Forming Lines in parallel to the existing Pulse Forming Networks for the 12 kicker magnets MKP-S, targeting a system field rise time of 100 ns. An alternative option is to optimise the system to approach the existing individual magnet field rise time (2-98%) of 150 ns. This would still significantly increase the number of colliding bunches in LHC while minimising the cost and effort of the system upgrade. The observed characteristics of the present system are described, compared to the expected system rise time, together with results of simulations and measurements with 175 and 150 ns injection batch spacing. The expected beam quality at injection into LHC is quantified, with the emittance growth and simulated tail population taking into account expected jitter and synchronisatio...

  16. Magnetic surface compression heating in the heliotron device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uo, K.; Motojima, O.

    1982-01-01

    The slow adiabatic compression of the plasma in the heliotron device is examined. It has a prominent characteristic that the plasma equilibrium always exists at each stage of the compression. The heating efficiency is calculated. We show the possible access to fusion. A large amount of the initial investment for the heating system (NBI or RF) is reduced by using the magnetic surface compression heating. (author)

  17. A comparison of the heating effect of magnetic fluid between the alternating and rotating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beković, Miloš; Trlep, Mladen; Jesenik, Marko; Hamler, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic fluids are distinct magnetic materials that have recently been the subject of extensive research precisely because of their unique properties. One of them is the heating effect when exposed to alternating magnetic fields, wherein the objective is to use this property in medicine as an alternative method for the treatment of tumors in the body. In this paper, we focus on two methods of magnetizing magnetic fluids, firstly using the alternating magnetic field (AMF), and secondly with the rotational magnetic field (RMF). The effects of the first are scientifically well-established, whilst the impact of RMF has not as yet been investigated as presented in this article. So far the effects of RMF have only been studied at low frequencies and high amplitudes, or vice versa. This article presents the results of heating at high frequencies and high magnetic field amplitudes, and the results compared with AMF. This paper presents the construction and implementation of a measuring system which is suitable both types of magnetic field. - Highlights: • Development of a new measurement system for the characterization of magnetic fluids. • System enables pulsed magnetic field, or a rotary magnetic field. • Analysis of the conditions to create a rotational magnetic field by means of a double power supply. • Good agreement between the analytical and numerical calculation of magnetic field and measurements. • Increase of the heating power when sample is exposed to rotating field compared to pulsating field

  18. Electrospun magnetic nanofibre mats – A new bondable biomaterial using remotely activated magnetic heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yi [Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Key Laboratory of Science & Technology of Eco-Textile, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai (China); Leung, Victor; Yuqin Wan, Lynn [Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Dutz, Silvio [Institut für Biomedizinische Technik und Informatik, Technische Universität Ilmenau (Germany); Department of Nano Biophotonics, Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena (Germany); Ko, Frank K., E-mail: frank.ko@ubc.ca [Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Häfeli, Urs O., E-mail: urs.hafeli@ubc.ca [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    A solvothermal process was adopted to produce hydrophilic magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles which were subsequently emulsified with a chloroform/methanol (70/30 v/v) solution of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and then electrospun into a 0.2 mm thick PCL mat. The magnetic heating of the mats at a field amplitude of 25 kA/m and frequency of 400 kHz exhibited promising efficiency for magnetic hyperthermia, with a specific absorption rate of about 40 W/g for the magnetic mat. The produced heat was used to melt the magnetic mat onto the surrounding non-magnetic polymer mat from within, without destroying the nanostructure of the non-magnetic polymer more than 0.5 mm away. Magnetic nanofibre mats might thus be useful for internal heat sealing applications, and potentially also for thermotherapy.

  19. Slot-type kicker for the AA stochastic cooling

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1979-01-01

    A "slotted transmission line" structure was used for both pickups and the kicker of one of the stochastic cooling systems of the Antiproton Accumulator (AA). They served for the cooling of the high-density stack, in momentum and in both transverse planes. In the beginning in a single band, 1-2 GHz, later in 3 bands, 1-2, 2-4 and 4-8 GHz. The kicker of the first generation, shown here, was located where the dispersion was zero and the beam size small, and thus had a quadratic cross-section. The pickups were rectangular and wider in the horizontal plane. See also 7906193

  20. Peltier heat of a small polaron in a magnetic semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.H.; Emin, D.

    1985-01-01

    For the first time the heat transported with a small polaron in both antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic semiconductors is calculated. This heat, the Peltier heat, π, is obtained from the change of the entropy of the total system upon introduction of a charge carrier. We explicitly consider both the intrasite and intersite exchange interactions between a small polaron and the interacting spins of a spin-1/2 magnet. There are two competing magnetic contributions to the Peltier heat. First, adding the carrier increases the spin entropy of the system. This provides a positive contribution to π. Second, the exchange between the carrier and the sites about it enhances the exchange binding between these sites. This reduces the energetically allowable spin configurations and provides a negative contribution to π. At extremely high temperatures when kT exceeds the intrasite exchange energy, the first effect dominates. Then π is simply augmented by kT ln 2. However, well below the magnetic transition temperature the second effect dominates. In the experimentally accessible range between these limits both effects are comparable and sizable. The net magnetic contribution to the Peltier heat rises with temperature. Thus, a carrier's interactions with its magnetic environment produces a significant and distinctive contribution to its Peltier heat

  1. Peltier heat of a small polaron in a magnetic semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.L.H.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    The heat transported with a small polaron in both antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic semiconductors is calculated. This heat, the Peltier heat, π, is obtained from the change of the entropy of the total system upon introduction of a charge carrier. We explicitly consider both the intrasite and intersite exchange interactions between a small polaron and the interacting spins of a spin-1/2 magnet. There are two competing magnetic contributions to the Peltier heat. First, adding the carrier increases the spin entropy of the system. This provides a positive contribution to π. Second, the exchange between the carrier and the sites about it enhances the exchange binding between these sites. This reduces the energetically allowable spin configurations and provides a negative contribution to π. At extremely high temperature when kT exceeds the intrasite exchange energy, the first effect dominates. Then π is simply augmented by kTln2. However, well below the magnetic transition temperature the second effect dominates. In the experimentally accessible range between these limits both effects are comparable and sizable. The net magnetic contribution to the Peltier heat rises with temperature. Thus, a carrier's interactions with its magnetic environment produces a significant and distinctive contribution to its Peltier heat

  2. Experimental study of ion heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, S.C.

    2000-01-28

    This dissertation reports an experimental study of ion heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection, which is the annihilation and topological rearrangement of magnetic flux in a conductive plasma. Reconnection is invoked often to explain particle heating and acceleration in both laboratory and naturally occurring plasmas. However, a simultaneous account of reconnection and its associated energy conversion has been elusive due to the extreme inaccessibility of reconnection events, e.g. in the solar corona, the Earth's magnetosphere, or in fusion research plasmas. Experiments for this work were conducted on MRX (Magnetic Reconnection Experiment), which creates a plasma environment allowing the reconnection process to be isolated, reproduced, and diagnosed in detail. Key findings of this work are the identification of local ion heating during magnetic reconnection and the determination that non-classical effects must provide the heating mechanism. Measured ion flows are sub-Alfvenic and can provide only slight viscous heating, and classical ion-electron interactions can be neglected due to the very long energy equipartition time. The plasma resistivity in the reconnection layer is seen to be enhanced over the classical value, and the ion heating is observed to scale with the enhancement factor, suggesting a relationship between the magnetic energy dissipation mechanism and the ion heating mechanism. The observation of non-classical ion heating during reconnection has significant implications for understanding the role played by non-classical dissipation mechanisms in generating fast reconnection. The findings are relevant for many areas of space and laboratory plasma research, a prime example being the currently unsolved problem of solar coronal heating. In the process of performing this work, local measurements of ion temperature and flows in a well-characterized reconnection layer were obtained for the first time in either laboratory or observational

  3. Experimental study of ion heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, S.C.

    2000-01-01

    This dissertation reports an experimental study of ion heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection, which is the annihilation and topological rearrangement of magnetic flux in a conductive plasma. Reconnection is invoked often to explain particle heating and acceleration in both laboratory and naturally occurring plasmas. However, a simultaneous account of reconnection and its associated energy conversion has been elusive due to the extreme inaccessibility of reconnection events, e.g. in the solar corona, the Earth's magnetosphere, or in fusion research plasmas. Experiments for this work were conducted on MRX (Magnetic Reconnection Experiment), which creates a plasma environment allowing the reconnection process to be isolated, reproduced, and diagnosed in detail. Key findings of this work are the identification of local ion heating during magnetic reconnection and the determination that non-classical effects must provide the heating mechanism. Measured ion flows are sub-Alfvenic and can provide only slight viscous heating, and classical ion-electron interactions can be neglected due to the very long energy equipartition time. The plasma resistivity in the reconnection layer is seen to be enhanced over the classical value, and the ion heating is observed to scale with the enhancement factor, suggesting a relationship between the magnetic energy dissipation mechanism and the ion heating mechanism. The observation of non-classical ion heating during reconnection has significant implications for understanding the role played by non-classical dissipation mechanisms in generating fast reconnection. The findings are relevant for many areas of space and laboratory plasma research, a prime example being the currently unsolved problem of solar coronal heating. In the process of performing this work, local measurements of ion temperature and flows in a well-characterized reconnection layer were obtained for the first time in either laboratory or observational

  4. Lubricant depletion under various laser heating conditions in Heat Assisted Magnetic Recording (HAMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shaomin; Wu, Haoyu; Bogy, David

    2014-09-01

    Heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) is expected to increase the storage areal density to more than 1 Tb/in2 in hard disk drives (HDDs). In this technology, a laser is used to heat the magnetic media to the Curie point (~400-600 °C) during the writing process. The lubricant on the top of a magnetic disk could evaporate and be depleted under the laser heating. The change of the lubricant can lead to instability of the flying slider and failure of the head-disk interface (HDI). In this study, a HAMR test stage is developed to study the lubricant thermal behavior. Various heating conditions are controlled for the study of the lubricant thermal depletion. The effects of laser heating repetitions and power levels on the lubricant depletion are investigated experimentally. The lubricant reflow behavior is discussed as well.

  5. A novel heat engine for magnetizing superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coombs, T A; Hong, Z; Zhu, X [Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Krabbes, G [IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2008-03-01

    The potential of bulk melt-processed YBCO single domains to trap significant magnetic fields (Tomita and Murakami 2003 Nature 421 517-20; Fuchs et al 2000 Appl. Phys. Lett. 76 2107-9) at cryogenic temperatures makes them particularly attractive for a variety of engineering applications including superconducting magnets, magnetic bearings and motors (Coombs et al 1999 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 9 968-71; Coombs et al 2005 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 15 2312-5). It has already been shown that large fields can be obtained in single domain samples at 77 K. A range of possible applications exist in the design of high power density electric motors (Jiang et al 2006 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 1164-8). Before such devices can be created a major problem needs to be overcome. Even though all of these devices use a superconductor in the role of a permanent magnet and even though the superconductor can trap potentially huge magnetic fields (greater than 10 T) the problem is how to induce the magnetic fields. There are four possible known methods: (1) cooling in field; (2) zero field cooling, followed by slowly applied field; (3) pulse magnetization; (4) flux pumping. Any of these methods could be used to magnetize the superconductor and this may be done either in situ or ex situ. Ideally the superconductors are magnetized in situ. There are several reasons for this: first, if the superconductors should become demagnetized through (i) flux creep, (ii) repeatedly applied perpendicular fields (Vanderbemden et al 2007 Phys. Rev. B 75 (17)) or (iii) by loss of cooling then they may be re-magnetized without the need to disassemble the machine; secondly, there are difficulties with handling very strongly magnetized material at cryogenic temperatures when assembling the machine; thirdly, ex situ methods would require the machine to be assembled both cold and pre-magnetized and would offer significant design difficulties. Until room temperature superconductors can be prepared, the

  6. A novel heat engine for magnetizing superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coombs, T A; Hong, Z; Zhu, X; Krabbes, G

    2008-01-01

    The potential of bulk melt-processed YBCO single domains to trap significant magnetic fields (Tomita and Murakami 2003 Nature 421 517-20; Fuchs et al 2000 Appl. Phys. Lett. 76 2107-9) at cryogenic temperatures makes them particularly attractive for a variety of engineering applications including superconducting magnets, magnetic bearings and motors (Coombs et al 1999 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 9 968-71; Coombs et al 2005 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 15 2312-5). It has already been shown that large fields can be obtained in single domain samples at 77 K. A range of possible applications exist in the design of high power density electric motors (Jiang et al 2006 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 1164-8). Before such devices can be created a major problem needs to be overcome. Even though all of these devices use a superconductor in the role of a permanent magnet and even though the superconductor can trap potentially huge magnetic fields (greater than 10 T) the problem is how to induce the magnetic fields. There are four possible known methods: (1) cooling in field; (2) zero field cooling, followed by slowly applied field; (3) pulse magnetization; (4) flux pumping. Any of these methods could be used to magnetize the superconductor and this may be done either in situ or ex situ. Ideally the superconductors are magnetized in situ. There are several reasons for this: first, if the superconductors should become demagnetized through (i) flux creep, (ii) repeatedly applied perpendicular fields (Vanderbemden et al 2007 Phys. Rev. B 75 (17)) or (iii) by loss of cooling then they may be re-magnetized without the need to disassemble the machine; secondly, there are difficulties with handling very strongly magnetized material at cryogenic temperatures when assembling the machine; thirdly, ex situ methods would require the machine to be assembled both cold and pre-magnetized and would offer significant design difficulties. Until room temperature superconductors can be prepared, the

  7. Threshold heating temperature for magnetic hyperthermia: Controlling the heat exchange with the blocking temperature of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, B.; Caraballo-Vivas, R. J.; Checca, N. R.; Zverev, V. I.; Salakhova, R. T.; Makarova, L. A.; Pyatakov, A. P.; Perov, N. S.; Tishin, A. M.; Shtil, A. A.; Rossi, A. L.; Reis, M. S.

    2018-04-01

    La0.75Sr0.25MnO3 nanoparticles with average diameter close to 20.9 nm were synthesized using a sol-gel method. Measurements showed that the heating process stops at the blocking temperaturesignificantly below the Curie temperature. Measurements of Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) as a function of AC magnetic field revealed a superquadratic power law, indicating that, in addition to usual Néel and Brown relaxation, the hysteresis also plays an important role in the mechanism of heating. The ability to control the threshold heating temperature, a low remanent magnetization and a low field needed to achieve the magnetic saturation are the advantages of this material for therapeutic magnetic hyperthermia.

  8. Free Magnetic Energy and Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy; Moore, Ron; Falconer, David

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the coronal X-ray luminosity of an active region increases roughly in direct proportion to the total photospheric flux of the active region's magnetic field (Fisher et al. 1998). It is also observed, however, that the coronal luminosity of active regions of nearly the same flux content can differ by an order of magnitude. In this presentation, we analyze 10 active regions with roughly the same total magnetic flux. We first determine several coronal properties, such as X-ray luminosity (calculated using Hinode XRT), peak temperature (calculated using Hinode EIS), and total Fe XVIII emission (calculated using SDO AIA). We present the dependence of these properties on a proxy of the free magnetic energy of the active region

  9. Fast Extraction Kicker for the Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Santis, Stefano; Urakawa, Junji; Naito, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a study for the design of a fast extraction kicker to be installed in the Accelerator Test Facility ring at KEK. This activity is carried on in the framework of the ATF2 project, which will be built on the KEK Tsukuba campus as an extension of the existing ATF, taking advantage of the worlds smallest normalized emittance achieved there. ATF2's primary goal is to operate as a test facility and establish the hardware and beam handling technologies envisaged for the International Linear Collider. In particular, the fast extraction kicker object of the present paper is an important component of the ILC damping rings, since its rise and fall time define the minimum distance between bunches and ultimately the damping rings length itself. Building on the initial results presented at EPAC '06, we report on the present status of the kicker design and define the minimum characteristics for pulsers and other subsystems. In addition to the original scheme with multiple stripline modules producing a total deflection of 5 mrad, we also investigated a scheme with a single kicker module for a reduced deflection of 1 mrad placed inside a closed orbit bump, which takes the electron closer to the extraction septum

  10. Slot-type pickup/kicker for AA stochastic cooling

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    A "slotted transmission line" was used for both pickups and kickers of the stochastic cooling systems of the AA. They served for the cooling of the high-density antiproton stack, in momentum and both transverse planes. In the beginning in a single band, 1-2 GHz, later in 2 bands, 2-4 and 4-8 GHz. See also 7906190, 7906193.

  11. Performances of four magnetic heat-pump cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F.C.; Murphy, R.W.; Mel, V.C.; Chen, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic heat pumps have been successfully used for refrigeration applications at near absolute-zero-degree temperatures. In these applications, a temperature lift of a few degrees in a cryogenic environment is sufficient and can be easily achieved by a simple magnetic heat-pump cycle. To extend magnetic heat pumping to other temperature ranges and other types of applications in which the temperature lift is more than just a few degrees requires more involved cycle processes. This paper investigates the characteristics of a few better-known thermomagnetic heat-pump cycles (Carnot, Ericsson, Stirling, and regenerative) in extended ranges of temperature lift. The regenerative cycle is the most efficient one. For gadolinium operating between 0 and 7 T (Tesla) in a heat pump cycle with a heat-rejection temperature of 320 K, our analysis predicted a 42% loss in coefficient of performance at 260 K cooling temperature, and a 15% loss in capacity at 232 K cooling temperature for the constant-field cycle as compared with the ideal regenerative cycle. Such substantial penalties indicate that the potential irreversibilities from this one source (the additional heat transfer that would be needed for the constant-field vs. the ideal regenerative cycle) may adversely affect the viability of certain proposed MHP concepts if the relevant loss mechanisms are not adequately addressed

  12. Heat diffusion and magnetic field generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holstein, P.A.

    1983-10-01

    In the report of CECAM workshop in 1982 some results of heat diffusion, when the spontaneous B-field is calculated, have been given. Separately, a similar code (magneto-calo-dynamic or MCD code) has been built and it was interesting to compare them. Comparisom has been made during the workshop of October 1983

  13. Role of Magnetic Carpet in Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... One of the fundamental questions in solar physics is how the solar corona maintains its high temperature of several million Kelvin above photosphere with a temperature of 6000 K. Observations show that solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different ...

  14. Conceptual design of an active magnetic regenerative heat circulator based on self-heat recuperation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotani, Yui; Kansha, Yasuki; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    A conceptual design of an active magnetic regenerative (AMR) heat circulator for self-heat recuperation to realize energy savings in thermal processes is proposed. The process fluid heat is recuperated by the magnetocaloric effect of ferromagnetic material through the AMR heat circulation cycle. In an AMR heat circulator, all the process fluid heat is circulated and no make-up heat is added to raise the process fluid to its set temperature. A one-dimensional mathematical model of the AMR heat circulator was constructed to understand its behavior and verify its energy-saving potential. From the constructed one-dimensional mathematical model, it is seen that AMR heat circulator has potential to drastically reduce the total energy consumption in a thermal process. The temperature–entropy diagram shows that in order to gain the maximum energy saving, optimization of the parameters such as the flow rate and geometry of the ferromagnetic working material beds is needed. - Highlights: • Self-heat recuperative active magnetic regenerative heat circulator is introduced. • One-dimensional model is constructed to verify its energy-saving potential. • Total energy consumption in thermal process is drastically reduced. • Further energy can be saved by reducing the overlapping of thermodynamic cycles

  15. Micromagnetic modeling for heat-assisted magnetic recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhenghua; Wei Dan; Wei Fulin

    2008-01-01

    Heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) is one of the candidate systems beyond the perpendicular recording technology. Here, a micromagnetic model and a heat transfer model are introduced to study the heating and cooling processes in the HAMR media; then, by integration of the SPT head and the laser heating source, the recording performance is simulated and investigated on a single track at an area density of 1 Tb/in 2 . In the HAMR system, the temperature in the medium under the laser wave guide is increased by heating, and decreased by air bearing and heat conduction when the write process really occurred. The target of this study is to find the proper design of the head-laser assembly for optimum recording. It is found that the proper distance between the laser wave guide and the head's main pole rear/front edge is only 41.4/1.4 nm for optimum recording performance

  16. Electromagnetic cold-test characterization of the quad-driven stripline kicker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlap, J E; Nelson, S D.

    1998-01-01

    The first kicker concept design for beam deflection was constructed to allow stripline plates to be driven; thus directing, or kicking, the electron beam into two subsequent beam lines. This quad-driven stripline kicker is an eight port electromagnetic network and consists of two actively driven plates and two terminated plates. Electromagnetic measurements performed on the bi-kicker and quad-kicker were designed to determine: (1) the quality of the fabrication of the kicker, including component alignments; (2) quantification of the input feed transition regions from the input coax to the driven kicker plates; (3) identification of properties of the kicker itself without involving the effects of the electron beam; (4) coupling between a line current source and the plates of the kicker; and (5) the effects on the driven current to simulate an electron beam through the body of the kicker. Included in this are the angular variations inside the kicker to examine modal distributions. The goal of the simulated beam was to allow curved path and changing radius studies to be performed electromagnetically. The cold test results produced were then incorporated into beam models

  17. The magnetic-nanofluid heat pipe with superior thermal properties through magnetic enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This study developed a magnetic-nanofluid (MNF) heat pipe (MNFHP) with magnetically enhanced thermal properties. Its main characteristic was additional porous iron nozzle in the evaporator and the condenser to form a unique flowing pattern of MNF slug and vapor, and to magnetically shield the magnet attraction on MNF flowing. The results showed that an optimal thermal conductivity exists in the applied field of 200 Oe. Furthermore, the minor thermal performance of MNF at the condenser limited the thermal conductivity of the entire MNFHP, which was 1.6 times greater than that filled with water for the input power of 60 W. The feasibilities of an MNFHP with the magnetically enhanced heat transfer and the ability of vertical operation were proved for both a promising heat-dissipation device and the energy architecture integrated with an additional energy system. PMID:22716909

  18. Magnetic nanowires and hyperthermia: How geometry and material affect heat production efficiency

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.; Zaher, A.; Perez, Jose E.; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia, which refers to the production of heat by magnetic nanostructures under an alternating magnetic field (AMF), has been previously investigated with superparamagnetic nanobeads as a cancer therapy method. Magnetic nanowires (NWs

  19. Surface spin tunneling and heat dissipation in magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palakkal, Jasnamol P.; Obula Reddy, Chinna; Paulose, Ajeesh P.; Sankar, Cheriyedath Raj

    2018-03-01

    Quantum superparamagnetic state is observed in ultra-fine magnetic particles, which is often experimentally identified by a significant hike in magnetization towards low temperatures much below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. Here, we report experimentally observed surface spin relaxation at low temperatures in hydrated magnesium ferrite nanoparticles of size range of about 5 nm. We observed time dependent oscillatory magnetization of the sample below 2.5 K, which is attributed to surface spin tunneling. Interestingly, we observed heat dissipation during the process by using an external thermometer.

  20. Liquid neon heat intercept for superconducting energy storage magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, A.; McIntosh, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    Previous analyses of heat intercept solutions are extended to include both insulation and strut heat leaks. The impact of using storable, boiling cryogens for heat intercept fluids, specifically liquid neon and nitrogen, is also examined. The selection of fluid for the heat intercepts is described. Refrigeration power for 1000 and 5000 MWhr SMES units is shown with optimum refrigeration power for each quantity shown in tables. Nitrogen and Neon cooled intercept location for minimum total refrigeration power for a 5000 MWhr SMES are each shown, as well as the location of nitrogen and neon cooled intercepts for minimum total refrigeration power for 5000 MWhr SMES. Cost comparisons are itemized and neon cost and availability discussed. For a large energy storage magnet system, liquid neon is a more effective heat intercept fluid than liquid nitrogen. Reasons and application of the conclusion are amplified

  1. Magnetic induction heating of FeCr nanocrystalline alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Polo, C.; Larumbe, S.; Pérez-Landazábal, J.I.; Pastor, J.M.; Olivera, J.; Soto-Armañanzas, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this work the thermal effects of magnetic induction heating in (FeCr) 73.5 Si 13.5 Cu 1 B 9 Nb 3 amorphous and nanocrystalline wires were analyzed. A single piece of wire was immersed in a glass capillary filled with water and subjected to an ac magnetic field (frequency, 320 kHz). The initial temperature rise enabled the determination of the effective Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). Maximum SAR values are achieved for those samples displaying high magnetic susceptibility, where the eddy current losses dominate the induction heating behavior. Moreover, the amorphous sample with Curie temperature around room temperature displays characteristic features of self-regulated hyperthermia. - Highlights: ► Amorphous and nanocrystalline Fe based alloys with tailored Curie temperature of the amorphous phase. ► Induction heating effects under the action of a ac magnetic field. ► Self-regulated characteristics based on the control of the Curie temperature. ► Dominant role of the eddy-current losses in the self-heating phenomena.

  2. Nanomodified heat-accumulating materials controlled by a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchegolkov, Alexander; Shchegolkov, Alexey; Dyachkova, Tatyana; Bodin, Nikolay; Semenov, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    The paper presents studies of nanomodified heat-accumulating materials controlled by a magnetic field. In order to obtain controlled heat-accumulating materials, synthetic motor oil CASTROL 0W30, ferromagnetic particles, CNTs and paraffin were used. Mechanically activated carbon nanotubes with ferromagnetic particles were used for the nanomodification of paraffin. Mechanoactivation ensured the production of ferromagnetic particles with an average particle size of 5 µm. Using an extrusion plant, a mixture of CNTs and ferromagnetic particles was introduced into the paraffin. Further, the nanomodified paraffin in a granular form was introduced into synthetic oil. To conduct experimental studies, a contactless method for measuring temperature was used. The thermal contact control with the help of the obtained nanomodified material is possible with a magnetic induction of 1250 mT, and a heat flux of about 74 kW/m2 is provided at the same time.

  3. A helium based pulsating heat pipe for superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Luis Diego; Miller, Franklin; Pfotenhauer, John

    2014-01-01

    This study was inspired to investigate an alternative cooling system using a helium-based pulsating heat pipes (PHP), for low temperature superconducting magnets. In addition, the same approach can be used for exploring other low temperature applications. The advantages of PHP for transferring heat and smoothing temperature profiles in various room temperature applications have been explored for the past 20 years. An experimental apparatus has been designed, fabricated and operated and is primarily composed of an evaporator and a condenser; in which both are thermally connected by a closed loop capillary tubing. The main goal is to measure the heat transfer properties of this device using helium as the working fluid. The evaporator end of the PHP is comprised of a copper winding in which heat loads up to 10 watts are generated, while the condenser is isothermal and can reach 4.2 K via a two stage Sumitomo RDK408A2 GM cryocooler. Various experimental design features are highlighted. Additionally, performance results in the form of heat transfer and temperature characteristics are provided as a function of average condenser temperature, PHP fill ratio, and evaporator heat load. Results are summarized in the form of a dimensionless correlation and compared to room temperature systems. Implications for superconducting magnet stability are highlighted.

  4. Simulation and measurement of the electrostatic beam kicker in the low-energy undulator test line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldschmidt, G. J.

    1998-01-01

    An electrostatic kicker has been constructed for use in the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The function of the kicker is to limit the amount of beam current to be accelerated by the APS linac. Two electrodes within the kicker create an electric field that adjusts the trajectory of the beam. This paper will explore the static fields that are set up between the offset electrode plates and determine the reaction of the beam to this field. The kicker was numerically simulated using the electromagnetic solver package MAFIA [1

  5. Investigation of heat distribution during magnetic heating treatment using a polyurethane–ferrofluid phantom-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrich, F.; Rahn, H.; Odenbach, S.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic heating treatment can be used as an adjuvant treatment for cancer therapy. In this therapy, magnetic nanoparticles are enriched inside the tumour and exposed to an alternating magnetic field. Due to magnetic losses the temperature in the tumour rises. The resulting temperature profile inside the tumour is useful for the therapeutic success. In this context heat transfer between tissue with nanoparticles and tissue without nanoparticles is a highly important feature which is actually not understood in detail. In order to investigate this, a phantom has been created which can be used to measure the temperature profile around a region enriched with magnetic nanoparticles. This phantom is composed of a material, which has similar thermal conductivity as human tissue. A tempered water bath surrounds the phantom to establish a constant surrounding temperature simulating the heat sink provided by the human body in a real therapeutic application. It has been found that even at a low concentration of magnetic nanoparticles around 13 mg/ml, sufficient heating of the enriched region can be achieved. Moreover it has been observed that the temperature drops rapidly in the material surrounding the enriched region. Corresponding numerical investigations provide a basis for future recalculations of the temperature inside the tumour using temperature data obtained in the surrounding tissue. - Highlights: • The temperature profile by magnetic hyperthermia was examined. • A model was built to get a deeper understanding of the temperature profile. • The temperature profile of the model inside magnetic fields was measured. • Based on the model a simulation of the temperature profile was performed. • The simulated temperature profile agreed well with the measured profile

  6. Construction and 60 kV tests of the prototype pulser for the LHC injection kicker system

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Carlier, E; Ducimetière, L; Schröder, G; Vossenberg, Eugène B

    1999-01-01

    The European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) is constructing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Two counter-rotating proton beams will be injected into the LHC at an energy of 450 GeV by two kicker magnet systems, producing magnetic field pulses of approximately 900 ns rise time and 6.6 mu s flat top duration with a ripple of less than +or-0.5Both injection systems are composed of 4 travelling wave kicker magnets of 2.17 m length each, powered by pulse forming networks (PFNs). To achieve the high-required kick strength of 1.2 Tm, for a compact and cost efficient design, a characteristic impedance of 5 Ohms has been chosen. The design strategy for the magnets and generators has been defined after detailed analysis of existing systems. The electrical circuit has been optimised using the circuit analysis software PSpice. Most known parasitics have been modelled. A prototype PFN has been constructed at CERN and successfully tested at 60 kV. A calibration procedure has been developed and utilised for obtainin...

  7. Beam coupling impedance of fast stripline beam kickers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caporaso, G; Chen, Y J; Nelson, A D; Poole, B R

    1999-01-01

    A fast stripline beam kicker is used to dynamically switch a high current electron beam between two beamlines. The transverse dipole impedance of a stripline beam kicker has been previously determined from a simple transmission line model of the structure. This model did not include effects due to the long axial slots along the structure as well as the cavities and coaxial feed transition sections at the ends of the structure. 3-D time domain simulations show that the simple transmission line model underestimates the low frequency dipole beam coupling impedance by about 20% for our structure. In addition, the end cavities and transition sections can exhibit dipole impedances not included in the transmission line model. For high current beams, these additional dipole coupling terms can provide additional beam-induced steering effects not included in the transmission line model of the structure

  8. Slot-type pickup/kicker for AA stochastic cooling

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    A "slotted transmission line" was used for both pickups and kickers of the cooling systems of the AA. They served for the cooling of the high-density antiproton stack, in momentum and both transverse planes. In the beginning in a single band, 1-2 GHz, later in 2 bands, 2-4 and 4-8 GHz. Here we see the slotted electrodes partly pulled out of the outer casing. See also 7906189, 7906581X, 7896193.

  9. Dynamic devices: A primer on pickups and kickers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, D.A.; Lambertson, G.R.

    1991-11-01

    A charged-particle beam generates electromagnetic fields which in turn interact with the beam's surroundings. These interactions can produce fields which act back on the beam itself, or, if the surroundings'' are of suitably designed form (e.g., sensing electrodes with electrical connection to the outside world''), can provide information on various properties of the beam; such electrodes are generally known as pickups. Similarly, charged- particle beams respond to the presence of externally imposed electromagnetic fields; devices used to generate such fields are generally known as kickers. As we shall show, the behavior of an electrode system when it functions as a pickup is intimately related to its behavior as a kicker. A number of papers on pickup behavior have appeared in recent years in most of which the primary emphasis has been on beam instrumentation; there have also been several workshops on the subject. There have been several papers which have treated both pickup and kicker behavior of a particular electrode system, but this has been done in the context of discussing a specialized application, such as a stochastic cooling system. The approach in the present paper is similar to that of earlier works by one of the authors, which is to provide a unified treatment of pickup and kicker behavior, and, it is hoped, to give the reader an understanding which is both general and fundamental enough to make the above references easily accessible to him. As implied by the revised title, we have done the re-writing with the non-expert in mind. We have made the introduction both lengthier and more detailed, and done the same with much of the explanatory material and discussion.

  10. Dynamic devices: A primer on pickups and kickers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, D.A.; Lambertson, G.R.

    1991-11-01

    A charged-particle beam generates electromagnetic fields which in turn interact with the beam`s surroundings. These interactions can produce fields which act back on the beam itself, or, if the ``surroundings`` are of suitably designed form (e.g., sensing electrodes with electrical connection to the ``outside world``), can provide information on various properties of the beam; such electrodes are generally known as pickups. Similarly, charged- particle beams respond to the presence of externally imposed electromagnetic fields; devices used to generate such fields are generally known as kickers. As we shall show, the behavior of an electrode system when it functions as a pickup is intimately related to its behavior as a kicker. A number of papers on pickup behavior have appeared in recent years in most of which the primary emphasis has been on beam instrumentation; there have also been several workshops on the subject. There have been several papers which have treated both pickup and kicker behavior of a particular electrode system, but this has been done in the context of discussing a specialized application, such as a stochastic cooling system. The approach in the present paper is similar to that of earlier works by one of the authors, which is to provide a unified treatment of pickup and kicker behavior, and, it is hoped, to give the reader an understanding which is both general and fundamental enough to make the above references easily accessible to him. As implied by the revised title, we have done the re-writing with the non-expert in mind. We have made the introduction both lengthier and more detailed, and done the same with much of the explanatory material and discussion.

  11. Dynamic devices: A primer on pickups and kickers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, D.A.; Lambertson, G.R.

    1991-11-01

    A charged-particle beam generates electromagnetic fields which in turn interact with the beam's surroundings. These interactions can produce fields which act back on the beam itself, or, if the ''surroundings'' are of suitably designed form (e.g., sensing electrodes with electrical connection to the ''outside world''), can provide information on various properties of the beam; such electrodes are generally known as pickups. Similarly, charged- particle beams respond to the presence of externally imposed electromagnetic fields; devices used to generate such fields are generally known as kickers. As we shall show, the behavior of an electrode system when it functions as a pickup is intimately related to its behavior as a kicker. A number of papers on pickup behavior have appeared in recent years in most of which the primary emphasis has been on beam instrumentation; there have also been several workshops on the subject. There have been several papers which have treated both pickup and kicker behavior of a particular electrode system, but this has been done in the context of discussing a specialized application, such as a stochastic cooling system. The approach in the present paper is similar to that of earlier works by one of the authors, which is to provide a unified treatment of pickup and kicker behavior, and, it is hoped, to give the reader an understanding which is both general and fundamental enough to make the above references easily accessible to him. As implied by the revised title, we have done the re-writing with the non-expert in mind. We have made the introduction both lengthier and more detailed, and done the same with much of the explanatory material and discussion

  12. Simulation of the LHC injection kicker impedance test bench

    CERN Document Server

    Tsutsui, H

    2003-01-01

    The coupling impedance measurements of the LHC injection kicker test bench are simulated by HFSS code. The simulation gives qualitatively good agreement with the measurement. In order to damp the resonances, some ferrite rings are tested in the simulation. Longitudinal resonances are damped by a ferrite ring of large tan$\\delta_{\\mu}$. The effect of the ferrite ring is small for damping the transverse impedance resonance around 30 MHz.

  13. Synthesis of FeCo magnetic nanoalloys and investigation of heating properties for magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Özer; Fırat, Tezer

    2018-06-01

    In this study, size controlled FeCo colloidal magnetic nanoalloys in the range of 11.5-37.2 nm were synthesized by surfactant assistant ball milling method. Magnetic separation technique was performed subsequent to synthesis process so as to obtain magnetic nanoalloy fluid with narrow size distribution. Particle distribution was determined by transmission electron microscope (TEM) while X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements verified FeCo alloy formation as BCC structure. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) method was used to investigate magnetic properties of nanoalloys. Maximum saturation magnetization and maximum coercivity were obtained as 172 Am2/kg for nanoparticles with the mean size of 37.2 nm and 19.4 mT for nanoparticles with the mean size of 13.3 nm, respectively. The heating ability of FeCo magnetic nanoalloys was determined through calorimetrical measurements for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) applications. Heat generation mechanisms were investigated by using linear response theory and Stoner-Wohlfarth (S-W) model. Specific absorption rate (SAR) values were obtained in the range of 2-15 W/g for magnetic field frequency of 171 kHz and magnetic field strength in between 6 and 14 mT.

  14. Parallel heat transport in integrable and chaotic magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo-Negrete, D. del; Chacon, L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8071 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The study of transport in magnetized plasmas is a problem of fundamental interest in controlled fusion, space plasmas, and astrophysics research. Three issues make this problem particularly challenging: (i) The extreme anisotropy between the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field), {chi}{sub ||} , and the perpendicular, {chi}{sub Up-Tack }, conductivities ({chi}{sub ||} /{chi}{sub Up-Tack} may exceed 10{sup 10} in fusion plasmas); (ii) Nonlocal parallel transport in the limit of small collisionality; and (iii) Magnetic field lines chaos which in general complicates (and may preclude) the construction of magnetic field line coordinates. Motivated by these issues, we present a Lagrangian Green's function method to solve the local and non-local parallel transport equation applicable to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields in arbitrary geometry. The method avoids by construction the numerical pollution issues of grid-based algorithms. The potential of the approach is demonstrated with nontrivial applications to integrable (magnetic island), weakly chaotic (Devil's staircase), and fully chaotic magnetic field configurations. For the latter, numerical solutions of the parallel heat transport equation show that the effective radial transport, with local and non-local parallel closures, is non-diffusive, thus casting doubts on the applicability of quasilinear diffusion descriptions. General conditions for the existence of non-diffusive, multivalued flux-gradient relations in the temperature evolution are derived.

  15. Local and Nonlocal Parallel Heat Transport in General Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo-Negrete, D. del; Chacon, L.

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for the study of parallel transport in magnetized plasmas is presented. The method avoids numerical pollution issues of grid-based formulations and applies to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields with local or nonlocal parallel closures. In weakly chaotic fields, the method gives the fractal structure of the devil's staircase radial temperature profile. In fully chaotic fields, the temperature exhibits self-similar spatiotemporal evolution with a stretched-exponential scaling function for local closures and an algebraically decaying one for nonlocal closures. It is shown that, for both closures, the effective radial heat transport is incompatible with the quasilinear diffusion model.

  16. Magnetic properties of atmospheric PMx in a small settlement during heating and non-heating season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovsky, E.; Kotlik, B.; Zboril, R.; Kapicka, A.; Grison, H.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic properties of environmental samples can serve as fast and relatively cheap proxy method to investigate occurrence of iron oxides. These methods are very sensitive in detecting strongly magnetic compounds such as magnetite and maghemite and can reveal concentration and assess grain-size distribution of these minerals. This information can be significant in estimating e.g. the source of pollutants, monitoring pollution load, or investigating seasonal and climatic effects. We studied magnetic properties of PM1, PM2.5 and PM10, collected over 32-48 hours in a small settlement in south Bohemia during heating and non-heating season. The site is rather remote, with negligible traffic and industrial contributions to air pollution. Thus, the suggested seasonal effect should be dominantly due to local (domestic) heating, burning wood or coal. In our contribution we show typical differences in PMx concentration, which is much higher in the winter (heating) sample, accompanied by SEM analyses and magnetic data oriented on concentration and grain-size distribution of magnetite/maghemite particles. While concentration of Fe-oxides does not vary that much, significant seasonal differences were observed in composition and grain-size distribution, reflecting different sources of the dust particles.

  17. Induction-heating MOCVD reactor with significantly improved heating efficiency and reduced harmful magnetic coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Kuang-Hui; Alotaibi, Hamad S.; Sun, Haiding; Lin, Ronghui; Guo, Wenzhe; Torres-Castanedo, Carlos G.; Liu, Kaikai; Galan, Sergio V.; Li, Xiaohang

    2018-01-01

    In a conventional induction-heating III-nitride metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor, the induction coil is outside the chamber. Therefore, the magnetic field does not couple with the susceptor well, leading to compromised heating efficiency and harmful coupling with the gas inlet and thus possible overheating. Hence, the gas inlet has to be at a minimum distance away from the susceptor. Because of the elongated flow path, premature reactions can be more severe, particularly between Al- and B-containing precursors and NH3. Here, we propose a structure that can significantly improve the heating efficiency and allow the gas inlet to be closer to the susceptor. Specifically, the induction coil is designed to surround the vertical cylinder of a T-shaped susceptor comprising the cylinder and a top horizontal plate holding the wafer substrate within the reactor. Therefore, the cylinder coupled most magnetic field to serve as the thermal source for the plate. Furthermore, the plate can block and thus significantly reduce the uncoupled magnetic field above the susceptor, thereby allowing the gas inlet to be closer. The results show approximately 140% and 2.6 times increase in the heating and susceptor coupling efficiencies, respectively, as well as a 90% reduction in the harmful magnetic flux on the gas inlet.

  18. Induction-heating MOCVD reactor with significantly improved heating efficiency and reduced harmful magnetic coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Kuang-Hui

    2018-02-23

    In a conventional induction-heating III-nitride metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor, the induction coil is outside the chamber. Therefore, the magnetic field does not couple with the susceptor well, leading to compromised heating efficiency and harmful coupling with the gas inlet and thus possible overheating. Hence, the gas inlet has to be at a minimum distance away from the susceptor. Because of the elongated flow path, premature reactions can be more severe, particularly between Al- and B-containing precursors and NH3. Here, we propose a structure that can significantly improve the heating efficiency and allow the gas inlet to be closer to the susceptor. Specifically, the induction coil is designed to surround the vertical cylinder of a T-shaped susceptor comprising the cylinder and a top horizontal plate holding the wafer substrate within the reactor. Therefore, the cylinder coupled most magnetic field to serve as the thermal source for the plate. Furthermore, the plate can block and thus significantly reduce the uncoupled magnetic field above the susceptor, thereby allowing the gas inlet to be closer. The results show approximately 140% and 2.6 times increase in the heating and susceptor coupling efficiencies, respectively, as well as a 90% reduction in the harmful magnetic flux on the gas inlet.

  19. Permanent magnet design for magnetic heat pumps using total cost minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyber, R.; Trevizoli, P. V.; Christiaanse, T. V.; Govindappa, P.; Niknia, I.; Rowe, A.

    2017-11-01

    The active magnetic regenerator (AMR) is an attractive technology for efficient heat pumps and cooling systems. The costs associated with a permanent magnet for near room temperature applications are a central issue which must be solved for broad market implementation. To address this problem, we present a permanent magnet topology optimization to minimize the total cost of cooling using a thermoeconomic cost-rate balance coupled with an AMR model. A genetic algorithm identifies cost-minimizing magnet topologies. For a fixed temperature span of 15 K and 4.2 kg of gadolinium, the optimal magnet configuration provides 3.3 kW of cooling power with a second law efficiency (ηII) of 0.33 using 16.3 kg of permanent magnet material.

  20. Assessment of Vascular Stent Heating with Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnerin, Nicole; Mirando, David; Potter-Baker, Kelsey A; Cardenas, Jesus; Cunningham, David A; Sankarasubramanian, Vishwanath; Beall, Erik; Plow, Ela B

    2017-05-01

    A high proportion of patients with stroke do not qualify for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) clinical studies due to the presence of metallic stents. The ultimate concern is that any metal could become heated due to eddy currents. However, to date, no clinical safety data are available regarding the risk of metallic stents heating with rTMS. We tested the safety of common rTMS protocols (1 Hz and 10 Hz) with stents used commonly in stroke, nitinol and elgiloy. In our method, stents were tested in gelled saline at 2 different locations: at the center and at the lobe of the coil. In addition, at each location, stent heating was evaluated in 3 different orientations: parallel to the long axis of coil, parallel to the short axis of the coil, and perpendicular to the plane of the coil. We found that stents did not heat to more than 1°C with either 1 Hz rTMS or 10 Hz rTMS in any configuration or orientation. Heating in general was greater at the lobe when the stent was oriented perpendicularly. Our study represents a new method for ex vivo quantification of stent heating. We have found that heating of stents was well below the Food and Drug Administration standards of 2°C. Thus, our study paves the way for in vivo testing of rTMS (≤10 Hz) in the presence of implanted magnetic resonance imaging-compatible stents in animal studies. When planning human safety studies though, geometry, orientation, and location relative to the coil would be important to consider as well. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Chiral heat wave and mixing of magnetic, vortical and heat waves in chiral media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernodub, M.N.

    2016-01-01

    We show that a hot rotating fluid of relativistic chiral fermions possesses a new gapless collective mode associated with coherent propagation of energy density and chiral density waves along the axis of rotation. This mode, which we call the Chiral Heat Wave, emerges due to a mixed gauge-gravitational anomaly. At finite density the Chiral Heat Wave couples to the Chiral Vortical Wave while in the presence of an external magnetic field it mixes with the Chiral Magnetic Wave. The coupling of the Chiral Magnetic and Chiral Vortical Waves is also demonstrated. We find that the coupled waves — which are coherent fluctuations of the vector, axial and energy currents — have generally different velocities compared to the velocities of the individual waves.

  2. Novel magnetic heating probe for multimodal cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan-Dapaah, Kwabena; Rahbar, Nima; Soboyejo, Wole

    2015-05-01

    Multifunctional materials consisting of polymers and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are highly sought after in the field of biomedical engineering. These materials offer new opportunities for the development of novel cancer treatment modalities that can increase the efficacy of cancer therapy. In this paper, a novel probe for multimodal cancer treatment is proposed and analyzed. The probe is essentially a cannula with two main parts: a distal heat generating tip made of a magnetic nanocomposite and a proximal insulated shaft. A description of the concept and functional operations of the probe is presented. In an effort to assess its feasibility, the authors evaluated the ability of probe tip (made of PMMA-Fe3O4 nanocomposite) to generate heat in biological tissue using alternating magnetic field (AMF) parameters (field strength and frequency) that are acceptable for human use. Heat generation by MNPs was determined using the linear response theory. The effects of Fe3O4 volume fraction on heat generation as well as treatment time on the thermal dose were studied. The finite element method model was tested for its validity using an analytical model. Lesions were revealed to have an ellipsoidal shape and their sizes were affected by treatment time. However, their shapes remained unchanged. The comparison with the analytical model showed reasonably a good agreement to within 2%. Furthermore, the authors' numerical predictions also showed reasonable agreement with the experimental results previously reported in the literature. The authors' predictions demonstrate the feasibility of their novel probe to achieve reasonable lesion sizes, during hyperthermic or ablative heating using AMF parameters (field strength and frequency) that are acceptable for human use.

  3. Modeling drug release from functionalized magnetic nanoparticles actuated by non-heating low frequency magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovin, Y., E-mail: nano@tsutmb.ru [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, School of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Golovin, D. [G.R. Derzhavin Tambov State University (Russian Federation); Klyachko, N.; Majouga, A.; Kabanov, A. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, School of Chemistry (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Various plausible acceleration mechanisms of drug release from nanocarriers composed of a single-domain magnetic nanoparticle core with attached long macromolecule chains activated by low frequency non-heating alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed. The most important system characteristics affecting the AMF exposure impact are determined. Impact of several reasonable mechanisms is estimated analytically or obtained using numerical modeling. Some conditions providing manifold release acceleration as a result from exposure in AMF are found.

  4. Modeling drug release from functionalized magnetic nanoparticles actuated by non-heating low frequency magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovin, Y.; Golovin, D.; Klyachko, N.; Majouga, A.; Kabanov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Various plausible acceleration mechanisms of drug release from nanocarriers composed of a single-domain magnetic nanoparticle core with attached long macromolecule chains activated by low frequency non-heating alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed. The most important system characteristics affecting the AMF exposure impact are determined. Impact of several reasonable mechanisms is estimated analytically or obtained using numerical modeling. Some conditions providing manifold release acceleration as a result from exposure in AMF are found.

  5. Induction heating of rotating nonmagnetic billet in magnetic field produced by high-parameter permanent magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Doležel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An advanced way of induction heating of nonmagnetic billets is discussed and modeled. The billet rotates in a stationary magnetic field produced by unmoving high-parameter permanent magnets fixed on magnetic circuit of an appropriate shape. The mathematical model of the problem consisting of two coupled partial differential equations is solved numerically, in the monolithic formulation. Computations are carried out using our own code Agros2D based on a fully adaptive higher-order finite element method. The most important results are verified experimentally on our own laboratory device.

  6. High power semiconductor switches in the 12 kV, 50 kA pulse generator of the SPS beam dump kicker system

    CERN Document Server

    Bonthond, J; Faure, P; Vossenberg, Eugène B

    2001-01-01

    Horizontal deflection of the beam in the dump kicker system of the CERN SPS accelerator is obtained with a series of fast pulsed magnets. The high current pulses of 50 kA per magnet are generated with capacitor discharge type generators which, combined with a resistive free-wheel diode circuit, deliver a critically damped half-sine current with a rise-time of 25 ms. Each generator consists of two 25 kA units, connected in parallel to a magnet via a low inductance transmission line.

  7. Magnetic pumping as a source of particle heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichko, Emily; Egedal, Jan; Daughton, William; Kasper, Justin

    2017-10-01

    Magnetic pumping is a means of heating plasmas for both fusion and astrophysical applications. In this study a magnetic pumping model is developed as a possible explanation for the heating and the generation of power-law distribution functions observed in the solar wind plasma. In most previous studies turbulent energy is only dissipated at microscopic kinetic scales. In contrast, magnetic pumping energizes the particles through the largest scale turbulent fluctuations, thus bypassing the energy cascade. Kinetic simulations are applied to verify these analytic predictions. Previous results for the one-dimensional model, as well as initial results for a two-dimensional model which includes the effects of trapped and passing particles are presented. Preliminary results of the presence of this mechanism in the bow shock region, using spacecraft data from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission, are presented as well. This research was conducted with support from National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship, 32 CFR 168, as well as from NSF Award 1404166 and NASA award NNX15AJ73G.

  8. Localized Electron Heating by Strong Guide-Field Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuehan; Sugawara, Takumichi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ono, Yasushi; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field (typically Bt 15Bp) using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in Univ. Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. The region of high electron temperature, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field, was found to have a round shape with radius of 2 [cm]. Also, it was localized around the X-point and does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et .jt . When we include a guide-field effect term Bt / (Bp + αBt) for Et .jt where α =√{ (vin2 +vout2) /v∥2 } , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus,'' a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  9. Magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic structure of CuNi2(PO4)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobal, Jaione; Pizarro, Jose L.; Mesa, Jose L.; Larranaga, Aitor; Fernandez, Jesus Rodriguez; Arriortua, Maria I.; Rojo, Teofilo

    2006-01-01

    The CuNi 2 (PO 4 ) 2 phosphate has been synthesized by the ceramic method at 800 deg. C in air. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional skeleton constructed from MO 4 (M II =Cu and Ni) planar squares and M 2 O 8 dimers with square pyramidal geometry, which are interconnected by (PO 4 ) 3- oxoanions with tetrahedral geometry. The magnetic behavior has been studied on powdered sample by using susceptibility, specific heat and neutron diffraction data. The bimetallic copper(II)-nickel(II) orthophosphate exhibits a three-dimensional magnetic ordering at, approximately, 29.8 K. However, its complex crystal structure hampers any parametrization of the J-exchange parameter. The specific heat measurements exhibit a three-dimensional magnetic ordering (λ-type) peak at 29.5 K. The magnetic structure of this phosphate shows ferromagnetic interactions inside the Ni 2 O 8 dimers, whereas the sublattice of Cu(II) ions presents antiferromagnetic couplings along the y-axis. The change of the sign in the magnetic unit-cell, due to the [1/2, 0, 1/2] propagation vector determines a purely antiferromagnetic structure. - Graphical abstract: Magnetic structure of CuNi2(PO4)2

  10. MEASURED TRANSVERSE COUPLING IMPEDANCE OF RHIC INJECTION AND ABORT KICKERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAHN, H.; DAVINO, D.

    2001-01-01

    Concerns regarding possible transverse instabilities in RHIC and the SNS pointed to the need for measurements of the transverse coupling impedance of ring components. The impedance of the RHIC injection and abort kicker was measured using the conventional method based on the S 21 forward transmission coefficient. A commercial 450 Ω twin-wire Lecher line were used and the data was interpreted via the log-formula. All measurements, were performed in test stands fully representing operational conditions including pulsed power supplies and connecting cables. The measured values for the transverse coupling impedance in kick direction and perpendicular to it are comparable in magnitude, but differ from Handbook predictions

  11. Design of cryogenic heat exchangers for a superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrusciel, W.A.; Tao, B.Y.; Ventura, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    Computer programs were written to design and simulate the behavior of three heat exchangers for cooling supercritical helium to approximately 4.3 0 K at 4 atm. Helium, at 1, 3, or 5 gm/sec, is cooled by passing it through 0.635-cm-diam copper tubing immersed in a liquid nitrogen bath, through a copper, concentric tube, counter-current heat exchanger, and then through 0.635-cm copper tubing immersed in a liquid helium bath. The helium then enters a superconducting test magnet and finally passes through the annulus of the countercurrent exchanger before venting to the atmosphere. Several acceptable designs are presented that meet design and space limitations

  12. Ion heating due to rotation and collision in magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderegg, F.; Stern, R.A.; Skiff, F.; Hammel, B.A.; Tran, M.Q.; Paris, P.J.; Kohler, P.

    1986-01-01

    The E x B rotation and associated collisional ion heating of noble-gas magnetized plasmas are investigated with high resolution by means of laser-induced fluorescence and electrical probes. Plasma rotation results from a radial potential gradient which can be controlled by biasing of the discharge electrodes. The time and space evolution of the potential, the rotation velocity v/sub t//sub h//sub e//sub t//sub a/, and the ion perpendicular temperature indicate that heating is due to the randomization of v/sub t//sub h//sub e//sub t//sub a/ by ion-neutral collisions, and leads to temperature increases as high as a factor of 50 over initial values

  13. Magnetic-field asymmetry of nonlinear thermoelectric and heat transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Sun-Yong; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa; Lee, Minchul

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear transport coefficients do not obey, in general, reciprocity relations. We here discuss the magnetic-field asymmetries that arise in thermoelectric and heat transport of mesoscopic systems. Based on a scattering theory of weakly nonlinear transport, we analyze the leading-order symmetry parameters in terms of the screening potential response to either voltage or temperature shifts. We apply our general results to a quantum Hall antidot system. Interestingly, we find that certain symmetry parameters show a dependence on the measurement configuration. (paper)

  14. Radiofrequency Waves, Heating and Current Drive in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porkolab, M; Bonoli, P T; Temkin, R J [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Pinsker, R I; Prater, R [General Atomics, San Diego, California (United States); Wilson, J R [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2012-09-15

    The need for supplementary heating of magnetically confined plasmas to fusion relevant temperatures ({approx}20 keV) has been recognized from the beginning of modern fusion plasma research. Although in tokamaks the plasmas are formed initially by ohmic heating (P{Omega}{approx}{eta}{sub R}j, where j is the current density and {eta}{sub R} is the resistivity) its effectiveness deteriorates with increasing temperature since the resistivity decreases as T{sub e}{sup -3/2}, and losses due to bremsstrahlung radiation increase as Z{sub eff}{sup 3} T{sub e}{sup 1/2} (where Z{sub eff} is the effective ion charge), and the plasma current cannot be raised to arbitrarily large values because of MHD stability limits. In addition, energy losses due to thermal conduction P{sub loss} are typically anomalously large compared to neoclassical predictions and the dependence on temperature is not well understood. Thus, the simplest form of steady state power balance indicates that losses due to radiation and heat conduction must be balanced by auxiliary heating of some form, P{sub aux}, which may simply be stated as P{sub {Omega}} + P{sub {alpha}} - P{sub loss} P{sub aux} where P{sub {alpha}} is the power input provided by alpha particles, which does not become significant until the temperature exceeds some tens of keV, depending on confinement and density. (author)

  15. Role of Magnetic Reconnection in Heating Astrophysical Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, M. M.; El Eid, M.; Darwish, M.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    The description of plasma in the context of a fluid model reveals the important phenomenon of magnetic reconnection (MGR). This process is thought to be the cause of particle heating and acceleration in various astrophysical phenomena. Examples are geomagnetic storms, solar flares, or heating the solar corona, which is the focus of the present contribution. The magnetohydrodynamic approach (MHD) provides a basic description of MGR. However, the simulation of this process is rather challenging. Although it is not yet established whether waves or reconnection play the dominant role in heating the solar atmosphere, the present goal is to examine the tremendous increase of the temperature between the solar chromosphere and the corona in a very narrow transition region. Since we are dealing with very-high temperature plasma, the modeling of such heating process seems to require a two-fluid description consisting of ions and electrons. This treatment is an extension of the one-fluid model of resistive MHD that has been recently developed by [Hammoud et al., 2017] using the modern numerical openfoam toolbox. In this work, we outline the two-fluid approach using coronal conditions, show evidence of MGR in the two-fluid description, and investigate the temperature increase as a result of this MGR process.

  16. Heat Flux of a Transferred Arc Driven by a Transverse Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Matsumoto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical consideration of a magnetically driven arc was performed to elucidate the variation of heat flux with an imposed DC magnetic field. Experiments were conducted to confirm the validity of the theoretical model. The heat flux decreased concomitantly with increased imposed magnetic flux density. Theoretical predictions agreed with experimental results.

  17. Control of the MKQA tuning and aperture kickers of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Barlow, R A; Pianfetti, J P; Senaj, V; Cattin, M; CERN. Geneva. TE Department

    2009-01-01

    The large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN has been equipped with four fast pulsed kicker magnets in RA43 situated at point 4 which are part of the measurement system for the tune and the dynamic aperture of the LHC beam (Beam 1 and Beam 2). For the tune measurement 'Q', the magnets will excite oscillations in part of the beam. This is achieved by means of a generator producing a 5 µs base half-sine pulse of 1.2 kA [1] amplitude, superimposed with a 3rd harmonic to produce a 2 µs flat top. A kick repetition rate of 2 Hz will be possible. To measure the dynamic aperture 'A' of the LHC at different beam energies, the same magnets will also be driven by a more powerful generator which produces a 43 µs base half-sine current pulse of 3.8 kA. For the 'A' mode a thyristor is used as switching element inside the generator. A final third mode named 'AC dipole' will rely on the beam being excited coherently at a frequency close but outside its Eigen-frequencies by an oscillating dipole field. The beam is expected to o...

  18. Confinement of ohmically heated plasmas and turbulent heating in high-magnetic field tokamak TRIAM-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, N; Itoh, S; Kawai, Y; Toi, K; Nakamura, K [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1979-12-01

    TRIAM-1, the tokamak device with high toroidal magnetic field, has been constructed to establish the scaling laws of advanced tokamak devices such as Alcator, and to study the possibility of the turbulent heating as a further economical heating method of the fusion oriented plasmas. The plasma parameters obtained by ohmic heating alone are as follows; central electron temperature T sub(e0) = 640 eV, central ion temperature T sub(i0) = 280 eV and line-average electron density n average sub(e) = 2.2 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/. The empirical scaling laws are investigated concerning T sub(e0), T sub(i0) and n average sub(e). The turbulent heating has been carried out by applying the high electric field in the toroidal direction to the typical tokamak discharge with T sub(i0) asymptotically equals 200 eV. The efficient ion heating is observed and T sub(i0) attains to about 600 eV.

  19. Theoretical predictions for spatially-focused heating of magnetic nanoparticles guided by magnetic particle imaging field gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhavalikar, Rohan [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1030 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1030 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, 1275 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) transfer some of the field's energy to their surroundings in the form of heat, a property that has attracted significant attention for use in cancer treatment through hyperthermia and in developing magnetic drug carriers that can be actuated to release their cargo externally using magnetic fields. To date, most work in this field has focused on the use of AMFs that actuate heat release by nanoparticles over large regions, without the ability to select specific nanoparticle-loaded regions for heating while leaving other nanoparticle-loaded regions unaffected. In parallel, magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has emerged as a promising approach to image the distribution of magnetic nanoparticle tracers in vivo, with sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The underlying principle in MPI is the application of a selection magnetic field gradient, which defines a small region of low bias field, superimposed with an AMF (of lower frequency and amplitude than those normally used to actuate heating by the nanoparticles) to obtain a signal which is proportional to the concentration of particles in the region of low bias field. Here we extend previous models for estimating the energy dissipation rates of magnetic nanoparticles in uniform AMFs to provide theoretical predictions of how the selection magnetic field gradient used in MPI can be used to selectively actuate heating by magnetic nanoparticles in the low bias field region of the selection magnetic field gradient. Theoretical predictions are given for the spatial decay in energy dissipation rate under magnetic field gradients representative of those that can be achieved with current MPI technology. These results underscore the potential of combining MPI and higher amplitude/frequency actuation AMFs to achieve selective magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) guided by MPI. - Highlights: • SAR predictions based on a field-dependent magnetization relaxation model.

  20. Heating of polyacrylamide ferrogel by alternating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronov, A.P., E-mail: Safronov@iep.uran.ru [Ural Federal University, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Elecrophysics, UB RAS, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Samatov, O.M. [Institute of Elecrophysics, UB RAS, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Tyukova, I.S.; Mikhnevich, E.A. [Ural Federal University, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Beketov, I.V. [Ural Federal University, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Elecrophysics, UB RAS, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-01

    Ferrogel based on polacryamide network with embedded maghemite nanoparticles with mean number average particle diameter 12 nm was synthesized by radical polymerization in water-based ferrofluid. The network structure of ferrogel was characterized by Flory–Rehner theory and it was shown that the embedded particles were substantially larger than the mesh size. It prevented the translational movement of particles in the ferrogel. The immobilization of particles was confirmed by dynamic light scattering. The adhesion of macromolecular chains to the particles was determined by calorimetry using thermochemical cycle. The enthalpy of interfacial adhesion was found several orders of magnitude higher than the energy of dipoles in typically applied magnetic fields. Despite the differenve in the mobility of particles in ferrofluid and ferrogel the comparative study of their heating in alternating magnetic field, however, revealed their close similarity. In both cases it was goverened by superposing of Neel and Brownian relaxation mechanisms. - Highlights: • We synthesized polyacrylamide ferrogel with maghemite nanoparticles. • Nanoparticles are entrapped into gel network. • Polyacrylamide chains are strongly linked to the particles. • Brownian relaxation contributes to heating of ferrogel in alternating field.

  1. Physics responsible for heating efficiency and self-controlled temperature rise of magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic hyperthermia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaterabadi, Zhila; Nabiyouni, Gholamreza; Soleymani, Meysam

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles as heat-generating nanosources in hyperthermia treatment are still faced with many drawbacks for achieving sufficient clinical potential. In this context, increase in heating ability of magnetic nanoparticles in a biologically safe alternating magnetic field and also approach to a precise control on temperature rise are two challenging subjects so that a significant part of researchers' efforts has been devoted to them. Since a deep understanding of Physics concepts of heat generation by magnetic nanoparticles is essential to develop hyperthermia as a cancer treatment with non-adverse side effects, this review focuses on different mechanisms responsible for heat dissipation in a radio frequency magnetic field. Moreover, particular attention is given to ferrite-based nanoparticles because of their suitability in radio frequency magnetic fields. Also, the key role of Curie temperature in suppressing undesired temperature rise is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiofrequency heating and magnetically induced displacement of dental magnetic attachments during 3.0 T MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, K; Hasegawa, M; Abe, Y; Tabuchi, T; Namiki, T; Ishigami, T

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of injury from dental magnetic attachments due to their radiofrequency (RF) heating and magnetically induced displacement during 3.0 T MRI. Methods To examine the magnetic attachments, we adopted the American Society for Testing and Materials F2182-02a and F2052-06 standards in two MRI systems (Achieva 3.0 T Nova Dual; Philips, Tokyo, Japan, and Signa HDxt 3.0 T; GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). The temperature change was measured in a cylindrical keeper (GIGAUSS D600; GC, Tokyo, Japan) with coping of the casting alloy and a keeper with a dental implant at the maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) for 20 min. To measure the magnetically induced displacement force, three sizes of keepers (GIGAUSS D400, D600 and D1000) were used in deflection angle tests conducted at the point of the maximum magnetic field strength. Results Temperature elevations of both coping and implant were higher in the Signa system than in the Achieva system. The highest temperature changes in the keeper with implant and keeper with coping were 0.6 °C and 0.8 °C in the Signa system, respectively. The temperature increase did not exceed 1.0 °C at any location. The deflection angle (α) was not measurable because it exceeded 90°. GIGAUSS D400 required an extra 3.0 g load to constrain the deflection angle to less than 45°; GIGAUSS D600 and D1000 required 5.0 and 9.0 g loads, respectively. Conclusions Dental magnetic attachments pose no risk due to RF heating and magnetically induced displacement at 3.0 T MRI. However, it is necessary to confirm that these keepers are securely attached to the prosthesis before imaging. PMID:22499128

  3. An experimental study of magnetic-field and temperature dependence on magnetic fluid’s heating power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beković, Miloš; Trlep, Mladen; Jesenik, Marko; Goričan, Viktor; Hamler, Anton

    2013-01-01

    This paper firstly presents a measurement system for determining the magnetic properties of magnetic fluids, based on three pickup coils. The accuracy of the system was tested on known samples and then used for the characterization of magnetic losses (heating power P) on the magnetic fluid sample using two different methods. The first method is based on determining the hysteresis loop area and the second on determining the complex susceptibility; and showed that both methods are equivalent. The aim of this paper was to identify the heating power of the liquid at a known value for the magnetic field, and the arbitrary temperature. Thus, we explored the actual reduction in the heating power due to the heating of the sample, which cannot be achieved without the temperature regulated heat bath using established calorimetric methods. -- Highlights: ► A new measurement system was tested with numerous samples, and results were promising. ► Magnetic fluid heating power was determined using a system of J-compensated coil. ► Complex susceptibility method results equal losses as hysteresis loops approach. ► Temperature dependent heating power was explored without the heath-bath . ► For larger magnetic fields a linear H dependence of heating power is revealed

  4. Performance evaluation of citric ion-stabilized magnetic fluid heat pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeyadevan, B. [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Department of Geoscience and Technology, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba 01, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-7589 (Japan)]. E-mail: jeya@mail.kankyo.tohoku.ac.jp; Koganezawa, H. [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Department of Geoscience and Technology, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba 01, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-7589 (Japan); Nakatsuka, K. [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Department of Geoscience and Technology, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba 01, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-7589 (Japan)

    2005-03-15

    The performance of heat pipe (HP) using citric ion-stabilized magnetic fluid (CMF) as working fluid (WF) was evaluated. The heat transferred was influenced by the application of magnetic field and was enhanced by a maximum of 30% compared to the field-free case. Furthermore, under the optimum magnetic field configuration, the heat transferred by CMF HP was 10% higher than that with water as WF.

  5. Development of Stripline Kickers for Low Emittance Rings: Application to the Beam Extraction Kicker for CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)728476; Toral Fernandez, Fernando

    In the framework of the design study of Future Linear Colliders, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) aims for electron-positron collisions with high luminosity at a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. To achieve the luminosity requirements, Pre-Damping Rings (PDRs) and Damping Rings (DRs) are required: they reduce the beam emittance before the beam is accelerated in the main linac. Several injection and extraction systems are needed to inject and extract the beam from the PDRs and DRs. The work of this Thesis consists of the design, fabrication and laboratory tests of the first stripline kicker prototype for beam extraction from the CLIC DRs, although the methodology proposed can be extended to stripline kickers for any low emittance ring. The excellent field homogeneity required, as well as a good transmission of the high voltage pulse through the electrodes, has been achieved by choosing a novel electrode shape. With this new geometry, it has been possible to benefit from all the advantages that the most...

  6. Specific heat and magnetization of RMn2(H,D)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarnawski, Z.; Kolwicz-Chodak, L.; Figiel, H.; Kim-Ngan, N.-T.H.; Havela, L.; Miliyanchuk, K.; Sechovsky, V.; Santava, E.; Sebek, J.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen absorption on magnetic and thermodynamic properties of hydrides compounds RMn 2 (H,D) 2 (R = Y, Nd, Tb, Ho, and Er) have been investigated by performing specific heat and magnetization measurements in the temperature range of 2-320 K and in magnetic fields up to 9 T. The phase transition to the antiferromagnetic order accompanying a crystal structure transformation have been revealed by complicated-structure anomalies in specific heat and weak anomalies in magnetization

  7. Enhancement in heat transfer of a ferrofluid in a differentially heated square cavity through the use of permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, J. C.; Sharifpur, M.; Solomon, A. Brusly; Meyer, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    The natural convection heat transfer of a magnetic nanofluid in a differentially heated cavity is investigated with and without an applied external magnetic field. The effects of volume fraction, magnetic field configuration, and magnetic field strength are investigated. Spherical Fe2O3 nanoparticles with a diameter of 15-20 nm are used in the nanofluids. Volume fractions ranging between 0.05% and 0.3% are tested for the case with no magnetic field, while only a volume fraction of 0.1% was tested in an externally applied magnetic field. The experiments were conducted for a range of Rayleigh numbers in 1.7 × 108 < Ra < 4.2 × 108. The viscosity of the nanofluid was determined experimentally. An empirical correlation for the viscosity was determined, and the stability of various nanofluids was investigated. Using heat transfer data obtained from the cavity, the average heat transfer coefficient and average Nusselt number for the nanofluids are determined. It was found that a volume fraction of 0.1% showed a maximum increase of 5.63% to the Nu at the maximum Ra. For the magnetic field study, it was found that the best-performing magnetic field enhanced the heat transfer behaviour by an additional 2.81% in Nu at Ra = 3.8 × 108.

  8. Use of miniature magnetic sensors for real-time control of the induction heating process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Anthony E.; Kelley, John Bruce; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2002-01-01

    A method of monitoring the process of induction heating a workpiece. A miniature magnetic sensor located near the outer surface of the workpiece measures changes in the surface magnetic field caused by changes in the magnetic properties of the workpiece as it heats up during induction heating (or cools down during quenching). A passive miniature magnetic sensor detects a distinct magnetic spike that appears when the saturation field, B.sub.sat, of the workpiece has been exceeded. This distinct magnetic spike disappears when the workpiece's surface temperature exceeds its Curie temperature, due to the sudden decrease in its magnetic permeability. Alternatively, an active magnetic sensor can also be used to measure changes in the resonance response of the monitor coil when the excitation coil is linearly swept over 0-10 MHz, due to changes in the magnetic permeability and electrical resistivity of the workpiece as its temperature increases (or decreases).

  9. Heat transfer in flow past a continuously moving semi-infinite flat plate in transverse magnetic field with heat flux

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, T.V.R.

    Thermal boundary layer on a continuously moving semi-infinite flat plate in the presence of transverse magnetic field with heat flux has been examined. Similarity solutions have been derived and the resulting equations are integrated numerically...

  10. Design Considerations of Fast Kicker Systems for High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.; Sandberg, J.; Parson, W.M.; Walstrom, P.; Murray, M.M.; Cook, E.; Hartouni, E.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the specific issues related to the design of the Fast Kicker Systems for high intensity proton accelerators. To address these issues in the preliminary design stage can be critical since the fast kicker systems affect the machine lattice structure and overall design parameters. Main topics include system architecture, design strategy, beam current coupling, grounding, end user cost vs. system cost, reliability, redundancy and flexibility. Operating experience with the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron injection and extraction kicker systems at Brookhaven National Laboratory and their future upgrade is presented. Additionally, new conceptual designs of the extraction kicker for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge and the Advanced Hydrotest Facility at Los Alamos are discussed

  11. RHIC BEAM ABORT KICKER POWER SUPPLY SYSTEM COMMISSIONING EXPERIENCE AND REMAINING ISSUES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZHANG, W.; AHRENS, L.A.; MI, J.; OERTER, B.; SANDERS, R.; SANDBERG, J.

    2001-01-01

    The RHIC Beam Abort Kicker Power Supply Systems commissioning experience and the remaining issues will be reported in this paper. The RHIC Blue Ring Beam Abort Kicker Power Supply System initial commissioning took place in June 1999. Its identical system in Yellow Ring was brought on line during Spring 2000. Each of the RHIC Beam Abort Kicker Power Supply Systems consists of five high voltage modulators and subsystems. These systems are critical devices for RHIC machine protection and environmental protection. They are required to be effective, reliable and operating with sufficient redundancy to safely abort the beam to its beam dump at the end of accumulation or at any time when they are commanded. To deflect 66 GeV ion beam to the beam absorbers, the RHIC Beam Abort Kicker Power Supply Systems were operated at 22 kV level. The RHIC 2000 commissioning run was very successful

  12. Introduction to wave heating and current drive in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsker, R. I.

    2001-01-01

    The development of high-power wave heating and current drive in magnetized plasmas in the last 40 years is a major ongoing success story in plasma science. A hallmark of this area of research has been the detailed quantitative comparison of theory and experiment; the good agreement consistently found is indicative of the robustness and the predictive power of the underlying theory. This tutorial paper is a brief overview of the fundamental concepts and applications of this branch of plasma science. Most of the high-power applications have been in three frequency regimes: the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), the lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF), and the electron cyclotron range of frequencies (ECRF). The basic physics of wave propagation and damping in these regimes is briefly discussed. Some of the coupling structures (antennas) used to excite the waves at the plasma boundary are described, and the high-power systems used to generate the wave energy are touched on. Representative examples of the remarkably wide range of applications of high-power wave heating and current drive in high-temperature fusion plasmas will be discussed

  13. ADVANCEMENT OF THE RHIC BEAM ABORT KICKER SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZHANG, W.; AHRENS, L.; MI, J.; OERTER, B.; SANDBERG, J.; WARBURTON, D.

    2003-01-01

    As one of the most critical system for RHIC operation, the beam abort kicker system has to be highly available, reliable, and stable for the entire operating range. Along with the RHIC commission and operation, consistent efforts have been spend to cope with immediate issues as well as inherited design issues. Major design changes have been implemented to achieve the higher operating voltage, longer high voltage hold-off time, fast retriggering and redundant triggering, and improved system protection, etc. Recent system test has demonstrated for the first time that both blue ring and yellow ring beam abort systems have achieved more than 24 hours hold off time at desired operating voltage. In this paper, we report break down, thyratron reverse arcing, and to build a fast re-trigger system to reduce beam spreading in event of premature discharge

  14. Heat transfer control in a plane magnetic fluid layer with a free surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashtovoi, V.G.; Pogirnitskaya, S.G.; Reks, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    The heat transfer mechanisms that are specific to a magnetic liquid have been already investigated extensively. The high sensitivity of the free magnetic liquid surface to the external magnetic field introduces a new feature into the heat transfer process. In the present work, the authors have investigated the possibility of controlling the heat transfer through the phenomenon of magnetic liquid surface instability in a uniform magnetic field. The conditions for heat transfer through a chamber, partially filled with a magnetic liquid, are governed by the characteristics of the free liquid surface and by its stability and development in the supercritical magnetic fields. The authors consider a model two-dimensional problem of heat transfer through a two-layer medium consisting of horizontally situated immiscible layers of magnetic and nonmagnetic liquids with given thermal conductivities. In the absence of an external magnetic field, the interface of the liquids represents a plane surface. In fields which exceed the critical magnitude, the interface is deformed along the wave. As the field intensity is increased, the amplitude of interface distortion becomes larger. The two-dimensional shape of the free magnetic liquid surface may be realized experimentally using two plane layers of magnetic and nonmagnetic liquids in a uniform magnetic field tangent to the interface of the component layers. 7 refs., 9 figs

  15. Performance characteristics and parametric optimization of an irreversible magnetic Ericsson heat-pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Fang; Lin Guoxing; Chen Jincan; Brueck, Ekkes

    2011-01-01

    Taking into account the finite-rate heat transfer in the heat-transfer processes, heat leak between the two external heat reservoirs, regenerative loss, regeneration time, and internal irreversibility due to dissipation of the cycle working substance, an irreversible magnetic Ericsson heat-pump cycle is presented. On the basis of the thermodynamic properties of magnetic materials, the performance characteristics of the irreversible magnetic Ericsson heat-pump are investigated and the relationship between the optimal heating load and the coefficient of performance (COP) is derived. Moreover, the maximum heating load and the corresponding COP as well as the maximum COP and the corresponding heating load are obtained. Furthermore, the other optimal performance characteristics are discussed in detail. The results obtained here may provide some new information for the optimal parameter design and the development of real magnetic Ericsson heat-pumps. -- Research Highlights: →The effects of multi-irreversibilities on the performance of a magnetic heat-pump are revealed. →Mathematical expressions of the heating load and the COP are derived and the optimal performance and operating parameters are analyzed and discussed. →Several important performance bounds are determined.

  16. Heat generation and cooling of SSC magnets at high ramp rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snitchler, G.; Capone, D.; Kovachev, V.; Schermer, R.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation will address a summary of AC loss calculations (SSCL), experimental results on cable samples (Westinghouse STC), short model magnets test results (FNAL, KEK-Japan), and recent full length magnets test data on AC losses and quench current ramp rate sensitivity (FNAL, BNL). Possible sources of the observed enhanced heat generation and quench sensitivity for some magnets will be discussed. A model for cooling conditions of magnet coils considering heat generation distribution and specific anisotropy of the heat transfer will be presented. The crossover contact resistance in cables and curing procedure influence on resistivity, currently under study, will be briefly discussed. (author)

  17. Multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in heat stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Zhang, X.Y.; Wang, B.; Zou, Z.M.; Li, H.F.; Wang, P.Y.; Xia, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess the role of proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) in the detection of changes in metabolite levels of the cerebellum after heat stroke (HS). Materials and methods: The study group consisted of eight patients after HS, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 3–9. The MR studies were performed with a 1.5 T system. MR spectra were recorded from a normal-appearing cerebellum region. Spectra from patients were compared with a control group including seven age-matched healthy volunteers recorded with the same techniques. Metabolites ratios including N-acetyl aspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr), N-acetyl aspartate/creatine2 (NAA/Cr2), choline/creatine (Cho/Cr), choline/creatine2 (Cho/Cr2), and N-acetyl aspartate/choline (NAA/Cho) were calculated and the differences between the two groups were evaluated using the Mann–Whitney U-test. Pearson correlation analysis was used to analyse the relationship between NAA/Cr ratios and GCS scores for eight patients after HS. Results: In the cerebellum of the patients after HS, NAA/Cr ratios were found to be significantly decreased compared to normal controls (p = 0.004) and Cho/Cr ratios were found to be decreased compared to normal controls (p = 0.032). Significant positive correlation was found between NAA/Cr ratios and GCS scores for eight patients after HS (r = 0.748, p = 0.033). Conclusions: Metabolite abnormalities were seen in normal-appearing cerebellum structures in patients after HS. Proton MRS is a useful tool for evaluating major changes in metabolite levels of the cerebellum after HS and the severity of the disease can be effectively evaluated by NAA/Cr ratios. - Highlights: • Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy offers important information in patients with heat stroke. • Significantly different NAA/Cr ratios were found between heat stroke and controls. • The severity of heat stroke can be effectively evaluated by NAA/Cr ratios

  18. Heat leak testing of a superconducting RHIC dipole magnet at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLalio, J.T.; Brown, D.P.; Sondericker, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is currently performing heat load tests on a superconducting dipole magnet. The magnet is a prototype of the 360, 8 cm bore, arc dipole magnets that will be used in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RMC). An accurate measurement of the heat load is needed to eliminate cumulative errors when determining the REUC cryogenic system load requirements. The test setup consists of a dipole positioned between two quadrupoles in a common vacuum tank and heat shield. Piping and instrumentation are arranged to facilitate measurement of the heat load on the primary 4.6 K magnet load and the secondary 55 K heat shield load. Initial results suggest that the primary heat load is well below design allowances. The secondary load was found to be higher than estimated, but remained close to the budgeted amount. Overall, the dipole performed to specifications

  19. Closed loop control of the induction heating process using miniature magnetic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Anthony E.; Kelley, John Bruce; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2003-05-20

    A method and system for providing real-time, closed-loop control of the induction hardening process. A miniature magnetic sensor located near the outer surface of the workpiece measures changes in the surface magnetic field caused by changes in the magnetic properties of the workpiece as it heats up during induction heating (or cools down during quenching). A passive miniature magnetic sensor detects a distinct magnetic spike that appears when the saturation field, B.sub.sat, of the workpiece has been exceeded. This distinct magnetic spike disappears when the workpiece's surface temperature exceeds its Curie temperature, due to the sudden decrease in its magnetic permeability. Alternatively, an active magnetic sensor can measure changes in the resonance response of the monitor coil when the excitation coil is linearly swept over 0-10 MHz, due to changes in the magnetic permeability and electrical resistivity of the workpiece as its temperature increases (or decreases).

  20. System and method for heating ferrite magnet motors for low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Patel Bhageerath; El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi; Huh, Kum-Kang

    2017-07-04

    A system and method for heating ferrite permanent magnets in an electrical machine is disclosed. The permanent magnet machine includes a stator assembly and a rotor assembly, with a plurality of ferrite permanent magnets disposed within the stator assembly or the rotor assembly to generate a magnetic field that interacts with a stator magnetic field to produce a torque. A controller of the electrical machine is programmed to cause a primary field current to be applied to the stator windings to generate the stator magnetic field, so as to cause the rotor assembly to rotate relative to the stator assembly. The controller is further programmed to cause a secondary current to be applied to the stator windings to selectively generate a secondary magnetic field, the secondary magnetic field inducing eddy currents in at least one of the stator assembly and the rotor assembly to heat the ferrite permanent magnets.

  1. System and method for heating ferrite magnet motors for low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Patel Bhageerath; El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi; Huh, Kum-Kang

    2018-05-08

    A system and method for heating ferrite permanent magnets in an electrical machine is disclosed. The permanent magnet machine includes a stator assembly and a rotor assembly, with a plurality of ferrite permanent magnets disposed within the stator assembly or the rotor assembly to generate a magnetic field that interacts with a stator magnetic field to produce a torque. A controller of the electrical machine is programmed to cause a primary field current to be applied to the stator windings to generate the stator magnetic field, so as to cause the rotor assembly to rotate relative to the stator assembly. The controller is further programmed to cause a secondary current to be applied to the stator windings to selectively generate a secondary magnetic field, the secondary magnetic field inducing eddy currents in at least one of the stator assembly and the rotor assembly to heat the ferrite permanent magnets.

  2. Diffusive heat transport across magnetic islands and stochastic layers in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelzl, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Heat transport in tokamak plasmas with magnetic islands and ergodic field lines was simulated at realistic plasma parameters in realistic tokamak geometries. This requires the treatment of anisotropic heat diffusion, which is more efficient along magnetic field lines by up to ten orders of magnitude than perpendicular to them. Comparisons with analytical predictions and experimental measurements allow to determine the stability properties of neoclassical tearing modes as well as the experimental heat diffusion anisotropy.

  3. Pressure drop and heat transfer of lithium single-phase flow under transverse magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Aritomi, Masanori; Inoue, Akira; Matsuzaki, Mitsuo

    1996-01-01

    Pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of a lithium single-phase flow in a rectangular channel was investigated experimentally in the presence of a magnetic field. Friction loss coefficient under non-magnetic field and skin friction coefficient under magnetic field agreed well with the Blasius formula and a simple analytical expression, respectively. Nusselt number under non-magnetic field was slightly lower than the correlation by Hartnett and Irvine. Heat transfer was enhanced by increasing magnetic field above the Hartmann number of about 200. (author)

  4. Magnetic nanowires and hyperthermia: How geometry and material affect heat production efficiency

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia, which refers to the production of heat by magnetic nanostructures under an alternating magnetic field (AMF), has been previously investigated with superparamagnetic nanobeads as a cancer therapy method. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) used in hyperthermia can be very promising, as it has been shown that they have a larger magnetic moment per unit of volume compared to the nanobeads. Moreover, Fe NWs proved to have a higher heating efficiency compared to Fe nanobeads, when exposed to an AMF at the same concentration [1].

  5. The effect of a magnetic field on heat transfer in a slotted channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evtushenko, I.A.; Hua, T.Q.; Kirillov, I.R.; Reed, Claude B.; Sidorenkov, S.S.

    1995-01-01

    The results of numerical and experimental studies of liquid metal heat transfer in slotted channels in a transverse magnetic field are presented. Test results showed an improvement in heat transfer in a straight channel at low and moderate interaction parameter N. The Nusselt number at small N (around 120) was up to twofold higher than in turbulent flow without a magnetic field, the Peclet number being equal. This effect of heat transfer enhancement is caused by the generation and development of large-scale velocity fluctuations close to the heated wall area. Qualitative and quantitative correlations between heat transfer and velocity fluctuation characteristics are presented. (orig.)

  6. Tunable biasing magnetic field design of ferrite tuner for ICRF heating system in EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manman, XU; Yuntao, SONG; Gen, CHEN; Yanping, ZHAO; Yuzhou, MAO; Guang, LIU; Zhen, PENG

    2017-11-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating has been used in tokamaks as one of the most successful auxiliary heating tools and has been adopted in the EAST. However, the antenna load will fluctuate with the change of plasma parameters in the ICRF heating process. To ensure the steady operation of the ICRF heating system in the EAST, fast ferrite tuner (FFT) has been carried out to achieve real-time impedance matching. For the requirements of the FFT impedance matching system, the magnet system of the ferrite tuner (FT) was designed by numerical simulations and experimental analysis, where the biasing magnetic circuit and alternating magnetic circuit were the key researched parts of the ferrite magnet. The integral design goal of the FT magnetic circuit is that DC bias magnetic field is 2000 Gs and alternating magnetic field is ±400 Gs. In the FTT, E-type magnetic circuit was adopted. Ferrite material is NdFeB with a thickness of 30 mm by setting the working point of NdFeB, and the ampere turn of excitation coil is 25 through the theoretical calculation and simulation analysis. The coil inductance to generate alternating magnetic field is about 7 mH. Eddy-current effect has been analyzed, while the magnetic field distribution has been measured by a Hall probe in the medium plane of the biasing magnet. Finally, the test results show the good performance of the biasing magnet satisfying the design and operating requirements of the FFT.

  7. Low temperature anomaly of light stimulated magnetization and heat capacity of the 1D diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffe, Chernet Amente

    2018-03-01

    This article reports magnetization and specific heat capacity anomalies in one dimensional diluted magnetic semiconductors observed at very low temperatures. Based on quantum field theory double time temperature dependent Green function technique is employed to evaluate magnon dispersion and the time correlation function. It is understood that magnon-photon coupling and magnetic impurity concentration controls both, such that near absolute temperature magnetization is nearly zero and abruptly increase to saturation level with decreasing magnon-photon coupling strength. We also found out dropping of magnetic specific heat capacity as a result of increase in magnetic impurity concentration x, perhaps because of inter-band disorder that would suppress the enhancement of density of spin waves.

  8. Low temperature anomaly of light stimulated magnetization and heat capacity of the 1D diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernet Amente Geffe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reports magnetization and specific heat capacity anomalies in one dimensional diluted magnetic semiconductors observed at very low temperatures. Based on quantum field theory double time temperature dependent Green function technique is employed to evaluate magnon dispersion and the time correlation function. It is understood that magnon-photon coupling and magnetic impurity concentration controls both, such that near absolute temperature magnetization is nearly zero and abruptly increase to saturation level with decreasing magnon-photon coupling strength. We also found out dropping of magnetic specific heat capacity as a result of increase in magnetic impurity concentration x, perhaps because of inter-band disorder that would suppress the enhancement of density of spin waves.

  9. Effect of an alternating nonuniform magnetic field on ferrofluid flow and heat transfer in a channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goharkhah, Mohammad; Ashjaee, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Forced convective heat transfer of water based Fe 3 O 4 nanofluid (ferrofluid) in the presence of an alternating non-uniform magnetic field is investigated numerically. The geometry is a two-dimensional channel which is subjected to a uniform heat flux at the top and bottom surfaces. Nonuniform magnetic field produced by eight line source dipoles is imposed on several parts of the channel. Also, a rectangular wave function is applied to the dipoles in order to turn them on and off alternatingly. The effects of the alternating magnetic field strength and frequency on the convective heat transfer are investigated for four different Reynolds numbers (Re=100, 600, 1200 and 2000) in the laminar flow regime. Comparing the results with zero magnetic field case, show that the heat transfer enhancement increases with the Reynolds number and reaches a maximum of 13.9% at Re=2000 and f=20 Hz. Moreover, at a constant Reynolds number, it increases with the magnetic field intensity while an optimum value exists for the frequency. Also, the optimum frequency increases with the Reynolds number. On the other hand, the heat transfer enhancement due to the magnetic field is always accompanied by a pressure drop penalty. A maximum pressure drop increase of 6% is observed at Re=2000 and f=5 Hz which shows that the pressure drop increase is not as significant as the heat transfer enhancement. - Highlights: • An alternating magnetic field is imposed on ferrofluid flow in a heated channel. • Heat transfer is enhanced noticeably compared to the case with no magnetic field. • Heat transfer depends on Reynolds number, magnetic field intensity and frequency. • Optimum frequency is independent of intensity but increases with Reynolds number. • Pressure drop increase is not as significant as the heat transfer enhancement

  10. Improving heat generation of magnetic nanoparticles by pre-orientation of particles in a static three tesla magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Mathias M., E-mail: Mathias.Beck@tum.de [Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lammel, Christian [Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard [Institute of Medical Engineering, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 11, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    Inductive heating of electrically insulating materials like fiberglass reinforced thermoplastics (FRTP) without susceptors is not possible. However, due to their low thermal conductivity a volumetric heat generation method is advisable to reach short heating times to melt this material for reshaping. This can be done with magnetic nanoparticles as susceptors within the thermoplastic of the FRTP using Néel relaxation. During the heating process the particle's magnetic moment rotates with the field while the particle itself is fixed within the thermoplastic. Therefore the heat dissipation of each particle depends on its orientation within the field. To achieve the maximum heat generation of the particles we pre-oriented the particles within a plastic at the best angle to the applied AC field for induction. To do this, five mass percent nanoparticles were dispersed in an epoxy resin, which was then hardened at room temperature in a static three Tesla magnetic field. After its solidification the heating behavior of the sample was compared to a reference sample, which was hardened without a field. The oriented particles showed an increased heating rate when oriented parallel to the applied AC field. The absorption rate was 3.3 times as high as the undirected reference sample. When the alternating electromagnetic field was perpendicular to the oriented particles, the specific absorption rate was similar to that of the reference sample. We compare this result with theory and with calculations from literature, and conduct a numerical simulation. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoparticles are aligned using a static three tesla magnetic field. • Inductive heating depends on the particles pre-orientation in a solid matrix. • Alignment increases the heat generation significantly.

  11. Consideration on nuclear fusion in plasma by the magnetic confinement as a heat engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Yoshio

    1990-01-01

    In comparing nuclear fusion in plasma by the magnetic confinement with nuclear fission and chemical reactions, the power density and the function of a heat engine are discussed using a new parameter G introduced as an eigenvalue of a reaction and the value of q introduced to estimate the thermal efficiency of a heat engine. It is shown that the fusion reactor by the magnetic confinement is very difficult to be a modern heat engine because of the lack of some indispensable functions as a modern heat engine. The value of G and q have the important role in the consideration. (author)

  12. Pulse Power Modulator development for the CLIC Damping Ring Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity (10-34 – 10-35 cm-2s-1) and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV: CLIC would complement LHC physics in the multi-TeV range. The CLIC design relies on Pre-Damping Rings (PDR) and Damping Rings (DR) to achieve the very low emittance, through synchrotron radiation, needed for the luminosity requirements of CLIC. To limit the beam emittance blow-up due to oscillations, the pulse power modulators for the DR kickers must provide extremely flat, high-voltage pulses: the 2 GHz specification called for a 160 ns duration flat-top of 12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 %. In order to meet these demanding specifications, a combination of broadband impedance matching, optimized electrical circuit layout and advanced control techniques is required. A solid-state modulator, the inductive adder, is the most promising approach to meeting the demanding specifications...

  13. Magnetic behaviors of cataclasites within Wenchuan earthquake fault zone in heating experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Li, H.; Sun, Z.; Chou, Y. M.; Cao, Y., Jr.; Huan, W.; Ye, X.; He, X.

    2017-12-01

    Previous rock magnetism of fault rocks were used to trace the frictional heating temperature, however, few studies are focus on different temperatures effect of rock magnetic properties. To investigate rock magnetic response to different temperature, we conducted heating experiments on cataclasites from the Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling borehole 2 (WFSD-2) cores. Samples of cataclasites were obtained using an electric drill with a 1 cm-diameter drill pipe from 580.65 m-depth. Experiments were performed by a Thermal-optical measurement system under argon atmosphere and elevated temperatures. Both microstructural observations and powder X-ray diffraction analyses show that feldspar and quartz start to melt at 1100 ° and 1300 ° respectively. Magnetic susceptibility values of samples after heating are higher than that before heating. Samples after heating at 700 and 1750 ° have the highest values of magnetic susceptibility. Rock magnetic measurements show that the main ferromagnetic minerals within samples heated below 1100 ° (400, 700, 900 and 1100 °) are magnetite, which is new-formed by transformation of paramagnetic minerals. The χferri results show that the quantity of magnetite is bigger at sample heated by 700° experiment than by 400, 900 and 1100° experiments. Based on the FORC diagrams, we consider that magnetite grains are getting finer from 400 to 900°, and growing coarser when heated from 900 to 1100 °. SEM-EDX results indicate that the pure iron are formed in higher temperature (1300, 1500 and 1750 °), which present as framboids with size values of samples when heated at 400, 700, 900 and 1100°, while the neoformed pure iron is responsible to the higher magnetic susceptibility values of samples when heated at 1300, 1500 and 1750°.

  14. Joining of parts via magnetic heating of metal aluminum powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ian

    2013-05-21

    A method of joining at least two parts includes steps of dispersing a joining material comprising a multi-phase magnetic metal-aluminum powder at an interface between the at least two parts to be joined and applying an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The AMF has a magnetic field strength and frequency suitable for inducing magnetic hysteresis losses in the metal-aluminum powder and is applied for a period that raises temperature of the metal-aluminum powder to an exothermic transformation temperature. At the exothermic transformation temperature, the metal-aluminum powder melts and resolidifies as a metal aluminide solid having a non-magnetic configuration.

  15. Experimental study on heat transfer augmentation of graphene based ferrofluids in presence of magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadeghinezhad, Emad; Mehrali, Mohammad; Akhiani, Amir Reza

    2017-01-01

    The effect of a permanent magnetic field on the heat transfer characteristics of hybrid graphene-magnetite nanofluids (hybrid nanofluid) under forced laminar flow was experimentally investigated. For this purpose, a reduced graphene oxide-Fe3O4 was synthesized by using two-dimensional (2D) graphene...... and it shows that the thermal conductivity increased up to 11%. The hybrid nanofluid behaves as a Newtonian fluid with liquid like behavior with superparamagnetic properties as was evident from its magnetic saturation value at 45.9 emu/g. Moreover, the experimental heat-transfer results indicated that the heat...... transfer enhancement of the hybrid nanofluid compared to the control fluid (distilled water) was negligible when no magnetic field was applied. Additionally, the convective heat transfer was significantly improved under the influence of a magnetic field with a maximum enhancement of 82% in terms...

  16. Role of Magnetic Carpet in Coronal Heating S. R. Verma & Diksha ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in the solar corona. ... ity, termed magnetic carpet contributing to solar activity on a short time .... migrates to the boundaries of supergranule cells and moves along them, fragmenting,.

  17. Effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and properties of Ni based soft magnetic alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhong; Ruan, Hui; Chen, Dengming; Li, Kejian; Guo, Donglin; Shao, Bin

    2018-04-20

    A Ni-based alloy was heat treated by changing the temperature and ambient atmosphere of the heat treatment. Morphology, crystal structure, and physical performance of the Ni-based alloy were characterized via SEM, XRD, TEM, and PPMS. Results show that due to the heat treatment process, the grain growth of the Ni-based alloy and the removal of impurities and defects are promoted. Both the orientation and stress caused by rolling are reduced. The permeability and saturation magnetization of the alloy are improved. The hysteresis loss and coercivity are decreased. Higher heat treatment temperature leads to increased improvement of permeability and saturation magnetization. Heat treatment in hydrogen is more conducive to the removal of impurities. At the same temperature, the magnetic performance of the heat-treated alloy in hydrogen is better than that of an alloy with heat treatment in vacuum. The Ni-based alloy shows an excellent magnetic performance on 1,373 K heat treatment in hydrogen atmosphere. In this process, the µ m , B s , P u , and H c of the obtained alloy are 427 mHm -1 , 509 mT, 0.866 Jm -3 , and 0.514 Am -1 , respectively. At the same time, the resistivity of alloy decreases and its thermal conductivity increases in response to heat treatment. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The ELETTRA fast magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tommasini, D.

    1992-01-01

    The design of the fast magnets to be used to inject the electron beam into the 2 GeV storage ring Elettra is presented and discussed. Injection makes use of two types of fast magnets: the septa and the kickers. There are two identical septa magnets of the so called 'eddy current' type, which will be housed in a vacuum tank. The orbit bump is generated by four identical kicker magnets symmetrically placed around the mid-point of a single straight section: they will be in air with an internal vacuum chamber. Extensive electric and magnetic tests have been performed on prototypes, and the relevant results are presented and discussed. (author) 6 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  19. A multi-functional testing instrument for heat assisted magnetic recording media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H. Z.; Chen, Y. J.; Leong, S. H.; An, C. W.; Ye, K. D.; Hu, J. F.; Yin, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    With recent developments in heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), characterization of HAMR media is becoming very important. We present a multi-functional instrument for testing HAMR media, which integrates HAMR writing, reading, and a micro-magneto-optic Kerr effect (μ-MOKE) testing function. A potential application of the present instrument is to make temperature dependent magnetic property measurement using a pump-probe configuration. In the measurement, the media is heated up by a heating (intense) beam while a testing (weak) beam is overlapped with the heating beam for MOKE measurement. By heating the media with different heating beam power, magnetic measurements by MOKE at different temperatures can be performed. Compared to traditional existing tools such as the vibrating sample magnetometer, the present instrument provides localized and efficient heating at the measurement spot. The integration of HAMR writing and μ-MOKE system can also facilitate a localized full investigation of the magnetic media by potential correlation of HAMR head independent write/read performance to localized magnetic properties

  20. Beam heating studies on an early model is a superconducting cosine theta magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoki, G.; Bunce, G.; Danby, G.; Foelsche, H.; Jackson, J.; Prodell, A.; Soukas, A.; Stevens, A.; Stoehr, R.; Weisenbloom, J.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting magnets for accelerators can be accidentally quenched by heat resulting from beam losses in the magnet. The threshold for such quenches is determined by the time structure of the beam loss and by details of the magnet application, construction and cooling. A 4.25 m long superconducting cosine theta dipole magnet, MARK VI, constructed during the research and development phase of the ISABELLE Project at BNL was installed in the 28.5 GeV/c primary proton beam line from the AGS. By energizing the magnet, the proton beam could be deflected into the magnet. The beam intensity required to quench the magnet was observed for different beam sizes and at several values of magnet current up to 2400 A or approximately 70% of the highest magnet operating current. The maximum current was limited by the gas-cooled power lead flow available using pool-boiling helium rather than single phase forced-flow helium at 5 atm for which the magnet system was designed. Details of the experimental setup including the magnet and cryogenic system, the beam-monitoring equipment and instrumentation are described. The measurements are discussed and compared with beam heating measurements made on another superconducting magnet and interpreted using the Cascade Simulation Program, CASIM

  1. One of the 10 cells of AA Injection Kicker K4

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The 3.5 GeV/c Antiproton Accumulator (AA) had 2 delay-line type injection kickers, K3 (12 cells) and K4 (10 cells). Here we see one of the K4 cells, with ferrite between stainless-steel plates. Pulse voltage: 61 kV; rise/fall-time 86 ns; flat-top 460 ns; top flatness +-2%. During injection, the open side of the C-shaped kickers was closed off with a fast shutter, so that their stray field would not perturb the stack of already accumulated antiprotons.

  2. Experimental investigation of MHD heat transfer in a vertical round tube affected by transverse magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, I.A., E-mail: corpuskula@gmail.com; Sviridov, E.V.; Sviridov, V.G.; Razuvanov, N.G.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Local and averaged heat transfer coefficient are measured. • Free convection influence on MHD-flow is investigated. • The region with the free convection effect of MHD-heat transfer is found. • Temperature low-frequency fluctuations of abnormally high amplitude are detected. • Analysis of the MHD-heat transfer experimental data is performed. - Abstract: The article is devoted to the results of experimental investigation of heat transfer for a downward mercury flow in a vertical round tube in the presence of a transverse magnetic with non-uniform heat flux along the tube circumference.

  3. Specific heat and magnetism of a UIrGe single crystal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sechovský, V.; Vejpravová, J.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Honda, F.; Prokeš, K.; Šantavá, Eva

    359-361, - (2005), s. 1126-1128 ISSN 0921-4526 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : uranium intermetallics * antiferromagnetism * magnetic anisotropy * specific heat Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.796, year: 2005

  4. Regarding the influence of heating and the Soret effect on a magnetic fluid seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakov, M.S., E-mail: mkrakov@gmail.com [Belarusian National Technical University, 65 Independence Ave., 220013 Minsk (Belarus); Nikiforov, I.V. [Belarusian State University, 4 Independence Sq., 220050 Minsk (Belarus)

    2017-06-01

    The influence of a temperature gradient and the Soret effect on the distribution of particles in a magnetic fluid seal (MFS) is studied. The heating of the MFS is found to be an effective method of homogenizing the magnetic fluid in the seal; in addition, the influence of the Soret effect on this process is found to be essential.

  5. The Hardy inequality and the heat equation with magnetic field in any dimension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cazacu, C.; Krejčiřík, David

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 7 (2016), s. 1056-1088 ISSN 0360-5302 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06818S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Aharonov-Bohm magnetic field * Hardy inequality * heat equation * large time behaviour of solutions * magnetic Schrodinger operator Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.608, year: 2016

  6. Modulation of the wall-heat transfer in turbulent thermomagnetic convection by magnetic field gradients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Zinsmeester, R.; Pyrda, L.; Fornalik-Wajs, E.; Szmyd, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present combined experimental and numerical studies of the heat transfer of paramagnetic or diamagnetic fluid inside a differentially heated cubical enclosure subjected to the magnetic field gradients of different strength and orientation. In contrast to the previously reported studies in

  7. Magnetically Modulated Heat Transport in a Global Simulation of Solar Magneto-convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Campus Box 600, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Charbonneau, Paul [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K. [European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, RG2 9AX (United Kingdom); Rast, Mark P., E-mail: Jean-Francois.Cossette@lasp.colorado.edu, E-mail: paulchar@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: smolar@ecmwf.int, E-mail: Mark.Rast@lasp.colorado.edu [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Campus Box 391, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2017-05-20

    We present results from a global MHD simulation of solar convection in which the heat transported by convective flows varies in-phase with the total magnetic energy. The purely random initial magnetic field specified in this experiment develops into a well-organized large-scale antisymmetric component undergoing hemispherically synchronized polarity reversals on a 40 year period. A key feature of the simulation is the use of a Newtonian cooling term in the entropy equation to maintain a convectively unstable stratification and drive convection, as opposed to the specification of heating and cooling terms at the bottom and top boundaries. When taken together, the solar-like magnetic cycle and the convective heat flux signature suggest that a cyclic modulation of the large-scale heat-carrying convective flows could be operating inside the real Sun. We carry out an analysis of the entropy and momentum equations to uncover the physical mechanism responsible for the enhanced heat transport. The analysis suggests that the modulation is caused by a magnetic tension imbalance inside upflows and downflows, which perturbs their respective contributions to heat transport in such a way as to enhance the total convective heat flux at cycle maximum. Potential consequences of the heat transport modulation for solar irradiance variability are briefly discussed.

  8. Geothermal Heat Flux Underneath Ice Sheets Estimated From Magnetic Satellite Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox Maule, Cathrine; Purucker, M.E.; Olsen, Nils

    The geothermal heat flux is an important factor in the dynamics of ice sheets, and it is one of the important parameters in the thermal budgets of subglacial lakes. We have used satellite magnetic data to estimate the geothermal heat flux underneath the ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland...

  9. Temperature Dependence and Magnetic Properties of Injection Molding Tool Materials Used in Induction Heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrier, Patrick; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the heating phase of an induction heated injection molding tool precisely, the temperature-dependent magnetic properties, B–H curves, and the hysteresis loss are necessary for the molding tool materials. Hence, injection molding tool steels, core materials among other materials have...

  10. High Magnetic Field Processing - A Heat-Free Heat Treating Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael [ORNL; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz- [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; Rogers, Hiram [ORNL; Manuel, Michele [University of Florida, Gainesville; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Murphy, Bart L [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    The High and Thermal Magnetic Processing/Electro-magnetic Acoustic Transducer (HTMP/EMAT) technology has been shown to be an enabling disruptive materials processing technology, that can achieve significant improvements in microstructure and consequently material performance beyond that achievable through conventional processing, and will lead to the next generation of advanced performance structural and functional materials. HTMP exposure increased the reaction kinetics enabling refinement of microstructural features such as finer martensite lath size, and finer, more copious, homogeneous dispersions of strengthening carbides leading to combined strength and toughness improvements in bainitic steels. When induction heating is applied in a high magnetic field environment, the induction heating coil is configured so that high intensity acoustic/ultrasonic treatment occurs naturally. The configuration results in a highly effective electromagnetic acoustical transducer (EMAT). HTMP combined with applying high-field EMAT, produce a non-contact ultrasonic treatment that can be used to process metal alloys in either the liquid state resulting in significant microstructural changes over conventional processing. Proof-of-principle experiments on cast irons resulted in homogeneous microstructures in small castings along with improved casting surface appearance. The experiment showed that by exposing liquid metal to the non-contact acoustic/ultrasonic processing technology developed using HMFP/EMAT wrought-like microstructures were developed in cast components. This Energy Intensive Processes (EIP) project sponsored by the DOE EERE Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) demonstrated the following: (1) The reduction of retained austenite in high carbon/high alloy steels with an ambient temperature HTMP process, replacing either a cryogenic or double tempering thermal process normally employed to accomplish retained austenite transformation. HTMP can be described as a 'heat

  11. Effects on heat transfer of multiphase magnetic fluid due to circular magnetic field over a stretching surface with heat source/sink and thermal radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zeeshan

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current article is to explore the boundary layer heat transport flow of multiphase magnetic fluid with solid impurities suspended homogeneously past a stretching sheet under the impact of circular magnetic field. Thermal radiation effects are also taken in account. The equations describing the flow of dust particles in fluid along with point dipole are modelled by employing conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy, which are then converted into non-linear coupled differential equations by mean of similarity approach. The transformed ODE’s are tackled numerically with the help of efficient Runga-Kutta method. The influence of ferromagnetic interaction parameter, viscous dissipation, fluid-particle interaction parameter, Eckert number, Prandtl number, thermal radiation parameter and number of dust particles, heat production or absorption parameter with the two thermal process namely, prescribed heat flux (PHF or prescribed surface temperature (PST are observed on temperature and velocity profiles. The value of skin-friction coefficient and Nusselt number are calculated for numerous physical parameters. Present results are correlated with available for a limited case and an excellent agreement is found. Keywords: Ferromagnetic interaction parameter, Dusty magnetic fluid, stretching sheet, Magnetic dipole, Heat source/sink, Thermal radiation

  12. Thermomagnetic force acting on an ellipsoidal body immersed into a nonuniformly heated magnetic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naletova, V.A.; Kvitantsev, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    A prolate spheroidal body immersed into a nonuniformly heated magnetic liquid in an applied magnetic field has been considered. The expressions for the pressure and velocity of the liquid, temperature and magnetic field have been obtained. The formula for a thermomagnetic force acting on the body has been calculated. It has been shown that the body shape needs to be taken into account when we study the thermomagnetic diffusion of the prolate bodies

  13. Helium II heat transfer in LHC magnets : polyimide cable insulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler, Tiemo

    2017-01-01

    Today’s large particle accelerators like the LHC at CERN are using superconducting materials as a construction material for magnets. These magnets need to be cooled constantly to temperatures below the critical surface of the superconducting material. In the LHC this is achieved by using liquid

  14. Magnetic specific heat and magnetoresistance of URhSi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokeš, K.; Wand, T.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Meissner, M.; Honda, F.; Sechovský, V.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 460, 1-2 (2008), s. 47-53 ISSN 0925-8388 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : URhSi * calorimetry * ferromagnetism * magnetic measurements Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.510, year: 2008

  15. Magnon heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility of the spin Lieb lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen, E-mail: m.yarmohammadi69@gamil.com

    2016-11-01

    Using linear response theory, Heisenberg model Hamiltonian and Green's function technique, the influences of Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI), external magnetic field and next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) coupling on the density of magnon modes (DMM), the magnetic susceptibility (MS) and the magnon heat capacity (MHC) of a spin Lieb lattice, a face-centered square lattice, are investigated. The results reveal a band gap in the DMM and we witness an extension in the bandwidth and an increase in the number of van-Hove singularities as well. As a notable point, besides the magnetic nature which includes ferromagnetism in spin Lieb-based nanosystems, MS is investigated. Further, we report a Schottky anomaly in the MHC. The results show that the effects of the magnetic field on the MHC and MS have different behaviors in two temperature regions. In the low temperature region, MHC and MS increase when the magnetic field strength increases. On the other hand, the MHC and MS reduce with increasing the magnetic field strength in the high temperature region. Also comprehensive numerical modelling of the DMM, the MS and the MHC of a spin Lieb lattice yields excellent qualitative agreement with the experimental data. - Highlights: • Theoretical calculation of density of states of the spin Lieb lattice. • The investigation of the effect of external magnetic field on the magnon heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility. • The investigation of the effect of NNN coupling and the DMI strength on the magnon heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility.

  16. Coronal Heating Topology: The Interplay of Current Sheets and Magnetic Field Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappazzo, A. F.; Velli, M. [Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Matthaeus, W. H. [Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Ruffolo, D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Servidio, S., E-mail: rappazzo@ucla.edu [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, Cosenza I-87036 (Italy)

    2017-07-20

    The magnetic topology and field line random walk (FLRW) properties of a nanoflare-heated and magnetically confined corona are investigated in the reduced magnetohydrodynamic regime. Field lines originating from current sheets form coherent structures, called current sheet connected (CSC) regions, which extend around them. CSC FLRW is strongly anisotropic, with preferential diffusion along the current sheets’ in-plane length. CSC FLRW properties remain similar to those of the entire ensemble but exhibit enhanced mean square displacements and separations due to the stronger magnetic field intensities in CSC regions. The implications for particle acceleration and heat transport in the solar corona and wind, and for solar moss formation are discussed.

  17. Plasma heating and confinement in toroidal magnetic bottle by means of microwave slowing-down structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datlov, J.; Klima, R.; Kopecky, V.; Musil, J.; Zacek, F.

    1977-01-01

    An invention is described concerning high-frequency plasma heating and confinement in toroidal magnetic vessels. Microwave energy is applied to the plasma via one or more slowing-down structures exciting low phase velocity waves whose energy may be efficiently absorbed by plasma electrons. The wave momentum transfer results in a toroidal electrical current whose magnetic field together with an external magnetic field ensure plasma confinement. The low-frequency modulation of microwave energy may also be used for heating the ion plasma component. (J.U.)

  18. Design and heat load analysis of support structure of CR superconducting dipole magnet for FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yinfeng; Wu Songtao; Wu Weiyue; Xu Houchang; Liu Changle

    2008-01-01

    In order to meet the requirement of the Collector ring (CR) dipole superconducting magnet of FAIR in the process of operation, meanwhile, and to ensure the heat loads coming from the support structures to be lower than the design demands, the 3D models of support structures have been constructed with CATIA, then the calculation of low-temperature heat-load and the structure analysis have been done with ANSYS, the support structure material, 316LN+G10, is decided according to the heat-load calculation and the structure optimization, these results are necessary for manufacturing the formal magnet. (authors)

  19. Electro-magnetic heating in viscous oil reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Marathon Oil Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-10-15

    This paper discussed electromagnetic (EM) heating techniques for primary and secondary enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes. Ohmic, induction, and formation resistive heating techniques were discussed. Issues related to energy equivalence and hardware requirements were reviewed. Challenges related to heat losses in vertical wellbores, well integrity, and galvanic corrosion were also outlined. A pair of 1500 foot horizontal wells in a heavy oil reservoir were then modelled in order to optimize EM recovery processes. DC current was used in a base case water flood run. Electrical conductivities were measured. The model was converted to a homogenous model in order to study injector and producer electrodes. The study showed that reservoir resistance was low, and most of the heating took place near the electrode area where electric lines diverged or converged. Results of the study suggested that EM heating in formations is not as efficient as steam-based processes. Accurate simulations of EM heating processes within reservoirs are difficult to obtain, as the amounts of estimated heat input are sensitive to grid refinement. It was concluded that hot spots in the EM electrodes have also caused failures in other field applications and studies. 11 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Encouragement of Enzyme Reaction Utilizing Heat Generation from Ferromagnetic Particles Subjected to an AC Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masashi; Aki, Atsushi; Mizuki, Toru; Maekawa, Toru; Usami, Ron; Morimoto, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of activating an enzyme utilizing heat generation from ferromagnetic particles under an ac magnetic field. We immobilize α-amylase on the surface of ferromagnetic particles and analyze its activity. We find that when α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids, that is, ferromagnetic particles, on which α-amylase molecules are immobilized, are subjected to an ac magnetic field, the particles generate heat and as a result, α-amylase on the particles is heated up and activated. We next prepare a solution, in which α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids and free, nonimmobilized chitinase are dispersed, and analyze their activities. We find that when the solution is subjected to an ac magnetic field, the activity of α-amylase immobilized on the particles increases, whereas that of free chitinase hardly changes; in other words, only α-amylase immobilized on the particles is selectively activated due to heat generation from the particles.

  1. Encouragement of Enzyme Reaction Utilizing Heat Generation from Ferromagnetic Particles Subjected to an AC Magnetic Field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Suzuki

    Full Text Available We propose a method of activating an enzyme utilizing heat generation from ferromagnetic particles under an ac magnetic field. We immobilize α-amylase on the surface of ferromagnetic particles and analyze its activity. We find that when α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids, that is, ferromagnetic particles, on which α-amylase molecules are immobilized, are subjected to an ac magnetic field, the particles generate heat and as a result, α-amylase on the particles is heated up and activated. We next prepare a solution, in which α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids and free, nonimmobilized chitinase are dispersed, and analyze their activities. We find that when the solution is subjected to an ac magnetic field, the activity of α-amylase immobilized on the particles increases, whereas that of free chitinase hardly changes; in other words, only α-amylase immobilized on the particles is selectively activated due to heat generation from the particles.

  2. Analysis of self-heating of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Deschenes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal assistance has been shown to significantly reduce the required operation power for spin torque transfer magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM. Proposed heating methods include modified material stack compositions that result in increased self-heating or external heat sources. In this work we analyze the self-heating process of a standard perpendicular magnetic anisotropy STT-MRAM device through numerical simulations in order to understand the relative contributions of Joule, thermoelectric Peltier and Thomson, and tunneling junction heating. A 2D rotationally symmetric numerical model is used to solve the coupled electro-thermal equations including thermoelectric effects and heat absorbed or released at the tunneling junction. We compare self-heating for different common passivation materials, positive and negative electrical current polarity, and different device thermal anchoring and boundaries resistance configurations. The variations considered are found to result in significant differences in maximum temperatures reached. Average increases of 3 K, 10 K, and 100 K for different passivation materials, positive and negative polarity, and different thermal anchoring configurations, respectively, are observed. The highest temperatures, up to 424 K, are obtained for silicon dioxide as the passivation material, positive polarity, and low thermal anchoring with thermal boundary resistance configurations. Interestingly it is also found that due to the tunneling heat, Peltier effect, device geometry, and numerous interfacial layers around the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ, most of the heat is dissipated on the lower potential side of the magnetic junction. This asymmetry in heating, which has also been observed experimentally, is important as thermally assisted switching requires heating of the free layer specifically and this will be significantly different for the two polarity operations, set and reset.

  3. Heat generation in agglomerated ferrite nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, E Jr; De Biasi, E; Mansilla, M Vasquez; Saleta, M E; Granada, M; Troiani, H E; Zysler, R D; Effenberger, F B; Rossi, L M; Rechenberg, H R

    2013-01-01

    The role of agglomeration and magnetic interparticle interactions in heat generation of magnetic ferrofluids in an ac magnetic field is still unclear, with apparent discrepancy between the results presented in the literature. In this work, we measured the heat generating capability of agglomerated ferrite nanoparticles in a non-invasive ac magnetic field with f = 100 kHz and H 0 = 13 kA m -1 . The nanoparticles were morphologically and magnetically characterized, and the specific absorption rate (SAR) for our ac magnetic field presents a clear dependence on the diameter of the nanoparticles, with a maximum SAR = 48 W g -1 for 15 nm. Our agglomerated nanoparticles have large hydrodynamic diameters, thus the mechanical relaxation can be neglected as a heat generation mechanism. Therefore, we present a model that simulates the SAR dependence of the agglomerated samples on the diameter of the nanoparticles based on the hysteresis losses that is valid for the non-linear region (with H 0 comparable to the anisotropy field). Our model takes into account the magnetic interactions among the nanoparticles in the agglomerate. For comparison, we also measured the SAR of non-agglomerated nanoparticles in a similar diameter range, in which Néel and Brown relaxations dominate the heat generation.

  4. Study on VCSEL laser heating chip in nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Binquan; Wu, Wenfeng; Jia, Yuchen; Wang, Jing

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, atomic gyroscope has become an important direction of inertial navigation. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope has a stronger advantage in the miniaturization of the size. In atomic gyroscope, the lasers are indispensable devices which has an important effect on the improvement of the gyroscope performance. The frequency stability of the VCSEL lasers requires high precision control of temperature. However, the heating current of the laser will definitely bring in the magnetic field, and the sensitive device, alkali vapor cell, is very sensitive to the magnetic field, so that the metal pattern of the heating chip should be designed ingeniously to eliminate the magnetic field introduced by the heating current. In this paper, a heating chip was fabricated by MEMS process, i.e. depositing platinum on semiconductor substrates. Platinum has long been considered as a good resistance material used for measuring temperature The VCSEL laser chip is fixed in the center of the heating chip. The thermometer resistor measures the temperature of the heating chip, which can be considered as the same temperature of the VCSEL laser chip, by turning the temperature signal into voltage signal. The FPGA chip is used as a micro controller, and combined with PID control algorithm constitute a closed loop control circuit. The voltage applied to the heating resistor wire is modified to achieve the temperature control of the VCSEL laser. In this way, the laser frequency can be controlled stably and easily. Ultimately, the temperature stability can be achieved better than 100mK.

  5. Influence of resonant magnetic perturbations on transient heat load deposition and fast ion losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, Michael Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion is the energy conversion process which keeps the sun shining. For the last six decades, researchers have been investigating the physics involved in order to enable the usage of this energy supply on Earth. The most promising candidates for fusion power plants are based on magnetic confinement of plasma to provide the ideal conditions for efficient thermonuclear fusion in well controlled surroundings. One important aspect is the control of instabilities that occur in the edge region of the plasma and lead to an ejection of huge amounts of energy. Magnetic perturbation fields which are resonant in the plasma edge are found to modify the plasma favourably and reduce the impact of these instabilities. This dissertation focuses on the effects of resonant magnetic perturbation fields on the ejected energy as well as on the drawbacks of these perturbation fields. The transient energy ejection which is triggered by the instabilities causes extreme heat loads on the wall components in fusion devices. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how resonant magnetic perturbation fields affect the heat load deposition. Furthermore, the impact of resonant magnetic perturbation fields on the confinement of fast ions is an important aspect as fast ions are still required to be well confined in order to avoid additional wall loads and increase the fusion efficiency. Recent upgrades on the Joint European Torus allow for a detailed study of the heat load deposition profiles caused by transient events. Throughout this work, the new features are used for the study of the modifications of the transient heat load depositions that occur if resonant magnetic perturbation fields are applied. This leads to a further understanding of the processes involved during the plasma edge instabilities. Additionally, an alternative method using lower hybrid waves for applying resonant magnetic perturbations is investigated. Furthermore, a new diagnostic, capable of detecting fast ion

  6. Influence of resonant magnetic perturbations on transient heat load deposition and fast ion losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, Michael Thomas

    2014-07-11

    Thermonuclear fusion is the energy conversion process which keeps the sun shining. For the last six decades, researchers have been investigating the physics involved in order to enable the usage of this energy supply on Earth. The most promising candidates for fusion power plants are based on magnetic confinement of plasma to provide the ideal conditions for efficient thermonuclear fusion in well controlled surroundings. One important aspect is the control of instabilities that occur in the edge region of the plasma and lead to an ejection of huge amounts of energy. Magnetic perturbation fields which are resonant in the plasma edge are found to modify the plasma favourably and reduce the impact of these instabilities. This dissertation focuses on the effects of resonant magnetic perturbation fields on the ejected energy as well as on the drawbacks of these perturbation fields. The transient energy ejection which is triggered by the instabilities causes extreme heat loads on the wall components in fusion devices. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how resonant magnetic perturbation fields affect the heat load deposition. Furthermore, the impact of resonant magnetic perturbation fields on the confinement of fast ions is an important aspect as fast ions are still required to be well confined in order to avoid additional wall loads and increase the fusion efficiency. Recent upgrades on the Joint European Torus allow for a detailed study of the heat load deposition profiles caused by transient events. Throughout this work, the new features are used for the study of the modifications of the transient heat load depositions that occur if resonant magnetic perturbation fields are applied. This leads to a further understanding of the processes involved during the plasma edge instabilities. Additionally, an alternative method using lower hybrid waves for applying resonant magnetic perturbations is investigated. Furthermore, a new diagnostic, capable of detecting fast ion

  7. Natural convection and boiling heat transfer of a liquid metal in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Masahiro; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1983-02-01

    A liquid metal is often assumed as a coolant and a breeding material of a Tokamak fusion reactor. However, many problems on the thermo-hydraulics of a liquid metal in a magnetic field are still remained to be studied. In the present report, natural convection and boiling of a liquid metal in a strong magnetic field are studied to examine a fundamental feasibility of a fusion reactor cooled by a liquid metal. In the experimental study of the natural convection, the circulation of a liquid metal was found to be surpressed even by a magnetic field parallel to the gravity. A numerical study has confirmed the conclusion drawn by the experiment. In the study of boiling heat transfer, stable boiling of a liquid metal has been found also in a strong magnetic field. The burnout heat flux hardly affected by the magnetic field. These indicate a fundamental feasibility of the liquid-metal cooling for a Tokamak fusion reactor. (author)

  8. Flat super-oscillatory lens for heat-assisted magnetic recording with sub-50 nm resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guanghui; Rogers, Edward T F; Roy, Tapashree; Shen, Zexiang; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2014-03-24

    Heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) is a future roadmap technology to overcome the superparamagnetic limit in high density magnetic recording. Existing HAMR schemes depend on a simultaneous magnetic stimulation and light-induced local heating of the information carrier. To achieve high-density recorded data, near-field plasmonic transducers have been proposed as light concentrators. Here we suggest and investigate in detail an alternative approach exploiting a far-field focusing device that can focus light into sub-50 nm hot-spots in the magnetic recording layer using a laser source operating at 473 nm. It is based on a recently introduced super-oscillatory flat lens improved with the use of solid immersion, giving an effective numerical aperture as high as 4.17. The proposed solution is robust and easy to integrate with the magnetic recording head thus offering a competitive advantage over plasmonic technology.

  9. Leg mass characteristics of accurate and inaccurate kickers--an Australian football perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Nicolas H; Nimphius, Sophia; Cochrane, Jodie L; Newton, Robert U

    2013-01-01

    Athletic profiling provides valuable information to sport scientists, assisting in the optimal design of strength and conditioning programmes. Understanding the influence these physical characteristics may have on the generation of kicking accuracy is advantageous. The aim of this study was to profile and compare the lower limb mass characteristics of accurate and inaccurate Australian footballers. Thirty-one players were recruited from the Western Australian Football League to perform ten drop punt kicks over 20 metres to a player target. Players were separated into accurate (n = 15) and inaccurate (n = 16) groups, with leg mass characteristics assessed using whole body dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans. Accurate kickers demonstrated significantly greater relative lean mass (P ≤ 0.004) and significantly lower relative fat mass (P ≤ 0.024) across all segments of the kicking and support limbs, while also exhibiting significantly higher intra-limb lean-to-fat mass ratios for all segments across both limbs (P ≤ 0.009). Inaccurate kickers also produced significantly larger asymmetries between limbs than accurate kickers (P ≤ 0.028), showing considerably lower lean mass in their support leg. These results illustrate a difference in leg mass characteristics between accurate and inaccurate kickers, highlighting the potential influence these may have on technical proficiency of the drop punt.

  10. The change of magnetic properties of minerals and rocks after their microwave heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianèin Jaroslav

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of microwaves utilisation in drying processes of different materials (e.g. wood, textiles, coffee, paper, treating of synthetics, glass and ceramic materials, vulcanisation of gum, melting of ferrous and non-ferrous ores, intensification processes of disintegration of raw materials, desulphurization of coal as well as in processes of disposing hazardous wastes is studied. The presented paper describes the influence of microwave radiation on on the change of magnetic properties of minerals and ores. The modification of magnetic properties of valuable components of irradiated ores increases the efficiency of process of their magnetic separation. Changes of magnetic properties of samples were evaluated by measuring the magnetic susceptibility and by X-ray diffraction analysis before and after their microwave heating.Thermal pretreatment of weakly magnetic ores by applying of microwave radiation is tested on the samples of iron spathic ore from the Rudòany deposit (25.1 % of Fe, 5.1 % of SiO2 and the Nižná Slaná ore (31.1 % of Fe, 9.6 % of SiO2. The influence of microwave on a rate of change of iron spathic ore to magnetite depending on the time of heating was observed for a grain size of 0.5 – 1 mm at a constant oven output of 900 W. The weight of tested samples was 100 g. After 10 min. of heating, an essential change of magnetic properties of ore samples from both deposits occurs and after 15 min. a rapid growth of magnetic susceptibility value is observed. This fact testifies about an intensive decomposition of siderite. The achieved values of magnetic susceptibility, results of chemical analyses as well as the X-ray diffraction records of irradiated samples confirmed the formation of new strongly magnetic mineral phases. Finally, after 40 min. of heating, a sintering of grains resulting in agglomerates, accompanied by molten mass creation, were observed.

  11. Optimal laser heating of plasmas confined in strong solenoidal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitela, J.; Akcasu, A.Z.

    1987-01-01

    Optimal Control Theory is used to analyze the laser-heating of plasmas confined in strong solenoidal magnetic fields. Heating strategies that minimize a linear combination of heating time and total energy spent by the laser system are found. A numerical example is used to illustrate the theory. Results of this example show that by an appropriate modulation of the laser intensity, significant savings in the laser energy are possible with only slight increases in the heating time. However, results may depend strongly on the initial state of the plasma and on the final ion temperature. (orig.)

  12. Electron heat flux dropouts in the solar wind: Evidence for interplanetary magnetic field reconnection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McComas, D.J.; Gosling, J.T.; Phillips, J.L.; Bame, S.J.; Luhmann, J.G.; Smith, E.J.

    1989-01-01

    Electron heat flux dropout events have been observed in the solar wind using the ISEE 3 plasma electron data set. These events manifest themselves as dropouts of the solar wind halo electrons which are normally found streaming outward along the local magnetic field. These dropouts leave nearly isotropic distributions of solar wind halo electrons, and consequently, the heat flux in these events is reduced to near the observational noise level. We have examined ISEE 3 data from shortly after launch (August 16, 1978) through the end of 1978 and identified 25 such events ranging in duration from 20 min to over 11 hours. Comparison with the ISEE 3 magnetometer data indicates that these intervals nearly always occur in conjunction with large rotations of the interplanetary magnetic field. Statistical analyses of the plasma and magnetic field data for the 25 dropout intervals indicate that heat flux dropouts generally occur in association with high plasma densities low plasma velocities, low ion and electron temperatures, and low magnetic field magnitudes. A second set of 25 intervals chosen specifically to lie at large field rotations, but at times at which not heat flux dropouts were observed, do not show these characteristic plalsma variations. This suggests that the dropout intervals comprise a unique set of events. Since the hot halo electrons normally found streaming outward from the Sun along the interplanetary magnetic field (the solar wind electron heat flux) are a result of direct magnetic connection to the hot solar corona, heat flux dropout intervals may indicate that the spacecraft is sampling plasma regimes which are magnetically disconnected from the Sun and instead are connected to the outer heliosphere at both ends

  13. A FET based kicker for a charge booster for the TRIUMF ISAC project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.; Wait, G.D.

    2001-07-01

    A charge booster unit is required as part of an upgrade to the ISAC facility at TRIUMF. ISAC is an isotope separator coupled to an accelerator. ISAC is presently capable of accelerating only isotopes with atomic mass up to 30. The charge booster will allow ISAC to accelerate all the masses in the periodic table. A fast kicker system has been built to study the characteristics of an existing charge booster, designed by ISN in Grenoble, to assess the suitability of using this charge booster at TRIUMF. This fast kicker will subsequently be used in the TRIUMF ISAC facility for time of flight separation of the chosen charge and to recycle the higher and lower charges back to the charge booster. This will increase the efficiency from 10% to 60%. The kicker system includes a pair of deflector plates. One plate is charged up to -3.5 kV by a PET based modulator, while the other plate is held at ground potential. The modulator consists of two stacks of FETs operating in push pull with variable output voltage, pulse width, and repetition rate from virtually DC to 52 kHz. The measured high voltage output pulse rise and fall times are 63 ns and the minimum pulse width is 350 ns. The maximum pulse width is dependent upon the repetition rate. The large dynamic range for the repetition rate and pulse width required a novel circuit design and control technique, which also resulted in an energy efficient kicker system. This paper describes the design of the kicker system and shows the results of measurements. (author)

  14. Theoretical study of the magnetic heat capacity of praseodymium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    The heat capacity of praseodymium metal at low temperatures is calculated using a valence change model. The effect of the presence of a small temperature-dependent and field-dependent percentage of 4+ ions is computed using crystalfield techniques. Good agreement with the experimentally determined values is obtained for polycrystalline and single-crystal praseodymium in zero field and various other fields up to 30 koe. In addition, the effects of selected exchange models on the heat capacity and susceptibility are computed. The model is shown to be compatible with both the parallel and perpendicular susceptibilities

  15. Demonstration of Efficient Core Heating of Magnetized Fast Ignition in FIREX project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johzaki, Tomoyuki

    2017-10-01

    Extensive theoretical and experimental research in the FIREX ``I project over the past decade revealed that the large angular divergence of the laser generated electron beam is one of the most critical problems inhibiting efficient core heating in electron-driven fast ignition. To solve this problem, beam guiding using externally applied kilo-tesla class magnetic field was proposed, and its feasibility has recently been numerically demonstrated. In 2016, integrated experiments at ILE Osaka University demonstrated core heating efficiencies reaching > 5 % and heated core temperatures of 1.7 keV. In these experiments, a kilo-tesla class magnetic field was applied to a cone-attached Cu(II) oleate spherical solid target by using a laser-driven capacitor-coil. The target was then imploded by G-XII laser and heated by the PW-class LFEX laser. The heating efficiency was evaluated by measuring the number of Cu-K- α photons emitted. The heated core temperature was estimated by the X-ray intensity ratio of Cu Li-like and He-like emission lines. To understand the detailed dynamics of the core heating process, we carried out integrated simulations using the FI3 code system. Effects of magnetic fields on the implosion and electron beam transport, detailed core heating dynamics, and the resultant heating efficiency and core temperature will be presented. I will also discuss the prospect for an ignition-scale design of magnetized fast ignition using a solid ball target. This work is partially supported by JSPA KAKENHI Grant Number JP16H02245, JP26400532, JP15K21767, JP26400532, JP16K05638 and is performed with the support and the auspices of the NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS12KUGK057, NIFS15KUGK087).

  16. Blockage effects on viscous fluid flow and heat transfer past a magnetic obstacle in a duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xi-Dong; Huang Hu-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The effect of lateral walls on fluid flow and heat transfer is investigated when a fluid passes a magnetic obstacle. The blockage ratio β that represents the ratio between the width of external magnet M y and the spanwise width L y is employed to depict the effect. The finite volume method (FVM) based on the PISO algorithm is applied for the blockage ratios of 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4. The results show that the value of Strouhal number St increases as the blockage ratio β increases, and for small β, the variation of St is very small when the interaction parameter and Reynolds number are increasing. Moreover, the cross-stream mixing induced by the magnetic obstacle can enhance the wall-heat transfer and the maximum value of the overall heat transfer increment is about 50.5%

  17. Heat transfer from aluminum to He II: application to superconductive magnetic energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sciver, S.W.; Boom, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Heat transfer problems associated with large scale Superconductive Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) are unique due to the proposed size of a unit. The Wisconsin design consists of a cryogenically stable magnet cooled with He II at 1.8 K. The special properties of He II (T 2 at 1.91 K and a recovery at 0.7 W/cm 2 . The advantages of operating the magnet under subcooled conditions are exemplified by improved heat transfer. The maximum at 1.89 K and 1.3 atm pressure is 2.3 W/cm 2 with recovery enhanced to 1.9 W/cm 2 . A conservative maximum heat flux of 0.5 W/cm 2 with an associated temperature difference of 0.5 K has been chosen for design. Elements of the experimental study as well as the design will be discussed

  18. Heat and momentum transfer for magnetoconvection in a vertical external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürner, Till; Liu, Wenjun; Krasnov, Dmitry; Schumacher, Jörg

    2016-11-01

    The scaling theory of Grossmann and Lohse for the turbulent heat and momentum transfer is extended to the magnetoconvection case in the presence of a (strong) vertical magnetic field. The comparison with existing laboratory experiments and direct numerical simulations in the quasistatic limit allows to restrict the parameter space to very low Prandtl and magnetic Prandtl numbers and thus to reduce the number of unknown parameters in the model. Also included is the Chandrasekhar limit for which the outer magnetic induction field B is large enough such that convective motion is suppressed and heat is transported by diffusion. Our theory identifies four distinct regimes of magnetoconvection which are distinguished by the strength of the outer magnetic field and the level of turbulence in the flow, respectively. LIMTECH Research Alliance and Research Training Group GK 1567 on Lorentz Force Velocimetry, funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  19. Heat characteristic analysis of a conduction cooling toroidal-type SMES magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.M.; Kim, A.R.; Kim, J.G.; Kim, D.W.; Park, M.; Yu, I.K.; Eom, B.Y.; Sim, K.; Kim, S.H.; Shon, M.H.; Kim, H.J.; Bae, H.J.; Seong, K.C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzed the heat characteristics of a conduction cooling toroidal-type SMES magnet. The authors designed and manufactured a conduction cooling toroidal-type SMES magnet which consists of 30 double pancake coils. One (a single pancake coil) of a double pancake coil is arranged at an angle of 6 o from each other. The shape of the toroidal-type SMES magnet was designed by a 3D CAD program. The heat invasion was investigated under no-load condition and the thermal characteristic of the toroidal-type SMES magnet was analyzed using the Finite Elements Method program. Both the analyzed and the experiment results are compared and discussed in detail.

  20. Development of the heat treatment system for the 40 T hybrid magnet superconducting outsert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W G; Chen, Z M; Chen, Z Y; Huang, P C; He, P; Zhu, J W

    2011-10-01

    The heat treatment of Nb(3)Sn coil with the glass fabric insulation is one of the key and critical processes for the outsert solenoids of the 40 T hybrid magnet, which could be wound with cable-in-conduit conductors using the insulation-wind-and-react technique. The manufacturing of the large vertical type vacuum/Ar atmosphere-protection heat treatment system has been completed and recently installed in the High Magnetic Filed Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The heat treatment system composed mainly the furnace, the purging gas supply system, the control system, the gas impurities monitoring system, and so on. At present, the regulation and testing of the heat treatment system has been successfully finished, and all of technical parameters meet or exceed specifications.

  1. Stability and fast heat removal with He-II cooling for pulsed superconductive magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desportes, H.

    1979-01-01

    The use of pressurized superfluid helium between 1.6 K and 1.8 K is being considered for a number of superconducting magnet applications. This type of cooling is particularly interesting in the case of pulsed field magnets where large heat fluxes need to be evacuated in a short time. This paper reviews a few recent experiments on heat transport properties and stability in He-II, which contribute to evaluating its potential use for such an application. Present technology is illustrated by the description of a large test facility recently operated at Saclay

  2. EFFECT OF HORIZONTALLY INHOMOGENEOUS HEATING ON FLOW AND MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE CHROMOSPHERE OF THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, P.; Vasyliūnas, V. M., E-mail: paul_song@uml.edu [Space Science Laboratory and Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The solar chromosphere is heated by damped Alfvén waves propagating upward from the photosphere at a rate that depends on magnetic field strength, producing enhanced heating at low altitudes in the extended weak-field regions (where the additional heating accounts for the radiative losses) between the boundaries of the chromospheric network as well as enhanced heating per particle at higher altitudes in strong magnetic field regions of the network. The resulting inhomogeneous radiation and temperature distribution produces bulk flows, which in turn affect the configuration of the magnetic field. The basic flow pattern is circulation on the spatial scale of a supergranule, with upward flow in the strong-field region; this is a mirror image in the upper chromosphere of photospheric/subphotospheric convection widely associated with the formation of the strong network field. There are significant differences between the neutral and the ionized components of the weakly ionized medium: neutral flow streamlines can form closed cells, whereas plasma is largely constrained to flow along the magnetic field. Stresses associated with this differential flow may explain why the canopy/funnel structures of the network magnetic field have a greater horizontal extent and are relatively more homogeneous at high altitudes than is expected from simple current-free models.

  3. EFFECT OF HORIZONTALLY INHOMOGENEOUS HEATING ON FLOW AND MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE CHROMOSPHERE OF THE SUN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, P.; Vasyliūnas, V. M.

    2014-01-01

    The solar chromosphere is heated by damped Alfvén waves propagating upward from the photosphere at a rate that depends on magnetic field strength, producing enhanced heating at low altitudes in the extended weak-field regions (where the additional heating accounts for the radiative losses) between the boundaries of the chromospheric network as well as enhanced heating per particle at higher altitudes in strong magnetic field regions of the network. The resulting inhomogeneous radiation and temperature distribution produces bulk flows, which in turn affect the configuration of the magnetic field. The basic flow pattern is circulation on the spatial scale of a supergranule, with upward flow in the strong-field region; this is a mirror image in the upper chromosphere of photospheric/subphotospheric convection widely associated with the formation of the strong network field. There are significant differences between the neutral and the ionized components of the weakly ionized medium: neutral flow streamlines can form closed cells, whereas plasma is largely constrained to flow along the magnetic field. Stresses associated with this differential flow may explain why the canopy/funnel structures of the network magnetic field have a greater horizontal extent and are relatively more homogeneous at high altitudes than is expected from simple current-free models

  4. Magnetic flux tubes and transport of heat in the convection zone of the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruit, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    This thesis consists of five papers dealing with transport of heat in the solar convection zone on the one hand, and with the structure of magnetic flux tubes in the top of the convection zone on the other hand. These subjects are interrelated. For example, the heat flow in the convection zone is disturbed by the presence of magnetic flux tubes, while exchange of heat between a flux tube and the convection zone is important for the energy balance of such a tube. A major part of this thesis deals with the structure of small magnetic flux tubes. Such small tubes (diameters less than about 2'') carry most of the flux appearing at the solar surface. An attempt is made to construct models of the surface layers of such small tubes in sufficient detail to make a comparison with observations possible. Underlying these model calculations is the assumption that the magnetic elements at the solar surface are flux tubes in a roughly static equilibrium. The structure of such tubes is governed by their pressure equilibrium, exchange of heat with the surroundings, and transport of heat by some modified form of convection along the tube. The tube models calculated are compared with observations

  5. Parametric investigation of heating due to magnetic fluid hyperthermia in a tumor with blood perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liangruksa, Monrudee [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Ganguly, Ranjan [Department of Power Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700098 (India); Puri, Ishwar K., E-mail: ikpuri@vt.ed [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a cancer treatment that can selectively elevate the tumor temperature without significantly damaging the surrounding healthy tissue. Optimal MFH design requires a fundamental parametric investigation of the heating of soft materials by magnetic fluids. We model the problem of a spherical tumor and its surrounding healthy tissue that are heated by exciting a homogeneous dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles infused only into the tumor with an external AC magnetic field. The key dimensionless parameters influencing thermotherapy are the Peclet, Fourier, and Joule numbers. Analytical solutions for transient and steady hyperthermia provide correlations between these parameters and the portions of tumor and healthy tissue that are subjected to a threshold temperature beyond which they are damaged. Increasing the ratio of the Fourier and Joule numbers also increases the tumor temperature, but doing so can damage the healthy tissue. Higher magnetic heating is required for larger Peclet numbers due to the larger convection heat loss that occurs through blood perfusion. A comparison of the model predictions with previous experimental data for MFH applied to rabbit tumors shows good agreement. The optimal MFH conditions are identified based on two indices, the fraction I{sub T} of the tumor volume in which the local temperature is above a threshold temperature and the ratio I{sub N} of the damaged normal tissue volume to the tumor tissue volume that also lies above it. The spatial variation in the nanoparticle concentration is also considered. A Gaussian distribution provides efficacy while minimizing the possibility of generating a tumor hot spot. Varying the thermal properties of tumor and normal tissue alters I{sub T}and I{sub N} but the nature of the temperature distribution remains unchanged. - Research highlights: > Analytical model of magnetic fluid hyperthermia of tumor tissue perfused with magnetic nanoparticles that is surrounded

  6. Parametric investigation of heating due to magnetic fluid hyperthermia in a tumor with blood perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liangruksa, Monrudee; Ganguly, Ranjan; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a cancer treatment that can selectively elevate the tumor temperature without significantly damaging the surrounding healthy tissue. Optimal MFH design requires a fundamental parametric investigation of the heating of soft materials by magnetic fluids. We model the problem of a spherical tumor and its surrounding healthy tissue that are heated by exciting a homogeneous dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles infused only into the tumor with an external AC magnetic field. The key dimensionless parameters influencing thermotherapy are the Peclet, Fourier, and Joule numbers. Analytical solutions for transient and steady hyperthermia provide correlations between these parameters and the portions of tumor and healthy tissue that are subjected to a threshold temperature beyond which they are damaged. Increasing the ratio of the Fourier and Joule numbers also increases the tumor temperature, but doing so can damage the healthy tissue. Higher magnetic heating is required for larger Peclet numbers due to the larger convection heat loss that occurs through blood perfusion. A comparison of the model predictions with previous experimental data for MFH applied to rabbit tumors shows good agreement. The optimal MFH conditions are identified based on two indices, the fraction I T of the tumor volume in which the local temperature is above a threshold temperature and the ratio I N of the damaged normal tissue volume to the tumor tissue volume that also lies above it. The spatial variation in the nanoparticle concentration is also considered. A Gaussian distribution provides efficacy while minimizing the possibility of generating a tumor hot spot. Varying the thermal properties of tumor and normal tissue alters I T and I N but the nature of the temperature distribution remains unchanged. - Research Highlights: →Analytical model of magnetic fluid hyperthermia of tumor tissue perfused with magnetic nanoparticles that is surrounded by healthy tissue

  7. MAGNETIC END CLOSURES FOR PLASMA CONFINING AND HEATING DEVICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, R.F.

    1963-08-20

    More effective magnetic closure field regions for various open-ended containment magnetic fields used in fusion reactor devices are provided by several spaced, coaxially-aligned solenoids utilized to produce a series of nodal field regions of uniform or, preferably, of incrementally increasing intensity separated by lower intensity regions outwardly from the ends of said containment zone. Plasma sources may also be provided to inject plasma into said lower intensity areas to increase plasma density therein. Plasma may then be transported, by plasma diffusion mechanisms provided by the nodal fields, into the containment field. With correlated plasma densities and nodal field spacings approximating the mean free partl cle collision path length in the zones between the nodal fields, optimum closure effectiveness is obtained. (AEC)

  8. Magnetic ordering and specific heat analysis of TmPtSn

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vejpravová, J.; Svoboda, P.; Šebek, Josef; Janeček, M.; Komatsubara, T.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 328, - (2003), s. 142-144 ISSN 0921-4526 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/02/0943 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 165/01; VACUUM PRAHA(CZ) 2002 Keywords : rare-earth intermetallic compounds * magnetic ordering * specific heat Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.908, year: 2003

  9. Unsteady free convection MHD flow between two heated vertical parallel plates in induced magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Borkakati, A.K.

    1999-01-01

    An unsteady viscous incompressible free convection flow of an electrically conducting fluid between two heated vertical parallel plates is considered in presence of a uniform magnetic field applied transversely to the flow. The approximate analytical solutions for velocity, induced field and temperature distributions are obtained for small and large magnetic Reynolds number. The skin-friction on the two plates are obtained and plotted graphically. The problem is extended for thermometric case. (author)

  10. Stabilization of a magnetic island by localized heating in a tokamak with stiff temperature profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maget, Patrick; Widmer, Fabien; Février, Olivier; Garbet, Xavier; Lütjens, Hinrich

    2018-02-01

    In tokamaks plasmas, turbulent transport is triggered above a threshold in the temperature gradient and leads to stiff profiles. This particularity, neglected so far in the problem of magnetic island stabilization by a localized heat source, is investigated analytically in this paper. We show that the efficiency of the stabilization is deeply modified compared to the previous estimates due to the strong dependence of the turbulence level on the additional heat source amplitude inside the island.

  11. Heat transfer enhancement of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} ferrofluids in the presence of magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadaei, Farzad; Shahrokhi, Mohammad; Molaei Dehkordi, Asghar, E-mail: amolaeid@sharif.edu; Abbasi, Zeinab

    2017-05-01

    In this article, three-dimensional (3D) forced-convection heat transfer of magnetic nanofluids in a pipe subject to constant wall heat flux in the presence of single or double permanent magnet(s) or current-carrying wire has been investigated and compared. In this regard, laminar fluid flow and equilibrium magnetization for the ferrofluid were considered. In addition, variations of magnetic field in different media were taken into account and the assumption of having a linear relationship of magnetization with applied magnetic field intensity was also relaxed. Effects of magnetic field intensity, nanoparticle volume fraction, Reynolds number value, and the type of magnetic field source (i.e., a permanent magnet or current-carrying wire) on the forced-convection heat transfer of magnetic nanofluids were carefully investigated. It was found that by applying the magnetic field, the fluid mixing could be intensified that leads to an increase in the Nusselt number value along the pipe length. Moreover, the obtained simulation results indicate that applying the magnetic field induced by two permanent magnets with a magnetization of 3×10{sup 5} (A/m) (for each one), the fully developed Nusselt number value can be increased by 196%. - Highlights: • 3D forced-convection heat transfer of magnetic nanofluids is investigated. • Effects of single or double permanent magnet on the heat transfer are studied. • Influences of magnetic field induced by a current-carrying wire are studied. • Effects of magnetic field intensity and Reynolds number value are studied. • Variations of magnetic field in different media are taken into account.

  12. Modelling of Quench Limit for Steady State Heat Deposits in LHC Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bocian, D; Siemko, A

    2008-01-01

    A quench, the transition of a conductor from the superconducting to the normal conducting state, occurs irreversibly in the accelerator magnets if one of the three parameters: temperature, magnetic field or current density exceeds a critical value. Energy deposited in the superconductor by the particle beams provokes quenches detrimental for the accelerator operation. In particular if particles impacting on the vacuum chamber and their secondary showers depose energy in the magnet coils. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) nominal beam intensity is 3.2 ldr 10^14 protons. A quench occurs if a fraction of the order of 10^7 protons per second is lost locally. A network model is used to simulate the thermodynamic behaviour of the magnets. The heat flow in the network model was validated with measurements performed in the CERN magnet test facility. A steady state heat flow was introduced in the coil by using the quench heaters implemented in the LHC magnets. The value of the heat source current is determined by the ne...

  13. Buoyancy effects in vertical rectangular duct with coplanar magnetic field and single sided heat load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostichev, P. I.; Poddubnyi, I. I.; Razuvanov, N. G.

    2017-11-01

    In some DEMO blanket designs liquid metal flows in vertical ducts of rectangular cross-section between ceramic breeder units providing their cooling. Heat exchange in these conditions is governed by the influence of magnetic field (coplanar) and by buoyancy effects that depend on the flow orientation to the gravity vector (downward and upward flow). Magnetohydrodynamic and heat transfer of liquid metal in vertical rectangular ducts is not well researched. Experimental study of buoyancy effects in rectangular duct with coplanar magnetic field for one-sided heat load and downward and upward flowsis presented in this paper. The detail research with has been done on mercury MHD close loop with using of the probe technique allow to discover several advantageous and disadvantageous effects. The intensive impact of buoyancy force has been observed in a few regime of downward flow which has been laminarized by magnetic field. Due to the development in the flow of the secondary large-scale vortices heat transfer improved and the temperature fluctuations of the abnormally high intensity have been fixed. On the contrary, in the upward flow the buoyancy force stabilized the flow which lead to decreasing of the turbulence heat transfer ratio and, consequently, deterioration of heat transfer.

  14. Magnetic measurements of the steel septum magnet used for extraction: MSDC01

    CERN Document Server

    Cornuet, D; Leclère, P

    2002-01-01

    The proton beams extracted from the LHC are dumped on external absorbers by horizontally deflecting kicker magnets and vertically deflecting steel septum magnets. For this system there are three variants of steel septum magnets MSD A, MSD B and MSD C, which will be produced by the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP, Protvino/Russia). This document gives the results of the magnetic measurements at CERN on the first magnet of the series: MSDC01.

  15. HEATING MECHANISMS IN THE LOW SOLAR ATMOSPHERE THROUGH MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN CURRENT SHEETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Lei; Lin, Jun [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Roussev, Ilia I. [Division of Geosciences, National Science Foundation Arlington, Virginia (United States); Schmieder, Brigitte, E-mail: leini@ynao.ac.cn [Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, Meudon (France)

    2016-12-01

    We simulate several magnetic reconnection processes in the low solar chromosphere/photosphere; the radiation cooling, heat conduction and ambipolar diffusion are all included. Our numerical results indicate that both the high temperature (≳8 × 10{sup 4} K) and low temperature (∼10{sup 4} K) magnetic reconnection events can happen in the low solar atmosphere (100–600 km above the solar surface). The plasma β controlled by plasma density and magnetic fields is one important factor to decide how much the plasma can be heated up. The low temperature event is formed in a high β magnetic reconnection process, Joule heating is the main mechanism to heat plasma and the maximum temperature increase is only several thousand Kelvin. The high temperature explosions can be generated in a low β magnetic reconnection process, slow and fast-mode shocks attached at the edges of the well developed plasmoids are the main physical mechanisms to heat the plasma from several thousand Kelvin to over 8 × 10{sup 4} K. Gravity in the low chromosphere can strongly hinder the plasmoid instability and the formation of slow-mode shocks in a vertical current sheet. Only small secondary islands are formed; these islands, however, are not as well developed as those in the horizontal current sheets. This work can be applied to understand the heating mechanism in the low solar atmosphere and could possibly be extended to explain the formation of common low temperature Ellerman bombs (∼10{sup 4} K) and the high temperature Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) bombs (≳8 × 10{sup 4}) in the future.

  16. Interplanetary magnetic field orientations associated with bidirectional electron heat fluxes detected at ISEE 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stansberry, J.A.; Gosling, J.T.; Thomsen, M.F.; Bame, S.J.; Smith, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    A statistical survey of interplanetary magnetic field orientations associated with bidirectional electron heat fluxes observed at ISEE 3 in orbit about the Sunward Lagrange point indicates that magnetic connection of the spacecraft to the Earth's bow shock was frequently the source of the bidirectionality. When the interplanetary magnetic field was oriented within 5 0 of the Earth-spacecraft line, backstreaming electrons from the bow shock were clearly observed approximately 18% of the time, and connections apparently occurred for angles as large as ∼30 0 --35 0 . copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  17. Thermal conductance of heat transfer interfaces for conductively cooled superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T.L.; Walters, J.D.; Fikse, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    Minimizing thermal resistances across interfaces is critical for efficient thermal performance of conductively cooled superconducting magnet systems. Thermal conductance measurements have been made for a flexible thermal coupling, designed to accommodate magnet-to-cryocooler and cryocooler-to-shield relative motion, and an interface incorporating Multilam designed as a sliding thermal connector for cryocoolers. Temperature changes were measured across each interface as a function of heat input. Thermal conductances have been calculated for each interface, and the impact of each interface on conductively cooled magnet systems will be discussed

  18. Stress-induced heating in commercial conductors and its possible influence on magnet performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easton, D.S.; Kroeger, D.M.; Moazed, A.

    1976-01-01

    Calorimetric measurements show that significant amounts of heat are generated when a multifilamentary composite conductor is stressed in tension to levels expected to occur in large, high-field magnet systems. When the stress on the conductor is repetitively cycled between zero and some maximum value, the amount of heat produced per cycle is constant after the first few cycles. Comparison is made between calorimetric determinations of heat injections and the work done on the specimen as indicated by stress-strain curves. Stress-strain curves for a number of commercial conductors indicate that the most important determinant of the magnitude of this effect is the choice of matrix material

  19. Local entropy generation analysis of a rotary magnetic heat pump regenerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drost, M.K.; White, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    The rotary magnetic heat pump has attractive thermodynamic performance but it is strongly influenced by the effectiveness of the regenerator. This paper uses local entropy generation analysis to evaluate the regenerator design and to suggest design improvements. The results show that performance of the proposed design is dominated by heat transfer related entropy generation. This suggests that enhancement concepts that improve heat transfer should be considered, even if the enhancement causes a significant increase in viscous losses (pressure drop). One enhancement technique, the use of flow disruptors, was evaluated and the results showed that flow disruptors can significantly reduce thermodynamic losses

  20. Numerical Simulation of the Moving Induction Heating Process with Magnetic Flux Concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The induction heating with ferromagnetic metal powder bonded magnetic flux concentrator (MPB-MFC demonstrates more advantages in surface heating treatments of metal. However, the moving heating application is mostly applied in the industrial production. Therefore, the analytical understanding of the mechanism, efficiency, and controllability of the moving induction heating process becomes necessary for process design and optimization. This paper studies the mechanism of the moving induction heating with magnetic flux concentrator. The MPB-MFC assisted moving induction heating for Inconel 718 alloy is studied by establishing the finite element simulation model. The temperature field distribution is analyzed, and the factors influencing the temperature are studied. The conclusion demonstrates that the velocity of the workpiece should be controlled properly and the heat transfer coefficient (HTC has little impact on the temperature development, compared with other input parameters. In addition, the validity of the static numerical model is verified by comparing the finite element simulation with experimental results on AISI 1045 steel. The numerical model established in this work can provide comprehensive understanding for the process control in production.

  1. Bulk ion acceleration and particle heating during magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Myers, Clayton E. [Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bulk ion acceleration and particle heating during magnetic reconnection are studied in the collisionless plasma of the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). The plasma is in the two-fluid regime, where the motion of the ions is decoupled from that of the electrons within the ion diffusion region. The reconnection process studied here is quasi-symmetric since plasma parameters such as the magnitude of the reconnecting magnetic field, the plasma density, and temperature are compatible on each side of the current sheet. Our experimental data show that the in-plane (Hall) electric field plays a key role in ion heating and acceleration. The electrostatic potential that produces the in-plane electric field is established by electrons that are accelerated near the electron diffusion region. The in-plane profile of this electrostatic potential shows a “well” structure along the direction normal to the reconnection current sheet. This well becomes deeper and wider downstream as its boundary expands along the separatrices where the in-plane electric field is strongest. Since the in-plane electric field is 3–4 times larger than the out-of-plane reconnection electric field, it is the primary source of energy for the unmagnetized ions. With regard to ion acceleration, the Hall electric field causes ions near separatrices to be ballistically accelerated toward the outflow direction. Ion heating occurs as the accelerated ions travel into the high pressure downstream region. This downstream ion heating cannot be explained by classical, unmagnetized transport theory; instead, we conclude that ions are heated by re-magnetization of ions in the reconnection exhaust and collisions. Two-dimensional (2-D) simulations with the global geometry similar to MRX demonstrate downstream ion thermalization by the above mechanisms. Electrons are also significantly heated during reconnection. The electron temperature sharply increases across the separatrices and peaks just outside of the

  2. An Induction Heating Method with Traveling Magnetic Field for Long Structure Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Takamitsu; Tomita, Hideo; Obata, Shuji; Saito, Yukio

    A novel dismantlable adhesion method for recycling operation of interior materials is proposed. This method is applied a high frequency induction heating and a thermoplastic adhesive. For an adhesion of interior material to long steel stud, a conventional spiral coil as like IH cooking heater gives inadequateness for uniform heating to the stud. Therefore, we have proposed an induction heating method with traveling magnetic field for perfect long structures bonding. In this paper, we describe on the new adhesion method using the 20kHz, three-phase 200V inverter and linear induction coil. From induction heating characteristics to thin steel plates and long studs, the method is cleared the usefulness for uniform heating to long structures.

  3. New possibility of magnetic ripple shielding for specific heat measurements in hybrid magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarnawski, Z.; Meulen, der, H. van; Franse, J.J.M.; Kadowaki, K.; Veenhuizen, P.A.; Klaasse, J.

    1988-01-01

    A test of the new high Tc superconducting materials for magnetic ripple shielding has been carried out. It was found that magnetic ripples of 0.0009 T (peak-to-peak) in the frequency range below 20 kHz can be completely shielded in high static fields by a 2 mm thick Y-Ba-Cu-O screen.

  4. The effect of magnetic field on instabilities of heat transfer from an obstacle in a channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashidi, S.; Esfahani, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents forced convective heat transfer in a channel with a built-in square obstacle. The governing equations with the boundary conditions are solved using a finite volume method. The computations were done for a fixed blockage ratio (S=1/8) at Pr=0.71, and Reynolds (Re) and Stuart (N) numbers ranging from 1 to 250 and 0 to 10, respectively. The results are presented to show the effect of the channel walls and streamwise magnetic field at different Reynolds numbers on forced convection heat transfer from a square cylinder. A correlation is obtained for Nusselt number, in which the effect of a magnetic field is taken into account. The obtained results revealed that the existence of channel walls decreases the effects of magnetic field on Nusselt number. It also showed that by increasing Stuart number the thickness of thermal boundary layer increases and the convective heat transfer decreases. - Highlights: • The magnetic field is used to control the instabilities of heat transfer. • The thickness of thermal boundary layer increases by increasing Stuart number. • Unsteadiness in temperature field increases with increase in Reynolds number. • Time-averaged Nusselt number decreases with increase in Stuart number. • The Lorentz forces are much denser near the surface of the obstacle

  5. On Electromagnetic Modulation of Flow Instabilities, Mixing and Heat Transfer in Conducting and Magnetized Fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we give a concise review of some recent highlights of our research dealing with electromagnetic control of flow, mixing and heat transfer of electrically conductive or magnetized fluids. We apply a combination of state-of-art numerical (DNS and LES) and experimental (PIV and

  6. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Heat Flow in Permanent Magnet Brushless DC Hub Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasil, Muhammed; Plesner, Daniel; Walther, Jens Honore

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the heat dissipation in the hub motor of an electric two-wheeler using lumped parameter (LP), finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models. The motor uses external rotor permanent magnet brushless DC topology and nearly all of its losses are generated...

  7. Transient heat transfer analysis of superconducting magnetic levitating flywheel rotor operating in vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochida, A.; Kudo, K.; Higasa, H.

    1999-07-01

    In the present study, transient temperature rise is analyzed in a flywheel type power storage system operated in vacuum environment. The flywheel rotor is levitated by high-temperature-superconducting magnetic bearing to reduce the bearing loss. Though the superconductor is cooled by liquid nitrogen, the temperature of the whole system rises due to Joule heating in the coils of the bearings and the motor during the operation. If the temperature should reach the critical temperature of the permanent magnet used for the magnetic bearings after long time operation, the magnetic bearings lose their effect. The heat generated in the levitated rotor diffuses within it by heat conduction and finally emitted to its surrounding solid materials by thermal radiation from the rotor surfaces across vacuum layer. Numerical simulation is carried out calculating the transient radiative-conductive heat transfer and time-dependent profiles of temperature within the rotor are obtained. The results are compared with the experimentally obtained temperatures by measured a test model of 1kWh power storage and the measured profiles of the temperature rise of the rotor fit very well with the calculated ones. Using this simulation tool, the effects of the surface emissivity of the materials of the rotor and the stator, the temperature of the surrounding casings and the thermal conductivity of the materials on the temperature profiles in the system are estimated.

  8. Hyperthermia with rotating magnetic nanowires inducing heat into tumor by fluid friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egolf, Peter W.; Pawlowski, Anne-Gabrielle; Tsague, Paulin; Marco, Bastien de; Bovy, William; Tucev, Sinisa [Institute of Thermal Sciences and Engineering, University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, CH 1401 Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland); Shamsudhin, Naveen, E-mail: snaveen@ethz.ch; Pané, Salvador; Pokki, Juho; Ansari, M. H. D.; Nelson, Bradley J. [Multi-Scale Robotics Lab, Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems, ETH Zurich, CH 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Vuarnoz, Didier [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), EPFL Fribourg, CH 1701 Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2016-08-14

    A magnetic hyperthermia cancer treatment strategy that does not operate by means of conventional heating mechanisms is presented. The proposed approach consists of injecting a gel with homogeneously distributed magnetic nanowires into a tumor. Upon the application of a low-frequency rotating or circularly polarized magnetic field, nanowires spin around their center of viscous drag due to torque generated by shape anisotropy. As a result of external rotational forcing and fluid friction in the nanoparticle's boundary layer, heating occurs. The nanowire dynamics is theoretically and experimentally investigated, and different feasibility proofs of the principle by physical modeling, which adhere to medical guidelines, are presented. The magnetic nanorotors exhibit rotations and oscillations with quite a steady center of gravity, which proves an immobile behavior and guarantees a time-independent homogeneity of the spatial particle distribution in the tumor. Furthermore, a fluid dynamic and thermodynamic heating model is briefly introduced. This model is a generalization of Penne's model that for this method reveals theoretic heating rates that are sufficiently high, and fits well into medical limits defined by present standards.

  9. Specific heat and magnetism of LuFe.sub.6./sub.Al.sub.6./sub..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, P.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Šantavá, Eva; Šebek, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 1 (2008), s. 307-310 ISSN 0587-4246. [CSMAG'07. Košice, 09.07.2007-12.07.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : specific heat * LuFe 6 Al 6 Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.321, year: 2008

  10. Performance-oriented Analysis of a Hybrid magnetic Assembly for a Heat-pump Magnetocaloric Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Insinga, Andrea Roberto; Smith, Anders; Bahl, Christian R.H.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional active-regenerator magnetocaloric devices include moving parts, with the purpose of generating an oscillating magnetic field in the magneto-caloric material, placed inside the regenerator. In this work a different design is analyzed, for application in a magnetocaloric heat pump...

  11. Specific heat and magnetic susceptibility vs long range order in V3Ga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junod, A.; Fluekiger, R.; Treyvaud, A.; Muller, J.

    1976-01-01

    A new technique of studying the magnetic susceptibility together with the specific heat and the superconducting transition of typical A15-type compounds in different ordering states enables us to consistently isolate the spin paramagnetism. Satisfactory results are obtained for V 3 Ga and these are compared with data on V 3 Au and Nb 3 (Au-Pt). (author)

  12. Unsteady Magnetized Flow and Heat Transfer of a Viscoelastic fluid over a Stretching Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sushil Kumar

    2017-12-01

    This paper is to study the flow of heated ferro-fluid over a stretching sheet under the influence of magnetic field. The fluid considered in the present investigation is a mixture of blood as well as fluid-dispersed magnetic nano particles and under this context blood is found to be the appropriate choice of viscoelastic, Walter's B fluid. The objective of the present work is to study the effect of various parameters found in the mathematical analysis. Taking into account the blood has zero electrical conductivity, magnetization effect has been considered in the governing equation of the present study with the use of ferro-fluid dynamics principle. By introducing appropriate non-dimensional variables into the governing equations of unsteady two-dimensional flow of viscoelastic fluid with heat transfer are converted to a set of ordinary differential equations with appropriate boundary conditions. Newton's linearization technique has been employed for the solution of non-linear ordinary differential equations. Important results found in the present investigation are the substantial influence of ferro-magnetic parameter, Prandlt number and the parameter associated with the thermal conductivity on the flow and heat transfer. It is observed that the presence of magnetic dipole essentially reduces the flow velocity in the vertical direction and that helps to damage the cancer cells in the tumor region.

  13. Coronal heating driven by a magnetic gradient pumping mechanism in solar plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Baolin, E-mail: bltan@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-11-10

    The heating of the solar corona is a longstanding mystery in astrophysics. Considering that the solar magnetic field is spatially inhomogeneous with a considerable magnetic gradient from the solar surface to the corona, this work proposes a magnetic gradient pumping (MGP) mechanism to try to explain the formation of hot plasma upflows, such as hot type II spicules and hot plasma ejections. In the MGP mechanism, the magnetic gradient may drive the energetic particles to move upward from the underlying solar atmosphere and form hot upflows. These upflow energetic particles are deposited in the corona, causing it to become very hot. Rough estimations indicate that the solar corona can be heated to above 1 million degrees, and the upflow velocity is about 40 km s{sup –1} in the chromosphere and about 130 km s{sup –1} in the corona. The solar magnetic flux tubes act as pumpers to extract energetic particles from the underlying thermal photosphere, convey them, and deposit them in the corona. The deposit of these energetic particles causes the corona to become hot, and the escape of such particles from the photosphere leaves it a bit cold. This mechanism can present a natural explanation to the mystery of solar coronal heating.

  14. Specific heat of heavy-fermion CePd2Si2 in high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikin, I.; Wang, Y.; Bouquet, F.; Junod, A.; Lejay, P.

    2002-01-01

    We report specific heat measurements on the heavy-fermion compound CePd 2 Si 2 in magnetic fields up to 16 T and in the temperature range 1.4-16 K. A sharp peak in the specific heat signals the antiferromagnetic transition at T N ∼ 9.3 K in zero field. The transition is found to shift to lower temperatures when a magnetic field is applied along the crystallographic a-axis, while a field applied parallel to the tetragonal c-axis does not affect the transition. The magnetic contribution to the specific heat below T N is well described by a sum of a linear electronic term and an antiferromagnetic spin-wave contribution. Just below T N , an additional positive curvature, especially at high fields, arises most probably due to thermal fluctuations. The field dependence of the coefficient of the low-temperature linear term, γ 0 , extracted from the fits shows a maximum at about 6 T, at the point where an anomaly was detected in susceptibility measurements. The relative field dependences of both T N and the magnetic entropy at T N scale as [1-(B/B 0 ) 2 ] for B parallel a, suggesting the disappearance of antiferromagnetism at B 0 ∼42 T. The expected suppression of the antiferromagnetic transition temperature to zero makes the existence of a magnetic quantum critical point possible. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  15. Design and Testing of a Fast, 50 kV Solid-State Kicker Pulser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, E G; Hickman, B C; Lee, B S; Hawkins, S A; Gower, E J; Allen, F V; Walstrom, P L

    2002-01-01

    The ability to extract particle beam bunches from a ring accelerator in arbitrary order can greatly extend an accelerator's capabilities and applications. A prototype solid-state kicker pulser capable of generating asynchronous bursts of 50 kV pulses has been designed and tested into a 50(Omega) load. The pulser features fast rise and fall times and is capable of generating an arbitrary pattern of pulses with a maximum burst frequency exceeding 5 MHz If required, the pulse-width of each pulse in the burst is independently adjustable. This kicker modulator uses multiple solid-state modules stacked in an inductive-adder configuration where the energy is switched into each section of the adder by a parallel array of MOSFETs. Test data, capabilities, and limitations of the prototype pulser are described

  16. Measurement report on the LHC injection kicker ripple denition and maximum pulse length (MD 1268)

    CERN Document Server

    Bartmann, Wolfgang; Kotzian, Gerd; Stoel, Linda; Velotti, Francesco Maria; Vlachodimitropoulos, Vasileios; Wiesner, Christoph; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The present LHC lling scheme uses a batch spacing which corresponds to the design report specication of the injection kicker rise time. A reduction of the batch spacing can be directly used to increase luminosity without detrimental eect on beam stability. Therefore, measurements were performed to understand if a tighter batch spacing would lead to increased injection oscillations of a the rst and last bunches of a bunch train and eventually also a growth of the transverse emittance. The results of theses measurement were used to dene the minimum possible batch spacing for an acceptable emittance growth. Another measurement was performed to test if a batch consisting of 320 bunches can be injected instead of the nominal 288 bunch trains. This bunch train is dierently produced in the LHC injectors and features an optimum between beam stability and luminosity gain. The pulse length of the injection kicker was measured to ensure the full batch can be injected at once.

  17. Magnetic pumping as a source of particle heating in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichko, E. R.; Egedal, J.; Daughton, W. S.; Kasper, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic pumping is a means of heating plasmas for both fusion and astrophysical applications. In this study a magnetic pumping model is developed as a possible explanation for the heating and the generation of power-law distribution functions observed in the solar wind plasma. In most previous studies turbulent energy is only dissipated at microscopic kinetic scales. In contrast, magnetic pumping energizes the particles through the largest scale turbulent fluctuations, thus bypassing the energy cascade. Kinetic simulations are applied to verify these analytic predictions. Previous results for the one-dimensional model, as well as initial results for a two-dimensional model which includes the effects of trapped and passing particles are presented. Preliminary results of the presence of this mechanism in the bow shock region, using spacecraft data from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission, are presented as well.

  18. Study and Development of an Air Conditioning System Operating on a Magnetic Heat Pump Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pao-Lien

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the design of a laboratory scale demonstration prototype of an air conditioning system operating on a magnetic heat pump cycle. Design parameters were selected through studies performed by a Kennedy Space Center (KSC) System Simulation Computer Model. The heat pump consists of a rotor turning through four magnetic fields that are created by permanent magnets. Gadolinium was selected as the working material for this demonstration prototype. The rotor was designed to be constructed of flat parallel disks of gadolinium with very little space in between. The rotor rotates in an aluminum housing. The laboratory scale demonstration prototype is designed to provide a theoretical Carnot Cycle efficiency of 62 percent and a Coefficient of Performance of 16.55.

  19. A practical nonlocal model for heat transport in magnetized laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaie, Ph.D.; Feugeas, J.-L.A.; Schurtz, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    A model of nonlocal transport for multidimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamics codes is presented. In laser produced plasmas, it is now believed that the heat transport can be strongly modified by the nonlocal nature of the electron conduction. Other mechanisms, such as self-generated magnetic fields, may also affect the heat transport. The model described in this work, based on simplified Fokker-Planck equations aims at extending the model of G. Schurtz, Ph. Nicolaie, and M. Busquet [Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] to magnetized plasmas. A complete system of nonlocal equations is derived from kinetic equations with self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. These equations are analyzed and simplified in order to be implemented into large laser fusion codes and coupled to other relevant physics. The model is applied to two laser configurations that demonstrate the main features of the model and point out the nonlocal Righi-Leduc effect in a multidimensional case

  20. A practical nonlocal model for heat transport in magnetized laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaï, Ph. D.; Feugeas, J.-L. A.; Schurtz, G. P.

    2006-03-01

    A model of nonlocal transport for multidimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamics codes is presented. In laser produced plasmas, it is now believed that the heat transport can be strongly modified by the nonlocal nature of the electron conduction. Other mechanisms, such as self-generated magnetic fields, may also affect the heat transport. The model described in this work, based on simplified Fokker-Planck equations aims at extending the model of G. Schurtz, Ph. Nicolaï, and M. Busquet [Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] to magnetized plasmas. A complete system of nonlocal equations is derived from kinetic equations with self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. These equations are analyzed and simplified in order to be implemented into large laser fusion codes and coupled to other relevant physics. The model is applied to two laser configurations that demonstrate the main features of the model and point out the nonlocal Righi-Leduc effect in a multidimensional case.

  1. Curie Temperature and Microstructural Changes Due to the Heating Treatment of Magnetic Amorphous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gondro J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Three distinct alloys: Fe86Zr7Nb1Cu1B5, Fe82Zr7Nb2Cu1B8, and Fe81Pt5Zr7Nb1Cu1B5 were characterized both magnetically and structurally. The samples, obtained with spinning roller method as a ribbons 3 mm in width and 20 μm thick, were investigated as-quenched and after each step of a multi steps heating treatment procedure. Each sample was annealed at four steps, fifteen minutes at every temperature, starting from 573K+600K up to +700K depending on type of alloy. Mössbauer spectroscopy data and transmission electron microscope (HRE M pictures confirmed that the as-quenched samples are fully amorphous. This is not changed after the first stages of treatment heating leads to a reduction of free volumes. The heating treatment has a great influence on the magnetic susceptibilities. The treatment up to 600K improves soft magnetic properties: an χ increase was observed, from about 400 to almost 1000 for the samples of alloys without Pt, and from about 200 to 450 at maximum, for the Fe81Pt5Zr7Nb1Cu1B5. Further heating, at more elevated temperatures, leads to magnetic hardening of the samples. Curie temperatures, established from the location of Hopkinson’s maxima on the χ(T curve are in very good agreement with those obtained from the data of specific magnetization, σ(T, measured in a field of 0.75T. As a critical parameter β was chosen to be equal 0.36 for these calculations, it confirmed that the alloys may be considered as ferromagnetic of Heisenberg type. Heating treatment resulted in decreasing of TC. These changes are within a range of several K.

  2. New wave form surveillance and diagnostics for the LEP injection kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Carlier, E; Verhagen, H

    1995-01-01

    The introduction of the Bunch Train Scheme in LEP requires a more precise and automatic supervision of the stability of the LEP injection kickers in timing and amplitude. Comprehensive and user-friendly diagnostic tools are required for in-depth investigation of equipment behaviour. A new system is currently being prepared using to a large extent commercial data acquisition hardware and hardware independent software products.

  3. Biomechanical predictors of ball velocity during punt kicking in elite rugby league kickers

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair, Jonathan Kenneth; Taylor, Paul John; Atkins, Stephen; Hobbs, Sarah Jane

    2016-01-01

    Punt kicking is integral to the attacking and defensive elements of rugby league and the ability to kick the ball with high\\ud velocity is desirable. This study aimed to identify important technical aspects of kicking linked to the generation of ball\\ud velocity. Maximal punt kicks were obtained from six elite rugby league kickers using a 10-camera motion capture system.\\ud Three-dimensional kinematics of the lower extremities was obtained. Regression analysis with ball velocity as criterion\\...

  4. Review of heat transfer problems associated with magnetically-confined fusion reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Werner, R.W.; Carlson, G.A.; Cornish, D.N.

    1976-01-01

    Conceptual design studies of possible fusion reactor configurations have revealed a host of interesting and sometimes extremely difficult heat transfer problems. The general requirements imposed on the coolant system for heat removal of the thermonuclear power from the reactor are discussed. In particular, the constraints imposed by the fusion plasma, neutronics, structure and magnetic field environment are described with emphasis on those aspects which are unusual or unique to fusion reactors. Then the particular heat transfer characteristics of various possible coolants including lithium, flibe, boiling alkali metals, and helium are discussed in the context of these general fusion reactor requirements. Some specific areas where further experimental and/or theoretical work is necessary are listed for each coolant along with references to the pertinent research already accomplished. Specialized heat transfer problems of the plasma injection and removal systems are also described. Finally, the challenging heat transfer problems associated with the superconducting magnets are reviewed, and once again some of the key unsolved heat transfer problems are enumerated

  5. Preliminary testing of the LEB to MEB transfer kicker modulator prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappas, G.C.; Askew, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The extraction kicker for the Low Energy Booster (LEB) is used to deflect a 12 GeV/c proton beam from the synchrotron into a transfer line. A kicker system of similar design is used to inject the beam from the transfer line into the Medium Energy Booster (MEB). The modulator requirements for these kicker systems are to deliver a pulse train of seven 1.6 kA, 2.5 μs pulses at a pulse repetition frequency of 10 pps, every seven seconds for one hour. The impedance of the modulator is 12.5 Ω, resulting in a charge voltage of 40 kV. The 10-90% rise time of the pulses is 20 ns, and the 1-99% fall time is 2 μs. The allowable pulse ripple is ±1% of the peak current during the pulse, and ±0.3% from pulse to pulse. The shot-to-shot timing jitter requirement is less than 2 ns. This paper describes the design and performance of the prototype modulator which was fabricated to meet these specifications

  6. Preliminary testing of the LEB to MEB transfer kicker modulator prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappas, G.C.; Askew, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    The extraction kicker for the Low Energy Booster (LEB) is used to deflect a 12 GeV/c proton beam from the synchrotron into a transfer line. A kicker system of similar design is used to inject the beam from the transfer line into the Medium Energy Booster (MEB). The modulator requirements for these kicker systems are to deliver a pulse train of seven 1.6kA, 2.5 μs pulses at a pulse repetition frequency of 20 pps, every seven seconds for one hour. The impedance of the modulator is 12.5 ω, resulting in a charge voltage of 40 kV. The 10--90% rise time of the pulses is 20 ns, and the 1--99% fall time is 2 μs. The allowable pulse ripple is ±1% of the peak current during the pulse, and ±0.3% from pulse to pulse. The shot -to-shot timing jitter requirement is less than ns. This paper describes the design and performance of the prototype modulator which was fabricated to meet these specifications

  7. The fast extraction kicker power supply for the main ring of J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koseki, Kunio, E-mail: kunio.koseki@kek.jp

    2013-11-21

    An effect induced by parasitic inductance in a pulsed power supply for a fast extraction kicker was studied. The parasitic inductance in high voltage capacitors for a low impedance pulse forming network disturbs a sharp rise of an excitation current. A high voltage capacitor with a coaxial structure to minimize the parasitic inductance is proposed. The effectiveness was confirmed experimentally. An impedance mismatch by a leakage inductance of a pulse transformer in a transmission line was studied. The effect is serious at the flat-top period of the excitation current. By introducing a compensation circuit, which is composed by a capacitor and a resistor, impedance matching was established. The pulsed power supply for the fast extraction kicker was operated at a charging voltage of 30 kV. A required rise time of less than 1.1 μs was achieved. The flatness was also confirmed to be in an acceptable value of less than 1%. -- Highlights: ●An effect by parasitic inductance of the energy storage capacitor of the PFN was studied. ●A faster rise time was achieved by introducing a coaxial structure for the PFN capacitor. ●An impedance mismatch by a leakage inductance of a pulse transformer was studied. ●Serious deterioration of the pulsed waveform was cured by a compensation circuit. ●The pulsed power supply for the fast extraction kicker was developed and operated successfully.

  8. Retained Austenite in SAE 52100 Steel Post Magnetic Processing and Heat Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappas, Nathaniel R [ORNL; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Cavin, Odis Burl [ORNL; Jaramillo, Roger A [ORNL; Ludtka, Gerard Michael [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Steel is an iron-carbon alloy that contains up to 2% carbon by weight. Understanding which phases of iron and carbon form as a function of temperature and percent carbon is important in order to process/manufacture steel with desired properties. Austenite is the face center cubic (fcc) phase of iron that exists between 912 and 1394 C. When hot steel is rapidly quenched in a medium (typically oil or water), austenite transforms into martensite. The goal of the study is to determine the effect of applying a magnetic field on the amount of retained austenite present at room temperature after quenching. Samples of SAE 52100 steel were heat treated then subjected to a magnetic field of varying strength and time, while samples of SAE 1045 steel were heat treated then subjected to a magnetic field of varying strength for a fixed time while being tempered. X-ray diffraction was used to collect quantitative data corresponding to the amount of each phase present post processing. The percentage of retained austenite was then calculated using the American Society of Testing and Materials standard for determining the amount of retained austenite for randomly oriented samples and was plotted as a function of magnetic field intensity, magnetic field apply time, and magnetic field wait time after quenching to determine what relationships exist with the amount of retained austenite present. In the SAE 52100 steel samples, stronger field strengths resulted in lower percentages of retained austenite for fixed apply times. The results were inconclusive when applying a fixed magnetic field strength for varying amounts of time. When applying a magnetic field after waiting a specific amount of time after quenching, the analyses indicate that shorter wait times result in less retained austenite. The SAE 1045 results were inconclusive. The samples showed no retained austenite regardless of magnetic field strength, indicating that tempering removed the retained austenite. It is apparent

  9. Material impacts and heat flux characterization of an electrothermal plasma source with an applied magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, T. E.; Martinez-Rodriguez, R. A.; Baylor, L. R.; Rapp, J.; Winfrey, A. L.

    2017-08-01

    To produce a realistic tokamak-like plasma environment in linear plasma device, a transient source is needed to deliver heat and particle fluxes similar to those seen in an edge localized mode (ELM). ELMs in future large tokamaks will deliver heat fluxes of ˜1 GW/m2 to the divertor plasma facing components at a few Hz. An electrothermal plasma source can deliver heat fluxes of this magnitude. These sources operate in an ablative arc regime which is driven by a DC capacitive discharge. An electrothermal source was configured with two pulse lengths and tested under a solenoidal magnetic field to determine the resulting impact on liner ablation, plasma parameters, and delivered heat flux. The arc travels through and ablates a boron nitride liner and strikes a tungsten plate. The tungsten target plate is analyzed for surface damage using a scanning electron microscope.

  10. The dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles exposed to non-heating alternating magnetic field in biochemical applications: theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovin, Yuri I., E-mail: nano@tsutmb.ru [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation); Gribanovsky, Sergey L.; Golovin, Dmitry Y.; Zhigachev, Alexander O. [G.R. Derzhavin Tambov State University, Nanocenter (Russian Federation); Klyachko, Natalia L.; Majouga, Alexander G. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation); Sokolsky, Marina [University of North Carolina, Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy (United States); Kabanov, Alexander V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    In the past decade, magneto-nanomechanical approach to biochemical systems stimulation has been studied intensively. This method involves macromolecule structure local deformation via mechanical actuation of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (f-MNPs) by non-heating low frequency (LF) alternating magnetic field (AMF). Specificity at cellular or molecular level and spatial locality in nanometer scale are its key advantages as compared to magnetic fluid hyperthermia. However, current experimental studies have weak theoretical basis. Several models of magneto-nanomechanical actuation of macromolecules and cells in non-heating uniform LF AMF are presented in the article. Single core-shell spherical, rod-like, and Janus MNPs, as well as dimers consisting of two f-MNPs with macromolecules immobilized on their surfaces are considered. AMF-induced rotational oscillations of MNPs can affect properties and functioning of macromolecules or cellular membranes attached to them via periodic deformations in nanometer scale. This could be widely used in therapy, in particular for targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release, and cancer cell killing. An aggregate composed of MNPs can affect associated macromolecules by force up to several hundreds of piconewton in the case of MNPs of tens of nanometers in diameter and LF AMF below 1 T. AMF parameters and MNP design requirements for effective in vitro and in vivo magneto-nanomechanical treatment are presented.

  11. The dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles exposed to non-heating alternating magnetic field in biochemical applications: theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovin, Yuri I.; Gribanovsky, Sergey L.; Golovin, Dmitry Y.; Zhigachev, Alexander O.; Klyachko, Natalia L.; Majouga, Alexander G.; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade, magneto-nanomechanical approach to biochemical systems stimulation has been studied intensively. This method involves macromolecule structure local deformation via mechanical actuation of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (f-MNPs) by non-heating low frequency (LF) alternating magnetic field (AMF). Specificity at cellular or molecular level and spatial locality in nanometer scale are its key advantages as compared to magnetic fluid hyperthermia. However, current experimental studies have weak theoretical basis. Several models of magneto-nanomechanical actuation of macromolecules and cells in non-heating uniform LF AMF are presented in the article. Single core-shell spherical, rod-like, and Janus MNPs, as well as dimers consisting of two f-MNPs with macromolecules immobilized on their surfaces are considered. AMF-induced rotational oscillations of MNPs can affect properties and functioning of macromolecules or cellular membranes attached to them via periodic deformations in nanometer scale. This could be widely used in therapy, in particular for targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release, and cancer cell killing. An aggregate composed of MNPs can affect associated macromolecules by force up to several hundreds of piconewton in the case of MNPs of tens of nanometers in diameter and LF AMF below 1 T. AMF parameters and MNP design requirements for effective in vitro and in vivo magneto-nanomechanical treatment are presented.

  12. The dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles exposed to non-heating alternating magnetic field in biochemical applications: theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Yuri I.; Gribanovsky, Sergey L.; Golovin, Dmitry Y.; Zhigachev, Alexander O.; Klyachko, Natalia L.; Majouga, Alexander G.; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2017-02-01

    In the past decade, magneto-nanomechanical approach to biochemical systems stimulation has been studied intensively. This method involves macromolecule structure local deformation via mechanical actuation of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (f-MNPs) by non-heating low frequency (LF) alternating magnetic field (AMF). Specificity at cellular or molecular level and spatial locality in nanometer scale are its key advantages as compared to magnetic fluid hyperthermia. However, current experimental studies have weak theoretical basis. Several models of magneto-nanomechanical actuation of macromolecules and cells in non-heating uniform LF AMF are presented in the article. Single core-shell spherical, rod-like, and Janus MNPs, as well as dimers consisting of two f-MNPs with macromolecules immobilized on their surfaces are considered. AMF-induced rotational oscillations of MNPs can affect properties and functioning of macromolecules or cellular membranes attached to them via periodic deformations in nanometer scale. This could be widely used in therapy, in particular for targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release, and cancer cell killing. An aggregate composed of MNPs can affect associated macromolecules by force up to several hundreds of piconewton in the case of MNPs of tens of nanometers in diameter and LF AMF below 1 T. AMF parameters and MNP design requirements for effective in vitro and in vivo magneto-nanomechanical treatment are presented.

  13. Structure of slow shocks in a magnetized plasma with heat conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.L.; Tsai, R.H.; Wu, B.H.; Lee, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    The structure of slow shocks in the presence of a heat conduction parallel to the local magnetic field is simulated from the set of magnetohydrodynamic equations. In this study, a pair of slow shocks is formed through the evolution of a current sheet initiated by the presence of a normal magnetic field. It is found that the slow shock consists of two parts: The isothermal main shock and foreshock. Significant jumps in plasma density, velocity and magnetic field occur across the main shock, but the temperature is found to be continuous across the main shock. The foreshock is featured by a smooth temperature variation and is formed due to the heat flow from downstream to upstream region. The plasma density downstream of the main shock decreases with time, while the downstream temperature increases with time, keeping the downstream pressure constant. It is shown that the jumps in plasma density, pressure, velocity, and magnetic field across the main shock are determined by the set of modified isothermal Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. It is also found that a jump in the temperature gradient is present across the main shock in order to satisfy the energy conservation. The present results can be applied to the heating in the solar corona and solar wind

  14. On Electromagnetic Modulation of Flow Instabilities, Mixing and Heat Transfer in Conducting and Magnetized Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenjeres, S.

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper we give a concise review of some recent highlights of our research dealing with electromagnetic control of flow, mixing and heat transfer of electrically conductive or magnetized fluids. We apply a combination of state-of-art numerical (DNS and LES) and experimental (PIV and LIF) techniques to provide fundamental insights into the complex phenomena of interactions between imposed (or induced) electromagnetic fields and underlying fluid flow. Our analysis covers an extensive range of working fluids, i.e. weakly- and highly-electrically-conductive, as well as magnetized fluids. These interactions are defined through the presence of different types of body forces acting per volume of fluid. A fully closed system of governing equations containing an extended set of the Navier-Stokes and a simplified set of the Maxwell equations is presented. The four characteristic examples are selected: the electromagnetic control of self-sustained jet oscillations, the electromagnetic enhancement of heat transfer in thermal convection, the wake interactions behind magnetic obstacles and finally, the thermo-magnetic convection in differentially heated cubical enclosure. The comparative assessment between experimental and numerical results is presented. It is concluded that generally good agreement between simulations and experiments is obtained for all cases considered, proving the concept of electromagnetic modulation, which can be used in numerous technological applications.

  15. Magnetic Characteristics of Active Region Heating Observed with TRACE, SOHO/EIT, and Yohkoh/SXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, J. G.; Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Over the past several years, we have reported results from studies that have compared the magnetic structure and heating of the transition region and corona (both in active regions and in the quiet Sun) by combining X-ray and EUV images from Yohkoh and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) with photospheric magnetograms from ground-based observatories. Our findings have led us to the hypothesis that most heating throughout the corona is driven from near and below the base of the corona by eruptive microflares occurring in compact low-lying "core magnetic fields (i.e., fields rooted along and closely enveloping polarity inversion lines in the photospheric magnetic flux). We now extend these studies, comparing sequences of UV images from Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) with longitudinal magnetograms from Kitt Peak and vector magnetograms from MUSIC. These comparisons confirm the previous results regarding the importance of core-field activity to active region heating. Activity in fields associated with satellite polarity inclusions and/or magnetically sheared configurations is especially prominent. This work is funded by NASA's Office of Space Science through the Sun-Earth Connection Guest Investigator Program and the Solar Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program.

  16. Detailing Radio Frequency Heating Induced by Coronary Stents: A 7.0 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Davide; Winter, Lukas; Müller, Alexander; Vogt, Julia; Renz, Wolfgang; Özerdem, Celal; Grässl, Andreas; Tkachenko, Valeriy; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity gain of ultrahigh field Magnetic Resonance (UHF-MR) holds the promise to enhance spatial and temporal resolution. Such improvements could be beneficial for cardiovascular MR. However, intracoronary stents used for treatment of coronary artery disease are currently considered to be contra-indications for UHF-MR. The antenna effect induced by a stent together with RF wavelength shortening could increase local radiofrequency (RF) power deposition at 7.0 T and bears the potential to induce local heating, which might cause tissue damage. Realizing these constraints, this work examines RF heating effects of stents using electro-magnetic field (EMF) simulations and phantoms with properties that mimic myocardium. For this purpose, RF power deposition that exceeds the clinical limits was induced by a dedicated birdcage coil. Fiber optic probes and MR thermometry were applied for temperature monitoring using agarose phantoms containing copper tubes or coronary stents. The results demonstrate an agreement between RF heating induced temperature changes derived from EMF simulations versus MR thermometry. The birdcage coil tailored for RF heating was capable of irradiating power exceeding the specific-absorption rate (SAR) limits defined by the IEC guidelines by a factor of three. This setup afforded RF induced temperature changes up to +27 K in a reference phantom. The maximum extra temperature increase, induced by a copper tube or a coronary stent was less than 3 K. The coronary stents examined showed an RF heating behavior similar to a copper tube. Our results suggest that, if IEC guidelines for local/global SAR are followed, the extra RF heating induced in myocardial tissue by stents may not be significant versus the baseline heating induced by the energy deposited by a tailored cardiac transmit RF coil at 7.0 T, and may be smaller if not insignificant than the extra RF heating observed under the circumstances used in this study. PMID:23185498

  17. Detailing radio frequency heating induced by coronary stents: a 7.0 Tesla magnetic resonance study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Santoro

    Full Text Available The sensitivity gain of ultrahigh field Magnetic Resonance (UHF-MR holds the promise to enhance spatial and temporal resolution. Such improvements could be beneficial for cardiovascular MR. However, intracoronary stents used for treatment of coronary artery disease are currently considered to be contra-indications for UHF-MR. The antenna effect induced by a stent together with RF wavelength shortening could increase local radiofrequency (RF power deposition at 7.0 T and bears the potential to induce local heating, which might cause tissue damage. Realizing these constraints, this work examines RF heating effects of stents using electro-magnetic field (EMF simulations and phantoms with properties that mimic myocardium. For this purpose, RF power deposition that exceeds the clinical limits was induced by a dedicated birdcage coil. Fiber optic probes and MR thermometry were applied for temperature monitoring using agarose phantoms containing copper tubes or coronary stents. The results demonstrate an agreement between RF heating induced temperature changes derived from EMF simulations versus MR thermometry. The birdcage coil tailored for RF heating was capable of irradiating power exceeding the specific-absorption rate (SAR limits defined by the IEC guidelines by a factor of three. This setup afforded RF induced temperature changes up to +27 K in a reference phantom. The maximum extra temperature increase, induced by a copper tube or a coronary stent was less than 3 K. The coronary stents examined showed an RF heating behavior similar to a copper tube. Our results suggest that, if IEC guidelines for local/global SAR are followed, the extra RF heating induced in myocardial tissue by stents may not be significant versus the baseline heating induced by the energy deposited by a tailored cardiac transmit RF coil at 7.0 T, and may be smaller if not insignificant than the extra RF heating observed under the circumstances used in this study.

  18. Kalman Filtered Bio Heat Transfer Model Based Self-adaptive Hybrid Magnetic Resonance Thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxin; Chen, Shuo; Deng, Kexin; Chen, Bingyao; Wei, Xing; Yang, Jiafei; Wang, Shi; Ying, Kui

    2017-01-01

    To develop a self-adaptive and fast thermometry method by combining the original hybrid magnetic resonance thermometry method and the bio heat transfer equation (BHTE) model. The proposed Kalman filtered Bio Heat Transfer Model Based Self-adaptive Hybrid Magnetic Resonance Thermometry, abbreviated as KalBHT hybrid method, introduced the BHTE model to synthesize a window on the regularization term of the hybrid algorithm, which leads to a self-adaptive regularization both spatially and temporally with change of temperature. Further, to decrease the sensitivity to accuracy of the BHTE model, Kalman filter is utilized to update the window at each iteration time. To investigate the effect of the proposed model, computer heating simulation, phantom microwave heating experiment and dynamic in-vivo model validation of liver and thoracic tumor were conducted in this study. The heating simulation indicates that the KalBHT hybrid algorithm achieves more accurate results without adjusting λ to a proper value in comparison to the hybrid algorithm. The results of the phantom heating experiment illustrate that the proposed model is able to follow temperature changes in the presence of motion and the temperature estimated also shows less noise in the background and surrounding the hot spot. The dynamic in-vivo model validation with heating simulation demonstrates that the proposed model has a higher convergence rate, more robustness to susceptibility problem surrounding the hot spot and more accuracy of temperature estimation. In the healthy liver experiment with heating simulation, the RMSE of the hot spot of the proposed model is reduced to about 50% compared to the RMSE of the original hybrid model and the convergence time becomes only about one fifth of the hybrid model. The proposed model is able to improve the accuracy of the original hybrid algorithm and accelerate the convergence rate of MR temperature estimation.

  19. Investigating the efficacy of magnetic nanofluid as a coolant in double-pipe heat exchanger in the presence of magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahiraei, Mehdi; Hangi, Morteza

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Efficacy of magnetic nanofluid as coolant was studied in double-pipe heat exchanger. • Effect of applying quadrupole magnetic field with different magnitudes was analyzed. • Magnetic force makes the concentration distribution more uniform in tube side. • Applying magnetic field enhances both pressure drop and heat transfer. • Optimization was performed to reach maximum heat transfer and minimum pressure drop. - Abstract: The current study attempts to investigate the performance of water based Mn–Zn ferrite magnetic nanofluid in a counter-flow double-pipe heat exchanger under quadrupole magnetic field using the two-phase Euler–Lagrange method. The nanofluid flows in the tube side as coolant, while the hot water flows in the annulus side. The effects of different parameters including concentration, size of the particles, magnitude of the magnetic field and Reynolds number are examined. Distribution of the particles is non-uniform at the cross section of the tube such that the concentration is higher at central regions of the tube. Application of the magnetic field makes the distribution of particles more uniform and this uniformity increases by increasing the distance from the tube inlet. Increasing each of the parameters of concentration, particle size and magnitude of the magnetic field will lead to a greater pressure drop and also higher heat transfer improvement. At higher Reynolds numbers, the effect of magnetic force is diminished. Optimization was performed using genetic algorithm coupled with compromise programming technique in order to reach the maximum overall heat transfer coefficient along with the minimum pressure drop. For this purpose, the models of objective functions of overall heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of the nanofluid were first extracted in terms of the effective parameters using neural network. The neural network model predicts the output variables with a very good accuracy. The optimal values were

  20. Anomalous heating and plasmoid formation in pulsed power driven magnetic reconnection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jack

    2017-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important process occurring in various plasma environments, including high energy density plasmas. In this talk we will present results from a recently developed magnetic reconnection platform driven by the MAGPIE pulsed power generator (1 MA, 250 ns) at Imperial College London. In these experiments, supersonic, sub-Alfvénic plasma flows collide, bringing anti-parallel magnetic fields into contact and producing a well-defined, elongated reconnection layer. This layer is long-lasting (>200 ns, > 10 hydrodynamic flow times) and is diagnosed using a suite of high resolution, spatially and temporally resolved diagnostics which include laser interferometry, Thomson scattering and Faraday rotation imaging. We observe significant heating of the electrons and ions inside the reconnection layer, and calculate that the heating must occur on time-scales far faster than can be explained by classical mechanisms. Possible anomalous mechanisms include in-plane electric fields caused by two-fluid effects, and enhanced resistivity and viscosity caused by kinetic turbulence. We also observe the repeated formation of plasmoids in the reconnection layer, which are ejected outwards along the layer at super-Alfvénic velocities. The O-point magnetic field structure of these plasmoids is determined using in situ magnetic probes, and these plasmoids could also play a role in the anomalous heating of the electrons and ions. In addition, we present further modifications to this experimental platform which enable us to study asymmetric reconnection or measure the out-of-plane magnetic field inside the plasmoids. This work was supported in part by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Grant No. EP/N013379/1, and by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Awards No. DE-F03-02NA00057 and No. DE-SC-0001063.

  1. Neutron diffraction, specific heat and magnetic susceptibility of Ni3(PO4)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobal, J.; Pizarro, J.L.; Mesa, J.L.; Rojo, J.M.; Bazan, B.; Arriortua, M.I.; Rojo, T.

    2005-01-01

    The Ni 3 (PO 4 ) 2 phosphate was synthesized by the ceramic method in air atmosphere. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional skeleton constructed from Ni 3 O 14 edge-sharing octahedra, which are interconnected by (PO 4 ) 3- oxoanions with tetrahedral geometry. The magnetic behavior was studied on powdered sample by using susceptibility, specific heat and neutron diffraction data. The nickel(II) orthophosphate exhibits a three-dimensional magnetic ordering at approximately 17.1 K. However, its complex crystal structure hampers any parametrization of the J-exchange parameter. The specific heat measurements of Ni 3 (PO 4 ) 2 exhibit a three-dimensional magnetic ordering (λ-type) peak at 17.1 K. Measurements above T N suggest the presence of a small short-range order in this phase. The total magnetic entropy was found to be 28.1 KJ/mol at 50 K. The magnetic structure of the nickel(II) phosphate exhibits ferromagnetic interactions inside the Ni 3 O 14 trimers which are antiferromagnetically coupled between them, giving rise to a purely antiferromagnetic structure

  2. Measurement of specific heat and specific absorption rate by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gultekin, David H., E-mail: david.gultekin@aya.yale.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Gore, John C. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2010-05-20

    We evaluate a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method of calorimetry for the measurement of specific heat (c{sub p}) and specific absorption rate (SAR) in liquids. The feasibility of NMR calorimetry is demonstrated by experimental measurements of water, ethylene glycol and glycerol using any of three different NMR parameters (chemical shift, spin-spin relaxation rate and equilibrium nuclear magnetization). The method involves heating the sample using a continuous wave laser beam and measuring the temporal variation of the spatially averaged NMR parameter by non-invasive means. The temporal variation of the spatially averaged NMR parameter as a function of thermal power yields the ratio of the heat capacity to the respective nuclear thermal coefficient, from which the specific heat can be determined for the substance. The specific absorption rate is obtained by subjecting the liquid to heating by two types of radiation, radiofrequency (RF) and near-infrared (NIR), and by measuring the change in the nuclear spin phase shift by a gradient echo imaging sequence. These studies suggest NMR may be a useful tool for measurements of the thermal properties of liquids.

  3. Formation of toroidal pre-heat plasma without residual magnetic field for high-beta pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Nagayasu; Tamaru, Ken; Nagata, Akiyoshi.

    1979-01-01

    Formation of toroidal pre-heat plasma was studied. The pre-heat plasma without residual magnetic field was made by chopping the current for pre-heat, A small toroidal-pinch system was used for the experiment. The magnetic field was measured with a magnetic probe. One turn loop was used for the measurement of the toroidal one-turn electric field. A pair of Rogoski coil was used for the measurement of plasma current. The dependence of residual magnetic field on chopping time was measured. By fast chopping of the primary current in the pre-heating circuit, the poloidal magnetic field was reduced to several percent within 5 microsecond. After chopping, no instability was observed in the principal discharge plasma produced within several microsecond. As the conclusion, it can be said that the control of residual field can be made by current chopping. (Kato, T.)

  4. Falkner-Skan Flow of a Maxwell Fluid with Heat Transfer and Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Qasim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation deals with the Falkner-Skan flow of a Maxwell fluid in the presence of nonuniform applied magnetic fi…eld with heat transfer. Governing problems of flow and heat transfer are solved analytically by employing the homotopy analysis method (HAM. Effects of the involved parameters, namely, the Deborah number, Hartman number, and the Prandtl number, are examined carefully. A comparative study is made with the known numerical solution in a limiting sense and an excellent agreement is noted.

  5. Symmetric Anderson impurity model: Magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and Wilson ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalom, Peter; Pokorný, Vladislav; Janiš, Václav

    2018-05-01

    We extend the spin-polarized effective-interaction approximation of the parquet renormalization scheme from Refs. [1,2] applied on the symmetric Anderson model by adding the low-temperature asymptotics of the total energy and the specific heat. We calculate numerically the Wilson ratio and determine analytically its asymptotic value in the strong-coupling limit. We demonstrate in this way that the exponentially small Kondo scale from the strong-coupling regime emerges in qualitatively the same way in the spectral function, magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat.

  6. A Harmonic Kicker Scheme for the Circulator Cooler Ring in the Proposed Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissen, Edward W.; Hutton, Andrew M.; Kimber, Andrew J.

    2013-06-01

    The current electron cooler design for the proposed Medium Energy Electron-Ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab utilizes a circulator ring for reuse of the cooling electron bunch up to 100 times to cool the ion beams. This cooler requires a fast kicker system for injecting and extracting individual bunches in the circulator ring. Such a kicker must work at a high repetition rate, up to 7.5 to 75 MHz depending on the number of turns in the recirculator ring. It also must have a very short rise and fall time (of order of 1 ns) such that it will kick an individual bunch without disturbing the others in the ring. Both requirements are orders of magnitude beyond the present state-of-the-art as well as the goals of other on-going kicker R&D programs such as that for the ILC damping rings. In this paper we report a scheme of creating this fast, high repetition rate kicker by combining RF waveforms at multiple frequencies to create a kicker waveform that will, for example, kick every eleventh bunch while leaving the other ten unperturbed. We also present a possible implementation of this scheme as well as discuss its limitations.

  7. Effect of heat treatment on interface driven magnetic properties of CoFe films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kr., E-mail: drakhintu@gmail.com; Hsu, Jen-Hwa

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Ta underlayer and cap layer dependent anisotropy nature in thin CoFe films. • Thin Ta layer induces the magnetization component along normal to the film plane. • Heat treatment and Ta layers driven surface morphology, roughness and grain size. • Roughness reduces more than an order of magnitude with 2 nm Ta cap layer. • H{sub C}, domain patterns and domain size depend on Ta layers and heat treatment. - Abstract: We report systematic studies on non-magnetic Ta underlayer and cap layer driven microstructural and magnetic properties at a wide temperature range for CoFe films. All the films were grown at room temperature and post annealed at different annealing temperatures (T{sub A} = 200 °C, 250 °C, 300 °C, 350 °C, 400 °C and 450 °C). The in-plane magnetic hysteresis (M–H) loops of 10 nm thick CoFe single layer films, grown directly on thermally oxidized Si substrate, exhibit anisotropic nature for T{sub A} above 250 °C. However, the CoFe (10 nm) films grown on the 5 nm thick Ta underlayer show reduced anisotropy. Moreover, with underlayer and cap layers (2 nm) the anisotropy is disappeared. The in-plane coercivity (H{sub C}) shows a strong variation with T{sub A}, underlayer and cap layers. H{sub C} increases significantly with Ta underlayer and cap layers. The out of plane M–H loops exhibit increase in the remanence magnetization and squareness with both Ta underlayer and cap layers due to transition of in-plane magnetization component to the out of plane direction. The atomic force microscopic observations revealed that grain/particle size and shape depend strongly on T{sub A} and Ta layers. Moreover, a large reduction in the surface roughness is observed with the Ta cap layer. The magnetic domain patterns depend on the T{sub A}, and Ta layers. However, for Ta/CoFe/Ta films no clear domains were observed for all the T{sub A}. Hence, the Ta cap layers not only protect the CoFe magnetic layer against the heat treatment, but also

  8. Specific heat and magnetic properties of single-crystalline ZnxDyyCrzSe4 spinels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendrzejewska, Izabela; Groń, Tadeusz; Maciążek, Ewa; Duda, Henryk; Kubisztal, Marian; Ślebarski, Andrzej; Pietrasik, Ewa; Fijałkowski, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure, magnetic isotherm, magnetic susceptibility, electrical conductivity and specific heat measurements for single-crystalline Zn x Dy y Cr z Se 4 (where x+y+z≈3) spinels are presented. A semiconducting behavior with the activation energy of 0.53 eV, an antiferromagnetic order with a Néel temperature T N =22 K and a strong ferromagnetic exchange evidenced by a positive Curie–Weiss temperature θ=79, 71 and 70 K with increasing Dy-content in the sequence 0.05, 0.13 and 0.19 were established. Below T N the magnetic field dependence of magnetization, M(H), shows two peaks at critical fields H c1 and H c2 . The values of H c1 decrease slightly with temperature, especially for the larger Dy-content, while the values of H c2 drop rapidly with temperature. The magnetic contribution to the specific heat displays a sharp peak at T N , which is strongly shifted to much lower temperatures in the applied magnetic fields. Similar behavior was found for the temperature dependence of the specific heat C(T) plotted as C(T)/T vs. T. The value of the magnetic and phonon contribution to the entropy at T N and at H=0 is only ∼4.8, ∼4.4 and ∼4.2 J mol −1 K −1 /Cr 3+ for y=0.05, 0.13 and 0.19, respectively, much lower than the average magnetic contribution S m =(z/2)Rln(2S+1)=12.33 J mol −1 K −1 /Cr 3+ calculated for Cr 3+ ion with S=3/2, as the dysprosium one is paramagnetic. - Highlights: • Dy-substitution does not affect the Cr 3+ 3d 3 electronic configuration and AFM order. • The larger Dy-content, the smaller FM short-range interactions. • The magnetic and phonon contribution to the entropy decreases as Dy-content increases.

  9. Effect of heat treatment on interface driven magnetic properties of CoFe films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kr.; Hsu, Jen-Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Ta underlayer and cap layer dependent anisotropy nature in thin CoFe films. • Thin Ta layer induces the magnetization component along normal to the film plane. • Heat treatment and Ta layers driven surface morphology, roughness and grain size. • Roughness reduces more than an order of magnitude with 2 nm Ta cap layer. • H C , domain patterns and domain size depend on Ta layers and heat treatment. - Abstract: We report systematic studies on non-magnetic Ta underlayer and cap layer driven microstructural and magnetic properties at a wide temperature range for CoFe films. All the films were grown at room temperature and post annealed at different annealing temperatures (T A = 200 °C, 250 °C, 300 °C, 350 °C, 400 °C and 450 °C). The in-plane magnetic hysteresis (M–H) loops of 10 nm thick CoFe single layer films, grown directly on thermally oxidized Si substrate, exhibit anisotropic nature for T A above 250 °C. However, the CoFe (10 nm) films grown on the 5 nm thick Ta underlayer show reduced anisotropy. Moreover, with underlayer and cap layers (2 nm) the anisotropy is disappeared. The in-plane coercivity (H C ) shows a strong variation with T A , underlayer and cap layers. H C increases significantly with Ta underlayer and cap layers. The out of plane M–H loops exhibit increase in the remanence magnetization and squareness with both Ta underlayer and cap layers due to transition of in-plane magnetization component to the out of plane direction. The atomic force microscopic observations revealed that grain/particle size and shape depend strongly on T A and Ta layers. Moreover, a large reduction in the surface roughness is observed with the Ta cap layer. The magnetic domain patterns depend on the T A , and Ta layers. However, for Ta/CoFe/Ta films no clear domains were observed for all the T A . Hence, the Ta cap layers not only protect the CoFe magnetic layer against the heat treatment, but also show a smooth surface at a wide

  10. Cytokines profile changers after magnetic-heat-vibromassage in chronic abacterial prostatitis with erectile disfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Коren’kov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the influence of magnetic-heat-vibromassage procedure in treatment of 27 patients with chronic abacterial prostatitis with erectile dysfunction, by mean of transrectal electrodes application of MAVIT® apparatus (ULP-01-“ELAT”. In the prostatic gland (PG media and blood plasma the pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations was investigated. PG hemodynamic, and erectile dysfunction also was determined. Control group was presented by 10 healthy males (23–45 years old. Measurements were done before treatment, and after 10 procedures of PG massage, and 30 days after procedure.It was shown that chronic abacterial prostatitis with erectile dysfunction with low clinical performance is supported by pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by the PG. The usage of magnetic-heat-vibromassage procedure increased prostatic microcirculation, as well as testosterone level, and improved the erectile dysfunction in all 27 patients enrolled into the study

  11. Wave heating and the U.S. magnetic fusion energy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staten, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    The U.S. Government's support of the fusion program is predicated upon the long-term need for the fusion option in our energy future, as well as the near-term benefits associated with developments on the frontier of science and high technology. As a long-term energy option, magnetic fusion energy has the potential to provide an inexpensive, vast, and secure fuel reserve, to be environmentally clean and safe. It has many potential uses, which include production of central station electricity, fuel for fission reactors, synthetic fuels, and process heat for such applications as desalination of sea water. This paper presents an overview of the U.S. Government program for magnetic fusion energy. The goal and objectives of the U.S. program are reviewed followed by a summary of plasma experiments presently under way and the application of wave heating to these experiments

  12. Prototyping Energy Efficient Thermo-Magnetic & Induction Hardening for Heat Treat & Net Shape Forming Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquil Ahmad

    2012-08-03

    Within this project, Eaton undertook the task of bringing about significant impact with respect to sustainability. One of the major goals for the Department of Energy is to achieve energy savings with a corresponding reduction in carbon foot print. The use of a coupled induction heat treatment with high magnetic field heat treatment makes possible not only improved performance alloys, but with faster processing times and lower processing energy, as well. With this technology, substitution of lower cost alloys for more exotic alloys became a possibility; microstructure could be tailored for improved magnetic properties or wear resistance or mechanical performance, as needed. A prototype commercial unit has been developed to conduct processing of materials. Testing of this equipment has been conducted and results demonstrate the feasibility for industrial commercialization.

  13. Approximate method for calculating heat conditions in the magnetic circuits of transformers and betatrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loginov, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    A technique for engineering design of two-dimensional stationary temperature field of rectangular cross section blending pile with inner heat release under nonsymmetrical cooling conditions is suggested. Area of its practical application is determined on the basis of experimental data known in literature. Different methods for calculating temperature distribution in betatron magnetic circuit are compared. Graph of maximum temperature calculation error on the basis of approximated expressions with respect to exact solution is given

  14. Divertor Heat Flux Reduction by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in the LHD-Type Helical DEMO Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagi, N.; Sagara, A.; Goto, T.; Masuzaki, S.; Miyazawa, J., E-mail: yanagi@lhd.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: The conceptual design studies of the LHD-type helical fusion DEMO reactor, FFHR-d1, are progressing steadfastly. The LHD-type heliotron magnetic configuration equipped with the built- in helical divertors has a potential to realize low divertor heat flux in spatial average. However, the toroidal asymmetry may give more than a couple of times higher peak heat flux at some locations, as has been experimentally observed in LHD and confirmed by magnetic field-line tracing. By providing radiation dispersion accompanied with a plasma detachment, the heat flux may decrease significantly though the compatibility with a good core plasma confinement is an important issue to be explored. Whereas the engineering difficulties for developing materials to be used under the neutron environment require even further decrease of the heat flux (even though the heliotron is a unique configuration that divertor plates be largely shielded from the direct irradiation of neutrons by breeder blankets). In this respect, we proposed, in the last IAEA FEC, a new strike point sweeping scheme using a set of auxiliary helical coils, termed helical divertor (HD) coils. The HD coils carrying a few percent of the current amplitude of the main helical coils sweep the divertor strike points without altering the core plasma. Though this scheme is effective in dispersing the heat flux in the poloidal direction, the toroidal asymmetry still remains. The AC operation may also give unforeseen engineering difficulties. We here propose that the peak heat flux be mitigated using RMP fields in steady-state. The magnetic field-lines are numerically traced in the vacuum configuration and their footprints coming to the divertor regions are counted. Their fraction plotted as a function of the toroidal angle indicates that the peak heat flux be mitigated to {approx} 20 MW per square meters at 3 GW fusion power generation without having radiation dispersion when an RMP field is applied. We note that the

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Chenyan; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng; An, Yanli

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression. (paper)

  16. Numerical Study of Erosion, Heating, and Acceleration of the Magnetic Cloud as Impacted by Fast Shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Shoudi; He, Jiansen; Yang, Liping; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The impact of an overtaking fast shock on a magnetic cloud (MC) is a pivotal process in CME–CME (CME: coronal mass ejection) interactions and CME–SIR (SIR: stream interaction region) interactions. MC with a strong and rotating magnetic field is usually deemed a crucial part of CMEs. To study the impact of a fast shock on an MC, we perform a 2.5 dimensional numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulation. Two cases are run in this study: without and with impact by fast shock. In the former case, the MC expands gradually from its initial state and drives a relatively slow magnetic reconnection with the ambient magnetic field. Analyses of forces near the core of the MC as a whole body indicates that the solar gravity is quite small compared to the Lorentz force and the pressure gradient force. In the second run, a fast shock propagates, relative to the background plasma, at a speed twice that of the perpendicular fast magnetosonic speed, catches up with and takes over the MC. Due to the penetration of the fast shock, the MC is highly compressed and heated, with the temperature growth rate enhanced by a factor of about 10 and the velocity increased to about half of the shock speed. The magnetic reconnection with ambient magnetic field is also sped up by a factor of two to four in reconnection rate as a result of the enhanced density of the current sheet, which is squeezed by the forward motion of the shocked MC.

  17. Numerical Study of Erosion, Heating, and Acceleration of the Magnetic Cloud as Impacted by Fast Shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Shoudi; He, Jiansen; Yang, Liping; Wang, Linghua [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University No. 5 Yiheyuan Road, Haidian District Beijing, 100871 (China); Zhang, Lei, E-mail: jshept@gmail.com [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences No.1 Nanertiao, Zhongguancun, Haidian district Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2017-06-20

    The impact of an overtaking fast shock on a magnetic cloud (MC) is a pivotal process in CME–CME (CME: coronal mass ejection) interactions and CME–SIR (SIR: stream interaction region) interactions. MC with a strong and rotating magnetic field is usually deemed a crucial part of CMEs. To study the impact of a fast shock on an MC, we perform a 2.5 dimensional numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulation. Two cases are run in this study: without and with impact by fast shock. In the former case, the MC expands gradually from its initial state and drives a relatively slow magnetic reconnection with the ambient magnetic field. Analyses of forces near the core of the MC as a whole body indicates that the solar gravity is quite small compared to the Lorentz force and the pressure gradient force. In the second run, a fast shock propagates, relative to the background plasma, at a speed twice that of the perpendicular fast magnetosonic speed, catches up with and takes over the MC. Due to the penetration of the fast shock, the MC is highly compressed and heated, with the temperature growth rate enhanced by a factor of about 10 and the velocity increased to about half of the shock speed. The magnetic reconnection with ambient magnetic field is also sped up by a factor of two to four in reconnection rate as a result of the enhanced density of the current sheet, which is squeezed by the forward motion of the shocked MC.

  18. Specific heat and magnetization of a ZrB12 single crystal: characterization of a type II/1 superconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuxing; Lortz, Rolf; Paderno, Yuriy; Filippov, Vladimir; Abe, Satoko; Tutsch, Ulrich; Junod, Alain

    2005-01-01

    We measured the specific heat, the magnetization, and the magnetoresistance of a single crystal of ZrB12, which is superconducting below Tc ~ 6 K. The specific heat in zero field shows a BCS-type superconducting transition. The normal- to superconducting-state transition changes from first order (with a latent heat) to second order (without latent heat) with increasing magnetic field, indicating that the pure compound is a low-kappa, type-II/1 superconductor in the classification of Auer and ...

  19. Magnetic-susceptibility and heat-capacity measurements on PrRhSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, S.K.; Takeya, H.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic-susceptibility (ac and dc) and heat-capacity measurements have been carried out on the compound PrRhSb. These measurements reveal two magnetic transitions in this compound---one at about 18 K and the other around 6 K. In the dc susceptibility the 18-K transition is evident as the temperature below which a magnetic correlation sets in and the susceptibility is found to be field dependent. The lower transition manifests as a peak in the susceptibility of zero-field-cooled samples which were measured in low applied fields. The electronic-specific-heat coefficient, γ, is found to be 33 mJ/mol K 2 between 40 and 70 K after correcting for the lattice contribution taken to be the same as in its La analog. The γ value is fairly large for a Pr compound and may be indicative of moderately heavy quasiparticles. A Kondo-type interaction of the Pr 4f electrons with the conduction electrons may be responsible for high-magnetic-ordering temperatures and the moderately large γ value in this compound

  20. 2D heat flux pattern in ASDEX upgrade L-mode with magnetic perturbation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faitsch, Michael; Sieglin, Bernhard; Eich, Thomas; Herrmann, Albrecht; Suttrop, Wolfgang [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: the ASDEDX Upgrade Team

    2016-07-01

    A future fusion reactor is likely to operate in high confinement mode (H-mode). This mode is associated with a periodic instability at the plasma edge that expels particles and energy. This instability is called edge localized mode (ELM). External magnetic perturbation (MP) is one technique that is thought to be able to mitigate or even suppress large ELMs in next step fusion devices such as ITER, where the ELM induced heat load for unmitigated ELMs might limit the lifetime of the divertor. Applying an external magnetic perturbation breaks the axisymmetry and leads to a 2D steady state heat flux pattern at the divertor. The ASDEX Upgrade tokamak is equipped with 16 perturbation coils, 8 above (upper row) and 8 below (lower row) the outer mid plane, toroidal equally distributed. A high resolution infra red system is measuring the heat flux at the outer target at a fixed toroidal position with a resolution of around 0.6 mm. In order to measure the 2D structure a slow rotation of the MP field was applied (1 Hz) with a toroidal mode number n=2. The differential phase between the upper and lower row was changed to investigate the effect of the alignment with the field lines at the edge. The density was varied to study the density dependence of the heat transport with applied external MP and compare it to the axisymmetric scenario.

  1. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shit, G.C.; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-01-01

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank–Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance. - Highlights: • We have investigated the pulsatile MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in arteries. • The influence of periodic body acceleration has been taken into account. • The temperature dependent viscosity of blood is considered. • The variable viscosity has an increasing effect on blood flow and heat transfer. • The overall temperature distribution enhances in the presence of magnetic field

  2. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shit, G.C., E-mail: gopal_iitkgp@yahoo.co.in; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-15

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank–Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance. - Highlights: • We have investigated the pulsatile MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in arteries. • The influence of periodic body acceleration has been taken into account. • The temperature dependent viscosity of blood is considered. • The variable viscosity has an increasing effect on blood flow and heat transfer. • The overall temperature distribution enhances in the presence of magnetic field.

  3. Development of supersonic plasma flows by use of a magnetic nozzle and an ICRF heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inutake, M.; Ando, A.; Hattori, K.; Tobari, H.; Hosokawa, Y.; Sato, R.; Hatanaka, M.; Harata, K. [Tohoku Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Sendai (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    A high-beta, supersonic plasma flow plays a crucial role in MHD phenomena in space and fusion plasmas. There are a few experimental researches on production and control of a fast flowing plasma in spite of a growing significance in the magnetized-plasma flow dynamics. A magneto-plasma-dynamic arc-jet (MPDA) is one of promising devices to produce a supersonic plasma flow and has been utilized as an electric propulsion device with a higher specific impulse and a relatively larger thrust. We have improved the performance of an MPDA to produce a quasi-steady plasma flow with a transonic and supersonic Mach number in a highly-ionized state. There are two methods in order to control an ion-acoustic Mach number of the plasma flow exhausted from an MPDA: one is to use a magnetic Laval nozzle to convert a thermal energy to a flow energy and the other is a combined system of an ion heating and a divergent magnetic nozzle. The former is an analogous method to a compressible air flow and the latter is the method proposed in an advanced thruster for a manned interplanetary space mission. We have clarified the plasma flow characteristics in various shapes of a magnetic field configuration. It was demonstrated that the Mach number of the plasma flow could increase up to almost 3 in a divergent magnetic nozzle field. This paper reports recent results on the flow field improvements: one is on a magnetic-Laval-nozzle effects observed at the muzzle region of the MPDA, and the other is on ICRF (ion-cyclotron-range of frequency) heating of a supersonic plasma by use of a helical antenna. (authors)

  4. Effect of heat treatment on interface driven magnetic properties of CoFe films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kr.; Hsu, Jen-Hwa

    2017-06-01

    We report systematic studies on non-magnetic Ta underlayer and cap layer driven microstructural and magnetic properties at a wide temperature range for CoFe films. All the films were grown at room temperature and post annealed at different annealing temperatures (TA = 200 °C, 250 °C, 300 °C, 350 °C, 400 °C and 450 °C). The in-plane magnetic hysteresis (M-H) loops of 10 nm thick CoFe single layer films, grown directly on thermally oxidized Si substrate, exhibit anisotropic nature for TA above 250 °C. However, the CoFe (10 nm) films grown on the 5 nm thick Ta underlayer show reduced anisotropy. Moreover, with underlayer and cap layers (2 nm) the anisotropy is disappeared. The in-plane coercivity (HC) shows a strong variation with TA, underlayer and cap layers. HC increases significantly with Ta underlayer and cap layers. The out of plane M-H loops exhibit increase in the remanence magnetization and squareness with both Ta underlayer and cap layers due to transition of in-plane magnetization component to the out of plane direction. The atomic force microscopic observations revealed that grain/particle size and shape depend strongly on TA and Ta layers. Moreover, a large reduction in the surface roughness is observed with the Ta cap layer. The magnetic domain patterns depend on the TA, and Ta layers. However, for Ta/CoFe/Ta films no clear domains were observed for all the TA. Hence, the Ta cap layers not only protect the CoFe magnetic layer against the heat treatment, but also show a smooth surface at a wide temperature range. These results could be discussed on the basis of random anisotropy model, TA, underlayer and cap layers driven microstructure and magnetization orientation of the CoFe films.

  5. Magnetic reconnection in plasma under inertial confinement fusion conditions driven by heat flux effects in Ohm's law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, A S; Thomas, A G R; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A

    2014-03-14

    In the interaction of high-power laser beams with solid density plasma there are a number of mechanisms that generate strong magnetic fields. Such fields subsequently inhibit or redirect electron flows, but can themselves be advected by heat fluxes, resulting in complex interplay between thermal transport and magnetic fields. We show that for heating by multiple laser spots reconnection of magnetic field lines can occur, mediated by these heat fluxes, using a fully implicit 2D Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code. Under such conditions, the reconnection rate is dictated by heat flows rather than Alfvènic flows. We find that this mechanism is only relevant in a high β plasma. However, the Hall parameter ωcτei can be large so that thermal transport is strongly modified by these magnetic fields, which can impact longer time scale temperature homogeneity and ion dynamics in the system.

  6. Beam interaction of a pulsed, nonlinear in-vacuum injection magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rast, Helge

    2013-01-01

    Theme of this thesis is the study of the interaction of the injection magnet designed for BESSY II with the electron beam. The main topic of this thesis lies in the numerical and measurement-technical study of the loss factor, the wake potential, and the wake impedance of the nonlinear kicker magnet with the aim of an optimization of the magnet design, so that a stable operation of the kicker in the BESSY II storage ring is made possible. A further main topic of this thesis is a study on the matching of the injection scheme with a single kicker to the conditions of the DELTA storage ring, which is operated by the TU Dortmund.

  7. Tidal Heating of Earth-like Exoplanets around M Stars: Thermal, Magnetic, and Orbital Evolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, P E; Barnes, R

    2015-09-01

    The internal thermal and magnetic evolution of rocky exoplanets is critical to their habitability. We focus on the thermal-orbital evolution of Earth-mass planets around low-mass M stars whose radiative habitable zone overlaps with the "tidal zone," where tidal dissipation is expected to be a significant heat source in the interior. We develop a thermal-orbital evolution model calibrated to Earth that couples tidal dissipation, with a temperature-dependent Maxwell rheology, to orbital circularization and migration. We illustrate thermal-orbital steady states where surface heat flow is balanced by tidal dissipation and cooling can be stalled for billions of years until circularization occurs. Orbital energy dissipated as tidal heat in the interior drives both inward migration and circularization, with a circularization time that is inversely proportional to the dissipation rate. We identify a peak in the internal dissipation rate as the mantle passes through a viscoelastic state at mantle temperatures near 1800 K. Planets orbiting a 0.1 solar-mass star within 0.07 AU circularize before 10 Gyr, independent of initial eccentricity. Once circular, these planets cool monotonically and maintain dynamos similar to that of Earth. Planets forced into eccentric orbits can experience a super-cooling of the core and rapid core solidification, inhibiting dynamo action for planets in the habitable zone. We find that tidal heating is insignificant in the habitable zone around 0.45 (or larger) solar-mass stars because tidal dissipation is a stronger function of orbital distance than stellar mass, and the habitable zone is farther from larger stars. Suppression of the planetary magnetic field exposes the atmosphere to stellar wind erosion and the surface to harmful radiation. In addition to weak magnetic fields, massive melt eruption rates and prolonged magma oceans may render eccentric planets in the habitable zone of low-mass stars inhospitable for life.

  8. Transmission line analysis of beam deflection in a BPM stripline kicker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caporaso, G.J.; Chen, Yu Ju; Poole, B.

    1997-05-01

    In the usual treatment of impedances of beamline structures the electromagnetic response is computed under the assumption that the source charge trajectory is parallel to the propagation axis and is unaffected by the wake of the structure. For high energy beams of relatively low current this is generally a valid assumption. Under certain conditions the assumption of a parallel source charge trajectory is no longer valid and the effects of the changing trajectory must be included in the analysis. Here the usual transmission line analysis that has been applied to BPM type transverse kickers is extended to include the self-consistent motion of the beam in the structure

  9. The Low-Level Control System for the CERN PS Multi-Turn Extraction Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Schipper, J; Boucly, C; Carlier, E; Fowler, T; Gaudillet, H; Noulibos, R; Sermeus, L

    2010-01-01

    To reduce the beam losses when preparing high intensity proton beam for the CERN Neutrino to Gran Sasso (CNGS) facility, a new Multi-Turn extraction (MTE) scheme has been implemented in the PS, to replace the present Continuous Transfer (CT) to the SPS. Industrial off-the-shelf components have been used for the low-level part of the MTE kicker control system. National Instruments PXI systems are used to control the high voltage pulse generators and a SIEMENS programmable logic controller (PLC) handles the centralised oil cooling and gas insulation sub-systems

  10. Nanosecond high-voltage generators for supplying the kickers of charged particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchuganov, V.N.; Matveev, Yu.G.; Shvedov, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    The high-voltage nanosecond generators (VNG) of rectangular pulses, developed for supplying the injection and extraction kickers of the accelerator-storage complexes are considered in this work. The pulse hydrogen thyratrons and gas-filled discharges are used as commutators in those generators. If necessary, the VNG pulses fronts may be shortened up to 2-3 ns in the coaxial lines, filled with ferrite rings. The mechanism of the pulse fronts shortening was considered earlier. The basis parameters of the VNG various types are presented [ru

  11. Gas gap heat switch for a cryogen-free magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, J; De Sousa, P Borges; Martins, D; Bonfait, G; Catarino, I; Kar, S

    2015-01-01

    Cryogen-free superconducting magnet systems (CFMS) have become popular over the last two decades for the simple reason that the use of liquid helium is rather cumbersome and that helium is a scarce resource. Some available CFMS use a mechanical cryocooler as the magnet's cold source. However, the variable temperature insert (VTI) for some existing CFMS are not strictly cryogen-free as they are still based on helium gas circulation through the sample space. We designed a prototype of a gas gap heat switch (GGHS) that allows a thermal management of a completely cryogen-free magnet system, with no helium losses. The idea relies on a parallel cooling path to a variable temperature insert (VTI) of a magnetic properties measurement system under development at Inter-University Accelerator Centre. A Gifford-McMahon cryocooler (1.5 W @ 4.2 K) would serve primarily as the cold source of the superconducting magnet, dedicating 1 W to this cooling, under quite conservative safety factors. The remaining cooling power (0.5 W) is to be diverted towards a VTI through a controlled GGHS that was designed and built with a 80 μm gap width. The built GGHS thermal performance was measured at 4 K, using helium as the exchange gas, and its conductance is compared both with a previously developed analytical model and a finite element method. Lessons learned lead to a new and more functional prototype yet to be reported. (paper)

  12. Thermal modeling of head disk interface system in heat assisted magnetic recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vemuri, Sesha Hari; Seung Chung, Pil; Jhon, Myung S., E-mail: mj3a@andrew.cmu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Min Kim, Hyung [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Kyonggi University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-07

    A thorough understanding of the temperature profiles introduced by the heat assisted magnetic recording is required to maintain the hotspot at the desired location on the disk with minimal heat damage to other components. Here, we implement a transient mesoscale modeling methodology termed lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for phonons (which are primary carriers of energy) in the thermal modeling of the head disk interface (HDI) components, namely, carbon overcoat (COC). The LBM can provide more accurate results compared to conventional Fourier methodology by capturing the nanoscale phenomena due to ballistic heat transfer. We examine the in-plane and out-of-plane heat transfer in the COC via analyzing the temperature profiles with a continuously focused and pulsed laser beam on a moving disk. Larger in-plane hotspot widening is observed in continuously focused laser beam compared to a pulsed laser. A pulsed laser surface develops steeper temperature gradients compared to continuous hotspot. Furthermore, out-of-plane heat transfer from the COC to the media is enhanced with a continuous laser beam then a pulsed laser, while the temperature takes around 140 fs to reach the bottom surface of the COC. Our study can lead to a realistic thermal model describing novel HDI material design criteria for the next generation of hard disk drives with ultra high recording densities.

  13. Effect of heat sink layer on ultrafast magnetization recovery of FeCo films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Y; Zhao, J Q; Zhang, Z Z; Jin, Q Y; Hu, H N; Zhou, S M

    2008-01-01

    For FeCo alloy thin films with Ag, Cu, Pt, Ta and Cr as heat sink layers, ultrafast demagnetization and recovery processes of transient magnetization have been studied by the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect. For all samples, the ultrafast demagnetization process is accomplished within almost the same time interval of 500 fs, which is independent of the heat sink layer material and the pump fluence. The recovery rate of the FeCo film grown on the Si(1 0 0) substrate is enhanced with a heat sink layer. In addition, the recovery rate is found to be independent of the heat sink layer thickness; it decreases with increasing pump fluence. Among all heat sink layers, the sample with the Cr layer achieves the highest recovery rate because it has the same bcc structure as that of the FeCo layer and the small lattice mismatch. The sample with the Ta layer, has the largest damage threshold of pump fluence because of the highest melting point

  14. Electron heating, magnetic field amplification, and cosmic-ray precursor length at supernova remnant shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laming, J. Martin [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7684, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Hwang, Una [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Ghavamian, Parviz [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences, Towson University, Towson, MD 21252 (United States); Rakowski, Cara, E-mail: laming@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: Una.Hwang-1@nasa.gov, E-mail: pghavamian@towson.edu

    2014-07-20

    We investigate the observability, by direct and indirect means, of a shock precursor arising from magnetic field amplification by cosmic rays. We estimate the depth of such a precursor under conditions of nonresonant amplification, which can provide magnetic field strengths comparable to those inferred for supernova remnants. Magnetic field generation occurs as the streaming cosmic rays induce a plasma return current, and it may be quenched by either nonresonant or resonant channels. In the case of nonresonant saturation, the cosmic rays become magnetized and amplification saturates at higher magnetic fields. The precursor can extend out to 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} cm and is potentially detectable. If resonant saturation occurs, the cosmic rays are scattered by turbulence and the precursor length will likely be much smaller. The dependence of precursor length on shock velocity has implications for electron heating. In the case of resonant saturation, this dependence is similar to that in the more familiar resonantly generated shock precursor, which when expressed in terms of the cosmic-ray diffusion coefficient kappav and shock velocity v{sub s} is kappav/v{sub s} . In the nonresonantly saturated case, the precursor length declines less quickly with increasing v{sub s} . Where precursor length proportional to 1/v{sub s} gives constant electron heating, this increased precursor length could be expected to lead to higher electron temperatures for nonresonant amplification. This should be expected at faster supernova remnant shocks than studied by previous works. Existing results and new data analysis of SN 1006 and Cas A suggest some observational support for this idea.

  15. Numerical analysis of magnetic field effects on hydro-thermal behavior of a magnetic nanofluid in a double pipe heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakiba, Ali, E-mail: Shakiba7858@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mazandaran Institute of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vahedi, Khodadad, E-mail: Khvahedi@ihu.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    This study attempts to numerically investigate the hydro-thermal characteristics of a ferrofluid (water and 4 vol% Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) in a counter-current horizontal double pipe heat exchanger, which is exposed to a non-uniform transverse magnetic field with different intensities. The magnetic field is generated by an electric current going through a wire located parallel to the inner tube and between two pipes. The single phase model and the control volume technique have been used to study the flow. The effects of magnetic field have been added to momentum equation by applying C++ codes in Ansys Fluent 14. The results show that applying this kind of magnetic field causes kelvin force to be produced perpendicular to the ferrofluid flow, changing axial velocity profile and creating a pair of vortices which leads to an increase in Nusselt number, friction factor and pressure drop. Comparing the enhancement percentage of Nusselt number, friction factor and pressure drop demonstrates that the optimum value of magnetic number for Re{sub ff}=50 is between Mn=1.33×10{sup 6} and Mn=2.37×10{sup 6}. So applying non-uniform transverse magnetic field can control the flow of ferrofluid and improve heat transfer process of double pipe heat exchanger. - Highlights: • Effect of applying non-uniform transverse magnetic field on a ferrofluid for enhancing the cooling process in a double pipe heat exchanger is investigated. • Heat exchanger is exposed to a non-uniform transverse magnetic field with different intensities. • The magnetic field is generated by an electric current going through a wire located parallel to inner tube and between two pipes. • Applying this field produces kelvin force to change axial velocity profile and creating a pair of vortices increasing Nusselt number, friction factor and pressure drop.

  16. Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, and low temperature heat capacity of α-Na2NpO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Anna L; Hen, Amir; Magnani, Nicola; Colineau, Eric; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Raison, Philippe E; Caciuffo, Roberto; Konings, Rudy J M; Sanchez, Jean-Pierre; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2016-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties at low temperatures of hexavalent disodium neptunate α-Na 2 NpO 4 are investigated for the first time in this work using Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements. The Np(VI) valence state is confirmed by the isomer shift value of the Mössbauer spectra, and the local structural environment around the neptunium cation is related to the fitted quadrupole coupling constant and asymmetry parameters. Moreover, magnetic hyperfine splitting is reported below 12.5 K, which could indicate magnetic ordering at this temperature. This interpretation is further substantiated by the existence of a λ-peak at 12.5 K in the heat capacity curve, which is shifted to lower temperatures with the application of a magnetic field, suggesting antiferromagnetic ordering. However, the absence of any anomaly in the magnetization and magnetic susceptibility data shows that the observed transition is more intricate. In addition, the heat capacity measurements suggest the existence of a Schottky-type anomaly above 15 K associated with a low-lying electronic doublet found about 60 cm −1 above the ground state doublet. The possibility of a quadrupolar transition associated with a ground state pseudoquartet is thereafter discussed. The present results finally bring new insights into the complex magnetic and electronic peculiarities of α-Na 2 NpO 4 . (paper)

  17. Evaluation of the transfer of heat from the coil of the LHC dipole magnet to Helium II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, D.; Sevred, A.; Fleiter, J.; Baudouy, B.; Devred, A.

    2007-01-01

    During operation of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, heat will be generated inside the coils of its superconducting magnets as a consequence of ramping of magnetic field, and of the interaction of lost beam particles with the magnet mass. Heat has to be transferred from the conductor into the He II coolant and removed from the magnet environment. During the LHC R and D stage, this transfer has been extensively studied on simulated coil segments at CEA/Saclay, and by analyzing dynamic behavior of short model magnets at CERN. Owing to the importance of efficient cooling for the design of future superconducting accelerator magnets, study of heat transfer has been restored at CERN and in frame of the Next European Dipole Collaboration. The article features two recently performed works: 1) Attempt to analyse archived high ramp rate quench data of 1-m-long LHC model dipole magnets of the 2. generation. 2) Development of a method for direct measurement of heat transfer on segments of production LHC dipole magnet coils. (authors)

  18. Long-time tails of the heat-conductivity time correlation functions for a magnetized plasma - a kinetic theory approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoolderman, A.J.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1989-01-01

    The long-time behaviour of the longitudinal and the transverse heat conductivity time correlation functions for a magnetized one-component plasma is studied by means of kinetic theory. To that end these correlation functions, which are defined as the inverse Laplace transforms of the dynamic heat

  19. Expression of Heat Shock Proteins in Human Fibroblast Cells under Magnetic Resonant Coupling Wireless Power Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Mizuno

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007, resonant coupling wireless power transfer (WPT technology has been attracting attention and has been widely researched for practical use. Moreover, dosimetric evaluation has also been discussed to evaluate the potential health risks of the electromagnetic field from this WPT technology based on the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP guidelines. However, there has not been much experimental evaluation of the potential health risks of this WPT technology. In this study, to evaluate whether magnetic resonant coupling WPT induces cellular stress, we focused on heat shock proteins (Hsps and determined the expression level of Hsps 27, 70 and 90 in WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells using a western blotting method. The expression level of Hsps under conditions of magnetic resonant coupling WPT for 24 h was not significantly different compared with control cells, although the expression level of Hsps for cells exposed to heat stress conditions was significantly increased. These results suggested that exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT did not cause detectable cell stress.

  20. Compressional heating in magnetized disks neighborhood: from the galactic center to micro-quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belmont, Renaud

    2005-01-01

    Faint, magnetized and energetic plasmas are very common media in Astrophysics. This thesis is dedicated to two specific cases characterized by a thin disk geometry: the Galactic center and the corona of micro-quasars. In both cases, observations show evidence for a faint and very hot plasma (at 100 million and 1 billion degrees) whose origin is unknown; some clues seem also to indicate a strong, large scale bipolar magnetic field. At the Galactic Center, the gas temperature is such that, if it were collisional and mostly composed by hydrogen, it would escape quickly, so that the power required to sustain the related energy losses would be huge. We however show that the specific conditions of this region can lead to form a helium plasma that is confined by the Galactic potential. In this favorable situation, we study a possible heating mechanism based on the high viscosity of the hot plasma and friction with cold molecular clouds flowing in this region. The corona of micro-quasars is a very similar issue but it is probably weakly collisional. In this regime we study a heating by magnetic pumping, by which the resonance between the periodic motion of some coronal ions and the periodic excitation by an instability in the disc itself can energize the corona. We show that this mechanism is inefficient to explain the hot temperature. (author) [fr

  1. Precise determination of the heat delivery during in vivo magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia with infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Harley F.; Capistrano, Gustavo; Mello, Francyelli M.; Zufelato, Nicholas; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela; Bakuzis, Andris F.

    2017-05-01

    Non-invasive and real-time monitoring of the heat delivery during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (MNH) is of fundamental importance to predict clinical outcomes for cancer treatment. Infrared thermography (IRT) can determine the surface temperature due to three-dimensional heat delivery inside a subcutaneous tumor, an argument that is supported by numerical simulations. However, for precise temperature determination, it is of crucial relevance to use a correct experimental configuration. This work reports an MNH study using a sarcoma 180 murine tumor containing 3.9 mg of intratumorally injected manganese-ferrite nanoparticles. MNH was performed at low field amplitude and non-uniform field configuration. Five 30 min in vivo magnetic hyperthermia experiments were performed, monitoring the surface temperature with a fiber optical sensor and thermal camera at distinct angles with respect to the animal’s surface. The results indicate that temperature errors as large as 7~\\circ C can occur if the experiment is not properly designed. A new IRT error model is found to explain the data. More importantly, we show how to precisely monitor temperature with IRT during hyperthermia, which could positively impact heat dosimetry and clinical planning.

  2. The role of electron heat flux in guide-field magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Masha; Birn, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    A combination of analytical theory and particle-in-cell simulations are employed in order to investigate the electron dynamics near and at the site of guide field magnetic reconnection. A detailed analysis of the contributions to the reconnection electric field shows that both bulk inertia and pressure-based quasiviscous processes are important for the electrons. Analytic scaling demonstrates that conventional approximations for the electron pressure tensor behavior in the dissipation region fail, and that heat flux contributions need to be accounted for. Based on the evolution equation of the heat flux three tensor, which is derived in this paper, an approximate form of the relevant heat flux contributions to the pressure tensor is developed, which reproduces the numerical modeling result reasonably well. Based on this approximation, it is possible to develop a scaling of the electron current layer in the central dissipation region. It is shown that the pressure tensor contributions become important at the scale length defined by the electron Larmor radius in the guide magnetic field

  3. Laser surface modification of medical grade alloys for reduced heating in a magnetic resonance imaging environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benafan, O., E-mail: othmane.benafan@nasa.gov, E-mail: raj@ucf.edu; Vaidyanathan, R., E-mail: othmane.benafan@nasa.gov, E-mail: raj@ucf.edu [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center (AMPAC), Materials Science and Engineering, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Chen, S.-Y.; Kar, A. [Laser-Advanced Materials Processing Laboratory, Center for Research and Education in Optics and Lasers (CREOL), College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Nanoscale surface modification of medical grade metallic alloys was conducted using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser-based dopant diffusion technique. The objective of this approach was to minimize the induction heating by reducing the absorbed radio frequency field. Such an approach is advantageous in that the dopant is diffused into the alloy and is not susceptible to detachment or spallation as would an externally applied coating, and is expected to not deteriorate the mechanical and electrical properties of the base alloy or device. Experiments were conducted using a controlled environment laser system with the ability to control laser properties (i.e., laser power, spot size, and irradiation time) and dopant characteristics (i.e., temperature, concentration, and pressure). The reflective and transmissive properties of both the doped and untreated samples were measured in a radio frequency (63.86 MHz) magnetic field using a system comprising a high power signal generator, a localized magnetic field source and sensor, and a signal analyzer. The results indicate an increase in the reflectivity of the laser-treated samples compared to untreated samples. The effect of reflectivity on the heating of the alloys is investigated through a mathematical model incorporating Maxwell’s equations and heat conduction.

  4. Initial measurements on a prototype inductive adder for the CLIC kicker systems

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, Janne

    2013-01-01

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings will produce, through synchrotron radiation, ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the damping ring kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the DRs are particularly demanding: the flattops of the pulses must be ±12.5 kV with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 % (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. To achieve ultra-flat pulses with a fast rise time the output impedance of the inductive adder needs to be well matched to the system impedance. The parasitic circuit elements of the inductive adder have a significant effect upon the output impedance and these values are very difficult to calculate accurately analytically. To predict these paramet...

  5. Measurements on Prototype Inductive Adders with Ultra-Flat-Top Output Pulses for CLIC DR Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J; Belver-Aguilar, C

    2014-01-01

    The CLIC study is investigating the technical feasibility of an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings (DRs) will produce ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the DR kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the DR extraction kickers call for a 160 ns duration flat-top pulses of ±12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 % (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications because this topology allows the use of both passive and analogue modulation methods to adjust the output waveform. Recently, two five-layer, 3.5 kV, prototype inductive adders have been built at CERN. The first of these has been used to test the passive and active analogue modulation methods to compensate voltage droop and ripple of the output pulses. Pulse waveforms have been reco...

  6. The Prototype Inductive Adder With Droop Compensation for the CLIC Kicker Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC predamping rings and damping rings (DRs) will produce, through synchrotron radiation, an ultralow emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the DR kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the extraction kickers of the DRs are particularly demanding: the flattops of the pulses must be ±12.5 kV with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02% (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications. Recently, a five-layer prototype has been built at CERN. Passive analog modulation has been applied to compensate the voltage droop, for example of the pulse capacitors. The output waveforms of the prototype inductive adder have been compared with predictions of the voltage droop and pulse shape. Conclusions are drawn concern...

  7. Heat kernel expansion for fermionic billiards in an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoine, M.; Comtet, A.; Knecht, M.

    1989-05-01

    Using Seeley's heat kernel expansion, we compute the asymptotic density of states of the Dirac operator coupled to a magnetic field on a two dimensional manifold with boundary (fermionic billiard). Local boundary conditions compatible with vector current conservation depend on a free parameter α. It is shown that the perimeter correction identically vanishes for α = 0. In that case, the next order constant term is found to be proportional to the Euler characteristic of the manifold. These results are independent of the external magnetic field and of the shape of the billiard, provided the boundary is sufficiently smooth. For the flat circular billiard, the constant term is found to be - 1/12, in agreement with a numerical result by M.V. BERRY and R.J. MONDRAGON (1987)

  8. Heat Treatment of Iron-Carbon Alloys in a Magnetic Field (Phase 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Thermomagnetic processing was shown to shift the phase transformation temperatures and therefore microstructural evolution in the high performance engine valve spring 9254 steel alloy by applying a high magnetic field during cooling. These effects would be anticipated to improve performance such as high cycle fatigue as demonstrated in prior projects. Thermomagnetic processing of gears and crank shafts was constrained by the size of the prototype equipment currently available at ORNL. However, the commercial procurement viability of production scale 9-Tesla, 16-inch diameter bore thermomagnetic processing equipment for truck idler gears up to ~11-inch diameter and potential crank shaft applications was shown, as multiple superconducting magnet manufacturing companies (in conjunction with an induction heat treating company, AjaxTOCCO Magnethermic) offered cryogen-free or cryocooler equipment designs to Cummins.

  9. Magnetic field profiles during turbulent heating in a toroidal hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalfsbeek, H.W.

    1978-12-01

    A description is given of the measurements of both poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components as functions of radius and time in a small turbulently heated tokamak. These measurements have been carried out with an array of miniature pick-up coils, enclosed in a quartz tube which is inserted into the plasma. The electric fields inside the plasma, as well as the parallel resistivity profiles are deduced from the measured magnetic fields. The ohmically dissipated energy is determined from the field distributions and compared with the total input energy. The experimental results are compared with the outcome of a numerical model. The consistency with information obtained from other diagnostic measurements is checked. (Auth.)

  10. Magnetic properties of doped Mn-Ga alloys made by mechanical milling and heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Daniel R. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304 (United States); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Han, Ke; Niu, Rongmei [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Siegrist, Theo; Besara, Tiglet [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University-Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32304 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Mn-Ga alloys have shown hard magnetic properties, even though these alloys contain no rare-earth metals. However, much work is needed before rare-earth magnets can be replaced. We have examined the magnetic properties of bulk alloys made with partial replacement of both the Mn and Ga elements in the Mn{sub 0.8}Ga{sub 0.2} system. Bulk samples of Mn-Ga-Bi, Mn-Ga-Al, Mn-Fe-Ga and Mn-(FeB)-Ga alloys were fabricated and studied using mechanically milling and heat treatments while altering the atomic percentage of the third element between 2.5 and 20 at%. The ternary alloy exhibits all hard magnetic properties at room temperature with large coercivity. Annealed Mn-Ga-X bulk composites exhibit high coercivities up to 16.6 kOe and remanence up to 9.8 emu/g, that is increased by 115% over the binary system.

  11. Magnetic properties of doped Mn-Ga alloys made by mechanical milling and heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Brown

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mn-Ga alloys have shown hard magnetic properties, even though these alloys contain no rare-earth metals. However, much work is needed before rare-earth magnets can be replaced. We have examined the magnetic properties of bulk alloys made with partial replacement of both the Mn and Ga elements in the Mn0.8Ga0.2 system. Bulk samples of Mn-Ga-Bi, Mn-Ga-Al, Mn-Fe-Ga and Mn-(FeB-Ga alloys were fabricated and studied using mechanically milling and heat treatments while altering the atomic percentage of the third element between 2.5 and 20 at%. The ternary alloy exhibits all hard magnetic properties at room temperature with large coercivity. Annealed Mn-Ga-X bulk composites exhibit high coercivities up to 16.6 kOe and remanence up to 9.8 emu/g, that is increased by 115% over the binary system.

  12. Structure of intermediate shocks and slow shocks in a magnetized plasma with heat conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.L.; Wu, B.H.; Lee, L.C.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of slow shocks and intermediate shocks in the presence of a heat conduction parallel to the local magnetic field is simulated from the set of magnetohydrodynamic equations. This study is an extension of an earlier work [C. L. Tsai, R. H. Tsai, B. H. Wu, and L. C. Lee, Phys. Plasmas 9, 1185 (2002)], in which the effects of heat conduction are examined for the case that the tangential magnetic fields on the two side of initial current sheet are exactly antiparallel (B y =0). For the B y =0 case, a pair of slow shocks is formed as the result of evolution of the initial current sheet, and each slow shock consists of two parts: the isothermal main shock and the foreshock. In the present paper, cases with B y ≠0 are also considered, in which the evolution process leads to the presence of an additional pair of time-dependent intermediate shocks (TDISs). Across the main shock of the slow shock, jumps in plasma density, velocity, and magnetic field are significant, but the temperature is continuous. The plasma density downstream of the main shock decreases with time, while the downstream temperature increases with time, keeping the downstream pressure constant. The foreshock is featured by a smooth temperature variation and is formed due to the heat flow from downstream to upstream region. In contrast to the earlier study, the foreshock is found to reach a steady state with a constant width in the slow shock frame. In cases with B y ≠0, the plasma density and pressure increase and the magnetic field decreases across TDIS. The TDIS initially can be embedded in the slow shock's foreshock structure, and then moves out of the foreshock region. With an increasing B y , the propagation speed of foreshock leading edge tends to decrease and the foreshock reaches its steady state at an earlier time. Both the pressure and temperature downstreams of the main shock decrease with increasing B y . The results can be applied to the shock heating in the solar corona and

  13. Theory of free-electron-laser heating and current drive in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Nevins, W.M.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    The introduction of a powerful new microwave source, the free-electron laser, provides new opportunities for novel heating and current-drive schemes to be used in toroidal fusion devices. This high-power, pulsed source has a number of technical advantages for these applications, and its use is predicted to lead to improved current-drive efficiencies and opacities in reactor-grade fusion plasmas in specific cases. The Microwave Tokamak Experiment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will provide a test for some of these new heating and current-drive schemes. Although the motivation for much of this research has derived from the application of a free-electron laser to the heating of a tokamak plasma at a frequency near the electron cyclotron frequency, the underlying physics, i.e., the highly nonlinear interaction of an intense, pulsed, coherent electromagnetic wave with an electron in a magnetized plasma including relativistic effects, is of general interest. Other relevant applications include ionospheric modification by radio-frequency waves, high-energy electron accelerators, and the propagation of intense, pulsed electromagnetic waves in space and astrophysical plasmas. This review reports recent theoretical progress in the analysis and computer simulation of the absorption and current drive produced by intense pulses, and of the possible complications that may arise, e.g., parametric instabilities, nonlinear self-focusing, trapped-particle sideband instability, and instabilities of the heated plasma

  14. Effect of microwave irradiation on selective heating behavior and magnetic separation characteristics of Panzhihua ilmenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Wei; Chen, Jin; Chang, Xiaodong; Guo, Shenghui; Srinivasakannan, C.; Chen, Guo; Peng, Jinhui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Microwave irradiation can be applied effectively and efficiently to the irradiation processes of Panzhihua ilmenite. • The mineral processing properties of microwave treated ilmenite were generally as good as or better than that of initial ilmenite. • The microwave selective heating characteristics of the different minerals and compounds, and the thermal stresses were caused by the uniform heat rate disturbed under microwave irradiation. - Abstract: The influences of microwave irradiation on the surface characteristics of Panzhihua ilmenite were systematically investigated. The crystal structures, surface morphology and surface chemical functional groups of ilmenite were characterized before and after microwave irradiation and magnetic separation for different microwave treatment times by using various methods, such as XRD, SEM, and FT-IR, respectively. XRD analysis showed that the microwave treated ilmenite has the strongest peaks of phase more than that of raw samples, indicates that the crystalline compound of ilmenite increased with the microwave irradiation time. SEM analysis showed the micro-cracking appeared at many grain boundaries of ilmenite after being pretreated by microwave treatment. The separations of ilmenite from gangue minerals were completed and the micro-fissure within ilmenite minerals were also formed, which could be attributed to the microwave selective heating characteristics of the different minerals and compounds, and the thermal stresses were caused by the uniform heat rate disturbed under microwave irradiation. The mineral processing results showed that the magnetic separation characteristics and properties of microwave treated ilmenite samples were better than that of microwave untreated ilmenite samples. It was concluded that microwave irradiation can be applied effectively and efficiently to the irradiation processes of Panzhihua ilmenite

  15. The Effect of Heat Treatment on the Crystallography and Mineral Magnetism of Pyrrhotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobart, K.; Feinberg, J. M.; Jones, D. S.

    2017-12-01

    Pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.125) is the second most common sulfide mineral after pyrite in the Earth's crust, and its properties are of interest to a wide variety of scientific disciplines, including electrical engineering, physical chemistry, planetary geology and meteoritics, and economic geology. The physical properties of pyrrhotite are highly dependent on slight variations in composition and the ordering of iron vacancies, resulting in a number of possible phases between the endmember compositions of FeS and Fe7S8­­. A common complication in studies on pyrrhotite is that different phases are frequently intergrown, making it difficult to isolate a natural single phase. This has led many researchers to rely on synthesis techniques, which produce a specific structure by using precise iron/sulfur ratios, heating protocols, and controlled cooling. One of the most common synthesis treatments used to create 4C pyrrhotite is an extended heating and annealing process, which is believed to allow the reordering of vacancies to a more thermodynamically stable, ordered state with elevated saturation magnetization. The process was first studied in detail by Schwarz and Vaughan (1972) who produced synthetic pyrrhotite at varying Fe/S ratios with annealing at either 700, 300, or 144°C. The most common method for producing 4C pyrrhotite is heating at 500°C for 24 hours under a vacuum followed by annealing at 250°C for 50 hours. While this technique has been broadly applied in diverse disciplines, there is debate about whether it produces ferrimagnetic, monoclinic 4C pyrrhotite or a different metastable disordered phase. We examined this process using a combination of rock magnetic, X-ray diffraction, and electron imaging techniques to study the effect of heating and annealing on a natural sample of pyrrhotite. Due to the lack of a Besnus transition in the annealed material, our data suggest that the increased magnetization we found following annealing, rather than

  16. submitter Measurements on a 20-layer 12.5 kV prototype inductive adder for the CLIC DR kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J

    2018-01-01

    The CLIC study is investigating the technical feasibility of an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The predamping rings and damping rings (DRs) will produce ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the DR kicker systems must provide extremely stable field pulses during injection and extraction of bunches. The DR extraction kicker system consists of a stripline kicker and two pulse modulators. The present specification for the modulators calls for pulses with 160 ns or 900 ns flat-top duration of nominally ±12.5 kV and 305 A, with ripple of not more than ±0.02% (±2.5 V). In addition, there is a proposal to use the same modulators and striplines for dumping the beam, with ±17.5 kV stripline pulse voltage. An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the CLIC DR extraction kicker specifications because analogue modulation methods can be applied to adjust the shape of the flat-top of the output w...

  17. High heat generation ability in AC magnetic field for nano-sized magnetic Y3Fe5O12 powder prepared by bead milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aono, Hiromichi; Ebara, Hiroki; Senba, Ryota; Naohara, Takashi; Maehara, Tsunehiro; Hirazawa, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Nano-sized magnetic Y 3 Fe 5 O 12 ferrite having a high heat generation ability in an AC magnetic field was prepared by bead milling. A commercial powder sample (non-milled sample) of ca. 2.9 μm in particle size did not show any temperature enhancement in the AC magnetic field. The heat generation ability in the AC magnetic field improved with a decrease in the average crystallite size for the bead-milled Y 3 Fe 5 O 12 ferrites. The highest heat ability in the AC magnetic field was for the fine Y 3 Fe 5 O 12 powder with a 15-nm crystallite size (the samples were milled for 4 h using 0.1 mmφ beads). The heat generation ability of the excessively milled Y 3 Fe 5 O 12 samples decreased. The main reason for the high heat generation property of the milled samples was ascribed to an increase in the Néel relaxation of the superparamagnetic material. The heat generation ability was not influenced by the concentration of the ferrite powder. For the samples milled for 4 h using 0.1 mmφ beads, the heat generation ability (W g −1 ) was estimated using a 3.58×10 −4 fH 2 frequency (f/kHz) and the magnetic field (H/kA m −1 ), which is the highest reported value of superparamagnetic materials. - Highlights: ► The nano-sized Y 3 Fe 5 O 12 powder prepared by bead-milling has the highest heat generation ability in an AC magnetic field. ► The heat generation properties are ascribed to an increase in the Néel relaxation of the superparamagnetic material. ► The heat ability (W g −1 ) can be estimated using 3.58×10 −4 fH 2 (f=kHz, H=kA m −1 ). ► This is an expectable material for use in a drug delivery system for the thermal coagulation therapy of cancer tumors.

  18. Helium flow dynamics and heat transfer in a cable in conduit conductor of superconducting magnets: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaghela, Hitensinh; Sarkar, Biswanath; Lakhera, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting (SC) magnets with Cable in Conduit Conductor (CICC) winding, cooled by helium at 4 K temperature are employed for many applications which require high magnetic field and high current densities. The construction of CICC aims to maintain superconductivity state by optimization of various parameters, i.e., thermal stability, ratio of normal conductor to superconductor material, mechanical strength, low hydraulic impedance, current density, magnetic field, etc. The cryogenic thermal stability of the CICC is of prime importance for the safe, stable and reliable operation of SC magnets. The prediction of thermal and hydraulic behaviour of CICC in large SC magnets is difficult due to the complex geometry, variation of fluid properties, various heat in-flux incidences over the long length of CICC and a complex heat transport phenomenon. A systematic review of the thermal and hydraulic studies of CICC has been presented in the paper highlighting the challenges and opportunities for further improvement in its design and performance. (author)

  19. Time of isothermal holding in the course of in-air heat treatment of soft magnetic Fe-based amorphous alloys and their magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulkina, N. A.; Ivanov, O. A.; Pavlova, I. O.; Minina, O. A.

    2011-12-01

    On the example of soft magnetic Fe81B13Si4C2 and Fe77Ni1Si9B13 amorphous alloys, the relation between the level of magnetic properties and duration of isothermal holding in the course of heat treatment in air has been studied. The optimum temperature-dependent time τ of isothermal holding has been shown to be related to the volume fraction of domains ( V orth) with orthogonal magnetization in the initial (quenched) ribbon by equation V orth = ττ1/3. A temperature dependence of the proportionality coefficient α, which determines the degree of diffusion-process activity, has been determined. The results obtained allow us to substantially simplify the choice of optimum conditions of atmospheric heat treatment of soft magnetic Fe-based amorphous ribbons.

  20. Ultrafast harmonic rf kicker design and beam dynamics analysis for an energy recovery linac based electron circulator cooler ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulu Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An ultrafast kicker system is being developed for the energy recovery linac (ERL based electron circulator cooler ring (CCR in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC, previously named MEIC. In the CCR, the injected electron bunches can be recirculated while performing ion cooling for 10–30 turns before the extraction, thus reducing the recirculation beam current in the ERL to 1/10−1/30 (150  mA-50  mA of the cooling beam current (up to 1.5 A. Assuming a bunch repetition rate of 476.3 MHz and a recirculating factor of 10 in the CCR, the kicker is required to operate at a pulse repetition rate of 47.63 MHz with pulse width of around 2 ns, so that only every 10th bunch in the CCR will experience a transverse kick while the rest of the bunches will not be disturbed. Such a kicker pulse can be synthesized by ten harmonic modes of the 47.63 MHz kicker pulse repetition frequency, using up to four quarter wavelength resonator (QWR based deflecting cavities. In this paper, several methods to synthesize such a kicker waveform will be discussed and a comparison of their beam dynamics performance is made using ELEGANT. Four QWR cavities are envisaged with high transverse shunt impedance requiring less than 100 W of total rf power for a Flat-Top kick pulse. Multipole fields due to the asymmetry of this type of cavity are analyzed. The transverse emittance growth due to the sextupole component is simulated in ELEGANT. Off-axis injection and extraction issues and beam optics using a multicavity kick-drift scheme will also be discussed.

  1. Rapid further heating of tokamak plasma by fast-rising magnetic pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, N.; Nihei, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Ichimura, M.; Morikawa, J.; Hoshino, K.; Uchida, T.

    1977-01-01

    The object of the experiment was to study the rapid further heating of a tokamak plasma and its influence on confinement. For this purpose, a high-voltage theta-pinch pulse was applied to a tokamak plasma and production of a high-temperature (keV) plasma was ensured within a microsecond. The magnetic pulse is applied at the plasma current maximum parallel or antiparallel to the study toroidal field. In either case, the pulsed field quickly penetrates the plasma and the plasma resistivity estimated from the penetration time is about 100 times larger than the classical. A burst of energetic neutrals of approximately 1 μs duration was observed and the energy distribution had two components of the order of 1 keV and 0.1 keV in the antiparallel case. Doppler broadening measurement shows heating of ions to a temperature higher than 200 eV; however, the line profile is not always Maxwellian distribution. The X-rays disappear at the moment of applying the magnetic pulse and reappear about 100 μs later with an intensive burst, while both energy levels are the same (approximately 100 keV). (author)

  2. Thermal effects on transducer material for heat assisted magnetic recording application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Rong, E-mail: Ji-Rong@dsi.a-star.edu.sg; Xu, Baoxi; Cen, Zhanhong; Ying, Ji Feng; Toh, Yeow Teck [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117608 (Singapore)

    2015-05-07

    Heat Assisted Magnetic Recording (HAMR) is a promising technology for next generation hard disk drives with significantly increased data recording capacities. In HAMR, an optical near-field transducer (NFT) is used to concentrate laser energy on a magnetic recording medium to fulfill the heat assist function. The key components of a NFT are transducer material, cladding material, and adhesion material between the cladding and the transducer materials. Since transducer materials and cladding materials have been widely reported, this paper focuses on the adhesion materials between the Au transducer and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} cladding material. A comparative study for two kinds of adhesion material, Ta and Cr, has been conducted. We found that Ta provides better thermal stability to the whole transducer than Cr. This is because after thermal annealing, chromium forms oxide material at interfaces and chromium atoms diffuse remarkably into the Au layer and react with Au to form Au alloy. This study also provides insights on the selection of adhesion material for HAMR transducer.

  3. Heat Load Measurements on a Large Superconducting Magnet An Application of a Void Fraction Meter

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, R; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; ten Kate, H H J

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the two major experiments of the LHC project at CERN using cryogenics. The superconducting magnet system of ATLAS is composed of the Barrel Toroid (BT), two End Caps Toroids and the Central Solenoid. The BT is formed of 8 race-track superconducting dipoles, each one 25 m long and 5 m wide. A reduced scale prototype (named B0) of one of the 8 dipoles, about one third of the length, has been constructed and tested in a dedicated cryogenic facility at CERN. To simulate the final thermal and hydraulic operating conditions, the B0 was cooled by a forced flow of 4.5 K saturated liquid helium provided by a centrifugal pump of 80 g/s nominal capacity. Both static and dynamic heat loads, generated by the induced currents on the B0 casing during a slow dump or a ramp up, have been measured to verify the expected thermal budget of the entire BT. The instrument used for the heat load measurements was a Void Fraction Meter (VFM) installed on the magnet return line. The instrument constructed at CERN was ca...

  4. Application of optimal control theory to laser heating of a plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neal, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    Laser heating of a plasma column confined by a solenoidal magnetic field is studied via modern optimal control techniques. A two-temperature, constant pressure model is used for the plasma so that the temperature and density are functions of time and location along the plasma column. They are assumed to be uniform in the radial direction so that refraction of the laser beam does not occur. The laser intensity used as input to the column at one end is taken as the control variable and plasma losses are neglected. The localized behavior of the plasma heating dynamics is first studied and conventional optimal control theory applied. The distributed parameter optimal control problem is next considered with minimum time to reach a specified final ion temperature criterion as the objective. Since the laser intensity can only be directly controlled at the input end of the plasma column, a boundary control situation results. The problem is unique in that the control is the boundary value of one of the state variables. The necessary conditions are developed and the problem solved numerically for typical plasma parameters. The problem of maximizing the space-time integral of neutron production rate in the plasma is considered for a constant distributed control problem where the laser intensity is assumed fixed at maximum and the external magnetic field is taken as a control variable

  5. Uncertainties in the estimation of specific absorption rate during radiofrequency alternating magnetic field induced non-adiabatic heating of ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Ranoo, Surojit; Philip, John

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is becoming a viable cancer treatment methodology where the alternating magnetic field induced heating of magnetic fluid is utilized for ablating the cancerous cells or making them more susceptible to the conventional treatments. The heating efficiency in MFH is quantified in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR), which is defined as the heating power generated per unit mass. In majority of the experimental studies, SAR is evaluated from the temperature rise curves, obtained under non-adiabatic experimental conditions, which is prone to various thermodynamic uncertainties. A proper understanding of the experimental uncertainties and its remedies is a prerequisite for obtaining accurate and reproducible SAR. Here, we study the thermodynamic uncertainties associated with peripheral heating, delayed heating, heat loss from the sample and spatial variation in the temperature profile within the sample. Using first order approximations, an adiabatic reconstruction protocol for the measured temperature rise curves is developed for SAR estimation, which is found to be in good agreement with those obtained from the computationally intense slope corrected method. Our experimental findings clearly show that the peripheral and delayed heating are due to radiation heat transfer from the heating coils and slower response time of the sensor, respectively. Our results suggest that the peripheral heating is linearly proportional to the sample area to volume ratio and coil temperature. It is also observed that peripheral heating decreases in presence of a non-magnetic insulating shielding. The delayed heating is found to contribute up to ~25% uncertainties in SAR values. As the SAR values are very sensitive to the initial slope determination method, explicit mention of the range of linear regression analysis is appropriate to reproduce the results. The effect of sample volume to area ratio on linear heat loss rate is systematically studied and the

  6. Uncertainties in the estimation of specific absorption rate during radiofrequency alternating magnetic field induced non-adiabatic heating of ferrofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahiri, B B; Ranoo, Surojit; Philip, John

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is becoming a viable cancer treatment methodology where the alternating magnetic field induced heating of magnetic fluid is utilized for ablating the cancerous cells or making them more susceptible to the conventional treatments. The heating efficiency in MFH is quantified in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR), which is defined as the heating power generated per unit mass. In majority of the experimental studies, SAR is evaluated from the temperature rise curves, obtained under non-adiabatic experimental conditions, which is prone to various thermodynamic uncertainties. A proper understanding of the experimental uncertainties and its remedies is a prerequisite for obtaining accurate and reproducible SAR. Here, we study the thermodynamic uncertainties associated with peripheral heating, delayed heating, heat loss from the sample and spatial variation in the temperature profile within the sample. Using first order approximations, an adiabatic reconstruction protocol for the measured temperature rise curves is developed for SAR estimation, which is found to be in good agreement with those obtained from the computationally intense slope corrected method. Our experimental findings clearly show that the peripheral and delayed heating are due to radiation heat transfer from the heating coils and slower response time of the sensor, respectively. Our results suggest that the peripheral heating is linearly proportional to the sample area to volume ratio and coil temperature. It is also observed that peripheral heating decreases in presence of a non-magnetic insulating shielding. The delayed heating is found to contribute up to ∼25% uncertainties in SAR values. As the SAR values are very sensitive to the initial slope determination method, explicit mention of the range of linear regression analysis is appropriate to reproduce the results. The effect of sample volume to area ratio on linear heat loss rate is systematically studied and

  7. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in MagLIF-like plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2014-01-01

    The MagLIF approach to inertial confinement fusion involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a DT plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot plasma to the cold liner is dominated by the transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ω e τ e effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux are both shown to decrease with ω e τ e as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient, which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. This family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics

  8. Same magnetic nanoparticles, different heating behavior: Influence of the arrangement and dispersive medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreu, Irene [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Campus Río Ebro, María de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Natividad, Eva, E-mail: evanat@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Campus Río Ebro, María de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Solozábal, Laura [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Campus Río Ebro, María de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Roubeau, Olivier [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    The heating ability of the same magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) dispersed in different media has been studied in the 170–310 K temperature range. For this purpose, the biggest non-twinned nanoparticles have been selected among a series of magnetite nanoparticles of increasing sizes synthesized via a seeded growth method. The sample with nanoparticles dispersed in n-tetracosane, thermally quenched from 100 °C and solid in the whole measuring range, follows the linear response theoretical behavior for non-interacting nanoparticles, and displays a remarkably large maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) value comparable to that of magnetosomes at the alternating magnetic fields used in the measurements. The other samples, with nanoparticles dispersed either in alkane solvents of sub-ambient melting temperatures or in epoxy resin, display different thermal behaviors and maximum SAR values ranging between 11 and 65% of that achieved for the sample with n-tetracosane as dispersive medium. These results highlight the importance of the MNPs environment and arrangement to maintain optimal SAR values, and may help to understand the disparity sometimes found between MNPs heating performance measured in a ferrofluid and after injection in an animal model, where MNP arrangement and environment are not the same. - Highlights: • We synthetize a series of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles by the seeded-growth method. • We characterize the heating ability of 13.9 nm particles dispersed in several media. • We apply SAR(T) characterization to locate the onset of superparamagnetic behavior. • The highest SAR values are obtained in low-concentration solid-alkane dispersion. • Acquired arrangements in different media strongly modify SAR trends and values.

  9. Conventional magnets. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, N.

    1994-01-01

    This second paper covers the wide range of techniques associated with a.c. and pulsed magnets and associated power supplies. The necessary changes in magnet design to minimise eddy losses in low frequency magnets are first considered and this leads to a broader discussion of the different types of steel used in magnet yokes. Inductance is then considered and the traditional power supply circuit used for a.c. magnets is described. The paper then presents a simple description of the higher-frequency pulsed magnets and supply circuits used for injection and extraction and contrasts a number of different design concepts for both kicker and septum systems. In conclusion, the relevant properties of high-frequency magnetic materials are briefly reviewed. (orig.)

  10. Ion heating at the cyclotron resonance in plasmas magnetically confined in a toroidal octupole field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    Ion temperatures as high as 600 eV have been produced using rf wave heating at the ion cyclotron resonance frequency in a toroidal octupole magnetic field. Rf is coupled to the plasma with an externally driven ''fifth'' hoop which forms the inductive leg of an oscillator tank circuit. Power levels up to 1 MW at 1 to 3 MHz have been applied for periods up to 2 msec. Plasmas produced either by ECRH or by gun injection are simulated with a computer program in which known particle and energy production and loss mechanisms are used to predict the spatially averaged time behaviour of the plasma in the presence of the applied ion heating. The program can be used to calculate the consequences of the heating model in the presence of many cooling mechanisms which may each have a separate dependence on instantaneous plasma parameters. Experimental quantities compared to computer predictions include density, ion temperature, and loading of the hoop by the plasma, both resistive and reactive, and neutral reflux from the wall by electron and ion impact. Wave penetration to the resonance zone is good up to the highest densities available (6 x 10 12 cm -3 by gun injection) in good agreement with theory. Neutral reflux from the walls and the large charge exchange cooling which results is the dominant loss mechanism at the higher hoop voltages

  11. Magnetic power conversion with machines containing full or porous wheel heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egolf, Peter W.; Kitanovski, Andrej; Diebold, Marc; Gonin, Cyrill; Vuarnoz, Didier

    2009-04-01

    A first part of the article contains a thermodynamic theory describing the temperature distribution in a Curie wheel. The occurring nonlinear ordinary differential equation has an analytical solution. If a Curie wheel is stabilized by levitation, it is named Palmy wheel. These wheels show a full structure, and because of this reason, their uptake of heat from a flame (Curie wheel) or by (solar) light absorption (Palmy wheel) only on the periphery of a cylinder is very limited. To improve the method, a modification of the principle by introducing a convective heat transport into a porous wheel is discussed. By this the power conversion rate from a heat flux to mechanical and electric power is very much increased. The second part of the article presents results of a theoretical/numerical study on the efficiencies of magnetic power conversion plants operating with porous wheels. Furthermore, these efficiencies—which are promising—are compared with those of existing power conversion plants, as e.g. geothermal binary cycle power plants.

  12. Magnetic power conversion with machines containing full or porous wheel heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egolf, Peter W.; Kitanovski, Andrej; Diebold, Marc; Gonin, Cyrill; Vuarnoz, Didier

    2009-01-01

    A first part of the article contains a thermodynamic theory describing the temperature distribution in a Curie wheel. The occurring nonlinear ordinary differential equation has an analytical solution. If a Curie wheel is stabilized by levitation, it is named Palmy wheel. These wheels show a full structure, and because of this reason, their uptake of heat from a flame (Curie wheel) or by (solar) light absorption (Palmy wheel) only on the periphery of a cylinder is very limited. To improve the method, a modification of the principle by introducing a convective heat transport into a porous wheel is discussed. By this the power conversion rate from a heat flux to mechanical and electric power is very much increased. The second part of the article presents results of a theoretical/numerical study on the efficiencies of magnetic power conversion plants operating with porous wheels. Furthermore, these efficiencies-which are promising-are compared with those of existing power conversion plants, as e.g. geothermal binary cycle power plants

  13. Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields can impair spermatogenesis recovery after reversible testicular damage induced by heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Bruno Mendes; Ferreira Filho, Moisés Bonifacio Alves; Jimenez, George Chaves; de Morais, Rosana Nogueira; Peixoto, Christina Alves; Nogueira, Romildo de Albuquerque; da Silva Junior, Valdemiro Amaro

    2014-06-01

    Male infertility is often related to reproductive age couples experiencing fertility-related issues. Men may have fertility problems associated with reversible testicular damage. Considering that men have been increasingly exposed to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields generated by the production, distribution and use of electricity, this study analyzed whether 60 Hz and 1 mT magnetic field exposure may impair spermatogenesis recovery after reversible testicular damage induced by heat shock using rats as an experimental model. Adult male rats were subjected to a single testicular heat shock (HS, 43 °C for 12 min) and then exposed to the magnetic field for 15, 30 and 60 d after HS. Magnetic field exposure during the spermatogenesis recovery induced changes in testis components volume, cell ultrastructure and histomorphometrical parameters. Control animals had a reestablished and active spermatogenesis at 60 d after heat shock, while animals exposed to magnetic field still showed extensive testicular degeneration. Magnetic field exposure did not change the plasma testosterone. In conclusion, extremely low-frequency magnetic field may be harmful to fertility recovery in males affected by reversible testicular damage.

  14. Theranostic multimodal potential of magnetic nanoparticles actuated by non-heating low frequency magnetic field in the new-generation nanomedicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovin, Yuri I., E-mail: nano@tsutmb.ru; Klyachko, Natalia L.; Majouga, Alexander G. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Faculty (Russian Federation); Sokolsky, Marina [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy (United States); Kabanov, Alexander V. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Faculty (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The scope of this review involves one of the most promising branches of new-generation biomedicine, namely magnetic nanotheranostics using remote control of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (f-MNPs) by means of alternating magnetic fields (AMFs). The review is mainly focused on new approach which utilizes non-heating low frequency magnetic fields (LFMFs) for nanomechanical actuation of f-MNPs. This approach is compared to such traditional ones as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radio-frequency (RF) magnetic hyperthermia (MH) which utilize high frequency heating AMF. The innovative principles and specific models of non-thermal magnetomechanical actuation of biostructures by MNP rotational oscillations in LFMF are described. The discussed strategy allows biodistribution monitoring in situ, delivering drugs to target tissues and releasing them with controlled rate, controlling biocatalytic reaction kinetics, inducing malignant cell apoptosis, and more. Optimization of both LFMF and f-MNP parameters may lead to dramatic improvement of treatment efficiency, locality, and selectivity on molecular or cellular levels and allow implementing both drug and drugless, i.e., pure nanomechanical therapy, in particular cancer therapy. The optimal parameters within this approach differ significantly from those used in MH or MRI because of the principal difference in the f-MNP actuation modes. It is shown that specifically designed high gradient, steady magnetic field enables diagnostic and therapeutic LFMF impact localization in the deep tissues within the area ranging from a millimeter to a few centimeters and 3D scanning of affected region, if necessary.

  15. Theranostic multimodal potential of magnetic nanoparticles actuated by non-heating low frequency magnetic field in the new-generation nanomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Yuri I.; Klyachko, Natalia L.; Majouga, Alexander G.; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2017-02-01

    The scope of this review involves one of the most promising branches of new-generation biomedicine, namely magnetic nanotheranostics using remote control of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (f-MNPs) by means of alternating magnetic fields (AMFs). The review is mainly focused on new approach which utilizes non-heating low frequency magnetic fields (LFMFs) for nanomechanical actuation of f-MNPs. This approach is compared to such traditional ones as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radio-frequency (RF) magnetic hyperthermia (MH) which utilize high frequency heating AMF. The innovative principles and specific models of non-thermal magnetomechanical actuation of biostructures by MNP rotational oscillations in LFMF are described. The discussed strategy allows biodistribution monitoring in situ, delivering drugs to target tissues and releasing them with controlled rate, controlling biocatalytic reaction kinetics, inducing malignant cell apoptosis, and more. Optimization of both LFMF and f-MNP parameters may lead to dramatic improvement of treatment efficiency, locality, and selectivity on molecular or cellular levels and allow implementing both drug and drugless, i.e., pure nanomechanical therapy, in particular cancer therapy. The optimal parameters within this approach differ significantly from those used in MH or MRI because of the principal difference in the f-MNP actuation modes. It is shown that specifically designed high gradient, steady magnetic field enables diagnostic and therapeutic LFMF impact localization in the deep tissues within the area ranging from a millimeter to a few centimeters and 3D scanning of affected region, if necessary.

  16. 3D magneto-convective heat transfer in CNT-nanofluid filled cavity under partially active magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rashed, Abdullah A. A. A.; Kolsi, Lioua; Oztop, Hakan F.; Aydi, Abdelkarim; Malekshah, Emad Hasani; Abu-Hamdeh, Nidal; Borjini, Mohamed Naceur

    2018-05-01

    A computational study has been performed to investigate the effects of partially active magnetic field on natural convection heat transfer in CNT-nanofluid filled and three-dimensional differentially heated closed space. Two cases are considered to see this effect as magnetic field is applied to upper half (Case I) and lower half (Case II) while remaining walls are insulated. The finite volume method is used to solve governing equations and results are obtained for different governing parameters as Hartmann number (0 ≤ Ha ≤ 100), nanoparticle volume fraction (0 ≤ φ ≤ 0.05) and height of the active zone (0 ≤ LB ≤ 1). It is found that location of magnetic field plays an important role even at the same Hartmann number. Thus, it can be a good parameter to control heat and fluid flow inside the closed space.

  17. Magnetic Field Enhancement of Heat Transport in the 2D Heisenberg Antiferromagnet K_2V_3O_8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, B. C.; Lumsden, M. D.; Nagler, S. E.; Mandrus, D.; Jin, R.

    2002-03-01

    The thermal conductivity and heat capacity of single crystals of the spin 1/2 quasi-2D Heisenberg antiferromagnet K_2V_3O8 have been measured from 1.9 to 300 K in magnetic fields from 0 to 8T. The data are consistent with resonant scattering of phonons by magnons near the zone boundary and heat transport by long wavelength magnons. The magnon heat transport only occurs after the small anisotropic gap at k=0 is closed by the application of a magnetic field. The low temperature thermal conductivity increases linearly with magnetic field after the gap has been closed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is managed by UT-Battelle LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-00R22725.

  18. Transitions to improved core electron heat confinement triggered by low order rational magnetic surfaces in the stellarator TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, T.; Medina, F.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; AscasIbar, E.; BalbIn, R.; Cappa, A.; Castejon, F.; Eguilior, S.; Fernandez, A.; Guasp, J.; Hidalgo, C.; Petrov, S.

    2007-01-01

    Transitions to improved core electron heat confinement are triggered by low order rational magnetic surfaces in TJ-II electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasmas. Experiments are performed changing the magnetic shear around the rational surface n = 3/m = 2 to study its influence on the transition; ECH power modulation is used to look at transport properties. The improvement in the electron heat confinement shows no obvious dependence on the magnetic shear. Transitions triggered by the rational surface n = 4/m = 2 show, in addition, an increase in the ion temperature synchronized with the increase in the electron temperature. Ion temperature changes had not been previously observed either in TJ-II or in any other helical device. SXR measurements demonstrate that, under certain circumstances, the rational surface positioned inside the plasma core region precedes and provides a trigger for the transition

  19. Influence of low-order rational magnetic surfaces on heat transport in TJ-II heliac ECRH plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castejon, F.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Estrada, T.; Ascasibar, E.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.

    2004-01-01

    We study the effect of low-order rational surfaces on electron heat transport in plasmas confined in the TJ-II stellarator (Alejaldre et al 1990 Fusion Technol. 17 131) and heated by electron cyclotron waves. Enhancement of core electron heat confinement is observed when the rational surface is placed in the vicinity of the power deposition zone, either by performing a magnetic configuration scan or by inducing Ohmic current in a single discharge. The key to improving heat confinement seems to be a locally strong positive radial electric field, which is made possible by a synergistic effect between enhanced electron heat fluxes through radial positions around low-order rationals and pump out mechanisms in the heat deposition zone. (author)

  20. Electron heating in the exhaust of magnetic reconnection with negligible guide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan; Chen, Li-Jen; Bessho, Naoki; Kistler, Lynn M.; Shuster, Jason R.; Guo, Ruilong

    2016-03-01

    Electron heating in the magnetic reconnection exhaust is investigated with particle-in-cell simulations, space observations, and theoretical analysis. Spatial variations of the electron temperature (Te) and associated velocity distribution functions (VDFs) are examined and understood in terms of particle energization and randomization processes that vary with exhaust locations. Inside the electron diffusion region (EDR), the electron temperature parallel to the magnetic field (Te∥) exhibits a local minimum and the perpendicular temperature (Te⊥) shows a maximum at the current sheet midplane. In the intermediate exhaust downstream from the EDR and far from the magnetic field pileup region, Te⊥/Te∥ is close to unity and Te is approximately uniform, but the VDFs are structured: close to the midplane, VDFs are quasi-isotropic, whereas farther away from the midplane, VDFs exhibit field-aligned beams directed toward the midplane. In the far exhaust, Te generally increases toward the midplane and the pileup region, and the corresponding VDFs show counter-streaming beams. A distinct population with low v∥ and high v⊥ is prominent in the VDFs around the midplane. Test particle results show that the magnetic curvature near the midplane produces pitch angle scattering to generate quasi-isotropic distributions in the intermediate exhaust. In the far exhaust, electrons with initial high v∥ (v⊥) are accelerated mainly through curvature (gradient-B) drift opposite to the electric field, without significant pitch angle scattering. The VDF structures predicted by simulations are observed in magnetotail reconnection measurements, indicating that the energization mechanisms captured in the reported simulations are applicable to magnetotail reconnection with negligible guide field.

  1. Proceedings of the kaon pds magnet design workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, A.J.; Strathdee, A.

    1989-03-01

    These proceedings bring together the papers given at the Magnet Design Workshop (October 3 - 5 ) which was held to kick off the Kaon Factory PDS which was officially started on October 1, 1988. The workshop included sessions on power supplies and measurements as well as synchrotron and kicker magnet design. The aim of the meetings was to bring together experts who could advise us on magnet and power supply techniques which, prior to the Kaon era, have not been required at TRIUMF. These include fast - cycling cyclotron magnets and their power supplies, and the kickers needed to switch the beam from one ring to another or to the experimental areas. We also invited participation from industrial companies who will be potential magnet suppliers when Kaon Factory is funded. It was a pleasure to have representatives from six industrial companies amongst the participants

  2. Feasibility study for magnetic heat-pumps: applications in Switzerland; Machbarkeitsstudie fuer magnetische Waermepumpen: Anwendungen in der Schweiz. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egolf, P.W.; Gendre, F.; Sari, O. [Haute Ecole d' Ingenerie et de Gestion, Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland); Kitanovski, A. [University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2006-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a feasibility study on the use of magneto-caloric materials. The authors are of the opinion that possibilities are not yet given for the application of magnetic heat pumps in the retro-fitting of buildings with radiator heating systems or for the production of sanitary hot water, whereas a good potential exists for the application of magnetic heat pumps in new buildings with floor heating. The report reviews the thermodynamic cycles involved, cascaded and regenerative systems and makes recommendations on the use in various types of buildings. Theoretical considerations are discussed, numerical simulations are described and a simple calculation method is presented. Cost considerations are discussed and comparisons are made with conventional systems.

  3. Effect of kicker circuit inductance on the transmission-line discharging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Deren; Wang Xiangqi; Shang Lei; Pei Yuanji; Fan Kuanjun

    2004-01-01

    Circuit inductance exists at discharging circuit of transmission-line, it includes the inductance at the main switch of thyratron when conducts, the linking inductance between the linking cables, the matching resistance inductance and the load inductance. When a long pulse is generated by transmission-line, the circuit inductance can be omitted. However, when the pulse is short (such as shorter than 200 ns), especially when ferromagnetic core kicker acts as the load, the effect is obvious. The short pulse current is needed in order to generate long time interval synchronous radiation light pulses by using online assembly of pulse convex orbit and DC convex orbit. This paper analyses the effect and presents several experimental results. It also supposes two practical cases to decrease the rise time of the pulse

  4. Synthesis of palm oil empty fruit bunch magnetic pyrolytic char impregnating with FeCl3 by microwave heating technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubarak, N.M.; Kundu, A.; Sahu, J.N.; Abdullah, E.C.; Jayakumar, N.S.

    2014-01-01

    Empty fruit bunch (EFB) is one of the most abundant residues of the Palm oil mill industry in Malaysia. The novel magnetic bio-char was synthesized by single stage microwave heating technique, using EFB in the presence of ferric chloride hexahydrate. The effect of microwave powers, radiation time and impregnation ratio (IR) of ferric chloride hexahydrate to biomass were studied. Also the process parameters such as microwave powers, radiation times and IR were optimized using response surface method. The statistical analysis revealed that the optimum conditions for the high porosity magnetic bio-char production were at 900 W microwave power, 20 min radiation time and 0.5 (FeCl 3 : biomass) impregnation ratio. These newly produced magnetic bio-char have a high surface area of 890 m 2  g −1 and that leads to highly efficient in the removal of methylene blue (MB) with an efficiency of 99.9% from aqueous solution with a maximum adsorption capacity of 265 mg g −1 . - Highlights: • Magnetic bio-char production using discarded material EFB with chemical activation. • Single stage synthesis of magnetic bioc-har via microwave heating was narrated. • Effect of each process parameters on synthesis of magnetic bio-char was elaborated. • Magnetic bio-char has high surface area, high porosity and high adsorption capacity. • Novel magnetic bio-char adds new dimension to the materials as an adsorbent

  5. Ion heating and magnetic flux pile-up in a magnetic reconnection experiment with super-Alfvénic plasma inflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttle, L. G.; Hare, J. D.; Lebedev, S. V.; Ciardi, A.; Loureiro, N. F.; Burdiak, G. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Clayson, T.; Halliday, J. W. D.; Niasse, N.; Russell, D.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Tubman, E.; Lane, T.; Ma, J.; Robinson, T.; Smith, R. A.; Stuart, N.

    2018-04-01

    This work presents a magnetic reconnection experiment in which the kinetic, magnetic, and thermal properties of the plasma each play an important role in the overall energy balance and structure of the generated reconnection layer. Magnetic reconnection occurs during the interaction of continuous and steady flows of super-Alfvénic, magnetized, aluminum plasma, which collide in a geometry with two-dimensional symmetry, producing a stable and long-lasting reconnection layer. Optical Thomson scattering measurements show that when the layer forms, ions inside the layer are more strongly heated than electrons, reaching temperatures of Ti˜Z ¯ Te≳300 eV—much greater than can be expected from strong shock and viscous heating alone. Later in time, as the plasma density in the layer increases, the electron and ion temperatures are found to equilibrate, and a constant plasma temperature is achieved through a balance of the heating mechanisms and radiative losses of the plasma. Measurements from Faraday rotation polarimetry also indicate the presence of significant magnetic field pile-up occurring at the boundary of the reconnection region, which is consistent with the super-Alfvénic velocity of the inflows.

  6. Effect of Stabilization Heat Treatment on Time-Dependent Polarization Losses in Sintered Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuominen S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Some companies in the motor and generator industry utilizing sintered NdFeB magnets have adopted pre-ageing heat treatment in order to improve the stability of the magnets. The parameters of this stabilization heat treatment are based mainly on assumptions rather than on any published research results. In this work, the effects of pre-ageing treatment on the time-dependent polarization losses of two different types of commercial sintered NdFeB magnets were studied. The material showing the squarer J(H curve did not benefit from the pre-ageing treatment, since it seems to be stable under a certain critical temperature. In contrast, a stabilizing effect was observed in the material showing rounder J(H curve. After the stabilization heat treatment, the polarization of the magnets was found to be at lower level, but unchanged over a certain period of time. The length of this period depends on the temperature and the duration of the pre-ageing treatment. In addition, our analysis reveals that the stabilization heat treatment performed in an open circuit condition does not stabilize the magnet uniformly.

  7. Study of stream wise transverse magnetic fluid flow with heat transfer around an obstacle embedded in a porous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashidi, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad 91775-1111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehghan, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Semnan University, P.O. Box: 35196-45399, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ellahi, R., E-mail: rellahi@engr.ucr.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, FBAS, IIUI, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bourns Hall, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Riaz, M. [Department of QEC, National Defense University, E-9 Sector, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Jamal-Abad, M.T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Semnan University, P.O. Box: 35196-45399, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    A mathematical model for two-dimensional fluid flow under the influence of stream wise transverse magnetic fields in laminar regime is simulated in this study. Heat transfer past a square diamond shaped porous obstacle is also taken into account. The attention is focused to investigate the effects of intensity and direction of magnetic field, Darcy and Reynolds numbers on the mechanism of convective heat transfer and flow structures. The Darcy–Brinkman–Forchheimer model along with the Maxwell equations is used. The nonlinear coupled equations using a finite volume approach (FVA) are solved numerically. The calculations are performed for different governing parameters such as Reynolds number, Nusselt number, Stuart number and Prandtl Number. The physical interpretation of velocity and isothermal contours is assigned through graphs. It is shown that the effects of a transverse magnetic field on flow behavior and heat transfer mechanism are more than that of the stream wise magnetic field. The configuration of streamlines and vorticity contours phenomena are also presented for porous diamond obstacle. Comparison of the numerical solutions with existing literature is also made. - Highlights: • This paper analyses two-dimensional fluid flow under the influence of stream wise transverse magnetic field. • Heat transfer past a square diamond shaped porous obstacle is taken into account. • The Darcy–Brinkman–Forchheimer model is used. • Finite volume approach is used to find numerical solutions. • The configuration of streamlines and vorticity contours phenomena are presented through graphs.

  8. First Observation of the High Field Side Sawtooth Crash and Heat Transfer during Driven Reconnection Processes in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, HK; Luhmann, NC; Donne, AJH; Classen, IGJ; Domier, CW; Mazzucato, E; Munsat, T; van de Pol, MJ; Xia, Z

    2005-01-01

    High resolution (temporal and spatial), two-dimensional images of electron temperature fluctuations during sawtooth oscillations were employed to study driven reconnection processes in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas. The combination of kink and local pressure driven instabilities leads to an 'X-point' reconnection process that is localized in the toroidal and poloidal planes. The reconnection is not always confined to the magnetic surfaces with minimum energy. The heat transport process from the core is demonstrated to be highly collective rather than stochastic

  9. Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording: Fundamental Limits to Inverse Electromagnetic Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Samarth

    In this dissertation, we address the burgeoning fields of diffractive optics, metals-optics and plasmonics, and computational inverse problems in the engineering design of electromagnetic structures. We focus on the application of the optical nano-focusing system that will enable Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording (HAMR), a higher density magnetic recording technology that will fulfill the exploding worldwide demand of digital data storage. The heart of HAMR is a system that focuses light to a nano- sub-diffraction-limit spot with an extremely high power density via an optical antenna. We approach this engineering problem by first discussing the fundamental limits of nano-focusing and the material limits for metal-optics and plasmonics. Then, we use efficient gradient-based optimization algorithms to computationally design shapes of 3D nanostructures that outperform human designs on the basis of mass-market product requirements. In 2014, the world manufactured ˜1 zettabyte (ZB), ie. 1 Billion terabytes (TBs), of data storage devices, including ˜560 million magnetic hard disk drives (HDDs). Global demand of storage will likely increase by 10x in the next 5-10 years, and manufacturing capacity cannot keep up with demand alone. We discuss the state-of-art HDD and why industry invented Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording (HAMR) to overcome the data density limitations. HAMR leverages the temperature sensitivity of magnets, in which the coercivity suddenly and non-linearly falls at the Curie temperature. Data recording to high-density hard disks can be achieved by locally heating one bit of information while co-applying a magnetic field. The heating can be achieved by focusing 100 microW of light to a 30nm diameter spot on the hard disk. This is an enormous light intensity, roughly ˜100,000,000x the intensity of sunlight on the earth's surface! This power density is ˜1,000x the output of gold-coated tapered optical fibers used in Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopes

  10. In vitro toxicity test and searching the possibility of cancer cell line extermination by magnetic heating with using Fe3O4 magnetic fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Hoai Linh; Nguyen Chi Thuan; Nguyen Anh Tuan; Pham Van Thach; Nguyen Xuan Phuc; Le Van Hong; Tran Cong Yen; Nguyen Thi Quy; Hoang Thi My Nhung; Phi Thi Xuyen

    2009-01-01

    A Fe 3 O 4 based magnetic fluid with different concentrations ranged between 0.15 ng/cell to 10 ng/cell (nano gram/cell) was used in the in vitro toxicity test on several cancer cell lines, Sarcoma 180, HeLa and H358. It shows that the fluid with a concentration of Fe 3 O 4 below 1.2 ng/cell is completely non-toxic for these cell lines. Even through in the presence of the highest concentration of 10 ng/cell, the cell viability still reaches more than 60%. The magnetic fluid with Fe 3 O 4 concentration of about 0.1 ng/cell was also used to search ex-vivo the possibility of Sarcoma 180 extermination by magnetic heating with an AC field of 120Oe and 184 KHz. The result shows that after a heat treatment for 30 min., 40% of Sarcoma 180 cells was killed.

  11. Crystal-field study of magnetization and specific heat properties of frustrated pyrochlore Pr2Zr2O7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, J.; Jana, Y.M.; Biswas, A. Ali

    2016-01-01

    The experimental results of temperature dependent dc magnetic susceptibility, field dependent isothermal magnetization, magnetic specific heat and entropy of the pyrochlore Pr 2 Zr 2 O 7 are simulated and analyzed using appropriate D 3d crystal-field (CF) and anisotropic molecular field tensors at Pr-sites in the self-consistent mean-field approach involving four magnetically non-equivalent rare-earth spins on the tetrahedral unit of the pyrochlore structure. CF level pattern and wave-functions of the ground 3 H 4 multiplet of the Pr 3+ ions are obtained considering intermediate coupling between different Russell-Saunders terms of the 4f 2 electronic configurations of Pr-ion and J-mixing effects. CF analysis shows that the CF ground-state of the Pr 3+ ion in Pr 2 Zr 2 O 7 is a well-isolated doublet, with significant admixtures of terms coming from |M J =±4〉 and |M J =±1〉, and the Pr-spins are effectively Ising-like along the local <111> axes. Magnetic specific heat in zero-field is simulated by considering a temperature dependence of the exchange splitting of the ground doublet. - Highlights: • Full CF diagonalization using intermediate coupling and J-mixing. • Pr-spins are Ising-like along local [111] axis. • Magnetic specific heat is due to temperature dependence exchange splitting of ground CF doublet.

  12. Specific heat of S=1 quasi-1D antiferromagnet NDMAP in magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujii, H.; Honda, Z.; Andraka, B.; Katsumata, K.; Takano, Y.

    2003-01-01

    NDMAP, Ni(C 5 H 14 N 2 ) 2 N 3 (PF 6 ), is a quasi-one-dimensional S=1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet with Haldane-gap energies of 22 and 5.5 K for excitations polarized parallel and perpendicular to the chain c-axis, respectively. We have extended the specific-heat measurements by Honda et al. in this compound to 150 mK in temperature and 18 T in magnetic field, employing a novel relaxation calorimeter. The experiment provides an accurate determination of the exponent for the transition line for the field-assisted ordered phase. In addition, a new feature has been found in the phase diagram at around 14 T

  13. Numerical investigation of MHD heat transfer in a vertical round tube affected by transverse magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zikanov, Oleg [University of Michigan - Dearborn, MI 48128-1491 (United States); Listratov, Yaroslav [Moscow Power Engineering Institute, 14 Karsnokazarmennaya St., Moscow 111250 (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    Numerical simulations of the flow of a liquid metal in a vertical pipe are performed. The configuration reproduces the test section of the recent experiment . The mean flow is directed downward, a half of the pipe's wall is heated, and a strong horizontal magnetic field perpendicular to the temperature gradient is imposed. The simulations produce results in good agreement with the experiment and lead us to an explanation of the observed phenomenon of anomalous high-amplitude temperature fluctuations. The fluctuations are caused by growth and quasi-periodic breakdown of the pairs of ascending and descending jets related to the elevator-mode thermal convection. Implications for operation of liquid metal blankets with poloidal ducts are discussed.

  14. Physics. Examples and problems. Mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, oscillations and waves, atomic and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroppe, Heribert; Streitenberger, Peter; Specht, Eckard; Zeitler, Juergen; Langer, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    The present book is the unification of the proved problem collections for the basic physical training of studyings of especially engineering courses at technical colleges and universities. The book contains - didactically prepared and structured in the style of a textbook as well as with increasing difficulty - a total of 960 exemplary and additional tasks from the fields mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, oscillations and waves, as well as atomic and nuclear physics. For the exemplary problems the whole solution path and the complete calculation process with explanation of the relevant physical laws are extensively presented, for the additional problems for the self-control only the solutions and, if necessary, intermediate calculations are given. The examples and problems with mostly practice-oriented content are selected in such a way that they largely cover the matter treated in courses and exercises and make by their didactical preparation an effective repetition and optimal examination-preparation possible.

  15. A global simulation of ICRF heating in a 3D magnetic configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Fukuyama, A.; Akutsu, T.

    2005-01-01

    A global simulation code for the ICRF heating analysis in a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic configuration is developed combining two global simulation codes; a drift kinetic equation solver, GNET, and a wave field solver, TASK/WM. Both codes take into account 3D geometry using the numerically obtained 3D MHD equilibrium. The developed simulation code is applied to the LHD configuration as an example. Characteristics of energetic ion distributions in the phase space are clarified in LHD. The simulation results are also compared with experimental results by evaluating the count number of the neutral particle analyzer using the obtained energetic ion distribution, and a relatively good agreement is obtained. (author)

  16. Injection septum magnets for the Loma Linda medical accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satti, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The injection beamline runs over the last magnet before a long straight section and is then displaced downward 55.88 cm to the accelerator beamline. The displacement is magnetic and the final deflection onto the synchrotron orbit is by an electric kicker. The first component, the reverse septum magnet, bends the injection beam 25/degree/ downward. This is followed by the injection septum (20/degree/ bend upward) and the final injection kicker (5/degree/ bend upward). The septum magnets produce a peak field of 3.4 K gauss at a current of 28,000 amperes within a 0.1 msec long pulse. The electric kicker produces a field of 7.3 KV/cm with a pulse length of 0.0011 msec. The septum magnets are similar to each other in construction with a bending radium of 72.7 cm. The curvature is required to increase the effective aperture. Each magnet has a single-turn copper coil bonded to a stainless steel plate for reinforcement. This eliminates insulating material, which could be subject to radiation damage, at the septum. The stainless steel plate is welded to the magnet laminations. The current is confined to the septum by the insulation between the laminations, which are a standard core material. The total septum thickness with shield is 1.227 cm. Pulsing the magnet eliminates the need for water cooling. 2 refs., 4 figs

  17. Improved magnetic induction heating of nanoferrites for hyperthermia applications: Correlation with colloidal stability and magneto-structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khot, V.M., E-mail: wish_khot@yahoo.co.in [Center for Interdisciplinary Research, D. Y. Patil University, Kolhapur 416006 (India); Salunkhe, A.B. [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule University of Pune (India); Ruso, J.M. [Soft Matter and Molecular Biophysics Group, Applied Physics Department, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pawar, S.H. [Center for Interdisciplinary Research, D. Y. Patil University, Kolhapur 416006 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Nanoferrites with compositions Mn{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Co{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Ni{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (MZF, CZF and NZF respectively) coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) were prepared in a single step. These nanoparticles are highly water dispersible with zeta potential values between 14 and 21 mV. Magnetic induction heating characteristics of these NPs have been studied as a function of magnetic field amplitude from 6.7 to 26.7 kA m{sup −1} (at fixed frequency 265 kHz) and concentration of nanoparticles. Notable enhancement in specific absorption rate (334.5 W g{sup −1}) by CZF nanoparticles has been observed. This enhanced induction heating properties have been studied and correlated with colloidal stability and magnetostructural properties such as tuned magnetic anisotropy arising from zinc substitution. Cytotoxicity of synthesized mixed ferrites has been evaluated in vitro on HeLa cell lines using MTT assay to explore their use as heating agents in magnetic hyperthermia. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoferrites (sizes 8–12 nm) with improved specific absorption rate (334.5 W g{sup −1}) at lowest particle concentration have been prepared • The results have been explained by correlating colloidal stability and magnetostructural properties such as magnetocrystalline anisotropy. • It has been shown that substitution of zinc tunes anisotropy of cobalt iron oxide within the value optimized previously in achieving high throughput in magnetic induction heating. • In vitro cytotoxicity proves nanoparticles are non-toxic suggesting their use as a potential heating agent in hyperthermia therapy.

  18. Improved magnetic induction heating of nanoferrites for hyperthermia applications: Correlation with colloidal stability and magneto-structural properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khot, V.M.; Salunkhe, A.B.; Ruso, J.M.; Pawar, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoferrites with compositions Mn 0.4 Zn 0.6 Fe 2 O 4 , Co 0.4 Zn 0.6 Fe 2 O 4 , Ni 0.4 Zn 0.6 Fe 2 O 4 (MZF, CZF and NZF respectively) coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) were prepared in a single step. These nanoparticles are highly water dispersible with zeta potential values between 14 and 21 mV. Magnetic induction heating characteristics of these NPs have been studied as a function of magnetic field amplitude from 6.7 to 26.7 kA m −1 (at fixed frequency 265 kHz) and concentration of nanoparticles. Notable enhancement in specific absorption rate (334.5 W g −1 ) by CZF nanoparticles has been observed. This enhanced induction heating properties have been studied and correlated with colloidal stability and magnetostructural properties such as tuned magnetic anisotropy arising from zinc substitution. Cytotoxicity of synthesized mixed ferrites has been evaluated in vitro on HeLa cell lines using MTT assay to explore their use as heating agents in magnetic hyperthermia. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoferrites (sizes 8–12 nm) with improved specific absorption rate (334.5 W g −1 ) at lowest particle concentration have been prepared • The results have been explained by correlating colloidal stability and magnetostructural properties such as magnetocrystalline anisotropy. • It has been shown that substitution of zinc tunes anisotropy of cobalt iron oxide within the value optimized previously in achieving high throughput in magnetic induction heating. • In vitro cytotoxicity proves nanoparticles are non-toxic suggesting their use as a potential heating agent in hyperthermia therapy

  19. Exchange coupled CoPt/FePtC media for heat assisted magnetic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Tanmay; Piramanayagam, S. N.; Ru, Tan Hui; Saifullah, M. S. M.; Bhatia, C. S.; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2018-04-01

    L10 FePtC granular media are being studied as potential future magnetic recording media and are set to be used in conjunction with heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) to enable recording at write fields within the range of current day recording heads. Media structures based on a FePtC storage layer and a capping layer can alleviate the switching field distribution (SFD) requirements of HAMR and reduce the noise originating from the writing process. However, the current designs suffer from SFD issues due to high temperature writing. To overcome this problem, we study a CoPt/FePtC exchange coupled composite structure, where FePtC serves as the storage layer and CoPt (with higher Curie temperature, Tc) as the capping layer. CoPt remains ferromagnetic at near Tc of FePtC. Consequently, the counter exchange energy from CoPt would reduce the noise resulting from the adjacent grain interactions during the writing process. CoPt/FePtC bilayer samples with different thicknesses of CoPt were investigated. Our studies found that CoPt forms a continuous layer at a thickness of 6 nm and leads to considerable reduction in the saturation field and its distribution.

  20. Investigation of plasma heating by magnetic pumping with nonaxisymmetric alternating fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapshin, V.I.; Stepanov, K.N.

    1975-01-01

    Non-collisional heating is studied of an inhomogeneous plasma cylinder with the aid of magnetic pumping with axial nonsymmetric variable fields running along a constant field at the phase velocity ω/ksub(ax) which is around an ion thermal velocity or an ion sound velocity. The axial wave-number ksub(ax) is assumed to be greater that I/R, where R is the major radius of the torus. The heating rate at ksub(ax)a approximately 1 (a is the plasma radius) is found to be equal to that in the axial symmetric case. In the event of an ion-acoustic resonance (ω approximately ksub(ax) vsub(s) the energy absorption rate increases by (Tsub(e)/Tsub(i)) >> 1 times, if the resonance occurs in a narrow resonance layer, and by (Tsub(e)/Tsub(i))sup(3/2) times if it does in the entire plasma volume (vsub(s) is the sound velocity). If the pumping frequency is of the same order as the frequency of drift oscillations of inhomogeneous plasma, the pumping field may lead to plasma cooling. This effect is linked with a severe non-equilibrium and instability of an inhomogeneous plasma in this frequency range

  1. Specific heat of the antiferro/ferro-magnet NpGa3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colineau, E.; Griveau, J.-C.; Wastin, F.; Rebizant, J.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The Actinide Research Department at ITU is devoted to basic and strategic research on actinide elements and compounds. The scientific programme encompasses both physics and chemistry, and is carried out in collaboration with a number of academic research partners worldwide. → The availability of state-of-the-art instrumentation adapted for measuring spectroscopic, thermodynamic and transport properties of radioactive samples, together with specialised facilities for preparation and characterisation of high quality samples, makes the department a centre of excellence in actinide research and one of the leading institutions in this field. → The object of actinide research is the understanding of chemical bonding in, and the solid-state physics properties of, the actinide metals and their compounds. The level of knowledge of actinides is far inferior to that of the rest of the periodic table, mainly because of the difficulty of handling transuranium materials, but also because of the inherent difficulty of understanding the behavior of the 5f-electrons. Their spatial extent and tendency to interact with electrons on ligand sites give actinide elements a complexity unique in the periodic table. Experiments and theory are performed with a view to improved understanding. - Abstract: The specific heat of NpGa 3 has been measured for the first time. The magnetic transitions and more generally the full magnetic phase diagram have been re-established precisely. The Sommerfeld coefficient and the magnetic entropy point to a rather localized system, in agreement with previous studies, in particular high pressure Moessbauer and resistivity. The comparison with other NpX 3 suggests that NpGa 3 is the most localized member of the series.

  2. Heating of a plasma by a powerful relativistic electron beam in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzhannikov, A.V.; Brejzman, B.N.; Vyacheslavov, L.N.; Kojdan, V.S.; Konyukhov, V.V.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation into the interaction of a powerful relativistic electron beam with plasma in the INAR apparatus are presented. The relativistic electron beam had initial energy of 1 MeV, maximum injection current of 10 kA, duration of 70 ns, and diameter of 2 cm. The total beam energy at entry into the plasma was approximately 300 J. The beam was injected into the column of a hydrogen plasma 230 cm long, 8 cm in diameter, and with a density of 3x10 14 cm -3 . The magnetic field had mirror-trap geometry (mirror ratio 1.7, intensity in the uniform region up to 15 kOe). In the experiments various diagnostic methods were used, making it possible to measure the beam current, the total current within the plasma, the total energy of the beam entering and leaving the plasma, and the distribution of beam current over the cross-section at the plasma outlet; the energy content of the plasma was determined from diamagnetic measurements; the electron distribution function was analysed by the method of Thomson scattering of light at 90 0 . From an analysis of the shape of the diamagnetic signals and distribution of diamagnetism along the length of the apparatus it was established that under the assumption of predominant electron heating, the temperature of plasma electrons in order of magnitude equals 1 keV for a plasma density of 5x10 13 cm -3 . The cause of heating cannot be dissipation of the reversed current. Thomson scattering of laser radiation indicated the presence of a comparatively cold plasma component with a temperature of 25 eV. High-energy electrons moving from the opposite direction toward the beam were recorded; their appearance evidently was associated with acceleration of plasma electrons in the induction fields. Mechanisms which can provide effective heating of the whole mass of electrons under conditions in which pair collisions are minor are indicated. (author)

  3. Head-disk Interface Study for Heat Assisted Magnetic Recording (HAMR) and Plasmonic Nanolithography for Patterned Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shaomin

    The magnetic storage areal density keeps increasing every year, and magnetic recording-based hard disk drives provide a very cheap and effective solution to the ever increasing demand for data storage. Heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) and bit patterned media have been proposed to increase the magnetic storage density beyond 1 Tb/in2. In HAMR systems, high magnetic anisotropy materials are recommended to break the superparamagnetic limit for further scaling down the size of magnetic bits. However, the current magnetic transducers are not able to generate strong enough field to switch the magnetic orientations of the high magnetic anisotropy material so the data writing is not able to be achieved. So thermal heating has to be applied to reduce the coercivity for the magnetic writing. To provide the heating, a laser is focused using a near field transducer (NFT) to locally heat a ~(25 nm)2 spot on the magnetic disk to the Curie temperature, which is ~ 400 C-600°C, to assist in the data writing process. But this high temperature working condition is a great challenge for the traditional head-disk interface (HDI). The disk lubricant can be depleted by evaporation or decomposition. The protective carbon overcoat can be graphitized or oxidized. The surface quality, such as its roughness, can be changed as well. The NFT structure is also vulnerable to degradation under the large number of thermal load cycles. The changes of the HDI under the thermal conditions could significantly reduce the robustness and reliability of the HAMR products. In bit patterned media systems, instead of using the continuous magnetic granular material, physically isolated magnetic islands are used to store data. The size of the magnetic islands should be about or less than 25 nm in order to achieve the storage areal density beyond 1 Tb/in2. However, the manufacture of the patterned media disks is a great challenge for the current optical lithography technology. Alternative lithography

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  5. Heat transfer effects on a viscous dissipative fluid flow past a vertical plate in the presence of induced magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Raju

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical analysis is performed to study induced magnetic field effects on free convection flow past a vertical plate. The x¯-axis is taken vertically upwards along the plate, y¯-axis normal to the plate into the fluid region. It is assumed that the plate is electrically non-conducting and the applied magnetic field is of uniform strength (H0 and perpendicular to the plate. The magnetic Reynolds number of the flow is not taken to be small enough so that the induced magnetic field is taken into account. The coupled nonlinear partial differential equations are solved by Perturbation technique and the effects of various physical parameters on velocity, temperature, and induced magnetic fields are studied through graphs and tables. Variations in Skin friction and rate of heat transfer are also studied. It is observed that an increase in magnetic parameter decreases the velocity for both water and air. It is also seen that there is a fall in induced magnetic field as magnetic Prandtl number, and magnetic field parameter increase.

  6. Determination of the stochastic layer properties induced by magnetic perturbations via heat pulse experiments at ASDEX upgrade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brida, D.; Lunt, T.; Wischmeier, M.; Birkenmeier, G.; Cahyna, Pavel; Carralero, D.; Faitsch, M.; Feng, Y.; Kurzan, B.; Schubert, M.; Sieglin, B.; Suttrop, W.; Wolfrum, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, August (2017), s. 831-837 ISSN 2352-1791 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : ASDEX upgrade * Magnetic perturbations * Divertor heat flux Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352179116302150

  7. Magnetic Pumping as a Source of Particle Heating and Power-law Distributions in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichko, E.; Egedal, J.; Daughton, W.; Kasper, J.

    2017-12-01

    Based on the rate of expansion of the solar wind, the plasma should cool rapidly as a function of distance to the Sun. Observations show this is not the case. In this work, a magnetic pumping model is developed as a possible explanation for the heating and the generation of power-law distribution functions observed in the solar wind plasma. Most previous studies in this area focus on the role that the dissipation of turbulent energy on microscopic kinetic scales plays in the overall heating of the plasma. However, with magnetic pumping, particles are energized by the largest-scale turbulent fluctuations, thus bypassing the energy cascade. In contrast to other models, we include the pressure anisotropy term, providing a channel for the large-scale fluctuations to heat the plasma directly. A complete set of coupled differential equations describing the evolution, and energization, of the distribution function are derived, as well as an approximate closed-form solution. Numerical simulations using the VPIC kinetic code are applied to verify the model’s analytical predictions. The results of the model for realistic solar wind scenario are computed, where thermal streaming of particles are important for generating a phase shift between the magnetic perturbations and the pressure anisotropy. In turn, averaged over a pump cycle, the phase shift permits mechanical work to be converted directly to heat in the plasma. The results of this scenario show that magnetic pumping may account for a significant portion of the solar wind energization.

  8. Specific heat (1-330K), magnetic susceptiblity and Meissner effect Bi-(Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junod, A.; Eckert, D.; Triscone, G.; Brunner, O.; Muller, J.; Zhao, Z.

    1989-01-01

    Five samples in the Bi 2 - y Pb y Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 + x system selected for their sharp diamagnetic transitions are characterized with particular emphasis on the specific heat. The behavior of the magnetic susceptibility upon doping with holes (Pb) is similar to that of the La 1 - y Sr y CuO 4 system

  9. Harmonic Kicker RF Cavity for the Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider EM Simulation, Modification, and Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, Sarah; Wang, Haipeng

    2017-09-01

    An important step in the conceptual design for the future Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider (JLEIC) is the development of supporting technologies for the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) Electron Cooling Facility. The Harmonic Radiofrequency (RF) kicker cavity is one such device that is responsible for switching electron bunches in and out of the Circulator Cooling Ring (CCR) from and to the ERL, which is a critical part of the ion cooling process. Last year, a half scale prototype of the JLEIC harmonic RF kicker model was designed with resonant frequencies to support the summation of 5 odd harmonics (95.26 MHz, 285.78 MHz, 476.30 MHz, 666.82 MHz, and 857.35 MHz); however, the asymmetry of the kicker cavity gives rise to multipole components of the electric field at the electron-beam axis of the cavity. Previous attempts to symmetrize the electric field of this asymmetrical RF cavity have been unsuccessful. The aim of this study is to modify the existing prototype for a uniform electric field across the beam pathway so that the electron bunches will experience nearly zero beam current loading. In addition to this, we have driven the unmodified cavity with the harmonic sum and used the wire stretching method for an analysis of the multipole electric field components.

  10. Heat transfer and flow analysis of nanofluid flow between parallel plates in presence of variable magnetic field using HPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatami, M., E-mail: m.hatami@tue.nl [Esfarayen University of Technology, Mechanical Engineering Department, Esfarayen, North Khorasan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jing, Dengwei; Song, Dongxing [International Research Center for Renewable Energy, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Sheikholeslami, M.; Ganji, D.D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    In this study, effect of variable magnetic field on nanofluid flow and heat transfer analysis between two parallel disks is investigated. By using the appropriate transformation for the velocity, temperature and concentration, the basic equations governing the flow, heat and mass transfer were reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations. These equations subjected to the associated boundary conditions were solved analytically using Homotopy perturbation method. The analytical investigation is carried out for different governing parameters namely: squeeze number, suction parameter, Hartmann number, Brownian motion parameter, thermophrotic parameter and Lewis number. Results show that Nusselt number has direct relationship with Brownian motion parameter and thermophrotic parameter but it is a decreasing function of squeeze number, suction parameter, Hartmann number and Lewis number. - Highlights: • Heat and mass transfer of nanofluids between parallel plates investigated. • A variable magnetic field is applied on the plates. • Governing equations are solved analytically. • Effects of physical parameters are discussed on the Nusselt number.

  11. Highly macroscopically degenerated single-point ground states as source of specific heat capacity anomalies in magnetic frustrated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčišinová, E.; Jurčišin, M.

    2018-04-01

    Anomalies of the specific heat capacity are investigated in the framework of the exactly solvable antiferromagnetic spin- 1 / 2 Ising model in the external magnetic field on the geometrically frustrated tetrahedron recursive lattice. It is shown that the Schottky-type anomaly in the behavior of the specific heat capacity is related to the existence of unique highly macroscopically degenerated single-point ground states which are formed on the borders between neighboring plateau-like ground states. It is also shown that the very existence of these single-point ground states with large residual entropies predicts the appearance of another anomaly in the behavior of the specific heat capacity for low temperatures, namely, the field-induced double-peak structure, which exists, and should be observed experimentally, along with the Schottky-type anomaly in various frustrated magnetic system.

  12. Theoretical evaluations of magnetic nanoparticle-enhanced heating on tumor embedded with large blood vessels during hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Deng, Z. S.; Liu, J.

    2012-01-01

    The large blood vessels surrounding the tumor would significantly result in heat sink, and thus seriously limit the thermal ablative area during tumor hyperthermia. Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) was recently identified as an important heating enhancer to improve the treatment efficiency. It will not only help to absorb more energy under the irradiation of external magnetic field, but also can block the blood flow and subsequently weaken the heat sink effect of large vessels. In this study, these two critical factors, reserved to be undisclosed before in theory, were comprehensively investigated through three-dimensional numerical simulation. The results suggested that concerning the contribution to temperature increase in the tissues surrounding large vessel, the factor of blood flow blocking is more effective than that of energy absorption. Therefore, selective loading of MNPs to the target sites is expected to serve as a promising method to perform successful hyperthermia treatment for tumor tissues embedded with large blood vessels.

  13. Theoretical evaluations of magnetic nanoparticle-enhanced heating on tumor embedded with large blood vessels during hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q. [Tsinghua University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine (China); Deng, Z. S. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry (China); Liu, J., E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine (China)

    2012-07-15

    The large blood vessels surrounding the tumor would significantly result in heat sink, and thus seriously limit the thermal ablative area during tumor hyperthermia. Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) was recently identified as an important heating enhancer to improve the treatment efficiency. It will not only help to absorb more energy under the irradiation of external magnetic field, but also can block the blood flow and subsequently weaken the heat sink effect of large vessels. In this study, these two critical factors, reserved to be undisclosed before in theory, were comprehensively investigated through three-dimensional numerical simulation. The results suggested that concerning the contribution to temperature increase in the tissues surrounding large vessel, the factor of blood flow blocking is more effective than that of energy absorption. Therefore, selective loading of MNPs to the target sites is expected to serve as a promising method to perform successful hyperthermia treatment for tumor tissues embedded with large blood vessels.

  14. Heat transfer and flow analysis of nanofluid flow between parallel plates in presence of variable magnetic field using HPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatami, M.; Jing, Dengwei; Song, Dongxing; Sheikholeslami, M.; Ganji, D.D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, effect of variable magnetic field on nanofluid flow and heat transfer analysis between two parallel disks is investigated. By using the appropriate transformation for the velocity, temperature and concentration, the basic equations governing the flow, heat and mass transfer were reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations. These equations subjected to the associated boundary conditions were solved analytically using Homotopy perturbation method. The analytical investigation is carried out for different governing parameters namely: squeeze number, suction parameter, Hartmann number, Brownian motion parameter, thermophrotic parameter and Lewis number. Results show that Nusselt number has direct relationship with Brownian motion parameter and thermophrotic parameter but it is a decreasing function of squeeze number, suction parameter, Hartmann number and Lewis number. - Highlights: • Heat and mass transfer of nanofluids between parallel plates investigated. • A variable magnetic field is applied on the plates. • Governing equations are solved analytically. • Effects of physical parameters are discussed on the Nusselt number

  15. Mixed convection in a nanofluid filled-cavity with partial slip subjected to constant heat flux and inclined magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismael, Muneer A. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Engineering College, University of Basrah, Basrah (Iraq); Mansour, M.A. [Department of Mathematics, Assuit University, Faculty of Science, Assuit (Egypt); Chamkha, Ali J. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Prince Mohammad Bin Fahd University, Al-Khobar 31952 (Saudi Arabia); Prince Sultan Endowment for Energy and Environment, Prince Mohammad Bin Fahd University, Al-Khobar 31952 (Saudi Arabia); Rashad, A.M., E-mail: am_rashad@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Aswan University, Faculty of Science, Aswan 81528 (Egypt)

    2016-10-15

    Mixed convection in a lid-driven square cavity filled with Cu-water nanofluid and subjected to inclined magnetic field is investigated in this paper. Partial slip effect is considered along the lid driven horizontal walls. A constant heat flux source on the left wall is considered, meanwhile the right vertical wall is cooled isothermally. The remainder cavity walls are thermally insulted. A control finite volume method is used as a numerical appliance of the governing equations. Six pertinent parameters were studied these; the orientation of the magnetic field (Φ=0–360°), Richardson number (Ri=0.001–1000), Hartman number (Ha=0–100), the size and position of the heat source (B=0.2–0.8, D=0.3–0.7, respectively), nanoparticles volume fraction (ϕ=0.0–0.1), and the lid-direction of the horizontal walls (λ=±1) where the positive sign means lid-driven to the right while the negative sign means lid-driven to the left. The results show that the orientation and the strength of the magnetic field can play a significant role in controlling the convection under the effect of partial slip. It is also found that the natural convection decreases with increasing the length of the heat source for all ranges of the studied parameters, while it is do so due to the vertical distance up to Hartman number of 50, beyond this value the natural convection decreases with lifting the heat source narrower to the top wall. - Highlights: • Partial slip along moving walls of MHD cavity filled with nanofluid is considered. • The suppression exerted by the magnetic field decreases with its orientation. • Nusselt number is enhanced slightly with nanoparticles at shortest heat source. • Nusselt number is enhanced with nanoparticles at stronger magnetic field.

  16. Mixed convection in a nanofluid filled-cavity with partial slip subjected to constant heat flux and inclined magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismael, Muneer A.; Mansour, M.A.; Chamkha, Ali J.; Rashad, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Mixed convection in a lid-driven square cavity filled with Cu-water nanofluid and subjected to inclined magnetic field is investigated in this paper. Partial slip effect is considered along the lid driven horizontal walls. A constant heat flux source on the left wall is considered, meanwhile the right vertical wall is cooled isothermally. The remainder cavity walls are thermally insulted. A control finite volume method is used as a numerical appliance of the governing equations. Six pertinent parameters were studied these; the orientation of the magnetic field (Φ=0–360°), Richardson number (Ri=0.001–1000), Hartman number (Ha=0–100), the size and position of the heat source (B=0.2–0.8, D=0.3–0.7, respectively), nanoparticles volume fraction (ϕ=0.0–0.1), and the lid-direction of the horizontal walls (λ=±1) where the positive sign means lid-driven to the right while the negative sign means lid-driven to the left. The results show that the orientation and the strength of the magnetic field can play a significant role in controlling the convection under the effect of partial slip. It is also found that the natural convection decreases with increasing the length of the heat source for all ranges of the studied parameters, while it is do so due to the vertical distance up to Hartman number of 50, beyond this value the natural convection decreases with lifting the heat source narrower to the top wall. - Highlights: • Partial slip along moving walls of MHD cavity filled with nanofluid is considered. • The suppression exerted by the magnetic field decreases with its orientation. • Nusselt number is enhanced slightly with nanoparticles at shortest heat source. • Nusselt number is enhanced with nanoparticles at stronger magnetic field.

  17. Studies on MHD pressure drop and heat transfer of helium-lithium annular-mist flow in a transverse magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Akira; Aritomi, Masanori; Takahashi, Minoru; Matsuzaki, Mitsuo; Narita, Yoshihito; Yano, Toshikazu.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient of helium-lithium annular-mist flow in a rectangular duct were investigated experimentally under a transverse magnetic field at system pressure of 0.2 MPa. A ratio of MHD pressure drop to that of non-magnetic field increases with magnetic flux density and a mass flow rate ratio of lithium to helium in low helium velocity region. However, as increasing the helium velocity, the increment of MHD pressure drop with the magnetic flux density is much reduced and then becomes almost zero. At this condition, the MHD pressure drop of the annular-mist flow becomes much smaller than that of lithium single phase flow with the same lithium mass flow at the high magnetic flux density. Heat transfer coefficient ratio of the helium-lithium annular-mist flow to helium single phase in the non-magnetic field is well correlated by a ratio of the mass flow rate of lithium to helium. The heat transfer coefficient in the magnetic field increases with the magnetic flux density and then terminates at a certain value depending on the mass flow rate ratio and the helium velocity. These characteristics of the MHD pressure drop and the heat transfer in the magnetic field suggest that the helium-lithium annular-mist flow is effectively applicable to cooling of the high heat flux wall in a strong magnetic field like a first wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactors. (author)

  18. Magnetic force microscopy characterization of heat and current treated Fe40Ni38Mo4B18 amorphous ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Ignacio; Iturriza, Nuria; Jose del Val, Juan; Grande, Hans; Pomposo, Jose A.; Gonzalez, Julian

    2010-01-01

    The domain structure of a magnetostrictive Fe 40 Ni 38 Mo 4 B 18 amorphous ribbon has been studied using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) at room temperature. First, the evolution of the magnetic domain patterns as a function of the annealing temperature has been investigated. In samples heat treated at 250 and 450 deg. C for 1 h, a transformation from 90 deg. to 180 deg. domain wall has been clearly observed, while the sample heat treated at 700 deg. C for 1 h showed a magnetic phase fixed by the crystalline anisotropy. Additionally, the evolution of the magnetic domain structure by applying a DC current was recorded by the MFM technique. For current annealed samples at 1 A for 1, 30 and 60 min, a transformation between different domain patterns has been observed. Finally, in samples treated by the current annealing method under simultaneous stress, an increase of the annealing time gives rise to a different magnetic structure arising from the development of transverse magnetic anisotropy.

  19. The effect of heat treatments on Ni43Mn42Co4Sn11 meta-magnetic shape memory alloys for magnetic refrigeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, Nickolaus M.; Yegin, Cengiz; Karaman, Ibrahim; Chen, Jing-Han; Ross, Joseph H.; Liu, Jian; Li, Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    The inverse magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in bulk polycrystalline and melt-spun ribbons of the Ni 43 Mn 42 Co 4 Sn 11 meta-magnetic shape memory alloy (MSMA) is investigated. The influence of several material properties on the MCE and relative cooling power (RCP) are discussed and the property combinations for optimum MCE and RCP identified for a given thermodynamic framework. These include a small slope of magnetic field vs. martensitic transformation temperature phase diagram, a narrow transformation range, low transformation thermal hysteresis and a large change in magnetization on martensitic transformation, which results in low levels of applied magnetic fields desired for repeated MCE on field cycling. The thermo-magnetic responses of the samples were measured before and after heat treatments. The heat-treated ribbons produced the most favorable MCE by exhibiting the highest magnetization change and smallest elastic energy storage through the transformation. This was attributed to the specific microstructural features, including grain size to thickness ratio and degree of L2 1 ordering. In addition, issues in the literature in determining RCP for MSMAs are discussed, and a new method to find RCP is proposed and implemented. Completely reversible magnetic-field-induced martensitic transformation cycles were used to investigate hysteresis losses relative to actual refrigeration cycles, whereby the RCP was calculated using the defined thermodynamic framework and indirectly measured entropy changes. The annealed ribbons exhibited the high RCP level of 242 J kg −1 under the applied field of 7 T compared with a theoretical maximum of 343 J kg −1 . Similar values of RCP in other MSMAs can be achievable if microstructural elastic energy storage and hysteresis loss are minimized during the transformation with the help of annealing treatments

  20. Experimental study on heat transfer enhancement of laminar ferrofluid flow in horizontal tube partially filled porous media under fixed parallel magnet bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikhnejad, Yahya; Hosseini, Reza, E-mail: hoseinir@aut.ac.ir; Saffar Avval, Majid

    2017-02-15

    In this study, steady state laminar ferroconvection through circular horizontal tube partially filled with porous media under constant heat flux is experimentally investigated. Transverse magnetic fields were applied on ferrofluid flow by two fixed parallel magnet bar positioned on a certain distance from beginning of the test section. The results show promising notable enhancement in heat transfer as a consequence of partially filled porous media and magnetic field, up to 2.2 and 1.4 fold enhancement were observed in heat transfer coefficient respectively. It was found that presence of both porous media and magnetic field simultaneously can highly improve heat transfer up to 2.4 fold. Porous media of course plays a major role in this configuration. Virtually, application of Magnetic field and porous media also insert higher pressure loss along the pipe which again porous media contribution is higher that magnetic field. - Highlights: • Porous media can improve the coefficient of heat transfer up to 2.2 fold. • Both porous media and Nano particles have undesired pressure drop effect. • Application of both porous media and magnetic field in ferrofluid flow will result in significant enhancement in heat transfer up to 2.4 fold. • Magnet bar effect is mainly restricted to approximately one fourth of the test section. • Diluted Ferrofluids 2%, results in over 1.4 fold enhancement in heat transfer coefficient.

  1. Magnetic field effect on nanoparticles migration and heat transfer of water/alumina nanofluid in a channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malvandi, A., E-mail: amirmalvandi@aut.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), 424 Hafez Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganji, D.D., E-mail: ddg_davood@yahoo.com [Mechanical Engineering Department, Babol Noshirvani University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-08-01

    The present study is a theoretical investigation of the laminar flow and convective heat transfer of water/alumina nanofluid inside a parallel-plate channel in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. A modified two-component, four-equation, nonhomogeneous equilibrium model was employed for the alumina/water nanofluid, which fully accounted for the effect of the nanoparticle volume fraction distribution. The no-slip condition of the fluid–solid interface is abandoned in favor of a slip condition which appropriately represents the non-equilibrium region near the interface at micro/nano channels. The results obtained indicated that nanoparticles move from the heated walls (nanoparticles depletion) toward the core region of the channel (nanoparticles accumulation) and construct a non-uniform nanoparticles distribution. Moreover, in the presence of the magnetic field, the near wall velocity gradients increase, enhancing the slip velocity and thus the heat transfer rate and pressure drop increase. - Highlights: • Force convection of alumina/water nanofluid inside a parallel-plate channel. • Magnetic field effects on nanoparticles' migration. • Effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis diffusivities on nanoparticle migration. • Different mechanisms of heat transfer rate based on nanoparticles' diameter.

  2. Heating of a plasma by a powerful relativistic electron beam in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzhannikov, A.V.; Brejzman, B.N.; Vyacheslavov, L.N.; Kojdan, V.S.; Konyukhov, V.V.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation into the interaction of a powerful relativistic electron beam with plasma in the INAR apparatus are presented. The relativistic electron beam had initial energy of 1 MeV, maximum injection current of 10 kA, duration of 70 ns, and diameter of 2 cm. The total beam energy at entry into the plasma was approximately 300 J. The beam was injected into the column of a hydrogen plasma 230 cm long, 8 cm in diameter, and with a density of 3 x 10 14 cm -3 . The magnetic field had mirror-trap geometry (mirror ratio 1.7, intensity in the uniform portion up to 15 kOe). In the experiments, various diagnostic methods were used, making it possible to measure the beam current, the total current within the plasma, the total energy of the beam entering and leaving the plasma, and the distribution of beam current over the cross-section at the plasma outlet; opposing high-energy electrons were recorded. The density of the preliminary plasma was controlled during the experiment; the energy content of the plasma was determined from diamagnetic measurements; the electron distribution function was analysed by the method of Thomson scattering of light at 90deg. From an analysis of the shape of the diamagnetic signals and distribution of diamagnetism along the length of the apparatus it was established that under the assumption of predominant electron heating, the temperature of plasma electrons in order of magnitude equals 1 keV for a plasma density of 5 x 10 13 cm -3 . The cause of heating cannot be dissipation of the reversed current. According to Thomson scattering of laser radiation, the authors established the presence of a comparatively cold plasma component with temperature of 25 eV. High-energy electrons moving from the opposite direction toward the beam were recorded; their appearance evidently was associated with acceleration of plasma electrons in the induction fields. Mechanisms which can provide effective heating of the whole mass of

  3. Structural stability of hydrogenated amorphous carbon overcoats used in heat-assisted magnetic recording investigated by rapid thermal annealing

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.; Komvopoulos, K.; Rose, F.; Marchon, B.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films are extensively used as protective overcoats of magnetic recording media. Increasing demands for even higher storage densities have necessitated the development of new storage technologies, such as heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), which uses laser-assisted heating to record data on high-stability media that can store single bits in extremely small areas (∼1 Tbit/in.2). Because HAMR relies on locally changing the coercivity of the magnetic medium by raising the temperature above the Curie temperature for data to be stored by the magnetic write field, it raises a concern about the structural stability of the ultrathin a-C film. In this study, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) experiments were performed to examine the thermal stability of ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Structural changes in the a-C:H films caused by RTA were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray reflectivity, and conductive atomic force microscopy. The results show that the films exhibit thermal stability up to a maximum temperature in the range of 400-450 °C. Heating above this critical temperature leads to hydrogen depletion and sp 2 clustering. The critical temperature determined by the results of this study represents an upper bound of the temperature rise due to laser heating in HAMR hard-disk drives and the Curie temperature of magnetic materials used in HAMR hard disks. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Numerical simulation of flow and heat transfer of continous cast steel slab under traveling magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Haijun

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A unified numerical model for simulating solidification transport phenomena (STP of steel slab in electromagnetic continuous casting (EMCC process was developed. In order to solve the multi-physics fields coupled problem conveniently, the complicated bidirectional coupled process between EM and STP was simplified as a unidirectional one, and a FEM/FVM-combined numerical simulation technique was adopted. The traveling magnetic fields (TMFs applied to the EMCC process were calculated using the ANSYS11.0 software, and then the EM-data output by ANSYS were converted to FVM-format using a data-format conversion program developed previously. Thereafter, the governing equations were solved using a pressure-based Direct-SIMPLE algorithm. The simulation results of the STP in CC-process show that, due to the influences of Lorentz force and Joule heat, the two strong circulating flows and the temperature field can be obviously damped and changed once TMF with one pair of poles (1-POPs or 2-POPs is applied, which would accordingly improve the quality of casting. It was found in the present research that the integrated actions of 2-POPs TMF are superior to 1-POPs. All the computations indicate that the present numerical model of EM-STP as well as the FEM/FVM-combined technique is successful.

  5. Natural convection of nanofluid in a wavy cavity in the presence of magnetic field on variable heat surface temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javaherdeh, Korosh; Moslemi, Mehdi; Shahbazi, Mona [University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    A numerical analysis has been performed to investigate the laminar natural convection heat characteristics in a wavy cavity filled with CuO/water nanofluid. One of the sinusoidal walls (BC) is at the volatile high temperature and the opposite wavy surface is at a stable low temperature and the two other walls are considered flat and insulated while the uniform magnetic field is considered. Performing the analysis, the governing equations are given in terms of the stream function-vorticity formulation. In order to solve the nondimensionalized equations, discretizing with second-order accurate central difference method is performed then the successive under relaxation method with appropriate boundary conditions is considered. To validate the numerical model, various comparisons with previously published studies have been conducted and the results are in a good agreement. The main objective is to survey the effects of the Rayleigh number, Hartmann number, and nanoparticles volume fraction on the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics. The results are illustrated in contours of stream function, constant temperature, and Nusselt number. The results show that the presence of the magnetic field the local Nusselt number decreases at the hot wall. Moreover, the enhancement in the heat transfer performance increases with an increasing nanoparticle concentration. However, for all values of Rayleigh number, the presence of nanoparticles leads to significant enhancement in heat transfer and the increase of Rayleigh number causes the heat transfer mechanism to change from conduction to convection.

  6. Modeling of divertor particle and heat loads during application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields for ELM control in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, O., E-mail: o.schmitz@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Becoulet, M. [CEA/IRFM, Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Cahyna, P. [IPP AS CR, Za Slovankou 3, 18200 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Evans, T.E. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Feng, Y. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Frerichs, H.; Kirschner, A. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Kukushkin, A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Laengner, R. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Lunt, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Loarte, A.; Pitts, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Reiser, D.; Reiter, D. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Saibene, G. [Fusion for Energy Joint Undertaking, Barcelona (Spain); Samm, U. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    First results from three-dimensional modeling of the divertor heat and particle flux pattern during application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields as ELM control scheme in ITER with the EMC3-Eirene fluid plasma and kinetic neutral transport code are discussed. The formation of a helical magnetic footprint breaks the toroidal symmetry of the heat and particle fluxes. Expansion of the flux pattern as far as 60 cm away from the unperturbed strike line is seen with vacuum RMP fields, resulting in a preferable heat flux spreading. Inclusion of plasma response reduces the radial extension of the heat and particle fluxes and results in a heat flux peaking closer to the unperturbed level. A strong reduction of the particle confinement is found. 3D flow channels are identified as a consistent reason due to direct parallel outflow from inside of the separatrix. Their radial inward expansion and hence the level of particle pump out is shown to be dependent on the perturbation level.

  7. ROLE OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH AND NUMERICAL RESOLUTION IN SIMULATIONS OF THE HEAT-FLUX-DRIVEN BUOYANCY INSTABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avara, Mark J.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Bogdanović, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    The role played by magnetic fields in the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters is complex. The weakly collisional nature of the ICM leads to thermal conduction that is channeled along field lines. This anisotropic heat conduction profoundly changes the instabilities of the ICM atmosphere, with convective stabilities being driven by temperature gradients of either sign. Here, we employ the Athena magnetohydrodynamic code to investigate the local non-linear behavior of the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI) relevant in the cores of cooling-core clusters where the temperature increases with radius. We study a grid of two-dimensional simulations that span a large range of initial magnetic field strengths and numerical resolutions. For very weak initial fields, we recover the previously known result that the HBI wraps the field in the horizontal direction, thereby shutting off the heat flux. However, we find that simulations that begin with intermediate initial field strengths have a qualitatively different behavior, forming HBI-stable filaments that resist field-line wrapping and enable sustained vertical conductive heat flux at a level of 10%-25% of the Spitzer value. While astrophysical conclusions regarding the role of conduction in cooling cores require detailed global models, our local study proves that systems dominated by the HBI do not necessarily quench the conductive heat flux

  8. Flow of magnetic particles in blood with isothermal heating: A fractional model for two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farhad; Imtiaz, Anees; Khan, Ilyas; Sheikh, Nadeem Ahmad

    2018-06-01

    In the sixteenth century, medical specialists were of the conclusion that magnet can be utilized for the treatment or wipe out the illnesses from the body. On this basis, the research on magnet advances day by day for the treatment of different types of diseases in mankind. This study aims to investigate the effect of magnetic field and their applications in human body specifically in blood. Blood is a non-Newtonian fluid because its viscosity depends strongly on the fraction of volume occupied by red cells also called the hematocrit. Therefore, in this paper blood is considered as an example of non-Newtonian Casson fluid. The blood flow is considered in a vertical cylinder together with heat transfer due to mixed conviction caused by buoyancy force and the external pressure gradient. Effect of magnetic field on the velocities of blood and magnetic particles is also considered. The problem is modelled using the Caputo-Fabrizio derivative approach. The governing fractional partial differential equations are solved using Laplace and Hankel transformation techniques and exact solutions are obtained. Effects of different parameters such as Grashof number, Prandtl number, Casson fluid parameter and fractional parameters, and magnetic field are shown graphically. Both velocity profiles increase with the increase of Grashoff number and Casson fluid parameter and reduce with the increase of magnetic field.

  9. The PS Booster, PS and SPS Magnets for the next 25 years

    CERN Document Server

    Tommasini, D

    2010-01-01

    This note provides information and analysis on the present status of the magnets installed in the CERN Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB), the Proton Synchrotron (PS) and the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in view of their possible operation for the next 25 years. The note does not cover the magnets installed in the transfer lines, neither it covers the fast injection/extraction magnets (septa and kickers).

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  11. Thermodynamics of the Heat-Flux Avalanches at the First-Order Magnetic Transition in Magnetocaloric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazzi, Marco; Bennati, Cecilia; Basso, Vittorio

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the kinetics of first-order magnetic phase transitions by measuring and modeling the heat-flux avalanches corresponding to the irreversible motion of the phase-boundary interface separating the coexisting low- and high-temperature stable magnetic phases. By means of out-of-equilibrium thermodynamics, we encompass the damping mechanisms of the boundary motion in a phenomenological parameter αs. By analyzing the time behavior of the heat-flux signals measured on La (Fe -Mn -Si )13-H magnetocaloric compounds through Peltier calorimetry temperature scans performed at low rates, we relate the linear rise of the individual avalanches to the intrinsic-damping parameter αs.

  12. In-situ magnetization/heating electron holography to study the magnetic ordering in arrays of nickel metallic nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ortega

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanostructures of different size, shape, and composition possess a great potential to improve current technologies like data storage and electromagnetic sensing. In thin ferromagnetic nanowires, their magnetization behavior is dominated by the competition between magnetocrystalline anisotropy (related to the crystalline structure and shape anisotropy. In this way electron diffraction methods like precession electron diffraction (PED can be used to link the magnetic behavior observed by Electron Holography (EH with its crystallinity. Using off-axis electron holography under Lorentz conditions, we can experimentally determine the magnetization distribution over neighboring nanostructures and their diamagnetic matrix. In the case of a single row of nickel nanowires within the alumina template, the thin TEM samples showed a dominant antiferromagnetic arrangement demonstrating long-range magnetostatic interactions playing a major role.

  13. Experiments on the margin of beam induced quenches a superconducting quadrupole magnet in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Bednarek, M J; Nebot Del Busto, E; Goddard, B; Holzer, E B; Nordt, A; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    Protection of LHC equipment relies on a complex system of collimators to capture injected and circulating beam in case of LHC kicker magnet failures. However, for specific failures of the injection kickers, the beam can graze the injection protection collimators and induce quenches of downstream superconducting magnets. This occurred twice during 2011 operation and cannot be excluded during future operation. Tests were performed during Machine Development periods of the LHC to assess the quench margin of the quadrupole located just downstream of the last injection protection collimator in point 8. In addition to the existing Quench Protection System, a special monitoring instrumentation was installed at this magnet to detect any resistance increase below the quench limit. The correlation between the magnet and Beam Loss Monitor signals was analysed for different beam intensities and magnet currents. The results of the experiments are presented.

  14. INDUCTION HEATING OF NON-MAGNETIC SHEET METALS IN THE FIELD OF A FLAT CIRCULAR MULTITURN SOLENOID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Batygin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analysis of electromagnetic processes in the system for induction heating presented by a flat circular multiturn solenoid positioned above a plane of thin sheet non-magnetic metal has been conducted. The calculated dependences for the current induced in a metal sheet blank and ratio of transformation determined have been obtained. The maximal value of the transformation ratio with regard to spreading the eddy-currents over the whole area of the sheet metal has been determined.

  15. Magnetic determination of the specific heat jump at Tc in YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triscone, G.; Junod, A.; Muller, J.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetization measurements M(H,T) were performed on a polycrystalline YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 - δ sample in the reversible region near T c . Thermodynamic relations are used to address the question: is the specific heat jump an intrinsic characteristic property of the electron system at the superconducting transition? It is shown that the measured data up to 8T (rather than extrapolated to H c2 ) already yield 45% of the calorimetric jump

  16. Specific heat of heavy-fermion CePd{sub 2}Si{sub 2} in high magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikin, I. [University of Geneva, DPMC, Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: Ilya.Sheikin@physics.unige.ch; Wang, Y.; Bouquet, F.; Junod, A. [University of Geneva, DPMC, Geneva (Switzerland); Lejay, P. [CRTBT, CNRS, Grenoble (France)

    2002-07-22

    We report specific heat measurements on the heavy-fermion compound CePd{sub 2}Si{sub 2} in magnetic fields up to 16 T and in the temperature range 1.4-16 K. A sharp peak in the specific heat signals the antiferromagnetic transition at T{sub N} {approx} 9.3 K in zero field. The transition is found to shift to lower temperatures when a magnetic field is applied along the crystallographic a-axis, while a field applied parallel to the tetragonal c-axis does not affect the transition. The magnetic contribution to the specific heat below T{sub N} is well described by a sum of a linear electronic term and an antiferromagnetic spin-wave contribution. Just below T{sub N}, an additional positive curvature, especially at high fields, arises most probably due to thermal fluctuations. The field dependence of the coefficient of the low-temperature linear term, {gamma}{sub 0}, extracted from the fits shows a maximum at about 6 T, at the point where an anomaly was detected in susceptibility measurements. The relative field dependences of both T{sub N} and the magnetic entropy at T{sub N} scale as [1-(B/B{sub 0}){sup 2}] for B parallel a, suggesting the disappearance of antiferromagnetism at B{sub 0}{approx}42 T. The expected suppression of the antiferromagnetic transition temperature to zero makes the existence of a magnetic quantum critical point possible. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  17. Effects of the divertor tile geometries and magnetic field angles on the heat fluxes to the surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wanpeng; Sang, Chaofeng; Sun, Zhenyue; Wang, Dezhen, E-mail: wangdez@dlut.edu.cn

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Simulation of the plasma behaviors in the divertor gap region is done by using a 2d3 v Particle-In-Cell code. • Heat fluxes on the wall surface in different gap geometries are studied. • The effect of the magnetic field angle on the heat flux is investigated. - Abstract: A two dimension-in-space and three dimension-in-velocity (2d3v) Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code is applied to investigate the plasma behaviors at the divertor gaps region in this work. Electron and D{sup +} ion fluxes to the tile surface in the poloidal and toroidal gaps for different shaped edges are compared to demonstrate the optimized tile geometry. For poloidal gap, shaped edge in the shadowing side makes more ions penetrate into the gap, while shaped edge in the wetted side can mitigate the peak flux value. For toroidal gap, most ions entering the gap impinge on the side tile mainly due to the E × B drift, and shaped wetted edges also can mitigate the peak heat fluxes. In addition, effects of magnetic field inclination angle from toroidal direction on the plasma behaviors are simulated for poloidal and toroidal gaps, respectively. It is found that the magnetic field angles don’t influence the plasma behaviors in poloidal gap; while significant changes have been observed in the toroidal gap.

  18. Curing of a Bisphenol-E Based Cyanate Ester using Magnetic Nanoparticles as an Internal Heat Source through Induction Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    reactions forming high-temperature thermosetting polymers and for innovative ways to process such polymers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY...reaction should allow for other reactions forming high-temperature thermosetting polymers and for innovative ways to process such polymers...generated by the particles in a polymer,18 1 µm nickel alloy (Nitinol) used to compare polymerizations with conventional or induction heating,19 or a

  19. Effects of coating molecules on the magnetic heating properties of Au-Fe3O4 heterodimer nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Ogasawara, J.; Himukai, H.; Itoh, T.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we report the heating properties of gold-magnetite (Au-Fe3O4) heterodimer nanoparticles (NPs) subjected to an alternating magnetic field. The Au-Fe3O4 NPs coated with oleic acid and oleylamine (OA) were synthesized through a method that combines seed mediation and high-temperature decomposition. The coating was replaced with dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) by the ligand-exchange method. The specific absorption rates (SARs) for the OA- and DMSA-coated Au-Fe3O4 NPs coated with OA and DMSA at room temperature were determined through the calorimetric and magnetometric methods. SAR depended on the square of the magnetic field H up to an H value of 4 kA/m. The absolute value of the SAR for DMSA-coated NPs is about fivefold higher than that of the OA-coated NPs. The AC magnetic hysteresis measurements showed the recovery of the magnetic volume and the decrease in the magnetic anisotropy of the DMSA-coated NPs relative to those of the OA-coated NPs. These results suggest that the protective agent influences the magnetic properties of magnetite NPs via gold NPs.

  20. Boundary plasma heat flux width measurements for poloidal magnetic fields above 1 Tesla in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Dan; Labombard, Brian; Kuang, Adam; Terry, Jim; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2017-10-01

    The boundary heat flux width, along with the total power flowing into the boundary, sets the power exhaust challenge for tokamaks. A multi-machine boundary heat flux width database found that the heat flux width in H-modes scaled inversely with poloidal magnetic field (Bp) and was independent of machine size. The maximum Bp in the database was 0.8 T, whereas the ITER 15 MA, Q =10 scenario will be 1.2 T. New measurements of the boundary heat flux width in Alcator C-Mod extend the international database to plasmas with Bp up to 1.3 T. C-Mod was the only experiment able to operate at ITER-level Bp. These new measurements are from over 300 plasma shots in L-, I-, and EDA H-modes spanning essentially the whole operating space in C-Mod. We find that the inverse-Bp dependence of the heat flux width in H-modes continues to ITER-level Bp, further reinforcing the empirical projection of 500 μm heat flux width for ITER. We find 50% scatter around the inverse-Bp scaling and are searching for the `hidden variables' causing this scatter. Supported by USDoE award DE-FC02-99ER54512.