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Sample records for key nucleolar proteins

  1. Mapping a nucleolar targeting sequence of an RNA binding nucleolar protein, Nop25

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Suzuki, Shunji; Kanno, Motoko; Sugiyama, Hironobu; Takahashi, Hisaaki; Tanaka, Junya

    2006-01-01

    Nop25 is a putative RNA binding nucleolar protein associated with rRNA transcription. The present study was undertaken to determine the mechanism of Nop25 localization in the nucleolus. Deletion experiments of Nop25 amino acid sequence showed Nop25 to contain a nuclear targeting sequence in the N-terminal and a nucleolar targeting sequence in the C-terminal. By expressing derivative peptides from the C-terminal as GFP-fusion proteins in the cells, a lysine and arginine residue-enriched peptide (KRKHPRRAQDSTKKPPSATRTSKTQRRRR) allowed a GFP-fusion protein to be transported and fully retained in the nucleolus. When the peptide was fused with cMyc epitope and expressed in the cells, a cMyc epitope was then detected in the nucleolus. Nop25 did not localize in the nucleolus by deletion of the peptide from Nop25. Furthermore, deletion of a subdomain (KRKHPRRAQ) in the peptide or amino acid substitution of lysine and arginine residues in the subdomain resulted in the loss of Nop25 nucleolar localization. These results suggest that the lysine and arginine residue-enriched peptide is the most prominent nucleolar targeting sequence of Nop25 and that the long stretch of basic residues might play an important role in the nucleolar localization of Nop25. Although Nop25 contained putative SUMOylation, phosphorylation and glycosylation sites, the amino acid substitution in these sites had no effect on the nucleolar localization, thus suggesting that these post-translational modifications did not contribute to the localization of Nop25 in the nucleolus. The treatment of the cells, which expressed a GFP-fusion protein with a nucleolar targeting sequence of Nop25, with RNase A resulted in a complete dislocation of the protein from the nucleolus. These data suggested that the nucleolar targeting sequence might therefore play an important role in the binding of Nop25 to RNA molecules and that the RNA binding of Nop25 might be essential for the nucleolar localization of Nop25

  2. Nucleolar proteins change in altered gravity

    Sobol, M. A.; Kordyum, E. L.; Gonzalez-Camacho, F.; Medina, F. J.

    Discovery of gravisensitivity of cells no specified to gravity perception focused continuous attention on an elucidation of mechanisms involved in altered gravity effects at the different levels of cellular organization A nucleolus is the nuclear domain in which the major portion of ribosome biogenesis takes place This is a basic process for cell vitality beginning with the transcription of rDNA followed by processing newly synthesized pre-rRNA molecules A wide range of nucleolar proteins plays a highly significant role in all stages of biosynthesis of ribosomes Different steps of ribosome biogenesis should respond to various external factors affecting generally the cell metabolism Nevertheless a nucleolus remains not enough studied under the influence of altered environmental conditions For this reason we studied root apices from 2-day old Lepidium sativum seedlings germinated and grown under slow horizontal clinorotation and stationary conditions in darkness The extraction of cell nuclei followed by sequential fractionation of nuclear proteins according to their solubility in buffers of increasing ionic strength was carried out This procedure gave rise to 5 distinct fractions We analyzed nuclear subproteomes of the most soluble fraction called S2 It is actually a functionally significant fraction consisting of ribonucleoproteins actively engaged in pre-rRNA synthesis and processing 2D-electrophoresis of S2 fraction proteins was carried out The gels were silver stained and stained gels were scanned and analyzed

  3. Electrophoretic comparison of nuclear and nucleolar proteins II. Rat pancreas

    Poort, C.

    1961-01-01

    The nuclei and nucleoli from rat pancreas were isolated and extracted successively with 0.14 M NaCl, 1 M NaCl, and 0.1 N NaOH. In the 0.14 M NaCl and 0.1 N NaOH extracts agar electrophoresis revealed differences between the nucleolar proteins and those from the non-nucleolar part of the nucleus.

  4. SmgGDS is a transient nucleolar protein that protects cells from nucleolar stress and promotes the cell cycle by regulating DREAM complex gene expression.

    Gonyo, P; Bergom, C; Brandt, A C; Tsaih, S-W; Sun, Y; Bigley, T M; Lorimer, E L; Terhune, S S; Rui, H; Flister, M J; Long, R M; Williams, C L

    2017-12-14

    The chaperone protein and guanine nucleotide exchange factor SmgGDS (RAP1GDS1) is a key promoter of cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. SmgGDS undergoes nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, suggesting that it has both cytoplasmic and nuclear functions that promote cancer. Previous studies indicate that SmgGDS binds cytoplasmic small GTPases and promotes their trafficking to the plasma membrane. In contrast, little is known about the functions of SmgGDS in the nucleus, or how these nuclear functions might benefit cancer cells. Here we show unique nuclear localization and regulation of gene transcription pathways by SmgGDS. Strikingly, SmgGDS depletion significantly reduces expression of over 600 gene products that are targets of the DREAM complex, which is a transcription factor complex that regulates expression of proteins controlling the cell cycle. The cell cycle regulators E2F1, MYC, MYBL2 (B-Myb) and FOXM1 are among the DREAM targets that are diminished by SmgGDS depletion. E2F1 is well known to promote G1 cell cycle progression, and the loss of E2F1 in SmgGDS-depleted cells provides an explanation for previous reports that SmgGDS depletion characteristically causes a G1 cell cycle arrest. We show that SmgGDS localizes in nucleoli, and that RNAi-mediated depletion of SmgGDS in cancer cells disrupts nucleolar morphology, signifying nucleolar stress. We show that nucleolar SmgGDS interacts with the RNA polymerase I transcription factor upstream binding factor (UBF). The RNAi-mediated depletion of UBF diminishes nucleolar localization of SmgGDS and promotes proteasome-mediated degradation of SmgGDS, indicating that nucleolar sequestration of SmgGDS by UBF stabilizes SmgGDS protein. The ability of SmgGDS to interact with UBF and localize in the nucleolus is diminished by expressing DiRas1 or DiRas2, which are small GTPases that bind SmgGDS and act as tumor suppressors. Taken together, our results support a novel nuclear role for SmgGDS in protecting malignant

  5. Association of protein C23 with rapidly labeled nucleolar RNA

    Herrera, A.H.; Olson, M.O.

    1986-01-01

    The association of nucleolar phosphoprotein C23 with preribosomal ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles was examined in Novikoff hepatoma nucleoli. RNA was labeled with [ 3 H]uridine for various times in cell suspensions, and RNP particles were extracted from isolated nucleoli and fractionated by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. The majority of protein C23 cosedimented with fractions containing rapidly labeled RNA (RL fraction). To determine whether there was a direct association of RNA with protein C23, the RL fraction was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light (254 nm) for short periods of time. After 2 min of exposure there was a 50% decrease in C23 as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analyses, with no significant further decrease at longer times. When UV-treated fractions were subjected to phenol/chloroform extractions, as much as 30% of the labeled RNA was found in the phenol (protein) layer, indicating that RNA became cross-linked to protein. Similarly, there was an increase in protein C23 extracted into the water layer after irradiation. By SDS-PAGE analyses the cross-linked species migrated more slowly than protein C23, appearing as a smear detected either by [ 3 H]uridine radioactivity or by anti-C23 antibody. With anti-C23 antibodies, up to 25% of the labeled RNA was precipitated from the RL fraction. Dot-blot hybridizations, using cloned rDNA fragments as probes, indicated that the RNA in the RL fraction and the immunoprecipitated RNA contained sequences from 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA

  6. Fibrillarin, a nucleolar protein, is required for normal nuclear morphology and cellular growth in HeLa cells

    Amin, Mohammed Abdullahel; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Ma, Nan; Takata, Hideaki; Yokoyama, Masami; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2007-01-01

    Fibrillarin is a key small nucleolar protein in eukaryotes, which has an important role in pre-rRNA processing during ribosomal biogenesis. Though several functions of fibrillarin are known, its function during the cell cycle is still unknown. In this study, we confirmed the dynamic localization of fibrillarin during the cell cycle of HeLa cells and also performed functional studies by using a combination of immunofluorescence microscopy and RNAi technique. We observed that depletion of fibrillarin has almost no effect on the nucleolar structure. However, fibrillarin-depleted cells showed abnormal nuclear morphology. Moreover, fibrillarin depletion resulted in the reduction of the cellular growth and modest accumulation of cells with 4n DNA content. Our data suggest that fibrillarin would play a critical role in the maintenance of nuclear shape and cellular growth

  7. Nucleolar protein trafficking in response to HIV-1 Tat: rewiring the nucleolus.

    Jarboui, Mohamed Ali; Bidoia, Carlo; Woods, Elena; Roe, Barbara; Wynne, Kieran; Elia, Giuliano; Hall, William W; Gautier, Virginie W

    2012-01-01

    The trans-activator Tat protein is a viral regulatory protein essential for HIV-1 replication. Tat trafficks to the nucleoplasm and the nucleolus. The nucleolus, a highly dynamic and structured membrane-less sub-nuclear compartment, is the site of rRNA and ribosome biogenesis and is involved in numerous cellular functions including transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control and viral infection. Importantly, transient nucleolar trafficking of both Tat and HIV-1 viral transcripts are critical in HIV-1 replication, however, the role(s) of the nucleolus in HIV-1 replication remains unclear. To better understand how the interaction of Tat with the nucleolar machinery contributes to HIV-1 pathogenesis, we investigated the quantitative changes in the composition of the nucleolar proteome of Jurkat T-cells stably expressing HIV-1 Tat fused to a TAP tag. Using an organellar proteomic approach based on mass spectrometry, coupled with Stable Isotope Labelling in Cell culture (SILAC), we quantified 520 proteins, including 49 proteins showing significant changes in abundance in Jurkat T-cell nucleolus upon Tat expression. Numerous proteins exhibiting a fold change were well characterised Tat interactors and/or known to be critical for HIV-1 replication. This suggests that the spatial control and subcellular compartimentaliation of these cellular cofactors by Tat provide an additional layer of control for regulating cellular machinery involved in HIV-1 pathogenesis. Pathway analysis and network reconstruction revealed that Tat expression specifically resulted in the nucleolar enrichment of proteins collectively participating in ribosomal biogenesis, protein homeostasis, metabolic pathways including glycolytic, pentose phosphate, nucleotides and amino acids biosynthetic pathways, stress response, T-cell signaling pathways and genome integrity. We present here the first differential profiling of the nucleolar proteome of T-cells expressing HIV-1 Tat. We discuss how these

  8. Ribosomal RNA and nucleolar proteins from the oocyte are to some degree used for embryonic nucleolar formation in cattle and pig

    Maddox-Hyttel, Poul; Svarcova, Olga; Laurincik, Josef

    2007-01-01

    The nucleolus is the site of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosome production. In the bovine primordial follicle oocyte, this organelle is inactive, but in the secondary follicle an active fibrillo-granular nucleolus develops and proteins involved in rDNA transcription (topoisomerase I, RNA polymerase...... I and upstream binding factor) and early (fibrillarin) or late rRNA processing (nucleolin and nucleophosmin) localize to it. At the end of the oocyte growth phase, the nucleolus is inactivated again and transforms into a solid remnant. The nucleolar remnant is dissolved when meiosis is resumed. Upon...... fertilization, structures resembling the nucleolar remnant, now referred to as nucleolus precursor bodies (NPBs), are established in the pronuclei. These entities are engaged in the re-establishment of fibrilo-granular nucleoli at the major activation of the embryonic genome. This nucleolar formation can...

  9. Nonstructural Protein NSs of Schmallenberg Virus Is Targeted to the Nucleolus and Induces Nucleolar Disorganization.

    Gouzil, Julie; Fablet, Aurore; Lara, Estelle; Caignard, Grégory; Cochet, Marielle; Kundlacz, Cindy; Palmarini, Massimo; Varela, Mariana; Breard, Emmanuel; Sailleau, Corinne; Viarouge, Cyril; Coulpier, Muriel; Zientara, Stéphan; Vitour, Damien

    2017-01-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) was discovered in Germany in late 2011 and then spread rapidly to many European countries. SBV is an orthobunyavirus that causes abortion and congenital abnormalities in ruminants. A virus-encoded nonstructural protein, termed NSs, is a major virulence factor of SBV, and it is known to promote the degradation of Rpb1, a subunit of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) complex, and therefore hampers global cellular transcription. In this study, we found that NSs is mainly localized in the nucleus of infected cells and specifically appears to target the nucleolus through a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) localized between residues 33 and 51 of the protein. NSs colocalizes with nucleolar markers such as B23 (nucleophosmin) and fibrillarin. We observed that in SBV-infected cells, B23 undergoes a nucleolus-to-nucleoplasm redistribution, evocative of virus-induced nucleolar disruption. In contrast, the nucleolar pattern of B23 was unchanged upon infection with an SBV recombinant mutant with NSs lacking the NoLS motif (SBVΔNoLS). Interestingly, unlike wild-type SBV, the inhibitory activity of SBVΔNoLS toward RNA Pol II transcription is impaired. Overall, our results suggest that a putative link exists between NSs-induced nucleolar disruption and its inhibitory function on cellular transcription, which consequently precludes the cellular antiviral response and/or induces cell death. Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is an emerging arbovirus of ruminants that spread in Europe between 2011 and 2013. SBV induces fetal abnormalities during gestation, with the central nervous system being one of the most affected organs. The virus-encoded NSs protein acts as a virulence factor by impairing host cell transcription. Here, we show that NSs contains a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) and induces disorganization of the nucleolus. The NoLS motif in the SBV NSs is absolutely necessary for virus-induced inhibition of cellular transcription. To our knowledge, this

  10. In nucleoli, the steady state of nucleolar proteins is leptomycin B-sensitive.

    Muro, Eleonora; Hoang, Thang Q; Jobart-Malfait, Aude; Hernandez-Verdun, Danièle

    2008-05-01

    The nucleolus is a dynamic structure. It has been demonstrated that nucleolar proteins rapidly associate with and dissociate from nucleolar components in continuous exchanges with the nucleoplasm using GFP (green fluorescent protein)-tagged proteins. However, how the exchanges within one nucleolus and between nucleoli within the nuclear volume occurred is still poorly understood. The movement of PAGFP (photoactivatable GFP)-tagged proteins that become visible after photoactivation can be followed. In the present study, we establish the protocol allowing quantification of the traffic of PAGFP-tagged nucleolar proteins in nuclei containing two nucleoli. The traffic in the activated area, at the periphery of the activated area and to the neighbouring nucleolus is measured. Protein B23 is rapidly replaced in the activated area, and at the periphery of the activated area the steady state suggests intranucleolar recycling of B23; this recycling is LMB (leptomycin B)-sensitive. The pool of activated B23 is equally distributed in the volume of the two nucleoli within 2 min. The three-dimensional distribution of the proteins Nop52 and fibrillarin is less rapid than that of B23 but is also LMB-sensitive. In contrast, traffic of fibrillarin from the nucleoli to the CB (Cajal body) was not modified by LMB. We propose that the steady state of nucleolar proteins in nucleoli depends on the affinity of the proteins for their partners and on intranucleolar recycling. This steady state can be impaired by LMB but not the uptake in the neighbouring nucleolus or the CB.

  11. A plant virus movement protein forms ringlike complexes with the major nucleolar protein, fibrillarin, in vitro.

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Kim, Sang Hyon; Kalinina, Natalia O; Shaw, Jane; Adya, Ashok K; Gillespie, Trudi; Brown, John W S; Taliansky, Michael

    2008-02-29

    Fibrillarin, one of the major proteins of the nucleolus, has methyltransferase activity directing 2'-O-ribose methylation of rRNA and snRNAs and is required for rRNA processing. The ability of the plant umbravirus, groundnut rosette virus, to move long distances through the phloem, the specialized plant vascular system, has been shown to strictly depend on the interaction of one of its proteins, the ORF3 protein (protein encoded by open reading frame 3), with fibrillarin. This interaction is essential for several stages in the groundnut rosette virus life cycle such as nucleolar import of the ORF3 protein via Cajal bodies, relocalization of some fibrillarin from the nucleolus to cytoplasm, and assembly of cytoplasmic umbraviral ribonucleoprotein particles that are themselves required for the long-distance spread of the virus and systemic infection. Here, using atomic force microscopy, we determine the architecture of these complexes as single-layered ringlike structures with a diameter of 18-22 nm and a height of 2.0+/-0.4 nm, which consist of several (n=6-8) distinct protein granules. We also estimate the molar ratio of fibrillarin to ORF3 protein in the complexes as approximately 1:1. Based on these data, we propose a model of the structural organization of fibrillarin-ORF3 protein complexes and discuss potential mechanistic and functional implications that may also apply to other viruses.

  12. Influence of heart failure on nucleolar organization and protein expression in human hearts

    Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Rivera, Miguel; Cortés, Raquel; Azorín, Inmaculada; Sirera, Rafael; Martínez-Dolz, Luis; Hove, Leif; Cinca, Juan; Lago, Francisca; González-Juanatey, José R.; Salvador, Antonio; Portolés, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Heart failure alters nucleolar morphology and organization. ► Nucleolin expression is significant increased in ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy. ► Ventricular function of heart failure patients was related with nucleolin levels. -- Abstract: We investigate for the first time the influence of heart failure (HF) on nucleolar organization and proteins in patients with ischemic (ICM) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). A total of 71 human hearts from ICM (n = 38) and DCM (n = 27) patients, undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n = 6), were analysed by western-blotting, RT-PCR and cell biology methods. When we compared protein levels according to HF etiology, nucleolin was increased in both ICM (117%, p < 0.05) and DCM (141%, p < 0.01). Moreover, mRNA expression were also upregulated in ICM (1.46-fold, p < 0.05) and DCM (1.70-fold, p < 0.05. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the highest intensity of nucleolin was into nucleolus (p < 0.0001), and it was increased in pathological hearts (p < 0.0001). Ultrastructure analysis by electron microscopy showed an increase in the nucleus and nucleolus size in ICM (17%, p < 0.05 and 131%, p < 0.001) and DCM (56%, p < 0.01 and 69%, p < 0.01). Nucleolar organization was influenced by HF irrespective of etiology, increasing fibrillar centers (p < 0.001), perinucleolar chromatin (p < 0.01) and dense fibrillar components (p < 0.01). Finally, left ventricular function parameters were related with nucleolin levels in ischemic hearts (p < 0.0001). The present study demonstrates that HF influences on morphology and organization of nucleolar components, revealing changes in the expression and in the levels of nucleolin protein.

  13. Influence of heart failure on nucleolar organization and protein expression in human hearts

    Rosello-Lleti, Esther; Rivera, Miguel; Cortes, Raquel [Cardiocirculatory Unit, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Azorin, Inmaculada [Experimental Neurology, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Sirera, Rafael [Biotechnology Department, Universidad Politecnica, Valencia (Spain); Martinez-Dolz, Luis [Cardiology Unit, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Hove, Leif; Cinca, Juan [Cardiology Unit, Hospital San Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Lago, Francisca; Gonzalez-Juanatey, Jose R. [Cardiology Unit, Institute of Biomedical Research, Hospital Clinicode Santiagode Compostela (Spain); Salvador, Antonio [Experimental Neurology, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Portoles, Manuel, E-mail: portoles_man@gva.es [Cell Biology and Pathology Unit, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heart failure alters nucleolar morphology and organization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleolin expression is significant increased in ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ventricular function of heart failure patients was related with nucleolin levels. -- Abstract: We investigate for the first time the influence of heart failure (HF) on nucleolar organization and proteins in patients with ischemic (ICM) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). A total of 71 human hearts from ICM (n = 38) and DCM (n = 27) patients, undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n = 6), were analysed by western-blotting, RT-PCR and cell biology methods. When we compared protein levels according to HF etiology, nucleolin was increased in both ICM (117%, p < 0.05) and DCM (141%, p < 0.01). Moreover, mRNA expression were also upregulated in ICM (1.46-fold, p < 0.05) and DCM (1.70-fold, p < 0.05. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the highest intensity of nucleolin was into nucleolus (p < 0.0001), and it was increased in pathological hearts (p < 0.0001). Ultrastructure analysis by electron microscopy showed an increase in the nucleus and nucleolus size in ICM (17%, p < 0.05 and 131%, p < 0.001) and DCM (56%, p < 0.01 and 69%, p < 0.01). Nucleolar organization was influenced by HF irrespective of etiology, increasing fibrillar centers (p < 0.001), perinucleolar chromatin (p < 0.01) and dense fibrillar components (p < 0.01). Finally, left ventricular function parameters were related with nucleolin levels in ischemic hearts (p < 0.0001). The present study demonstrates that HF influences on morphology and organization of nucleolar components, revealing changes in the expression and in the levels of nucleolin protein.

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae SSB1 protein and its relationship to nucleolar RNA-binding proteins.

    Jong, A Y; Clark, M W; Gilbert, M; Oehm, A; Campbell, J L

    1987-08-01

    To better define the function of Saccharomyces cerevisiae SSB1, an abundant single-stranded nucleic acid-binding protein, we determined the nucleotide sequence of the SSB1 gene and compared it with those of other proteins of known function. The amino acid sequence contains 293 amino acid residues and has an Mr of 32,853. There are several stretches of sequence characteristic of other eucaryotic single-stranded nucleic acid-binding proteins. At the amino terminus, residues 39 to 54 are highly homologous to a peptide in calf thymus UP1 and UP2 and a human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein. Residues 125 to 162 constitute a fivefold tandem repeat of the sequence RGGFRG, the composition of which suggests a nucleic acid-binding site. Near the C terminus, residues 233 to 245 are homologous to several RNA-binding proteins. Of 18 C-terminal residues, 10 are acidic, a characteristic of the procaryotic single-stranded DNA-binding proteins and eucaryotic DNA- and RNA-binding proteins. In addition, examination of the subcellular distribution of SSB1 by immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that SSB1 is a nuclear protein, predominantly located in the nucleolus. Sequence homologies and the nucleolar localization make it likely that SSB1 functions in RNA metabolism in vivo, although an additional role in DNA metabolism cannot be excluded.

  15. Clusters of basic amino acids contribute to RNA binding and nucleolar localization of ribosomal protein L22.

    Jennifer L Houmani

    Full Text Available The ribosomal protein L22 is a component of the 60S eukaryotic ribosomal subunit. As an RNA-binding protein, it has been shown to interact with both cellular and viral RNAs including 28S rRNA and the Epstein-Barr virus encoded RNA, EBER-1. L22 is localized to the cell nucleus where it accumulates in nucleoli. Although previous studies demonstrated that a specific amino acid sequence is required for nucleolar localization, the RNA-binding domain has not been identified. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that the nucleolar accumulation of L22 is linked to its ability to bind RNA. To address this hypothesis, mutated L22 proteins were generated to assess the contribution of specific amino acids to RNA binding and protein localization. Using RNA-protein binding assays, we demonstrate that basic amino acids 80-93 are required for high affinity binding of 28S rRNA and EBER-1 by L22. Fluorescence localization studies using GFP-tagged mutated L22 proteins further reveal that basic amino acids 80-93 are critical for nucleolar accumulation and for incorporation into ribosomes. Our data support the growing consensus that the nucleolar accumulation of ribosomal proteins may not be mediated by a defined localization signal, but rather by specific interaction with established nucleolar components such as rRNA.

  16. The Subcellular Localization and Functional Analysis of Fibrillarin2, a Nucleolar Protein in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Luping Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleolar proteins play important roles in plant cytology, growth, and development. Fibrillarin2 is a nucleolar protein of Nicotiana benthamiana (N. benthamiana. Its cDNA was amplified by RT-PCR and inserted into expression vector pEarley101 labeled with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP. The fusion protein was localized in the nucleolus and Cajal body of leaf epidermal cells of N. benthamiana. The N. benthamiana fibrillarin2 (NbFib2 protein has three functional domains (i.e., glycine and arginine rich domain, RNA-binding domain, and α-helical domain and a nuclear localization signal (NLS in C-terminal. The protein 3D structure analysis predicted that NbFib2 is an α/β protein. In addition, the virus induced gene silencing (VIGS approach was used to determine the function of NbFib2. Our results showed that symptoms including growth retardation, organ deformation, chlorosis, and necrosis appeared in NbFib2-silenced N. benthamiana.

  17. Identification of an evolutionary conserved SURF-6 domain in a family of nucleolar proteins extending from human to yeast

    Polzikov, Mikhail; Zatsepina, Olga; Magoulas, Charalambos

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian SURF-6 protein is localized in the nucleolus, yet its function remains elusive in the recently characterized nucleolar proteome. We discovered by searching the Protein families database that a unique evolutionary conserved SURF-6 domain is present in the carboxy-terminal of a novel family of eukaryotic proteins extending from human to yeast. By using the enhanced green fluorescent protein as a fusion protein marker in mammalian cells, we show that proteins from distantly related taxonomic groups containing the SURF-6 domain are localized in the nucleolus. Deletion sequence analysis shows that multiple regions of the SURF-6 protein are capable of nucleolar targeting independently of the evolutionary conserved domain. We identified that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae member of the SURF-6 family, named rrp14 or ykl082c, has been categorized in yeast databases to interact with proteins involved in ribosomal biogenesis and cell polarity. These results classify SURF-6 as a new family of nucleolar proteins in the eukaryotic kingdom and point out that SURF-6 has a distinct domain within the known nucleolar proteome that may mediate complex protein-protein interactions for analogous processes between yeast and mammalian cells

  18. Evolutionary conservation of nuclear and nucleolar targeting sequences in yeast ribosomal protein S6A

    Lipsius, Edgar; Walter, Korden; Leicher, Torsten; Phlippen, Wolfgang; Bisotti, Marc-Angelo; Kruppa, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Over 1 billion years ago, the animal kingdom diverged from the fungi. Nevertheless, a high sequence homology of 62% exists between human ribosomal protein S6 and S6A of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To investigate whether this similarity in primary structure is mirrored in corresponding functional protein domains, the nuclear and nucleolar targeting signals were delineated in yeast S6A and compared to the known human S6 signals. The complete sequence of S6A and cDNA fragments was fused to the 5'-end of the LacZ gene, the constructs were transiently expressed in COS cells, and the subcellular localization of the fusion proteins was detected by indirect immunofluorescence. One bipartite and two monopartite nuclear localization signals as well as two nucleolar binding domains were identified in yeast S6A, which are located at homologous regions in human S6 protein. Remarkably, the number, nature, and position of these targeting signals have been conserved, albeit their amino acid sequences have presumably undergone a process of co-evolution with their corresponding rRNAs

  19. Nucleolar localization of cirhin, the protein mutated in North American Indian childhood cirrhosis

    Yu, Bin; Mitchell, Grant A.; Richter, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Cirhin (NP 1 16219), the product of the CIRH1A gene is mutated in North American Indian childhood cirrhosis (NAIC/CIRH1A, OMIM 604901), a severe autosomal recessive intrahepatic cholestasis. It is a 686-amino-acid WD40-repeat containing protein of unknown function that is predicted to contain multiple targeting signals, including an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signal, a C-terminal monopartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) and a bipartite nuclear localization signal (BNLS). We performed the direct determination of subcellular localization of cirhin as a crucial first step in unraveling its biological function. Using EGFP and His-tagged cirhin fusion proteins expressed in HeLa and HepG2, cells we show that cirhin is a nucleolar protein and that the R565W mutation, for which all NAIC patients are homozygous, has no effect on subcellular localization. Cirhin has an active C-terminal monopartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) and a unique nucleolar localization signal (NrLS) between residues 315 and 432. The nucleolus is not known to be important specifically for intrahepatic cholestasis. These observations provide a new dimension in the study of hereditary cholestasis

  20. Nucleolar development and allocation of key nucleolar proteins require de novo transcription in bovine embryos

    Svarcova, Olga; Laurincik, Jozef; Avery, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    and the early 8-cell stage, and the entire nucleoplasm as well as nucleolus precursor bodies (NBBs) were prominently labelled in all late 8-cell stages. The NPBs displayed initial transformation into fibrillo-granular nucleoli. In the a-amanitin group, lack of autoradiographic labelling was seen at all...

  1. Immunodetection of nucleolar proteins and ultrastructure of nucleoli of soybean root meristematic cells treated with chilling stress and after recovery.

    Stepiński, Dariusz

    2009-03-01

    The nucleolar proteins, fibrillarin and nucleophosmin, have been identified immunofluorescently in the root meristematic cells of soybean seedlings under varying experimental conditions: at 25 degrees C (control), chilling at 10 degrees C for 3 h and 4 days and recovery from the chilling stress at 25 degrees C. In each experimental variant, the immunofluorescence signals were present solely at the nucleolar territories. Fluorescent staining for both proteins was mainly in the shape of circular domains that are assumed to correspond to the dense fibrillar component of the nucleoli. The fewest fluorescent domains were observed in the nucleoli of chilled plants, and the highest number was observed in the plants recovered after chilling. This difference in the number of circular domains in the nucleoli of each variant may indicate various levels of these proteins in each variant. Both the number of circular domains and the level of these nucleolar proteins changed with changes in the transcriptional activity of the nucleoli, with the more metabolically active cell having higher numbers of active areas in the nucleolus and higher levels of nucleolar proteins, and conversely. Electron microscopic studies revealed differences in the ultrastructure of the nucleoli in all experimental variants and confirmed that the number of fibrillar centres surrounded by dense fibrillar component was the lowest in the nucleoli of chilled plants, and the highest in the nucleoli of recovered seedlings.

  2. The nucleolar GTP-binding proteins Gnl2 and nucleostemin are required for retinal neurogenesis in developing zebrafish

    Paridaen, J.T.M.; Janson, E.; Utami, K.H.; Pereboom, T.C.; Essers, P.; van Rooijen, C.R.; Zivkovic, D.; MacInnes, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleostemin (NS), a member of a family of nucleolar GTP-binding proteins, is highly expressed in proliferating cells such as stem and cancer cells and is involved in the control of cell cycle progression. Both depletion and overexpression of NS result in stabilization of the tumor suppressor p53

  3. The nucleolar phosphoprotein B23 targets Newcastle disease virus matrix protein to the nucleoli and facilitates viral replication.

    Duan, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jian; Xu, Haixu; Zhu, Jie; Li, Qunhui; He, Liang; Liu, Huimou; Hu, Shunlin; Liu, Xiufan

    2014-03-01

    The cellular nucleolar proteins are reported to facilitate the replication cycles of some human and animal viruses by interaction with viral proteins. In this study, a nucleolar phosphoprotein B23 was identified to interact with Newcastle disease virus (NDV) matrix (M) protein. We found that NDV M protein accumulated in the nucleolus by binding B23 early in infection, but resulted in the redistribution of B23 from the nucleoli to the nucleoplasm later in infection. In vitro binding studies utilizing deletion mutants indicated that amino acids 30-60 of M and amino acids 188-245 of B23 were required for binding. Furthermore, knockdown of B23 by siRNA or overexpression of B23 or M-binding B23-derived polypeptides remarkably reduced cytopathic effect and inhibited NDV replication. Collectively, we show that B23 facilitates NDV replication by targeting M to the nucleolus, demonstrating for the first time a direct role for nucleolar protein B23 in a paramyxovirus replication process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of nucleolar-related proteins in porcine preimplantation embryos produced in vivo and in vitro

    Bjerregaard, Bolette; Wrenzycki, Christine; Strejcek, Frantisek

    2004-01-01

    The expression of nucleolar-related proteins was studied as an indirect marker of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene activation in porcine embryos up to the blastocyst stage produced in vivo and in vitro. A group of the in vivo-developed embryos were cultured with alpha-amanitin to block the de novo...... proteins pRb and p130, which are involved in cell-cycle regulation, was assessed by semiquantitative RT-PCR up to the blastocyst stage. Toward the end of third cell cycle, the nuclei in non-alpha-amanitin-treated, in vivo-produced embryos displayed different stages of transformation of the nuclear...... was delayed in porcine embryos produced in vitro compared to the in vivo-derived counterparts with respect to mRNAs encoding PAF53 and UBF. Moreover, differences existed in the mRNA expression patterns of pRb between in vivo- and in vitro-developed embryos. These findings show, to our knowledge for the first...

  5. C1q protein binds to the apoptotic nucleolus and causes C1 protease degradation of nucleolar proteins.

    Cai, Yitian; Teo, Boon Heng Dennis; Yeo, Joo Guan; Lu, Jinhua

    2015-09-11

    In infection, complement C1q recognizes pathogen-congregated antibodies and elicits complement activation. Among endogenous ligands, C1q binds to DNA and apoptotic cells, but whether C1q binds to nuclear DNA in apoptotic cells remains to be investigated. With UV irradiation-induced apoptosis, C1q initially bound to peripheral cellular regions in early apoptotic cells. By 6 h, binding concentrated in the nuclei to the nucleolus but not the chromatins. When nucleoli were isolated from non-apoptotic cells, C1q also bound to these structures. In vivo, C1q exists as the C1 complex (C1qC1r2C1s2), and C1q binding to ligands activates the C1r/C1s proteases. Incubation of nucleoli with C1 caused degradation of the nucleolar proteins nucleolin and nucleophosmin 1. This was inhibited by the C1 inhibitor. The nucleoli are abundant with autoantigens. C1q binding and C1r/C1s degradation of nucleolar antigens during cell apoptosis potentially reduces autoimmunity. These findings help us to understand why genetic C1q and C1r/C1s deficiencies cause systemic lupus erythematosus. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. NAT10, a nucleolar protein, localizes to the midbody and regulates cytokinesis and acetylation of microtubules

    Shen, Qi; Zheng, Xingzheng; McNutt, Michael A.; Guang, Lizhao; Sun, Ying; Wang, Jiaochen; Gong, Yilei; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Bo

    2009-01-01

    The midbody is a structural organelle formed in late phase mitosis which is responsible for completion of cytokinesis. Although various kinds of proteins have been found to distribute or immigrate to this organelle, their functions have still not been completely worked out. In this study, we demonstrated that NAT10 (N-acetyltransferase 10, NAT10) is not only predominantly distributed in the nucleolus in interphase, but is also concentrated in the mitotic midbody during telophase. The domain in N-terminal residues 549-834 of NAT10 specifically mediated its subcellular localization. Treatment with genotoxic agents or irradiation increased concentration of NAT10 in both the nucleolus and midbody. Moreover, DNA damage induced increase of NAT10 in the midbody apparently accompanied by in situ elevation of the level of acetylated α-tubulin, suggesting that it plays a role in maintaining or enhancing stability of α-tubulin. The depletion of NAT10 induced defects in nucleolar assembly, cytokinesis and decreased acetylated α-tubulin, leading to G2/M cell cycle arrest or delay of mitotic exit. In addition, over-expression of NAT10 was found in a variety of soft tissue sarcomas, and correlated with tumor histological grading. These results indicate that NAT10 may play an important role in cell division through facilitating reformation of the nucleolus and midbody in the late phase of cell mitosis, and stabilization of microtubules.

  7. NAT10, a nucleolar protein, localizes to the midbody and regulates cytokinesis and acetylation of microtubules

    Shen, Qi; Zheng, Xingzheng; McNutt, Michael A.; Guang, Lizhao; Sun, Ying; Wang, Jiaochen; Gong, Yilei; Hou, Lin [Department of Pathology, Health Science Center of Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, Bo, E-mail: zhangbo@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology, Health Science Center of Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2009-06-10

    The midbody is a structural organelle formed in late phase mitosis which is responsible for completion of cytokinesis. Although various kinds of proteins have been found to distribute or immigrate to this organelle, their functions have still not been completely worked out. In this study, we demonstrated that NAT10 (N-acetyltransferase 10, NAT10) is not only predominantly distributed in the nucleolus in interphase, but is also concentrated in the mitotic midbody during telophase. The domain in N-terminal residues 549-834 of NAT10 specifically mediated its subcellular localization. Treatment with genotoxic agents or irradiation increased concentration of NAT10 in both the nucleolus and midbody. Moreover, DNA damage induced increase of NAT10 in the midbody apparently accompanied by in situ elevation of the level of acetylated {alpha}-tubulin, suggesting that it plays a role in maintaining or enhancing stability of {alpha}-tubulin. The depletion of NAT10 induced defects in nucleolar assembly, cytokinesis and decreased acetylated {alpha}-tubulin, leading to G2/M cell cycle arrest or delay of mitotic exit. In addition, over-expression of NAT10 was found in a variety of soft tissue sarcomas, and correlated with tumor histological grading. These results indicate that NAT10 may play an important role in cell division through facilitating reformation of the nucleolus and midbody in the late phase of cell mitosis, and stabilization of microtubules.

  8. NOA36 Protein Contains a Highly Conserved Nucleolar Localization Signal Capable of Directing Functional Proteins to the Nucleolus, in Mammalian Cells

    de Melo, Ivan S.; Jimenez-Nuñez, Maria D.; Iglesias, Concepción; Campos-Caro, Antonio; Moreno-Sanchez, David; Ruiz, Felix A.; Bolívar, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    NOA36/ZNF330 is an evolutionarily well-preserved protein present in the nucleolus and mitochondria of mammalian cells. We have previously reported that the pro-apoptotic activity of this protein is mediated by a characteristic cysteine-rich domain. We now demonstrate that the nucleolar localization of NOA36 is due to a highly-conserved nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) present in residues 1–33. This NoLS is a sequence containing three clusters of two or three basic amino acids. We fused the amino terminal of NOA36 to eGFP in order to characterize this putative NoLS. We show that a cluster of three lysine residues at positions 3 to 5 within this sequence is critical for the nucleolar localization. We also demonstrate that the sequence as found in human is capable of directing eGFP to the nucleolus in several mammal, fish and insect cells. Moreover, this NoLS is capable of specifically directing the cytosolic yeast enzyme polyphosphatase to the target of the nucleolus of HeLa cells, wherein its enzymatic activity was detected. This NoLS could therefore serve as a very useful tool as a nucleolar marker and for directing particular proteins to the nucleolus in distant animal species. PMID:23516598

  9. Nucleolar targeting of proteins by the tandem array of basic amino acid stretches identified in the RNA polymerase I-associated factor PAF49

    Ushijima, Ryujiro; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Nagata, Izumi; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence to indicate that the regulation of subnuclear compartmentalization plays important roles in cellular processes. The RNA polymerase I-associated factor PAF49 has been shown to accumulate in the nucleolus in growing cells, but disperse into the nucleoplasm in growth-arrested cells. Serial deletion analysis revealed that amino acids 199-338 were necessary for the nucleolar localization of PAF49. Combinatorial point mutation analysis indicated that the individual basic amino acid stretches (BS) within the central (BS1-4) and the C-terminal (BS5 and 6) regions may cooperatively confer the nucleolar localization of PAF49. Addition of the basic stretches in tandem to a heterologous protein, such as the interferon regulatory factor-3, translocated the tagged protein into the nucleolus, even in the presence of an intrinsic nuclear export sequence. Thus, tandem array of the basic amino acid stretches identified here functions as a dominant nucleolar targeting sequence

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae SSB1 protein and its relationship to nucleolar RNA-binding proteins.

    Jong, A Y; Clark, M W; Gilbert, M; Oehm, A; Campbell, J L

    1987-01-01

    To better define the function of Saccharomyces cerevisiae SSB1, an abundant single-stranded nucleic acid-binding protein, we determined the nucleotide sequence of the SSB1 gene and compared it with those of other proteins of known function. The amino acid sequence contains 293 amino acid residues and has an Mr of 32,853. There are several stretches of sequence characteristic of other eucaryotic single-stranded nucleic acid-binding proteins. At the amino terminus, residues 39 to 54 are highly ...

  11. Analysis of nucleolar morphology and protein localization as an indicator of nuclear reprogramming

    Østrup, Olga; Pedersen, Hanne Skovsgaard; Holm, Hanne M.

    2015-01-01

    When a cell is reprogrammed to a new phenotype, the nucleolus undergoes more or less dramatic modulations, which can be used as a marker for the occurrence of the reprogramming. This phenomenon is most pronounced when differentiated cells are reprogrammed to totipotency when they are submitted...... of the nucleolus are summarized in this developmental context, but also as they occur in assisted reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization and somatic cell nuclear transfer. Moreover, detailed protocols for monitoring the nucleolar changes by transmission electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry...

  12. Comparison of mitochondrial and nucleolar RNase MRP reveals identical RNA components with distinct enzymatic activities and protein components.

    Lu, Qiaosheng; Wierzbicki, Sara; Krasilnikov, Andrey S; Schmitt, Mark E

    2010-03-01

    RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein endoribonuclease found in three cellular locations where distinct substrates are processed: the mitochondria, the nucleolus, and the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic RNase MRP is the nucleolar enzyme that is transiently relocalized during mitosis. Nucleolar RNase MRP (NuMRP) was purified to homogeneity, and we extensively purified the mitochondrial RNase MRP (MtMRP) to a single RNA component identical to the NuMRP RNA. Although the protein components of the NuMRP were identified by mass spectrometry successfully, none of the known NuMRP proteins were found in the MtMRP preparation. Only trace amounts of the core NuMRP protein, Pop4, were detected in MtMRP by Western blot. In vitro activity of the two enzymes was compared. MtMRP cleaved only mitochondrial ORI5 substrate, while NuMRP cleaved all three substrates. However, the NuMRP enzyme cleaved the ORI5 substrate at sites different than the MtMRP enzyme. In addition, enzymatic differences in preferred ionic strength confirm these enzymes as distinct entities. Magnesium was found to be essential to both enzymes. We tested a number of reported inhibitors including puromycin, pentamidine, lithium, and pAp. Puromycin inhibition suggested that it binds directly to the MRP RNA, reaffirming the role of the RNA component in catalysis. In conclusion, our study confirms that the NuMRP and MtMRP enzymes are distinct entities with differing activities and protein components but a common RNA subunit, suggesting that the RNA must be playing a crucial role in catalytic activity.

  13. Identification and fine mapping of nuclear and nucleolar localization signals within the human ribosomal protein S17.

    Scott P Kenney

    Full Text Available Human ribosomal protein S17 (RPS17 is mutated in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA, a bone marrow disorder that fails to produce sufficient red blood cells leading to anemia. Recently, an RPS17 protein sequence was also found to be naturally inserted in the genome of hepatitis E virus (HEV from patients chronically-infected by HEV. The role of RPS17 in HEV replication and pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of knowledge about how RPS17 functions at a molecular level. Understanding the biological function of RPS17 is critical for elucidating its role in virus infection and DBA disease processes. In this study we probed the subcellular distribution of normal and mutant RPS17 proteins in a human liver cell line (Huh7. RPS17 was primarily detected within the nucleus, and more specifically within the nucleoli. Using a transient expression system in which RPS17 or truncations were expressed as fusions with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP, we were able to identify and map, for the first time, two separate nuclear localization signals (NLSs, one to the first 13 amino acids of the amino-terminus of RPS17 and the other within amino acids 30-60. Additionally, we mapped amino acid sequences required for nucleolar accumulation of RPS17 to amino acids 60-70. Amino acids 60-70 possess a di-RG motif that may be necessary for nucleolar retention of RPS17. The results from this study enhance our knowledge of RSP17 and will facilitate future mechanistic studies about the roles of RSP17 in hepatitis E and DBA disease processes.

  14. Three major nucleolar proteins migrate from nucleolus to nucleoplasm and cytoplasm in root tip cells of Vicia faba L. exposed to aluminum.

    Qin, Rong; Zhang, Huaning; Li, Shaoshan; Jiang, Wusheng; Liu, Donghua

    2014-09-01

    Results from our previous investigation indicated that Al could affect the nucleolus and induce extrusion of silver-staining nucleolar particles containing argyrophilic proteins from the nucleolus into the cytoplasm in root tip cells of Vicia faba L. So far, the nucleolar proteins involved have not been identified. It is well known that nucleophosmin (B23), nucleolin (C23), and fibrillarin are three major and multifunctional nucleolar proteins. Therefore, effects of Al on B23, C23, and fibrillarin in root tip cells of V. faba exposed to 100 μM Al for 48 h were observed and analyzed using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting. The results from this work demonstrated that after 100 μM of Al treatment for 48 h, B23 and C23 migrated from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm and fibrillarin from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. In some cells, fibrillarin was present only in the cytoplasm. Western blotting data revealed higher expression of the three major nucleolar proteins in Al-treated roots compared with the control and that the B23 content increased markedly. These findings confirmed our previous observations.

  15. Evidence for nucleolar subcompartments in Dictyostelium

    Catalano, Andrew; O’Day, Danton H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Two nucleolar subcompartments (NoSC1, NoSC2) were found in Dictyostelium. • Specific nucleolar proteins localize to different nucleolar subcompartments. • Specific proteins exit NoSC1 and NoSC2 differently upon Actinomycin D treatment. • KRKR appears to function as an NoSC2 nucleolar subcompartment localization signal. - Abstract: The nucleolus is a multifunctional nuclear compartment usually consisting of two to three subcompartments which represent stages of ribosomal biogenesis. It is linked to several human diseases including viral infections, cancer, and neurodegeneration. Dictyostelium is a model eukaryote for the study of fundamental biological processes as well as several human diseases however comparatively little is known about its nucleolus. Unlike most nucleoli it does not possess visible subcompartments at the ultrastructural level. Several recently identified nucleolar proteins in Dictyostelium leave the nucleolus after treatment with the rDNA transcription inhibitor actinomycin-D (AM-D). Different proteins exit in different ways, suggesting that previously unidentified nucleolar subcompartments may exist. The identification of nucleolar subcompartments would help to better understand the nucleolus in this model eukaryote. Here, we show that Dictyostelium nucleolar proteins nucleomorphin isoform NumA1 and Bud31 localize throughout the entire nucleolus while calcium-binding protein 4a localizes to only a portion, representing nucleolar subcompartment 1 (NoSC1). SWI/SNF complex member Snf12 localizes to a smaller area within NoSC1 representing a second nucleolar subcompartment, NoSC2. The nuclear/nucleolar localization signal KRKR from Snf12 localized GFP to NoSC2, and thus also appears to function as a nucleolar subcompartment localization signal. FhkA localizes to the nucleolar periphery displaying a similar pattern to that of Hsp32. Similarities between the redistribution patterns of Dictyostelium nucleolar proteins during

  16. Evidence for nucleolar subcompartments in Dictyostelium

    Catalano, Andrew, E-mail: acatalano@ccny.cuny.edu [Department of Biology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Rd. N., Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6 (Canada); O’Day, Danton H., E-mail: danton.oday@utoronto.ca [Department of Biology, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Rd. N., Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6 (Canada); Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Harbord St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G5 (Canada)

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Two nucleolar subcompartments (NoSC1, NoSC2) were found in Dictyostelium. • Specific nucleolar proteins localize to different nucleolar subcompartments. • Specific proteins exit NoSC1 and NoSC2 differently upon Actinomycin D treatment. • KRKR appears to function as an NoSC2 nucleolar subcompartment localization signal. - Abstract: The nucleolus is a multifunctional nuclear compartment usually consisting of two to three subcompartments which represent stages of ribosomal biogenesis. It is linked to several human diseases including viral infections, cancer, and neurodegeneration. Dictyostelium is a model eukaryote for the study of fundamental biological processes as well as several human diseases however comparatively little is known about its nucleolus. Unlike most nucleoli it does not possess visible subcompartments at the ultrastructural level. Several recently identified nucleolar proteins in Dictyostelium leave the nucleolus after treatment with the rDNA transcription inhibitor actinomycin-D (AM-D). Different proteins exit in different ways, suggesting that previously unidentified nucleolar subcompartments may exist. The identification of nucleolar subcompartments would help to better understand the nucleolus in this model eukaryote. Here, we show that Dictyostelium nucleolar proteins nucleomorphin isoform NumA1 and Bud31 localize throughout the entire nucleolus while calcium-binding protein 4a localizes to only a portion, representing nucleolar subcompartment 1 (NoSC1). SWI/SNF complex member Snf12 localizes to a smaller area within NoSC1 representing a second nucleolar subcompartment, NoSC2. The nuclear/nucleolar localization signal KRKR from Snf12 localized GFP to NoSC2, and thus also appears to function as a nucleolar subcompartment localization signal. FhkA localizes to the nucleolar periphery displaying a similar pattern to that of Hsp32. Similarities between the redistribution patterns of Dictyostelium nucleolar proteins during

  17. Colocalization of coilin and nucleolar proteins in Cajal body-like structures of micronucleated PtK2 cells

    N.P. Silva

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Cajal bodies (CB are ubiquitous nuclear structures involved in the biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and show narrow association with the nucleolus. To identify possible relationships between CB and the nucleolus, the localization of coilin, a marker of CB, and of a set of nucleolar proteins was investigated in cultured PtK2 cells undergoing micronucleation. Nocodazol-induced micronucleated cells were examined by double indirect immunofluorescence with antibodies against coilin, fibrillarin, NOR-90/hUBF, RNA polymerase I, PM/Scl, and To/Th. Cells were imaged on a BioRad 1024-UV confocal system attached to a Zeiss Axiovert 100 microscope. Since PtK2 cells possess only one nucleolus organizer region, micronucleated cells presented only one or two micronuclei containing nucleolus. By confocal microscopy we showed that in most micronuclei lacking a typical nucleolus a variable number of round structures were stained by antibodies against fibrillarin, NOR-90/hUBF protein, and coilin. These bodies were regarded as CB-like structures and were not stained by anti-PM/Scl and anti-To/Th antibodies. Anti-RNA polymerase I antibodies also reacted with CB-like structures in some micronuclei lacking nucleolus. The demonstration that a set of proteins involved in RNA/RNP biogenesis, namely coilin, fibrillarin, NOR-90/hUBF, and RNA polymerase I gather in CB-like structures present in nucleoli-devoid micronuclei may contribute to shed some light into the understanding of CB function.

  18. cDNA cloning and sequencing of human fibrillarin, a conserved nucleolar protein recognized by autoimmune antisera

    Aris, J.P.; Blobel, G.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have isolated a 1.1-kilobase cDNA clone that encodes human fibrillarin by screening a hepatoma library in parallel with DNA probes derived from the fibrillarin genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NOP1) and Xenopus laevis. RNA blot analysis indicates that the corresponding mRNA is ∼1,300 nucleotides in length. Human fibrillarin expressed in vitro migrates on SDS gels as a 36-kDa protein that is specifically immunoprecipitated by antisera from humans with scleroderma autoimmune disease. Human fibrillarin contains an amino-terminal repetitive domain ∼75-80 amino acids in length that is rich in glycine and arginine residues and is similar to amino-terminal domains in the yeast and Xenopus fibrillarins. The occurrence of a putative RNA-binding domain and an RNP consensus sequence within the protein is consistent with the association of fibrillarin with small nucleolar RNAs. Protein sequence alignments show that 67% of amino acids from human fibrillarin are identical to those in yeast fibrillarin and that 81% are identical to those in Xenopus fibrillarin. This identity suggests the evolutionary conservation of an important function early in the pathway for ribosome biosynthesis

  19. AAA-ATPase NVL2 acts on MTR4-exosome complex to dissociate the nucleolar protein WDR74

    Hiraishi, Nobuhiro; Ishida, Yo-ichi; Nagahama, Masami, E-mail: nagahama@my-pharm.ac.jp

    2015-11-20

    Nuclear VCP-like 2 (NVL2) is a chaperone-like nucleolar ATPase of the AAA (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) family, which exhibits a high level of amino acid sequence similarity with the cytosolic AAA-ATPase VCP/p97. These proteins generally act on macromolecular complexes to stimulate energy-dependent release of their constituents. We previously showed that NVL2 interacts with RNA processing/degradation machinery containing an RNA helicase MTR4/DOB1 and an exonuclease complex, nuclear exosome, and involved in the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits. These observations implicate NVL2 as a remodeling factor for the MTR4-exosome complex during the maturation of pre-ribosomal particles. Here, we used a proteomic screen and identified a WD repeat-containing protein 74 (WDR74) as a factor that specifically dissociates from this complex depending on the ATPase activity of NVL2. WDR74 shows weak amino acid sequence similarity with the yeast ribosome biogenesis protein Nsa1 and is co-localized with NVL2 in the nucleolus. Knockdown of WDR74 decreases 60S ribosome levels. Taken together, our results suggest that WDR74 is a novel regulatory protein of the MTR4-exsosome complex whose interaction is regulated by NVL2 and is involved in ribosome biogenesis. - Highlights: • WDR74 accumulates in MTR4-exosome complex upon expression of dominant-negative NVL2. • WDR74 is co-localized with NVL2 in the nucleolus. • WDR74, along with NVL2, is involved in the synthesis of 60S ribosomal subunits.

  20. AAA-ATPase NVL2 acts on MTR4-exosome complex to dissociate the nucleolar protein WDR74

    Hiraishi, Nobuhiro; Ishida, Yo-ichi; Nagahama, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear VCP-like 2 (NVL2) is a chaperone-like nucleolar ATPase of the AAA (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) family, which exhibits a high level of amino acid sequence similarity with the cytosolic AAA-ATPase VCP/p97. These proteins generally act on macromolecular complexes to stimulate energy-dependent release of their constituents. We previously showed that NVL2 interacts with RNA processing/degradation machinery containing an RNA helicase MTR4/DOB1 and an exonuclease complex, nuclear exosome, and involved in the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits. These observations implicate NVL2 as a remodeling factor for the MTR4-exosome complex during the maturation of pre-ribosomal particles. Here, we used a proteomic screen and identified a WD repeat-containing protein 74 (WDR74) as a factor that specifically dissociates from this complex depending on the ATPase activity of NVL2. WDR74 shows weak amino acid sequence similarity with the yeast ribosome biogenesis protein Nsa1 and is co-localized with NVL2 in the nucleolus. Knockdown of WDR74 decreases 60S ribosome levels. Taken together, our results suggest that WDR74 is a novel regulatory protein of the MTR4-exsosome complex whose interaction is regulated by NVL2 and is involved in ribosome biogenesis. - Highlights: • WDR74 accumulates in MTR4-exosome complex upon expression of dominant-negative NVL2. • WDR74 is co-localized with NVL2 in the nucleolus. • WDR74, along with NVL2, is involved in the synthesis of 60S ribosomal subunits.

  1. A model for the dynamic nuclear/nucleolar/cytoplasmic trafficking of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) nucleocapsid protein based on live cell imaging

    You, Jae-Hwan; Howell, Gareth; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Osorio, Fernando A.; Hiscox, Julian A.

    2008-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), an arterivirus, in common with many other positive strand RNA viruses, encodes a nucleocapsid (N) protein which can localise not only to the cytoplasm but also to the nucleolus in virus-infected cells and cells over-expressing N protein. The dynamic trafficking of positive strand RNA virus nucleocapsid proteins and PRRSV N protein in particular between the cytoplasm and nucleolus is unknown. In this study live imaging of permissive and non-permissive cell lines, in conjunction with photo-bleaching (FRAP and FLIP), was used to investigate the trafficking of fluorescent labeled (EGFP) PRRSV-N protein. The data indicated that EGFP-PRRSV-N protein was not permanently sequestered to the nucleolus and had equivalent mobility to cellular nucleolar proteins. Further the nuclear import of N protein appeared to occur faster than nuclear export, which may account for the observed relative distribution of N protein between the cytoplasm and the nucleolus

  2. Cloning and sequence analysis of cDNA coding for rat nucleolar protein C23

    Ghaffari, S.H.; Olson, M.O.J.

    1986-01-01

    Using synthetic oligonucleotides as primers and probes, the authors have isolated and sequenced cDNA clones encoding protein C23, a putative nucleolus organizer protein. Poly(A + ) RNA was isolated from rat Novikoff hepatoma cells and enriched in C23 mRNA by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. Two deoxyoligonuleotides, a 48- and a 27-mer, were synthesized on the basis of amino acid sequence from the C-terminal half of protein C23 and cDNA sequence data from CHO cell protein. The 48-mer was used a primer for synthesis of cDNA which was then inserted into plasmid pUC9. Transformed bacterial colonies were screened by hybridization with 32 P labeled 27-mer. Two clones among 5000 gave a strong positive signal. Plasmid DNAs from these clones were purified and characterized by blotting and nucleotide sequence analysis. The length of C23 mRNA was estimated to be 3200 bases in a northern blot analysis. The sequence of a 267 b.p. insert shows high homology with the CHO cDNA with only 9 nucleotide differences and an identical amino acid sequence. These studies indicate that this region of the protein is highly conserved

  3. Hierarchical recruitment of ribosomal proteins and assembly factors remodels nucleolar pre-60S ribosomes.

    Biedka, Stephanie; Micic, Jelena; Wilson, Daniel; Brown, Hailey; Diorio-Toth, Luke; Woolford, John L

    2018-04-24

    Ribosome biogenesis involves numerous preribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) processing events to remove internal and external transcribed spacer sequences, ultimately yielding three mature rRNAs. Removal of the internal transcribed spacer 2 spacer RNA is the final step in large subunit pre-rRNA processing and begins with endonucleolytic cleavage at the C 2 site of 27SB pre-rRNA. C 2 cleavage requires the hierarchical recruitment of 11 ribosomal proteins and 14 ribosome assembly factors. However, the function of these proteins in C 2 cleavage remained unclear. In this study, we have performed a detailed analysis of the effects of depleting proteins required for C 2 cleavage and interpreted these results using cryo-electron microscopy structures of assembling 60S subunits. This work revealed that these proteins are required for remodeling of several neighborhoods, including two major functional centers of the 60S subunit, suggesting that these remodeling events form a checkpoint leading to C 2 cleavage. Interestingly, when C 2 cleavage is directly blocked by depleting or inactivating the C 2 endonuclease, assembly progresses through all other subsequent steps. © 2018 Biedka et al.

  4. The centromeric/nucleolar chromatin protein ZFP-37 may function to specify neuronal nuclear domains

    E. Payen; T. Verkerk (Ton); D. Michalovich (David); S.D. Dreyer; A. Winterpacht; B. Lee (Brendan); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); N.J. Galjart (Niels); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractMurine ZFP-37 is a member of the large family of C2H2 type zinc finger proteins. It is characterized by a truncated NH2-terminal Kruppel-associated box and is thought to play a role in transcriptional regulation. During development Zfp-37 mRNA is most

  5. Mitochondrial and Nucleolar Localization of Cysteine Desulfurase Nfs and the Scaffold Protein Isu in Trypanosoma brucei

    Kovářová, Julie; Horáková, Eva; Changmai, Piya; Vancová, Marie; Lukeš, Julius

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2014), s. 353-362 ISSN 1535-9778 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179; GA MŠk LH12104; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : transfer RNA * iron sulfur protein * blood stream forms Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.820, year: 2014

  6. SAP-like domain in nucleolar spindle associated protein mediates mitotic chromosome loading as well as interphase chromatin interaction

    Verbakel, Werner, E-mail: werner.verbakel@chem.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, Bus 2403, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Carmeliet, Geert, E-mail: geert.carmeliet@med.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Experimental Medicine and Endocrinology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49, Bus 902, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Engelborghs, Yves, E-mail: yves.engelborghs@fys.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, Bus 2403, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} The SAP-like domain in NuSAP is a functional DNA-binding domain with preference for dsDNA. {yields} This SAP-like domain is essential for chromosome loading during early mitosis. {yields} NuSAP is highly dynamic on mitotic chromatin, as evident from photobleaching experiments. {yields} The SAP-like domain also mediates NuSAP-chromatin interaction in interphase nucleoplasm. -- Abstract: Nucleolar spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that localizes to chromosome arms and chromosome-proximal microtubules during mitosis and to the nucleus, with enrichment in the nucleoli, during interphase. The critical function of NuSAP is underscored by the finding that its depletion in HeLa cells results in various mitotic defects. Moreover, NuSAP is found overexpressed in multiple cancers and its expression levels often correlate with the aggressiveness of cancer. Due to its localization on chromosome arms and combination of microtubule-stabilizing and DNA-binding properties, NuSAP takes a special place within the extensive group of spindle assembly factors. In this study, we identify a SAP-like domain that shows DNA binding in vitro with a preference for dsDNA. Deletion of the SAP-like domain abolishes chromosome arm binding of NuSAP during mitosis, but is not sufficient to abrogate its chromosome-proximal localization after anaphase onset. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed the highly dynamic nature of this NuSAP-chromatin interaction during mitosis. In interphase cells, NuSAP also interacts with chromatin through its SAP-like domain, as evident from its enrichment on dense chromatin regions and intranuclear mobility, measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The obtained results are in agreement with a model where NuSAP dynamically stabilizes newly formed microtubules on mitotic chromosomes to enhance chromosome positioning without immobilizing these microtubules. Interphase Nu

  7. SAP-like domain in nucleolar spindle associated protein mediates mitotic chromosome loading as well as interphase chromatin interaction

    Verbakel, Werner; Carmeliet, Geert; Engelborghs, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The SAP-like domain in NuSAP is a functional DNA-binding domain with preference for dsDNA. → This SAP-like domain is essential for chromosome loading during early mitosis. → NuSAP is highly dynamic on mitotic chromatin, as evident from photobleaching experiments. → The SAP-like domain also mediates NuSAP-chromatin interaction in interphase nucleoplasm. -- Abstract: Nucleolar spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that localizes to chromosome arms and chromosome-proximal microtubules during mitosis and to the nucleus, with enrichment in the nucleoli, during interphase. The critical function of NuSAP is underscored by the finding that its depletion in HeLa cells results in various mitotic defects. Moreover, NuSAP is found overexpressed in multiple cancers and its expression levels often correlate with the aggressiveness of cancer. Due to its localization on chromosome arms and combination of microtubule-stabilizing and DNA-binding properties, NuSAP takes a special place within the extensive group of spindle assembly factors. In this study, we identify a SAP-like domain that shows DNA binding in vitro with a preference for dsDNA. Deletion of the SAP-like domain abolishes chromosome arm binding of NuSAP during mitosis, but is not sufficient to abrogate its chromosome-proximal localization after anaphase onset. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed the highly dynamic nature of this NuSAP-chromatin interaction during mitosis. In interphase cells, NuSAP also interacts with chromatin through its SAP-like domain, as evident from its enrichment on dense chromatin regions and intranuclear mobility, measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The obtained results are in agreement with a model where NuSAP dynamically stabilizes newly formed microtubules on mitotic chromosomes to enhance chromosome positioning without immobilizing these microtubules. Interphase NuSAP-chromatin interaction

  8. Nucleolar protein PES1 is a marker of neuroblastoma outcome and is associated with neuroblastoma differentiation

    Nakaguro, Masato; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Kishida, Satoshi; Cao, Dongliang; Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Nakamura, Shigeo; Kadomatsu, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a childhood malignant tumor that arises from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system. Spontaneous regression is a phenomenon unique to NBs and is caused by differentiation of tumor cells. PES1 is a multifunctional protein with roles in both neural development and ribosome biogenesis. Various kinds of models have revealed the significance of PES1 in neurodevelopment. However, the roles of PES1 in NB tumorigenesis and differentiation have remained unknown. Here we show that NB cases with MYCN amplification and clinically unfavorable stage (INSS stage 4) express higher levels of PES1. High PES1 expression was associated with worse overall and relapse-free survival. In NB cell lines, PES1 knockdown suppressed tumor cell growth and induced apoptosis. This growth inhibition was associated with the expression of NB differentiation markers. However, when the differentiation of NB cell lines was induced by the use of all-trans retinoic acid, there was a corresponding decrease in PES1 expression. Pes1 expression of tumorspheres originated from MYCN transgenic mice also diminished after the induction of differentiation with growth factors. We also reanalyzed the distribution of PES1 in the nucleolus. PES1 was localized in the dense fibrillar component, but not in the granular component of nucleoli. After treatment with the DNA-damaging agent camptothecin, this distribution was dramatically changed to diffuse nucleoplasmic. These data suggest that PES1 is a marker of NB outcome, that it regulates NB cell proliferation, and is associated with NB differentiation. PMID:25557119

  9. Dynamic Nucleolar Targeting of Dengue Virus Polymerase NS5 in Response to Extracellular pH

    Fraser, Johanna E.; Rawlinson, Stephen M.; Heaton, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nucleolar subcompartment of the nucleus is increasingly recognized as an important target of RNA viruses. Here we document for the first time the ability of dengue virus (DENV) polymerase, nonstructural protein 5 (NS5), to accumulate within the nucleolus of infected cells and to target green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the nucleolus of live transfected cells. Intriguingly, NS5 exchange between the nucleus and nucleolus is dynamically modulated by extracellular pH, responding rapidly and reversibly to pH change, in contrast to GFP alone or other nucleolar and non-nucleolar targeted protein controls. The minimal pH-sensitive nucleolar targeting region (pHNTR), sufficient to target GFP to the nucleolus in a pH-sensitive fashion, was mapped to NS5 residues 1 to 244, with mutation of key hydrophobic residues, Leu-165, Leu-167, and Val-168, abolishing pHNTR function in NS5-transfected cells, and severely attenuating DENV growth in infected cells. This is the first report of a viral protein whose nucleolar targeting ability is rapidly modulated by extracellular stimuli, suggesting that DENV has the ability to detect and respond dynamically to the extracellular environment. IMPORTANCE Infections by dengue virus (DENV) threaten 40% of the world's population yet there is no approved vaccine or antiviral therapeutic to treat infections. Understanding the molecular details that govern effective viral replication is key for the development of novel antiviral strategies. Here, we describe for the first time dynamic trafficking of DENV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) to the subnuclear compartment, the nucleolus. We demonstrate that NS5's targeting to the nucleolus occurs in response to acidic pH, identify the key amino acid residues within NS5 that are responsible, and demonstrate that their mutation severely impairs production of infectious DENV. Overall, this study identifies a unique subcellular trafficking event and suggests that DENV is able to detect and respond

  10. rDNA genetic imbalance and nucleolar chromatin restructuring is induced by distant hybridization between Raphanus sativus and Brassica alboglabra.

    Hong Long

    Full Text Available The expression of rDNA in hybrids inherited from only one progenitor refers to nucleolar dominance. The molecular basis for choosing which genes to silence remains unclear. We report genetic imbalance induced by distant hybridization correlates with formation of rDNA genes (NORs in the hybrids between Raphanus sativus L. and Brassica alboglabra Bailey. Moreover, increased CCGG methylation of rDNA in F1 hybrids is concomitant with Raphanus-derived rDNA gene silencing and rDNA transcriptional inactivity revealed by nucleolar configuration restriction. Newly formed rDNA gene locus occurred through chromosomal in F1 hybrids via chromosomal imbalance. NORs are gained de novo, lost, and/or transposed in the new genome. Inhibition of methyltransferases leads to changes in nucleolar architecture, implicating a key role of methylation in control of nucleolar dominance and vital nucleolar configuration transition. Our findings suggest that gene imbalance and methylation-related chromatin restructuring is important for rDNA gene silencing that may be crucial for synthesis of specific proteins.

  11. Identifying Key Attributes for Protein Beverages.

    Oltman, A E; Lopetcharat, K; Bastian, E; Drake, M A

    2015-06-01

    This study identified key attributes of protein beverages and evaluated effects of priming on liking of protein beverages. An adaptive choice-based conjoint study was conducted along with Kano analysis to gain insight on protein beverage consumers (n = 432). Attributes evaluated included label claim, protein type, amount of protein, carbohydrates, sweeteners, and metabolic benefits. Utility scores for levels and importance scores for attributes were determined. Subsequently, two pairs of clear acidic whey protein beverages were manufactured that differed by age of protein source or the amount of whey protein per serving. Beverages were evaluated by 151 consumers on two occasions with or without priming statements. One priming statement declared "great flavor," the other priming statement declared 20 g protein per serving. A two way analysis of variance was applied to discern the role of each priming statement. The most important attribute for protein beverages was sweetener type, followed by amount of protein, followed by type of protein followed by label claim. Beverages with whey protein, naturally sweetened, reduced sugar and ≥15 g protein per serving were most desired. Three consumer clusters were identified, differentiated by their preferences for protein type, sweetener and amount of protein. Priming statements positively impacted concept liking (P 0.05). Consistent with trained panel profiles of increased cardboard flavor with higher protein content, consumers liked beverages with 10 g protein more than beverages with 20 g protein (6.8 compared with 5.7, P appeal. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. The tumor suppressor SHIP1 colocalizes in nucleolar cavities with p53 and components of PML nuclear bodies.

    Ehm, Patrick; Nalaskowski, Marcus M; Wundenberg, Torsten; Jücker, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The inositol 5-phosphatase SHIP1 is a negative regulator of signaling processes in haematopoietic cells. By converting PI(3,4,5)P3 to PtdIns(3,4)P2 at the plasma membrane, SHIP1 modifies PI3-kinase mediated signaling. We have recently demonstrated that SHIP1 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein and SHIP1 nuclear puncta partially colocalize with FLASH, a component of nuclear bodies. In this study, we demonstrate that endogenous SHIP1 localizes to intranucleolar regions of both normal and leukemic haematopoietic cells. In addition, we report that ectopically expressed SHIP1 accumulates in nucleolar cavities and colocalizes with the tumor suppressor protein p53 and components of PML nuclear bodies (e.g. SP100, SUMO-1 and CK2). Moreover, SHIP1 also colocalizes in nucleolar cavities with components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. By using confocal microscopy data, we generated 3D-models revealing the enormous extent of the SHIP1 aggresomes in the nucleolus. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 causes an enlargement of nucleolar SHIP1 containing structures. Unexpectedly, this accumulation can be partially prevented by treatment with the inhibitor of nuclear protein export Leptomycin B. In recent years, several proteins aggregating in nucleolar cavities were shown to be key factors of neurodegenerative diseases and cancerogenesis. Our findings support current relevance of nuclear localized SHIP1.

  13. Plant Nucleolar Stress Response, a New Face in the NAC-Dependent Cellular Stress Responses.

    Ohbayashi, Iwai; Sugiyama, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    The nucleolus is the most prominent nuclear domain, where the core processes of ribosome biogenesis occur vigorously. All these processes are finely orchestrated by many nucleolar factors to build precisely ribosome particles. In animal cells, perturbations of ribosome biogenesis, mostly accompanied by structural disorders of the nucleolus, cause a kind of cellular stress to induce cell cycle arrest, senescence, or apoptosis, which is called nucleolar stress response. The best-characterized pathway of this stress response involves p53 and MDM2 as key players. p53 is a crucial transcription factor that functions in response to not only nucleolar stress but also other cellular stresses such as DNA damage stress. These cellular stresses release p53 from the inhibition by MDM2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase targeting p53, in various ways, which leads to p53-dependent activation of a set of genes. In plants, genetic impairments of ribosome biogenesis factors or ribosome components have been shown to cause characteristic phenotypes, including a narrow and pointed leaf shape, implying a common signaling pathway connecting ribosomal perturbations and certain aspects of growth and development. Unlike animals, however, plants have neither p53 nor MDM2 family proteins. Then the question arises whether plant cells have a nucleolar stress response pathway. In recent years, it has been reported that several members of the plant-specific transcription factor family NAC play critical roles in the pathways responsive to various cellular stresses. In this mini review, we outline the plant cellular stress response pathways involving NAC transcription factors with reference to the p53-MDM2-dependent pathways of animal cells, and discuss the possible involvement of a plant-unique, NAC-mediated pathway in the nucleolar stress response in plants.

  14. Plant Nucleolar Stress Response, a New Face in the NAC-Dependent Cellular Stress Responses

    Iwai Ohbayashi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleolus is the most prominent nuclear domain, where the core processes of ribosome biogenesis occur vigorously. All these processes are finely orchestrated by many nucleolar factors to build precisely ribosome particles. In animal cells, perturbations of ribosome biogenesis, mostly accompanied by structural disorders of the nucleolus, cause a kind of cellular stress to induce cell cycle arrest, senescence, or apoptosis, which is called nucleolar stress response. The best-characterized pathway of this stress response involves p53 and MDM2 as key players. p53 is a crucial transcription factor that functions in response to not only nucleolar stress but also other cellular stresses such as DNA damage stress. These cellular stresses release p53 from the inhibition by MDM2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase targeting p53, in various ways, which leads to p53-dependent activation of a set of genes. In plants, genetic impairments of ribosome biogenesis factors or ribosome components have been shown to cause characteristic phenotypes, including a narrow and pointed leaf shape, implying a common signaling pathway connecting ribosomal perturbations and certain aspects of growth and development. Unlike animals, however, plants have neither p53 nor MDM2 family proteins. Then the question arises whether plant cells have a nucleolar stress response pathway. In recent years, it has been reported that several members of the plant-specific transcription factor family NAC play critical roles in the pathways responsive to various cellular stresses. In this mini review, we outline the plant cellular stress response pathways involving NAC transcription factors with reference to the p53-MDM2-dependent pathways of animal cells, and discuss the possible involvement of a plant-unique, NAC-mediated pathway in the nucleolar stress response in plants.

  15. The human nucleolar protein FTSJ3 associates with NIP7 and functions in pre-rRNA processing.

    Luis G Morello

    Full Text Available NIP7 is one of the many trans-acting factors required for eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, which interacts with nascent pre-ribosomal particles and dissociates as they complete maturation and are exported to the cytoplasm. By using conditional knockdown, we have shown previously that yeast Nip7p is required primarily for 60S subunit synthesis while human NIP7 is involved in the biogenesis of 40S subunit. This raised the possibility that human NIP7 interacts with a different set of proteins as compared to the yeast protein. By using the yeast two-hybrid system we identified FTSJ3, a putative ortholog of yeast Spb1p, as a human NIP7-interacting protein. A functional association between NIP7 and FTSJ3 is further supported by colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation analyses. Conditional knockdown revealed that depletion of FTSJ3 affects cell proliferation and causes pre-rRNA processing defects. The major pre-rRNA processing defect involves accumulation of the 34S pre-rRNA encompassing from site A' to site 2b. Accumulation of this pre-rRNA indicates that processing of sites A0, 1 and 2 are slower in cells depleted of FTSJ3 and implicates FTSJ3 in the pathway leading to 18S rRNA maturation as observed previously for NIP7. The results presented in this work indicate a close functional interaction between NIP7 and FTSJ3 during pre-rRNA processing and show that FTSJ3 participates in ribosome synthesis in human cells.

  16. Overexpression and Nucleolar Localization of γ-Tubulin Small Complex Proteins GCP2 and GCP3 in Glioblastoma

    Dráberová, Eduarda; D'Agostino, L.; Caracciolo, V.; Sládková, Vladimíra; Sulimenko, Tetyana; Sulimenko, Vadym; Sobol, Margaryta; Maounis, N.F.; Tzelepis, E.; Mahera, E.; Křen, L.; Legido, A.; Giordano, A.; Moerk, S.; Hozák, Pavel; Dráber, Pavel; Katsetos, C.D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 7 (2015), s. 723-742 ISSN 0022-3069 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12050; GA MZd NT14467; GA ČR GAP302/12/1673; GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MPO FR-TI3/588 Grant - others:GA AV ČR M200521203PIPP; St. Christopher's Hospital for Children Reunified Endowment(US) 323256 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Gamma-tubulin * Gamma-tubulin complex proteins * GCP2 * Glioma * Glioblastoma * Nucleolus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.432, year: 2015

  17. EHD proteins: Key conductors of endocytic transport

    Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of endocytic transport is controlled by an elaborate network of proteins. Rab GTP-binding proteins and their effectors have well-defined roles in mediating specific endocytic transport steps, but until recently, less was known about the four mammalian dynamin-like C-terminal Eps15 Homology Domain (EHD) proteins that also regulate endocytic events. In recent years, however, great strides have been made in understanding the structure and function of these unique proteins. Indeed, a growing body of literature addresses EHD protein structure, interactions with binding partners, functions in mammalian cells, and the generation of various new model systems. Accordingly, this is now an opportune time to pause and review the function and mechanisms of action of EHD proteins, and to highlight some of the challenges and future directions for the field. PMID:21067929

  18. Locus-specific ribosomal RNA gene silencing in nucleolar dominance.

    Michelle S Lewis

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The silencing of one parental set of rRNA genes in a genetic hybrid is an epigenetic phenomenon known as nucleolar dominance. We showed previously that silencing is restricted to the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs, the loci where rRNA genes are tandemly arrayed, and does not spread to or from neighboring protein-coding genes. One hypothesis is that nucleolar dominance is the net result of hundreds of silencing events acting one rRNA gene at a time. A prediction of this hypothesis is that rRNA gene silencing should occur independent of chromosomal location. An alternative hypothesis is that the regulatory unit in nucleolar dominance is the NOR, rather than each individual rRNA gene, in which case NOR localization may be essential for rRNA gene silencing. To test these alternative hypotheses, we examined the fates of rRNA transgenes integrated at ectopic locations. The transgenes were accurately transcribed in all independent transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines tested, indicating that NOR localization is not required for rRNA gene expression. Upon crossing the transgenic A. thaliana lines as ovule parents with A. lyrata to form F1 hybrids, a new system for the study of nucleolar dominance, the endogenous rRNA genes located within the A. thaliana NORs are silenced. However, rRNA transgenes escaped silencing in multiple independent hybrids. Collectively, our data suggest that rRNA gene activation can occur in a gene-autonomous fashion, independent of chromosomal location, whereas rRNA gene silencing in nucleolar dominance is locus-dependent.

  19. Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding

    Gao, Meng; Zhu, Huaiqiu; Yao, Xin-Qiu; She, Zhen-Su

    2010-01-01

    A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

  20. The Proteins API: accessing key integrated protein and genome information.

    Nightingale, Andrew; Antunes, Ricardo; Alpi, Emanuele; Bursteinas, Borisas; Gonzales, Leonardo; Liu, Wudong; Luo, Jie; Qi, Guoying; Turner, Edd; Martin, Maria

    2017-07-03

    The Proteins API provides searching and programmatic access to protein and associated genomics data such as curated protein sequence positional annotations from UniProtKB, as well as mapped variation and proteomics data from large scale data sources (LSS). Using the coordinates service, researchers are able to retrieve the genomic sequence coordinates for proteins in UniProtKB. This, the LSS genomics and proteomics data for UniProt proteins is programmatically only available through this service. A Swagger UI has been implemented to provide documentation, an interface for users, with little or no programming experience, to 'talk' to the services to quickly and easily formulate queries with the services and obtain dynamically generated source code for popular programming languages, such as Java, Perl, Python and Ruby. Search results are returned as standard JSON, XML or GFF data objects. The Proteins API is a scalable, reliable, fast, easy to use RESTful services that provides a broad protein information resource for users to ask questions based upon their field of expertise and allowing them to gain an integrated overview of protein annotations available to aid their knowledge gain on proteins in biological processes. The Proteins API is available at (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/proteins/api/doc). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Nucleolar ultrastructure in bovine nuclear transfer embryos

    Kanka, J; Smith, S D; Soloy, E

    1999-01-01

    in nuclear morphology as a transformation of the nucleolus precursor body into a functional rRNA synthesising nucleolus with a characteristic ultrastructure. We examined nucleolar ultrastructure in bovine in vitro produced (control) embryos and in nuclear transfer embryos reconstructed from a MII phase...... at 1 hr after fusion and, by 3 hr after fusion, it was restored again. At this time, the reticulated fibrillo-granular nucleolus had an almost round shape. The nucleolar precursor body seen in the two-cell stage nuclear transfer embryos consisted of intermingled filamentous components and secondary...... time intervals after fusion. In the two-cell stage nuclear transfer embryo, the originally reticulated nucleolus of the donor blastomere had changed into a typical nucleolar precursor body consisting of a homogeneous fibrillar structure. A primary vacuole appeared in the four-cell stage nuclear...

  2. Identification of a novel TIF-IA-NF-κB nucleolar stress response pathway.

    Chen, Jingyu; Lobb, Ian T; Morin, Pierre; Novo, Sonia M; Simpson, James; Kennerknecht, Kathrin; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Batchelor, Emily E; Oakley, Fiona; Stark, Lesley A

    2018-06-05

    p53 as an effector of nucleolar stress is well defined, but p53 independent mechanisms are largely unknown. Like p53, the NF-κB transcription factor plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis under stress. Many stresses that stimulate NF-κB also disrupt nucleoli. However, the link between nucleolar function and activation of the NF-κB pathway is as yet unknown. Here we demonstrate that artificial disruption of the PolI complex stimulates NF-κB signalling. Unlike p53 nucleolar stress response, this effect does not appear to be linked to inhibition of rDNA transcription. We show that specific stress stimuli of NF-κB induce degradation of a critical component of the PolI complex, TIF-IA. This degradation precedes activation of NF-κB and is associated with increased nucleolar size. It is mimicked by CDK4 inhibition and is dependent upon a novel pathway involving UBF/p14ARF and S44 of the protein. We show that blocking TIF-IA degradation blocks stress effects on nucleolar size and NF-κB signalling. Finally, using ex vivo culture, we show a strong correlation between degradation of TIF-IA and activation of NF-κB in freshly resected, human colorectal tumours exposed to the chemopreventative agent, aspirin. Together, our study provides compelling evidence for a new, TIF-IA-NF-κB nucleolar stress response pathway that has in vivo relevance and therapeutic implications.

  3. Inference of epistatic effects in a key mitochondrial protein

    Nelson, Erik D.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2018-06-01

    We use Potts model inference to predict pair epistatic effects in a key mitochondrial protein—cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2—for ray-finned fishes. We examine the effect of phylogenetic correlations on our predictions using a simple exact fitness model, and we find that, although epistatic effects are underpredicted, they maintain a roughly linear relationship to their true (model) values. After accounting for this correction, epistatic effects in the protein are still relatively weak, leading to fitness valleys of depth 2 N s ≃-5 in compensatory double mutants. Interestingly, positive epistasis is more pronounced than negative epistasis, and the strongest positive effects capture nearly all sites subject to positive selection in fishes, similar to virus proteins evolving under selection pressure in the context of drug therapy.

  4. Nucleolar size in lymphocytes and haemocytes of different species

    J Berger

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The number of nucleoli in a cell and nucleolar area vary according to the cell. We compared nucleoli in mammalian circulating lymphocytes and insect circulating haemocytes. An increased nucleolar coefficient correlated with a lowered nucleoli size. The smaller nucleolar size in mammalian lymphocytes indicates a lower proteosynthetic cellular activity in both mammalian lymphocytes and insect haemocytes. Moreover, in insect haemocytes, the smaller size of the nucleoli may reflect a lowered potential to transform into another cell type.

  5. Phase Transitions in the Nucleus: the functional implications of concentration-dependent assembly of a Liquid-like RNA/Protein Body

    Zhu, Lian; Weber, Stephanie; Berry, Joel; Vaidya, Nilesh; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford

    2015-03-01

    The nucleolus is a liquid-like membrane-less nuclear body which plays an important role in cell growth and size control. By modulating nucleolar component concentration through RNAi conditions that change C. elegans cell size, we find that nucleoli only assemble above a threshold concentration; moreover, the ripening dynamics of nucleated droplets are consistent with the hypothesis that the assembly of the nucleolus represents an intracellular liquid-liquid phase transition. A key question is how this phase-transition is linked to the primary function of the nucleolus, in transcribing and processing ribosomal RNA. To address this, we characterize the localization of RNA Polymerase I, a key transcriptional enzyme, into nucleolar foci as a function of nucleolar component concentration. Our results suggest that there are a small number of key disordered phosphoproteins that may serve as a link between transcription and assembly. Finally, we present preliminary results using a reduced model system consisting of purified nucleolar proteins to assess the ability of nucleolar proteins to drive liquid-liquid phase separation in vitro. These results lay the foundation for a quantitative understanding of intracellular phase transitions and their impact on biomedically-critical RNA-processing steps.

  6. Nucleolar re-activation is delayed in mouse embryos cloned from two different cell lines

    Svarcova, Olga; Dinnyes, A.; Polgar, Z.

    2009-01-01

    displayed early NPBs transformation. In conclusion, despite normal onset of EGA in cloned embryos, activation of functional nucleoli was one cell cycle delayed in NT embryos. NT-MEF embryos displayed normal targeting but delayed activation of nucleolar proteins. Contrary, in NT-HM1 embryos, both......Aim of this study was to evaluate and compare embryonic genome activation (EGA) in mouse embryos of different origin using nucleolus as a marker. Early and late 2-cell and late 4-cell stage embryos, prepared by in vitro fertilization (IVF), parthenogenetic activation (PG), and nuclear transfer...... ofmouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) and mouse HM1 emryonic stem cells (HM1), were processed for autoradiography following 3H-uridine incubation (transcriptional activity), transmission electron microscopy (ultrastructure) and immunofluorescence (nucleolar proteins; upstream binding factor, UBF...

  7. A Genetic Cascade of let-7-ncl-1-fib-1 Modulates Nucleolar Size and rRNA Pool in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Yung-Hsiang Yi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome biogenesis takes place in the nucleolus, the size of which is often coordinated with cell growth and development. However, how metazoans control nucleolar size remains largely unknown. Caenorhabditis elegans provides a good model to address this question owing to distinct tissue distribution of nucleolar sizes and a mutant, ncl-1, which exhibits larger nucleoli than wild-type worms. Here, through a series of loss-of-function analyses, we report that the nucleolar size is regulated by a circuitry composed of microRNA let-7, translation repressor NCL-1, and a major nucleolar pre-rRNA processing protein FIB-1/fibrillarin. In cooperation with RNA binding proteins PUF and NOS, NCL-1 suppressed the translation of FIB-1/fibrillarin, while let-7 targeted the 3'UTR of ncl-1 and inhibited its expression. Consequently, the abundance of FIB-1 is tightly controlled and correlated with the nucleolar size. Together, our findings highlight a novel genetic cascade by which post-transcriptional regulators interplay in developmental control of nucleolar size and function.

  8. The Relationship Between Human Nucleolar Organizer Regions and Nucleoli, Probed by 3D-ImmunoFISH.

    van Sluis, Marjolein; van Vuuren, Chelly; McStay, Brian

    2016-01-01

    3D-immunoFISH is a valuable technique to compare the localization of DNA sequences and proteins in cells where three-dimensional structure has been preserved. As nucleoli contain a multitude of protein factors dedicated to ribosome biogenesis and form around specific chromosomal loci, 3D-immunoFISH is a particularly relevant technique for their study. In human cells, nucleoli form around transcriptionally active ribosomal gene (rDNA) arrays termed nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) positioned on the p-arms of each of the acrocentric chromosomes. Here, we provide a protocol for fixing and permeabilizing human cells grown on microscope slides such that nucleolar proteins can be visualized using antibodies and NORs visualized by DNA FISH. Antibodies against UBF recognize transcriptionally active rDNA/NORs and NOP52 antibodies provide a convenient way of visualizing the nucleolar volume. We describe a probe designed to visualize rDNA and introduce a probe comprised of NOR distal sequences, which can be used to identify or count individual NORs.

  9. Membrane Proteins : The Key Players of a Cancer Cell

    Kampen, Kim R.

    Membrane proteins are involved in the prognosis of the most common forms of cancer. Membrane proteins are the hallmark of a cancer cell. The overexpressed membrane receptors are becoming increasingly important in cancer cell therapy. Current renewing therapy approaches based on receptor

  10. Diverse Regulators of Human Ribosome Biogenesis Discovered by Changes in Nucleolar Number

    Katherine I. Farley-Barnes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome biogenesis is a highly regulated, essential cellular process. Although studies in yeast have established some of the biological principles of ribosome biogenesis, many of the intricacies of its regulation in higher eukaryotes remain unknown. To understand how ribosome biogenesis is globally integrated in human cells, we conducted a genome-wide siRNA screen for regulators of nucleolar number. We found 139 proteins whose depletion changed the number of nucleoli per nucleus from 2–3 to only 1 in human MCF10A cells. Follow-up analyses on 20 hits found many (90% to be essential for the nucleolar functions of rDNA transcription (7, pre-ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA processing (16, and/or global protein synthesis (14. This genome-wide analysis exploits the relationship between nucleolar number and function to discover diverse cellular pathways that regulate the making of ribosomes and paves the way for further exploration of the links between ribosome biogenesis and human disease.

  11. DAZ Family Proteins, Key Players for Germ Cell Development

    Fu, Xia-Fei; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Wang, Lin-Qing; Yin, Shen; De Felici, Massimo; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    DAZ family proteins are found almost exclusively in germ cells in distant animal species. Deletion or mutations of their encoding genes usually severely impair either oogenesis or spermatogenesis or both. The family includes Boule (or Boll), Dazl (or Dazla) and DAZ genes. Boule and Dazl are situated on autosomes while DAZ, exclusive of higher primates, is located on the Y chromosome. Deletion of DAZ gene is the most common causes of infertility in humans. These genes, encoding for RNA binding proteins, contain a highly conserved RNA recognition motif and at least one DAZ repeat encoding for a 24 amino acids sequence able to bind other mRNA binding proteins. Basically, Daz family proteins function as adaptors for target mRNA transport and activators of their translation. In some invertebrate species, BOULE protein play a pivotal role in germline specification and a conserved regulatory role in meiosis. Depending on the species, DAZL is expressed in primordial germ cells (PGCs) and/or pre-meiotic and meiotic germ cells of both sexes. Daz is found in fetal gonocytes, spermatogonia and spermatocytes of adult testes. Here we discuss DAZ family genes in a phylogenic perspective, focusing on the common and distinct features of these genes, and their pivotal roles during gametogenesis evolved during evolution. PMID:26327816

  12. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    Bhuin, Tanmay; Roy, Jagat Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future

  13. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    Bhuin, Tanmay [Cell and Developmental Biology Unit, Department of Zoology, The University of Burdwan, Golapbag 713104 (India); Roy, Jagat Kumar, E-mail: jkroy@bhu.ac.in [Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future.

  14. Inverse statistical physics of protein sequences: a key issues review.

    Cocco, Simona; Feinauer, Christoph; Figliuzzi, Matteo; Monasson, Rémi; Weigt, Martin

    2018-03-01

    In the course of evolution, proteins undergo important changes in their amino acid sequences, while their three-dimensional folded structure and their biological function remain remarkably conserved. Thanks to modern sequencing techniques, sequence data accumulate at unprecedented pace. This provides large sets of so-called homologous, i.e. evolutionarily related protein sequences, to which methods of inverse statistical physics can be applied. Using sequence data as the basis for the inference of Boltzmann distributions from samples of microscopic configurations or observables, it is possible to extract information about evolutionary constraints and thus protein function and structure. Here we give an overview over some biologically important questions, and how statistical-mechanics inspired modeling approaches can help to answer them. Finally, we discuss some open questions, which we expect to be addressed over the next years.

  15. Lymphocytic nucleolar index in the combined application

    Kilyovska, M.; Nechev, Kh.; Vankova, P.; Tsvetkov, P.; Shopova, V. (Meditsinski Fakultet, Pleven (Bulgaria). Katedra Mediko-Sanitarna Zashtita)

    1982-01-01

    Sex mature male rats were irradiated with 5,25 and 50 rad from X-ray source. One group of irradiated animals was treated intraperitoneally with 10 mCi/animal Ce/sup 144/ or 0.04 mCi/g Sr/sup 89/. The second group was treated only with radionuclide. The nucleolar index (NI) of the lymphocytes in a blood smear was studied on the 1st, 3rd, 8th and 30th day after application. It was found that X-irradiation increased the value of NI after the 15th day, the effect being independent on the dose rates. Ce/sup 144/, applied alone in combination with external irradiation, also causes an increase of NI. Combined application of Sr/sup 89/ and external irradiation leads after one month to a decrease of NI. The results are discussed in connection with radionuclide kinetics and dose distribution.

  16. Nucleolar TRF2 attenuated nucleolus stress-induced HCC cell-cycle arrest by altering rRNA synthesis.

    Yuan, Fuwen; Xu, Chenzhong; Li, Guodong; Tong, Tanjun

    2018-05-03

    The nucleolus is an important organelle that is responsible for the biogenesis of ribosome RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal subunits assembly. It is also deemed to be the center of metabolic control, considering the critical role of ribosomes in protein translation. Perturbations of rRNA synthesis are closely related to cell proliferation and tumor progression. Telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) is a member of shelterin complex that is responsible for telomere DNA protection. Interestingly, it was recently reported to localize in the nucleolus of human cells in a cell-cycle-dependent manner, while the underlying mechanism and its role on the nucleolus remained unclear. In this study, we found that nucleolar and coiled-body phosphoprotein 1 (NOLC1), a nucleolar protein that is responsible for the nucleolus construction and rRNA synthesis, interacted with TRF2 and mediated the shuttle of TRF2 between the nucleolus and nucleus. Abating the expression of NOLC1 decreased the nucleolar-resident TRF2. Besides, the nucleolar TRF2 could bind rDNA and promoted rRNA transcription. Furthermore, in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines HepG2 and SMMC7721, TRF2 overexpression participated in the nucleolus stress-induced rRNA inhibition and cell-cycle arrest.

  17. Extracellular proteins: Novel key components of metal resistance in cyanobacteria?

    Joaquin eGiner-Lamia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metals are essential for all living organisms and required for fundamental biochemical processes. However, when in excess, metals can turn into highly-toxic agents able to disrupt cell membranes, alter enzymatic activities and damage DNA. Metal concentrations are therefore tightly controlled inside cells, particularly in cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are ecologically relevant prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and can be found in many different marine and freshwater ecosystems, including environments contaminated with heavy metals. As their photosynthetic machinery imposes high demands for metals, homeostasis of these micronutrients has been widely studied in cyanobacteria. So far, most studies have focused on how cells are capable of controlling their internal metal pools, with a strong bias towards the analysis of intracellular processes. Ultrastructure, modulation of physiology, dynamic changes in transcription and protein levels have been studied, but what takes place in the extracellular environment when cells are exposed to an unbalanced metal availability remains largely unknown. The interest in studying the subset of proteins present in the extracellular space has only recently begun and the identification and functional analysis of the cyanobacterial exoproteomes are just emerging. Remarkably, metal-related proteins such as the copper-chaperone CopM or the iron-binding protein FutA2 have already been identified outside the cell. With this perspective, we aim to raise the awareness that metal-resistance mechanisms are not yet fully known and hope to motivate future studies assessing the role of extracellular proteins on bacterial metal homeostasis, with a special focus on cyanobacteria.

  18. Internal Associations of the Acidic Region of Upstream Binding Factor Control Its Nucleolar Localization.

    Ueshima, Shuhei; Nagata, Kyosuke; Okuwaki, Mitsuru

    2017-11-15

    Upstream binding factor (UBF) is a member of the high-mobility group (HMG) box protein family, characterized by multiple HMG boxes and a C-terminal acidic region (AR). UBF is an essential transcription factor for rRNA genes and mediates the formation of transcriptionally active chromatin in the nucleolus. However, it remains unknown how UBF is specifically localized to the nucleolus. Here, we examined the molecular mechanisms that localize UBF to the nucleolus. We found that the first HMG box (HMG box 1), the linker region (LR), and the AR cooperatively regulate the nucleolar localization of UBF1. We demonstrated that the AR intramolecularly associates with and attenuates the DNA binding activity of HMG boxes and confers the structured DNA preference to HMG box 1. In contrast, the LR was found to serve as a nuclear localization signal and compete with HMG boxes to bind the AR, permitting nucleolar localization of UBF1. The LR sequence binds DNA and assists the stable chromatin binding of UBF. We also showed that the phosphorylation status of the AR does not clearly affect the localization of UBF1. Our results strongly suggest that associations of the AR with HMG boxes and the LR regulate UBF nucleolar localization. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Comprehensive Protein Interactome Analysis of a Key RNA Helicase: Detection of Novel Stress Granule Proteins

    Rebecca Bish

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available DDX6 (p54/RCK is a human RNA helicase with central roles in mRNA decay and translation repression. To help our understanding of how DDX6 performs these multiple functions, we conducted the first unbiased, large-scale study to map the DDX6-centric protein-protein interactome using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. Using DDX6 as bait, we identify a high-confidence and high-quality set of protein interaction partners which are enriched for functions in RNA metabolism and ribosomal proteins. The screen is highly specific, maximizing the number of true positives, as demonstrated by the validation of 81% (47/58 of the RNA-independent interactors through known functions and interactions. Importantly, we minimize the number of indirect interaction partners through use of a nuclease-based digestion to eliminate RNA. We describe eleven new interactors, including proteins involved in splicing which is an as-yet unknown role for DDX6. We validated and characterized in more detail the interaction of DDX6 with Nuclear fragile X mental retardation-interacting protein 2 (NUFIP2 and with two previously uncharacterized proteins, FAM195A and FAM195B (here referred to as granulin-1 and granulin-2, or GRAN1 and GRAN2. We show that NUFIP2, GRAN1, and GRAN2 are not P-body components, but re-localize to stress granules upon exposure to stress, suggesting a function in translation repression in the cellular stress response. Using a complementary analysis that resolved DDX6’s multiple complex memberships, we further validated these interaction partners and the presence of splicing factors. As DDX6 also interacts with the E3 SUMO ligase TIF1β, we tested for and observed a significant enrichment of sumoylation amongst DDX6’s interaction partners. Our results represent the most comprehensive screen for direct interaction partners of a key regulator of RNA life cycle and localization, highlighting new stress granule components and possible DDX6 functions

  20. Nucleolar exit of RNF8 and BRCA1 in response to DNA damage

    Guerra-Rebollo, Marta; Mateo, Francesca; Franke, Kristin [Department of Cell Biology, Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB), CSIC, Barcelona Science Park, Helix Building, Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Huen, Michael S.Y. [Department of Anatomy, Centre for Cancer Research, The University of Hong Kong, L1, Laboratory Block, 21 Sassoon Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodriguez, Manuel S. [Proteomics Unit, CIC bioGUNE CIBERehd, ProteoRed, Technology Park of Bizkaia, Building 801A, 48160 Derio (Spain); Plans, Vanessa [Department of Cell Biology, Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB), CSIC, Barcelona Science Park, Helix Building, Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Thomson, Timothy M., E-mail: titbmc@ibmb.csic.es [Department of Cell Biology, Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB), CSIC, Barcelona Science Park, Helix Building, Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-11-01

    The induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) elicits a plethora of responses that redirect many cellular functions to the vital task of repairing the injury, collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR). We have found that, in the absence of DNA damage, the DSB repair factors RNF8 and BRCA1 are associated with the nucleolus. Shortly after exposure of cells to {gamma}-radiation, RNF8 and BRCA1 translocated from the nucleolus to damage foci, a traffic that was reverted several hours after the damage. RNF8 interacted through its FHA domain with the ribosomal protein RPSA, and knockdown of RPSA caused a depletion of nucleolar RNF8 and BRCA1, suggesting that the interaction of RNF8 with RPSA is critical for the nucleolar localization of these DDR factors. Knockdown of RPSA or RNF8 impaired bulk protein translation, as did {gamma}-irradiation, the latter being partially countered by overexpression of exogenous RNF8. Our results suggest that RNF8 and BRCA1 are anchored to the nucleolus through reversible interactions with RPSA and that, in addition to its known functions in DDR, RNF8 may play a role in protein synthesis, possibly linking the nucleolar exit of this factor to the attenuation of protein synthesis in response to DNA damage. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNF8 and BRCA1 are associated with the nucleolus of undamaged cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon {gamma}-radiation, RNF8 and BRCA1 are translocated from the nucleolus to damage foci. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ribosomal protein RPSA anchors RNF8 to the nucleolus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNF8 may play previously unsuspected roles in protein synthesis.

  1. Nucleolar exit of RNF8 and BRCA1 in response to DNA damage

    Guerra-Rebollo, Marta; Mateo, Francesca; Franke, Kristin; Huen, Michael S.Y.; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodríguez, Manuel S.; Plans, Vanessa; Thomson, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    The induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) elicits a plethora of responses that redirect many cellular functions to the vital task of repairing the injury, collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR). We have found that, in the absence of DNA damage, the DSB repair factors RNF8 and BRCA1 are associated with the nucleolus. Shortly after exposure of cells to γ-radiation, RNF8 and BRCA1 translocated from the nucleolus to damage foci, a traffic that was reverted several hours after the damage. RNF8 interacted through its FHA domain with the ribosomal protein RPSA, and knockdown of RPSA caused a depletion of nucleolar RNF8 and BRCA1, suggesting that the interaction of RNF8 with RPSA is critical for the nucleolar localization of these DDR factors. Knockdown of RPSA or RNF8 impaired bulk protein translation, as did γ-irradiation, the latter being partially countered by overexpression of exogenous RNF8. Our results suggest that RNF8 and BRCA1 are anchored to the nucleolus through reversible interactions with RPSA and that, in addition to its known functions in DDR, RNF8 may play a role in protein synthesis, possibly linking the nucleolar exit of this factor to the attenuation of protein synthesis in response to DNA damage. -- Highlights: ► RNF8 and BRCA1 are associated with the nucleolus of undamaged cells. ► Upon γ-radiation, RNF8 and BRCA1 are translocated from the nucleolus to damage foci. ► The ribosomal protein RPSA anchors RNF8 to the nucleolus. ► RNF8 may play previously unsuspected roles in protein synthesis.

  2. Distinct roles for key karyogamy proteins during yeast nuclear fusion.

    Melloy, Patricia; Shen, Shu; White, Erin; Rose, Mark D

    2009-09-01

    During yeast mating, cell fusion is followed by the congression and fusion of the two nuclei. Proteins required for nuclear fusion are found at the surface (Prm3p) and within the lumen (Kar2p, Kar5p, and Kar8p) of the nuclear envelope (NE). Electron tomography (ET) of zygotes revealed that mutations in these proteins block nuclear fusion with different morphologies, suggesting that they act in different steps of fusion. Specifically, prm3 zygotes were blocked before formation of membrane bridges, whereas kar2, kar5, and kar8 zygotes frequently contained them. Membrane bridges were significantly larger and occurred more frequently in kar2 and kar8, than in kar5 mutant zygotes. The kinetics of NE fusion in prm3, kar5, and kar8 mutants, measured by live-cell fluorescence microscopy, were well correlated with the size and frequency of bridges observed by ET. However the kar2 mutant was defective for transfer of NE lumenal GFP, but not diffusion within the lumen, suggesting that transfer was blocked at the NE fusion junction. These observations suggest that Prm3p acts before initiation of outer NE fusion, Kar5p may help dilation of the initial fusion pore, and Kar2p and Kar8p act after outer NE fusion, during inner NE fusion.

  3. With Protein Foods, Variety Is Key: 10 Tips for Choosing Protein

    ... Dietary Guidelines Communicator’s Guide 10 Tips: Vary Your Protein Routine You are here Home 10 Tips: Vary ... Protein Routine Print Share 10 Tips: Vary Your Protein Routine Protein foods include both animal (meat, poultry, ...

  4. Nucleolar localization of influenza A NS1: striking differences between mammalian and avian cells

    Mazel-Sanchez Beryl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In mammalian cells, nucleolar localization of influenza A NS1 requires the presence of a C-terminal nucleolar localization signal. This nucleolar localization signal is present only in certain strains of influenza A viruses. Therefore, only certain NS1 accumulate in the nucleolus of mammalian cells. In contrast, we show that all NS1 tested in this study accumulated in the nucleolus of avian cells even in the absence of the above described C-terminal nucleolar localization signal. Thus, nucleolar localization of NS1 in avian cells appears to rely on a different nucleolar localization signal that is more conserved among influenza virus strains.

  5. Molecular determinants of nucleolar translocation of RNA helicase A

    Liu Zhe; Kenworthy, Rachael; Green, Christopher; Tang, Hengli

    2007-01-01

    RNA helicase A (RHA) is a member of the DEAH-box family of DNA/RNA helicases involved in multiple cellular processes and the life cycles of many viruses. The subcellular localization of RHA is dynamic despite its steady-state concentration in the nucleoplasm. We have previously shown that it shuttles rapidly between the nucleus and the cytoplasm by virtue of a bidirectional nuclear transport domain (NTD) located in its carboxyl terminus. Here, we investigate the molecular determinants for its translocation within the nucleus and, more specifically, its redistribution from the nucleoplasm to nucleolus or the perinucleolar region. We found that low temperature treatment, transcription inhibition or replication of hepatitis C virus caused the intranuclear redistribution of the protein, suggesting that RHA shuttles between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm and becomes trapped in the nucleolus or the perinucleolar region upon blockade of transport to the nucleoplasm. Both the NTD and ATPase activity were essential for RHA's transport to the nucleolus or perinucleolar region. One of the double-stranded RNA binding domains (dsRBD II) was also required for this nucleolar translocation (NoT) phenotype. RNA interference studies revealed that RHA is essential for survival of cultured hepatoma cells and the ATPase activity appears to be important for this critical role

  6. All Small Nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) of the [U4/U6.U5] Tri-snRNP Localize to Nucleoli; Identification of the Nucleolar Localization Element of U6 snRNA

    Gerbi, Susan A.; Lange, Thilo Sascha

    2002-01-01

    Previously, we showed that spliceosomal U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) transiently passes through the nucleolus. Herein, we report that all individual snRNAs of the [U4/U6.U5] tri-snRNP localize to nucleoli, demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy of nucleolar preparations after injection of fluorescein-labeled snRNA into Xenopus oocyte nuclei. Nucleolar localization of U6 is independent from [U4/U6] snRNP formation since sites of direct interaction of U6 snRNA with U4 snRNA are not nucleolar localization elements. Among all regions in U6, the only one required for nucleolar localization is its 3′ end, which associates with the La protein and subsequently during maturation of U6 is bound by Lsm proteins. This 3′-nucleolar localization element of U6 is both essential and sufficient for nucleolar localization and also required for localization to Cajal bodies. Conversion of the 3′ hydroxyl of U6 snRNA to a 3′ phosphate prevents association with the La protein but does not affect U6 localization to nucleoli or Cajal bodies. PMID:12221120

  7. Nucleolar activity after 3-methylcholanthrene treatment of rat liver cells studied by silver staining procedure

    Komaromy, L.; Tigyi, A.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of a single dose of 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) was studied in nucleoli of young rat liver cells by means of conventional and ultracytochemical methods. The nucleolar activity was stimulated in the authors experimental conditions: the appearance of the fibrillar centers in the liver cell nucleoli as well as the silver staining protein content of the fibrillar centers and the dense fibrillar component were increased by 3-MC. The results suggest that the activity of ribosomal genes was increased following 3-MC treatment.

  8. Identification of key residues for protein conformational transition using elastic network model.

    Su, Ji Guo; Xu, Xian Jin; Li, Chun Hua; Chen, Wei Zu; Wang, Cun Xin

    2011-11-07

    Proteins usually undergo conformational transitions between structurally disparate states to fulfill their functions. The large-scale allosteric conformational transitions are believed to involve some key residues that mediate the conformational movements between different regions of the protein. In the present work, a thermodynamic method based on the elastic network model is proposed to predict the key residues involved in protein conformational transitions. In our method, the key functional sites are identified as the residues whose perturbations largely influence the free energy difference between the protein states before and after transition. Two proteins, nucleotide binding domain of the heat shock protein 70 and human/rat DNA polymerase β, are used as case studies to identify the critical residues responsible for their open-closed conformational transitions. The results show that the functionally important residues mainly locate at the following regions for these two proteins: (1) the bridging point at the interface between the subdomains that control the opening and closure of the binding cleft; (2) the hinge region between different subdomains, which mediates the cooperative motions between the corresponding subdomains; and (3) the substrate binding sites. The similarity in the positions of the key residues for these two proteins may indicate a common mechanism in their conformational transitions.

  9. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC

    Schwab, Ryan S.; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z.S.A.; Domaradzki, Tera [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University at Buffalo—State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States); Hofmann, Wilma A., E-mail: whofmann@buffalo.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University at Buffalo—State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms. - Highlights: ► Two NoLS have been identified in the myosin IC isoform B sequence. ► Both NoLS are necessary for myosin IC isoform B specific nucleolar localization. ► First mechanistic explanation of functional differences between the isoforms.

  10. Charge Segregation and Low Hydrophobicity Are Key Features of Ribosomal Proteins from Different Organisms*

    Fedyukina, Daria V.; Jennaro, Theodore S.; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomes are large and highly charged macromolecular complexes consisting of RNA and proteins. Here, we address the electrostatic and nonpolar properties of ribosomal proteins that are important for ribosome assembly and interaction with other cellular components and may influence protein folding on the ribosome. We examined 50 S ribosomal subunits from 10 species and found a clear distinction between the net charge of ribosomal proteins from halophilic and non-halophilic organisms. We found that ∼67% ribosomal proteins from halophiles are negatively charged, whereas only up to ∼15% of ribosomal proteins from non-halophiles share this property. Conversely, hydrophobicity tends to be lower for ribosomal proteins from halophiles than for the corresponding proteins from non-halophiles. Importantly, the surface electrostatic potential of ribosomal proteins from all organisms, especially halophiles, has distinct positive and negative regions across all the examined species. Positively and negatively charged residues of ribosomal proteins tend to be clustered in buried and solvent-exposed regions, respectively. Hence, the majority of ribosomal proteins is characterized by a significant degree of intramolecular charge segregation, regardless of the organism of origin. This key property enables the ribosome to accommodate proteins within its complex scaffold regardless of their overall net charge. PMID:24398678

  11. Methylation of nucleolar RNA in HeLa cells studied by autoradiography

    Cervera, J.; Martinez, A.; Renau-Piqueras, J.

    1984-01-01

    Methylation of nucleolar RNA was studied by autoradiography in HeLa cells using L-[methyl- 3 H]methionine and S-adenosyl-L-[methyl- 3 H]methionine as radioactive precursors. Pulse-labeling experiments show that nucleolar RNA methylation occurs on the newly synthesized RNA at the nucleolar fibrillar RNP component and mostly on the fibrillar ring of fibrillar centers, where pre-rRNA is being synthesized. Pulse-chase experiments show a shift of silver grains from the nucleolar fibrillar RNP component to the nucleolar granular component first and then to the cytoplasm. Labeling of nucleolar RNA via specific methylation permits the study of intranucleolar processing of pre-rRNA and confirms the sequence of labeling of the two nucleolar RNP components observed with radioactive uridine

  12. Stereologic estimation of nucleolar volume in ocular melanoma

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Gamel, J W; McCurdy, J

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between one-, two-, and three-dimensional histomorphometric estimators of nucleolar size in ordinary histologic sections of uveal melanomas from 144 patients. In addition, the prognostic value of the various size parameters was studied. T...

  13. Conserved regulators of nucleolar size revealed by global phenotypic analyses.

    Neumüller, Ralph A; Gross, Thomas; Samsonova, Anastasia A; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Buckner, Michael; Founk, Karen; Hu, Yanhui; Sharifpoor, Sara; Rosebrock, Adam P; Andrews, Brenda; Winston, Fred; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-08-20

    Regulation of cell growth is a fundamental process in development and disease that integrates a vast array of extra- and intracellular information. A central player in this process is RNA polymerase I (Pol I), which transcribes ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in the nucleolus. Rapidly growing cancer cells are characterized by increased Pol I-mediated transcription and, consequently, nucleolar hypertrophy. To map the genetic network underlying the regulation of nucleolar size and of Pol I-mediated transcription, we performed comparative, genome-wide loss-of-function analyses of nucleolar size in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila melanogaster coupled with mass spectrometry-based analyses of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) promoter. With this approach, we identified a set of conserved and nonconserved molecular complexes that control nucleolar size. Furthermore, we characterized a direct role of the histone information regulator (HIR) complex in repressing rRNA transcription in yeast. Our study provides a full-genome, cross-species analysis of a nuclear subcompartment and shows that this approach can identify conserved molecular modules.

  14. Conserved Regulators of Nucleolar Size Revealed by Global Phenotypic Analyses

    Neumüller, Ralph A.; Gross, Thomas; Samsonova, Anastasia A.; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Buckner, Michael; Founk, Karen; Hu, Yanhui; Sharifpoor, Sara; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Andrews, Brenda; Winston, Fred; Perrimon, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of cell growth is a fundamental process in development and disease that integrates a vast array of extra- and intracellular information. A central player in this process is RNA polymerase I (Pol I), which transcribes ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in the nucleolus. Rapidly growing cancer cells are characterized by increased Pol I–mediated transcription and, consequently, nucleolar hypertrophy. To map the genetic network underlying the regulation of nucleolar size and of Pol I–mediated transcription, we performed comparative, genome-wide loss-of-function analyses of nucleolar size in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila melanogaster coupled with mass spectrometry–based analyses of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) promoter. With this approach, we identified a set of conserved and nonconserved molecular complexes that control nucleolar size. Furthermore, we characterized a direct role of the histone information regulator (HIR) complex in repressing rRNA transcription in yeast. Our study provides a full-genome, cross-species analysis of a nuclear subcompartment and shows that this approach can identify conserved molecular modules. PMID:23962978

  15. Endogenous MCM7 microRNA cluster as a novel platform to multiplex small interfering and nucleolar RNAs for combinational HIV-1 gene therapy.

    Chung, Janet; Zhang, Jane; Li, Haitang; Ouellet, Dominique L; DiGiusto, David L; Rossi, John J

    2012-11-01

    Combinational therapy with small RNA inhibitory agents against multiple viral targets allows efficient inhibition of viral production by controlling gene expression at critical time points. Here we explore combinations of different classes of therapeutic anti-HIV-1 RNAs expressed from within the context of an intronic MCM7 (minichromosome maintenance complex component-7) platform that naturally harbors 3 microRNAs (miRNAs). We replaced the endogenous miRNAs with anti-HIV small RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting HIV-1 tat and rev messages that function to induce post-transcriptional gene silencing by the RNA interference pathway, a nucleolar-localizing RNA ribozyme that targets the conserved U5 region of HIV-1 transcripts for degradation, and finally nucleolar trans-activation response (TAR) and Rev-binding element (RBE) RNA decoys designed to sequester HIV-1 Tat and Rev proteins inside the nucleolus. We demonstrate the versatility of the MCM7 platform in expressing and efficiently processing the siRNAs as miRNA mimics along with nucleolar small RNAs. Furthermore, three of the combinatorial constructs tested potently suppressed viral replication during a 1-month HIV challenge, with greater than 5-log inhibition compared with untransduced, HIV-1-infected CEM T lymphocytes. One of the most effective constructs contains an anti-HIV siRNA combined with a nucleolar-localizing U5 ribozyme and TAR decoy. This represents the first efficacious example of combining Drosha-processed siRNAs with small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP)-processed nucleolar RNA chimeras from a single intron platform for effective inhibition of viral replication. Moreover, we demonstrated enrichment/selection for cells expressing levels of the antiviral RNAs that provide optimal inhibition under the selective pressure of HIV. The combinations of si/snoRNAs represent a new paradigm for combinatorial RNA-based gene therapy applications.

  16. Two Nucleolar Proteins, GDP1 and OLI2, Function As Ribosome Biogenesis Factors and Are Preferentially Involved in Promotion of Leaf Cell Proliferation without Strongly Affecting Leaf Adaxial–Abaxial Patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Koji Kojima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaf abaxial–adaxial patterning is dependent on the mutual repression of leaf polarity genes expressed either adaxially or abaxially. In Arabidopsis thaliana, this process is strongly affected by mutations in ribosomal protein genes and in ribosome biogenesis genes in a sensitized genetic background, such as asymmetric leaves2 (as2. Most ribosome-related mutants by themselves do not show leaf abaxialization, and one of their typical phenotypes is the formation of pointed rather than rounded leaves. In this study, we characterized two ribosome-related mutants to understand how ribosome biogenesis is linked to several aspects of leaf development. Previously, we isolated oligocellula2 (oli2 which exhibits the pointed-leaf phenotype and has a cell proliferation defect. OLI2 encodes a homolog of Nop2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a ribosome biogenesis factor involved in pre-60S subunit maturation. In this study, we found another pointed-leaf mutant that carries a mutation in a gene encoding an uncharacterized protein with a G-patch domain. Similar to oli2, this mutant, named g-patch domain protein1 (gdp1, has a reduced number of leaf cells. In addition, gdp1 oli2 double mutants showed a strong genetic interaction such that they synergistically impaired cell proliferation in leaves and produced markedly larger cells. On the other hand, they showed additive phenotypes when combined with several known ribosomal protein mutants. Furthermore, these mutants have a defect in pre-rRNA processing. GDP1 and OLI2 are strongly expressed in tissues with high cell proliferation activity, and GDP1-GFP and GFP-OLI2 are localized in the nucleolus. These results suggest that OLI2 and GDP1 are involved in ribosome biogenesis. We then examined the effects of gdp1 and oli2 on adaxial–abaxial patterning by crossing them with as2. Interestingly, neither gdp1 nor oli2 strongly enhanced the leaf polarity defect of as2. Similar results were obtained with as2 gdp1 oli2

  17. Integrating the genomic architecture of human nucleolar organizer regions with the biophysical properties of nucleoli.

    Mangan, Hazel; Gailín, Michael Ó; McStay, Brian

    2017-12-01

    Nucleoli are the sites of ribosome biogenesis and the largest membraneless subnuclear structures. They are intimately linked with growth and proliferation control and function as sensors of cellular stress. Nucleoli form around arrays of ribosomal gene (rDNA) repeats also called nucleolar organizer regions (NORs). In humans, NORs are located on the short arms of all five human acrocentric chromosomes. Multiple NORs contribute to the formation of large heterochromatin-surrounded nucleoli observed in most human cells. Here we will review recent findings about their genomic architecture. The dynamic nature of nucleoli began to be appreciated with the advent of photodynamic experiments using fluorescent protein fusions. We review more recent data on nucleoli in Xenopus germinal vesicles (GVs) which has revealed a liquid droplet-like behavior that facilitates nucleolar fusion. Further analysis in both XenopusGVs and Drosophila embryos indicates that the internal organization of nucleoli is generated by a combination of liquid-liquid phase separation and active processes involving rDNA. We will attempt to integrate these recent findings with the genomic architecture of human NORs to advance our understanding of how nucleoli form and respond to stress in human cells. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. QUANTITATIVE STUDY OF GASTRIC EPITHELIAL LESIONS BY NUCLEOLAR ORGANIZER REGION STAINING

    M.R. Arab

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Nucleolar organizer regions (NOR are defined as nucleolar components containing a set of argyrophilic proteins which are selectively stained by colloidal silver nitrate staining. Although studies have shown that the number of NOR dots or particles is directly related to the rapidity of cell proliferation in cancer cells, prognostic or diagnostic value of NOR remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to asses the proliferative activity of the NOR in different gastric epithelial lesions. For these purposes 60 biopsy and surgical specimens of stomach from pathology files of Khatamalanbia and Imam Hospitals were chosen. For each patient, 3-5 paraffin sections were prepared and stained by one step colloidal silver nitrate solution. In each section intranuclear dots in 100 cell nuclei were counted by two of authors in randomly selected fields and data were analyzed by ANOVA. Statistical analysis showed significant difference for NOR number between gastritis, different grades of dysplasia and carcinoma. The shape and number of NOR showed a grater variability in carcinoma compared to other lesions. It seems that NOR could reflect the proliferative activity of cells.

  19. Early Effects of Altered Gravity Environments on Plant Cell Growth and Cell Proliferation: Characterization of Morphofunctional Nucleolar Types in an Arabidopsis Cell Culture System

    Manzano, Ana I.; Herranz, Raúl; Manzano, Aránzazu [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Loon, Jack J. W. A. van [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Oral Pathology, Dutch Experiment Support Center, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam (Netherlands); ESA-ESTEC, TEC-MMG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Medina, F. Javier, E-mail: fjmedina@cib.csic.es [Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2016-02-05

    Changes in the cell growth rate of an in vitro cellular system in Arabidopsis thaliana induced by short exposure to an altered gravity environment have been estimated by a novel approach. The method consisted of defining three structural nucleolar types which are easy and reliable indicators of the ribosome biogenesis activity and, consequently, of protein biosynthesis, a parameter strictly correlated to cell growth in this cellular system. The relative abundance of each nucleolar type was statistically assessed in different conditions of gravity. Samples exposed to simulated microgravity for 200 min showed a significant decrease in nucleolar activity compared to 1g controls, whereas samples exposed to hypergravity (2g) for the same period showed nucleolar activity slightly increased. These effects could be considered as an early cellular response to the environmental alteration, given the short duration of the treatment. The functional significance of the structural data was validated by a combination of several different well-known parameters, using microscopical, flow cytometry, qPCR, and proteomic approaches, which showed that the decreased cell growth rate was decoupled from an increased cell proliferation rate under simulated microgravity, and the opposite trend was observed under hypergravity. Actually, not all parameters tested showed the same quantitative changes, indicating that the response to the environmental alteration is time-dependent. These results are in agreement with previous observations in root meristematic cells and they show the ability of plant cells to produce a response to gravity changes, independently of their integration into plant organs.

  20. Nucleolar integrity is required for the maintenance of long-term synaptic plasticity.

    Kim D Allen

    Full Text Available Long-term memory (LTM formation requires new protein synthesis and new gene expression. Based on our work in Aplysia, we hypothesized that the rRNA genes, stimulation-dependent targets of the enzyme Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1, are primary effectors of the activity-dependent changes in synaptic function that maintain synaptic plasticity and memory. Using electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, pharmacology and molecular biology techniques, we show here, for the first time, that the maintenance of forskolin-induced late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP in mouse hippocampal slices requires nucleolar integrity and the expression of new rRNAs. The activity-dependent upregulation of rRNA, as well as L-LTP expression, are poly(ADP-ribosylation (PAR dependent and accompanied by an increase in nuclear PARP-1 and Poly(ADP ribose molecules (pADPr after forskolin stimulation. The upregulation of PARP-1 and pADPr is regulated by Protein kinase A (PKA and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK--two kinases strongly associated with long-term plasticity and learning and memory. Selective inhibition of RNA Polymerase I (Pol I, responsible for the synthesis of precursor rRNA, results in the segmentation of nucleoli, the exclusion of PARP-1 from functional nucleolar compartments and disrupted L-LTP maintenance. Taken as a whole, these results suggest that new rRNAs (28S, 18S, and 5.8S ribosomal components--hence, new ribosomes and nucleoli integrity--are required for the maintenance of long-term synaptic plasticity. This provides a mechanistic link between stimulation-dependent gene expression and the new protein synthesis known to be required for memory consolidation.

  1. Prognostic value of nucleolar size and size pleomorphism in choroidal melanomas

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Gamel, J W; Jensen, O A

    1993-01-01

    Morphometric estimates of nucleolar size have been shown to possess a high prognostic value in patients with uveal melanomas. The authors investigated various quantitative estimators of the mean size and pleomorphism of nucleoli in choroidal melanomas from a consecutive series of 95 Danish patients...... of melanoma, and largest macroscopic tumor dimension (LTD), the following histomorphometric estimates were obtained: mean diameter of the 10 largest nucleoli (MLN), point-sampled mean nucleolar profile area (nucleolar ao) and the associated standard deviation of nucleolar ao, the volume-weighted mean...

  2. Key challenges for the creation and maintenance of specialist protein resources

    Holliday, Gemma L; Bairoch, Amos; Bagos, Pantelis G; Chatonnet, Arnaud; Craik, David J; Finn, Robert D; Henrissat, Bernard; Landsman, David; Manning, Gerard; Nagano, Nozomi; O’Donovan, Claire; Pruitt, Kim D; Rawlings, Neil D; Saier, Milton; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Spedding, Michael; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Vriend, Gert; Babbitt, Patricia C; Bateman, Alex

    2015-01-01

    As the volume of data relating to proteins increases, researchers rely more and more on the analysis of published data, thus increasing the importance of good access to these data that vary from the supplemental material of individual articles, all the way to major reference databases with professional staff and long-term funding. Specialist protein resources fill an important middle ground, providing interactive web interfaces to their databases for a focused topic or family of proteins, using specialized approaches that are not feasible in the major reference databases. Many are labors of love, run by a single lab with little or no dedicated funding and there are many challenges to building and maintaining them. This perspective arose from a meeting of several specialist protein resources and major reference databases held at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus (Cambridge, UK) on August 11 and 12, 2014. During this meeting some common key challenges involved in creating and maintaining such resources were discussed, along with various approaches to address them. In laying out these challenges, we aim to inform users about how these issues impact our resources and illustrate ways in which our working together could enhance their accuracy, currency, and overall value. Proteins 2015; 83:1005–1013. © 2015 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25820941

  3. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    Martinez, N.

    2016-09-06

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  4. High protein flexibility and reduced hydration water dynamics are key pressure adaptive strategies in prokaryotes

    Martinez, N.; Michoud, Gregoire; Cario, A.; Ollivier, J.; Franzetti, B.; Jebbar, M.; Oger, P.; Peters, J.

    2016-01-01

    Water and protein dynamics on a nanometer scale were measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the piezophile archaeon Thermococcus barophilus and the closely related pressure-sensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis, at 0.1 and 40 MPa. We show that cells of the pressure sensitive organism exhibit higher intrinsic stability. Both the hydration water dynamics and the fast protein and lipid dynamics are reduced under pressure. In contrast, the proteome of T. barophilus is more pressure sensitive than that of T. kodakarensis. The diffusion coefficient of hydration water is reduced, while the fast protein and lipid dynamics are slightly enhanced with increasing pressure. These findings show that the coupling between hydration water and cellular constituents might not be simply a master-slave relationship. We propose that the high flexibility of the T. barophilus proteome associated with reduced hydration water may be the keys to the molecular adaptation of the cells to high hydrostatic pressure.

  5. The nonstructural proteins of Nipah virus play a key role in pathogenicity in experimentally infected animals.

    Misako Yoneda

    Full Text Available Nipah virus (NiV P gene encodes P protein and three accessory proteins (V, C and W. It has been reported that all four P gene products have IFN antagonist activity when the proteins were transiently expressed. However, the role of those accessory proteins in natural infection with NiV remains unknown. We generated recombinant NiVs lacking V, C or W protein, rNiV(V-, rNiV(C-, and rNiV(W-, respectively, to analyze the functions of these proteins in infected cells and the implications in in vivo pathogenicity. All the recombinants grew well in cell culture, although the maximum titers of rNiV(V- and rNiV(C- were lower than the other recombinants. The rNiV(V-, rNiV(C- and rNiV(W- suppressed the IFN response as well as the parental rNiV, thereby indicating that the lack of each accessory protein does not significantly affect the inhibition of IFN signaling in infected cells. In experimentally infected golden hamsters, rNiV(V- and rNiV(C- but not the rNiV(W- virus showed a significant reduction in virulence. These results suggest that V and C proteins play key roles in NiV pathogenicity, and the roles are independent of their IFN-antagonist activity. This is the first report that identifies the molecular determinants of NiV in pathogenicity in vivo.

  6. Electrophoretic comparison of nuclear and nucleolar proteins : I. Beef Pancreas

    Poort, C.

    1961-01-01

    Nuclei and nucleoli, isolated from beef pancreas, are extracted with 0.14 M NaCl, 1 M NaCl and 0.1 N NaOH in the order given. The 0.14 M NaCl and 0.1 N NaOH extracts lend themselves to paper and agar electrophoresis and the electropherograms obtained from these extracts of nuclei and nucleoli are

  7. The sub-nucleolar localization of PHF6 defines its role in rDNA transcription and early processing events

    Todd, Matthew A M; Huh, Michael S; Picketts, David J

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA synthesis occurs in the nucleolus and is a tightly regulated process that is targeted in some developmental diseases and hyperactivated in multiple cancers. Subcellular localization and immunoprecipitation coupled mass spectrometry demonstrated that a proportion of plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein 6 (PHF6) protein is localized within the nucleolus and interacts with proteins involved in ribosomal processing. PHF6 sequence variants cause Börjeson–Forssman–Lehmann syndrome (BFLS, MIM#301900) and are also associated with a female-specific phenotype overlapping with Coffin–Siris syndrome (MIM#135900), T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (MIM#613065), and acute myeloid leukemia (MIM#601626); however, very little is known about its cellular function, including its nucleolar role. HEK 293T cells were treated with RNase A, DNase I, actinomycin D, or 5,6-dichloro-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimadole, followed by immunocytochemistry to determine PHF6 sub-nucleolar localization. We observed RNA-dependent localization of PHF6 to the sub-nucleolar fibrillar center (FC) and dense fibrillar component (DFC), at whose interface rRNA transcription occurs. Subsequent ChIP-qPCR analysis revealed strong enrichment of PHF6 across the entire rDNA-coding sequence but not along the intergenic spacer (IGS) region. When rRNA levels were quantified in a PHF6 gain-of-function model, we observed an overall decrease in rRNA transcription, accompanied by a modest increase in repressive promoter-associated RNA (pRNA) and a significant increase in the expression levels of the non-coding IGS36RNA and IGS39RNA transcripts. Collectively, our results demonstrate a role for PHF6 in carefully mediating the overall levels of ribosome biogenesis within a cell. PMID:27165002

  8. The Prediction of Key Cytoskeleton Components Involved in Glomerular Diseases Based on a Protein-Protein Interaction Network.

    Ding, Fangrui; Tan, Aidi; Ju, Wenjun; Li, Xuejuan; Li, Shao; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the physiological morphologies of different types of cells and tissues is essential for the normal functioning of each system in the human body. Dynamic variations in cell and tissue morphologies depend on accurate adjustments of the cytoskeletal system. The cytoskeletal system in the glomerulus plays a key role in the normal process of kidney filtration. To enhance the understanding of the possible roles of the cytoskeleton in glomerular diseases, we constructed the Glomerular Cytoskeleton Network (GCNet), which shows the protein-protein interaction network in the glomerulus, and identified several possible key cytoskeletal components involved in glomerular diseases. In this study, genes/proteins annotated to the cytoskeleton were detected by Gene Ontology analysis, and glomerulus-enriched genes were selected from nine available glomerular expression datasets. Then, the GCNet was generated by combining these two sets of information. To predict the possible key cytoskeleton components in glomerular diseases, we then examined the common regulation of the genes in GCNet in the context of five glomerular diseases based on their transcriptomic data. As a result, twenty-one cytoskeleton components as potential candidate were highlighted for consistently down- or up-regulating in all five glomerular diseases. And then, these candidates were examined in relation to existing known glomerular diseases and genes to determine their possible functions and interactions. In addition, the mRNA levels of these candidates were also validated in a puromycin aminonucleoside(PAN) induced rat nephropathy model and were also matched with existing Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) transcriptomic data. As a result, there are 15 of 21 candidates in PAN induced nephropathy model were consistent with our predication and also 12 of 21 candidates were matched with differentially expressed genes in the DN transcriptomic data. By providing a novel interaction network and prediction, GCNet

  9. Identification of a key structural element for protein folding within beta-hairpin turns.

    Kim, Jaewon; Brych, Stephen R; Lee, Jihun; Logan, Timothy M; Blaber, Michael

    2003-05-09

    Specific residues in a polypeptide may be key contributors to the stability and foldability of the unique native structure. Identification and prediction of such residues is, therefore, an important area of investigation in solving the protein folding problem. Atypical main-chain conformations can help identify strains within a folded protein, and by inference, positions where unique amino acids may have a naturally high frequency of occurrence due to favorable contributions to stability and folding. Non-Gly residues located near the left-handed alpha-helical region (L-alpha) of the Ramachandran plot are a potential indicator of structural strain. Although many investigators have studied mutations at such positions, no consistent energetic or kinetic contributions to stability or folding have been elucidated. Here we report a study of the effects of Gly, Ala and Asn substitutions found within the L-alpha region at a characteristic position in defined beta-hairpin turns within human acidic fibroblast growth factor, and demonstrate consistent effects upon stability and folding kinetics. The thermodynamic and kinetic data are compared to available data for similar mutations in other proteins, with excellent agreement. The results have identified that Gly at the i+3 position within a subset of beta-hairpin turns is a key contributor towards increasing the rate of folding to the native state of the polypeptide while leaving the rate of unfolding largely unchanged.

  10. Interplay between the key proteins of serotonin system in SSRI antidepressants efficacy.

    Kulikov, Alexander V; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Kalueff, Allan V; Naumenko, Vladimir S; Popova, Nina K

    2018-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most effective and most used antidepressant drugs. Acting by inhibiting serotonin (5-HT) transporter, SSRIs display a typical 3-4-week delay in their therapeutic effects, with nearly 40% of depressed patients remaining treatment-resistant. Recent evidence suggests complex interplay between 5-HT receptors and key proteins of 5-HT metabolism in molecular mechanisms of such delay and resistance to SSRIs. Area covered: This paper concentrates on the interplay between 5-HT receptors in the delay of therapeutic effect of SSRIs, and the interaction between tryptophan hydroxylase 2 and 5-HT transporter in the SSRI resistance. Specifically, it discusses: (1) the data on the association between antidepressant drug efficacy and genetically defined characteristics of key proteins in the 5-HT signaling (TPH2, MAOA, SERT and 5-HT 1A receptor), (2) the effect of dimerization of 5-HT 7 and 5-HT 1A receptors on the internalization and functioning of 5-HT 1A presynaptic receptors, (3) the role of Tph2 deficiency in the resistance to SSRIs treatment. We shift the emphasis from individual proteins to their interactions in explaining antidepressant action of SSRI. Expert opinion: These interactions should be considered when developing more effective antidepressant drugs as well as for predicting and improving the efficacy of antidepressant therapies.

  11. Origin and spread of photosynthesis based upon conserved sequence features in key bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis proteins.

    Gupta, Radhey S

    2012-11-01

    The origin of photosynthesis and how this capability has spread to other bacterial phyla remain important unresolved questions. I describe here a number of conserved signature indels (CSIs) in key proteins involved in bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) biosynthesis that provide important insights in these regards. The proteins BchL and BchX, which are essential for Bchl biosynthesis, are derived by gene duplication in a common ancestor of all phototrophs. More ancient gene duplication gave rise to the BchX-BchL proteins and the NifH protein of the nitrogenase complex. The sequence alignment of NifH-BchX-BchL proteins contain two CSIs that are uniquely shared by all NifH and BchX homologs, but not by any BchL homologs. These CSIs and phylogenetic analysis of NifH-BchX-BchL protein sequences strongly suggest that the BchX homologs are ancestral to BchL and that the Bchl-based anoxygenic photosynthesis originated prior to the chlorophyll (Chl)-based photosynthesis in cyanobacteria. Another CSI in the BchX-BchL sequence alignment that is uniquely shared by all BchX homologs and the BchL sequences from Heliobacteriaceae, but absent in all other BchL homologs, suggests that the BchL homologs from Heliobacteriaceae are primitive in comparison to all other photosynthetic lineages. Several other identified CSIs in the BchN homologs are commonly shared by all proteobacterial homologs and a clade consisting of the marine unicellular Cyanobacteria (Clade C). These CSIs in conjunction with the results of phylogenetic analyses and pair-wise sequence similarity on the BchL, BchN, and BchB proteins, where the homologs from Clade C Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria exhibited close relationship, provide strong evidence that these two groups have incurred lateral gene transfers. Additionally, phylogenetic analyses and several CSIs in the BchL-N-B proteins that are uniquely shared by all Chlorobi and Chloroflexi homologs provide evidence that the genes for these proteins have also been

  12. Identification of TOEFAZ1-interacting proteins reveals key regulators of Trypanosoma brucei cytokinesis.

    Hilton, Nicholas A; Sladewski, Thomas E; Perry, Jenna A; Pataki, Zemplen; Sinclair-Davis, Amy N; Muniz, Richard S; Tran, Holly L; Wurster, Jenna I; Seo, Jiwon; de Graffenried, Christopher L

    2018-05-21

    The protist parasite Trypanosoma brucei is an obligate extracellular pathogen that retains its highly-polarized morphology during cell division and has evolved a novel cytokinetic process independent of non-muscle myosin II. The polo-like kinase homolog TbPLK is essential for transmission of cell polarity during division and for cytokinesis. We previously identified a putative TbPLK substrate named Tip of the Extending FAZ 1 (TOEFAZ1) as an essential kinetoplastid-specific component of the T. brucei cytokinetic machinery. We performed a proximity-dependent biotinylation (BioID) screen using TOEFAZ1 as a means to identify additional proteins that are involved in cytokinesis. Using quantitative proteomic methods, we identified nearly 500 TOEFAZ1-proximal proteins and characterized 59 in further detail. Among the candidates, we identified an essential putative phosphatase that regulates the expression level and localization of both TOEFAZ1 and TbPLK, a previously uncharacterized protein that is necessary for the assembly of a new cell posterior, and a microtubule plus-end directed orphan kinesin that is required for completing cleavage furrow ingression. The identification of these proteins provides new insight into T. brucei cytokinesis and establishes TOEFAZ1 as a key component of this essential and uniquely-configured process in kinetoplastids. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Model for the structure of the active nucleolar chromatin

    Labhart, P.; Ness, P.; Banz, E.; Parish, R.; Koller, T.; Universitaet Zurich, Switzerland)

    1983-01-01

    Transcribed ribosomal genes of Xenopus laevis oocytes and of Dictyostelium discoideum were studied electron microscopically using step gradients at different ionic strengths. Under these conditions the fiber of the active chromatin appears smooth and is indistinguishable from free DNA. The accessibility of the coding region and of a nontranscribed spacer region to restriction enzymes and micrococcal nuclease were investigated. All of the results obtained are consistent with a model in which active nucleolar chromatin is mostly composed of free DNA and the components required for transcription. 50 references, 7 figures

  14. Alterações nucleolares em algumas neuroviroses humanas Nucleolar alterations in some human viral infections of the nervous system

    Alexandre Alberto de Alencar

    1973-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho estudamos alguns conceitos básicos sobre o nucléolo. Em seguida à apresentação do material de estudo, constante de casos de neuroviroses humanas, é feita um adescrição pormenorizada das alterações nucleares e nucleolares encontradas nas seguintes entidades mórbidas: polioencefalite subaguda com inclusões de DAWSON, leuco-encefalite subaguda esclerosante de VAN BOAGAERT, panencefalite nodular de PETTEDORING, poliomielite anterior aguda e raiva. As alterações nucleolares encontradas constam de hipertrofia inicial, a que se seguem profundas alterações em sua estrutura interna, sob a forma de vacuolizações e condensações granulares (os chamados nucleolinos de número e tamanhos variados. Alguns destes corpúsculos granulares, fortemente basófilos e que apresentam as mesmas características citoquímicas dos nucléolos, são lançados no carioplasma sob a forma de volumosos corpúsculos basófilos esferoidais. São feitos comentários sobre a natureza do fenômeno, concluindo-se que, tratando-se de uma ocorrência somente encontrada nas viroses, em certas formas de intoxicações e em determinados distúrbios genéticos, o seu aparecimento em um quadro histopatológico encefalítico ou mielítico permite, com segurança atribuir sua etiologia a um vírus. De todos os processos estudados, o que apresentou tais alterações nucleolares com maior exuberância foi a panencefalite nodular de PETTE-DORING.In this paper we studied the classic and modern concepts concerning the structure, composition, origen and function of the nucleole particularly in relation to the neuronal cells. The materal of study consisted of a number of cases of human neuroviroses. A detailed description of the nuclear and nucleolar alterations verfied in the following diseases was made: Dawson's Subacute Polioencephalitis, van Bogaert´s Sclerosing Subacute Leucoencephalitis, Pette Döring's Subacute Panencephalitis, Acute Anterior Poliomyelitis

  15. Uncoupling Protein 2: A Key Player and a Potential Therapeutic Target in Vascular Diseases

    Giorgia Pierelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 is an inner mitochondrial membrane protein that belongs to the uncoupling protein family and plays an important role in lowering mitochondrial membrane potential and dissipating metabolic energy with prevention of oxidative stress accumulation. In the present article, we will review the evidence that UCP2, as a consequence of its roles within the mitochondria, represents a critical player in the predisposition to vascular disease development in both animal models and in humans, particularly in relation to obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. The deletion of the UCP2 gene contributes to atherosclerosis lesion development in the knockout mice, also showing significantly shorter lifespan. The UCP2 gene downregulation is a key determinant of higher predisposition to renal and cerebrovascular damage in an animal model of spontaneous hypertension and stroke. In contrast, UCP2 overexpression improves both hyperglycemia- and high-salt diet-induced endothelial dysfunction and ameliorates hypertensive target organ damage in SHRSP. Moreover, drugs (fenofibrate and sitagliptin and several vegetable compounds (extracts from Brassicaceae, berberine, curcumin, and capsaicin are able to induce UCP2 expression level and to exert beneficial effects on the occurrence of vascular damage. As a consequence, UCP2 becomes an interesting therapeutic target for the treatment of common human vascular diseases.

  16. Quantitative analysis of nucleolar chromatin distribution in the complex convoluted nucleoli of Didinium nasutum (Ciliophora).

    Leonova, Olga G; Karajan, Bella P; Ivlev, Yuri F; Ivanova, Julia L; Skarlato, Sergei O; Popenko, Vladimir I

    2013-01-01

    We have earlier shown that the typical Didinium nasutum nucleolus is a complex convoluted branched domain, comprising a dense fibrillar component located at the periphery of the nucleolus and a granular component located in the central part. Here our main interest was to study quantitatively the spatial distribution of nucleolar chromatin structures in these convoluted nucleoli. There are no "classical" fibrillar centers in D.nasutum nucleoli. The spatial distribution of nucleolar chromatin bodies, which play the role of nucleolar organizers in the macronucleus of D.nasutum, was studied using 3D reconstructions based on serial ultrathin sections. The relative number of nucleolar chromatin bodies was determined in macronuclei of recently fed, starved D.nasutum cells and in resting cysts. This parameter is shown to correlate with the activity of the nucleolus. However, the relative number of nucleolar chromatin bodies in different regions of the same convoluted nucleolus is approximately the same. This finding suggests equal activity in different parts of the nucleolar domain and indicates the existence of some molecular mechanism enabling it to synchronize this activity in D. nasutum nucleoli. Our data show that D. nasutum nucleoli display bipartite structure. All nucleolar chromatin bodies are shown to be located outside of nucleoli, at the periphery of the fibrillar component.

  17. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase: An Ubiquitous Signaling Pathway With Key Roles in the Cardiovascular System.

    Salt, Ian P; Hardie, D Grahame

    2017-05-26

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of cellular and whole-body energy homeostasis, which acts to restore energy homoeostasis whenever cellular energy charge is depleted. Over the last 2 decades, it has become apparent that AMPK regulates several other cellular functions and has specific roles in cardiovascular tissues, acting to regulate cardiac metabolism and contractile function, as well as promoting anticontractile, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic actions in blood vessels. In this review, we discuss the role of AMPK in the cardiovascular system, including the molecular basis of mutations in AMPK that alter cardiac physiology and the proposed mechanisms by which AMPK regulates vascular function under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Proteomic analysis reveals heat shock protein 70 has a key role in polycythemia Vera.

    Gallardo, Miguel; Barrio, Santiago; Fernandez, Marisol; Paradela, Alberto; Arenas, Alicia; Toldos, Oscar; Ayala, Rosa; Albizua, Enriqueta; Jimenez, Ana; Redondo, Santiago; Garcia-Martin, Rosa Maria; Gilsanz, Florinda; Albar, Juan Pablo; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin

    2013-11-19

    JAK-STAT signaling through the JAK2V617F mutation is central to the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). However, other events could precede the JAK2 mutation. The aim of this study is to analyze the phenotypic divergence between polycytemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocytemia (ET) to find novel therapeutics targets by a proteomic and functional approach to identify alternative routes to JAK2 activation. Through 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry of granulocyte protein from 20 MPN samples, showed differential expression of HSP70 in PV and ET besides other 60 proteins. Immunohistochemistry of 46 MPN bone marrow samples confirmed HSP70 expression. The median of positive granulocytes was 80% in PV (SD 35%) vs. 23% in ET (SD 34.25%). In an ex vivo model KNK437 was used as an inhibition model assay of HSP70, showed dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and burst formation unit erythroid (BFU-E) in PV and ET, increased apoptosis in the erythroid lineage, and decreased pJAK2 signaling, as well as a specific siRNA for HSP70. These data suggest a key role for HSP70 in proliferation and survival of the erythroid lineage in PV, and may represent a potential therapeutic target in MPN, especially in PV.

  19. Depletion of key protein components of the RISC pathway impairs pre-ribosomal RNA processing.

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Crooke, Stanley T

    2011-06-01

    Little is known about whether components of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) mediate the biogenesis of RNAs other than miRNA. Here, we show that depletion of key proteins of the RISC pathway by antisense oligonucleotides significantly impairs pre-rRNA processing in human cells. In cells depleted of Drosha or Dicer, different precursors to 5.8S rRNA strongly accumulated, without affecting normal endonucleolytic cleavages. Moderate yet distinct processing defects were also observed in Ago2-depleted cells. Physical links between pre-rRNA and these proteins were identified by co-immunoprecipitation analyses. Interestingly, simultaneous depletion of Dicer and Drosha led to a different processing defect, causing slower production of 28S rRNA and its precursor. Both Dicer and Ago2 were detected in the nuclear fraction, and reduction of Dicer altered the structure of the nucleolus, where pre-rRNA processing occurs. Together, these results suggest that Drosha and Dicer are implicated in rRNA biogenesis.

  20. Deep-Red Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters for Nucleoli Staining: Real-Time Monitoring of the Nucleolar Dynamics in Reverse Transformation of Malignant Cells.

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yanan; He, Hua; Ma, Xiqi; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Shuai; Ge, Baosheng; Wang, Shengjie; Nau, Werner M; Huang, Fang

    2017-05-31

    Nucleoli are important subnuclear structures inside cells. We report novel fluorescent gold nanoclusters (K-AuNCs) that are able to stain the nucleoli selectively and make it possible to explore the nucleolar morphology with fluorescence imaging technique. This novel probe is prepared through an easy synthesis method by employing a tripeptide (Lys-Cys-Lys) as the surface ligand. The properties, including deep-red fluorescence emission (680 nm), large Stocks shift, broad excitation band, low cytotoxicity, and good photostability, endow this probe with potential for bioanalytical applications. Because of their small size and their positively charged surface, K-AuNCs are able to accumulate efficiently at the nucleolar regions and provide precise morphological information. K-AuNCs are also used to monitor the nucleolar dynamics along the reverse-transformation process of malignant cells, induced by the agonist of protein A, 8-chloro-cyclic adenosine monophosphate. This gives a novel approach for investigating the working mechanism of antitumor drugs.

  1. Tissue-selective effects of nucleolar stress and rDNA damage in developmental disorders.

    Calo, Eliezer; Gu, Bo; Bowen, Margot E; Aryan, Fardin; Zalc, Antoine; Liang, Jialiang; Flynn, Ryan A; Swigut, Tomek; Chang, Howard Y; Attardi, Laura D; Wysocka, Joanna

    2018-02-01

    Many craniofacial disorders are caused by heterozygous mutations in general regulators of housekeeping cellular functions such as transcription or ribosome biogenesis. Although it is understood that many of these malformations are a consequence of defects in cranial neural crest cells, a cell type that gives rise to most of the facial structures during embryogenesis, the mechanism underlying cell-type selectivity of these defects remains largely unknown. By exploring molecular functions of DDX21, a DEAD-box RNA helicase involved in control of both RNA polymerase (Pol) I- and II-dependent transcriptional arms of ribosome biogenesis, we uncovered a previously unappreciated mechanism linking nucleolar dysfunction, ribosomal DNA (rDNA) damage, and craniofacial malformations. Here we demonstrate that genetic perturbations associated with Treacher Collins syndrome, a craniofacial disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in components of the Pol I transcriptional machinery or its cofactor TCOF1 (ref. 1), lead to relocalization of DDX21 from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, its loss from the chromatin targets, as well as inhibition of rRNA processing and downregulation of ribosomal protein gene transcription. These effects are cell-type-selective, cell-autonomous, and involve activation of p53 tumour-suppressor protein. We further show that cranial neural crest cells are sensitized to p53-mediated apoptosis, but blocking DDX21 loss from the nucleolus and chromatin rescues both the susceptibility to apoptosis and the craniofacial phenotypes associated with Treacher Collins syndrome. This mechanism is not restricted to cranial neural crest cells, as blood formation is also hypersensitive to loss of DDX21 functions. Accordingly, ribosomal gene perturbations associated with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia disrupt DDX21 localization. At the molecular level, we demonstrate that impaired rRNA synthesis elicits a DNA damage response, and that rDNA damage results in tissue-selective and

  2. Human acrocentric chromosomes with transcriptionally silent nucleolar organizer regions associate with nucleoli

    Sullivan, Gareth J.; Bridger, Joanna M.; Cuthbert, Andrew P.; Newbold, Robert F.; Bickmore, Wendy A.; McStay, Brian

    2001-01-01

    Human ribosomal gene repeats are distributed among five nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) on the p arms of acrocentric chromosomes. On exit from mitosis, nucleoli form around individual active NORs. As cells progress through the cycle, these mini-nucleoli fuse to form large nucleoli incorporating multiple NORs. It is generally assumed that nucleolar incorporation of individual NORs is dependent on ribosomal gene transcription. To test this assumption, we determined the nuclear location of in...

  3. Nucleolus-like morphology produced during the in vitro reassociation of nucleolar components

    1993-01-01

    Nucleoli, the sites of rRNA synthesis, rRNA processing, and the assembly of ribosomes, are dynamic organelles that, in most cells, disperse and reform during mitosis. The mechanisms that regulate nucleolar formation are unknown as is the relationship between nucleolar morphology and the pathway of ribosome biogenesis. In this report we describe the in vitro formation of nucleolus-like particles (NLPs) from soluble extracts of nucleoli. NLPs, which reached sizes comparable to nucleoli (1-3 mic...

  4. Plant Nucleolar Stress Response, a New Face in the NAC-Dependent Cellular Stress Responses

    Iwai Ohbayashi; Munetaka Sugiyama

    2018-01-01

    The nucleolus is the most prominent nuclear domain, where the core processes of ribosome biogenesis occur vigorously. All these processes are finely orchestrated by many nucleolar factors to build precisely ribosome particles. In animal cells, perturbations of ribosome biogenesis, mostly accompanied by structural disorders of the nucleolus, cause a kind of cellular stress to induce cell cycle arrest, senescence, or apoptosis, which is called nucleolar stress response. The best-characterized p...

  5. CD-loop Extension in Zika Virus Envelope Protein Key for Stability and Pathogenesis.

    Gallichotte, Emily N; Dinnon, Kenneth H; Lim, Xin-Ni; Ng, Thiam-Seng; Lim, Elisa X Y; Menachery, Vineet D; Lok, Shee-Mei; Baric, Ralph S

    2017-12-05

    With severe disease manifestations including microcephaly, congenital malformation, and Guillain-Barré syndrome, Zika virus (ZIKV) remains a persistent global public health threat. Despite antigenic similarities with dengue viruses, structural studies have suggested the extended CD-loop and hydrogen-bonding interaction network within the ZIKV envelope protein contribute to stability differences between the viral families. This enhanced stability may lead to the augmented infection, disease manifestation, and persistence in body fluids seen following ZIKV infection. To examine the role of these motifs in infection, we generated a series of ZIKV recombinant viruses that disrupted the hydrogen-bonding network (350A, 351A, and 350A/351A) or the CD-loop extension (Δ346). Our results demonstrate a key role for the ZIKV extended CD-loop in cell-type-dependent replication, virion stability, and in vivo pathogenesis. Importantly, the Δ346 mutant maintains similar antigenicity to wild-type virus, opening the possibility for its use as a live-attenuated vaccine platform for ZIKV and other clinically relevant flaviviruses. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    Lei eShi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells.

  7. Structural insights into the interaction of the conserved mammalian proteins GAPR-1 and Beclin 1, a key autophagy protein

    Li, Yue; Zhao, Yuting; Su, Minfei; Glover, Karen; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Colbert, Christopher L.; Levine, Beth; Sinha, Sangita C.

    2017-08-29

    Mammalian Golgi-associated plant pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GAPR-1) is a negative autophagy regulator that binds Beclin 1, a key component of the autophagosome nucleation complex. Beclin 1 residues 267–284 are required for binding GAPR-1. Here, sequence analyses, structural modeling, mutagenesis combined with pull-down assays, X-ray crystal structure determination and small-angle X-ray scattering were used to investigate the Beclin 1–GAPR-1 interaction. Five conserved residues line an equatorial GAPR-1 surface groove that is large enough to bind a peptide. A model of a peptide comprising Beclin 1 residues 267–284 docked onto GAPR-1, built using theCABS-dockserver, indicates that this peptide binds to this GAPR-1 groove. Mutation of the five conserved residues lining this groove, H54A/E86A/G102K/H103A/N138G, abrogates Beclin 1 binding. The 1.27 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of this pentad mutant GAPR-1 was determined. Comparison with the wild-type (WT) GAPR-1 structure shows that the equatorial groove of the pentad mutant is shallower and more positively charged, and therefore may not efficiently bind Beclin 1 residues 267–284, which include many hydrophobic residues. Both WT and pentad mutant GAPR-1 crystallize as dimers, and in each case the equatorial groove of one subunit is partially occluded by the other subunit, indicating that dimeric GAPR-1 is unlikely to bind Beclin 1. SAXS analysis of WT and pentad mutant GAPR-1 indicates that in solution the WT forms monomers, while the pentad mutant is primarily dimeric. Thus, changes in the structure of the equatorial groove combined with the improved dimerization of pentad mutant GAPR-1 are likely to abrogate binding to Beclin 1.

  8. To the nucleolar bodies (nucleoli) in cells of the lymphocytic lineage in patients suffering from B - chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Smetana, K; Karban, J; Trneny, M

    2010-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to provide more information on nucleoli in lymphocytes of B - chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The computer assisted nucleolar and cytoplasmic RNA image densitometry, reflecting the nucleolar and cytoplasmic RNA concentration at the single cell level, demonstrated a remarkable stability during the differentiation and maturation of B- lymphocytes. In contrast, as it was expected, the nucleolar diameter during the lymphocytic development markedly decreased. Thus the nucleolar RNA content of leukemic B-lymphocytes was apparently related to the nucleolar size. In both immature and mature lymphocytes, the cytostatic treatment increased the incidence of micronucleoli, which represent the "inactive" type of nucleoli. However, the decreased values of the nucleolar diameter were statistically significant only in mature lymphocytes of treated patients. On the other hand, despite such observation, it must be mentioned that "large active" and "ring shaped resting" nucleoli were still present in immature and mature lymphocytes after the cytostatic therapy and such cells might represent a potential pool of proliferating cells. As it is generally accepted "large active nucleoli" with multiple fibrillar centers are known to be characteristic for proliferating cells. "Ring shaped resting nucleoli" are present in sleeping cells, which may be stimulated to return to the cell cycle and to proliferate again. In addition, the nucleolar RNA distribution also indicated that Gumprecht ghosts mostly originated from mature lymphocytes. Increased ratio of the nucleolar to cytoplasmic RNA density in Gumprecht ghosts or apoptotic cells and apoptotic bodies of the lymphocytic origin was related to the decreased cytoplasmic RNA concentration. The increased nucleolar size together with the markedly decreased cytoplasmic RNA concentration characteristic for Gumprecht ghosts just reflected the spreading of lymphocytes during smear preparations. In apoptotic cells or

  9. Hydrophobic environment is a key factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins.

    Gromiha, M Michael; Pathak, Manish C; Saraboji, Kadhirvel; Ortlund, Eric A; Gaucher, Eric A

    2013-04-01

    The stability of thermophilic proteins has been viewed from different perspectives and there is yet no unified principle to understand this stability. It would be valuable to reveal the most important interactions for designing thermostable proteins for such applications as industrial protein engineering. In this work, we have systematically analyzed the importance of various interactions by computing different parameters such as surrounding hydrophobicity, inter-residue interactions, ion-pairs and hydrogen bonds. The importance of each interaction has been determined by its predicted relative contribution in thermophiles versus the same contribution in mesophilic homologues based on a dataset of 373 protein families. We predict that hydrophobic environment is the major factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins and found that 80% of thermophilic proteins analyzed showed higher hydrophobicity than their mesophilic counterparts. Ion pairs, hydrogen bonds, and interaction energy are also important and favored in 68%, 50%, and 62% of thermophilic proteins, respectively. Interestingly, thermophilic proteins with decreased hydrophobic environments display a greater number of hydrogen bonds and/or ion pairs. The systematic elimination of mesophilic proteins based on surrounding hydrophobicity, interaction energy, and ion pairs/hydrogen bonds, led to correctly identifying 95% of the thermophilic proteins in our analyses. Our analysis was also applied to another, more refined set of 102 thermophilic-mesophilic pairs, which again identified hydrophobicity as a dominant property in 71% of the thermophilic proteins. Further, the notion of surrounding hydrophobicity, which characterizes the hydrophobic behavior of residues in a protein environment, has been applied to the three-dimensional structures of elongation factor-Tu proteins and we found that the thermophilic proteins are enriched with a hydrophobic environment. The results obtained in this work highlight the

  10. Nucleolus disassembly and distribution of segregated nucleolar material in prophase of root-tip meristematic cells in Triticum aestivum L.

    Wang Jianyue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents details of the process of nucleolar disassembly, studied by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM in wheat root cells. In early prophase, chromatin condensation and irregular nucleolar morphology are observed, with many small particles appearing around the nucleolus. In middle prophase, the nucleolus radiates outwards; in late prophase, the fine structure of the nucleolus disappears and nucleolar material diffuses away. Using “en bloc” silver-staining to distinguish between nucleoli and chromatin, we observed that the dispersed nucleolar material aggregates around the chromatin, forming a sheath-like perichromosomal structure that coats the chromosomes in late prophase.

  11. Shc adaptor proteins are key transducers of mitogenic signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled thrombin receptor

    Chen, Y; Grall, D; Salcini, A E

    1996-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin activates G protein signaling systems that lead to Ras activation and, in certain cells, proliferation. Whereas the steps leading to Ras activation by G protein-coupled receptors are not well defined, the mechanisms of Ras activation by receptor tyrosine kinases have......-insensitive proteins appear to mediate this effect, since (i) pertussis toxin pre-treatment of cells does not blunt the action of thrombin and (ii) Shc phosphorylation on tyrosine can be stimulated by the muscarinic m1 receptor. Shc phosphorylation does not appear to involve protein kinase C, since the addition of 4...

  12. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn.

    Yongbin Dong

    Full Text Available The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize.

  13. Regulatory Role of Small Nucleolar RNAs in Human Diseases

    Grigory A. Stepanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs are appreciable players in gene expression regulation in human cells. The canonical function of box C/D and box H/ACA snoRNAs is posttranscriptional modification of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs, namely, 2′-O-methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively. A series of independent studies demonstrated that snoRNAs, as well as other noncoding RNAs, serve as the source of various short regulatory RNAs. Some snoRNAs and their fragments can also participate in the regulation of alternative splicing and posttranscriptional modification of mRNA. Alterations in snoRNA expression in human cells can affect numerous vital cellular processes. SnoRNA level in human cells, blood serum, and plasma presents a promising target for diagnostics and treatment of human pathologies. Here we discuss the relation between snoRNAs and oncological, neurodegenerative, and viral diseases and also describe changes in snoRNA level in response to artificial stress and some drugs.

  14. A lock-and-key model for protein–protein interactions

    Morrison, Julie L.; Breitling, Rainer; Higham, Desmond J.; Gilbert, David R.

    2006-01-01

    Motivation: Protein–protein interaction networks are one of the major post-genomic data sources available to molecular biologists. They provide a comprehensive view of the global interaction structure of an organism’s proteome, as well as detailed information on specific interactions. Here we suggest a physical model of protein interactions that can be used to extract additional information at an intermediate level: It enables us to identify proteins which share biological interaction motifs,...

  15. Dissecting the Wnt secretion pathway: key questions on the modification and intracellular trafficking of Wnt proteins

    Harterink, M.; Korswagen, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt family of signalling proteins has essential functions in development and adult tissue homoeostasis throughout the animal kingdom. Although signalling cascades triggered by Wnt proteins have been extensively studied, much remains to be learned about how Wnts are produced and secreted. Over

  16. Mammalian small nucleolar RNAs are mobile genetic elements.

    Michel J Weber

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs of the H/ACA box and C/D box categories guide the pseudouridylation and the 2'-O-ribose methylation of ribosomal RNAs by forming short duplexes with their target. Similarly, small Cajal body-specific RNAs (scaRNAs guide modifications of spliceosomal RNAs. The vast majority of vertebrate sno/scaRNAs are located in introns of genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II and processed by exonucleolytic trimming after splicing. A bioinformatic search for orthologues of human sno/scaRNAs in sequenced mammalian genomes reveals the presence of species- or lineage-specific sno/scaRNA retroposons (sno/scaRTs characterized by an A-rich tail and an approximately 14-bp target site duplication that corresponds to their insertion site, as determined by interspecific genomic alignments. Three classes of snoRTs are defined based on the extent of intron and exon sequences from the snoRNA parental host gene they contain. SnoRTs frequently insert in gene introns in the sense orientation at genomic hot spots shared with other genetic mobile elements. Previously characterized human snoRNAs are encoded in retroposons whose parental copies can be identified by phylogenic analysis, showing that snoRTs can be faithfully processed. These results identify snoRNAs as a new family of mobile genetic elements. The insertion of new snoRNA copies might constitute a safeguard mechanism by which the biological activity of snoRNAs is maintained in spite of the risk of mutations in the parental copy. I furthermore propose that retroposition followed by genetic drift is a mechanism that increased snoRNA diversity during vertebrate evolution to eventually acquire new RNA-modification functions.

  17. Peptide domains involved in the localization of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nucleocapsid protein to the nucleolus

    Rowland, Raymond R.R.; Schneider, Paula; Fang Ying; Wootton, Sarah; Yoo, Dongwan; Benfield, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the principal component of the viral nucleocapsid and localizes to the nucleolus. Peptide sequence analysis of the N protein of several North American isolates identified two potential nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences located at amino acids 10-13 and 41-42, which were labeled NLS-1 and NLS-2, respectively. Peptides containing NLS-1 or NLS-2 were sufficient to accumulate enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the nucleus. The inactivation of NLS-1 by site-directed mutagenesis or the deletion of the first 14 amino acids did not affect N protein localization to the nucleolus. The substitution of key lysine residues with uncharged amino acids in NLS-2 blocked nuclear/nucleolar localization. Site-directed mutagenesis within NLS-2 identified the sequence, KKNKK, as forming the core localization domain within NLS-2. Using an in vitro pull-down assay, the N protein was able to bind importin-α, importin-β nuclear transport proteins. The localization pattern of N-EGFP fusion peptides represented by a series of deletions from the C- and N-terminal ends of the N protein identified a region covering amino acids 41-72, which contained a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) sequence. The 41-72 N peptide when fused to EGFP mimicked the nucleolar-cytoplasmic distribution of native N. These results identify a single NLS involved in the transport of N from the cytoplasm and into nucleus. An additional peptide sequence, overlapping NLS-2, is involved in the further targeting of N to the nucleolus

  18. High Pressure ZZ-Exchange NMR Reveals Key Features of Protein Folding Transition States.

    Zhang, Yi; Kitazawa, Soichiro; Peran, Ivan; Stenzoski, Natalie; McCallum, Scott A; Raleigh, Daniel P; Royer, Catherine A

    2016-11-23

    Understanding protein folding mechanisms and their sequence dependence requires the determination of residue-specific apparent kinetic rate constants for the folding and unfolding reactions. Conventional two-dimensional NMR, such as HSQC experiments, can provide residue-specific information for proteins. However, folding is generally too fast for such experiments. ZZ-exchange NMR spectroscopy allows determination of folding and unfolding rates on much faster time scales, yet even this regime is not fast enough for many protein folding reactions. The application of high hydrostatic pressure slows folding by orders of magnitude due to positive activation volumes for the folding reaction. We combined high pressure perturbation with ZZ-exchange spectroscopy on two autonomously folding protein domains derived from the ribosomal protein, L9. We obtained residue-specific apparent rates at 2500 bar for the N-terminal domain of L9 (NTL9), and rates at atmospheric pressure for a mutant of the C-terminal domain (CTL9) from pressure dependent ZZ-exchange measurements. Our results revealed that NTL9 folding is almost perfectly two-state, while small deviations from two-state behavior were observed for CTL9. Both domains exhibited large positive activation volumes for folding. The volumetric properties of these domains reveal that their transition states contain most of the internal solvent excluded voids that are found in the hydrophobic cores of the respective native states. These results demonstrate that by coupling it with high pressure, ZZ-exchange can be extended to investigate a large number of protein conformational transitions.

  19. A lock-and-key model for protein–protein interactions

    Morrison, Julie L.; Breitling, Rainer; Higham, Desmond J.; Gilbert, David R.

    2006-01-01

    Motivation: Protein–protein interaction networks are one of the major post-genomic data sources available to molecular biologists. They provide a comprehensive view of the global interaction structure of an organism’s proteome, as well as detailed information on specific interactions. Here we

  20. Protein Adsorption Patterns and Analysis on IV Nanoemulsions—The Key Factor Determining the Organ Distribution

    Mirko Jansch

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous nanoemulsions have been on the market for parenteral nutrition since the 1950s; meanwhile, they have also been used successfully for IV drug delivery. To be well tolerable, the emulsions should avoid uptake by the MPS cells of the body; for drug delivery, they should be target-specific. The organ distribution is determined by the proteins adsorbing them after injection from the blood (protein adsorption pattern, typically analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 2-D PAGE. The article reviews the 2-D PAGE method, the analytical problems to be faced and the knowledge available on how the composition of emulsions affects the protein adsorption patterns, e.g., the composition of the oil phase, stabilizer layer and drug incorporation into the interface or oil core. Data were re-evaluated and compared, and the implications for the in vivo distribution are discussed. Major results are that the interfacial composition of the stabilizer layer is the main determining factor and that this composition can be modulated by simple processes. Drug incorporation affects the pattern depending on the localization of the drug (oil core versus interface. The data situation regarding in vivo effects is very limited; mainly, it has to be referred to in the in vivo data of polymeric nanoparticles. As a conclusion, determination of the protein adsorption patterns can accelerate IV nanoemulsion formulation development regarding optimized organ distribution and related pharmacokinetics.

  1. Protein Adsorption Patterns and Analysis on IV Nanoemulsions-The Key Factor Determining the Organ Distribution.

    Keck, Cornelia M; Jansch, Mirko; Müller, Rainer H

    2012-12-21

    Intravenous nanoemulsions have been on the market for parenteral nutrition since the 1950s; meanwhile, they have also been used successfully for IV drug delivery. To be well tolerable, the emulsions should avoid uptake by the MPS cells of the body; for drug delivery, they should be target-specific. The organ distribution is determined by the proteins adsorbing them after injection from the blood (protein adsorption pattern), typically analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 2-D PAGE. The article reviews the 2-D PAGE method, the analytical problems to be faced and the knowledge available on how the composition of emulsions affects the protein adsorption patterns, e.g., the composition of the oil phase, stabilizer layer and drug incorporation into the interface or oil core. Data were re-evaluated and compared, and the implications for the in vivo distribution are discussed. Major results are that the interfacial composition of the stabilizer layer is the main determining factor and that this composition can be modulated by simple processes. Drug incorporation affects the pattern depending on the localization of the drug (oil core versus interface). The data situation regarding in vivo effects is very limited; mainly, it has to be referred to in the in vivo data of polymeric nanoparticles. As a conclusion, determination of the protein adsorption patterns can accelerate IV nanoemulsion formulation development regarding optimized organ distribution and related pharmacokinetics.

  2. Plasmalemma Vesicle-Associated Protein Has a Key Role in Blood-Retinal Barrier Loss

    Wisniewska-Kruk, Joanna; van der Wijk, Anne-Eva; van Veen, Henk A.; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; Vogels, Ilse M. C.; Versteeg, Danielle; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; Klaassen, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    Loss of blood-retinal barrier (BRB) properties induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and other factors is an important cause of diabetic macular edema. Previously, we found that the presence of plasmalemma vesicle-associated protein (PLVAP) in retinal capillaries associates with loss

  3. Heme metabolism in stress regulation and protein production: from Cinderella to a key player

    Martinez Ruiz, José Luis; Petranovic, D.; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Heme biosynthesis is a highly conserved pathway which is present in all kingdoms, from Archaea to higher organisms such as plants and mammals. The heme molecule acts as a prosthetic group for different proteins and enzymes involved in energy metabolism and reactions involved in electron transfer....

  4. Identifying Key Proteins in Hg Methylation Pathways of Desulfovibrio by Global Proteomics, Final Technical Report

    Summers, Anne O. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Microbiology; Miller, Susan M. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Chemistry; Wall, Judy [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; Lipton, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-18

    Elemental mercury, Hg(0) is a contaminant at many DOE sites, especially at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) where the spread of spilled Hg and its effects on microbial populations have been monitored for decades. To explore the microbial interactions with Hg, we have devised a global proteomic approach capable of directly detecting Hg-adducts of proteins. This technique developed in the facultative anaerobe, Escherichia coli, allows us to identify the proteins most vulnerable to acute exposure to organomercurials phenyl- and ethyl-mercury (as surrogates for the highly neurotoxic methyl-Hg) (Polacco, et al, 2011). We have found >300 such proteins in all metabolic functional groups and cellular compartments; most are highly conserved and can serve as markers for acute Hg exposure (Zink, et al. 2016, in preparation). We have also discovered that acute Hg exposure severely disrupts thiol, iron and redox homeostases, and electrolyte balance (LaVoie, et al., 2015) Thus, we proposed to bring these techniques to bear on the central problem of identifying the cellular proteins involved in bacterial uptake and methylation of mercury and its release from the cell.

  5. Key challenges for the creation and maintenance of specialist protein resources

    Holliday, G.L.; Bairoch, A.; Bagos, P.G.; Chatonnet, A.; Craik, D.J.; Finn, R.D.; Henrissat, B.; Landsman, D.; Manning, G.; Nagano, N.; O'Donovan, C.; Pruitt, K.D.; Rawlings, N.D.; Saier, M.; Sowdhamini, R.; Spedding, M.; Srinivasan, N.; Vriend, G.; Babbitt, P.C.; Bateman, A.

    2015-01-01

    As the volume of data relating to proteins increases, researchers rely more and more on the analysis of published data, thus increasing the importance of good access to these data that vary from the supplemental material of individual articles, all the way to major reference databases with

  6. Surface N-glycoproteome patterns reveal key proteins of neuronal differentiation

    Tylečková, Jiřina; Valeková, Ivona; Žižková, Martina; Rákocyová, Michaela; Maršala, S.; Maršala, M.; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 1 (2016), s. 13-20 ISSN 1874-3919 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : cell adhesion proteins * cell surface capture * neuronal differentiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.914, year: 2016

  7. Inhibition of protein aggregation: supramolecular assemblies of arginine hold the key.

    Utpal Das

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aggregation of unfolded proteins occurs mainly through the exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Any mechanism of inhibition of this aggregation should explain the prevention of these hydrophobic interactions. Though arginine is prevalently used as an aggregation suppressor, its mechanism of action is not clearly understood. We propose a mechanism based on the hydrophobic interactions of arginine. METHODOLOGY: We have analyzed arginine solution for its hydrotropic effect by pyrene solubility and the presence of hydrophobic environment by 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonic acid fluorescence. Mass spectroscopic analyses show that arginine forms molecular clusters in the gas phase and the cluster composition is dependent on the solution conditions. Light scattering studies indicate that arginine exists as clusters in solution. In the presence of arginine, the reverse phase chromatographic elution profile of Alzheimer's amyloid beta 1-42 (Abeta(1-42 peptide is modified. Changes in the hydrodynamic volume of Abeta(1-42 in the presence of arginine measured by size exclusion chromatography show that arginine binds to Abeta(1-42. Arginine increases the solubility of Abeta(1-42 peptide in aqueous medium. It decreases the aggregation of Abeta(1-42 as observed by atomic force microscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our experimental results we propose that molecular clusters of arginine in aqueous solutions display a hydrophobic surface by the alignment of its three methylene groups. The hydrophobic surfaces present on the proteins interact with the hydrophobic surface presented by the arginine clusters. The masking of hydrophobic surface inhibits protein-protein aggregation. This mechanism is also responsible for the hydrotropic effect of arginine on various compounds. It is also explained why other amino acids fail to inhibit the protein aggregation.

  8. Reduced Insulin/IGF-1 Signaling Restores the Dynamic Properties of Key Stress Granule Proteins during Aging

    Marie C. Lechler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Low-complexity “prion-like” domains in key RNA-binding proteins (RBPs mediate the reversible assembly of RNA granules. Individual RBPs harboring these domains have been linked to specific neurodegenerative diseases. Although their aggregation in neurodegeneration has been extensively characterized, it remains unknown how the process of aging disturbs RBP dynamics. We show that a wide variety of RNA granule components, including stress granule proteins, become highly insoluble with age in C. elegans and that reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 daf-2 receptor signaling efficiently prevents their aggregation. Importantly, stress-granule-related RBP aggregates are associated with reduced fitness. We show that heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF-1 is a main regulator of stress-granule-related RBP aggregation in both young and aged animals. During aging, increasing DAF-16 activity restores dynamic stress-granule-related RBPs, partly by decreasing the buildup of other misfolded proteins that seed RBP aggregation. Longevity-associated mechanisms found to maintain dynamic RBPs during aging could be relevant for neurodegenerative diseases. : Lechler et al. show that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs including stress granule proteins are prone to aggregate with age in C. elegans. Aggregation of stress granule RBPs with “prion-like” domains is associated with reduced fitness. Their aggregation is prevented by longevity pathways and promoted by the aggregation of other misfolded proteins. Keywords: neurodegenerative diseases, Caenorhabditis elegans, protein aggregation, aging, RNA-binding proteins, stress granules, HSF-1, DAF-2, longevity

  9. MiAMP1, a novel protein from macadamia integrifolia adopts a greek key β-barrel fold unique amongst plant antimicrobial proteins

    McManus, A.M.; Nielsen, K.J.; Craik, D.J.; Marcus, J.P.; Harrison, S.J.; Green, J.L.; Manners, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: MiAMP1 is a recently discovered 76 amino acid, highly basic protein from the nut kernel of Macadamia integrifolia which possesses no sequence homology to any known protein. A study of its antimicrobial activity revealed that it inhibited the growth of several microbial plant pathogens in vitro but had no effect on mammalian or plant cells. For these reasons, MiAMP1 is considered to be a potentially useful tool for the genetic engineering of disease resistance in transgenic crop plants and for the design of new fungicides. The three-dimensional structure of MiAMP1 was determined through homonuclear and heteronuclear ( 15 N) 2D NMR spectroscopy and subsequent simulated annealing calculations. MiAMP1 is made up of eight β-strands which are arranged in two Greek key motifs. These Greek key motifs associate to form a Greek key β-barrel. This structure is unique amongst plant antimicrobial proteins and forms a new class which we term the β-Barrelins. Interestingly, the structure of MiAMP1 bears remarkable similarity to a yeast killer toxin from Williopsis mrakii. The structural similarity of MiAMP1 and WmKT, which originate from plant and fungal phyla respectively, may reflect a similar mode of action

  10. Key roles of Arf small G proteins and biosynthetic trafficking for animal development.

    Rodrigues, Francisco F; Harris, Tony J C

    2017-04-14

    Although biosynthetic trafficking can function constitutively, it also functions specifically for certain developmental processes. These processes require either a large increase to biosynthesis or the biosynthesis and targeted trafficking of specific players. We review the conserved molecular mechanisms that direct biosynthetic trafficking, and discuss how their genetic disruption affects animal development. Specifically, we consider Arf small G proteins, such as Arf1 and Sar1, and their coat effectors, COPI and COPII, and how these proteins promote biosynthetic trafficking for cleavage of the Drosophila embryo, the growth of neuronal dendrites and synapses, extracellular matrix secretion for bone development, lumen development in epithelial tubes, notochord and neural tube development, and ciliogenesis. Specific need for the biosynthetic trafficking system is also evident from conserved CrebA/Creb3-like transcription factors increasing the expression of secretory machinery during several of these developmental processes. Moreover, dysfunctional trafficking leads to a range of developmental syndromes.

  11. DNA-dependent protein kinase in nonhomologous end joining: a lock with multiple keys?

    Weterings, Eric; Chen, David J

    2007-10-22

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is one of the central enzymes involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. It facilitates proper alignment of the two ends of the broken DNA molecule and coordinates access of other factors to the repair complex. We discuss the latest findings on DNA-PK phosphorylation and offer a working model for the regulation of DNA-PK during DSB repair.

  12. Shank synaptic scaffold proteins: keys to understanding the pathogenesis of autism and other synaptic disorders.

    Sala, Carlo; Vicidomini, Cinzia; Bigi, Ilaria; Mossa, Adele; Verpelli, Chiara

    2015-12-01

    Shank/ProSAP proteins are essential to synaptic formation, development, and function. Mutations in the family of SHANK genes are strongly associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, such as intellectual disability (ID), and schizophrenia. Thus, the term 'Shankopathies' identifies a number of neuronal diseases caused by alteration of Shank protein expression leading to abnormal synaptic development. With this review we want to summarize the major genetic, molecular, behavior and electrophysiological studies that provide new clues into the function of Shanks and pave the way for the discovery of new therapeutic drugs targeted to treat patients with SHANK mutations and also patients affected by other neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Shank/ProSAP proteins are essential to synaptic formation, development, and function. Mutations in the family of SHANK genes are strongly associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, such as intellectual disability (ID), and schizophrenia (SCZ). With this review we want to summarize the major genetic, molecular, behavior and electrophysiological studies that provide new clues into the function of Shanks and pave the way for the discovery of new therapeutic drugs targeted to treat patients with SHANK mutations. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Efficient Anaerobic Digestion of Microalgae Biomass: Proteins as a Key Macromolecule.

    Magdalena, Jose Antonio; Ballesteros, Mercedes; González-Fernandez, Cristina

    2018-05-06

    Biogas generation is the least complex technology to transform microalgae biomass into bioenergy. Since hydrolysis has been pointed out as the rate limiting stage of anaerobic digestion, the main challenge for an efficient biogas production is the optimization of cell wall disruption/hydrolysis. Among all tested pretreatments, enzymatic treatments were demonstrated not only very effective in disruption/hydrolysis but they also revealed the impact of microalgae macromolecular composition in the anaerobic process. Although carbohydrates have been traditionally recognized as the polymers responsible for the low microalgae digestibility, protease addition resulted in the highest organic matter solubilization and the highest methane production. However, protein solubilization during the pretreatment can result in anaerobic digestion inhibition due to the release of large amounts of ammonium nitrogen. The possible solutions to overcome these negative effects include the reduction of protein biomass levels by culturing the microalgae in low nitrogen media and the use of ammonia tolerant anaerobic inocula. Overall, this review is intended to evidence the relevance of microalgae proteins in different stages of anaerobic digestion, namely hydrolysis and methanogenesis.

  14. Rho proteins − the key regulators of cytoskeleton in the progression of mitosis and cytokinesis

    Anna Klimaszewska

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Rho proteins are members of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases. They are thought to be crucial regulators of multiple signal transduction pathways that influence a wide range of cellular functions, including migration, membrane trafficking, adhesion, polarity and cell shape changes. Thanks to their ability to control the assembly and organization of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, Rho GTPases are known to regulate mitosis and cytokinesis progression. These proteins are required for formation and rigidity of the cortex during mitotic cell rounding, mitotic spindle formation and attachment of the spindle microtubules to the kinetochore. In addition, during cytokinesis, they are involved in promoting division plane determination, contractile ring and cleavage furrow formation and abscission. They are also known as regulators of cell cycle progression at the G1/S and G2/M transition. Thus, the signal transduction pathways in which Rho proteins participate, appear to connect dynamics of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons to cell cycle progression. We review the current state of knowledge concerning the molecular mechanisms by which Rho GTPase signaling regulates remodeling of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons in order to control cell division progression.

  15. Defective nucleolar localization and dominant interfering properties of a parafibromin L95P missense mutant causing the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome

    Panicker, Leelamma M.; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Dagur, Pradeep K.; Gastinger, Matthew J.; Simonds, William F.

    2011-01-01

    The hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome (HPT-JT) is a familial cancer syndrome that can result from germline inactivation of HRPT2/CDC73, a putative tumor suppressor gene that encodes parafibromin, a component of the transcriptional regulatory PAF1 complex with homology to the yeast protein Cdc73p. The vast majority of HRPT2/CDC73 germline mutations identified have been truncation or frameshift mutations, and loss-of-function due to missense mutation is rare. We report here a kindred with HPT-JT due to a germline L95P missense mutation in parafibromin. The mutant parafibromin was studied in vitro to understand the basis of its presumed loss-of-function. When transfected in cultured cells the L95P mutant was expressed to a lower level than wild-type parafibromin, a difference that was not overcome by inhibition of the proteasome degradation pathway. The L95P mutant parafibromin retained the ability to assemble with endogenous PAF1 complex components as evidenced by co-immunoprecipitation. Analysis of subcellular localization showed that the L95P mutant was markedly deficient in nucleolar localization compared to the wild-type, an impairment likely resulting from disruption of a putative nucleolar localization signal immediately upstream of the L95P mutation. Transfection of the L95P parafibromin mutant, but not the wild type, enhanced cell-cycle progression and increased cell survival in NIH-3T3 and HEK 293 cells, resulting apparently from dominant interference with endogenous parafibromin action. The simultaneous loss of nucleolar localization and acquisition of a growth stimulatory phenotype with the L95P mutation raise the possibility that parafibromin must interact with targets in the nucleolus to fully execute its tumor suppressor functions. PMID:20304979

  16. Structural characterization of POM6 Fab and mouse prion protein complex identifies key regions for prions conformational conversion.

    Baral, Pravas Kumar; Swayampakula, Mridula; Aguzzi, Adriano; James, Michael N G

    2018-05-01

    Conversion of the cellular prion protein PrP C into its pathogenic isoform PrP S c is the hallmark of prion diseases, fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting many mammalian species including humans. Anti-prion monoclonal antibodies can arrest the progression of prion diseases by stabilizing the cellular form of the prion protein. Here, we present the crystal structure of the POM6 Fab fragment, in complex with the mouse prion protein (moPrP). The prion epitope of POM6 is in close proximity to the epitope recognized by the purportedly toxic antibody fragment, POM1 Fab also complexed with moPrP. The POM6 Fab recognizes a larger binding interface indicating a likely stronger binding compared to POM1. POM6 and POM1 exhibit distinct biological responses. Structural comparisons of the bound mouse prion proteins from the POM6 Fab:moPrP and POM1 Fab:moPrP complexes reveal several key regions of the prion protein that might be involved in initiating mis-folding events. The structural data of moPrP:POM6 Fab complex are available in the PDB under the accession number www.rcsb.org/pdb/search/structidSearch.do?structureId=6AQ7. © 2018 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. A charge-dependent mechanism is responsible for the dynamic accumulation of proteins inside nucleoli.

    Musinova, Yana R; Kananykhina, Eugenia Y; Potashnikova, Daria M; Lisitsyna, Olga M; Sheval, Eugene V

    2015-01-01

    The majority of known nucleolar proteins are freely exchanged between the nucleolus and the surrounding nucleoplasm. One way proteins are retained in the nucleoli is by the presence of specific amino acid sequences, namely nucleolar localization signals (NoLSs). The mechanism by which NoLSs retain proteins inside the nucleoli is still unclear. Here, we present data showing that the charge-dependent (electrostatic) interactions of NoLSs with nucleolar components lead to nucleolar accumulation as follows: (i) known NoLSs are enriched in positively charged amino acids, but the NoLS structure is highly heterogeneous, and it is not possible to identify a consensus sequence for this type of signal; (ii) in two analyzed proteins (NF-κB-inducing kinase and HIV-1 Tat), the NoLS corresponds to a region that is enriched for positively charged amino acid residues; substituting charged amino acids with non-charged ones reduced the nucleolar accumulation in proportion to the charge reduction, and nucleolar accumulation efficiency was strongly correlated with the predicted charge of the tested sequences; and (iii) sequences containing only lysine or arginine residues (which were referred to as imitative NoLSs, or iNoLSs) are accumulated in the nucleoli in a charge-dependent manner. The results of experiments with iNoLSs suggested that charge-dependent accumulation inside the nucleoli was dependent on interactions with nucleolar RNAs. The results of this work are consistent with the hypothesis that nucleolar protein accumulation by NoLSs can be determined by the electrostatic interaction of positively charged regions with nucleolar RNAs rather than by any sequence-specific mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Insulin/IGF1-PI3K-dependent nucleolar localization of a glycolytic enzyme--phosphoglycerate mutase 2, is necessary for proper structure of nucleolus and RNA synthesis.

    Gizak, Agnieszka; Grenda, Marcin; Mamczur, Piotr; Wisniewski, Janusz; Sucharski, Filip; Silberring, Jerzy; McCubrey, James A; Wisniewski, Jacek R; Rakus, Dariusz

    2015-07-10

    Phosphoglycerate mutase (PGAM), a conserved, glycolytic enzyme has been found in nucleoli of cancer cells. Here, we present evidence that accumulation of PGAM in the nucleolus is a universal phenomenon concerning not only neoplastically transformed but also non-malignant cells. Nucleolar localization of the enzyme is dependent on the presence of the PGAM2 (muscle) subunit and is regulated by insulin/IGF-1-PI3K signaling pathway as well as drugs influencing ribosomal biogenesis. We document that PGAM interacts with several 40S and 60S ribosomal proteins and that silencing of PGAM2 expression results in disturbance of nucleolar structure, inhibition of RNA synthesis and decrease of the mitotic index of squamous cell carcinoma cells. We conclude that presence of PGAM in the nucleolus is a prerequisite for synthesis and initial assembly of new pre-ribosome subunits.

  19. HTLV-1 HBZ Viral Protein: A Key Player in HTLV-1 Mediated Diseases

    Marco Baratella

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is an oncogenic human retrovirus that has infected 10–15 million people worldwide. After a long latency, 3–5% of infected individuals will develop either a severe malignancy of CD4+ T cells, known as Adult T-cell Leukemia (ATL or a chronic and progressive inflammatory disease of the nervous system designated Tropical Spastic Paraparesis/HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy (HAM/TSP. The precise mechanism behind HTLV-1 pathogenesis still remains elusive. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax-1 and HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ are thought to play a critical role in HTLV-1-associated diseases. Tax-1 is mainly involved in the onset of neoplastic transformation and in elicitation of the host’s inflammatory responses; its expression may be lost during cell clonal proliferation and oncogenesis. Conversely, HBZ remains constantly expressed in all patients with ATL, playing a role in the proliferation and maintenance of leukemic cells. Recent studies have shown that the subcellular distribution of HBZ protein differs in the two pathologies: it is nuclear with a speckled-like pattern in leukemic cells and is cytoplasmic in cells from HAM/TSP patients. Thus, HBZ expression and distribution could be critical in the progression of HTLV-1 infection versus the leukemic state or the inflammatory disease. Here, we reviewed recent findings on the role of HBZ in HTLV-1 related diseases, highlighting the new perspectives open by the possibility of studying the physiologic expression of endogenous protein in primary infected cells.

  20. HTLV-1 HBZ Viral Protein: A Key Player in HTLV-1 Mediated Diseases.

    Baratella, Marco; Forlani, Greta; Accolla, Roberto S

    2017-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic human retrovirus that has infected 10-15 million people worldwide. After a long latency, 3-5% of infected individuals will develop either a severe malignancy of CD4+ T cells, known as Adult T-cell Leukemia (ATL) or a chronic and progressive inflammatory disease of the nervous system designated Tropical Spastic Paraparesis/HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy (HAM/TSP). The precise mechanism behind HTLV-1 pathogenesis still remains elusive. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax-1 and HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) are thought to play a critical role in HTLV-1-associated diseases. Tax-1 is mainly involved in the onset of neoplastic transformation and in elicitation of the host's inflammatory responses; its expression may be lost during cell clonal proliferation and oncogenesis. Conversely, HBZ remains constantly expressed in all patients with ATL, playing a role in the proliferation and maintenance of leukemic cells. Recent studies have shown that the subcellular distribution of HBZ protein differs in the two pathologies: it is nuclear with a speckled-like pattern in leukemic cells and is cytoplasmic in cells from HAM/TSP patients. Thus, HBZ expression and distribution could be critical in the progression of HTLV-1 infection versus the leukemic state or the inflammatory disease. Here, we reviewed recent findings on the role of HBZ in HTLV-1 related diseases, highlighting the new perspectives open by the possibility of studying the physiologic expression of endogenous protein in primary infected cells.

  1. Identifying stabilizing key residues in proteins using interresidue interaction energy matrix

    Biedermannová, Lada; Hobza, Pavel; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 1 (2008), s. 402-413 ISSN 0887-3585 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0009; GA ČR GA203/06/1727; GA ČR(CZ) GD203/05/H001; GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : protein stabilisation * an-initio calculation * interaction energy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.419, year: 2008

  2. [Activation of nucleolar organizers during in vitro cultivation of mouse R1 embryonic stem cells].

    Kunafina, E R; Chaplina, M V; Filiasova, E I; Gibanova, N V; Khodarovich, Iu M; Larionov, O A; Zatsepina, O V

    2005-01-01

    We studies the activities of ribosomal genes (nucleolus forming regions of chromosomes) at successive stages of cultivation of the mouse R1 embryonic stem cells. The total number and number of active nucleolar organizers were estimated by means of in situ hybridization with mouse rDNA probes and argentophilic staining of nucleolus forming chromosomes regions from the 16th until the 32nd passages. The data we obtained suggest that the total number of nucleolar organizers per metaphase plate was constant (as a rule, eight), while the mean number of active nucleolar organizers progressively increased from the early (16th) to the late (32nd) passages: 5.2 +/- 0.4 versus 7.4 +/- 0.9 argentophilic organizers per cell. Cell heterogeneity by the number of active nucleolar organizers also increased during the late passages. Taken together, these data suggest activation of DNA transcription and synthesis of ribosomes during cultivation of mouse R1 embryonic stem cells. Based on the experimental and published data, it has been proposed that activation of ribosomal genes correlates in time with a decreased capacity of embryonic stem cells for pluripotent differentiation.

  3. Nucleolar chromatin organization at different activities of soybean root meristematic cell nucleoli.

    Stępiński, Dariusz

    2013-06-01

    Nucleolar chromatin, including nucleolus-associated chromatin as well as active and inactive condensed ribosomal DNA (rDNA) chromatin, derives mostly from secondary constrictions known as nucleolus organizer regions containing rDNA genes on nucleolus-forming chromosomes. This chromatin may occupy different nucleolar positions being in various condensation states which may imply different rDNA transcriptional competence. Sections of nucleoli originating from root meristematic cells of soybean seedlings grown at 25 °C (the control), then subjected to chilling stress (10 °C), and next transferred again to 25 °C (the recovery) were used to measure profile areas occupied by nucleolar condensed chromatin disclosed with sodium hydroxide methylation-acetylation plus uranyl acetate technique. The biggest total area of condensed chromatin was found in the nucleoli of chilled plants, while the smallest was found in those of recovered plants in relation to the amounts of chromatin in the control nucleoli. The condensed nucleolar chromatin, in the form of different-sized and different-shaped clumps, was mainly located in fibrillar centers. One can suppose that changes of condensed rDNA chromatin amounts might be a mechanism controlling the number of transcriptionally active rDNA genes as the nucleoli of plants grown under these experimental conditions show different transcriptional activity and morphology.

  4. Prognostic value of nucleolar size and size pleomorphism in choroidal melanomas

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Gamel, J W; Jensen, O A

    1993-01-01

    Morphometric estimates of nucleolar size have been shown to possess a high prognostic value in patients with uveal melanomas. The authors investigated various quantitative estimators of the mean size and pleomorphism of nucleoli in choroidal melanomas from a consecutive series of 95 Danish patien...

  5. Key intermediates in nitrogen transformation during microwave pyrolysis of sewage sludge: a protein model compound study.

    Zhang, Jun; Tian, Yu; Cui, Yanni; Zuo, Wei; Tan, Tao

    2013-03-01

    The nitrogen transformations with attention to NH3 and HCN were investigated at temperatures of 300-800°C during microwave pyrolysis of a protein model compound. The evolution of nitrogenated compounds in the char, tar and gas products were conducted. The amine-N, heterocyclic-N and nitrile-N compounds were identified as three important intermediates during the pyrolysis. NH3 and HCN were formed with comparable activation energies competed to consume the same reactive substances at temperatures of 300-800°C. The deamination and dehydrogenation of amine-N compounds from protein cracking contributed to the formation of NH3 (about 8.9% of Soy-N) and HCN (6.6%) from 300 to 500°C. The cracking of nitrile-N and heterocyclic-N compounds from the dehydrogenation and polymerization of amine-N generated HCN (13.4%) and NH3 (31.3%) between 500 and 800°C. It might be able to reduce the HCN and NH3 emissions through controlling the intermediates production at temperatures of 500-800°C. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Are Niemann-Pick type C proteins key players in cnidarian-dinoflagellate endosymbioses?

    Dani, Vincent; Ganot, Philippe; Priouzeau, Fabrice; Furla, Paola; Sabourault, Cecile

    2014-09-01

    The symbiotic interaction between cnidarians, such as corals and sea anemones, and the unicellular algae Symbiodinium is regulated by yet poorly understood cellular mechanisms, despite the ecological importance of coral reefs. These mechanisms, including host-symbiont recognition and metabolic exchange, control symbiosis stability under normal conditions, but also lead to symbiosis breakdown (bleaching) during stress. This study describes the repertoire of the sterol-trafficking proteins Niemann-Pick type C (NPC1 and NPC2) in the symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis. We found one NPC1 gene in contrast to the two genes (NPC1 and NPC1L1) present in vertebrate genomes. While only one NPC2 gene is present in many metazoans, this gene has been duplicated in cnidarians, and we detected four NPC2 genes in A. viridis. However, only one gene (AvNPC2-d) was upregulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic sea anemones and displayed higher expression in the gastrodermis (symbiont-containing tissue) than in the epidermis. We performed immunolabelling experiments on tentacle cross sections and demonstrated that the AvNPC2-d protein was closely associated with symbiosomes. In addition, AvNPC1 and AvNPC2-d gene expression was strongly downregulated during stress. These data suggest that AvNPC2-d is involved in both the stability and dysfunction of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbioses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Zero in on Key Open Problems in Automated NMR Protein Structure Determination

    Abbas, Ahmed

    2015-11-12

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is one of the main approaches for protein struc- ture determination. The biggest advantage of this approach is that it can determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein in the solution phase. Thus, the natural dynamics of the protein can be studied. However, NMR protein structure determina- tion is an expertise intensive and time-consuming process. If the structure determi- nation process can be accelerated or even automated by computational methods, that will significantly advance the structural biology field. Our goal in this dissertation is to propose highly efficient and error tolerant methods that can work well on real and noisy data sets of NMR. Our first contribution in this dissertation is the development of a novel peak pick- ing method (WaVPeak). First, WaVPeak denoises the NMR spectra using wavelet smoothing. A brute force method is then used to identify all the candidate peaks. Af- ter that, the volume of each candidate peak is estimated. Finally, the peaks are sorted according to their volumes. WaVPeak is tested on the same benchmark data set that was used to test the state-of-the-art method, PICKY. WaVPeak shows significantly better performance than PICKY in terms of recall and precision. Our second contribution is to propose an automatic method to select peaks pro- duced by peak picking methods. This automatic method is used to overcome the limitations of fixed number-based methods. Our method is based on the Benjamini- Hochberg (B-H) algorithm. The method is used with both WaVPeak and PICKY to automatically select the number of peaks to return from out of hundreds of candidate peaks. The volume (in WaVPeak) and the intensity (in PICKY) are converted into p-values. Peaks that have p-values below some certain threshold are selected. Ex- perimental results show that the new method is better than the fixed number-based method in terms of recall. To improve precision, we tried to eliminate false peaks using

  8. The cell cycle regulator CCDC6 is a key target of RNA-binding protein EWS.

    Sujitha Duggimpudi

    Full Text Available Genetic translocation of EWSR1 to ETS transcription factor coding region is considered as primary cause for Ewing sarcoma. Previous studies focused on the biology of chimeric transcription factors formed due to this translocation. However, the physiological consequences of heterozygous EWSR1 loss in these tumors have largely remained elusive. Previously, we have identified various mRNAs bound to EWS using PAR-CLIP. In this study, we demonstrate CCDC6, a known cell cycle regulator protein, as a novel target regulated by EWS. siRNA mediated down regulation of EWS caused an elevated apoptosis in cells in a CCDC6-dependant manner. This effect was rescued upon re-expression of CCDC6. This study provides evidence for a novel functional link through which wild-type EWS operates in a target-dependant manner in Ewing sarcoma.

  9. Uncovering SUMOylation Dynamics during Cell-Cycle Progression Reveals FoxM1 as a Key Mitotic SUMO Target Protein

    Schimmel, Joost; Eifler, Karolin; Sigurdsson, Jón Otti

    2014-01-01

    Loss of small ubiquitin-like modification (SUMOylation) in mice causes genomic instability due to the missegregation of chromosomes. Currently, little is known about the identity of relevant SUMO target proteins that are involved in this process and about global SUMOylation dynamics during cell......-cycle progression. We performed a large-scale quantitative proteomics screen to address this and identified 593 proteins to be SUMO-2 modified, including the Forkhead box transcription factor M1 (FoxM1), a key regulator of cell-cycle progression and chromosome segregation. SUMOylation of FoxM1 peaks during G2 and M...... relieving FoxM1 autorepression. Cells deficient for FoxM1 SUMOylation showed increased levels of polyploidy. Our findings contribute to understanding the role of SUMOylation during cell-cycle progression....

  10. Curcumin-mediated decrease in the expression of nucleolar organizer regions in cervical cancer (HeLa) cells.

    Lewinska, Anna; Adamczyk, Jagoda; Pajak, Justyna; Stoklosa, Sylwia; Kubis, Barbara; Pastuszek, Paulina; Slota, Ewa; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-09-01

    Curcumin, the major yellow-orange pigment of turmeric derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, is a highly pleiotropic molecule with the potential to modulate inflammation, oxidative stress, cell survival, cell secretion, homeostasis and proliferation. Curcumin, at relatively high concentrations, was repeatedly reported to be a potent inducer of apoptosis in cancer cells and thus considered a promising anticancer agent. In the present paper, the effects of low concentrations of curcumin on human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells were studied. We found curcumin-mediated decrease in the cell number and viability, and increase in apoptotic events and superoxide level. In contrast to previously shown curcumin cytotoxicity toward different cervical cancer lines, we observed toxic effects when even as low as 1 μM concentration of curcumin was used. Curcumin was not genotoxic to HeLa cells. Because argyrophilic nucleolar protein (AgNOR protein) expression is elevated in malignant cells compared to normal cells reflecting the rapidity of cancer cell proliferation, we evaluated curcumin-associated changes in size (area) and number of silver deposits. We showed curcumin-induced decrease in AgNOR protein pools, which may be mediated by global DNA hypermethylation observed after low concentration curcumin treatment. In summary, we have shown for the first time that curcumin at low micromolar range may be effective against HeLa cells, which may have implications for curcumin-based treatment of cervical cancer in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nucleolar Proteome Analysis and Proteasomal Activity Assays Reveal a Link between Nucleolus and 26S Proteasome in A. thaliana

    Montacié, Charlotte; Durut, Nathalie; Opsomer, Alison; Palm, Denise; Comella, Pascale; Picart, Claire; Carpentier, Marie-Christine; Pontvianne, Frederic; Carapito, Christine; Schleiff, Enrico; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2017-01-01

    In all eukaryotic cells, the nucleolus is functionally and structurally linked to rRNA synthesis and ribosome biogenesis. This compartment contains as well factors involved in other cellular activities, but the functional interconnection between non-ribosomal activities and the nucleolus (structure and function) still remains an open question. Here, we report a novel mass spectrometry analysis of isolated nucleoli from Arabidopsis thaliana plants using the FANoS (Fluorescence Assisted Nucleolus Sorting) strategy. We identified many ribosome biogenesis factors (RBF) and proteins non-related with ribosome biogenesis, in agreement with the recognized multi-functionality of the nucleolus. Interestingly, we found that 26S proteasome subunits localize in the nucleolus and demonstrated that proteasome activity and nucleolus organization are intimately linked to each other. Proteasome subunits form discrete foci in the disorganized nucleolus of nuc1.2 plants. Nuc1.2 protein extracts display reduced proteasome activity in vitro compared to WT protein extracts. Remarkably, proteasome activity in nuc1.2 is similar to proteasome activity in WT plants treated with proteasome inhibitors (MG132 or ALLN). Finally, we show that MG132 treatment induces disruption of nucleolar structures in WT but not in nuc1.2 plants. Altogether, our data suggest a functional interconnection between nucleolus structure and proteasome activity. PMID:29104584

  12. The PICALM protein plays a key role in iron homeostasis and cell proliferation.

    Paula B Scotland

    Full Text Available The ubiquitously expressed phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly (PICALM protein associates with the plasma membrane, binds clathrin, and plays a role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Alterations of the human PICALM gene are present in aggressive hematopoietic malignancies, and genome-wide association studies have recently linked the PICALM locus to late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Inactivating and hypomorphic Picalm mutations in mice cause different degrees of severity of anemia, abnormal iron metabolism, growth retardation and shortened lifespan. To understand PICALM's function, we studied the consequences of PICALM overexpression and characterized PICALM-deficient cells derived from mutant fit1 mice. Our results identify a role for PICALM in transferrin receptor (TfR internalization and demonstrate that the C-terminal PICALM residues are critical for its association with clathrin and for the inhibitory effect of PICALM overexpression on TfR internalization. Murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs that are deficient in PICALM display several characteristics of iron deficiency (increased surface TfR expression, decreased intracellular iron levels, and reduced cellular proliferation, all of which are rescued by retroviral PICALM expression. The proliferation defect of cells that lack PICALM results, at least in part, from insufficient iron uptake, since it can be corrected by iron supplementation. Moreover, PICALM-deficient cells are particularly sensitive to iron chelation. Taken together, these data reveal that PICALM plays a critical role in iron homeostasis, and offer new perspectives into the pathogenesis of PICALM-associated diseases.

  13. Tyr51: Key Determinant of the Low Thermostability of the Colwellia psychrerythraea Cold-Shock Protein.

    Lee, Yeongjoon; Kwak, Chulhee; Jeong, Ki-Woong; Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Kim, Eun-Hee; Cheong, Chaejoon; Ahn, Hee-Chul; Kim, Hak Jun; Kim, Yangmee

    2018-05-18

    Cold-shock proteins (Csps) are expressed at lower-than-optimum temperatures, and they function as RNA chaperones; however, no structural studies on psychrophilic Csps have been reported. Here, we aimed to investigate the structure and dynamics of the Csp of psychrophile Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H, ( Cp-Csp). Although Cp-Csp shares sequence homology, common folding patterns, and motifs, including a five β-stranded barrel, with its thermophilic counterparts, its thermostability (37 °C) was markedly lower than those of other Csps. Cp-Csp binds heptathymidine with an affinity of 10 -7 M, thereby increasing its thermostability to 50 °C. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of the Cp-Csp structure and backbone dynamics revealed a flexible structure with only one salt bridge and 10 residues in the hydrophobic cavity. Notably, Cp-Csp contains Tyr51 instead of the conserved Phe in the hydrophobic core, and its phenolic hydroxyl group projects toward the surface. The Y51F mutation increased the stability of hydrophobic packing and may have allowed for the formation of a K3-E21 salt bridge, thereby increasing its thermostability to 43 °C. Cp-Csp exhibited conformational exchanges in its ribonucleoprotein motifs 1 and 2 (754 and 642 s -1 ), and heptathymidine binding markedly decreased these motions. Cp-Csp lacks salt bridges and has longer flexible loops and a less compact hydrophobic cavity resulting from Tyr51 compared to mesophilic and thermophilic Csps. These might explain the low thermostability of Cp-Csp. The conformational flexibility of Cp-Csp facilitates its accommodation of nucleic acids at low temperatures in polar oceans and its function as an RNA chaperone for cold adaptation.

  14. Adaptive aneuploidy protects against thiol peroxidase deficiency by increasing respiration via key mitochondrial proteins.

    Kaya, Alaattin; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Seim, Inge; Labarre, Jean; Toledano, Michel B; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-08-25

    Aerobic respiration is a fundamental energy-generating process; however, there is cost associated with living in an oxygen-rich environment, because partially reduced oxygen species can damage cellular components. Organisms evolved enzymes that alleviate this damage and protect the intracellular milieu, most notably thiol peroxidases, which are abundant and conserved enzymes that mediate hydrogen peroxide signaling and act as the first line of defense against oxidants in nearly all living organisms. Deletion of all eight thiol peroxidase genes in yeast (∆8 strain) is not lethal, but results in slow growth and a high mutation rate. Here we characterized mechanisms that allow yeast cells to survive under conditions of thiol peroxidase deficiency. Two independent ∆8 strains increased mitochondrial content, altered mitochondrial distribution, and became dependent on respiration for growth but they were not hypersensitive to H2O2. In addition, both strains independently acquired a second copy of chromosome XI and increased expression of genes encoded by it. Survival of ∆8 cells was dependent on mitochondrial cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP1) and UTH1, present on chromosome XI. Coexpression of these genes in ∆8 cells led to the elimination of the extra copy of chromosome XI and improved cell growth, whereas deletion of either gene was lethal. Thus, thiol peroxidase deficiency requires dosage compensation of CCP1 and UTH1 via chromosome XI aneuploidy, wherein these proteins support hydroperoxide removal with the reducing equivalents generated by the electron transport chain. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of adaptive aneuploidy counteracting oxidative stress.

  15. Plasma Membrane-Located Purine Nucleotide Transport Proteins Are Key Components for Host Exploitation by Microsporidian Intracellular Parasites

    Heinz, Eva; Hacker, Christian; Dean, Paul; Mifsud, John; Goldberg, Alina V.; Williams, Tom A.; Nakjang, Sirintra; Gregory, Alison; Hirt, Robert P.; Lucocq, John M.; Kunji, Edmund R. S.; Embley, T. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular parasites of most animal groups including humans, but despite their significant economic and medical importance there are major gaps in our understanding of how they exploit infected host cells. We have investigated the evolution, cellular locations and substrate specificities of a family of nucleotide transport (NTT) proteins from Trachipleistophora hominis, a microsporidian isolated from an HIV/AIDS patient. Transport proteins are critical to microsporidian success because they compensate for the dramatic loss of metabolic pathways that is a hallmark of the group. Our data demonstrate that the use of plasma membrane-located nucleotide transport proteins (NTT) is a key strategy adopted by microsporidians to exploit host cells. Acquisition of an ancestral transporter gene at the base of the microsporidian radiation was followed by lineage-specific events of gene duplication, which in the case of T. hominis has generated four paralogous NTT transporters. All four T. hominis NTT proteins are located predominantly to the plasma membrane of replicating intracellular cells where they can mediate transport at the host-parasite interface. In contrast to published data for Encephalitozoon cuniculi, we found no evidence for the location for any of the T. hominis NTT transporters to its minimal mitochondria (mitosomes), consistent with lineage-specific differences in transporter and mitosome evolution. All of the T. hominis NTTs transported radiolabelled purine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, GTP and GDP) when expressed in Escherichia coli, but did not transport radiolabelled pyrimidine nucleotides. Genome analysis suggests that imported purine nucleotides could be used by T. hominis to make all of the critical purine-based building-blocks for DNA and RNA biosynthesis during parasite intracellular replication, as well as providing essential energy for parasite cellular metabolism and protein synthesis. PMID:25474405

  16. Plasma membrane-located purine nucleotide transport proteins are key components for host exploitation by microsporidian intracellular parasites.

    Eva Heinz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Microsporidia are obligate intracellular parasites of most animal groups including humans, but despite their significant economic and medical importance there are major gaps in our understanding of how they exploit infected host cells. We have investigated the evolution, cellular locations and substrate specificities of a family of nucleotide transport (NTT proteins from Trachipleistophora hominis, a microsporidian isolated from an HIV/AIDS patient. Transport proteins are critical to microsporidian success because they compensate for the dramatic loss of metabolic pathways that is a hallmark of the group. Our data demonstrate that the use of plasma membrane-located nucleotide transport proteins (NTT is a key strategy adopted by microsporidians to exploit host cells. Acquisition of an ancestral transporter gene at the base of the microsporidian radiation was followed by lineage-specific events of gene duplication, which in the case of T. hominis has generated four paralogous NTT transporters. All four T. hominis NTT proteins are located predominantly to the plasma membrane of replicating intracellular cells where they can mediate transport at the host-parasite interface. In contrast to published data for Encephalitozoon cuniculi, we found no evidence for the location for any of the T. hominis NTT transporters to its minimal mitochondria (mitosomes, consistent with lineage-specific differences in transporter and mitosome evolution. All of the T. hominis NTTs transported radiolabelled purine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, GTP and GDP when expressed in Escherichia coli, but did not transport radiolabelled pyrimidine nucleotides. Genome analysis suggests that imported purine nucleotides could be used by T. hominis to make all of the critical purine-based building-blocks for DNA and RNA biosynthesis during parasite intracellular replication, as well as providing essential energy for parasite cellular metabolism and protein synthesis.

  17. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase plays a key role in regulating MAPKAPK2 expression

    Sudo, Tatsuhiko; Kawai, Kayoko; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    One of three major families of the mitogen-activated kinases (MAPK), p38 as well as JNK, has been shown to transduce extracellular stress stimuli into cellular responses by phospho-relay cascades. Among p38 families, p38α is a widely characterized isoform and the biological phenomena are explained by its kinase activity regulating functions of its downstream substrates. However, its specific contributions to each phenomenon are yet not fully elucidated. For better understanding of the role of MAPKs, especially p38α, we utilized newly established mouse fibroblast cell lines originated from a p38α null mouse, namely, a parental cell line without p38α gene locus, knockout of p38α (KOP), Zeosin-resistant (ZKOP), revertant of p38α (RKOP), and Exip revertant (EKOP). EKOP is smaller in size but grows faster than the others. Although comparable amounts of ERK and JNK are expressed in each cell line, ERK is highly phosphorylated in EKOP even in normal culture conditions. Serum stimulation after serum starvation led to ERK phosphorylation in RKOP and ZKOP, but not in EKOP as much. On the contrary, relative phosphorylation level of JNK to total JNK in response to UV was low in RKOP. And its phosphorylation as well as total JNK is slightly lower in EKOP. RKOP is less sensitive to UV irradiation as judged by the survival rate. Stress response upon UV or sorbitol stimuli, leading to mitogen activate protein kinase activated kinase 2 (MAPKAPK2) phosphorylation, was only observed in RKOP. Further experiments reveal that MAPKAPK2 expression is largely suppressed in ZKOP and EKOP. Its expression was recovered by re-introduction of p38α. The loss of MAPKAPK2 expression accompanied by the defect of p38α is confirmed in an embryonic extract prepared from p38α null mice. These data demonstrate that p38 signal pathway is regulated not only by phosphorylation but also by modulation of the expression of its component. Together, we have established cell lines that can be used in

  18. AUP1 (Ancient Ubiquitous Protein 1) Is a Key Determinant of Hepatic Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein Assembly and Secretion.

    Zhang, Jing; Zamani, Mostafa; Thiele, Christoph; Taher, Jennifer; Amir Alipour, Mohsen; Yao, Zemin; Adeli, Khosrow

    2017-04-01

    AUP1 (ancient ubiquitous protein 1) is an endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein that also localizes to the surface of lipid droplets (LDs), with dual role in protein quality control and LD regulation. Here, we investigated the role of AUP1 in hepatic lipid mobilization and demonstrate critical roles in intracellular biogenesis of apoB100 (apolipoprotein B-100), LD mobilization, and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) assembly and secretion. APPROACH AND RESULTS: siRNA (short/small interfering RNA) knockdown of AUP1 significantly increased secretion of VLDL-sized apoB100-containing particles from HepG2 cells, correcting a key metabolic defect in these cells that normally do not secrete much VLDL. Secreted particles contained higher levels of metabolically labeled triglyceride, and AUP1-deficient cells displayed a larger average size of LDs, suggesting a role for AUP1 in lipid mobilization. Importantly, AUP1 was also found to directly interact with apoB100, and this interaction was enhanced with proteasomal inhibition. Knockdown of AUP1 reduced apoB100 ubiquitination, decreased intracellular degradation of newly synthesized apoB100, and enhanced extracellular apoB100 secretion. Interestingly, the stimulatory effect of AUP1 knockdown on VLDL assembly was reminiscent of the effect previously observed after MEK-ERK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase) inhibition; however, further studies indicated that the AUP1 effect was independent of MEK-ERK signaling. In summary, our findings reveal an important role for AUP1 as a regulator of apoB100 stability, hepatic LD metabolism, and intracellular lipidation of VLDL particles. AUP1 may be a crucial factor in apoB100 quality control, determining the rate at which apoB100 is degraded or lipidated to enable VLDL particle assembly and secretion. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Altered nucleosomes of active nucleolar chromatin contain accessible histone H3 in its hyperacetylated forms

    Johnson, E.M.; Sterner, R.; Allfrey, V.G.

    1987-01-01

    Chromatin of the organism Physarum polycephalum contains a class of conformationally altered nucleosomes previously localized to the transcribing regions of ribosomal genes in nucleoli. When nuclei are treated with 2-iodo[2-tritium]acetate, the histone H3 sulfhydryl group of the altered nucleosomes is derivatized while that of folded nucleosomes is not, and the labeled histones can then be identified by autoradiography of gels that separate H3 isoforms. The H3 derivatized is predominantly of tri- and tetraacetylated forms. In contrast, total free histone reacted with iodoacetate shows no preferential labeling of isoforms. Selective reaction of acetylated H3 is prevalent in both nucleolar and non-nucleolar chromatin. The results link specific patterns of H3 acetylation to changes in nucleosome conformation that occur during transcription

  20. The C-terminal region of Rad52 is essential for Rad52 nuclear and nucleolar localization, and accumulation at DNA damage sites immediately after irradiation

    Koike, Manabu, E-mail: m_koike@nirs.go.jp [DNA Repair Gene Res., National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yutoku, Yasutomo [DNA Repair Gene Res., National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Yayoicho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Koike, Aki [DNA Repair Gene Res., National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •Rad52 might play a key role in the repair of DSB immediately after irradiation. •EYFP-Rad52 accumulates rapidly at DSB sites and colocalizes with Ku80. •Accumulation of Rad52 at DSB sites is independent of the core NHEJ factors. •Localization and recruitment of Rad52 to DSB sites are dependent on the Rad52 CTR. •Basic amino acids in Rad52 CTR are highly conserved among vertebrate species. -- Abstract: Rad52 plays essential roles in homologous recombination (HR) and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, in vertebrates, knockouts of the Rad52 gene show no hypersensitivity to agents that induce DSBs. Rad52 localizes in the nucleus and forms foci at a late stage following irradiation. Ku70 and Ku80, which play an essential role in nonhomologous DNA-end-joining (NHEJ), are essential for the accumulation of other core NHEJ factors, e.g., XRCC4, and a HR-related factor, e.g., BRCA1. Here, we show that the subcellular localization of EYFP-Rad52(1–418) changes dynamically during the cell cycle. In addition, EYFP-Rad52(1–418) accumulates rapidly at microirradiated sites and colocalizes with the DSB sensor protein Ku80. Moreover, the accumulation of EYFP-Rad52(1–418) at DSB sites is independent of the core NHEJ factors, i.e., Ku80 and XRCC4. Furthermore, we observed that EYFP-Rad52(1–418) localizes in nucleoli in CHO-K1 cells and XRCC4-deficient cells, but not in Ku80-deficient cells. We also found that Rad52 nuclear localization, nucleolar localization, and accumulation at DSB sites are dependent on eight amino acids (411–418) at the end of the C-terminal region of Rad52 (Rad52 CTR). Furthermore, basic amino acids on Rad52 CTR are highly conserved among mammalian, avian, and fish homologues, suggesting that Rad52 CTR is important for the regulation and function of Rad52 in vertebrates. These findings also suggest that the mechanism underlying the regulation of subcellular localization of Rad52 is

  1. The hyaluronan and proteoglycan link proteins: Organizers of the brain extracellular matrix and key molecules for neuronal function and plasticity.

    Oohashi, Toshitaka; Edamatsu, Midori; Bekku, Yoko; Carulli, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The hyaluronan and proteoglycanbinding link protein (Hapln) is a key molecule in the formation and control of hyaluronan-based condensed perineuronal matrix in the adult brain. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding the role of Haplns in the formation and control of two distinct types of perineuronal matrices, one for "classical" PNN and the other for the specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) at the node of Ranvier in the central nervous system (CNS). We introduce the structural components of each ECM organization including the basic concept of supramolecular structure named "HLT model". We furthermore summarize the developmental and physiological role of perineuronal ECMs from the studies of Haplns and related molecules. Finally, we also discuss the potential mechanism modulating PNNs in the adult CNS. This layer of organized matrices may exert a direct effect via core protein or sugar moiety from the structure or by acting as a binding site for biologically active molecules, which are important for neuronal plasticity and saltatory conduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Epigenetic silencing of nucleolar rRNA genes in Alzheimer's disease.

    Maciej Pietrzak

    Full Text Available Ribosomal deficits are documented in mild cognitive impairment (MCI, which often represents an early stage Alzheimer's disease (AD, as well as in advanced AD. The nucleolar rRNA genes (rDNA, transcription of which is critical for ribosomal biogenesis, are regulated by epigenetic silencing including promoter CpG methylation.To assess whether CpG methylation of the rDNA promoter was dysregulated across the AD spectrum, we analyzed brain samples from 10 MCI-, 23 AD-, and, 24 age-matched control individuals using bisulfite mapping. The rDNA promoter became hypermethylated in cerebro-cortical samples from MCI and AD groups. In parietal cortex, the rDNA promoter was hypermethylated more in MCI than in advanced AD. The cytosine methylation of total genomic DNA was similar in AD, MCI, and control samples. Consistent with a notion that hypermethylation-mediated silencing of the nucleolar chromatin stabilizes rDNA loci, preventing their senescence-associated loss, genomic rDNA content was elevated in cerebrocortical samples from MCI and AD groups.In conclusion, rDNA hypermethylation could be a new epigenetic marker of AD. Moreover, silencing of nucleolar chromatin may occur during early stages of AD pathology and play a role in AD-related ribosomal deficits and, ultimately, dementia.

  3. Argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region in MIB-1 positive cells in non-small cell lung cancer: clinicopathological significance and survival

    Kobyakov, Dmitriy Sergeevich; Avdalyan, Ashot Merudzhanovich; Lazarev, Aleksandr Fedorovich; Lushnikova, Elena Leonidovna; Nepomnyashchikh, Lev Moiseevich

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the relation between argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region (AgNOR)-associated proteins and clinicopathological parameters and survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 207 surgical specimens diagnosed as NSCLC were included in this study. Double-staining procedures were performed using antigen Ki-67 (clone MIB-1) and silver nitrate by immunohistochemical and AgNOR-staining methods. The AgNOR area in MIB-1-positive cells of NSCLC is related to clinicopathological parameters under the TNM (tumor, node, and metastasis) system. The survival of patients with small AgNOR area in MIB-1-positive cells is better than that of patients with large AgNOR area. Molecular, biological (AgNOR area in MIB-1-positive cells), and clinicopathological (greatest tumor dimension, metastases to regional lymph nodes, histology, and differentiation) parameters are independent prognostic factors of NSCLC. The AgNOR area in MIB-1-positive cells is related to clinicopathological parameters and survival in NSCLC

  4. Proteomic analysis of the Arabidopsis nucleolus suggests novel nucleolar functions

    Pendle, Alison F; Clark, Gillian P; Boon, Reinier

    2005-01-01

    The eukaryotic nucleolus is involved in ribosome biogenesis and a wide range of other RNA metabolism and cellular functions. An important step in the functional analysis of the nucleolus is to determine the complement of proteins of this nuclear compartment. Here, we describe the first proteomic ...

  5. Wnt-inducible protein (WISP-1 is a key regulator of alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia in pulmonary fibrosis

    Melanie Königshoff

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibrotic lung disease is characterized by distorted lung architecture and severe loss of respiratory function secondary to alveolar epithelial cell (AEC hyperplasia, enhanced extracellular matrix (ECM deposition and fibroblast proliferation. Repetitive epithelial injuries with impaired alveolar wound healing and altered AEC gene expression represent a trigger mechanism for development of fibrosis. To reveal gene regulatory networks in lung fibrosis, we compared gene expression profiles of freshly isolated AEC obtained from mice 14 days after saline or bleomycin (BM instillation using whole genome microarray analysis. Several genes of the Wnt signaling pathway, in particular WISP-1, a member of the CCN family, were highly regulated. WISP-1 protein expression was demonstrated in proliferating AEC in BM-treated lungs by immunofluorescence. When analyzing all six CCN family members, WISP-1 was upregulated the most 14 days after BM challenge, as analyzed by qRT-PCR. To elucidate WISP-1 function, cultured primary mouse AEC were stimulated with WISP-1 and demonstrated a 230% increase in proliferation, analyzed by 3H-thymidine incorporation. This was mediated through enhanced phosphorylation, but not expression of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt, as detected by immunoblot. Finally, increased expression of WISP-1 was detected in lung homogenates and isolated AEC from IPF patients, using qRT-PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis of WISP-1 and Ki67 verified the existence of hyperplastic and proliferative AEC expressing WISP-1 in vivo. Our study thus identifies WISP-1 as a novel regulator of AEC injury and repair, and suggests that WISP-1 is a key mediator in pulmonary fibrosis.

  6. The non-octarepeat copper binding site of the prion protein is a key regulator of prion conversion

    Giachin, Gabriele; Mai, Phuong Thao; Tran, Thanh Hoa; Salzano, Giulia; Benetti, Federico; Migliorati, Valentina; Arcovito, Alessandro; Longa, Stefano Della; Mancini, Giordano; D'Angelo, Paola; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    The conversion of the prion protein (PrPC) into prions plays a key role in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Despite the importance for pathogenesis, the mechanism of prion formation has escaped detailed characterization due to the insoluble nature of prions. PrPC interacts with copper through octarepeat and non-octarepeat binding sites. Copper coordination to the non-octarepeat region has garnered interest due to the possibility that this interaction may impact prion conversion. We used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to study copper coordination at pH 5.5 and 7.0 in human PrPC constructs, either wild-type (WT) or carrying pathological mutations. We show that mutations and pH cause modifications of copper coordination in the non-octarepeat region. In the WT at pH 5.5, copper is anchored to His96 and His111, while at pH 7 it is coordinated by His111. Pathological point mutations alter the copper coordination at acidic conditions where the metal is anchored to His111. By using in vitro approaches, cell-based and computational techniques, we propose a model whereby PrPC coordinating copper with one His in the non-octarepeat region converts to prions at acidic condition. Thus, the non-octarepeat region may act as the long-sought-after prion switch, critical for disease onset and propagation.

  7. Ultrastructural and Molecular Analyses Reveal Enhanced Nucleolar Activity in Medicago truncatula Cells Overexpressing the MtTdp2α Gene

    Macovei, Anca; Faè, Matteo; Biggiogera, Marco; de Sousa Araújo, Susana; Carbonera, Daniela; Balestrazzi, Alma

    2018-01-01

    The role of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (Tdp2) involved in the repair of 5′-end-blocking DNA lesions is still poorly explored in plants. To gain novel insights, Medicago truncatula suspension cultures overexpressing the MtTdp2α gene (Tdp2α-13C and Tdp2α-28 lines, respectively) and a control (CTRL) line carrying the empty vector were investigated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed enlarged nucleoli (up to 44% expansion of the area, compared to CTRL), the presence of nucleolar vacuoles, increased frequency of multinucleolate cells (up to 4.3-fold compared to CTRL) and reduced number of ring-shaped nucleoli in Tdp2α-13C and Tdp2α-28 lines. Ultrastructural data suggesting for enhanced nucleolar activity in MtTdp2α-overexpressing lines were integrated with results from bromouridine incorporation. The latter revealed an increase of labeled transcripts in both Tdp2α-13C and Tdp2α-28 cells, within the nucleolus and in the extra-nucleolar region. MtTdp2α-overexpressing cells showed tolerance to etoposide, a selective inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II, as evidenced by DNA diffusion assay. TEM analysis revealed etoposide-induced rearrangements within the nucleolus, resembling the nucleolar caps observed in animal cells under transcription impairment. Based on these findings it is evident that MtTdp2α-overexpression enhances nucleolar activity in plant cells. PMID:29868059

  8. Ultrastructural and Molecular Analyses Reveal Enhanced Nucleolar Activity in Medicago truncatula Cells Overexpressing the MtTdp2α Gene

    Anca Macovei

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (Tdp2 involved in the repair of 5′-end-blocking DNA lesions is still poorly explored in plants. To gain novel insights, Medicago truncatula suspension cultures overexpressing the MtTdp2α gene (Tdp2α-13C and Tdp2α-28 lines, respectively and a control (CTRL line carrying the empty vector were investigated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed enlarged nucleoli (up to 44% expansion of the area, compared to CTRL, the presence of nucleolar vacuoles, increased frequency of multinucleolate cells (up to 4.3-fold compared to CTRL and reduced number of ring-shaped nucleoli in Tdp2α-13C and Tdp2α-28 lines. Ultrastructural data suggesting for enhanced nucleolar activity in MtTdp2α-overexpressing lines were integrated with results from bromouridine incorporation. The latter revealed an increase of labeled transcripts in both Tdp2α-13C and Tdp2α-28 cells, within the nucleolus and in the extra-nucleolar region. MtTdp2α-overexpressing cells showed tolerance to etoposide, a selective inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II, as evidenced by DNA diffusion assay. TEM analysis revealed etoposide-induced rearrangements within the nucleolus, resembling the nucleolar caps observed in animal cells under transcription impairment. Based on these findings it is evident that MtTdp2α-overexpression enhances nucleolar activity in plant cells.

  9. To the nucleolar density and size in apoptotic human leukemic myeloblasts produced in vitro by Trichostatin A

    K Smetana

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to provide more information on nucleoli in apoptotic cells, which were represented in the present study by cultured leukemic myeloblasts (Kasumi-1 cells. The apoptotic process in these cells was produced by trichostatin A (TSA that is a histone deacetylase inhibitor with strong cytostatic effects. The selected TSA concentration added to cultures facilitated to study apoptotic and notapoptotic cells in one and the same specimen. The nucleolar diameter and density were determined using computer assisted measurement and densitometry in specimens stained for RNA. In comparison with not-apoptotic cells, in apoptotic cells, nucleolar mean diameter did not change significantly and nucleolar RNA density was also not apparently different. On the other hand, the cytoplasmic RNA density in apoptotic cells was markedly reduced. Thus it seemed to be possible that the transcribed RNA remained “frozen” within the nucleolus but its transport to the cytoplasm decreased or stopped. However, the possibility of the RNA degradation in the cytoplasm of apoptotic cells based on the present study cannot be eliminated. At this occasion it should be added that AgNORs reflecting nucleolar biosynthetic and cell proliferation activity in apoptotic cells decreased in number or disappeared. The presented results also indicated that large nucleoli intensely stained for RNA need not be necessarily related to the high nucleolar biosynthetic or cell proliferation activity and may be also present in apoptotic cells responding to the cytostatic treatment.

  10. Cooking temperature is a key determinant of in vitro meat protein digestion rate: investigation of underlying mechanisms.

    Bax, Marie-Laure; Aubry, Laurent; Ferreira, Claude; Daudin, Jean-Dominique; Gatellier, Philippe; Rémond, Didier; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique

    2012-03-14

    The present study aimed to evaluate the digestion rate and nutritional quality of pig muscle proteins in relation to different meat processes (aging, mincing, and cooking). Under our experimental conditions, aging and mincing had little impact on protein digestion. Heat treatments had different temperature-dependent effects on the meat protein digestion rate and degradation potential. At 70 °C, the proteins underwent denaturation that enhanced the speed of pepsin digestion by increasing enzyme accessibility to protein cleavage sites. Above 100 °C, oxidation-related protein aggregation slowed pepsin digestion but improved meat protein overall digestibility. The digestion parameters defined here open new insights on the dynamics governing the in vitro digestion of meat protein. However, the effect of cooking temperature on protein digestion observed in vitro needs to be confirmed in vivo.

  11. Nuclear/Nucleolar morphometry and DNA image cytometry as a combined diagnostic tool in pathology of prostatic carcinoma

    Kavantzas, N.; Agapitos, E.; Lazaris, A. C.; Pavlopulos, P.M.; Sofikitis, N.; Davaris, P. [National University of Athens, Dept. of Pathology, Medical School, Athens (Greece)

    2001-12-01

    Paraffin tissue sections from 50 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma were used to study nuclear and nucleolar morphometric features by image analysis. The results were compared to DNA ploidy and Gleason grade. In the examined histological samples nuclear and nucleolar areas were positively interrelated. It was also noticed that the higher the percentage of nucleolated nuclei, the bigger the nuclear and nucleolar areas. The morphometric characteristics did not differ significantly among the four grades of the examined specimens. In well-differentiated carcinomas the DNA index was lower than in the rest at a statistically significant level. Hypodiploid carcinomas were found to possess significantly bigger nuclear areas than any other DNA index group. Morphonuclear evidence of anaplasia and DNA aneuploidy may be used as diagnostic tools in prostate cancer in addition to Gleason grade.

  12. Nuclear/Nucleolar morphometry and DNA image cytometry as a combined diagnostic tool in pathology of prostatic carcinoma

    Kavantzas, N.; Agapitos, E.; Lazaris, A. C.; Pavlopulos, P.M.; Sofikitis, N.; Davaris, P.

    2001-01-01

    Paraffin tissue sections from 50 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma were used to study nuclear and nucleolar morphometric features by image analysis. The results were compared to DNA ploidy and Gleason grade. In the examined histological samples nuclear and nucleolar areas were positively interrelated. It was also noticed that the higher the percentage of nucleolated nuclei, the bigger the nuclear and nucleolar areas. The morphometric characteristics did not differ significantly among the four grades of the examined specimens. In well-differentiated carcinomas the DNA index was lower than in the rest at a statistically significant level. Hypodiploid carcinomas were found to possess significantly bigger nuclear areas than any other DNA index group. Morphonuclear evidence of anaplasia and DNA aneuploidy may be used as diagnostic tools in prostate cancer in addition to Gleason grade

  13. Protonation states of histidine and other key residues in deoxy normal human adult hemoglobin by neutron protein crystallography

    Kovalevsky, Andrey; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Shibayama, Naoya; Park, Sam-Yong; Ishikawa, Takuya; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, S. Zoe; Langan, Paul; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    Using neutron diffraction analysis, the protonation states of 35 of 38 histidine residues were determined for the deoxy form of normal human adult hemoglobin. Distal and buried histidines may contribute to the increased affinity of the deoxy state for hydrogen ions and its decreased affinity for oxygen compared with the oxygenated form. The protonation states of the histidine residues key to the function of deoxy (T-state) human hemoglobin have been investigated using neutron protein crystallography. These residues can reversibly bind protons, thereby regulating the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. By examining the OMIT F o − F c and 2F o − F c neutron scattering maps, the protonation states of 35 of the 38 His residues were directly determined. The remaining three residues were found to be disordered. Surprisingly, seven pairs of His residues from equivalent α or β chains, αHis20, αHis50, αHis58, αHis89, βHis63, βHis143 and βHis146, have different protonation states. The protonation of distal His residues in the α 1 β 1 heterodimer and the protonation of αHis103 in both subunits demonstrates that these residues may participate in buffering hydrogen ions and may influence the oxygen binding. The observed protonation states of His residues are compared with their ΔpK a between the deoxy and oxy states. Examination of inter-subunit interfaces provided evidence for interactions that are essential for the stability of the deoxy tertiary structure

  14. A separable domain of the p150 subunit of human chromatin assembly factor-1 promotes protein and chromosome associations with nucleoli.

    Smith, Corey L; Matheson, Timothy D; Trombly, Daniel J; Sun, Xiaoming; Campeau, Eric; Han, Xuemei; Yates, John R; Kaufman, Paul D

    2014-09-15

    Chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1) is a three-subunit protein complex conserved throughout eukaryotes that deposits histones during DNA synthesis. Here we present a novel role for the human p150 subunit in regulating nucleolar macromolecular interactions. Acute depletion of p150 causes redistribution of multiple nucleolar proteins and reduces nucleolar association with several repetitive element-containing loci. Of note, a point mutation in a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) within p150 abolishes nucleolar associations, whereas PCNA or HP1 interaction sites within p150 are not required for these interactions. In addition, acute depletion of SUMO-2 or the SUMO E2 ligase Ubc9 reduces α-satellite DNA association with nucleoli. The nucleolar functions of p150 are separable from its interactions with the other subunits of the CAF-1 complex because an N-terminal fragment of p150 (p150N) that cannot interact with other CAF-1 subunits is sufficient for maintaining nucleolar chromosome and protein associations. Therefore these data define novel functions for a separable domain of the p150 protein, regulating protein and DNA interactions at the nucleolus. © 2014 Smith et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  15. Identification of "tumor-associated" nucleolar antigens in human urothelial cancer.

    Yu, D; Pietro, T; Jurco, S; Scardino, P T

    1987-09-01

    Nucleoli isolated from HeLa S3 cells were used to produce rabbit antisera capable of binding nucleoli of transitional cell carcinomas (TCCa) of the bladder. Cross-reactivity of the rabbit antiserum with normal nucleoli was reduced by absorption with fetal calf serum, normal human serum, and human placental nucleoli. This antinucleolar antiserum exhibited strong reactivity in immunoperoxidase assays performed on specimens of human bladder cancer. In frozen tissue sections of 24 patients with TCCa and eight individuals without tumor, nucleolar staining was observed in all malignant specimens, but was not observed in seven of the normal specimens. Cytologic examination of bladder washing specimens from 47 normal individuals showed absence of nucleolar staining in 43 (91%) of 47 normal specimens while 12 (86%) of 14 specimens from patients with TCCa were positive. These results suggest that there are antigens associated with the nucleoli of HeLa cells and transitional cell carcinomas which are generally absent (or in low concentration) in normal human urothelial cells, and that antisera to these antigens may be useful in the cytologic diagnosis of human transitional cell carcinoma.

  16. Analysis of chitosan/tripolyphosphate micro- and nanogel yields is key to understanding their protein uptake performance.

    Cai, Yuhang; Lapitsky, Yakov

    2017-05-15

    Chitosan/tripolyphosphate (TPP) micro- and nanogels are widely explored as vehicles for protein drug and vaccine delivery. Yet, aside from the consensus that protein uptake into these particles is enhanced by stronger protein/particle binding, factors that control their uptake performance, such as differences in the chitosan, TPP and protein concentrations, remain poorly understood. Here, we show that many of the differences in the reported association efficiencies (AE-values) for protein uptake likely reflect the largely-ignored variability in the particle yield (X Agg ), which is the fraction of the added chitosan that self-assembles into particles and (like the AE) varies with the chitosan, TPP and protein concentrations. Factors affecting X Agg are first systematically explored. The AE is then shown to scale almost linearly with the X Agg (which increases with the TPP and protein-to-chitosan ratios) until all chitosan aggregates into particles. Remarkably, the data collected at variable TPP and protein concentrations collapses onto a single AE∝X Agg curve for each protein type. Further analysis of protein/particle binding reveals this rise in AE with X Agg to reflect: (1) an increase in binding sites within the particles; and (2) a decrease in soluble (non-particulate) chitosan molecules, which form soluble protein/chitosan complexes and compete with the chitosan/TPP particles for the unassociated protein. These findings highlight the need to carefully analyze the effects of formulation parameters on chitosan/TPP particle yields and can likely be extended to other ionically crosslinked colloidal drug carriers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. PfEMP1 – A Parasite Protein Family of Key Importance in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Immunity and Pathogenesis

    Hviid, Lars; Jensen, Anja T R

    2015-01-01

    to be a central element in the pathogenesis of the disease. It is mediated by the interaction of parasite ligands on the erythrocyte surface and a range of host receptor molecules in many organs and tissues. Among several proteins and protein families implicated in this process, the P. falciparum erythrocyte...... membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family of high-molecular weight and highly variable antigens appears to be the most prominent. In this chapter, we aim to provide a systematic overview of the current knowledge about these proteins, their structure, their function, how they are presented on the erythrocyte...

  18. An ancillary method in urine cytology: Nucleolar/nuclear volume ratio for discrimination between benign and malignant urothelial cells.

    Tone, Kiyoshi; Kojima, Keiko; Hoshiai, Keita; Kumagai, Naoya; Kijima, Hiroshi; Kurose, Akira

    2016-06-01

    The essential of urine cytology for the diagnosis and the follow-up of urothelial neoplasia has been widely recognized. However, there are some cases in which a definitive diagnosis cannot be made due to difficulty in discriminating between benign and malignant. This study evaluated the practicality of nucleolar/nuclear volume ratio (%) for the discrimination. Using Papanicolaou-stained slides, 253 benign urothelial cells and 282 malignant urothelial cells were selected and divided into a benign urothelial cell and an urothelial carcinoma (UC) cell groups. Three suspicious cases and four cases in which discrimination between benign and malignant was difficult were prepared for verification test. Subject cells were decolorized and stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole for detection of the nuclei and the nucleoli. Z-stack method was performed to analyze. When the cutoff point of 1.514% discriminating benign urothelial cells and UC cells from nucleolar/nuclear volume ratio (%) was utilized, the sensitivity was 56.0%, the specificity was 88.5%, the positive predictive value was 84.5%, and the negative predictive value was 64.4%. Nuclear and nucleolar volume, number of the nucleoli, and nucleolar/nuclear volume ratio (%) were significantly higher in the UC cell group than in the benign urothelial cell group (P benign and malignant urothelial cells, providing possible additional information in urine cytology. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:483-491. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The role of RNA polymerase I transcription and embryonic genome activation in nucleolar development in bovine preimplantation embryos

    Østrup, Olga; Strejcek, F.; Petrovicova, I.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of RNA polymerase I (RPI) transcription in nucleolar development during major transcriptional activation (MTA) in cattle. Late eight-cell embryos were cultured in the absence (control group) or presence of actinomycin D (AD) (RPI inhibition...

  20. The unique fold and lability of the [2Fe-2S] clusters of NEET proteins mediate their key functions in health and disease.

    Karmi, Ola; Marjault, Henri-Baptiste; Pesce, Luca; Carloni, Paolo; Onuchic, Jose' N; Jennings, Patricia A; Mittler, Ron; Nechushtai, Rachel

    2018-02-12

    NEET proteins comprise a new class of [2Fe-2S] cluster proteins. In human, three genes encode for NEET proteins: cisd1 encodes mitoNEET (mNT), cisd2 encodes the Nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 (NAF-1) and cisd3 encodes MiNT (Miner2). These recently discovered proteins play key roles in many processes related to normal metabolism and disease. Indeed, NEET proteins are involved in iron, Fe-S, and reactive oxygen homeostasis in cells and play an important role in regulating apoptosis and autophagy. mNT and NAF-1 are homodimeric and reside on the outer mitochondrial membrane. NAF-1 also resides in the membranes of the ER associated mitochondrial membranes (MAM) and the ER. MiNT is a monomer with distinct asymmetry in the molecular surfaces surrounding the clusters. Unlike its paralogs mNT and NAF-1, it resides within the mitochondria. NAF-1 and mNT share similar backbone folds to the plant homodimeric NEET protein (At-NEET), while MiNT's backbone fold resembles a bacterial MiNT protein. Despite the variation of amino acid composition among these proteins, all NEET proteins retained their unique CDGSH domain harboring their unique 3Cys:1His [2Fe-2S] cluster coordination through evolution. The coordinating exposed His was shown to convey the lability to the NEET proteins' [2Fe-2S] clusters. In this minireview, we discuss the NEET fold and its structural elements. Special attention is given to the unique lability of the NEETs' [2Fe-2S] cluster and the implication of the latter to the NEET proteins' cellular and systemic function in health and disease.

  1. To the Large Nucleolar Bodies in Apoptotic Leukaemic Granulocytic Progenitors without Further Differentiation. Are Large Nucleoli Always Present in Proliferating Cells?

    Smetana, K; Kuželová, K; Zápotocký, M; Hrkal, Z

    2017-01-01

    Large nucleoli have generally been believed to be present in less differentiated and proliferating cells including the malignant ones. Such nucleoli have also been considered to be active in the biosynthetic process and major cell developmental activities. In contrast, after cytostatic treatment, apoptotic leukaemic progenitors still containing nuclei did not exhibit substantial reduction of the nucleolar size but displayed decreased nucleolar biosynthetic activity. The present study was undertaken to provide more information on the large nucleoli in spontaneously occurring apoptotic leukaemic progenitors without further differentiation. Leukaemic progenitors of established cell lineages originating from leukaemic patients represented a very convenient model for such study. Some of them exhibit morphological signs of the spontaneously occurring apoptotic process. Since such signs are expressed by nuclear and cytoplasmic morphological variability, the present study dealt with spontaneously occurring apoptotic progenitors with preserved nuclei characterized by heavy chromatin condensation and occasional fragmentation. Based of nucleolar body and nuclear maximal diameter measurements it seems to be clear that the nucleolar size in these cells was not substantially reduced, contrary to that of the nucleus. However, large nucleolar bodies in spontaneously occurring apoptotic cells were characterized by markedly reduced biosynthetic activity, as expressed by the decreased number of nucleolar transcription markers such as nucleolar fibrillar centres. In conclusion, large nucleoli may be present not only in proliferating, but also in spontaneously occurring apoptotic cells.

  2. Comparative proteomics reveals key proteins recruited at the nucleoid of Deinococcus after irradiation-induced DNA damage

    Bouthier de la Tour, Claire; Passot, Fanny Marie; Toueille, Magali; Servant, Pascale; Sommer, Suzanne; Mirabella, Boris; Blanchard, Laurence; Groot, Arjan de; Guerin, Philippe; Armengaud, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The nucleoids of radiation-resistant Deinococcus species show a high degree of compaction maintained after ionizing irradiation. We identified proteins recruited after irradiation in nucleoids of Deinococcus radiodurans and Deinococcus deserti by means of comparative proteomics. Proteins in nucleoid-enriched fractions from unirradiated and irradiated Deinococcus were identified and semi quantified by shotgun proteomics. The ssDNA-binding protein SSB, DNA gyrase subunits GyrA and GyrB, DNA topoisomerase I, RecA recombinase, UvrA excinuclease, RecQ helicase, DdrA, DdrB, and DdrD proteins were found in significantly higher amounts in irradiated nucleoids of both Deinococcus species. We observed, by immunofluorescence microscopy, the subcellular localization of these proteins in D. radiodurans, showing for the first time the recruitment of the DdrD protein into the D. radiodurans nucleoid. We specifically followed the kinetics of recruitment of RecA, DdrA, and DdrD to the nucleoid after irradiation. Remarkably, RecA proteins formed irregular filament-like structures 1 h after irradiation, before being redistributed throughout the cells by 3 h post-irradiation. Comparable dynamics of DdrD localization were observed, suggesting a possible functional interaction between RecA and DdrD. Several proteins involved in nucleotide synthesis were also seen in higher quantities in the nucleoids of irradiated cells, indicative of the existence of a mechanism for orchestrating the presence of proteins involved in DNA metabolism in nucleoids in response to massive DNA damage. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD00196. (authors)

  3. Structure of Rhodococcus equi virulence-associated protein B (VapB) reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel consisting of two Greek-key motifs

    Geerds, Christina; Wohlmann, Jens; Haas, Albert; Niemann, Hartmut H.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of VapB, a member of the Vap protein family that is involved in virulence of the bacterial pathogen R. equi, was determined by SAD phasing and reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel similar to avidin, suggestive of a binding function. Made up of two Greek-key motifs, the topology of VapB is unusual or even unique. Members of the virulence-associated protein (Vap) family from the pathogen Rhodococcus equi regulate virulence in an unknown manner. They do not share recognizable sequence homology with any protein of known structure. VapB and VapA are normally associated with isolates from pigs and horses, respectively. To contribute to a molecular understanding of Vap function, the crystal structure of a protease-resistant VapB fragment was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. The structure was solved by SAD phasing employing the anomalous signal of one endogenous S atom and two bound Co ions with low occupancy. VapB is an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel with a single helix. Structural similarity to avidins suggests a potential binding function. Unlike other eight- or ten-stranded β-barrels found in avidins, bacterial outer membrane proteins, fatty-acid-binding proteins and lysozyme inhibitors, Vaps do not have a next-neighbour arrangement but consist of two Greek-key motifs with strand order 41238567, suggesting an unusual or even unique topology

  4. Structure of Rhodococcus equi virulence-associated protein B (VapB) reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel consisting of two Greek-key motifs

    Geerds, Christina [Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Wohlmann, Jens; Haas, Albert [University of Bonn, Ulrich-Haberland Strasse 61a, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Niemann, Hartmut H., E-mail: hartmut.niemann@uni-bielefeld.de [Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2014-06-18

    The structure of VapB, a member of the Vap protein family that is involved in virulence of the bacterial pathogen R. equi, was determined by SAD phasing and reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel similar to avidin, suggestive of a binding function. Made up of two Greek-key motifs, the topology of VapB is unusual or even unique. Members of the virulence-associated protein (Vap) family from the pathogen Rhodococcus equi regulate virulence in an unknown manner. They do not share recognizable sequence homology with any protein of known structure. VapB and VapA are normally associated with isolates from pigs and horses, respectively. To contribute to a molecular understanding of Vap function, the crystal structure of a protease-resistant VapB fragment was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. The structure was solved by SAD phasing employing the anomalous signal of one endogenous S atom and two bound Co ions with low occupancy. VapB is an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel with a single helix. Structural similarity to avidins suggests a potential binding function. Unlike other eight- or ten-stranded β-barrels found in avidins, bacterial outer membrane proteins, fatty-acid-binding proteins and lysozyme inhibitors, Vaps do not have a next-neighbour arrangement but consist of two Greek-key motifs with strand order 41238567, suggesting an unusual or even unique topology.

  5. Autoantibody to Th ribonucleoprotein (nucleolar 7-2 RNA protein particle) in patients with systemic sclerosis

    Okano, Y.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    We studied sera of 371 consecutive new patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) who were first evaluated during 1984-1988. All sera were tested for antinuclear antibodies by immunofluorescence staining using HEp-2 cells as substrate. We excluded 219 sera showing dark nucleoli and screened for antibodies to Th in the remaining 152 sera by immunoprecipitation of a 32P-labeled HeLa cell extract. Fifteen (4.0%) of 371 sera were anti-Th+. Anti-Th antibodies were present in 14 (8.4%) of 167 SSc patients with limited cutaneous involvement, in 1 of 167 with diffuse cutaneous involvement, and in 0 of 37 with SSc overlap syndrome. Among 244 controls with other connective tissue diseases, anti-Th was detected in only 3 patients, all having primary Raynaud's phenomenon of less than 2 years duration. In the subgroup with SSc with limited cutaneous involvement, the 14 anti-Th+ patients had a significantly greater frequency of puffy fingers, small bowel involvement, and hypothyroidism, and a significantly lower frequency of arthralgia and/or arthritis. Their cumulative survival rate from the time of onset of symptoms was lower than that for anti-Th- patients (78% versus 91% at 10 years), primarily due to 3 deaths from pulmonary arterial hypertension (2 from primary pulmonary hypertension and 1 from pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary interstitial fibrosis). Serum anti-Th antibodies are present almost exclusively in patients with SSc with limited cutaneous involvement or in those with primary Raynaud's phenomenon whose disease may evolve to SSc with limited cutaneous involvement, and these antibodies may identify those patients who are at greater risk for reduced survival

  6. Sequence/structural analysis of xylem proteome emphasizes pathogenesis-related proteins, chitinases and β-1, 3-glucanases as key players in grapevine defense against Xylella fastidiosa

    Sandeep Chakraborty

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of various plant diseases including Pierce’s disease in the US, and Citrus Variegated Chlorosis in Brazil, remains a continual source of concern and economic losses, especially since almost all commercial varieties are sensitive to this Gammaproteobacteria. Differential expression of proteins in infected tissue is an established methodology to identify key elements involved in plant defense pathways. Methods. In the current work, we developed a methodology named CHURNER that emphasizes relevant protein functions from proteomic data, based on identification of proteins with similar structures that do not necessarily have sequence homology. Such clustering emphasizes protein functions which have multiple copies that are up/down-regulated, and highlights similar proteins which are differentially regulated. As a working example we present proteomic data enumerating differentially expressed proteins in xylem sap from grapevines that were infected with X. fastidiosa. Results. Analysis of this data by CHURNER highlighted pathogenesis related PR-1 proteins, reinforcing this as the foremost protein function in xylem sap involved in the grapevine defense response to X. fastidiosa. β-1, 3-glucanase, which has both anti-microbial and anti-fungal activities, is also up-regulated. Simultaneously, chitinases are found to be both up and down-regulated by CHURNER, and thus the net gain of this protein function loses its significance in the defense response. Discussion. We demonstrate how structural data can be incorporated in the pipeline of proteomic data analysis prior to making inferences on the importance of individual proteins to plant defense mechanisms. We expect CHURNER to be applicable to any proteomic data set.

  7. Heat-shock protein 40 is the key farnesylation target in meristem size control, abscisic acid signaling, and drought resistance.

    Barghetti, Andrea; Sjögren, Lars; Floris, Maïna; Paredes, Esther Botterweg; Wenkel, Stephan; Brodersen, Peter

    2017-11-15

    Protein farnesylation is central to molecular cell biology. In plants, protein farnesyl transferase mutants are pleiotropic and exhibit defective meristem organization, hypersensitivity to the hormone abscisic acid, and increased drought resistance. The precise functions of protein farnesylation in plants remain incompletely understood because few relevant farnesylated targets have been identified. Here, we show that defective farnesylation of a single factor-heat-shock protein 40 (HSP40), encoded by the J2 and J3 genes-is sufficient to confer ABA hypersensitivity, drought resistance, late flowering, and enlarged meristems, indicating that altered function of chaperone client proteins underlies most farnesyl transferase mutant phenotypes. We also show that expression of an abiotic stress-related microRNA (miRNA) regulon controlled by the transcription factor SPL7 requires HSP40 farnesylation. Expression of a truncated SPL7 form mimicking its activated proteolysis fragment of the membrane-bound SPL7 precursor partially restores accumulation of SPL7-dependent miRNAs in farnesyl transferase mutants. These results implicate the pathway directing SPL7 activation from its membrane-bound precursor as an important target of farnesylated HSP40, consistent with our demonstration that HSP40 farnesylation facilitates its membrane association. The results also suggest that altered gene regulation via select miRNAs contributes to abiotic stress-related phenotypes of farnesyl transferase mutants. © 2017 Barghetti et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Genome-wide functional analysis of plasmodium protein phosphatases reveals key regulators of parasite development and differentiation

    Guttery, David S.

    2014-07-09

    Reversible protein phosphorylation regulated by kinases and phosphatases controls many cellular processes. Although essential functions for the malaria parasite kinome have been reported, the roles of most protein phosphatases (PPs) during Plasmodium development are unknown. We report a functional analysis of the Plasmodium berghei protein phosphatome, which exhibits high conservation with the P. falciparum phosphatome and comprises 30 predicted PPs with differential and distinct expression patterns during various stages of the life cycle. Gene disruption analysis of P. berghei PPs reveals that half of the genes are likely essential for asexual blood stage development, whereas six are required for sexual development/sporogony in mosquitoes. Phenotypic screening coupled with transcriptome sequencing unveiled morphological changes and altered gene expression in deletion mutants of two N-myristoylated PPs. These findings provide systematic functional analyses of PPs in Plasmodium, identify how phosphatases regulate parasite development and differentiation, and can inform the identification of drug targets for malaria. © 2014 The Authors.

  9. Genome-wide functional analysis of plasmodium protein phosphatases reveals key regulators of parasite development and differentiation

    Guttery, David  S.; Poulin, Benoit; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Wall, Richard  J.; Ferguson, David  J.P.; Brady, Declan; Patzewitz, Eva-Maria; Whipple, Sarah; Straschil, Ursula; Wright, Megan  H.; Mohamed, Alyaa  M.A.H.; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Arold, Stefan T.; Tate, Edward  W.; Holder, Anthony  A.; Wickstead, Bill; Pain, Arnab; Tewari, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation regulated by kinases and phosphatases controls many cellular processes. Although essential functions for the malaria parasite kinome have been reported, the roles of most protein phosphatases (PPs) during Plasmodium development are unknown. We report a functional analysis of the Plasmodium berghei protein phosphatome, which exhibits high conservation with the P. falciparum phosphatome and comprises 30 predicted PPs with differential and distinct expression patterns during various stages of the life cycle. Gene disruption analysis of P. berghei PPs reveals that half of the genes are likely essential for asexual blood stage development, whereas six are required for sexual development/sporogony in mosquitoes. Phenotypic screening coupled with transcriptome sequencing unveiled morphological changes and altered gene expression in deletion mutants of two N-myristoylated PPs. These findings provide systematic functional analyses of PPs in Plasmodium, identify how phosphatases regulate parasite development and differentiation, and can inform the identification of drug targets for malaria. © 2014 The Authors.

  10. The amphiphilic hydrophobin Vmh2 plays a key role in one step synthesis of hybrid protein-gold nanoparticles.

    Politi, Jane; De Stefano, Luca; Longobardi, Sara; Giardina, Paola; Rea, Ilaria; Methivier, Christophe; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Casale, Sandra; Spadavecchia, Jolanda

    2015-12-01

    We report a simple and original method to synthesize gold nanoparticles in which a fungal protein, the hydrophobin Vmh2 from Pleurotus ostreatus and dicarboxylic acid-terminated polyethylene-glycol (PEG) has been used as additional components in a one step process, leading to hybrid protein-metal nanoparticles (NPs). The nanoparticles have been characterized by ultra-violet/visible, infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, dynamic light scattering and also by electron microscopy imaging. The results of these analytical techniques highlight nanometric sized, stable, hybrid complexes of about 12 nm, with outer surface rich in functional chemical groups. Interaction with protein and antibodies has also been exploited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nucleolar organizer regions in Sittasomus griseicapillus and Lepidocolaptes angustirostris (Aves, Dendrocolaptidae): Evidence of a chromosome inversion.

    de Oliveira Barbosa, Marcelo; da Silva, Rubens Rodrigues; de Sena Correia, Vanessa Carolina; Dos Santos, Luana Pereira; Garnero, Analía Del Valle; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2013-03-01

    Cytogenetic studies in birds are still scarce compared to other vertebrates. Woodcreepers (Dendrocolaptidae) are part of a highly specialized group within the Suboscines of the New World. They are forest birds exclusive to the Neotropical region and similar to woodpeckers, at a comparable evolutionary stage. This paper describes for the first time the karyotypes of the Olivaceous and the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper using conventional staining with Giemsa and silver nitrate staining of the nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NORs). Metaphases were obtained by fibular bone marrow culture. The chromosome number of the Olivaceous Woodcreeper was 2n = 82 and of the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper, 2n = 82. Ag-NORs in the largest macrochromosome pair and evidence of a chromosome inversion are described herein for the first time for this group.

  12. Nucleolar organizer regions in Sittasomus griseicapillus and Lepidocolaptes angustirostris (Aves, Dendrocolaptidae: evidence of a chromosome inversion

    Marcelo de Oliveira Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic studies in birds are still scarce compared to other vertebrates. Woodcreepers (Dendrocolaptidae are part of a highly specialized group within the Suboscines of the New World. They are forest birds exclusive to the Neotropical region and similar to woodpeckers, at a comparable evolutionary stage. This paper describes for the first time the karyotypes of the Olivaceous and the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper using conventional staining with Giemsa and silver nitrate staining of the nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NORs. Metaphases were obtained by fibular bone marrow culture. The chromosome number of the Olivaceous Woodcreeper was 2n = 82 and of the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper, 2n = 82. Ag-NORs in the largest macrochromosome pair and evidence of a chromosome inversion are described herein for the first time for this group.

  13. Nucleolar structure and synthetic activity during meiotic prophase and spermiogenesis in the rat

    Schultz, M.C.; Leblond, C.P.

    1990-01-01

    The ultrastructure of nucleoli was examined in developing rat spermatocytes and spermatids, with the help of serial sections. In addition, the radioautographic reaction of nucleoli as examined in rats sacrificed 1 hr after intratesticular injection of 3H(5')-uridine and taken as an index of the rate of synthesis of ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Primary spermatocytes from preleptotene to zygotene have small nucleoli typically composed of fibrillar centers, a fibrillar component, and a granular component, within which are narrow interstitial spaces. During early and mid-pachytene, nucleoli enlarge to about nine times their initial size, with the fibrillar and granular components forming an extensive network of cords--a nucleolonema--within which are wide interstitial spaces. Meanwhile, there appear structures identical to the granular component but distinct from nucleoli; they are referred to as extranucleolar granular elements. Finally, from late pachytene to the first maturation division, nucleoli undergo condensation, as shown by contraction of fibrillar centers into small clumps, while fibrillar and granular components condense and segregate from each other, with a gradual decrease in interstitial spaces. In secondary spermatocytes, nucleoli are compact and rather small, while in young spermatids they are also compact and even smaller. Nucleoli disappear in elongating spermatids. In 3H-uridine radioautographs, nucleolar label is weak in young primary spermatocytes, increases progressively during early pachytene, is strong by the end of mid pachytene, but gradually decreases during late pachytene up to the first maturation division. In secondary spermatocytes and spermatids, there is no significant nucleolar label. In conclusion, rRNA synthesis by nucleoli is low in young spermatocytes

  14. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DAN-PK), a key enzyme in the re-ligation of DNA double-strand breaks

    Hennequin, C.; Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    Repair pathways of DNA are now defined and some important findings have been discovered in the last few years. DNA non-homologous end-joining (NEH) is a crucial process in the repair of radiation-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs). NHEj implies at least three steps: the DNA free-ends must get closer, preparation of the free-ends by exonucleases and then a transient hybridization in a region of DNA with weak homology. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is the key enzyme in this process. DNA-PK is a nuclear serine/threonine kinase that comprises three components: a catalytic subunit (DNA-PK cs ) and two regulatory subunits, DNA-binding proteins, Ku80 and Ku70. The severe combined immuno-deficient (scid) mice are deficient in DNA-PK cs : this protein is involved both in DNA repair and in the V(D)J recombination of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes. It is a protein-kinase of the P13-kinase family and which can phosphorylate Ku proteins, p53 and probably some other proteins still unknown. DNA-PK is an important actor of DSBs repair (induced by ionising radiations or by drugs like etoposide), but obviously it is not the only mechanism existing in the cell for this function. Some others, like homologous recombination, seem also to have a great importance for cell survival. (authors)

  15. COMK ENCODES THE COMPETENCE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR, THE KEY REGULATORY PROTEIN FOR COMPETENCE DEVELOPMENT IN BACILLUS-SUBTILIS

    VANSINDEREN, D; LUTTINGER, A; KONG, LY; DUBNAU, D; VENEMA, G; HAMOEN, L

    comK is a positive autoregulatory gene occupying a central position in the com petence-signal-transduction network. All regulatory routes identified in this network converge at the level of comK expression. The ComK protein is required for the transcriptional induction of comK and the late

  16. Thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives: programmed chemical weapons for key protein targets of various pathological conditions.

    Chadha, Navriti; Bahia, Malkeet Singh; Kaur, Maninder; Silakari, Om

    2015-07-01

    Thiazolidine-2,4-dione is an extensively explored heterocyclic nucleus for designing of novel agents implicated for a wide variety of pathophysiological conditions, that is, diabetes, diabetic complications, cancer, arthritis, inflammation, microbial infection, and melanoma, etc. The current paradigm of drug development has shifted to the structure-based drug design, since high-throughput screenings have continued to generate disappointing results. The gap between hit generation and drug establishment can be narrowed down by investigation of ligand interactions with its receptor protein. Therefore, it would always be highly beneficial to gain knowledge of molecular level interactions between specific protein target and developed ligands; since this information can be maneuvered to design new molecules with improved protein fitting. Thus, considering this aspect, we have corroborated the information about molecular (target) level implementations of thiazolidine-2,4-diones (TZD) derivatives having therapeutic implementations such as, but not limited to, anti-diabetic (glitazones), anti-cancer, anti-arthritic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-microbial, etc. The structure based SAR of TZD derivatives for various protein targets would serve as a benchmark for the alteration of existing ligands to design new ones with better binding interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The localization of key Bacillus subtilis penicillin binding proteins during cell growth is determined by substrate availability

    Lages, Marta Carolina Afonso; Beilharz, Katrin; Angeles, Danae Morales; Veening, Jan-Willem; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    The shape of bacteria is maintained by the cell wall. The main component of the cell wall is peptidoglycan (PG) that is synthesized by penicillin binding proteins (PBPs). The correct positioning of PBPs is essential for the maintenance of cell shape. In the literature, two different models for

  18. Fatty Acids are Key in 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal-Mediated Activation of Uncoupling Proteins 1 and 2

    Malingriaux, E. A.; Rupprecht, A.; Gille, L.; Jovanovic, O.; Ježek, Petr; Jabůrek, Martin; Pohl, E. E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2013), e77786 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial uncoupling proteins * 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal * fatty acids Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  19. The myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant hypothiocyanous acid inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases via oxidation of key cysteine residues

    Cook, Naomi L.; Moeke, Cassidy H.; Fantoni, Luca I.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues is critical to cellular processes, and is regulated by kinases and phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs contain a redox-sensitive active site Cys residue, which is readily oxidized. Myeloperoxidase, released from activated leukocytes, catalyzes thiocyanate ion (SCN...

  20. The Duffy binding protein as a key target for a Plasmodium vivax vaccine: lessons from the Brazilian Amazon

    Taís Nóbrega de Sousa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium vivax infects human erythrocytes through a major pathway that requires interaction between an apical parasite protein, the Duffy binding protein (PvDBP and its receptor on reticulocytes, the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC. The importance of the interaction between PvDBP (region II, DBPII and DARC to P. vivax infection has motivated our malaria research group at Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (state of Minas Gerais, Brazil to conduct a number of immunoepidemiological studies to characterise the naturally acquired immunity to PvDBP in populations living in the Amazon rainforest. In this review, we provide an update on the immunology and molecular epidemiology of PvDBP in the Brazilian Amazon - an area of markedly unstable malaria transmission - and compare it with data from other parts of Latin America, as well as Asia and Oceania.

  1. Using microbes as a key tool to unravel the mechanism of autophagy and the functions of the ATG proteins

    Mario Mauthe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of microbe infections has always been a very effective approach to unveil and dissect cellular pathways. Autophagy is not an exception. Although some of the breakthrough discoveries in the field were obtained using yeast, pathogens have been and still are a great tool to discover and characterize new molecular and functional aspects of autophagy. Research on pathogens has helped to acquire knowledge about selective types of autophagy and the assembly of the autophagy machinery, i.e the autophagy-related (ATG proteins, but also about alternative cellular roles of this pathway, such as secretion. Finally, microbes have also served to discover and characterize unconventional functions of the ATG proteins, which are uncoupled from their role in autophagy. In our recent study, we have taken advantage of viruses as a screening tool to determine the extent of the unconventional functions of the ATG proteome and characterize one of them.

  2. Chemogenomic analysis of G-protein coupled receptors and their ligands deciphers locks and keys governing diverse aspects of signalling.

    Jörg D Wichard

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular mechanism of signalling in the important super-family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs is causally related to questions of how and where these receptors can be activated or inhibited. In this context, it is of great interest to unravel the common molecular features of GPCRs as well as those related to an active or inactive state or to subtype specific G-protein coupling. In our underlying chemogenomics study, we analyse for the first time the statistical link between the properties of G-protein-coupled receptors and GPCR ligands. The technique of mutual information (MI is able to reveal statistical inter-dependence between variations in amino acid residues on the one hand and variations in ligand molecular descriptors on the other. Although this MI analysis uses novel information that differs from the results of known site-directed mutagenesis studies or published GPCR crystal structures, the method is capable of identifying the well-known common ligand binding region of GPCRs between the upper part of the seven transmembrane helices and the second extracellular loop. The analysis shows amino acid positions that are sensitive to either stimulating (agonistic or inhibitory (antagonistic ligand effects or both. It appears that amino acid positions for antagonistic and agonistic effects are both concentrated around the extracellular region, but selective agonistic effects are cumulated between transmembrane helices (TMHs 2, 3, and ECL2, while selective residues for antagonistic effects are located at the top of helices 5 and 6. Above all, the MI analysis provides detailed indications about amino acids located in the transmembrane region of these receptors that determine G-protein signalling pathway preferences.

  3. Comparative and functional genomics of Legionella identified eukaryotic like proteins as key players in host-pathogen interactions

    Laura eGomez-Valero

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Although best known for its ability to cause severe pneumonia in people whose immune defenses are weakened, Legionella pneumophila and Legionella longbeachae are two species of a large genus of bacteria that are ubiquitous in nature, where they parasitize protozoa. Adaptation to the host environment and exploitation of host cell functions are critical for the success of these intracellular pathogens. The establishment and publication of the complete genome sequences of L. pneumophila and L. longbeachae isolates paved the way for major breakthroughs in understanding the biology of these organisms. In this review we present the knowledge gained from the analyses and comparison of the complete genome sequences of different L. pneumophila and L. longbeachae strains. Emphasis is given on putative virulence and Legionella life cycle related functions, such as the identification of an extended array of eukaryotic-like proteins, many of which have been shown to modulate host cell functions to the pathogen's advantage. Surprisingly, many of the eukaryotic domain proteins identified in L. pneumophila as well as many substrates of the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system essential for intracellular replication are different between these two species, although they cause the same disease. Finally, evolutionary aspects regarding the eukaryotic like proteins in Legionella are discussed.

  4. NSA2, a novel nucleolus protein regulates cell proliferation and cell cycle

    Zhang, Heyu; Ma, Xi; Shi, Taiping; Song, Quansheng; Zhao, Hongshan; Ma, Dalong

    2010-01-01

    NSA2 (Nop seven-associated 2) was previously identified in a high throughput screen of novel human genes associated with cell proliferation, and the NSA2 protein is evolutionarily conserved across different species. In this study, we revealed that NSA2 is broadly expressed in human tissues and cultured cell lines, and located in the nucleolus of the cell. Both of the putative nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of NSA2, also overlapped with nucleolar localization signals (NoLSs), are capable of directing nucleolar accumulation. Moreover, over-expression of the NSA2 protein promoted cell growth in different cell lines and regulated the G1/S transition in the cell cycle. SiRNA silencing of the NSA2 transcript attenuated the cell growth and dramatically blocked the cell cycle in G1/S transition. Our results demonstrated that NSA2 is a nucleolar protein involved in cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation.

  5. Structure-function mapping of BbCRASP-1, the key complement factor H and FHL-1 binding protein of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Cordes, Frank S; Kraiczy, Peter; Roversi, Pietro; Simon, Markus M; Brade, Volker; Jahraus, Oliver; Wallis, Russell; Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard; Lea, Susan M

    2006-05-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, a spirochaete transmitted to human hosts during feeding of infected Ixodes ticks, is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most frequent vector-borne disease in Eurasia and North America. Sporadically Lyme disease develops into a chronic, multisystemic disorder. Serum-resistant B. burgdorferi strains bind complement factor H (FH) and FH-like protein 1 (FHL-1) on the spirochaete surface. This binding is dependent on the expression of proteins termed complement-regulator acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs). The atomic structure of BbCRASP-1, the key FHL-1/FH-binding protein of B. burgdorferi, has recently been determined. Our analysis indicates that its protein topology apparently evolved to provide a high affinity interaction site for FH/FHL-1 and leads to an atomic-level hypothesis for the functioning of BbCRASP-1. This work demonstrates that pathogens interact with complement regulators in ways that are distinct from the mechanisms used by the host and are thus obvious targets for drug design.

  6. Airborne protein concentration: a key metric for type 1 allergy risk assessment-in home measurement challenges and considerations.

    Tulum, Liz; Deag, Zoë; Brown, Matthew; Furniss, Annette; Meech, Lynn; Lalljie, Anja; Cochrane, Stella

    2018-01-01

    Exposure to airborne proteins can be associated with the development of immediate, IgE-mediated respiratory allergies, with genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors also playing a role in determining the likelihood that sensitisation will be induced. The main objective of this study was to determine whether airborne concentrations of selected common aeroallergens could be quantified in the air of homes using easily deployable, commercially available equipment and analytical methods, at low levels relevant to risk assessment of the potential to develop respiratory allergies. Additionally, air and dust sampling were compared and the influence of factors such as different filter types on allergen quantification explored. Low volume air sampling pumps and DUSTREAM ® dust samplers were used to sample 20 homes and allergen levels were quantified using a MARIA ® immunoassay. It proved possible to detect a range of common aeroallergens in the home with sufficient sensitivity to quantify airborne concentrations in ranges relevant to risk assessment (Limits of Detection of 0.005-0.03 ng/m 3 ). The methodology discriminates between homes related to pet ownership and there were clear advantages to sampling air over dust which are described in this paper. Furthermore, in an adsorption-extraction study, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) filters gave higher and more consistent recovery values than glass fibre (grade A) filters for the range of aeroallergens studied. Very low airborne concentrations of allergenic proteins in home settings can be successfully quantified using commercially available pumps and immunoassays. Considering the greater relevance of air sampling to human exposure of the respiratory tract and its other advantages, wider use of standardised, sensitive techniques to measure low airborne protein concentrations and how they influence development of allergic sensitisation and symptoms could accelerate our understanding of human dose-response relationships

  7. Functional and transcriptomic analysis of the key unfolded protein response transcription factor HacA in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Zhou, Bin; Xie, Jingyi; Liu, Xiaokai; Wang, Bin; Pan, Li

    2016-11-15

    HacA is a conserved basic leucine zipper transcription factor that serves as the master transcriptional regulator in the unfolded protein response (UPR). To comprehensively evaluate the role of HacA in Aspergillus oryzae, a homokaryotic hacA disruption mutant (HacA-DE) and a strain that expressed a constitutively active form of HacA (HacA-CA) were successfully generated, and transcriptome analyses of these mutants were performed. Growth and phenotypic profiles demonstrated that hyphal growth and sporulation were impaired in the HacA-DE and HacA-CA strains that were grown on complete and minimal media, and the growth impairment was more pronounced for the HacA-CA strain. Compared with a wild-type (WT) strain, the transcriptome results indicated that differentially expressed genes in these mutants mainly fell into four categories: the protein secretory pathway, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, and carbohydrate metabolism. Furthermore, we identified 80 and 36 genes of the secretory pathway whose expression significantly differed in the HacA-CA strain (compared with the WT and HacA-DE strains) and HacA-DE strain (compared with the WT strain), respectively, which mostly belonged to protein folding/UPR, glycosylation, and vesicle transport processes. Both the HacA-CA and HacA-DE strains exhibited reduced expression of extracellular enzymes, especially amylolytic enzymes, which resulted from the activation of the repression under secretion stress mechanism in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress. Collectively, our results suggest that the function of HacA is important not only for UPR induction, but also for growth and fungal physiology, as it serves to reduce secretion stress in A. oryzae. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Developing Master Keys to Brain Pathology, Cancer and Aging from the Structural Biology of Proteins Controlling Reactive Oxygen Species and DNA Repair

    Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Fan, Li; Tainer, John A.

    2007-01-01

    This review is focused on proteins with key roles in pathways controlling either reactive oxygen species or DNA damage responses, both of which are essential for preserving the nervous system. An imbalance of reactive oxygen species or inappropriate DNA damage response likely causes mutational or cytotoxic outcomes, which may lead to cancer and/or aging phenotypes. Moreover, individuals with hereditary disorders in proteins of these cellular pathways have significant neurological abnormalities. Mutations in a superoxide dismutase, which removes oxygen free radicals, may cause the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Additionally, DNA repair disorders that affect the brain to varying extents include ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder, Cockayne syndrome or Werner syndrome. Here, we highlight recent advances gained through structural biochemistry studies on enzymes linked to these disorders and other related enzymes acting within the same cellular pathways. We describe the current understanding of how these vital proteins coordinate chemical steps and integrate cellular signaling and response events. Significantly, these structural studies may provide a set of master keys to developing a unified understanding of the survival mechanisms utilized after insults by reactive oxygen species and genotoxic agents, and also provide a basis for developing an informed intervention in brain tumor and neurodegenerative disease progression. PMID:17174478

  9. Usability as the Key Factor to the Design of a Web Server for the CReF Protein Structure Predictor: The wCReF

    Vanessa Stangherlin Machado Paixão-Cortes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein structure prediction servers use various computational methods to predict the three-dimensional structure of proteins from their amino acid sequence. Predicted models are used to infer protein function and guide experimental efforts. This can contribute to solving the problem of predicting tertiary protein structures, one of the main unsolved problems in bioinformatics. The challenge is to understand the relationship between the amino acid sequence of a protein and its three-dimensional structure, which is related to the function of these macromolecules. This article is an extended version of the article wCReF: The Web Server for the Central Residue Fragment-based Method (CReF Protein Structure Predictor, published in the 14th International Conference on Information Technology: New Generations. In the first version, we presented the wCReF, a protein structure prediction server for the central residue fragment-based method. The wCReF interface was developed with a focus on usability and user interaction. With this tool, users can enter the amino acid sequence of their target protein and obtain its approximate 3D structure without the need to install all the multitude of necessary tools. In this extended version, we present the design process of the prediction server in detail, which includes: (A identification of user needs: aiming at understanding the features of a protein structure prediction server, the end user profiles and the commonly-performed tasks; (B server usability inspection: in order to define wCReF’s requirements and features, we have used heuristic evaluation guided by experts in both the human-computer interaction and bioinformatics domain areas, applied to the protein structure prediction servers I-TASSER, QUARK and Robetta; as a result, changes were found in all heuristics resulting in 89 usability problems; (C software requirements document and prototype: assessment results guiding the key features that wCReF must

  10. Role of the Box C/D Motif in Localization of Small Nucleolar RNAs to Coiled Bodies and Nucleoli

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Speckmann, Wayne; Terns, Rebecca; Terns, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are a large family of eukaryotic RNAs that function within the nucleolus in the biogenesis of ribosomes. One major class of snoRNAs is the box C/D snoRNAs named for their conserved box C and box D sequence elements. We have investigated the involvement of cis-acting sequences and intranuclear structures in the localization of box C/D snoRNAs to the nucleolus by assaying the intranuclear distribution of fluorescently labeled U3, U8, and U14 snoRNAs injected into Xenopus oocyte nuclei. Analysis of an extensive panel of U3 RNA variants showed that the box C/D motif, comprised of box C′, box D, and the 3′ terminal stem of U3, is necessary and sufficient for the nucleolar localization of U3 snoRNA. Disruption of the elements of the box C/D motif of U8 and U14 snoRNAs also prevented nucleolar localization, indicating that all box C/D snoRNAs use a common nucleolar-targeting mechanism. Finally, we found that wild-type box C/D snoRNAs transiently associate with coiled bodies before they localize to nucleoli and that variant RNAs that lack an intact box C/D motif are detained within coiled bodies. These results suggest that coiled bodies play a role in the biogenesis and/or intranuclear transport of box C/D snoRNAs. PMID:10397754

  11. Mutation of the key residue for extraribosomal function of ribosomal protein S19 cause increased grooming behaviors in mice.

    Chen, Jun; Kaitsuka, Taku; Fujino, Rika; Araki, Kimi; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Yamamoto, Tetsuro

    2016-08-26

    Ribosomal protein S19 (RP S19) possesses ribosomal function as RP S19 monomer and extraribosomal function as cross-linked RP S19 oligomers which function as a ligand of the complement 5a (C5a) receptor (CD88). We have generated a Gln137Glu-RP S19 knock-in (KI) mouse, which is shown to possess the weakened extraribosomal function of RP S19. Because whether the extraribosomal function of RP S19 has a role in brain function had been unclear, we performed behavioral analysis on these mice and demonstrated that KI mice displayed an increased grooming behavior during open-field test and elevated plus maze test and an enhanced freezing behavior in contextual fear conditioning test. These results suggest an involvement of RP S19 oligomers in some anxiety-like behavior, especially grooming behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A molecular key for building hyphae aggregates: the role of the newly identified Streptomyces protein HyaS.

    Koebsch, Ilona; Overbeck, Jens; Piepmeyer, Sophie; Meschke, Holger; Schrempf, Hildgund

    2009-05-01

    Streptomycetes produce many metabolites with medical and biotechnological applications. During fermentations, their hyphae build aggregates, a process in which the newly identified protein HyaS plays an important role. The corresponding hyaS gene is present within all investigated Streptomyces species. Reporter fusions indicate that transcription of hyaS occurs within substrate hyphae of the Streptomyces lividans wild type (WT). The HyaS protein is dominantly associated with the substrate hyphae. The WT strain forms cylindrically shaped clumps of densely packed substrate hyphae, often fusing to higher aggregates (pellets), which remain stably associated during shaking. Investigations by electron microscopy suggest that HyaS induces tight fusion-like contacts among substrate hyphae. In contrast, the pellets of the designed hyaS disruption mutant ΔH are irregular in shape, contain frequently outgrowing bunches of hyphae, and fuse less frequently. ΔH complemented with a plasmid carrying hyaS resembles the WT phenotype. Biochemical studies indicate that the C-terminal region of HyaS has amine oxidase activity. Investigations of ΔH transformants, each carrying a specifically mutated gene, lead to the conclusion that the in situ oxidase activity correlates with the pellet-inducing role of HyaS, and depends on the presence of certain histidine residues. Furthermore, the level of undecylprodigiosin, a red pigment with antibiotic activity, is influenced by the engineered hyaS subtype within a strain. These data present the first molecular basis for future manipulation of pellets, and concomitant production of secondary metabolites during biotechnological processes. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. PCP-B class pollen coat proteins are key regulators of the hydration checkpoint in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen-stigma interactions.

    Wang, Ludi; Clarke, Lisa A; Eason, Russell J; Parker, Christopher C; Qi, Baoxiu; Scott, Rod J; Doughty, James

    2017-01-01

    The establishment of pollen-pistil compatibility is strictly regulated by factors derived from both male and female reproductive structures. Highly diverse small cysteine-rich proteins (CRPs) have been found to play multiple roles in plant reproduction, including the earliest stages of the pollen-stigma interaction. Secreted CRPs found in the pollen coat of members of the Brassicaceae, the pollen coat proteins (PCPs), are emerging as important signalling molecules that regulate the pollen-stigma interaction. Using a combination of protein characterization, expression and phylogenetic analyses we identified a novel class of Arabidopsis thaliana pollen-borne CRPs, the PCP-Bs (for pollen coat protein B-class) that are related to embryo surrounding factor (ESF1) developmental regulators. Single and multiple PCP-B mutant lines were utilized in bioassays to assess effects on pollen hydration, adhesion and pollen tube growth. Our results revealed that pollen hydration is severely impaired when multiple PCP-Bs are lost from the pollen coat. The hydration defect also resulted in reduced pollen adhesion and delayed pollen tube growth in all mutants studied. These results demonstrate that AtPCP-Bs are key regulators of the hydration 'checkpoint' in establishment of pollen-stigma compatibility. In addition, we propose that interspecies diversity of PCP-Bs may contribute to reproductive barriers in the Brassicaceae. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Imperfect DNA mirror repeats in the gag gene of HIV-1 (HXB2 identify key functional domains and coincide with protein structural elements in each of the mature proteins

    Lang Dorothy M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A DNA mirror repeat is a sequence segment delimited on the basis of its containing a center of symmetry on a single strand, e.g. 5'-GCATGGTACG-3'. It is most frequently described in association with a functionally significant site in a genomic sequence, and its occurrence is regarded as noteworthy, if not unusual. However, imperfect mirror repeats (IMRs having ≥ 50% symmetry are common in the protein coding DNA of monomeric proteins and their distribution has been found to coincide with protein structural elements – helices, β sheets and turns. In this study, the distribution of IMRs is evaluated in a polyprotein – to determine whether IMRs may be related to the position or order of protein cleavage or other hierarchal aspects of protein function. The gag gene of HIV-1 [GenBank:K03455] was selected for the study because its protein motifs and structural components are well documented. Results There is a highly specific relationship between IMRs and structural and functional aspects of the Gag polyprotein. The five longest IMRs in the polyprotein translate a key functional segment in each of the five cleavage products. Throughout the protein, IMRs coincide with functionally significant segments of the protein. A detailed annotation of the protein, which combines structural, functional and IMR data illustrates these associations. There is a significant statistical correlation between the ends of IMRs and the ends of PSEs in each of the mature proteins. Weakly symmetric IMRs (≥ 33% are related to cleavage positions and processes. Conclusion The frequency and distribution of IMRs in HIV-1 Gag indicates that DNA symmetry is a fundamental property of protein coding DNA and that different levels of symmetry are associated with different functional aspects of the gene and its protein. The interaction between IMRs and protein structure and function is precise and interwoven over the entire length of the polyprotein. The

  15. Molecular basis of cellular localization of poly C binding protein 1 in neuronal cells

    Berry, Andrea M.; Flock, Kelly E.; Loh, Horace H.; Ko, Jane L.

    2006-01-01

    Poly C binding protein 1 (PCBP) is involved in the transcriptional regulation of neuronal mu-opioid receptor gene. In this study, we examined the molecular basis of PCBP cellular/nuclear localization in neuronal cells using EGFP fusion protein. PCBP, containing three KH domains and a variable domain, distributed in cytoplasm and nucleus with a preferential nuclear expression. Domain-deletional analyses suggested the requirement of variable and KH3 domains for strong PCBP nuclear expression. Within the nucleus, a low nucleolar PCBP expression was observed, and PCBP variable domain contributed to this restricted nucleolar expression. Furthermore, the punctate nuclear pattern of PCBP was correlated to its single-stranded (ss) DNA binding ability, with both requiring cooperativity of at least three sequential domains. Collectively, certain PCBP domains thus govern its nuclear distribution and transcriptional regulatory activity in the nucleus of neurons, whereas the low nucleolar expression implicates the disengagement of PCBP in the ribosomal RNA synthesis

  16. Optimal response of key enzymes and uncoupling protein to cold in BAT depends on local T3 generation

    Bianco, A.C.; Silva, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have examined the activity of three lipogenic enzymes [malic enzyme (ME), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD), and acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase], the activity of the mitochondrial FAD-dependent α-glycerolphosphate dehydrogenase (α-GPD), and the mitochondrial concentration of uncoupling protein (UCP) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of euthyroid and hypothyroid rats, both at room temperature and in response to acute cold stress. These enzymes and UCP are important for the thermogenic response of BAT in adaptation to cold. The basal level of the lipogenic enzymes was normal or slightly elevated in hypothyroid rats maintained at 23 0 C, but the levels of α-GPD and UCP were markedly reduced. Forty-eight hours at 4 0 C resulted in an increase in the activity of G-6-PD, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and α-GPD and in the concentration of UCP both in euthyroid and hypothyroid animals, but the levels reached were invariably less in hypothyroid animals, indicating that thyroid hormone is necessary for a full metabolic response of BAT under maximal demands. Of all variables measured, the most affected was UCP followed by α-GDP. Dose-response relationship analysis of the UCP response to T 3 indicated that the normalization of the response to cold requires saturation of the nuclear T 3 receptors. They concluded, therefore, that the activation of the BAT 5'-deiodinase induced by cold exposure is essential to provide the high levels of nuclear T 3 required for the full expression of BAT thermogenic potential

  17. Bone morphogenetic protein 9 as a key regulator of liver progenitor cells in DDC-induced cholestatic liver injury.

    Addante, Annalisa; Roncero, Cesáreo; Almalé, Laura; Lazcanoiturburu, Nerea; García-Álvaro, María; Fernández, Margarita; Sanz, Julián; Hammad, Seddik; Nwosu, Zeribe C; Lee, Se-Jin; Fabregat, Isabel; Dooley, Steven; Ten Dijke, Peter; Herrera, Blanca; Sánchez, Aránzazu

    2018-05-11

    Bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9) interferes with liver regeneration upon acute injury, while promoting fibrosis upon carbon tetrachloride-induced chronic injury. We have now addressed the role of BMP9 in 3,5 diethoxicarbonyl-1,4 dihydrocollidine (DDC)-induced cholestatic liver injury, a model of liver regeneration mediated by hepatic progenitor cell (known as oval cell), exemplified as ductular reaction and oval cell expansion. WT and BMP9KO mice were submitted to DDC diet. Livers were examined for liver injury, fibrosis, inflammation and oval cell expansion by serum biochemistry, histology, RT-qPCR and western blot. BMP9 signalling and effects in oval cells were studied in vitro using western blot and transcriptional assays, plus functional assays of DNA synthesis, cell viability and apoptosis. Crosslinking assays and short hairpin RNA approaches were used to identify the receptors mediating BMP9 effects. Deletion of BMP9 reduces liver damage and fibrosis, but enhances inflammation upon DDC feeding. Molecularly, absence of BMP9 results in overactivation of PI3K/AKT, ERK-MAPKs and c-Met signalling pathways, which together with an enhanced ductular reaction and oval cell expansion evidence an improved regenerative response and decreased damage in response to DDC feeding. Importantly, BMP9 directly targets oval cells, it activates SMAD1,5,8, decreases cell growth and promotes apoptosis, effects that are mediated by Activin Receptor-Like Kinase 2 (ALK2) type I receptor. We identify BMP9 as a negative regulator of oval cell expansion in cholestatic injury, its deletion enhancing liver regeneration. Likewise, our work further supports BMP9 as an attractive therapeutic target for chronic liver diseases. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Key Feature of the Catalytic Cycle of TNF-α Converting Enzyme Involves Communication Between Distal Protein Sites and the Enzyme Catalytic Core

    Solomon, A.; Akabayov, B.; Frenkel, A.; Millas, M.; Sagi, I.

    2007-01-01

    Despite their key roles in many normal and pathological processes, the molecular details by which zinc-dependent proteases hydrolyze their physiological substrates remain elusive. Advanced theoretical analyses have suggested reaction models for which there is limited and controversial experimental evidence. Here we report the structure, chemistry and lifetime of transient metal-protein reaction intermediates evolving during the substrate turnover reaction of a metalloproteinase, the tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE). TACE controls multiple signal transduction pathways through the proteolytic release of the extracellular domain of a host of membrane-bound factors and receptors. Using stopped-flow x-ray spectroscopy methods together with transient kinetic analyses, we demonstrate that TACE's catalytic zinc ion undergoes dynamic charge transitions before substrate binding to the metal ion. This indicates previously undescribed communication pathways taking place between distal protein sites and the enzyme catalytic core. The observed charge transitions are synchronized with distinct phases in the reaction kinetics and changes in metal coordination chemistry mediated by the binding of the peptide substrate to the catalytic metal ion and product release. Here we report key local charge transitions critical for proteolysis as well as long sought evidence for the proposed reaction model of peptide hydrolysis. This study provides a general approach for gaining critical insights into the molecular basis of substrate recognition and turnover by zinc metalloproteinases that may be used for drug design

  19. Analysis of silver stained nucleolar organizing regions in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    Prasanna, Md; Charan, Cr; Reddy Ealla, Kranti Kiran; Surekha, V; Kulkarni, Ganesh; Gokavarapu, Sandhya

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the probable differences in cell proliferation index of odontogenic cysts and tumors by means of a comparative silver stained nucleolar organizing region (AgNOR) quantification. This descriptive cross-sectional study was done on archival paraffin blocks (n = 62), consisting of 10 odontogenic keratocysts, 10 dentigerous cysts, 10 radicular cysts, 10 conventional ameloblastomas, 10 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, 10 calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors and 2 ameloblasic carcinomas. The mean AgNOR count of odontogenic cysts was 1.709 and the benign odontogenic tumors was 1.862. Highest AgNOR count was recorded in odontogenic keratocyst and lowest was seen in radicular cyst. Statistically significant difference in AgNOR counts of ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, amelobalastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, benign odontogenic tumors and ameloblastic carcinoma were seen. AgNORs in ameloblastic carcinoma were more in number and more widely spread. AgNOR technique may be considered a good indicator of cell proliferation in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

  20. Lymphocytic nucleolar index in combined application of phosphororganic substances and different radiation factors

    Kilyovska, M.; Nechev, Kh.; Vankova, P.; Bakardzhiev, G.; Tsvetkov, P.; Shopova, V. (Meditsinski Fakultet, Pleven (Bulgaria). Katedra Mediko-Sanitarna Zashtita)

    1982-01-01

    Sex mature male rats were treated as follows: 1) daily during four months with phosphororganic substances (POS) containing preparation ''Agria 1050'' with a 1/40 LD/sub 50/ dose; 2) acute irradiated with X rays on three levels - 50 mGy, 250 mGy and 500 mGy; 3) intratracheally with Ce/sup 144/ with activities of 37 kBg/animal and 370 kBg/animal alone or in combination with POS. The nucleolar index (NI) of the lymphocytes was determined in the first and second week after treatment. It was found that NI showed insignificant increase after treatment with POS. When applied separately X-ray irradiation increased NI, the effect being independent on the dose rates. High doses of Ce/sup 144/ induced a significant increase of NI after the second week. Combined application of POS and irradiation factor caused more significant changes in NI-values. The results obtained are regarded as an early and sensitive criterion for the changes in reproductive activity of lymphoid organs or cells of the whole lymph system.

  1. Drosophila KDM2 is a H3K4me3 demethylase regulating nucleolar organization

    Birchler James A

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CG11033 (dKDM2 is the Drosophila homolog of the gene KDM2B. dKDM2 has been known to possess histone lysine demethylase activity towards H3K36me2 in cell lines and it regulates H2A ubiquitination. The human homolog of the gene has dual activity towards H3K36me2 as well as H3K4me3, and plays an important role in cellular senescence. Findings We have used transgenic flies bearing an RNAi construct for the dKDM2 gene. The knockdown of dKDM2 gene was performed by crossing UAS-RNAi-dKDM2 flies with actin-Gal4 flies. Western blots of acid extracted histones and immunofluoresence analysis of polytene chromosome showed the activity of the enzyme dKDM2 to be specific for H3K4me3 in adult flies. Immunofluoresence analysis of polytene chromosome also revealed the presence of multiple nucleoli in RNAi knockdown mutants of dKDM2 and decreased H3-acetylation marks associated with active transcription. Conclusion Our findings indicate that dKDM2 is a histone lysine demethylase with specificity for H3K4me3 and regulates nucleolar organization.

  2. The diagnostic and prognostic implications of silver-binding nucleolar organizer regions in periodontal lesions

    Saluja Mini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The periodontal lesions with cellular proliferation can be assessed by various methods. One of the most recent methods to determine the proliferative activity is silver-staining nucleolar organizer region (AgNOR staining. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate, if AgNOR count can act as a proliferative marker and can aid in the diagnosis and prognosis of periodontal lesions. Materials and Methods: For this study, subjects with healthy gingival status, non-neoplastic lesions, neoplastic lesions, and plaque-induced gingivitis were included. Following the provisional diagnosis of clinical entity, biopsies were taken from the respective selected sites for histopathological diagnosis. In plaque-induced gingivitis cases, a second biopsy was taken from the selected sites 3 weeks following scaling. After histological confirmation, one more section was prepared, which was subjected to AgNOR staining, and AgNOR numbers were counted by individual and cluster counts and statistically analyzed. Results: Results showed the highest AgNOR count in neoplastic lesions. Non-neoplastic lesions showed a higher AgNOR count as compared to clinically healthy gingiva. Plaque-induced gingivitis showed a considerable reduction in AgNOR count after treatment. Conclusion: Results of this study confirmed that AgNOR count reflects the cellular proliferation and has a limited diagnostic value. However, the prognostic value of AgNOR for periodontal lesions is dependable.

  3. A constitutively activating mutation alters the dynamics and energetics of a key conformational change in a ligand-free G protein-coupled receptor.

    Tsukamoto, Hisao; Farrens, David L

    2013-09-27

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) undergo dynamic transitions between active and inactive conformations. Usually, these conversions are triggered when the receptor detects an external signal, but some so-called constitutively activating mutations, or CAMs, induce a GPCR to bind and activate G proteins in the absence of external stimulation, in ways still not fully understood. Here, we investigated how a CAM alters the structure of a GPCR and the dynamics involved as the receptor transitions between different conformations. Our approach used site-directed fluorescence labeling (SDFL) spectroscopy to compare opsin, the ligand-free form of the GPCR rhodopsin, with opsin containing the CAM M257Y, focusing specifically on key movements that occur in the sixth transmembrane helix (TM6) during GPCR activation. The site-directed fluorescence labeling data indicate opsin is constrained to an inactive conformation both in detergent micelles and lipid membranes, but when it contains the M257Y CAM, opsin is more dynamic and can interact with a G protein mimetic. Further study of these receptors using tryptophan-induced quenching (TrIQ) methods indicates that in detergent, the CAM significantly increases the population of receptors in the active state, but not in lipids. Subsequent Arrhenius analysis of the TrIQ data suggests that, both in detergent and lipids, the CAM lowers the energy barrier for TM6 movement, a key transition required for conversion between the inactive and active conformations. Together, these data suggest that the lowered energy barrier is a primary effect of the CAM on the receptor dynamics and energetics.

  4. Prokaryotic homologs of Argonaute proteins are predicted to function as key components of a novel system of defense against mobile genetic elements

    van der Oost John

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotes, RNA interference (RNAi is a major mechanism of defense against viruses and transposable elements as well of regulating translation of endogenous mRNAs. The RNAi systems recognize the target RNA molecules via small guide RNAs that are completely or partially complementary to a region of the target. Key components of the RNAi systems are proteins of the Argonaute-PIWI family some of which function as slicers, the nucleases that cleave the target RNA that is base-paired to a guide RNA. Numerous prokaryotes possess the CRISPR-associated system (CASS of defense against phages and plasmids that is, in part, mechanistically analogous but not homologous to eukaryotic RNAi systems. Many prokaryotes also encode homologs of Argonaute-PIWI proteins but their functions remain unknown. Results We present a detailed analysis of Argonaute-PIWI protein sequences and the genomic neighborhoods of the respective genes in prokaryotes. Whereas eukaryotic Ago/PIWI proteins always contain PAZ (oligonucleotide binding and PIWI (active or inactivated nuclease domains, the prokaryotic Argonaute homologs (pAgos fall into two major groups in which the PAZ domain is either present or absent. The monophyly of each group is supported by a phylogenetic analysis of the conserved PIWI-domains. Almost all pAgos that lack a PAZ domain appear to be inactivated, and the respective genes are associated with a variety of predicted nucleases in putative operons. An additional, uncharacterized domain that is fused to various nucleases appears to be a unique signature of operons encoding the short (lacking PAZ pAgo form. By contrast, almost all PAZ-domain containing pAgos are predicted to be active nucleases. Some proteins of this group (e.g., that from Aquifex aeolicus have been experimentally shown to possess nuclease activity, and are not typically associated with genes for other (putative nucleases. Given these observations, the apparent extensive

  5. The nucleolar SUMO-specific protease SMT3IP1/SENP3 attenuates Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation

    Nishida, Tamotsu, E-mail: nishida@gene.mie-u.ac.jp [Department of Human Functional Genomics, Life Science Research Center, Mie University, 1577 Kurima-machiya, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan); Yamada, Yoshiji [Department of Human Functional Genomics, Life Science Research Center, Mie University, 1577 Kurima-machiya, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan)

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} SMT3IP1 interacts with p53 and Mdm2, and desumoylates both proteins. {yields} SMT3IP1 competes with p53 for binding to the central acidic domain of Mdm2. {yields} SMT3IP1 binding to Mdm2 inhibits Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation. {yields} We postulate that SMT3IP1 acts as a new regulator of the p53-Mdm2 pathway. -- Abstract: SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification plays multiple roles in several cellular processes. Sumoylation is reversibly regulated by SUMO-specific proteases. SUMO-specific proteases have recently been implicated in cell proliferation and early embryogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that a nucleolar SUMO-specific protease, SMT3IP1/SENP3, controls the p53-Mdm2 pathway. We found that SMT3IP1 interacts with p53 and Mdm2, and desumoylates both proteins. Overexpression of SMT3IP1 in cells resulted in the accumulation of Mdm2 in the nucleolus and increased stability of the p53 protein. In addition, SMT3IP1 bound to the acidic domain of Mdm2, which also mediates the p53 interaction, and competed with p53 for binding. Increasing expression of SMT3IP1 suppressed Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Interestingly, the desumoylation activity of SMT3IP1 was not necessary for p53 stabilization. These results suggest that SMT3IP1 is a new regulator of the p53-Mdm2 pathway.

  6. The nucleolar SUMO-specific protease SMT3IP1/SENP3 attenuates Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation

    Nishida, Tamotsu; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → SMT3IP1 interacts with p53 and Mdm2, and desumoylates both proteins. → SMT3IP1 competes with p53 for binding to the central acidic domain of Mdm2. → SMT3IP1 binding to Mdm2 inhibits Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation. → We postulate that SMT3IP1 acts as a new regulator of the p53-Mdm2 pathway. -- Abstract: SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification plays multiple roles in several cellular processes. Sumoylation is reversibly regulated by SUMO-specific proteases. SUMO-specific proteases have recently been implicated in cell proliferation and early embryogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that a nucleolar SUMO-specific protease, SMT3IP1/SENP3, controls the p53-Mdm2 pathway. We found that SMT3IP1 interacts with p53 and Mdm2, and desumoylates both proteins. Overexpression of SMT3IP1 in cells resulted in the accumulation of Mdm2 in the nucleolus and increased stability of the p53 protein. In addition, SMT3IP1 bound to the acidic domain of Mdm2, which also mediates the p53 interaction, and competed with p53 for binding. Increasing expression of SMT3IP1 suppressed Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Interestingly, the desumoylation activity of SMT3IP1 was not necessary for p53 stabilization. These results suggest that SMT3IP1 is a new regulator of the p53-Mdm2 pathway.

  7. Principles of protein targeting to the nucleolus.

    Martin, Robert M; Ter-Avetisyan, Gohar; Herce, Henry D; Ludwig, Anne K; Lättig-Tünnemann, Gisela; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The nucleolus is the hallmark of nuclear compartmentalization and has been shown to exert multiple roles in cellular metabolism besides its main function as the place of rRNA synthesis and assembly of ribosomes. Nucleolar proteins dynamically localize and accumulate in this nuclear compartment relative to the surrounding nucleoplasm. In this study, we have assessed the molecular requirements that are necessary and sufficient for the localization and accumulation of peptides and proteins inside the nucleoli of living cells. The data showed that positively charged peptide entities composed of arginines alone and with an isoelectric point at and above 12.6 are necessary and sufficient for mediating significant nucleolar accumulation. A threshold of 6 arginines is necessary for peptides to accumulate in nucleoli, but already 4 arginines are sufficient when fused within 15 amino acid residues of a nuclear localization signal of a protein. Using a pH sensitive dye, we found that the nucleolar compartment is particularly acidic when compared to the surrounding nucleoplasm and, hence, provides the ideal electrochemical environment to bind poly-arginine containing proteins. In fact, we found that oligo-arginine peptides and GFP fusions bind RNA in vitro. Consistent with RNA being the main binding partner for arginines in the nucleolus, we found that the same principles apply to cells from insects to man, indicating that this mechanism is highly conserved throughout evolution.

  8. Paenibacillus larvae chitin-degrading protein PlCBP49 is a key virulence factor in American Foulbrood of honey bees.

    Eva Garcia-Gonzalez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Paenibacillus larvae, the etiological agent of the globally occurring epizootic American Foulbrood (AFB of honey bees, causes intestinal infections in honey bee larvae which develop into systemic infections inevitably leading to larval death. Massive brood mortality might eventually lead to collapse of the entire colony. Molecular mechanisms of host-microbe interactions in this system and of differences in virulence between P. larvae genotypes are poorly understood. Recently, it was demonstrated that the degradation of the peritrophic matrix lining the midgut epithelium is a key step in pathogenesis of P. larvae infections. Here, we present the isolation and identification of PlCBP49, a modular, chitin-degrading protein of P. larvae and demonstrate that this enzyme is crucial for the degradation of the larval peritrophic matrix during infection. PlCBP49 contains a module belonging to the auxiliary activity 10 (AA10, formerly CBM33 family of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs which are able to degrade recalcitrant polysaccharides. Using chitin-affinity purified PlCBP49, we provide evidence that PlCBP49 degrades chitin via a metal ion-dependent, oxidative mechanism, as already described for members of the AA10 family. Using P. larvae mutants lacking PlCBP49 expression, we analyzed in vivo biological functions of PlCBP49. In the absence of PlCBP49 expression, peritrophic matrix degradation was markedly reduced and P. larvae virulence was nearly abolished. This indicated that PlCBP49 is a key virulence factor for the species P. larvae. The identification of the functional role of PlCBP49 in AFB pathogenesis broadens our understanding of this important family of chitin-binding and -degrading proteins, especially in those bacteria that can also act as entomopathogens.

  9. A STUDY OF SILVER STAINING NUCLEOLAR ORGANISING REGIONS AGNOR SCORE AS PROGNOSTIC MARKER IN BREAST LESIONS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN HYDERABAD

    Bhavani Shankar Nithyananda

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Nucleolar Organising Regions (NORS are segments of DNA closely associated with nucleolus, which code for ribosomal DNA consisting of non-histone proteins, which are argyrophilic. They are demonstrated as black, brown spots on staining with silver colloidal staining technique. Hence, they are called AgNORs. The assessment of AgNORs correlates with rate of proliferation, cell cycle time, since shorter the cell cycle, greater the ribosomal activity and protein synthesis higher AgNOR count. 1 AgNORs have been studied on NHL, GIT neoplasms, skin, gynaecological neoplasms, pulmonary neoplasms, prostate, bladder and breast cancer. In breast cancer, AgNOR can be used for early detection, grading and staging of disease. In this study, we have tried to correlate AgNOR character to morphological prognostic markers. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 159 cases presenting with lump in the breast were included in the study. Specimens were subjected to histopathological examination. Sections cut three micron thickness were stained for AgNOR with silver colloidal AgNOR staining technique. AgNOR count was done on both benign and malignant lesions. RESULTS Benign breast lesions were more common compared to malignant lesions. The age of the patients ranged from 15-79 yrs. The mean age for benign lesions was 31 yrs. and for malignant lesions 43 yrs. The most common benign lesion was fibroadenoma and most common malignant lesion was infiltrating ductal carcinoma. AgNOR spots were seen as black/brown spots. AgNOR score was higher in malignant lesions when compared to benign lesions. Among malignant lesions, AgNOR score was found to be higher in high grade, metastatic tumours. CONCLUSION AgNOR count is a useful technique, which can supplement other prognostic markers like Ki-67, mitotic index. A long follow up study is required to confirm the prognostic utility of AgNOR count done in this study

  10. Abscisic acid (ABA) and key proteins in its perception and signaling pathways are ancient, but their roles have changed through time.

    Sussmilch, Frances C; Atallah, Nadia M; Brodribb, Timothy J; Banks, Jo Ann; McAdam, Scott A M

    2017-09-02

    Homologs of the Arabidopsis core abscisic acid (ABA) signaling component OPEN STOMATA1 (OST1) are best known for their role in closing stomata in angiosperm species. We recently characterized a fern OST1 homolog, GAMETOPHYTES ABA INSENSITIVE ON ANTHERDIOGEN 1 (GAIA1), which is not required for stomatal closure in ferns, consistent with physiologic evidence that shows the stomata of these plants respond passively to changes in leaf water status. Instead, gaia1 mutants reveal a critical role in ABA signaling for spore dormancy and sex determination, in a system regulated by antagonism between ABA and the gibberellin (GA)-derived fern hormone antheridiogen (A CE ). ABA and key proteins, including ABA receptors from the PYR/PYL/RCAR family and negative regulators of ABA-signaling from Group A of the type-2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs), in addition to OST1 homologs, can be found in all terrestrial land plant lineages, ranging from liverworts that lack stomata, to angiosperms. As land plants have evolved and diversified over the past 450 million years, so too have the roles of this important plant hormone and the genes involved in its signaling and perception.

  11. Polypyrimidine Tract Binding Protein Homologs from Arabidopsis Are Key Regulators of Alternative Splicing with Implications in Fundamental Developmental Processes[W

    Rühl, Christina; Stauffer, Eva; Kahles, André; Wagner, Gabriele; Drechsel, Gabriele; Rätsch, Gunnar; Wachter, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) generates transcript variants by variable exon/intron definition and massively expands transcriptome diversity. Changes in AS patterns have been found to be linked to manifold biological processes, yet fundamental aspects, such as the regulation of AS and its functional implications, largely remain to be addressed. In this work, widespread AS regulation by Arabidopsis thaliana Polypyrimidine tract binding protein homologs (PTBs) was revealed. In total, 452 AS events derived from 307 distinct genes were found to be responsive to the levels of the splicing factors PTB1 and PTB2, which predominantly triggered splicing of regulated introns, inclusion of cassette exons, and usage of upstream 5′ splice sites. By contrast, no major AS regulatory function of the distantly related PTB3 was found. Dependent on their position within the mRNA, PTB-regulated events can both modify the untranslated regions and give rise to alternative protein products. We find that PTB-mediated AS events are connected to diverse biological processes, and the functional implications of selected instances were further elucidated. Specifically, PTB misexpression changes AS of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR6, coinciding with altered rates of abscisic acid–dependent seed germination. Furthermore, AS patterns as well as the expression of key flowering regulators were massively changed in a PTB1/2 level-dependent manner. PMID:23192226

  12. C9orf72 poly GA RAN-translated protein plays a key role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis via aggregation and toxicity.

    Lee, Youn-Bok; Baskaran, Pranetha; Gomez-Deza, Jorge; Chen, Han-Jou; Nishimura, Agnes L; Smith, Bradley N; Troakes, Claire; Adachi, Yoshitsugu; Stepto, Alan; Petrucelli, Leonard; Gallo, Jean-Marc; Hirth, Frank; Rogelj, Boris; Guthrie, Sarah; Shaw, Christopher E

    2017-12-15

    An intronic GGGGCC (G4C2) hexanucleotide repeat expansion inC9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (C9ALS/FTD). Repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation of G4C2 RNA can result in five different dipeptide repeat proteins (DPR: poly GA, poly GP, poly GR, poly PA, and poly PR), which aggregate into neuronal cytoplasmic and nuclear inclusions in affected patients, however their contribution to disease pathogenesis remains controversial. We show that among the DPR proteins, expression of poly GA in a cell culture model activates programmed cell death and TDP-43 cleavage in a dose-dependent manner. Dual expression of poly GA together with other DPRs revealed that poly GP and poly PA are sequestered by poly GA, whereas poly GR and poly PR are rarely co-localised with poly GA. Dual expression of poly GA and poly PA ameliorated poly GA toxicity by inhibiting poly GA aggregation both in vitro and in vivo in the chick embryonic spinal cord. Expression of alternative codon-derived DPRs in chick embryonic spinal cord confirmed in vitro data, revealing that each of the dipeptides caused toxicity, with poly GA being the most toxic. Further, in vivo expression of G4C2 repeats of varying length caused apoptotic cell death, but failed to generate DPRs. Together, these data demonstrate that C9-related toxicity can be mediated by either RNA or DPRs. Moreover, our findings provide evidence that poly GA is a key mediator of cytotoxicity and that cross-talk between DPR proteins likely modifies their pathogenic status in C9ALS/FTD. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. The {Delta}Np63 Proteins Are Key Allies of BRCA1 in the Prevention of Basal-Like Breast Cancer.

    Buckley, Niamh E

    2011-03-01

    Little is known about the origin of basal-like breast cancers, an aggressive disease that is highly similar to BRCA1-mutant breast cancers. p63 family proteins that are structurally related to the p53 suppressor protein are known to function in stem cell regulation and stratified epithelia development in multiple tissues, and p63 expression may be a marker of basal-like breast cancers. Here we report that ΔNp63 isoforms of p63 are transcriptional targets for positive regulation by BRCA1. Our analyses of breast cancer tissue microarrays and BRCA1-modulated breast cancer cell lines do not support earlier reports that p63 is a marker of basal-like or BRCA1 mutant cancers. Nevertheless, we found that BRCA1 interacts with the specific p63 isoform ΔNp63γ along with transcription factor isoforms AP-2α and AP-2γ. BRCA1 required ΔNp63γ and AP-2γ to localize to an intronic enhancer region within the p63 gene to upregulate transcription of the ΔNp63 isoforms. In mammary stem\\/progenitor cells, siRNA-mediated knockdown of ΔNp63 expression resulted in genomic instability, increased cell proliferation, loss of DNA damage checkpoint control, and impaired growth control. Together, our findings establish that transcriptional upregulation of ΔNp63 proteins is critical for BRCA1 suppressor function and that defects in BRCA1-ΔNp63 signaling are key events in the pathogenesis of basal-like breast cancer. Cancer Res; 71(5); 1933-44. ©2011 AACR.

  14. A systems biology approach for elucidating the interaction of curcumin with Fanconi anemia FANC G protein and the key disease targets of leukemia.

    Mahato, David; Samanta, Dipayan; Mukhopadhyay, Sudit S; Krishnaraj, R Navanietha

    2017-06-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder with a high risk of malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinoma. There is a constant search out of new potential therapeutic molecule to combat this disorder. In most cases, patients with FA develop haematological malignancies with acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Identifying drugs which can efficiently block the pathways of both these disorders can be an ideal and novel strategy to treat FA. The curcumin, a natural compound obtained from turmeric is an interesting therapeutic molecule as it has been reported in the literature to combat both FA as well as leukemia. However, its complete mechanism is not elucidated. Herein, a systems biology approach for elucidating the therapeutic potential of curcumin against FA and leukemia is investigated by analyzing the computational molecular interactions of curcumin ligand with FANC G of FA and seven other key disease targets of leukemia. The proteins namely DOT1L, farnesyl transferase (FDPS), histone decetylase (EP3000), Polo-like kinase (PLK-2), aurora-like kinase (AUKRB), tyrosine kinase (ABL1), and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) were chosen as disease targets for leukemia and modeled structure of FANC G protein as the disease target for FA. The docking investigations showed that curcumin had a very high binding affinity of -8.1 kcal/mol with FANC G protein. The key disease targets of leukemia namely tyrosine kinase (ABL1), aurora-like kinase (AUKRB), and polo-like kinase (PLK-2) showed that they had the comparable binding affinities of -9.7 k cal/mol, -8.7 k cal/mol, and -8.6 k cal/mol, respectively with curcumin. Further, the percentage similarity scores obtained from PAM50 using EMBOSS MATCHER was shown to provide a clue to understand the structural relationships to an extent and to predict the binding affinity. This investigation shows that curcumin effectively interacts with the disease targets of both

  15. Domain analysis of the Nematostella vectensis SNAIL ortholog reveals unique nucleolar localization that depends on the zinc-finger domains

    Dattoli, A.A.; Hink, M.A.; DuBuc, T.Q.; Teunisse, B.J.; Goedhart, J.; Röttinger, E.; Postma, M.

    2015-01-01

    SNAIL transcriptional factors are key regulators during development and disease. They arose early during evolution, and in cnidarians such as Nematostella vectensis, NvSNAILA/B are detected in invaginating tissues during gastrulation. The function of SNAIL proteins is well established in bilaterians

  16. Chromatin structure of ribosomal RNA genes in dipterans and its relationship to the location of nucleolar organizers.

    Madalena, Christiane Rodriguez Gutierrez; Díez, José Luís; Gorab, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Nucleoli, nuclear organelles in which ribosomal RNA is synthesized and processed, emerge from nucleolar organizers (NORs) located in distinct chromosomal regions. In polytene nuclei of dipterans, nucleoli of some species can be observed under light microscopy exhibiting distinctive morphology: Drosophila and chironomid species display well-formed nucleoli in contrast to the fragmented and dispersed nucleoli seen in sciarid flies. The available data show no apparent relationship between nucleolar morphology and location of NORs in Diptera. The regulation of rRNA transcription involves controlling both the transcription rate per gene as well as the proportion of rRNA genes adopting a proper chromatin structure for transcription, since active and inactive rRNA gene copies coexist in NORs. Transcription units organized in nucleosomes and those lacking canonical nucleosomes can be analyzed by the method termed psoralen gel retarding assay (PGRA), allowing inferences on the ratio of active to inactive rRNA gene copies. In this work, possible connections between chromosomal location of NORs and proportion of active rRNA genes were studied in Drosophila melanogaster, and in chironomid and sciarid species. The data suggested a link between location of NORs and proportion of active rRNA genes since the copy number showing nucleosomal organization predominates when NORs are located in the pericentric heterochromatin. The results presented in this work are in agreement with previous data on the chromatin structure of rRNA genes from distantly related eukaryotes, as assessed by the PGRA.

  17. Chromatin structure of ribosomal RNA genes in dipterans and its relationship to the location of nucleolar organizers.

    Christiane Rodriguez Gutierrez Madalena

    Full Text Available Nucleoli, nuclear organelles in which ribosomal RNA is synthesized and processed, emerge from nucleolar organizers (NORs located in distinct chromosomal regions. In polytene nuclei of dipterans, nucleoli of some species can be observed under light microscopy exhibiting distinctive morphology: Drosophila and chironomid species display well-formed nucleoli in contrast to the fragmented and dispersed nucleoli seen in sciarid flies. The available data show no apparent relationship between nucleolar morphology and location of NORs in Diptera. The regulation of rRNA transcription involves controlling both the transcription rate per gene as well as the proportion of rRNA genes adopting a proper chromatin structure for transcription, since active and inactive rRNA gene copies coexist in NORs. Transcription units organized in nucleosomes and those lacking canonical nucleosomes can be analyzed by the method termed psoralen gel retarding assay (PGRA, allowing inferences on the ratio of active to inactive rRNA gene copies. In this work, possible connections between chromosomal location of NORs and proportion of active rRNA genes were studied in Drosophila melanogaster, and in chironomid and sciarid species. The data suggested a link between location of NORs and proportion of active rRNA genes since the copy number showing nucleosomal organization predominates when NORs are located in the pericentric heterochromatin. The results presented in this work are in agreement with previous data on the chromatin structure of rRNA genes from distantly related eukaryotes, as assessed by the PGRA.

  18. Protein Kinase C-Related Kinase (PKN/PRK). Potential Key-Role for PKN1 in Protection of Hypoxic Neurons.

    Thauerer, Bettina; Zur Nedden, Stephanie; Baier-Bitterlich, Gabriele

    2014-05-01

    Serine/threonine protein kinase C-related kinase (PKN/PRK) is a family of three isoenzymes (PKN1, PKN2, PKN3), which are widely distributed in eukaryotic organisms and share the same overall domain structure. The Nterminal region encompasses a conserved repeated domain, termed HR1a-c as well as a HR2/C2 domain. The serine/threonine kinase domain is found in the C-terminal region of the protein and shows high sequence homology to other members of the PKC superfamily. In neurons, PKN1 is the most abundant isoform and has been implicated in a variety of functions including cytoskeletal organization and neuronal differentiation and its deregulation may contribute to neuropathological processes such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. We have recently identified a candidate role of PKN1 in the regulation of neuroprotective processes during hypoxic stress. Our key findings were that: 1) the activity of PKN1 was significantly increased by hypoxia (1% O2) and neurotrophins (nerve growth factor and purine nucleosides); 2) Neuronal cells, deficient of PKN1 showed a decrease of cell viability and neurite formation along with a disturbance of the F-actinassociated cytoskeleton; 3) Purine nucleoside-mediated neuroprotection during hypoxia was severely hampered in PKN1 deficient neuronal cells, altogether suggesting a potentially critical role of PKN1 in neuroprotective processes. This review gives an up-to-date overview of the PKN family with a special focus on the neuroprotective role of PKN1 in hypoxia.

  19. The intracellular redox stress caused by hexavalent chromium is selective for proteins that have key roles in cell survival and thiol redox control

    Myers, Judith M.; Antholine, William E.; Myers, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds (e.g. chromates) are strong oxidants that readily enter cells where they are reduced to reactive Cr intermediates that can directly oxidize some cell components and can promote the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Inhalation is a major route of exposure which directly exposes the bronchial epithelium. Previous studies with non-cancerous human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) demonstrated that Cr(VI) treatment results in the irreversible inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and the oxidation of thioredoxins (Trx) and peroxiredoxins (Prx). The mitochondrial Trx/Prx system is somewhat more sensitive to Cr(VI) than the cytosolic Trx/Prx system, and other redox-sensitive mitochondrial functions are subsequently affected including electron transport complexes I and II. Studies reported here show that Cr(VI) does not cause indiscriminant thiol oxidation, and that the Trx/Prx system is among the most sensitive of cellular protein thiols. Trx/Prx oxidation is not unique to BEAS-2B cells, as it was also observed in primary human bronchial epithelial cells. Increasing the intracellular levels of ascorbate, an endogenous Cr(VI) reductant, did not alter the effects on TrxR, Trx, or Prx. The peroxynitrite scavenger MnTBAP did not protect TrxR, Trx, Prx, or the electron transport chain from the effects of Cr(VI), implying that peroxynitrite is not required for these effects. Nitration of tyrosine residues of TrxR was not observed following Cr(VI) treatment, further ruling out peroxynitrite as a significant contributor to the irreversible inhibition of TrxR. Cr(VI) treatments that disrupt the TrxR/Trx/Prx system did not cause detectable mitochondrial DNA damage. Overall, the redox stress that results from Cr(VI) exposure shows selectivity for key proteins which are known to be important for redox signaling, antioxidant defense, and cell survival.

  20. Location of rRNA transcription to the nucleolar components: disappearance of the fibrillar centers in nucleoli of regenerating rat hepatocytes.

    Montanaro, Lorenzo; Govoni, Marzia; Orrico, Catia; Treré, Davide; Derenzini, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    The precise location of rDNA transcription to the components of mammalian cell nucleolus is still debated. This was due to the fact that all the molecules necessary for rRNA synthesis are located in two of the three components, the fibrillar centers (FCs) and the dense fibrillar component (DFC), which together with the granular component (GC) are considered to be constantly present in mammalian cell nucleoli. In the present study we demonstrated that in nucleoli of many regenerating rat hepatocytes at 15 h after partial hepatectomy the FCs were no longer present, only the DFC and the GC being detected. At this time of regeneration the rRNA transcriptional activity was three fold that of resting hepatocytes, while the synthesis of DNA was not yet significantly increased, indicating that these nucleolar changes were due to the rRNA synthesis up-regulation. The DFC appeared to be organized in numerous, small, roundish tufts of fibrils. The silver staining procedure for AgNOR proteins, which are associated with the ribosomal genes, selectively and homogeneously stained these fibrillar tufts. Immuno-gold visualization of the Upstream Binding Factor (UBF), which is associated with the promoter region and the transcribed portion of the rRNA 45S gene, demonstrated that UBF was selectively located in the fibrillar tufts. We concluded that in proliferating rat hepatocytes the increased synthesis of rRNA induced an activation of the rRNA transcription machinery located in the fibrillar centers which, by becoming associated with the ribonucleoprotein transcripts, assumed the morphological pattern of the DFC.

  1. Nucleolar organizer regions and a new chromosome number for Rhea americana (Aves: Rheiformes

    Ricardo José Gunski

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Sequential banding analysis (Giemsa-C-banding-Ag NOR of chromosomes of the common rhea (Rhea americana was performed. Metaphases were obtained by peripheral blood lymphocyte culture and monolayer embryo cell culture. The diploid chromosome number was 80, different from the 2n = 82 in previous reports. Macrochromosome pairs 1, 2 and 5 were submetacentric and pair 3, subacrocentric. The 4th pair was acrocentric and all of the microchromosomes appeared to be acrocentric, with the exception of a clearly metacentric pair which was fully heterochromatic. The Z was slightly larger than the W, both being acrocentric and C-band negative. Nucleolar organizer regions were observed in the secondary constriction of a microchromosome pair. Correct identification of the NOR-bearing pair was possible only by sequential analyses, Giemsa staining followed by the Ag-NOR technique.Foram efetuadas análises seqüenciais de bandeamento cromossômico (Giemsa-banda-C-AgNOR em material da espécie Rhea americana (ema com o objetivo de identificar os cromossomos portadores de regiões organizadoras de nucléolos e confirmar o cariótipo desta espécie. As metáfases foram obtidas de culturas de leucócitos e de células de embrião. O número diplóide de cromossomos, determinado pela análise de metáfases oriundas de 19 espécimes, foi de 80 (2n = 80, NF = 95, o que difere da literatura. Os pares de macrocromossomos números 1, 2 e 5 eram submetacêntricos e o par 3 era sub-acrocêntrico, confirmado pelo bandeamento C. O par 4 era acrocêntrico, bem como todos os microcromossomos, com exceção de um metacêntrico inteiramente heterocromático. O cromossomo Z era ligeiramente maior que o W, sendo ambos acrocêntricos e banda-C negativos. A região organizadora de nucléolos foi observada na constrição secundária de um par de microcromossomos. A correta identificação do par portador da NOR só foi possível com a utilização da análise seqüencial de colora

  2. Lipid transfer proteins and protease inhibitors as key factors in the priming of barley responses to Fusarium head blight disease by a biocontrol strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Petti, Carloalberto; Khan, Mojibur; Doohan, Fiona

    2010-11-01

    Strains of non-pathogenic pseudomonad bacteria, can elicit host defence responses against pathogenic microorganisms. Pseudomonas fluorescens strain MKB158 can protect cereals from pathogenesis by Fusarium fungi, including Fusarium head blight which is an economically important disease due to its association with both yield loss and mycotoxin contamination of grain. Using the 22 K barley Affymetrix chip, trancriptome studies were undertaken to determine the local effect of P. fluorescens strain MKB158 on the transcriptome of barley head tissue, and to discriminate transcripts primed by the bacterium to respond to challenge by Fusarium culmorum, a causal agent of the economically important Fusarium head blight disease of cereals. The bacterium significantly affected the accumulation of 1203 transcripts and primed 74 to positively, and 14 to negatively, respond to the pathogen (P = 0.05). This is the first study to give insights into bacterium priming in the Triticeae tribe of grasses and associated transcripts were classified into 13 functional classes, associated with diverse functions, including detoxification, cell wall biosynthesis and the amplification of host defence responses. In silico analysis of Arabidopsis homologs of bacterium-primed barley genes indicated that, as is the case in dicots, jasmonic acid plays a role in pseudomonad priming of host responses. Additionally, the transcriptome studies described herein also reveal new insights into bacterium-mediated priming of host defences against necrotrophs, including the positive effects on grain filling, lignin deposition, oxidative stress responses, and the inhibition of protease inhibitors and proteins that play a key role in programmed cell death.

  3. Pmr, a histone-like protein H1 (H-NS) family protein encoded by the IncP-7 plasmid pCAR1, is a key global regulator that alters host function.

    Yun, Choong-Soo; Suzuki, Chiho; Naito, Kunihiko; Takeda, Toshiharu; Takahashi, Yurika; Sai, Fumiya; Terabayashi, Tsuguno; Miyakoshi, Masatoshi; Shintani, Masaki; Nishida, Hiromi; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2010-09-01

    Histone-like protein H1 (H-NS) family proteins are nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) conserved among many bacterial species. The IncP-7 plasmid pCAR1 is transmissible among various Pseudomonas strains and carries a gene encoding the H-NS family protein, Pmr. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a host of pCAR1, which harbors five genes encoding the H-NS family proteins PP_1366 (TurA), PP_3765 (TurB), PP_0017 (TurC), PP_3693 (TurD), and PP_2947 (TurE). Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) demonstrated that the presence of pCAR1 does not affect the transcription of these five genes and that only pmr, turA, and turB were primarily transcribed in KT2440(pCAR1). In vitro pull-down assays revealed that Pmr strongly interacted with itself and with TurA, TurB, and TurE. Transcriptome comparisons of the pmr disruptant, KT2440, and KT2440(pCAR1) strains indicated that pmr disruption had greater effects on the host transcriptome than did pCAR1 carriage. The transcriptional levels of some genes that increased with pCAR1 carriage, such as the mexEF-oprN efflux pump genes and parI, reverted with pmr disruption to levels in pCAR1-free KT2440. Transcriptional levels of putative horizontally acquired host genes were not altered by pCAR1 carriage but were altered by pmr disruption. Identification of genome-wide Pmr binding sites by ChAP-chip (chromatin affinity purification coupled with high-density tiling chip) analysis demonstrated that Pmr preferentially binds to horizontally acquired DNA regions. The Pmr binding sites overlapped well with the location of the genes differentially transcribed following pmr disruption on both the plasmid and the chromosome. Our findings indicate that Pmr is a key factor in optimizing gene transcription on pCAR1 and the host chromosome.

  4. Interplay of ribosomal DNA loci in nucleolar dominance: dominant NORs are up-regulated by chromatin dynamics in the wheat-rye system.

    Manuela Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromatin organizational and topological plasticity, and its functions in gene expression regulation, have been strongly revealed by the analysis of nucleolar dominance in hybrids and polyploids where one parental set of ribosomal RNA (rDNA genes that are clustered in nucleolar organizing regions (NORs, is rendered silent by epigenetic pathways and heterochromatization. However, information on the behaviour of dominant NORs is very sparse and needed for an integrative knowledge of differential gene transcription levels and chromatin specific domain interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using molecular and cytological approaches in a wheat-rye addition line (wheat genome plus the rye nucleolar chromosome pair 1R, we investigated transcriptional activity and chromatin topology of the wheat dominant NORs in a nucleolar dominance situation. Herein we report dominant NORs up-regulation in the addition line through quantitative real-time PCR and silver-staining technique. Accompanying this modification in wheat rDNA trascription level, we also disclose that perinucleolar knobs of ribosomal chromatin are almost transcriptionally silent due to the residual detection of BrUTP incorporation in these domains, contrary to the marked labelling of intranucleolar condensed rDNA. Further, by comparative confocal analysis of nuclei probed to wheat and rye NORs, we found that in the wheat-rye addition line there is a significant decrease in the number of wheat-origin perinucleolar rDNA knobs, corresponding to a diminution of the rDNA heterochromatic fraction of the dominant (wheat NORs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that inter-specific interactions leading to wheat-origin NOR dominance results not only on the silencing of rye origin NOR loci, but dominant NORs are also modified in their transcriptional activity and interphase organization. The results show a cross-talk between wheat and rye NORs, mediated by ribosomal chromatin

  5. A novel Toxoplasma gondii nuclear factor TgNF3 is a dynamic chromatin-associated component, modulator of nucleolar architecture and parasite virulence.

    Alejandro Olguin-Lamas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In Toxoplasma gondii, cis-acting elements present in promoter sequences of genes that are stage-specifically regulated have been described. However, the nuclear factors that bind to these cis-acting elements and regulate promoter activities have not been identified. In the present study, we performed affinity purification, followed by proteomic analysis, to identify nuclear factors that bind to a stage-specific promoter in T. gondii. This led to the identification of several nuclear factors in T. gondii including a novel factor, designated herein as TgNF3. The N-terminal domain of TgNF3 shares similarities with the N-terminus of yeast nuclear FK506-binding protein (FKBP, known as a histone chaperone regulating gene silencing. Using anti-TgNF3 antibodies, HA-FLAG and YFP-tagged TgNF3, we show that TgNF3 is predominantly a parasite nucleolar, chromatin-associated protein that binds specifically to T. gondii gene promoters in vivo. Genome-wide analysis using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identified promoter occupancies by TgNF3. In addition, TgNF3 has a direct role in transcriptional control of genes involved in parasite metabolism, transcription and translation. The ectopic expression of TgNF3 in the tachyzoites revealed dynamic changes in the size of the nucleolus, leading to a severe attenuation of virulence in vivo. We demonstrate that TgNF3 physically interacts with H3, H4 and H2A/H2B assembled into bona fide core and nucleosome-associated histones. Furthermore, TgNF3 interacts specifically to histones in the context of stage-specific gene silencing of a promoter that lacks active epigenetic acetylated histone marks. In contrast to virulent tachyzoites, which express the majority of TgNF3 in the nucleolus, the protein is exclusively located in the cytoplasm of the avirulent bradyzoites. We propose a model where TgNF3 acts essentially to coordinate nucleolus and nuclear functions by modulating

  6. Data on the association of the nuclear envelope protein Sun1 with nucleoli.

    Moujaber, Ossama; Omran, Nawal; Kodiha, Mohamed; Pié, Brigitte; Cooper, Ellis; Presley, John F; Stochaj, Ursula

    2017-08-01

    SUN proteins participate in diverse cellular activities, many of which are connected to the nuclear envelope. Recently, the family member SUN1 has been linked to novel biological activities. These include the regulation of nucleoli, intranuclear compartments that assemble ribosomal subunits. We show that SUN1 associates with nucleoli in several mammalian epithelial cell lines. This nucleolar localization is not shared by all cell types, as SUN1 concentrates at the nuclear envelope in ganglionic neurons and non-neuronal satellite cells. Database analyses and Western blotting emphasize the complexity of SUN1 protein profiles in different mammalian cells. We constructed a STRING network which identifies SUN1-related proteins as part of a larger network that includes several nucleolar proteins. Taken together, the current data highlight the diversity of SUN1 proteins and emphasize the possible links between SUN1 and nucleoli.

  7. The key role of proinflammatory cytokines, matrix proteins, RANKL/OPG and Wnt/β-catenin in bone healing of hip arthroplasty patients.

    Cassuto, Jean; Folestad, Agnetha; Göthlin, Jan; Malchau, Henrik; Kärrholm, Johan

    2018-02-01

    1NP increased immediately after surgery and returned to basal level at 6W followed by a new peak at 10Y returning to basal at 13Y. IL-8 and IL-1β peaked at 5Y post-THA and returned to basal level at 10Y. RANKL/OPG and Wnt/β-catenin remained at preoperative levels until 5Y post-THA when a sustained increase in OPG level, paralleled by a sustained decrease in sclerostin, started and lasted until 18Y. Despite a strong increase by RANKL at 13Y, the OPG/RANKL-ratio remained high between 5Y and 18Y. Dkk-1 and sFRP-1 remained at basal level until 5Y followed by a peak at 7Y and a return to basal level at 15Y. Similarly, RANKL increased after 5Y, peaked at 13Y and returned to basal levels at 18Y, thus coinciding with Wnt-1. In contrast, Wnt3a, Dkk-3, Dkk-4, sFRP-3 and Wif-1 did not differ from preoperative levels or healthy subjects during the course of the follow-up. The primary peak of proinflammatory cytokines involved in the initiation of bone healing after trauma is in line with previous results. The primary phase of increased matrix proteins, P1NP and BALP paralleled by RANKL, OPG and Wnt/β-catenin remaining at preoperative level until 5Y, support a strong formation of mineralized matrix and to a lesser degree bone during this phase. The secondary proinflammatory peak at 5Y is likely a trigger of coupled bone remodeling and neosynthesis as it is followed by increased levels of the bone anabolic turnover marker, BALP, and mediators of the RANKL/OPG and Wnt/β-catenin pathways. A continuous increase by OPG level and the bone turnover marker, BALP, lasting from 5Y until 18Y and paralleled by a similar decrease in sclerostin level support their being key regulators of bone anabolism, whereas the transient and opposed activities of RANKL, Wnt-1, Dkk-1 and sFRP-1 serve as fine tuning tools during the coupled remodeling phase. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Influenza A H3N2 subtype virus NS1 protein targets into the nucleus and binds primarily via its C-terminal NLS2/NoLS to nucleolin and fibrillarin

    2012-01-01

    Background Influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a virulence factor, which is targeted into the cell cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus. NS1 is a multi-functional protein that inhibits host cell pre-mRNA processing and counteracts host cell antiviral responses. Previously, we have shown that the NS1 protein of the H3N2 subtype influenza viruses possesses a C-terminal nuclear localization signal (NLS) that also functions as a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) and targets the protein into the nucleolus. Results Here, we show that the NS1 protein of the human H3N2 virus subtype interacts in vitro primarily via its C-terminal NLS2/NoLS and to a minor extent via its N-terminal NLS1 with the nucleolar proteins, nucleolin and fibrillarin. Using chimeric green fluorescence protein (GFP)-NS1 fusion constructs, we show that the nucleolar retention of the NS1 protein is determined by its C-terminal NLS2/NoLS in vivo. Confocal laser microscopy analysis shows that the NS1 protein colocalizes with nucleolin in nucleoplasm and nucleolus and with B23 and fibrillarin in the nucleolus of influenza A/Udorn/72 virus-infected A549 cells. Since some viral proteins contain NoLSs, it is likely that viruses have evolved specific nucleolar functions. Conclusion NS1 protein of the human H3N2 virus interacts primarily via the C-terminal NLS2/NoLS and to a minor extent via the N-terminal NLS1 with the main nucleolar proteins, nucleolin, B23 and fibrillarin. PMID:22909121

  9. Interdependence of Pes1, Bop1, and WDR12 controls nucleolar localization and assembly of the PeBoW complex required for maturation of the 60S ribosomal subunit.

    Rohrmoser, Michaela; Hölzel, Michael; Grimm, Thomas; Malamoussi, Anastassia; Harasim, Thomas; Orban, Mathias; Pfisterer, Iris; Gruber-Eber, Anita; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Eick, Dirk

    2007-05-01

    The PeBoW complex is essential for cell proliferation and maturation of the large ribosomal subunit in mammalian cells. Here we examined the role of PeBoW-specific proteins Pes1, Bop1, and WDR12 in complex assembly and stability, nucleolar transport, and pre-ribosome association. Recombinant expression of the three subunits is sufficient for complex formation. The stability of all three subunits strongly increases upon incorporation into the complex. Only overexpression of Bop1 inhibits cell proliferation and rRNA processing, and its negative effects could be rescued by coexpression of WDR12, but not Pes1. Elevated levels of Bop1 induce Bop1/WDR12 and Bop1/Pes1 subcomplexes. Knockdown of Bop1 abolishes the copurification of Pes1 with WDR12, demonstrating Bop1 as the integral component of the complex. Overexpressed Bop1 substitutes for endogenous Bop1 in PeBoW complex assembly, leading to the instability of endogenous Bop1. Finally, indirect immunofluorescence, cell fractionation, and sucrose gradient centrifugation experiments indicate that transport of Bop1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleolus is Pes1 dependent, while Pes1 can migrate to the nucleolus and bind to preribosomal particles independently of Bop1. We conclude that the assembly and integrity of the PeBoW complex are highly sensitive to changes in Bop1 protein levels.

  10. Analysis of translesion DNA synthesis activity of the human REV1 protein, which is a key player in radiation-induced mutagenesis

    Masuda, Yuji; Kamiya, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    Ionizing radiation frequently causes oxidative DNA damage in cells. It has been suggested that functions of the REV1 gene are induction of mutations and prevention of cell death caused by ionizing radiation through the damage bypass DNA replication. The gene product possesses a deoxycytidyl transferase activity, which is required for translesion DNA synthesis of a variety of damaged bases and an abasic site. To elucidate molecular mechanisms of the mutagenesis and translesion DNA synthesis, it is important to characterize the enzymatic properties of the REV1 protein. Here, we describe a novel method for purifying the recombinant human REV1 protein and the anzymatic properties of the protein. We established an efficient system for induction of the recombinant human REV1 protein in Escherichia coli cells. The REV1 protein was purified to homogeneity using nickel-chelating sepharose, heparin sepharose and superdex 200 chromatography. When purified by this method, REV1 protein is free of endo-, exonuclease and DNA polymerase activities. The purified REV1 protein is suitable for enzymological studies, and we used this to biochemical characterization. The REV1 protein inserts dCMP opposite templates G, A, T, C and an abasic site and inserts dGMP and dTMP opposite template G. Kinetic analysis provided evidence for high efficiency for dCMP insertion opposite template G and an abasic site, suggesting that the REV1 protein play a role in translesion DNA synthesis of an abasic site. (author)

  11. Altered gravity causes the changes in the proteins NoA100 in plant cell nucleoli

    Sobol, Margarita A.; Gonzalez-Camacho, Fernando; Kordyum, Elizabeth L.; Medina, Francisco Javier

    2005-08-01

    A nucleolar protein homologous to the mammalian nucleolin and to the onion nucleolin-like protein NopA100 was detected in nuclear soluble protein fraction from Lepidium sativum root meristematic cells, using the specific silver staining method and the cross-reaction with the anti-NopA100 antibody. In 2D Western blots of soluble nuclear fraction, NopA100 was revealed as a smear extending through a certain range of pI. In extracts obtained from seedlings grown under clinorotation, the extension of the pI range was shorter than in the stationary control indicating a lower phosphorylation of the protein. This suggests that altered gravity causes a decrease in the rate of nucleolar activity.

  12. The Role of a Novel Nucleolar Protein in Regulation of E2F1 in Breast Cancer

    2009-09-01

    Homo sapiens mRNA; cDNA DKFZp434E1515 3.4 0.5 -0.5 Homo sapiens mRNA; cDNA DKFZp564E1363 ARHH 2.1 0.8 0.2 ras homolog gene family, member H CHML...Cell 85, 537-548 8. Meng, R. D., Phillips, P., and El -Deiry, W. S. (1999) Int J Oncol 14, 5-14 9. Pruschy, M., Wirbelauer, C., Glanzmann, C., Bodis

  13. Osteoarthritis: Control of human cartilage hypertrophic differentiation. Research highlight van: Gremlin1, frizzled-related protein, and Dkk-1 are key regulators of human articular cartilage homeostasis

    Buckland, J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of articular cartilage homeostasis is important in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis, key to which is activation of articular chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Healthy articular cartilage is resistant to hypertrophic differentiation, whereas growth-plate cartilage is destined to

  14. mRNA secondary structure at start AUG codon is a key limiting factor for human protein expression in Escherichia coli

    Zhang Weici; Xiao Weihua; Wei Haiming; Zhang Jian; Tian Zhigang

    2006-01-01

    Codon usage and thermodynamic optimization of the 5'-end of mRNA have been applied to improve the efficiency of human protein production in Escherichia coli. However, high level expression of human protein in E. coli is still a challenge that virtually depends upon each individual target genes. Using human interleukin 10 (huIL-10) and interferon α (huIFN-α) coding sequences, we systematically analyzed the influence of several major factors on expression of human protein in E. coli. The results from huIL-10 and reinforced by huIFN-α showed that exposing AUG initiator codon from base-paired structure within mRNA itself significantly improved the translation of target protein, which resulted in a 10-fold higher protein expression than the wild-type genes. It was also noted that translation process was not affected by the retained short-range stem-loop structure at Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences. On the other hand, codon-optimized constructs of huIL-10 showed unimproved levels of protein expression, on the contrary, led to a remarkable RNA degradation. Our study demonstrates that exposure of AUG initiator codon from long-range intra-strand secondary structure at 5'-end of mRNA may be used as a general strategy for human protein production in E. coli

  15. Identification of protein expression alterations in gefitinib-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma: PCNT and mPR play key roles in the development of gefitinib-associated resistance

    Lin, Chi-Chen [Institute of Biomedical Science, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Science, and Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Education, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Division of Chest Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jing-Ting [Department of Medical Science and Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Lin, Meng-Wei [Department of Medical Science and Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chan, Chia-Hao [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hsinchu Mackay Memorial Hospital, Hsinchu 30071, Taiwan (China); Wen, Yueh-Feng [Department of Medical Science and Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsinchu Branch, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Wu, Shin-Bei [Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chung, Ting-Wen [Department of Medical Science and Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Lyu, Kevin W. [Lutheran Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Global Scholars Program, St. George' s University/Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Chou, Hsiu-Chuan, E-mail: chouhc@mail.nhcue.edu.tw [Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); and others

    2015-11-01

    Gefitinib is the first-line chemotherapeutic drug for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which comprises nearly 85% of all lung cancer cases worldwide. However, most patients eventually develop drug resistance after 12–18 months of treatment. Hence, investigating the drug resistance mechanism and resistance-associated biomarkers is necessary. Two lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, PC9 and gefitinib-resistant PC9/Gef, were established for examining resistance mechanisms and identifying potential therapeutic targets. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used for examining global protein expression changes between PC9 and PC9/Gef. The results revealed that 164 identified proteins were associated with the formation of gefitinib resistance in PC9 cells. Additional studies using RNA interference showed that progesterone receptor membrane component 1 and pericentrin proteins have major roles in gefitinib resistance. In conclusion, the proteomic approach enabled identifying of numerous proteins involved in gefitinib resistance. The results provide useful diagnostic markers and therapeutic candidates for treating gefitinib-resistant NSCLC. - Highlights: • 164 proteins associated with gefitinib resistance were identified through proteomic analysis. • In this study, a lung adenocarcinoma and its gefitinib resistant partner were established. • mPR and PCNT proteins have evidenced to play important roles in gefitinib resistance.

  16. Identification of protein expression alterations in gefitinib-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma: PCNT and mPR play key roles in the development of gefitinib-associated resistance

    Lin, Chi-Chen; Chen, Jing-Ting; Lin, Meng-Wei; Chan, Chia-Hao; Wen, Yueh-Feng; Wu, Shin-Bei; Chung, Ting-Wen; Lyu, Kevin W.; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Gefitinib is the first-line chemotherapeutic drug for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which comprises nearly 85% of all lung cancer cases worldwide. However, most patients eventually develop drug resistance after 12–18 months of treatment. Hence, investigating the drug resistance mechanism and resistance-associated biomarkers is necessary. Two lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, PC9 and gefitinib-resistant PC9/Gef, were established for examining resistance mechanisms and identifying potential therapeutic targets. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used for examining global protein expression changes between PC9 and PC9/Gef. The results revealed that 164 identified proteins were associated with the formation of gefitinib resistance in PC9 cells. Additional studies using RNA interference showed that progesterone receptor membrane component 1 and pericentrin proteins have major roles in gefitinib resistance. In conclusion, the proteomic approach enabled identifying of numerous proteins involved in gefitinib resistance. The results provide useful diagnostic markers and therapeutic candidates for treating gefitinib-resistant NSCLC. - Highlights: • 164 proteins associated with gefitinib resistance were identified through proteomic analysis. • In this study, a lung adenocarcinoma and its gefitinib resistant partner were established. • mPR and PCNT proteins have evidenced to play important roles in gefitinib resistance.

  17. Cytological diagnostic clues in poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas of the breast: Streaming arrangement, necrotic background, nucleolar enlargement and cannibalism of cancer cells.

    Kinoshita, M; Matsuda, Y; Arai, T; Soejima, Y; Sawabe, M; Honma, N

    2018-02-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a rare histological type of breast cancer. The cytological diagnosis of non-keratinising, poorly differentiated SCC is often difficult, and distinguishing it from invasive ductal carcinoma or apocrine carcinoma (AC) is especially challenging. We aimed to define the diagnostic cytological features of poorly differentiated SCC of the breast. We studied the cytological findings of poorly differentiated SCC (n=10) and compared them to those of IDC (n=15) and AC (n=14). The following six cytological features were evaluated: streaming arrangement, nucleolar enlargement, dense nuclei, cannibalism, atypical keratinocytes and necrotic background. SCC exhibited significantly higher frequencies of streaming arrangement (70% vs 6.7%, P=.002), nucleolar enlargement (80% vs 27%, P=.02), and necrotic background (80% vs 36%, P=.002) than invasive ductal carcinoma. The detection of two or three of these features yielded a higher sensitivity (80%) and specificity (93%) for the diagnosis of SCC. Streaming arrangement (70% vs 0%, Pstreaming arrangement, a necrotic background, nucleolar enlargement and cannibalism are useful indicators for the diagnosis of SCC of the breast. As such, greater attention should be paid to these morphological features in daily clinical practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Ribosomal DNA-binding proteins in the nucleolus of Physarum polycephalum

    Graham-Lorence, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    In Physarum polycephalum, the nucleoli are extra chromosomal structures containing 200 to 400 copies of a linear 60 kilobase palindromic rDNA molecule. These rDNA molecules are organized into minichromosomes which apparently are held within a nucleolar protein matrix. To obtained evidence for attachment of the rDNA to such a matrix, both intact and lithium diiodosalicylate/NaCl-extracted nucleoli were digested for various lengths of time with micrococcal nuclease, so that portions of the rDNA molecules not attached within the nucleolar structure would be released. Nucleolar DNA-binding proteins were determined by blotting electrophoretically separated proteins from SDS-polyacrylamide gels onto nitrocellulose paper and probing them with radiolabeled DNA. In addition to the histones and lexosome proteins, eight DNA-binding proteins were identified having molecular weights of 25, 38, 47, 53, 55, 67, and 70 kD, with the 47, 53, 67, and 70 kD proteins requiring Ca 2+ for binding

  19. Key issues

    Cook, N.G.W.

    1980-01-01

    Successful modeling of the thermo-mechanical and hydrochemical behavior of radioactive waste repositories in hard rock is possible in principle. Because such predictions lie outside the realm of experience, their adequacy depends entirely upon a thorough understanding of three fundamental questions: an understanding of the chemical and physical processess that determine the behavior of rock and all its complexities; accurate and realistic numerical models of the geologic media within which a repository may be built; and sufficient in-situ data covering the entire geologic region affected by, or effecting the behavior of a repository. At present sufficient is known to be able to identify most of those areas which require further attention. These areas extend all the way from a complete understanding of the chemical and physical processes determining the behavior of rock through to the exploration mapping and testing that must be done during the development of any potential repository. Many of the techniques, laboratory equipment, field instrumentation, and numerical methods needed to accomplish this do not exist at present. Therefore it is necessary to accept that a major investment in scientific research is required to generate this information over the next few years. The spectrum of scientific and engineering activities is wide extending from laboratory measurements through the development of numerical models to the measurement of data in-situ, but there is every prospect that sufficient can be done to resolve these key issues. However, to do so requires overt recognition of the many gaps which exist in our knowledge and abilities today, and of the need to bridge these gaps and of the significant costs involved in doing so

  20. Age-dependent change in the morphology of nucleoli and methylation of genes of the Nucleolar Organizer Region in Japanese quail Coturnix japonica) model (Temminck and Schlegel, 1849) (Galliformes: Aves).

    Andraszek, Katarzyna; Gryzińska, Magdalena; Wójcik, Ewa; Knaga, Sebastian; Smalec, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Nucleoli are the product of the activity of nucleolar organizer regions (NOR) in certain chromosomes. Their main functions are the formation of ribosomal subunits from ribosomal protein molecules and the transcription of genes encoding rRNA. The aim of the study was to determine the shape of nucleoli and analyse methylation in the gene RN28S in the spermatocytes of male Japanese quail (Coturnixjaponica) in two age groups. Nucleoli were analysed in cells of the first meiotic prophase. Their number and shape were determined and they were classified as regular, irregular or defragmented. In the cells of the young birds no defragmented nucleoli were observed, with regular and irregular nucleoli accounting for 97% and 3%, respectively. In the cells of older birds no regular nucleoli were observed, while irregular and defragmented nucleoli accounted for 37% and 67%, respectively. MSP (methylation-specific PCR) showed that the gene RN28S is methylated in both 15-week-old and 52-week-old quails. In recent years an association has been established between nucleolus morphology and cellular ageing processes.

  1. High throughput, cell type-specific analysis of key proteins in human endometrial biopsies of women from fertile and infertile couples

    Leach, Richard E.; Jessmon, Philip; Coutifaris, Christos; Kruger, Michael; Myers, Evan R.; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Carson, Sandra A.; Legro, Richard S.; Schlaff, William D.; Carr, Bruce R.; Steinkampf, Michael P.; Silva, Susan; Leppert, Phyllis C.; Giudice, Linda; Diamond, Michael P.; Armant, D. Randall

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although histological dating of endometrial biopsies provides little help for prediction or diagnosis of infertility, analysis of individual endometrial proteins, proteomic profiling and transcriptome analysis have suggested several biomarkers with altered expression arising from intrinsic abnormalities, inadequate stimulation by or in response to gonadal steroids or altered function due to systemic disorders. The objective of this study was to delineate the developmental dynamics of potentially important proteins in the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle, utilizing a collection of endometrial biopsies from women of fertile (n = 89) and infertile (n = 89) couples. METHODS AND RESULTS Progesterone receptor-B (PGR-B), leukemia inhibitory factor, glycodelin/progestagen-associated endometrial protein (PAEP), homeobox A10, heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, calcitonin and chemokine ligand 14 (CXCL14) were measured using a high-throughput, quantitative immunohistochemical method. Significant cyclic and tissue-specific regulation was documented for each protein, as well as their dysregulation in women of infertile couples. Infertile patients demonstrated a delay early in the secretory phase in the decline of PGR-B (P localization provided important insights into the potential roles of these proteins in normal and pathological development of the endometrium that is not attainable from transcriptome analysis, establishing a basis for biomarker, diagnostic and targeted drug development for women with infertility. PMID:22215622

  2. Evidence for the presence of key chlorophyll-biosynthesis-related proteins in the genus Rubrobacter (Phylum Actinobacteria) and its implications for the evolution and origin of photosynthesis.

    Gupta, Radhey S; Khadka, Bijendra

    2016-02-01

    Homologs showing high degree of sequence similarity to the three subunits of the protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase enzyme complex (viz. BchL, BchN, and BchB), which carries out a central role in chlorophyll-bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) biosynthesis, are uniquely found in photosynthetic organisms. The results of BLAST searches and homology modeling presented here show that proteins exhibiting a high degree of sequence and structural similarity to the BchB and BchN proteins are also present in organisms from the high G+C Gram-positive phylum of Actinobacteria, specifically in members of the genus Rubrobacter (R. x ylanophilus and R. r adiotolerans). The results presented exclude the possibility that the observed BLAST hits are for subunits of the nitrogenase complex or the chlorin reductase complex. The branching in phylogenetic trees and the sequence characteristics of the Rubrobacter BchB/BchN homologs indicate that these homologs are distinct from those found in other photosynthetic bacteria and that they may represent ancestral forms of the BchB/BchN proteins. Although a homolog showing high degree of sequence similarity to the BchL protein was not detected in Rubrobacter, another protein, belonging to the ParA/Soj/MinD family, present in these bacteria, exhibits high degree of structural similarity to the BchL. In addition to the BchB/BchN homologs, Rubrobacter species also contain homologs showing high degree of sequence similarity to different subunits of magnesium chelatase (BchD, BchH, and BchI) as well as proteins showing significant similarity to the BchP and BchG proteins. Interestingly, no homologs corresponding to the BchX, BchY, and BchZ proteins were detected in the Rubrobacter species. These results provide the first suggestive evidence that some form of photosynthesis either exists or was anciently present within the phylum Actinobacteria (high G+C Gram-positive) in members of the genus Rubrobacter. The significance of these results concerning the

  3. Self-assembly of caseinomacropeptide as a potential key mechanism in the formation of visible storage induced aggregates in acidic whey protein isolate dispersions

    Villumsen, Nanna Stengaard; Jensen, Hanne Bak; Thu Le, Thao Thi

    2015-01-01

    Visible aggregates formed during storage in acidic whey protein isolate (WPI) dispersions represent a challenge to the beverage industry. Batch-to-batch variations are observed that prevents consistent quality and shelf-life prediction. Heat-treatment of WPI dispersions at 120°C for 20s instead...

  4. Translational control and differential RNA decay are key elements regulating postsegregational expression of the killer protein encoded by the parB locus of plasmid R1

    Gerdes, K; Helin, K; Christensen, O W

    1988-01-01

    The parB locus of plasmid R1, which mediates plasmid stability via postsegregational killing of plasmid-free cells, encodes two genes, hok and sok. The hok gene product is a potent cell-killing protein. The hok gene is regulated at the translational level by the sok gene-encoded repressor, a small...

  5. 2-DE and MS analysis of key proteins in the adhesion of Lactobacillus plantarum, a first step toward early selection of probiotics based on bacterial biomarkers

    Izquierdo, Esther; Horvatovich, Peter; Marchioni, Eric; Aoude-Werner, Dalal; Sanz, Yolanda; Ennahar, Saied

    The identification of cell components involved in probiotic activities is a challenge in current probiotic research. In this work, a new approach based on proteomics as an analytical tool for the identification of characteristic protein profiles related to adhesion to mucin as a model probiotic

  6. Detection of silver-stained nucleolar organizer regions in the peripheral blood T lymphocytes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    Li Xianming; Wu Dong; Chen Shanyi; Ren Zheping; Chen Yixin; Wang Xiuqing

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical significance of detecting silver-stained nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NOR) in the peripheral blood T lymphocytes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Methods: Ag-NOR in the peripheral blood T lymphocytes detected in 36 healthy subjects served as control. Those in 73 newly diagnosed but untreated, 11 recurrent (and/or metastatic) and 32 treated NPC patients in follow-up were monitored. The dynamic variations in the level of Ag-NORs in the peripheral blood T lymphocytes in the pre-radiotherapy (pre-RT), during RT and post-RT were evaluated in part of the newly diagnosed patients. Results: The level of Ag-NORs in the peripheral blood T lymphocytes in all groups of NPC patients were significantly lower as compared to the health controls (P 0.05). The level of Ag-NORs during RT significantly decreased as compared to that of pre-RT (P 0.05). Conclusions: Detection of Ag-NORs in the peripheral blood T lymphocytes is of significance in evaluating the outcome, predicting prognosis and even in making the diagnosis and staging for NPC patients

  7. Defective pairing and synaptonemal complex formation in a Sordaria mutant (spo44) with a translocated segment of the nucleolar organizer.

    Zickler, D; de Lares, L; Moreau, P J; Leblon, G

    1985-01-01

    The recessive meiotic mutant spo44 of Sordaria macrospora, with 90% ascospore abortion, exhibits striking effects on recombination (67% decrease), irregular segregation of the almost unpaired homologues, and a decrease in chiasma frequency in the few cases where bivalents are formed. Three-dimensional reconstructions of ten prophase nuclei indicate that pairing, as judged by the absence of fully formed synaptonemal complexes (SC), is not achieved although lateral elements (LE) assemble. The pairing failure is attributable to defects in the alignment of homologous chromosomes. The leptotene alignment seen in the wild type before SC formation was not observed in the spo44 nuclei. Dense material, considered to be precursor of SC central elements, was found scattered among the LE in two nuclei. The behaviour of spo44 substantiates the hypothesis that chromosome matching and SC formation are separable events. - The total length of the LE in the mutant is the same as in the wild type, but due to variable numbers and length of the individual LE, homologues cannot be lined up. Light microscopic observations indicate that the irregular length and number of LE is due to extensive chromosome breakage. The wild-type function corresponding to spo44 is required for both LE integrity and chromosome matching. Reconstructions of heterozygous nuclei reveal the presence of a supernumerary nucleolar organizer in one arm of chromosome 7. It is suggested that rDNA has been inserted into a gene whose function is involved in pairing or into a controlling sequence that interacts with the pairing process.

  8. Quantitative assessment of silver-stained nucleolar organizer region in odontogenic cysts to correlate the growth and malignant potentiality.

    Biswas, Sailendra Nath; Paul, R R; Ray, Jay Gopal; Majumdar, Sumit; Uppala, Divya

    2017-01-01

    The most common and important odontogenic cyst involving jaws is the odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) or primordial cyst, the dentigerous cyst and the radicular cyst. These cysts all though do not show similar behavior, they all have the potentiality to recur. Silver nitrate staining of the nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) of the benign and malignant lesions is becoming very useful as a diagnostic indicator. Thus, the aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic potential of AgNORs in the cystic epithelium of common odontogenic cysts. Archived specimens of odontogenic cysts were stained with hematoxylin and eosin stain and AgNOR stain. The comparative evaluation of the AgNOR counts was done among the three varieties of odontogenic cysts, i.e., radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts and OKC and were observed that the mean for OKC was significantly higher than that of radicular cyst. Therefore, AgNor could be used as an efficient tool for comparative evaluation of microscopic features such as epithelial thickness, surface keratinization and mural proliferation in dentigerous cyst to that of the AgNOR count.

  9. Different patterns of rDNA distribution in Pisum sativum nucleoli correlate with different levels of nucleolar activity

    Highett, M.I.; Rawlins, D.J.; Shaw, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    We have used in situ hybridization with probes to rDNA, labelled either with digoxygenin or directly with fluorescein, to determine the arrangement of these genes within the nucleoli of Pisum sativum L. root cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to image the three-dimensional structures revealed, but we have also compared this technique with deconvolution of conventional (wide-field) fluorescence images measured with a cooled CCD camera, and have shown that the results are remarkably similar. When the deconvolution technique was applied to the confocal data it gave clearer images than could be achieved by confocal microscopy alone. We have analysed the distribution of rDNA in the different cell types observable in root tips: the quiescent centre; active meristematic cells; and relatively differentiated root cap, epidermal and cortical cells. In addition to four perinucleolar knobs of condensed, inactive rDNA genes, corresponding to the four nucleolar organizers in P. sativum, which were the most brightly labelled structures, several characteristic patterns of intranucleolar labelling were apparent, including bright foci, large central chromatin masses, and fine, decondensed interconnecting fibres. The larger and more active the nucleolus, the smaller the proportion of condensed perinucleolar rDNA. In some large and active meristematic nucleoli, all the internal rDNA is decondensed, showing that transcription cannot be restricted to the bright foci, and is most likely to occur on the decondensed fibres. (author)

  10. The expression pattern of small nucleolar and small Cajal body-specific RNAs characterizes distinct molecular subtypes of multiple myeloma

    Ronchetti, D; Todoerti, K; Tuana, G; Agnelli, L; Mosca, L; Lionetti, M; Fabris, S; Colapietro, P; Miozzo, M; Ferrarini, M; Tassone, P; Neri, A

    2012-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and small Cajal body-specific RNAs (scaRNAs) are non-coding RNAs involved in the maturation of other RNA molecules and generally located in the introns of host genes. It is now emerging that altered sno/scaRNAs expression may have a pathological role in cancer. This study elucidates the patterns of sno/scaRNAs expression in multiple myeloma (MM) by profiling purified malignant plasma cells from 55 MMs, 8 secondary plasma cell leukemias (sPCLs) and 4 normal controls. Overall, a global sno/scaRNAs downregulation was found in MMs and, even more, in sPCLs compared with normal plasma cells. Whereas SCARNA22 resulted the only sno/scaRNA characterizing the translocation/cyclin D4 (TC4) MM, TC2 group displayed a distinct sno/scaRNA signature overexpressing members of SNORD115 and SNORD116 families located in a region finely regulated by an imprinting center at 15q11, which, however, resulted overall hypomethylated in MMs independently of the SNORD115 and SNORD116 expression levels. Finally, integrative analyses with available gene expression and genome-wide data revealed the occurrence of significant sno/scaRNAs/host genes co-expression and the putative influence of allelic imbalances on specific snoRNAs expression. Our data extend the current view of sno/scaRNAs deregulation in cancer and add novel information to the bio-molecular complexity of plasma cell dyscrasias

  11. Nuclear and nucleolar localization signals and their targeting function in phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase PI4K230

    Kakuk, Annamaria; Friedlaender, Elza; Vereb, Gyoergy; Lisboa, Duarte; Bagossi, Peter; Toth, Gabor; Gergely, Pal; Vereb, Gyoergy

    2008-01-01

    PI4K230, an isoform of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, known primarily as a cytoplasmic membrane-bound enzyme, was detected recently also in the nucleolus of several cells. Here we provide mechanistic insight on the targeting function of its putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences using molecular modeling, digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells and binding to various importins. The synthetic sequence 916 NFNHIHKRIRRVADKYLSG 934 comprising a putative monopartite NLS (NLS1), targeted covalently bound fluorescent BSA to the nucleoplasm via classical importin α/β mechanism employing importins α1 and α3 but not α5. This transport was inhibited by wheat germ agglutinin and GTPγS. The sequence 1414 SKKTNRGSQLHKYYMKRRTL 1433 , a putative bipartite NLS (NLS2) proved ineffective in nuclear targeting if conjugated to fluorescently labeled BSA. Nonetheless, NLS2 or either of its basic clusters directed to the nucleolus soybean trypsin inhibitor that can pass the nuclear pore complex passively; moreover, an expressed 58 kDa fragment of PI4K230 (AA1166-1667) comprising NLS2 was also imported into the nucleus by import factors of reticulocyte lysate or by importin α1/β or α3/β complexes and localized to the nucleolus. We conclude that the putative bipartite NLS itself is a nucleolar targeting signal, and for nuclear import PI4K230 requires a larger sequence around it or, alternatively, the monopartite NLS

  12. Duodenal-jejunal bypass surgery up-regulates the expression of the hepatic insulin signaling proteins and the key regulatory enzymes of intestinal gluconeogenesis in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    Sun, Dong; Wang, Kexin; Yan, Zhibo; Zhang, Guangyong; Liu, Shaozhuang; Liu, Fengjun; Hu, Chunxiao; Hu, Sanyuan

    2013-11-01

    Duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB), which is not routinely applied in metabolic surgery, is an effective surgical procedure in terms of type 2 diabetes mellitus resolution. However, the underlying mechanisms are still undefined. Our aim was to investigate the diabetic improvement by DJB and to explore the changes in hepatic insulin signaling proteins and regulatory enzymes of gluconeogenesis after DJB in a non-obese diabetic rat model. Sixteen adult male Goto-Kakizaki rats were randomly divided into DJB and sham-operated groups. The body weight, food intake, hormone levels, and glucose metabolism were measured. The levels of protein expression and phosphorylation of insulin receptor-beta (IR-β) and insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS-2) were evaluated in the liver. We also detected the expression of key regulatory enzymes of gluconeogenesis [phosphoenoylpyruvate carboxykinase-1 (PCK1), glucose-6-phosphatase-alpha (G6Pase-α)] in small intestine and liver. DJB induced significant diabetic improvement with higher postprandial glucagons-like peptide 1, peptide YY, and insulin levels, but without weight loss. The DJB group exhibited increased expression and phosphorylation of IR-β and IRS-2 in liver, up-regulated the expression of PCK1 and G6Pase-α in small intestine, and down-regulated the expression of these enzymes in liver. DJB is effective in up-regulating the expression of the key proteins in the hepatic insulin signaling pathway and the key regulatory enzymes of intestinal gluconeogenesis and down-regulating the expression of the key regulatory enzymes of hepatic gluconeogenesis without weight loss. Our study helps to reveal the potential role of hepatic insulin signaling pathway and intestinal gluconeogenesis in ameliorating insulin resistance after metabolic surgery.

  13. Structure and dimerization of the catalytic domain of the protein phosphatase Cdc14p, a key regulator of mitotic exit in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Kobayashi, Junya; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2017-10-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the protein phosphatase Cdc14p orchestrates various events essential for mitotic exit. We have determined the X-ray crystal structures at 1.85 Å resolution of the catalytic domain of Cdc14p in both the apo state, and as a complex with S160-phosphorylated Swi6p peptide. Each asymmetric unit contains two Cdc14p chains arranged in an intimately associated homodimer, consistent with its oligomeric state in solution. The dimerization interface is located on the backside of the substrate-binding cleft. Structure-based mutational analyses indicate that the dimerization of Cdc14p is required for normal growth of yeast cells. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  14. Comparative Proteomic Analysis Provides insight into the Key Proteins as Possible Targets Involved in Aspirin Inhibiting Biofilm Formation of Staphylococcus xylosus

    Chang-Geng Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus xylosus is an opportunistic pathogen that causes infection in humans and cow mastitis. And S. xylosus possesses a strong ability to form biofilms in vitro. As biofilm formation facilitates resistance to antimicrobial agents, the discovery of new medicinal properties for classic drugs is highly desired. Aspirin, which is the most common active component of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compounds, affects the biofilm-forming capacity of various bacterial species. We have found that aspirin effectively inhibits biofilm formation of S. xylosus by Crystal violet (CV staining and scanning electron microscopy analyses. The present study sought to elucidate possible targets of aspirin in suppressing S. xylosus biofilm formation. Based on an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ fold-change of >1.2 or <0.8 (P-value < 0.05, 178 differentially expressed proteins, 111 down-regulated and 67 up-regulated, were identified after application of aspirin to cells at a 1/2 minimal inhibitory concentration. Gene ontology analysis indicated enrichment in metabolic processes for the majority of the differentially expressed proteins. We then used the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway database to analyze a large number of differentially expressed proteins and identified genes involved in biosynthesis of amino acids pathway, carbon metabolism (pentose phosphate and glycolytic pathways, tricarboxylic acid cycle and nitrogen metabolism (histidine metabolism. These novel proteins represent candidate targets in aspirin-mediated inhibition of S. xylosus biofilm formation at sub-MIC levels. The findings lay the foundation for further studies to identify potential aspirin targets.

  15. Identification and modulation of the key amino acid residue responsible for the pH sensitivity of neoculin, a taste-modifying protein.

    Ken-ichiro Nakajima

    Full Text Available Neoculin occurring in the tropical fruit of Curculigo latifolia is currently the only protein that possesses both a sweet taste and a taste-modifying activity of converting sourness into sweetness. Structurally, this protein is a heterodimer consisting of a neoculin acidic subunit (NAS and a neoculin basic subunit (NBS. Recently, we found that a neoculin variant in which all five histidine residues are replaced with alanine elicits intense sweetness at both neutral and acidic pH but has no taste-modifying activity. To identify the critical histidine residue(s responsible for this activity, we produced a series of His-to-Ala neoculin variants and evaluated their sweetness levels using cell-based calcium imaging and a human sensory test. Our results suggest that NBS His11 functions as a primary pH sensor for neoculin to elicit taste modification. Neoculin variants with substitutions other than His-to-Ala were further analyzed to clarify the role of the NBS position 11 in the taste-modifying activity. We found that the aromatic character of the amino acid side chain is necessary to elicit the pH-dependent sweetness. Interestingly, since the His-to-Tyr variant is a novel taste-modifying protein with alternative pH sensitivity, the position 11 in NBS can be critical to modulate the pH-dependent activity of neoculin. These findings are important for understanding the pH-sensitive functional changes in proteinaceous ligands in general and the interaction of taste receptor-taste substance in particular.

  16. Intestinal cell kinase, a protein associated with endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome, is a key regulator of cilia length and Hedgehog signaling.

    Moon, Heejung; Song, Jieun; Shin, Jeong-Oh; Lee, Hankyu; Kim, Hong-Kyung; Eggenschwiller, Jonathan T; Bok, Jinwoong; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2014-06-10

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome is a recessive genetic disorder associated with multiple congenital defects in endocrine, cerebral, and skeletal systems that is caused by a missense mutation in the mitogen-activated protein kinase-like intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene. In algae and invertebrates, ICK homologs are involved in flagellar formation and ciliogenesis, respectively. However, it is not clear whether this role of ICK is conserved in mammals and how a lack of functional ICK results in the characteristic phenotypes of human ECO syndrome. Here, we generated Ick knockout mice to elucidate the precise role of ICK in mammalian development and to examine the pathological mechanisms of ECO syndrome. Ick null mouse embryos displayed cleft palate, hydrocephalus, polydactyly, and delayed skeletal development, closely resembling ECO syndrome phenotypes. In cultured cells, down-regulation of Ick or overexpression of kinase-dead or ECO syndrome mutant ICK resulted in an elongation of primary cilia and abnormal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Wild-type ICK proteins were generally localized in the proximal region of cilia near the basal bodies, whereas kinase-dead ICK mutant proteins accumulated in the distal part of bulged ciliary tips. Consistent with these observations in cultured cells, Ick knockout mouse embryos displayed elongated cilia and reduced Shh signaling during limb digit patterning. Taken together, these results indicate that ICK plays a crucial role in controlling ciliary length and that ciliary defects caused by a lack of functional ICK leads to abnormal Shh signaling, resulting in congenital disorders such as ECO syndrome.

  17. Prion protein is a key determinant of alcohol sensitivity through the modulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR activity.

    Agnès Petit-Paitel

    Full Text Available The prion protein (PrP is absolutely required for the development of prion diseases; nevertheless, its physiological functions in the central nervous system remain elusive. Using a combination of behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical approaches in transgenic mouse models, we provide strong evidence for a crucial role of PrP in alcohol sensitivity. Indeed, PrP knock out (PrP(-/- mice presented a greater sensitivity to the sedative effects of EtOH compared to wild-type (wt control mice. Conversely, compared to wt mice, those over-expressing mouse, human or hamster PrP genes presented a relative insensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation. An acute tolerance (i.e. reversion to ethanol inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory post-synaptic potentials in hippocampal slices developed slower in PrP(-/- mice than in wt mice. We show that PrP is required to induce acute tolerance to ethanol by activating a Src-protein tyrosine kinase-dependent intracellular signaling pathway. In an attempt to decipher the molecular mechanisms underlying PrP-dependent ethanol effect, we looked for changes in lipid raft features in hippocampus of ethanol-treated wt mice compared to PrP(-/- mice. Ethanol induced rapid and transient changes of buoyancy of lipid raft-associated proteins in hippocampus of wt but not PrP(-/- mice suggesting a possible mechanistic link for PrP-dependent signal transduction. Together, our results reveal a hitherto unknown physiological role of PrP on the regulation of NMDAR activity and highlight its crucial role in synaptic functions.

  18. Integrated cancer therapy combined radiotherapy and immunotherapy. The challenge of using Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF) as a key molecule

    Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Radiation oncologists know the conflict between radiotherapy and immunotherapy, but now challenged trails of the integrative cancer therapies combined radiation therapy and various immunoreaction/immune therapies begin. We therefore review the recent results of basic research and clinical trial of the integrated cancer therapies which combined radiotherapy and various immune therapies/immunoreaction, and the challenged studies of combined use of radiotherapy and our developed cancer immunotherapy using serum GcMAF which is human serum containing Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). (author)

  19. ATP-binding motifs play key roles in Krp1p, kinesin-related protein 1, function for bi-polar growth control in fission yeast

    Rhee, Dong Keun; Cho, Bon A; Kim, Hyong Bai

    2005-01-01

    Kinesin is a microtubule-based motor protein with various functions related to the cell growth and division. It has been reported that Krp1p, kinesin-related protein 1, which belongs to the kinesin heavy chain superfamily, localizes on microtubules and may play an important role in cytokinesis. However, the function of Krp1p has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we overexpressed an intact form and three different mutant forms of Krp1p in fission yeast constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in two ATP-binding motifs or by truncation of the leucine zipper-like motif (LZiP). We observed hyper-extended microtubules and the aberrant nuclear shape in Krp1p-overexpressed fission yeast. As a functional consequence, a point mutation of ATP-binding domain 1 (G89E) in Krp1p reversed the effect of Krp1p overexpression in fission yeast, whereas the specific mutation in ATP-binding domain 2 (G238E) resulted in the altered cell polarity. Additionally, truncation of the leucine zipper-like domain (LZiP) at the C-terminal of Krp1p showed a normal nuclear division. Taken together, we suggest that krp1p is involved in regulation of cell-polarized growth through ATP-binding motifs in fission yeast

  20. A Key Role of Xanthophylls That Are Not Embedded in Proteins in Regulation of the Photosynthetic Antenna Function in Plants, Revealed by Monomolecular Layer Studies.

    Welc, Renata; Luchowski, Rafal; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Puzio, Michal; Sowinski, Karol; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2016-12-29

    The main physiological function of LHCII (light-harvesting pigment-protein complex of photosystem II), the largest photosynthetic antenna complex of plants, is absorption of light quanta and transfer of excitation energy toward the reaction centers, to drive photosynthesis. However, under strong illumination, the photosynthetic apparatus faces the danger of photodegradation and therefore excitations in LHCII have to be down-regulated, e.g., via thermal energy dissipation. One of the elements of the regulatory system, operating in the photosynthetic apparatus under light stress conditions, is a conversion of violaxanthin, the xanthophyll present under low light, to zeaxanthin, accumulated under strong light. In the present study, an effect of violaxanthin and zeaxanthin on the molecular organization and the photophysical properties of LHCII was studied in a monomolecular layer system with application of molecular imaging (atomic force microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy) and spectroscopy (UV-Vis absorption, FTIR, fluorescence spectroscopy) techniques. The results of the experiments show that violaxanthin promotes the formation of supramolecular LHCII structures preventing dissipative excitation quenching while zeaxanthin is involved in the formation of excitonic energy states able to quench chlorophyll excitations in both the higher (B states) and lower (Q states) energy levels. The results point to a strategic role of xanthophylls that are not embedded in a protein environment, in regulation of the photosynthetic light harvesting activity in plants.

  1. Interplay between Structure and Charge as a Key to Allosteric Modulation of Human 20S Proteasome by the Basic Fragment of HIV-1 Tat Protein.

    Przemysław Karpowicz

    Full Text Available The proteasome is a giant protease responsible for degradation of the majority of cytosolic proteins. Competitive inhibitors of the proteasome are used against aggressive blood cancers. However, broadening the use of proteasome-targeting drugs requires new mechanistic approaches to the enzyme's inhibition. In our previous studies we described Tat1 peptide, an allosteric inhibitor of the proteasome derived from a fragment of the basic domain of HIV-Tat1 protein. Here, we attempted to dissect the structural determinants of the proteasome inhibition by Tat1. Single- and multiple- alanine walking scans were performed. Tat1 analogs with stabilized beta-turn conformation at positions 4-5 and 8-9, pointed out by the molecular dynamics modeling and the alanine scan, were synthesized. Structure of Tat1 analogs were analyzed by circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies, supplemented by molecular dynamics simulations. Biological activity tests and structural studies revealed that high flexibility and exposed positive charge are hallmarks of Tat1 peptide. Interestingly, stabilization of a beta-turn at the 8-9 position was necessary to significantly improve the inhibitory potency.

  2. The 5S RNP couples p53 homeostasis to ribosome biogenesis and nucleolar stress.

    Sloan, Katherine E; Bohnsack, Markus T; Watkins, Nicholas J

    2013-10-17

    Several proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors regulate the production of ribosomes. Ribosome biogenesis is a major consumer of cellular energy, and defects result in p53 activation via repression of mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) homolog by the ribosomal proteins RPL5 and RPL11. Here, we report that RPL5 and RPL11 regulate p53 from the context of a ribosomal subcomplex, the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP). We provide evidence that the third component of this complex, the 5S rRNA, is critical for p53 regulation. In addition, we show that the 5S RNP is essential for the activation of p53 by p14(ARF), a protein that is activated by oncogene overexpression. Our data show that the abundance of the 5S RNP, and therefore p53 levels, is determined by factors regulating 5S complex formation and ribosome integration, including the tumor suppressor PICT1. The 5S RNP therefore emerges as the critical coordinator of signaling pathways that couple cell proliferation with ribosome production. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Upregulation of Long Noncoding RNA Small Nucleolar RNA Host Gene 18 Promotes Radioresistance of Glioma by Repressing Semaphorin 5A

    Zheng, Rong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Yao, Qiwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian (China); Ren, Chen; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hongli; Xie, Guozhu; Du, Shasha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Yang, Kaijun [Department of Neurosurgery, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Yuan, Yawei, E-mail: yuanyawei2015@outlook.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital Center of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: Although increasing evidence has shown that long noncoding RNAs play an important regulatory role in carcinogenesis and tumor progression, little is known about the role of small nucleolar RNA host gene 18 (SNHG18) in cancer. The goal of this study was to investigate the expression of SNHG18 and its clinical significance in glioma. Methods and Materials: Differences in the lncRNA expression profile between M059K and M059J cells were assessed by lncRNA expression microarray analysis. The expression and localization of SNHG18 in glioma cells or tissues was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH), respectively. the clinical associations of SNHG18 in glioma was evaluated by qRT-PCR, ISH and immunohistochemistry. The role of SNHG18 in glioma radiosensitivity was evaluated by colony formation assays, immunofluorescence, Western blot and tumor growth inhibition study. Results: The present study investigated the clinical associations of SNHG18 and its role in glioma. Our results showed that the expression of SNHG18 was remarkably upregulated in clinical glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues. SNHG18 expression was associated with the clinical tumor grade and correlated negatively with isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation. In addition, knockdown of SNHG18 with short hairpin RNA suppressed the radioresistance of glioma cells, and transgenic expression of SNHG18 had the opposite effect. Furthermore, xenograft tumors grown from cells with SNHG18 deletion were more radiosensitive than tumors grown from control cells. Further studies revealed that SNHG18 promotes radioresistance by inhibiting semaphorin 5A and that inhibition of semaphorin 5A expression abrogated the radiosensitizing effect caused by SNHG18 deletion. Conclusions: Our findings provide new insights into the role of SNHG18 in glioma and suggest its potential as a target for glioma therapy.

  4. Upregulation of Long Noncoding RNA Small Nucleolar RNA Host Gene 18 Promotes Radioresistance of Glioma by Repressing Semaphorin 5A

    Zheng, Rong; Yao, Qiwei; Ren, Chen; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hongli; Xie, Guozhu; Du, Shasha; Yang, Kaijun; Yuan, Yawei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although increasing evidence has shown that long noncoding RNAs play an important regulatory role in carcinogenesis and tumor progression, little is known about the role of small nucleolar RNA host gene 18 (SNHG18) in cancer. The goal of this study was to investigate the expression of SNHG18 and its clinical significance in glioma. Methods and Materials: Differences in the lncRNA expression profile between M059K and M059J cells were assessed by lncRNA expression microarray analysis. The expression and localization of SNHG18 in glioma cells or tissues was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH), respectively. the clinical associations of SNHG18 in glioma was evaluated by qRT-PCR, ISH and immunohistochemistry. The role of SNHG18 in glioma radiosensitivity was evaluated by colony formation assays, immunofluorescence, Western blot and tumor growth inhibition study. Results: The present study investigated the clinical associations of SNHG18 and its role in glioma. Our results showed that the expression of SNHG18 was remarkably upregulated in clinical glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues. SNHG18 expression was associated with the clinical tumor grade and correlated negatively with isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation. In addition, knockdown of SNHG18 with short hairpin RNA suppressed the radioresistance of glioma cells, and transgenic expression of SNHG18 had the opposite effect. Furthermore, xenograft tumors grown from cells with SNHG18 deletion were more radiosensitive than tumors grown from control cells. Further studies revealed that SNHG18 promotes radioresistance by inhibiting semaphorin 5A and that inhibition of semaphorin 5A expression abrogated the radiosensitizing effect caused by SNHG18 deletion. Conclusions: Our findings provide new insights into the role of SNHG18 in glioma and suggest its potential as a target for glioma therapy.

  5. Oligomer formation and G-quadruplex binding by purified murine Rif1 protein, a key organizer of higher-order chromatin architecture.

    Moriyama, Kenji; Yoshizawa-Sugata, Naoko; Masai, Hisao

    2018-03-09

    Rap1-interacting protein 1 (Rif1) regulates telomere length in budding yeast. We previously reported that, in metazoans and fission yeast, Rif1 also plays pivotal roles in controlling genome-wide DNA replication timing. We proposed that Rif1 may assemble chromatin compartments that contain specific replication-timing domains by promoting chromatin loop formation. Rif1 also is involved in DNA lesion repair, restart after replication fork collapse, anti-apoptosis activities, replicative senescence, and transcriptional regulation. Although multiple physiological functions of Rif1 have been characterized, biochemical and structural information on mammalian Rif1 is limited, mainly because of difficulties in purifying the full-length protein. Here, we expressed and purified the 2418-amino-acid-long, full-length murine Rif1 as well as its partially truncated variants in human 293T cells. Hydrodynamic analyses indicated that Rif1 forms elongated or extended homo-oligomers in solution, consistent with the presence of a HEAT-type helical repeat segment known to adopt an elongated shape. We also observed that the purified murine Rif1 bound G-quadruplex (G4) DNA with high specificity and affinity, as was previously shown for Rif1 from fission yeast. Both the N-terminal (HEAT-repeat) and C-terminal segments were involved in oligomer formation and specifically bound G4 DNA, and the central intrinsically disordered polypeptide segment increased the affinity for G4. Of note, pulldown assays revealed that Rif1 simultaneously binds multiple G4 molecules. Our findings support a model in which Rif1 modulates chromatin loop structures through binding to multiple G4 assemblies and by holding chromatin fibers together. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Molecular basis of cannabinoid CB1 receptor coupling to the G protein heterotrimer Gαiβγ: identification of key CB1 contacts with the C-terminal helix α5 of Gαi.

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Ahn, Kwang H; Kendall, Debra A

    2013-11-08

    The cannabinoid (CB1) receptor is a member of the rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. The human CB1 receptor, which is among the most expressed receptors in the brain, has been implicated in several disease states, including drug addiction, anxiety, depression, obesity, and chronic pain. Different classes of CB1 agonists evoke signaling pathways through the activation of specific subtypes of G proteins. The molecular basis of CB1 receptor coupling to its cognate G protein is unknown. As a first step toward understanding CB1 receptor-mediated G protein signaling, we have constructed a ternary complex structural model of the CB1 receptor and Gi heterotrimer (CB1-Gi), guided by the x-ray structure of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) in complex with Gs (β2AR-Gs), through 824-ns duration molecular dynamics simulations in a fully hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer environment. We identified a group of residues at the juxtamembrane regions of the intracellular loops 2 and 3 (IC2 and IC3) of the CB1 receptor, including Ile-218(3.54), Tyr-224(IC2), Asp-338(6.30), Arg-340(6.32), Leu-341(6.33), and Thr-344(6.36), as potential key contacts with the extreme C-terminal helix α5 of Gαi. Ala mutations of these residues at the receptor-Gi interface resulted in little G protein coupling activity, consistent with the present model of the CB1-Gi complex, which suggests tight interactions between CB1 and the extreme C-terminal helix α5 of Gαi. The model also suggests that unique conformational changes in the extreme C-terminal helix α5 of Gα play a crucial role in the receptor-mediated G protein activation.

  7. Toxic elements and associations with hematology, plasma biochemistry, and protein electrophoresis in nesting loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) from Casey Key, Florida.

    Perrault, Justin R; Stacy, Nicole I; Lehner, Andreas F; Poor, Savannah K; Buchweitz, John P; Walsh, Catherine J

    2017-12-01

    Toxic elements (arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, selenium, thallium) are a group of contaminants that are known to elicit developmental, reproductive, general health, and immune system effects in reptiles, even at low concentrations. Reptiles, including marine turtles, are susceptible to accumulation of toxic elements due to their long life span, low metabolic rate, and highly efficient conversion of prey into biomass. The objectives of this study were to (1) document concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, selenium, and thallium in whole blood and keratin from nesting loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) from Casey Key, Florida and document correlations thereof and (2) correlate whole blood toxic element concentrations to various hematological and plasma biochemistry analytes. Baselines for various hematological and plasma analytes and toxic elements in whole blood and keratin (i.e., scute) in nesting loggerheads are documented. Various correlations between the toxic elements and hematological and plasma biochemistry analytes were identified; however, the most intriguing were negative correlations between arsenic, cadmium, lead, and selenium with and α- and γ-globulins. Although various extrinsic and intrinsic variables such as dietary and feeding changes in nesting loggerheads need to be considered, this finding may suggest a link to altered humoral immunity. This study documents a suite of health variables of nesting loggerheads in correlation to contaminants and identifies the potential of toxic elements to impact the overall health of nesting turtles, thus presenting important implications for the conservation and management of this species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The communication of endogenous biomolecules (RNA, DNA, protein, hormone) via graft union might play key roles in the new traits formation of graft hybrids

    Khan, I.A.; Ghazal, L.; Arsalan, M.H.; Siddiqui, M.F.

    2018-01-01

    Plant graft hybridization is a fact of a sexual hybridization in which heritable changes trigger by grafting, it can produce hereditable variation types desired by breeders and can be used as a new method for germplasm innovation. This paper aimed to discuss new phenotypic variations such as phenotypic diversity and polyploidy formation discovered in recent years, new evidence supporting genetic material exchange between the rootstock and scion, and the timeliness, direction, and genetic stability of trait formation induced by graft hybridization. The unresolved mechanisms of trait variation were also discussed, and the relationship with exchange of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) genetic information, horizontal gene transfer events of chloroplast and mitochondria, miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation, and pressure-driven trait variations from graft hybridization were performed to clarify the relevant questions. Finally, the future research trend and key questions of graft hybridization were identified. Three clear conclusions for graft hybridization are presented: the new traits of graft hybrids have stable genetic characteristics and can be controlled via selection different genetic plant by grafting, and the products of graft hybrids were safer than those of transgenic plants. (author)

  9. Physical activity in the prevention and treatment of diseases of affluence – the key role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK

    Ewa Grochowska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries, we can observe an increasing number of people with obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension and arteriosclerosis. The main reason for this phenomenon is the abnormal energy balance due to sedentary lifestyles. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in many countries around the world, nowadays. In this paper, the impact of physical activity on the effectiveness of treatment and prevention of metabolic diseases and cancer is considered. Exercise is one of the factors activating 5’AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. This enzyme is crucial in maintaining the energy balance of the cell and the entire organism, and its activation results in excluding the anabolic and switching on the catabolic processes. It is believed that the activation of AMPK is responsible for most of the positive effects resulting from physical exercise. Although there are pharmacological methods of activation of this enzyme, they seem to be not as effective as physical exercise. Therefore, physical activity should be the most important form of prevention and treatment of metabolic diseases.

  10. Immune escape mutants of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 selected using polyclonal sera: identification of key amino acids in the HA protein.

    Ioannis Sitaras

    Full Text Available Evolution of Avian Influenza (AI viruses--especially of the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI H5N1 subtype--is a major issue for the poultry industry. HPAI H5N1 epidemics are associated with huge economic losses and are sometimes connected to human morbidity and mortality. Vaccination (either as a preventive measure or as a means to control outbreaks is an approach that splits the scientific community, due to the risk of it being a potential driving force in HPAI evolution through the selection of mutants able to escape vaccination-induced immunity. It is therefore essential to study how mutations are selected due to immune pressure. To this effect, we performed an in vitro selection of mutants from HPAI A/turkey/Turkey/1/05 (H5N1, using immune pressure from homologous polyclonal sera. After 42 rounds of selection, we identified 5 amino acid substitutions in the Haemagglutinin (HA protein, most of which were located in areas of antigenic importance and suspected to be prone to selection pressure. We report that most of the mutations took place early in the selection process. Finally, our antigenic cartography studies showed that the antigenic distance between the selected isolates and their parent strain increased with passage number.

  11. KeyPathwayMinerWeb

    List, Markus; Alcaraz, Nicolas; Dissing-Hansen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    , for instance), KeyPathwayMiner extracts connected sub-networks containing a high number of active or differentially regulated genes (proteins, metabolites) in the molecular profiles. The web interface at (http://keypathwayminer.compbio.sdu.dk) implements all core functionalities of the KeyPathwayMiner tool set......We present KeyPathwayMinerWeb, the first online platform for de novo pathway enrichment analysis directly in the browser. Given a biological interaction network (e.g. protein-protein interactions) and a series of molecular profiles derived from one or multiple OMICS studies (gene expression...... such as data integration, input of background knowledge, batch runs for parameter optimization and visualization of extracted pathways. In addition to an intuitive web interface, we also implemented a RESTful API that now enables other online developers to integrate network enrichment as a web service...

  12. Key Markers of mTORC1-Dependent and mTORC1-Independent Signaling Pathways Regulating Protein Synthesis in Rat Soleus Muscle During Early Stages of Hindlimb Unloading.

    Mirzoev, Timur; Tyganov, Sergey; Vilchinskaya, Natalia; Lomonosova, Yulia; Shenkman, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the amount of rRNA and phosphorylation status of the key markers of mTORC1-dependent (70s6k, 4E-BP1) and mTORC1-independent (GSK-3β, AMPK) signaling pathways controlling protein synthesis in rat soleus during early stages of mechanical unloading (hindlimb suspension (HS) for 1-, 3- and 7 days). The content of the key signaling molecules of various anabolic signaling pathways was determined by Western-blotting. The amount of 28S rRNA was evaluated by RT-PCR. The rate of protein synthesis was assessed using in-vivo SUnSET technique. HS for 3 and 7 days induced a significant (pprotein synthesis in soleus muscle in comparison with control. HS within 24 hours resulted in a significant (pprotein synthesis in rat soleus during early stages of simulated microgravity is associated with impaired ribosome biogenesis as well as reduced activity of mTORC1-independent signaling pathways. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Computer-aided design of multi-target ligands at A1R, A2AR and PDE10A, key proteins in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Kalash, Leen; Val, Cristina; Azuaje, Jhonny; Loza, María I; Svensson, Fredrik; Zoufir, Azedine; Mervin, Lewis; Ladds, Graham; Brea, José; Glen, Robert; Sotelo, Eddy; Bender, Andreas

    2017-12-30

    Compounds designed to display polypharmacology may have utility in treating complex diseases, where activity at multiple targets is required to produce a clinical effect. In particular, suitable compounds may be useful in treating neurodegenerative diseases by promoting neuronal survival in a synergistic manner via their multi-target activity at the adenosine A 1 and A 2A receptors (A 1 R and A 2A R) and phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A), which modulate intracellular cAMP levels. Hence, in this work we describe a computational method for the design of synthetically feasible ligands that bind to A 1 and A 2A receptors and inhibit phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A), involving a retrosynthetic approach employing in silico target prediction and docking, which may be generally applicable to multi-target compound design at several target classes. This approach has identified 2-aminopyridine-3-carbonitriles as the first multi-target ligands at A 1 R, A 2A R and PDE10A, by showing agreement between the ligand and structure based predictions at these targets. The series were synthesized via an efficient one-pot scheme and validated pharmacologically as A 1 R/A 2A R-PDE10A ligands, with IC 50 values of 2.4-10.0 μM at PDE10A and K i values of 34-294 nM at A 1 R and/or A 2A R. Furthermore, selectivity profiling of the synthesized 2-amino-pyridin-3-carbonitriles against other subtypes of both protein families showed that the multi-target ligand 8 exhibited a minimum of twofold selectivity over all tested off-targets. In addition, both compounds 8 and 16 exhibited the desired multi-target profile, which could be considered for further functional efficacy assessment, analog modification for the improvement of selectivity towards A 1 R, A 2A R and PDE10A collectively, and evaluation of their potential synergy in modulating cAMP levels.

  14. Identification and characterization of a novel non-structural protein of bluetongue virus.

    Maxime Ratinier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bluetongue virus (BTV is the causative agent of a major disease of livestock (bluetongue. For over two decades, it has been widely accepted that the 10 segments of the dsRNA genome of BTV encode for 7 structural and 3 non-structural proteins. The non-structural proteins (NS1, NS2, NS3/NS3a play different key roles during the viral replication cycle. In this study we show that BTV expresses a fourth non-structural protein (that we designated NS4 encoded by an open reading frame in segment 9 overlapping the open reading frame encoding VP6. NS4 is 77-79 amino acid residues in length and highly conserved among several BTV serotypes/strains. NS4 was expressed early post-infection and localized in the nucleoli of BTV infected cells. By reverse genetics, we showed that NS4 is dispensable for BTV replication in vitro, both in mammalian and insect cells, and does not affect viral virulence in murine models of bluetongue infection. Interestingly, NS4 conferred a replication advantage to BTV-8, but not to BTV-1, in cells in an interferon (IFN-induced antiviral state. However, the BTV-1 NS4 conferred a replication advantage both to a BTV-8 reassortant containing the entire segment 9 of BTV-1 and to a BTV-8 mutant with the NS4 identical to the homologous BTV-1 protein. Collectively, this study suggests that NS4 plays an important role in virus-host interaction and is one of the mechanisms played, at least by BTV-8, to counteract the antiviral response of the host. In addition, the distinct nucleolar localization of NS4, being expressed by a virus that replicates exclusively in the cytoplasm, offers new avenues to investigate the multiple roles played by the nucleolus in the biology of the cell.

  15. Kinetics of the association of dengue virus capsid protein with the granular component of nucleolus.

    Tiwary, Ashish Kumar; Cecilia, D

    2017-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) replicates in the cytoplasm but translocation of the capsid protein (C) to the nucleoli of infected cells has been shown to facilitate virus multiplication for DENV-2. This study demonstrates that the nucleolar localization of C occurs with all four serotypes of DENV. The interaction of C with the nucleolus was found to be dynamic with a mobile fraction of 66% by FRAP. That the C shuttled between the nucleus and cytoplasm was suggested by FLIP and translation inhibition experiments. Colocalization with B23 indicated that DENV C targeted the granular component (GC) of the nucleolus. Presence of DENV C in the nucleolus affected the recovery kinetics of B23 in infected and transfected cells. Sub-nucleolar localization of DENV C of all serotypes to the GC, its mobility in and out of the nucleolus and its affect on the dynamics of B23 is being shown for the first time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel family of katanin-like 2 protein isoforms (KATNAL2), interacting with nucleotide-binding proteins Nubp1 and Nubp2, are key regulators of different MT-based processes in mammalian cells.

    Ververis, Antonis; Christodoulou, Andri; Christoforou, Maria; Kamilari, Christina; Lederer, Carsten W; Santama, Niovi

    2016-01-01

    Katanins are microtubule (MT)-severing AAA proteins with high phylogenetic conservation throughout the eukaryotes. They have been functionally implicated in processes requiring MT remodeling, such as spindle assembly in mitosis and meiosis, assembly/disassembly of flagella and cilia and neuronal morphogenesis. Here, we uncover a novel family of katanin-like 2 proteins (KATNAL2) in mouse, consisting of five alternatively spliced isoforms encoded by the Katnal2 genomic locus. We further demonstrate that in vivo these isoforms are able to interact with themselves, with each other and moreover directly and independently with MRP/MinD-type P-loop NTPases Nubp1 and Nubp2, which are integral components of centrioles, negative regulators of ciliogenesis and implicated in centriole duplication in mammalian cells. We find KATNAL2 localized on interphase MTs, centrioles, mitotic spindle, midbody and the axoneme and basal body of sensory cilia in cultured murine cells. shRNAi of Katnal2 results in inefficient cytokinesis and severe phenotypes of enlarged cells and nuclei, increased numbers of centrioles and the manifestation of aberrant multipolar mitotic spindles, mitotic defects, chromosome bridges, multinuclearity, increased MT acetylation and an altered cell cycle pattern. Silencing or stable overexpression of KATNAL2 isoforms drastically reduces ciliogenesis. In conclusion, KATNAL2s are multitasking enzymes involved in the same cell type in critically important processes affecting cytokinesis, MT dynamics, and ciliogenesis and are also implicated in cell cycle progression.

  17. Increased insulin sensitivity and changes in the expression profile of key insulin regulatory genes and beta cell transcription factors in diabetic KKAy-mice after feeding with a soy bean protein rich diet high in isoflavone content.

    Nordentoft, I; Jeppesen, P B; Hong, J; Abudula, R; Hermansen, K

    2008-06-25

    High content isoflavone soy protein (SBP) (Abalon) has been found in animal studies to possess beneficial effects on a number of the characteristic features of the insulin resistance syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate whether SBP exerts beneficial effects on metabolism in the diabetic KKAy-mouse. Furthermore, we investigated the long-term in vivo effect of SBP on the expression profile in islets of key insulin regulatory genes. Twenty KKAy-mice, aged 5 weeks, were divided into 2 groups and treated for 9 weeks with either (A) standard chow diet (control) or (B) chow + 50% SBP. Twenty normal C57BL-mice fed with standard chow diet served as nondiabetic controls (C). Blood samples were collected and analyzed before and after intervention. Gene expression was determined in islets by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Affymetrix microarray. It was demonstrated that long-term treatment with SBP improves glucose homeostasis, increases insulin sensitivity, and lowers plasma triglycerides in diabetic KKAy-mice. SBP reduces fasting plasma glucose, insulin, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Furthermore, SBP markedly changes the gene expression profile of key insulin regulatory genes GLUT2, GLUT3, Ins1, Ins2, IGF1, Beta2/Neurod1, cholecystokinin, and LDLr, and proliferative genes in islets isolated from KKAy-mice. After 9 weeks of treatment with SBP, plasma glucose and insulin homeostasis was normalized compared to start levels. The results indicate that SBP improves glucose and insulin sensitivity and up-regulates the expression of key insulin regulatory genes.

  18. Characterisation of the nucleolar organising regions during the cell cycle in two varieties of Petunia hybrida as visualised by fluorescence in situ hybridisation and silver staining.

    Montijn, M B; ten Hoopen, R; Fransz, P F; Oud, J L; Nanninga, N

    1998-05-01

    The cell cycle-dependent spatial position, morphology and activity of the four nucleolar organising regions (NORs) of the Petunia hybrida cultivar Mitchell and the inbred line V26 have been analysed. Application of the silver staining technique and fluorescence in situ hybridisation on fixed root-tip material revealed that these interspecific hybrids possess four NORs of which only those of chromosome 2 are active during interphase, which implies that the NOR activity is not of parental origin. However, at the end of mitosis, activity of all NOR regions could be detected, suggesting that the high demand for ribosomes at this stage of the cell cycle requires temporal activity of all NORs. Using actin DNA probes as markers in fluorescence in situ hybridisation experiments enabled the identification of the individual petunia chromosomes.

  19. Various Bee Pheromones Binding Affinity, Exclusive Chemosensillar Localization, and Key Amino Acid Sites Reveal the Distinctive Characteristics of Odorant-Binding Protein 11 in the Eastern Honey Bee, Apis cerana.

    Song, Xin-Mi; Zhang, Lin-Ya; Fu, Xiao-Bin; Wu, Fan; Tan, Jing; Li, Hong-Liang

    2018-01-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are the critical elements responsible for binding and transporting odors and pheromones in the sensitive olfactory system in insects. Honey bees are representative social insects that have complex odorants and pheromone communication systems relative to solitary insects. Here, we first cloned and characterized OBP11 ( AcerOBP11 ), from the worker bees antennae of Eastern honey bee, Apis cerana . Based on sequence and phylogenetic analysis, most sequences homologous to AcerOBP11 belong to the typical OBPs family. The transcriptional expression profiles showed that AcerOBP11 was expressed throughout the developmental stages and highly specifically expressed in adult antennae. Using immunofluorescence localization, AcerOBP11 in worker bee's antennae was only localized in the sensilla basiconica (SB) near the fringe of each segment. Fluorescence ligand-binding assay showed that AcerOBP11 protein had strong binding affinity with the tested various bee pheromones components, including the main queen mandibular pheromones (QMPs), methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (HOB), and ( E )-9-oxo-2-decanoic acid (9-ODA), alarm pheromone (n-hexanol), and worker pheromone components. AcerOBP11 also had strong binding affinity to plant volatiles, such as 4-Allylveratrole. Based on the docking and site-directed mutagenesis, two key amino acid residues (Ile97 and Ile140) were involved in the binding of AcerOBP11 to various bee pheromones. Taken together, we identified that AcerOBP11 was localized in a single type of antennal chemosensilla and had complex ligand-binding properties, which confer the dual-role with the primary characteristics of sensing various bee pheromones and secondary characteristics of sensing general odorants. This study not only prompts the theoretical basis of OBPs-mediated bee pheromones recognition of honey bee, but also extends the understanding of differences in pheromone communication between social and solitary insects.

  20. Various Bee Pheromones Binding Affinity, Exclusive Chemosensillar Localization, and Key Amino Acid Sites Reveal the Distinctive Characteristics of Odorant-Binding Protein 11 in the Eastern Honey Bee, Apis cerana

    Xin-Mi Song

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs are the critical elements responsible for binding and transporting odors and pheromones in the sensitive olfactory system in insects. Honey bees are representative social insects that have complex odorants and pheromone communication systems relative to solitary insects. Here, we first cloned and characterized OBP11 (AcerOBP11, from the worker bees antennae of Eastern honey bee, Apis cerana. Based on sequence and phylogenetic analysis, most sequences homologous to AcerOBP11 belong to the typical OBPs family. The transcriptional expression profiles showed that AcerOBP11 was expressed throughout the developmental stages and highly specifically expressed in adult antennae. Using immunofluorescence localization, AcerOBP11 in worker bee's antennae was only localized in the sensilla basiconica (SB near the fringe of each segment. Fluorescence ligand-binding assay showed that AcerOBP11 protein had strong binding affinity with the tested various bee pheromones components, including the main queen mandibular pheromones (QMPs, methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (HOB, and (E-9-oxo-2-decanoic acid (9-ODA, alarm pheromone (n-hexanol, and worker pheromone components. AcerOBP11 also had strong binding affinity to plant volatiles, such as 4-Allylveratrole. Based on the docking and site-directed mutagenesis, two key amino acid residues (Ile97 and Ile140 were involved in the binding of AcerOBP11 to various bee pheromones. Taken together, we identified that AcerOBP11 was localized in a single type of antennal chemosensilla and had complex ligand-binding properties, which confer the dual-role with the primary characteristics of sensing various bee pheromones and secondary characteristics of sensing general odorants. This study not only prompts the theoretical basis of OBPs-mediated bee pheromones recognition of honey bee, but also extends the understanding of differences in pheromone communication between social and solitary insects.

  1. Quantum key management

    Hughes, Richard John; Thrasher, James Thomas; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth

    2016-11-29

    Innovations for quantum key management harness quantum communications to form a cryptography system within a public key infrastructure framework. In example implementations, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a Merkle signature scheme (using Winternitz one-time digital signatures or other one-time digital signatures, and Merkle hash trees) to constitute a cryptography system. More generally, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a hash-based signature scheme. This provides a secure way to identify, authenticate, verify, and exchange secret cryptographic keys. Features of the quantum key management innovations further include secure enrollment of users with a registration authority, as well as credential checking and revocation with a certificate authority, where the registration authority and/or certificate authority can be part of the same system as a trusted authority for quantum key distribution.

  2. Group key management

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  3. Modular Connector Keying Concept

    Ishman, Scott; Dukes, Scott; Warnica, Gary; Conrad, Guy; Senigla, Steven

    2013-01-01

    For panel-mount-type connectors, keying is usually "built-in" to the connector body, necessitating different part numbers for each key arrangement. This is costly for jobs that require small quantities. This invention was driven to provide a cost savings and to reduce documentation of individual parts. The keys are removable and configurable in up to 16 combinations. Since the key parts are separate from the connector body, a common design can be used for the plug, receptacle, and key parts. The keying can then be set at the next higher assembly.

  4. Biometry, the safe key

    María Fraile-Hurtado

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Biometry is the next step in authentication, why do not we take this stepforward in our communication security systems? Keys are the main disadvantage in the cryptography, what if we were our own key?

  5. Financial Key Ratios

    Tănase Alin-Eliodor

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on computing techniques starting from trial balance data regarding financial key ratios. There are presented activity, liquidity, solvency and profitability financial key ratios. It is presented a computing methodology in three steps based on a trial balance.

  6. Public Key Cryptography.

    Tapson, Frank

    1996-01-01

    Describes public key cryptography, also known as RSA, which is a system using two keys, one used to put a message into cipher and another used to decipher the message. Presents examples using small prime numbers. (MKR)

  7. Key Management Laboratory

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides a secure environment to research and develop advanced electronic key management and networked key distribution technologies for the Navy and DoD....

  8. Public Key Infrastructure Study

    Berkovits, Shimshon

    1994-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has tasked The MITRE Corporation to study the alternatives for automated management of public keys and of the associated public key certificates for the Federal Government...

  9. RNA and Proteins: Mutual Respect [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Kathleen B. Hall

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA are often found in ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs, where they function in cellular processes to synthesize proteins (the ribosome, chemically modify RNAs (small nucleolar RNPs, splice pre-mRNAs (the spliceosome, and, on a larger scale, sequester RNAs, degrade them, or process them (P bodies, Cajal bodies, and nucleoli. Each RNA–protein interaction is a story in itself, as both molecules can change conformation, compete for binding sites, and regulate cellular functions. Recent studies of Xist long non-coding RNP, the U4/5/6 tri-small nuclear RNP complex, and an activated state of a spliceosome reveal new features of RNA interactions with proteins, and, although their stories are incomplete, they are already fascinating.

  10. The Key Lake project

    1991-01-01

    Key Lake is located in the Athabasca sand stone basin, 640 kilometers north of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The three sources of ore at Key Lake contain 70 100 tonnes of uranium. Features of the Key Lake Project were described under the key headings: work force, mining, mill process, tailings storage, permanent camp, environmental features, worker health and safety, and economic benefits. Appendices covering the historical background, construction projects, comparisons of western world mines, mining statistics, Northern Saskatchewan surface lease, and Key Lake development and regulatory agencies were included

  11. Identification of a nuclear localization signal in the retinitis pigmentosa-mutated RP26 protein, ceramide kinase-like protein

    Inagaki, Yuichi; Mitsutake, Susumu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by degeneration of the retina. A mutation in a new ceramide kinase (CERK) homologous gene, named CERK-like protein (CERKL), was found to cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP26). Here, we show a point mutation of one of two putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences inhibited the nuclear localization of the protein. Furthermore, the tetra-GFP-tagged NLS, which cannot passively enter the nucleus, was observed not only in the nucleus but also in the nucleolus. Our results provide First evidence of the active nuclear import of CERKL and suggest that the identified NLS might be responsible for nucleolar retention of the protein. As recent studies have shown other RP-related proteins are localized in the nucleus or the nucleolus, our identification of NLS in CERKL suggests that CERKL likely plays important roles for retinal functions in the nucleus and the nucleolus

  12. LOCKS AND KEYS SERVICE

    Locks and Keys Service

    2002-01-01

    The Locks and Keys service (ST/FM) will move from building 55 to building 570 from the 2nd August to the 9th August 2002 included. During this period the service will be closed. Only in case of extreme urgency please call the 164550. Starting from Monday, 12th August, the Locks and Keys Service will continue to follow the activities related to office keys (keys and locks) and will provide the keys for furniture. The service is open from 8h30 to 12h00 and from 13h00 to 17h30. We remind you that your divisional correspondents can help you in the execution of the procedures. We thank you for your comprehension and we remain at your service to help you in solving all the matters related to keys for offices and furniture. Locks and Keys Service - ST Division - FM Group

  13. Nucleophosmin integrates within the nucleolus via multi-modal interactions with proteins displaying R-rich linear motifs and rRNA.

    Mitrea, Diana M; Cika, Jaclyn A; Guy, Clifford S; Ban, David; Banerjee, Priya R; Stanley, Christopher B; Nourse, Amanda; Deniz, Ashok A; Kriwacki, Richard W

    2016-02-02

    The nucleolus is a membrane-less organelle formed through liquid-liquid phase separation of its components from the surrounding nucleoplasm. Here, we show that nucleophosmin (NPM1) integrates within the nucleolus via a multi-modal mechanism involving multivalent interactions with proteins containing arginine-rich linear motifs (R-motifs) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Importantly, these R-motifs are found in canonical nucleolar localization signals. Based on a novel combination of biophysical approaches, we propose a model for the molecular organization within liquid-like droplets formed by the N-terminal domain of NPM1 and R-motif peptides, thus providing insights into the structural organization of the nucleolus. We identify multivalency of acidic tracts and folded nucleic acid binding domains, mediated by N-terminal domain oligomerization, as structural features required for phase separation of NPM1 with other nucleolar components in vitro and for localization within mammalian nucleoli. We propose that one mechanism of nucleolar localization involves phase separation of proteins within the nucleolus.

  14. Quantum dense key distribution

    Degiovanni, I.P.; Ruo Berchera, I.; Castelletto, S.; Rastello, M.L.; Bovino, F.A.; Colla, A.M.; Castagnoli, G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a protocol for quantum dense key distribution. This protocol embeds the benefits of a quantum dense coding and a quantum key distribution and is able to generate shared secret keys four times more efficiently than the Bennet-Brassard 1984 protocol. We hereinafter prove the security of this scheme against individual eavesdropping attacks, and we present preliminary experimental results, showing its feasibility

  15. Nucleolar organizer (NO) size as a measure of instantaneous growth in Chironomus riparius larvae (Diptera: Chironomidae) : a tool for monitoring individual and population responses to stress

    Martin, J.P.; Ciborowski, J.J.; Wytrykush, C. [Windsor Univ., Windsor, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation reported on 2 laboratory experiments that were conducted using Chironomus riparius larvae to relate nucleolar growth (NO) size to chironomid growth. In one experiment, 5 treatments varied in diet quality only, which was manipulated by providing midge larvae with 1.0 mg of food per individual per day, but varying the ratio of Tetramin to non-nutritious methyl-cellulose. A second experiment followed a 2 x 2 factorial design. The factors were growth period and diet quality. Diet quality and growth period were found to influence the individual biomass considerably. NO size was related to the quality of the diet provided at the end of the experiment, regardless of larval biomass. Therefore, NO size appears to be related to growth rate at time of collection rather than larval size. The authors proposed using NO size of larvae in natural populations as a measure of growth on which to base estimates of secondary production and as a new way to monitor individual and population responses to environmental stress. Preliminary field measurements of larval production and NO size from oil sands-affected and reference wetlands were found to be consistent with laboratory results.

  16. Nucleolar organizer (NO) size as a measure of instantaneous growth in Chironomus riparius larvae (Diptera: Chironomidae) : a tool for monitoring individual and population responses to stress

    Martin, J.P.; Ciborowski, J.J.; Wytrykush, C.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation reported on 2 laboratory experiments that were conducted using Chironomus riparius larvae to relate nucleolar growth (NO) size to chironomid growth. In one experiment, 5 treatments varied in diet quality only, which was manipulated by providing midge larvae with 1.0 mg of food per individual per day, but varying the ratio of Tetramin to non-nutritious methyl-cellulose. A second experiment followed a 2 x 2 factorial design. The factors were growth period and diet quality. Diet quality and growth period were found to influence the individual biomass considerably. NO size was related to the quality of the diet provided at the end of the experiment, regardless of larval biomass. Therefore, NO size appears to be related to growth rate at time of collection rather than larval size. The authors proposed using NO size of larvae in natural populations as a measure of growth on which to base estimates of secondary production and as a new way to monitor individual and population responses to environmental stress. Preliminary field measurements of larval production and NO size from oil sands-affected and reference wetlands were found to be consistent with laboratory results.

  17. Key improvements to XTR

    Lenstra, A.K.; Verheul, E.R.; Okamoto, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes improved methods for XTR key representation and parameter generation (cf. [4]). If the field characteristic is properly chosen, the size of the XTR public key for signature applications can be reduced by a factor of three at the cost of a small one time computation for the

  18. A new link between stress response and nucleolar function during pollen development in Arabidopsis mediated by AtREN1 protein

    Reňák, David; Gibalová, Antónia; Šolcová, Katarzyna; Honys, David

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 3 (2014), s. 670-683 ISSN 0140-7791 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/11/1462; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/12/2611; GA MŠk(CZ) LD11018; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13049 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : heat shock response * heat shock transcription factor * male gametophyte development Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 6.960, year: 2014

  19. Chlamydia trachomatis protein CT009 is a structural and functional homolog to the key morphogenesis component RodZ and interacts with division septal plane localized MreB

    Kemege, Kyle E.; Hickey, John M.; Barta, Michael L.; Wickstrum, Jason; Balwalli, Namita; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Hefty, P. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Cell division in Chlamydiae is poorly understood as apparent homologs to most conserved bacterial cell division proteins are lacking and presence of elongation (rod shape) associated proteins indicate non-canonical mechanisms may be employed. The rod-shape determining protein MreB has been proposed as playing a unique role in chlamydial cell division. In other organisms, MreB is part of an elongation complex that requires RodZ for proper function. A recent study reported that the protein enco...

  20. B23/nucleophosmin interacts with bovine immunodeficiency virus Rev protein and facilitates viral replication.

    Passos-Castilho, Ana Maria; Marchand, Claude; Archambault, Denis

    2018-02-01

    The bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) Rev shuttling protein contains nuclear/nucleolar localization signals and nuclear import/export mechanisms that are novel among lentivirus Rev proteins. Several viral proteins localize to the nucleolus, which may play a role in processes that are essential to the outcome of viral replication. Although BIV Rev localizes to the nucleoli of transfected/infected cells and colocalizes with one of its major proteins, nucleophosmin (NPM1, also known as B23), the role of the nucleolus and B23 in BIV replication remains to be determined. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that BIV Rev interacts with nucleolar phosphoprotein B23 in cells. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology, we show that depletion of B23 expression inhibits virus production by BIV-infected cells, indicating that B23 plays an important role in BIV replication. The interaction between Rev and B23 may represent a potential new target for the development of antiviral drugs against lentiviruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Interaction of Protein Phosphatase 1δ with Nucleophosmin in Human Osteoblastic Cells

    Haneji, Tatsuji; Teramachi, Jumpei; Hirashima, Kanji; Kimura, Koji; Morimoto, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation has been recognized as an essential mechanism in the regulation of cellular metabolism and function in various tissues. Serine and threonine protein phosphatases (PP) are divided into four categories: PP1, PP2A, PP2B, and PP2C. At least four isoforms of PP1 catalytic subunit in rat, PP1α, PP1γ1, PP1γ2, and PP1δ, were isolated. In the present study, we examined the localization and expression of PP1δ in human osteoblastic Saos-2 cells. Anti-PP1δ antibody recognized a protein present in the nucleolar regions in Saos-2 cells. Cellular fractionation revealed that PP1δ is a 37 kDa protein localized in the nucleolus. Nucleophosmin is a nucleolar phosphoprotein and located mainly in the nucleolus. Staining pattern of nucleophosmin in Saos-2 cells was similar to that of PP1δ. PP1δ and nucleophosmin were specifically stained as dots in the nucleus. Dual fluorescence images revealed that PP1δ and nucleophosmin were localized in the same regions in the nucleolus. Similar distribution patterns of PP1δ and nucleophosmin were observed in osteoblastic MG63 cells. The interaction of PP1δ and nucleophosmin was also shown by immunoprecipitation and Western analysis. These results indicated that PP1δ associate with nucleophosmin directly in the nucleolus and suggested that nucleophosmin is one of the candidate substrate for PP1δ

  2. Key Facts about Tularemia

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Key Facts About Tularemia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This fact ... and Prevention (CDC) Tularemia Web site . What is Tularemia? Tularemia is a potentially serious illness that occurs ...

  3. Key technologies book

    1997-01-01

    In this book can be found all the useful information on the French industry key technologies of the years 2000-2005. 136 technologies at the junction of the science advances and of the markets expectations are divided into 9 sectors. Among them, only 4 are interesting here: the environment, the transports, the materials and the energy. In 1995, the secretary's office of State for industry has published a first synthesis book on these key technologies. This 1997 new key technologies book extends and completes the initial study. For each key technology, an encyclopedic sheet is given. Each sheet combines thus some exact and practical information on: advance state of the technology, market characteristics, development forecasts, occupation and involved sectors, technology acquisition cost, research programs but also contacts of the main concerned efficiency poles. (O.M.)

  4. The Key Lake project

    Glattes, G.

    1985-01-01

    Aspects of project financing for the share of the Canadian subsidiary of Uranerzbergbau-GmbH, Bonn, in the uranium mining and milling facility at Key Lake, Saskatchewan, by a Canadian bank syndicate. (orig.) [de

  5. The tumor suppressor SHIP1 colocalizes in nucleolar cavities with p53 and components of PML nuclear bodies

    Ehm, Patrick; Nalaskowski, Marcus M; Wundenberg, Torsten; Jücker, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The inositol 5-phosphatase SHIP1 is a negative regulator of signaling processes in haematopoietic cells. By converting PI(3,4,5)P3 to PtdIns(3,4)P2 at the plasma membrane, SHIP1 modifies PI3-kinase mediated signaling. We have recently demonstrated that SHIP1 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein and SHIP1 nuclear puncta partially colocalize with FLASH, a component of nuclear bodies. In this study, we demonstrate that endogenous SHIP1 localizes to intranucleolar regions of both normal and ...

  6. Chlamydia trachomatis protein CT009 is a structural and functional homolog to the key morphogenesis component RodZ and interacts with division septal plane localized MreB.

    Kemege, Kyle E; Hickey, John M; Barta, Michael L; Wickstrum, Jason; Balwalli, Namita; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P; Hefty, P Scott

    2015-02-01

    Cell division in Chlamydiae is poorly understood as apparent homologs to most conserved bacterial cell division proteins are lacking and presence of elongation (rod shape) associated proteins indicate non-canonical mechanisms may be employed. The rod-shape determining protein MreB has been proposed as playing a unique role in chlamydial cell division. In other organisms, MreB is part of an elongation complex that requires RodZ for proper function. A recent study reported that the protein encoded by ORF CT009 interacts with MreB despite low sequence similarity to RodZ. The studies herein expand on those observations through protein structure, mutagenesis and cellular localization analyses. Structural analysis indicated that CT009 shares high level of structural similarity to RodZ, revealing the conserved orientation of two residues critical for MreB interaction. Substitutions eliminated MreB protein interaction and partial complementation provided by CT009 in RodZ deficient Escherichia coli. Cellular localization analysis of CT009 showed uniform membrane staining in Chlamydia. This was in contrast to the localization of MreB, which was restricted to predicted septal planes. MreB localization to septal planes provides direct experimental observation for the role of MreB in cell division and supports the hypothesis that it serves as a functional replacement for FtsZ in Chlamydia. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Chlamydia trachomatis protein CT009 is a structural and functional homolog to the key morphogenesis component RodZ and interacts with division septal plane localized MreB

    Kemege, Kyle E.; Hickey, John M.; Barta, Michael L.; Wickstrum, Jason; Balwalli, Namita; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Hefty, P. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell division in Chlamydiae is poorly understood as apparent homologs to most conserved bacterial cell division proteins are lacking and presence of elongation (rod shape) associated proteins indicate non-canonical mechanisms may be employed. The rod-shape determining protein MreB has been proposed as playing a unique role in chlamydial cell division. In other organisms, MreB is part of an elongation complex that requires RodZ for proper function. A recent study reported that the protein encoded by ORF CT009 interacts with MreB despite low sequence similarity to RodZ. The studies herein expand on those observations through protein structure, mutagenesis, and cellular localization analyses. Structural analysis indicated that CT009 shares high level of structural similarity to RodZ, revealing the conserved orientation of two residues critical for MreB interaction. Substitutions eliminated MreB protein interaction and partial complementation provided by CT009 in RodZ deficient E. coli. Cellular localization analysis of CT009 showed uniform membrane staining in Chlamydia. This was in contrast to the localization of MreB, which was restricted to predicted septal planes. MreB localization to septal planes provides direct experimental observation for the role of MreB in cell division and supports the hypothesis that it serves as a functional replacement for FtsZ in Chlamydia. PMID:25382739

  8. Comparison is key.

    Stone, Mark H; Stenner, A Jackson

    2014-01-01

    Several concepts from Georg Rasch's last papers are discussed. The key one is comparison because Rasch considered the method of comparison fundamental to science. From the role of comparison stems scientific inference made operational by a properly developed frame of reference producing specific objectivity. The exact specifications Rasch outlined for making comparisons are explicated from quotes, and the role of causality derived from making comparisons is also examined. Understanding causality has implications for what can and cannot be produced via Rasch measurement. His simple examples were instructive, but the implications are far reaching upon first establishing the key role of comparison.

  9. Key World Energy Statistics

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The IEA produced its first handy, pocket-sized summary of key energy data in 1997. This new edition responds to the enormously positive reaction to the book since then. Key World Energy Statistics produced by the IEA contains timely, clearly-presented data on supply, transformation and consumption of all major energy sources. The interested businessman, journalist or student will have at his or her fingertips the annual Canadian production of coal, the electricity consumption in Thailand, the price of diesel oil in Spain and thousands of other useful energy facts. It exists in different formats to suit our readers' requirements.

  10. Keyed shear joints

    Hansen, Klaus

    This report gives a summary of the present information on the behaviour of vertical keyed shear joints in large panel structures. An attemp is made to outline the implications which this information might have on the analysis and design of a complete wall. The publications also gives a short...

  11. Cryptographic Key Management System

    No, author

    2014-02-21

    This report summarizes the outcome of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-OE0000543, requesting the design of a Cryptographic Key Management System (CKMS) for the secure management of cryptographic keys for the energy sector infrastructure. Prime contractor Sypris Electronics, in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Valicore Technologies, and Purdue University's Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS) and Smart Meter Integration Laboratory (SMIL), has designed, developed and evaluated the CKMS solution. We provide an overview of the project in Section 3, review the core contributions of all contractors in Section 4, and discuss bene ts to the DOE in Section 5. In Section 6 we describe the technical construction of the CKMS solution, and review its key contributions in Section 6.9. Section 7 describes the evaluation and demonstration of the CKMS solution in different environments. We summarize the key project objectives in Section 8, list publications resulting from the project in Section 9, and conclude with a discussion on commercialization in Section 10 and future work in Section 11.

  12. Turn key contracts

    Feretic, D.

    1975-01-01

    The aim of this summary is to point out some specific areas which have to be covered in a turn-key contract and which are of primarily interest to the buyer of a nuclear plant. It will be assumed that the buyer is utility company in a developing country and a plant supplier a company in an industrial country. (orig./FW) [de

  13. Key numbers: Energy

    1994-01-01

    The key numbers of energy give statistical data related to production, consumption, and to foreign trade of each energy in the World and in France. A chapter is dedicated to environment and brings quantitative elements on pollutant emissions connected to energy uses

  14. Key performance indicators

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses how organisations can use OSH performance indicators. This is an important way to mainstream OSH into business management. Key performance indicators (KPIs) should provide objective data on the OSH situation. It is often said that ‘what gets measured gets managed’. Without

  15. Locks and Keys Service

    Claude Ducastel

    The GS-LS-SEM section is pleased to inform you that as from Monday 30 November 2009, the opening hours of the Locks and Keys service will be the following: 08h30 - 12h30 / 13h30 - 16:30, Mondays to Fridays. GS-SEM-LS 73333

  16. Semantic Keys and Reading

    Zev bar-Lev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Semantic Keys are elements (word-parts of written language that give an iconic, general representation of the whole word’s meaning. In written Sino-Japanese the “radical” or semantic components play this role. For example, the character meaning ‘woman, female’ is the Semantic Key of the character for Ma ‘Mama’ (alongside the phonetic component Ma, which means ‘horse’ as a separate character. The theory of semantic Keys in both graphic and phonemic aspects is called qTheory or nanosemantics. The most innovative aspect of the present article is the hypothesis that, in languages using alphabetic writing systems, the role of Semantic Key is played by consonants, more specifically the first consonant. Thus, L meaning ‘LIFT’ is the Semantic Key of English Lift, Ladle, Lofty, aLps, eLevator, oLympus; Spanish Leva, Lecantarse, aLto, Lengua; Arabic aLLah, and Hebrew① ªeL-ºaL ‘upto-above’ (the Israeli airline, Polish Lot ‘flight’ (the Polish airline; Hebrew ªeL, ªeLohim ‘God’, and haLLeluyah ‘praise-ye God’ (using Parallels, ‘Lift up God’. Evidence for the universality of the theory is shown by many examples drawn from various languages, including Indo-European Semitic, Chinese and Japanese. The theory reveals hundreds of relationships within and between languages, related and unrelated, that have been “Hiding in Plain Sight”, to mention just one example: the Parallel between Spanish Pan ‘bread’ and Mandarin Fan ‘rice’.

  17. Key role of the expression of bone morphogenetic proteins in increasing the osteogenic activity of osteoblast-like cells exposed to shock waves and seeded on bioactive glass-ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Muzio, Giuliana; Martinasso, Germana; Baino, Francesco; Frairia, Roberto; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Canuto, Rosa A

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the role of shock wave-induced increase of bone morphogenetic proteins in modulating the osteogenic properties of osteoblast-like cells seeded on a bioactive scaffold was investigated using gremlin as a bone morphogenetic protein antagonist. Bone-like glass-ceramic scaffolds, based on a silicate experimental bioactive glass developed at the Politecnico di Torino, were produced by the sponge replication method and used as porous substrates for cell culture. Human MG-63 cells, exposed to shock waves and seeded on the scaffolds, were treated with gremlin every two days and analysed after 20 days for the expression of osteoblast differentiation markers. Shock waves have been shown to induce osteogenic activity mediated by increased expression of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, type I collagen, BMP-4 and BMP-7. Cells exposed to shock waves plus gremlin showed increased growth in comparison with cells treated with shock waves alone and, conversely, mRNA contents of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin were significantly lower. Therefore, the shock wave-mediated increased expression of bone morphogenetic protein in MG-63 cells seeded on the scaffolds is essential in improving osteogenic activity; blocking bone morphogenetic protein via gremlin completely prevents the increase of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. The results confirmed that the combination of glass-ceramic scaffolds and shock waves exposure could be used to significantly improve osteogenesis opening new perspectives for bone regenerative medicine. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Ancel Keys: a tribute

    VanItallie Theodore B

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ancel Keys, Ph.D., who died in November, 2004, at the age of 100, was among the first scientists to recognize that human atherosclerosis is not an inevitable consequence of aging, and that a high-fat diet can be a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. During World War II, he and a group of talented co-workers at the University of Minnesota conducted a large-scale study of experimentally-induced human starvation. The data generated by this study – which was immediately recognized to be a classic – continue to be of inestimable value to nutrition scientists. In his later years, Keys spent more time at his home in Naples, Italy, where he had the opportunity to continue his personal study of the beneficial effects on health and longevity of a Mediterranean diet.

  19. Physician Appraisals: Key Challenges

    Klich Jacek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the article is to identify key criteria being used for physician appraisals and to find how communication skills of physicians are valued in those appraisals. ScienceDirect and EBSCOhost databases were used for this search. The results show that a physician appraisal is underestimated both theoretically and empirically. The particular gap exists with respect to the communication skills of physicians, which are rarely present in medical training syllabi and physician assessments. The article contributes to the theoretical discourse on physician appraisals and points out at the inconsistency between the high status of physicians as a key hospital resource on the one hand and, on the other hand, at inadequate and poorly researched assessment of their performance with a special emphasis on communication skills. The article may inspire health managers to develop and implement up-to-date assessment forms for physicians and good managerial practices in this respect in hospitals and other health care units.

  20. NAGRADATA. Code key. Geology

    Mueller, W.H.; Schneider, B.; Staeuble, J.

    1984-01-01

    This reference manual provides users of the NAGRADATA system with comprehensive keys to the coding/decoding of geological and technical information to be stored in or retreaved from the databank. Emphasis has been placed on input data coding. When data is retreaved the translation into plain language of stored coded information is done automatically by computer. Three keys each, list the complete set of currently defined codes for the NAGRADATA system, namely codes with appropriate definitions, arranged: 1. according to subject matter (thematically) 2. the codes listed alphabetically and 3. the definitions listed alphabetically. Additional explanation is provided for the proper application of the codes and the logic behind the creation of new codes to be used within the NAGRADATA system. NAGRADATA makes use of codes instead of plain language for data storage; this offers the following advantages: speed of data processing, mainly data retrieval, economies of storage memory requirements, the standardisation of terminology. The nature of this thesaurian type 'key to codes' makes it impossible to either establish a final form or to cover the entire spectrum of requirements. Therefore, this first issue of codes to NAGRADATA must be considered to represent the current state of progress of a living system and future editions will be issued in a loose leave ringbook system which can be updated by an organised (updating) service. (author)

  1. Is there any relationship between decreased AgNOR protein synthesis and human hair loss?

    Eroz, R; Tasdemir, S; Dogan, H

    2012-11-01

    Argyrophilic nucleolar organizing region associated proteins (AgNORs) play roles in cell proliferation and a variety of diseases. We attempted to determine whether decreased NOR protein synthesis causes human hair loss. We studied 21 healthy males who suffered hair loss on the frontal/vertex portion of the head. Hair root cells from normal and hair loss sites were stained for AgNOR. One hundred nuclei per site were evaluated and the AgNOR number and NORa/TNa proportions of individual cells were determined using a computer program. The cells from normal sites had significantly higher AgNOR counts than those from hair loss sites. Also, the cells from the normal sites had significantly higher NORa/TNa than cells from the hair loss sites. In the normal sites, the cells demonstrated more NOR protein synthesis than cells in hair loss sites. Therefore, decreased NOR protein synthesis appears to be related to hair loss in humans.

  2. Progress in studies on nucleolus functions

    Chang Lei; Zhou Guangming

    2011-01-01

    Nucleoli is the sites for ribosome synthesis and processing, however, recent approaches have revealed that it is also involved in variety of cellular processes, especially the cellular stress response. As sensors, nucleoli regulate the localization of nucleolar proteins, such as (Alternate Reading Frame, ARF), and the activation of key factors, such as P53, and consequently mediate the cellular stress response.In this paper, recent progress in the studies on nucleolar functions in cellular stress response to radiation is reviewed. (authors)

  3. Comparison of The Means of Argyrophilic Nucleolar Organizer Region (mAgNOR Pre- and Post-Therapy in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients at Wahidin Sudirohusodo General Hospital Makassar

    Freddy George Kuhuwael

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is malignant tumor growing in nasopharynx with a predilection in fossa Rossenmuller and nasopharyngeal roof. This research aimed to prove whether the means of argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region (mAgNOR can predict the success of treatment in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients. METHODS: We used diagnostic test method with longitudinal design and purposive sampling technique. Endoscopic biopsy examination was performed on 15 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients before and after therapy, 13 patients underwent chemotherapy and other two underwent chemoradiotherapy. Tumor tissues were stained and AgNOR was calculated. RESULTS: Based on the tumor stage, sample characteristic showed 3 patients (20% were in stage II, 3 patients (20% in stage III, and 9 patients (60% in stage IV, with pre- and post-therapy mAgNOR were 1.610±0.988 and 1.000±0.000, respectively in stage II, 1.100±0.092 and 1.000±0.000, respectively in stage III, 1.226±0.265 and 1.107±0.164, respectively in stage IV patients. Based on histopathology type, 4 patients (26.7% had non keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma with pre- and post-therapy mAgNOR were 1.117±0.134 and 1.060±0.120, respectively, while 11 patients (73.3% had undifferentiated squamous cell carcinoma with pre- and post-therapy mAgNOR were 1.335±0.528 and 1.065±0.146, respectively. Overall the pre-therapy were significantly higher than post-therapy mAgNOR. In subgroups there are significant differences in stage IV and type 3. CONCLUSION: The values of AgNOR were decreased in all NPC stages and significantly decreased in undifferentiated squamous cell carcinoma. AgNOR can be used to predict the successfulness of therapy in NPC. KEYWORDS: nasopharyngeal carcinoma, therapy, proliferation, mAgNOR

  4. Manet key management via Mobile Ficlke Key protocol (MFK ...

    Manet key management via Mobile Ficlke Key protocol (MFK) ... Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL ... No Abstract. Keywords: MANET; key management scheme; simulation environment ...

  5. Protein Sub-Nuclear Localization Prediction Using SVM and Pfam Domain Information

    Kumar, Ravindra; Jain, Sohni; Kumari, Bandana; Kumar, Manish

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus is the largest and the highly organized organelle of eukaryotic cells. Within nucleus exist a number of pseudo-compartments, which are not separated by any membrane, yet each of them contains only a specific set of proteins. Understanding protein sub-nuclear localization can hence be an important step towards understanding biological functions of the nucleus. Here we have described a method, SubNucPred developed by us for predicting the sub-nuclear localization of proteins. This method predicts protein localization for 10 different sub-nuclear locations sequentially by combining presence or absence of unique Pfam domain and amino acid composition based SVM model. The prediction accuracy during leave-one-out cross-validation for centromeric proteins was 85.05%, for chromosomal proteins 76.85%, for nuclear speckle proteins 81.27%, for nucleolar proteins 81.79%, for nuclear envelope proteins 79.37%, for nuclear matrix proteins 77.78%, for nucleoplasm proteins 76.98%, for nuclear pore complex proteins 88.89%, for PML body proteins 75.40% and for telomeric proteins it was 83.33%. Comparison with other reported methods showed that SubNucPred performs better than existing methods. A web-server for predicting protein sub-nuclear localization named SubNucPred has been established at http://14.139.227.92/mkumar/subnucpred/. Standalone version of SubNucPred can also be downloaded from the web-server. PMID:24897370

  6. P53 activation, a key event of the cellular response to gamma irradiation; L'activation de la proteine p53, un evenement determinant de la reponse cellulaire aux radiations ionisantes

    Drane, P.; Alvarez, S.; Meiller, A.; May, E. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Dept. de Radiobiologie et de Radiopathologie, Lab. de Cancerogenese Moleculaire, CNRS, UMR 217, 92 (France)

    2002-03-01

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 encodes a protein whose major function is to protect organisms from proliferation of potentially tumorigenic cells. In normal conditions (unstressed cells), the p53 protein is inert and maintained at low level through its association with the Mdm2 oncogene, causing its translocation from the nucleus into the cytoplasm and its degradation through ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In response to damaged DNA or to a variety of stresses, p53 accumulates in the nucleus and is activated as a transcriptional trans-activator. Posttranslational modifications of p53 including multi-site phosphorylation and acetylation are the major mechanism of p53 regulation. After exposure to ionising radiation, p53 activation implicates ATM, ATR, Chk2 and Chk1 kinases that phosphorylate the N-terminal domain on Ser15 (ATM and/or ATR), and Ser20 (Chk2 and/or Chk1), causing the dissociation of the p53/Mdm2 complex and thereby the stabilisation of p53. The process initiated by {gamma}-irradiation exposure involves also increased interaction of the p53 N-terminal domain with CBP/p300 and P/CAF leading to acetylation of the distant C-terminal domain at Lys 320, 373 and 382. In addition, the ATM-mediated dephosphorylation of Ser376 creates a fixation site for 14-3-3 protein. Taken together, phosphorylation, acetylation and association with co factors induce the stimulation of p53 transcriptional activity resulting in the expression of a set of genes involved, notably, in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This stress-induced p53 pathways lead to one of two outcomes: growth arrest or apoptosis and consequently protects the organism from the genotoxic effects of ionising radiation. (author)

  7. In vitro glutathione peroxidase mimicry of ebselen is linked to its oxidation of critical thiols on key cerebral suphydryl proteins - A novel component of its GPx-mimic antioxidant mechanism emerging from its thiol-modulated toxicology and pharmacology.

    Kade, I J; Balogun, B D; Rocha, J B T

    2013-10-25

    The antioxidant mechanism of ebselen in rats brain is largely linked with its glutathione peroxidase (GPx) rather than its peroxiredoxin mimicry ability. However, the precise molecular dynamics between the GPx-mimicry of ebselen and thiol utilization is yet to be fully clarified and thus still open. Herein, we investigated the influence of dithiothreitol (DTT) on the antioxidant action of ebselen against oxidant-induced cerebral lipid peroxidation and deoxyribose degradation. Furthermore, the critical inhibitory concentrations of ebselen on the activities of sulphydryl enzymes such as cerebral sodium pump, δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were also investigated. We observe that ebselen (at ≥42 μM) markedly inhibited lipid peroxidation in the presence and absence of DTT, whereas it inhibited deoxyribose degradation only in the presence of DTT. Furthermore, under in vitro conditions, ebselen inhibited the thiol containing enzymes; cerebral sodium pump (at ≥40 μM), δ-ALAD (≥10 μM) and LDH (≥1 μM) which were either prevented or reversed by DTT. However, the inhibition of the activities of these sulphydryl proteins in diabetic animals was prevented by ebselen. Summarily, it is apparent that the effective in vitro inhibitory doses of ebselen on the activity of the sulphydryl proteins are far less than its antioxidant doses. In addition, the presence of DTT is evidently a critical requirement for ebselen to effect its antioxidant action against deoxyribose degeradation and not lipid peroxidation. Consequently, we conclude that ebselen possibly utilizes available thiols on sulphydryl proteins to effect its GPx mimicry antioxidant action against lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Phosphoinositide metabolism links cGMP-dependent protein kinase G to essential Ca²⁺ signals at key decision points in the life cycle of malaria parasites.

    Mathieu Brochet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many critical events in the Plasmodium life cycle rely on the controlled release of Ca²⁺ from intracellular stores to activate stage-specific Ca²⁺-dependent protein kinases. Using the motility of Plasmodium berghei ookinetes as a signalling paradigm, we show that the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP-dependent protein kinase, PKG, maintains the elevated level of cytosolic Ca²⁺ required for gliding motility. We find that the same PKG-dependent pathway operates upstream of the Ca²⁺ signals that mediate activation of P. berghei gametocytes in the mosquito and egress of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites from infected human erythrocytes. Perturbations of PKG signalling in gliding ookinetes have a marked impact on the phosphoproteome, with a significant enrichment of in vivo regulated sites in multiple pathways including vesicular trafficking and phosphoinositide metabolism. A global analysis of cellular phospholipids demonstrates that in gliding ookinetes PKG controls phosphoinositide biosynthesis, possibly through the subcellular localisation or activity of lipid kinases. Similarly, phosphoinositide metabolism links PKG to egress of P. falciparum merozoites, where inhibition of PKG blocks hydrolysis of phosphatidylinostitol (4,5-bisphosphate. In the face of an increasing complexity of signalling through multiple Ca²⁺ effectors, PKG emerges as a unifying factor to control multiple cellular Ca²⁺ signals essential for malaria parasite development and transmission.

  9. Key aspects congenital infection

    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The key questions to solve the problem of congenital infection in the Russian Federation are: using in national practice over world accepted terminology adapted to the recommendations of the World Health Organization; representation of the modern concepts of an infectious process in the classification of congenital infections; scientific development and introducing in clinical practice the «standard case definitions», applied to different congenital infections; optimization of protocols and clinical guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of congenital infections; improvement a knowledge in the infectious disease for all  pecialists involved in the risk assessment of congenital infections, manage pregnancy and children. Based on our experience and analysis of publications, the authors suggest possible solutions.

  10. Key figures. Year 2006

    2006-01-01

    This document summarizes in a series of tables the key data of the petroleum industry and of the other energies for the year 2006. Data of the two previous years are given for comparison: 1 - petroleum, France: exploration, reserves, production, transports (tankers, pipelines, crude and refined products), storage capacities, status of resources and uses, foreign trade (imports, prices, exports), refining (capacities, facilities), evolution of supplies, automotive fuels consumption; 2 - energies, France: production, consumption and trade data for coal, natural gas, electricity; total production and consumption of primary energy; consumption per sector of use; 3 - petroleum, world: crude production and reserves per geographical area, OPEC production, imports/exports and refining/consumption per geographical area, international quotation for crudes and refined products; 4 - energies, world: reserves, production and consumption data for coal, natural gas and electricity; uranium production and resources; total primary energy production and consumption per energy source and geographical area. (J.S.)

  11. Key figures. Year 2005

    2005-01-01

    This document summarizes in a series of tables the key data of the petroleum industry and of the other energies for the year 2005. Data of the two previous years are given for comparison: 1 - petroleum, France: exploration, reserves, production, transports (tankers, pipelines, crude and refined products), storage capacities, status of resources and uses, foreign trade (imports, prices, exports), refining (capacities, facilities), evolution of supplies, automotive fuels consumption; 2 - energies, France: production, consumption and trade data for coal, natural gas, electricity; total production and consumption of primary energy; consumption per sector of use; 3 - petroleum, world: crude production and reserves per geographical area, OPEC production, imports/exports and refining/consumption per geographical area, international quotation for crudes and refined products; 4 - energies, world: reserves, production and consumption data for coal, natural gas and electricity; uranium production and resources; total primary energy production and consumption per energy source and geographical area. (J.S.)

  12. Cytoplasmic influence of nucleolar development

    Ghosh, Sibdas

    1974-01-01

    The role of cytoplasmic factors on the development of nucleolus in nucleus has been investigated in Ehrlich mouse ascites tumour cells using tritiated thymidine/uridine for autoradiography. It is inferred from the observations that the cytoplasmic factors has some but not absolute control over the development of nucleolus. (M.G.B.)

  13. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein localizes efficiently to the nucleus and nucleolus

    Yu, Kyung Lee; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Eun Soo; You, Ji Chang

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is an essential viral protein containing two highly conserved retroviral-type zinc finger (ZF) motifs, which functions in multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Although a number of functions for NC either in its mature form or as a domain of Gag have been revealed, little is known about the intracellular localization of NC and, moreover, its role in Gag protein trafficking. Here, we have investigated various forms of HIV-1 NC protein for its cellular localization and found that the NC has a strong nuclear and nucleolar localization activity. The linker region, composed of a stretch of basic amino acids between the two ZF motifs, was necessary and sufficient for the activity. - Highlights: • HIV-1 NC possess a NLS and leads to nuclear and nucleolus localization. • Mutations in basic residues between two ZFs in NC decrease the nucleus localization. • ZFs of NC affect cytoplasmic organelles localization rather than nucleus localization.

  14. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein localizes efficiently to the nucleus and nucleolus.

    Yu, Kyung Lee; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Eun Soo; You, Ji Chang

    2016-05-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is an essential viral protein containing two highly conserved retroviral-type zinc finger (ZF) motifs, which functions in multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Although a number of functions for NC either in its mature form or as a domain of Gag have been revealed, little is known about the intracellular localization of NC and, moreover, its role in Gag protein trafficking. Here, we have investigated various forms of HIV-1 NC protein for its cellular localization and found that the NC has a strong nuclear and nucleolar localization activity. The linker region, composed of a stretch of basic amino acids between the two ZF motifs, was necessary and sufficient for the activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein localizes efficiently to the nucleus and nucleolus

    Yu, Kyung Lee; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Eun Soo; You, Ji Chang, E-mail: jiyou@catholic.ac.kr

    2016-05-15

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is an essential viral protein containing two highly conserved retroviral-type zinc finger (ZF) motifs, which functions in multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Although a number of functions for NC either in its mature form or as a domain of Gag have been revealed, little is known about the intracellular localization of NC and, moreover, its role in Gag protein trafficking. Here, we have investigated various forms of HIV-1 NC protein for its cellular localization and found that the NC has a strong nuclear and nucleolar localization activity. The linker region, composed of a stretch of basic amino acids between the two ZF motifs, was necessary and sufficient for the activity. - Highlights: • HIV-1 NC possess a NLS and leads to nuclear and nucleolus localization. • Mutations in basic residues between two ZFs in NC decrease the nucleus localization. • ZFs of NC affect cytoplasmic organelles localization rather than nucleus localization.

  16. Smooth Phase Interpolated Keying

    Borah, Deva K.

    2007-01-01

    Smooth phase interpolated keying (SPIK) is an improved method of computing smooth phase-modulation waveforms for radio communication systems that convey digital information. SPIK is applicable to a variety of phase-shift-keying (PSK) modulation schemes, including quaternary PSK (QPSK), octonary PSK (8PSK), and 16PSK. In comparison with a related prior method, SPIK offers advantages of better performance and less complexity of implementation. In a PSK scheme, the underlying information waveform that one seeks to convey consists of discrete rectangular steps, but the spectral width of such a waveform is excessive for practical radio communication. Therefore, the problem is to smooth the step phase waveform in such a manner as to maintain power and bandwidth efficiency without incurring an unacceptably large error rate and without introducing undesired variations in the amplitude of the affected radio signal. Although the ideal constellation of PSK phasor points does not cause amplitude variations, filtering of the modulation waveform (in which, typically, a rectangular pulse is converted to a square-root raised cosine pulse) causes amplitude fluctuations. If a power-efficient nonlinear amplifier is used in the radio communication system, the fluctuating-amplitude signal can undergo significant spectral regrowth, thus compromising the bandwidth efficiency of the system. In the related prior method, one seeks to solve the problem in a procedure that comprises two major steps: phase-value generation and phase interpolation. SPIK follows the two-step approach of the related prior method, but the details of the steps are different. In the phase-value-generation step, the phase values of symbols in the PSK constellation are determined by a phase function that is said to be maximally smooth and that is chosen to minimize the spectral spread of the modulated signal. In this step, the constellation is divided into two groups by assigning, to information symbols, phase values

  17. Sterols regulate 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) via dual sterol regulatory elements: cooperative induction of key enzymes in lipid synthesis by Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins.

    Zerenturk, Eser J; Sharpe, Laura J; Brown, Andrew J

    2012-10-01

    3β-Hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) catalyzes a final step in cholesterol synthesis, and has been ascribed diverse functions, such as being anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory. How this enzyme is regulated transcriptionally by sterols is currently unclear. Some studies have suggested that its expression is regulated by Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs) while another suggests it is through the Liver X Receptor (LXR). However, these transcription factors have opposing effects on cellular sterol levels, so it is likely that one predominates. Here we establish that sterol regulation of DHCR24 occurs predominantly through SREBP-2, and identify the particular region of the DHCR24 promoter to which SREBP-2 binds. We demonstrate that sterol regulation is mediated by two sterol regulatory elements (SREs) in the promoter of the gene, assisted by two nearby NF-Y binding sites. Moreover, we present evidence that the dual SREs work cooperatively to regulate DHCR24 expression by comparison to two known SREBP target genes, the LDL receptor with one SRE, and farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyltransferase 1, with two SREs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic and pharmacological screens converge in identifying FLIP, BCL2 and IAP proteins as key regulators of sensitivity to the TRAIL-inducing anti-cancer agent ONC201/TIC10

    Allen, Joshua E.; Prabhu, Varun V.; Talekar, Mala; van den Heuvel, AP; Lim, Bora; Dicker, David T.; Fritz, Jennifer L.; Beck, Adam; El-Deiry, Wafik S.

    2015-01-01

    ONC201/TIC10 is a small molecule inducer of the TRAIL gene under current investigation as a novel anticancer agent. In this study, we identify critical molecular determinants of ONC201 sensitivity offering potential utility as pharmacodynamic or predictive response markers. By screening a library of kinase siRNAs in combination with a subcytotoxic dose of ONC201, we identified several kinases that ablated tumor cell sensitivity, including the MAPK pathway inducer KSR1. Unexpectedly, KSR1 silencing did not affect MAPK signaling in the presence or absence of ONC201, but instead reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins FLIP, Mcl-1, Bcl-2, cIAP1, cIAP2, and survivin. In parallel to this work, we also conducted a synergy screen in which ONC201 was combined with approved small molecule anticancer drugs. In multiple cancer cell populations, ONC201 synergized with diverse drug classes including the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib. Notably, combining ONC201 and sorafenib led to synergistic induction of TRAIL and its receptor DR5 along with a potent induction of cell death. In a mouse xenograft model of hepatocellular carcinoma, we demonstrated that ONC201 and sorafenib cooperatively and safely triggered tumor regressions. Overall, our results established a set of determinants for ONC201 sensitivity that may predict therapeutic response, particularly in settings of sorafenib co-treatment to enhance anticancer responses. PMID:25681273

  19. Genetic and Pharmacological Screens Converge in Identifying FLIP, BCL2, and IAP Proteins as Key Regulators of Sensitivity to the TRAIL-Inducing Anticancer Agent ONC201/TIC10.

    Allen, Joshua E; Prabhu, Varun V; Talekar, Mala; van den Heuvel, A Pieter J; Lim, Bora; Dicker, David T; Fritz, Jennifer L; Beck, Adam; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2015-04-15

    ONC201/TIC10 is a small-molecule inducer of the TRAIL gene under current investigation as a novel anticancer agent. In this study, we identify critical molecular determinants of ONC201 sensitivity offering potential utility as pharmacodynamic or predictive response markers. By screening a library of kinase siRNAs in combination with a subcytotoxic dose of ONC201, we identified several kinases that ablated tumor cell sensitivity, including the MAPK pathway-inducer KSR1. Unexpectedly, KSR1 silencing did not affect MAPK signaling in the presence or absence of ONC201, but instead reduced expression of the antiapoptotic proteins FLIP, Mcl-1, Bcl-2, cIAP1, cIAP2, and survivin. In parallel to this work, we also conducted a synergy screen in which ONC201 was combined with approved small-molecule anticancer drugs. In multiple cancer cell populations, ONC201 synergized with diverse drug classes, including the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib. Notably, combining ONC201 and sorafenib led to synergistic induction of TRAIL and its receptor DR5 along with a potent induction of cell death. In a mouse xenograft model of hepatocellular carcinoma, we demonstrated that ONC201 and sorafenib cooperatively and safely triggered tumor regressions. Overall, our results established a set of determinants for ONC201 sensitivity that may predict therapeutic response, particularly in settings of sorafenib cotreatment to enhance anticancer responses. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Key to good fit: body measurement problems specific to key ...

    Key to good fit: body measurement problems specific to key dimensions. ... to explore and describe the problems that the South African Clothing Industry currently ... A postal survey was conducted among South African apparel and footwear ...

  1. Flow hydrodynamics near inlet key of Piano Key Weir (PKW)

    Department of Water Resources Development and Management, Indian Institute ... on the hydrodynamic performance near inlet key of Piano Key Weir (PKW). ... nature of flows is clearly understood with the help of advanced instrumentation.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded EBNA-5 binds to Epstein-Barr virus-induced Fte1/S3a protein

    Kashuba, Elena; Yurchenko, Mariya; Szirak, Krisztina; Stahl, Joachim; Klein, George; Szekely, Laszlo

    2005-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transforms resting human B cells into immortalized immunoblasts. EBV-encoded nuclear antigens EBNA-5 (also called EBNA-LP) is one of the earliest viral proteins expressed in freshly infected B cells. We have recently shown that EBNA-5 binds p14ARF, a nucleolar protein that regulates the p53 pathway. Here, we report the identification of another protein with partially nucleolar localization, the v-fos transformation effector Fte-1 (Fte-1/S3a), as an EBNA-5 binding partner. In transfected cells, Fte-1/S3a and EBNA-5 proteins showed high levels of colocalization in extranucleolar inclusions. Fte-1/S3a has multiple biological functions. It enhances v-fos-mediated cellular transformation and is part of the small ribosomal subunit. It also interacts with the transcriptional factor CHOP and apoptosis regulator poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Fte-1/S3a is regularly expressed at high levels in both tumors and cancer cell lines. Its high expression favors the maintenance of malignant phenotype and undifferentiated state, whereas its down-regulation is associated with cellular differentiation and growth arrest. Here, we show that EBV-induced B cell transformation leads to the up-regulation of Fte-1/S3a. We suggest that EBNA-5 through binding may influence the growth promoting, differentiation inhibiting, or apoptosis regulating functions of Fte-1/S3a

  3. Loss of the integral nuclear envelope protein SUN1 induces alteration of nucleoli.

    Matsumoto, Ayaka; Sakamoto, Chiyomi; Matsumori, Haruka; Katahira, Jun; Yasuda, Yoko; Yoshidome, Katsuhide; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Goldberg, Ilya G; Matsuura, Nariaki; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Hieda, Miki

    2016-01-01

    A supervised machine learning algorithm, which is qualified for image classification and analyzing similarities, is based on multiple discriminative morphological features that are automatically assembled during the learning processes. The algorithm is suitable for population-based analysis of images of biological materials that are generally complex and heterogeneous. Here we used the algorithm wndchrm to quantify the effects on nucleolar morphology of the loss of the components of nuclear envelope in a human mammary epithelial cell line. The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, an assembly of nuclear envelope proteins comprising mainly members of the SUN and nesprin families, connects the nuclear lamina and cytoskeletal filaments. The components of the LINC complex are markedly deficient in breast cancer tissues. We found that a reduction in the levels of SUN1, SUN2, and lamin A/C led to significant changes in morphologies that were computationally classified using wndchrm with approximately 100% accuracy. In particular, depletion of SUN1 caused nucleolar hypertrophy and reduced rRNA synthesis. Further, wndchrm revealed a consistent negative correlation between SUN1 expression and the size of nucleoli in human breast cancer tissues. Our unbiased morphological quantitation strategies using wndchrm revealed an unexpected link between the components of the LINC complex and the morphologies of nucleoli that serves as an indicator of the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells.

  4. Involvement of the UL24 protein in herpes simplex virus 1-induced dispersal of B23 and in nuclear egress

    Lymberopoulos, Maria H.; Bourget, Amelie; Abdeljelil, Nawel Ben; Pearson, Angela

    2011-01-01

    UL24 of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is widely conserved within the Herpesviridae family. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that UL24, which we have previously shown to induce the redistribution of nucleolin, also affects the localization of the nucleolar protein B23. We found that HSV-1-induced dispersal of B23 was dependent on UL24. The conserved N-terminal portion of UL24 was sufficient to induce the redistribution of B23 in transient transfection assays. Mutational analysis revealed that the endonuclease motif of UL24 was important for B23 dispersal in both transfected and infected cells. Nucleolar protein relocalization during HSV-1 infection was also observed in non-immortalized cells. Analysis of infected cells by electron microscopy revealed a decrease in the ratio of cytoplasmic versus nuclear viral particles in cells infected with a UL24-deficient strain compared to KOS-infected cells. Our results suggest that UL24 promotes nuclear egress of nucleocapsids during HSV-1 infection, possibly though effects on nucleoli.

  5. Sub-cellular localisation studies may spuriously detect the Yes-associated protein, YAP, in nucleoli leading to potentially invalid conclusions of its function.

    Finch, Megan L; Passman, Adam M; Strauss, Robyn P; Yeoh, George C; Callus, Bernard A

    2015-01-01

    The Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a potent transcriptional co-activator that functions as a nuclear effector of the Hippo signaling pathway. YAP is oncogenic and its activity is linked to its cellular abundance and nuclear localisation. Activation of the Hippo pathway restricts YAP nuclear entry via its phosphorylation by Lats kinases and consequent cytoplasmic retention bound to 14-3-3 proteins. We examined YAP expression in liver progenitor cells (LPCs) and surprisingly found that transformed LPCs did not show an increase in YAP abundance compared to the non-transformed LPCs from which they were derived. We then sought to ascertain whether nuclear YAP was more abundant in transformed LPCs. We used an antibody that we confirmed was specific for YAP by immunoblotting to determine YAP's sub-cellular localisation by immunofluorescence. This antibody showed diffuse staining for YAP within the cytosol and nuclei, but, noticeably, it showed intense staining of the nucleoli of LPCs. This staining was non-specific, as shRNA treatment of cells abolished YAP expression to undetectable levels by Western blot yet the nucleolar staining remained. Similar spurious YAP nucleolar staining was also seen in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and mouse liver tissue, indicating that this antibody is unsuitable for immunological applications to determine YAP sub-cellular localisation in mouse cells or tissues. Interestingly nucleolar staining was not evident in D645 cells suggesting the antibody may be suitable for use in human cells. Given the large body of published work on YAP in recent years, many of which utilise this antibody, this study raises concerns regarding its use for determining sub-cellular localisation. From a broader perspective, it serves as a timely reminder of the need to perform appropriate controls to ensure the validity of published data.

  6. Structure of the JmjC domain-containing protein NO66 complexed with ribosomal protein Rpl8

    Wang, Chengliang [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Zhang, Qiongdi [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Hang, Tianrong [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Tao, Yue [Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, 1678 Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120, People’s Republic of (China); Ma, Xukai [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Wu, Minhao; Zhang, Xuan, E-mail: xuanzbin@ustc.edu.cn; Zang, Jianye, E-mail: xuanzbin@ustc.edu.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of (China)

    2015-08-28

    The structure of the complex of NO66 and Rpl8 was solved in the native state and NO66 recognizes the consensus motif NHXH . Tetramerization is required for efficient substrate binding and catalysis by NO66. The JmjC domain-containing proteins belong to a large family of oxygenases possessing distinct substrate specificities which are involved in the regulation of different biological processes, such as gene transcription, RNA processing and translation. Nucleolar protein 66 (NO66) is a JmjC domain-containing protein which has been reported to be a histone demethylase and a ribosome protein 8 (Rpl8) hydroxylase. The present biochemical study confirmed the hydroxylase activity of NO66 and showed that oligomerization is required for NO66 to efficiently catalyze the hydroxylation of Rpl8. The structures of NO66{sup 176–C} complexed with Rpl8{sup 204–224} in a tetrameric form and of the mutant protein M2 in a dimeric form were solved. Based on the results of structural and biochemical analyses, the consensus sequence motif NHXH recognized by NO66 was confirmed. Several potential substrates of NO66 were found by a BLAST search according to the consensus sequence motif. When binding to substrate, the relative positions of each subunit in the NO66 tetramer shift. Oligomerization may facilitate the motion of each subunit in the NO66 tetramer and affect the catalytic activity.

  7. Identifying tier one key suppliers.

    Wicks, Steve

    2013-01-01

    In today's global marketplace, businesses are becoming increasingly reliant on suppliers for the provision of key processes, activities, products and services in support of their strategic business goals. The result is that now, more than ever, the failure of a key supplier has potential to damage reputation, productivity, compliance and financial performance seriously. Yet despite this, there is no recognised standard or guidance for identifying a tier one key supplier base and, up to now, there has been little or no research on how to do so effectively. This paper outlines the key findings of a BCI-sponsored research project to investigate good practice in identifying tier one key suppliers, and suggests a scalable framework process model and risk matrix tool to help businesses effectively identify their tier one key supplier base.

  8. Security for Key Management Interfaces

    Kremer , Steve; Steel , Graham; Warinschi , Bogdan

    2011-01-01

    International audience; We propose a much-needed formal definition of security for cryptographic key management APIs. The advantages of our definition are that it is general, intuitive, and applicable to security proofs in both symbolic and computational models of cryptography. Our definition relies on an idealized API which allows only the most essential functions for generating, exporting and importing keys, and takes into account dynamic corruption of keys. Based on this we can define the ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK102383 [KOME

    Full Text Available AK102383 J033092C12 (Q14978) Nucleolar phosphoprotein p130 (Nucleolar 130 kDa protein) (140 kDa nucleol...ar phosphoprotein) (Nopp140) (Nucleolar and coiled-body phosphoprotein 1) NOLC1_HUMAN 3e-16 ...

  10. Shape of Key Malaria Protein Could Help Improve Vaccine Efficacy

    ... Featured Diseases & Conditions Food Allergy HIV/AIDS Influenza Malaria Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Tuberculosis Zika Virus Find ... To Volunteer for Vaccine Research Studies Volunteer for Malaria Vaccine Research Volunteer Profiles Q&A: Vaccine Clinical ...

  11. Specificity and affinity quantification of protein-protein interactions.

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Guo, Liyong; Hu, Liang; Wang, Jin

    2013-05-01

    Most biological processes are mediated by the protein-protein interactions. Determination of the protein-protein structures and insight into their interactions are vital to understand the mechanisms of protein functions. Currently, compared with the isolated protein structures, only a small fraction of protein-protein structures are experimentally solved. Therefore, the computational docking methods play an increasing role in predicting the structures and interactions of protein-protein complexes. The scoring function of protein-protein interactions is the key responsible for the accuracy of the computational docking. Previous scoring functions were mostly developed by optimizing the binding affinity which determines the stability of the protein-protein complex, but they are often lack of the consideration of specificity which determines the discrimination of native protein-protein complex against competitive ones. We developed a scoring function (named as SPA-PP, specificity and affinity of the protein-protein interactions) by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions show that SPA-PP performs remarkably on both predictions of binding pose and binding affinity. Thus, SPA-PP is a promising quantification of protein-protein interactions, which can be implemented into the protein docking tools and applied for the predictions of protein-protein structure and affinity. The algorithm is implemented in C language, and the code can be downloaded from http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1865642/Optimization.cpp.

  12. Feasibility of protein turnover studies in prototroph Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Martin-Perez, Miguel; Villén, Judit

    2015-04-07

    Quantitative proteomics studies of yeast that use metabolic labeling with amino acids rely on auxotrophic mutations of one or more genes on the amino acid biosynthesis pathways. These mutations affect yeast metabolism and preclude the study of some biological processes. Overcoming this limitation, it has recently been described that proteins in a yeast prototrophic strain can also be metabolically labeled with heavy amino acids. However, the temporal profiles of label incorporation under the different phases of the prototroph's growth have not been examined. Labeling trajectories are important in the study of protein turnover and dynamics, in which label incorporation into proteins is monitored across many time points. Here we monitored protein labeling trajectories for 48 h after a pulse with heavy lysine in a yeast prototrophic strain and compared them with those of a lysine auxotrophic yeast. Labeling was successful in prototroph yeast during exponential growth phase but not in stationary phase. Furthermore, we were able to determine the half-lives of more than 1700 proteins during exponential phase of growth with high accuracy and reproducibility. We found a median half-life of 2 h in both strains, which corresponds with the cellular doubling time. Nucleolar and ribosomal proteins showed short half-lives, whereas mitochondrial proteins and other energy production enzymes presented longer half-lives. Except for some proteins involved in lysine biosynthesis, we observed a high correlation in protein half-lives between prototroph and auxotroph strains. Overall, our results demonstrate the feasibility of using prototrophs for proteomic turnover studies and provide a reliable data set of protein half-lives in exponentially growing yeast.

  13. Model plant Key Measurement Points

    Schneider, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    For IAEA safeguards a Key Measurement Point is defined as the location where nuclear material appears in such a form that it may be measured to determine material flow or inventory. This presentation describes in an introductory manner the key measurement points and associated measurements for the model plant used in this training course

  14. Breaking chaotic shift key communication via adaptive key identification

    Ren Haipeng; Han Chongzhao; Liu Ding

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive parameter identification method for breaking chaotic shift key communication from the transmitted signal in public channel. The sensitive dependence property of chaos on parameter mismatch is used for chaos adaptive synchronization and parameter identification. An index function about the synchronization error is defined and conjugate gradient method is used to minimize the index function and to search the transmitter's parameter (key). By using proposed method, secure key is recovered from transmitted signal generated by low dimensional chaos and hyper chaos switching communication. Multi-parameters can also be identified from the transmitted signal with noise

  15. Advances in Protein Precipitation

    Golubovic, M.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are biological macromolecules, which are among the key components of all living organisms. Proteins are nowadays present in all fields of biotech industry, such as food and feed, synthetic and pharmaceutical industry. They are isolated from their natural sources or produced in different

  16. Amino acids and proteins

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H.; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional

  17. A Distributed Shared Key Generation Procedure Using Fractional Keys

    Poovendran, Radha; Corson, M. S; Baras, J. S

    1998-01-01

    We present a new class of distributed key generation and recovery algorithms suitable for group communication systems where the group membership is either static or slowly time-varying, and must be tightly controlled...

  18. Silencing of ribosomal protein S9 elicits a multitude of cellular responses inhibiting the growth of cancer cells subsequent to p53 activation.

    Mikael S Lindström

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disruption of the nucleolus often leads to activation of the p53 tumor suppressor pathway through inhibition of MDM2 that is mediated by a limited set of ribosomal proteins including RPL11 and RPL5. The effects of ribosomal protein loss in cultured mammalian cells have not been thoroughly investigated. Here we characterize the cellular stress response caused by depletion of ribosomal protein S9 (RPS9. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Depletion of RPS9 impaired production of 18S ribosomal RNA and induced p53 activity. It promoted p53-dependent morphological differentiation of U343MGa Cl2:6 glioma cells as evidenced by intensified expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and profound changes in cell shape. U2OS osteosarcoma cells displayed a limited senescence response with increased expression of DNA damage response markers, whereas HeLa cervical carcinoma cells underwent cell death by apoptosis. Knockdown of RPL11 impaired p53-dependent phenotypes in the different RPS9 depleted cell cultures. Importantly, knockdown of RPS9 or RPL11 also markedly inhibited cell proliferation through p53-independent mechanisms. RPL11 binding to MDM2 was retained despite decreased levels of RPL11 protein following nucleolar stress. In these settings, RPL11 was critical for maintaining p53 protein stability but was not strictly required for p53 protein synthesis. CONCLUSIONS: p53 plays an important role in the initial restriction of cell proliferation that occurs in response to decreased level of RPS9. Our results do not exclude the possibility that other nucleolar stress sensing molecules act upstream or in parallel to RPL11 to activate p53. Inhibiting the expression of certain ribosomal proteins, such as RPS9, could be one efficient way to reinitiate differentiation processes or to induce senescence or apoptosis in rapidly proliferating tumor cells.

  19. Protein Networks in Alzheimer's Disease

    Carlsen, Eva Meier; Rasmussen, Rune

    2017-01-01

    Overlap of RNA and protein networks reveals glia cells as key players for the development of symptomatic Alzheimer’s disease in humans......Overlap of RNA and protein networks reveals glia cells as key players for the development of symptomatic Alzheimer’s disease in humans...

  20. Key parameters controlling radiology departments

    Busch, Hans-Peter

    2011-01-01

    For radiology departments and outstanding practises control and optimization of processes demand an efficient management based on key data. Systems of key data deliver indicators for control of medical quality, service quality and economics. For practices effectiveness (productivity), for hospitals effectiveness and efficiency are in the focus of economical optimization strategies. Task of daily key data is continuous monitoring of activities and workflow, task of weekly/monthly key data is control of data quality, process quality and achievement of objectives, task of yearly key data is determination of long term strategies (marketing) and comparison with competitors (benchmarking). Key parameters have to be defined clearly and have to be available directly. For generation, evaluation and control of key parameters suitable forms of organization and processes are necessary. Strategies for the future will be directed more to the total processes of treatment. To think in total processes and to steer and optimize with suitable parameters is the challenge for participants in the healthcare market of the future. (orig.)

  1. Key economic sectors and services

    Arent, Douglas J.; Tol, Richard S.J.; Faust, Eberhard; Hella, Joseph P.; Kumar, Surender; Strzepek, Kenneth M.; Tóth, Ferenc L.; Yan, Denghua; Abdulla, Amjad; Kheshgi, Haroon; Xu, He; Ngeh, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Context This chapter discusses the implications of climate change on key economic sectors and services, for example, economic activity. Other chapters discuss impacts from a physical, chemical, biological, or social perspective. Economic impacts cannot be isolated; therefore, there

  2. Algorithms for Lightweight Key Exchange.

    Alvarez, Rafael; Caballero-Gil, Cándido; Santonja, Juan; Zamora, Antonio

    2017-06-27

    Public-key cryptography is too slow for general purpose encryption, with most applications limiting its use as much as possible. Some secure protocols, especially those that enable forward secrecy, make a much heavier use of public-key cryptography, increasing the demand for lightweight cryptosystems that can be implemented in low powered or mobile devices. This performance requirements are even more significant in critical infrastructure and emergency scenarios where peer-to-peer networks are deployed for increased availability and resiliency. We benchmark several public-key key-exchange algorithms, determining those that are better for the requirements of critical infrastructure and emergency applications and propose a security framework based on these algorithms and study its application to decentralized node or sensor networks.

  3. Key Injury and Violence Data

    ... Traumatic Brain Injury Violence Prevention Key Injury and Violence Data Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Injuries ... of death among persons 1-44. Injury- and violence-related deaths are only part of the problem ...

  4. Large-scale purification and crystallization of the endoribonuclease XendoU: troubleshooting with His-tagged proteins

    Renzi, Fabiana; Panetta, Gianna; Vallone, Beatrice; Brunori, Maurizio; Arceci, Massimo; Bozzoni, Irene; Laneve, Pietro; Caffarelli, Elisa

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant His-tagged XendoU, a eukaryotic endoribonuclease, appeared to aggregate in the presence of divalent cations. Monodisperse protein which yielded crystals diffracting to 2.2 Å was obtained by addition of EDTA. XendoU is the first endoribonuclease described in higher eukaryotes as being involved in the endonucleolytic processing of intron-encoded small nucleolar RNAs. It is conserved among eukaryotes and its viral homologue is essential in SARS replication and transcription. The large-scale purification and crystallization of recombinant XendoU are reported. The tendency of the recombinant enzyme to aggregate could be reversed upon the addition of chelating agents (EDTA, imidazole): aggregation is a potential drawback when purifying and crystallizing His-tagged proteins, which are widely used, especially in high-throughput structural studies. Purified monodisperse XendoU crystallized in two different space groups: trigonal P3 1 21, diffracting to low resolution, and monoclinic C2, diffracting to higher resolution

  5. Secret key rates in quantum key distribution using Renyi entropies

    Abruzzo, Silvestre; Kampermann, Hermann; Mertz, Markus; Bratzik, Sylvia; Bruss, Dagmar [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik III, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The secret key rate r of a quantum key distribution protocol depends on the involved number of signals and the accepted ''failure probability''. We reconsider a method to calculate r focusing on the analysis of the privacy amplification given by R. Renner and R. Koenig (2005). This approach involves an optimization problem with an objective function depending on the Renyi entropy of the density operator describing the classical outcomes and the eavesdropper system. This problem is analyzed for a generic class of QKD protocols and the current research status is presented.

  6. Three state quantum key distribution for small keys

    Batuwantudawe, J.; Boileau, J.-C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols allow two parties, Alice and Bob, to establish secure keys. The most well-known protocol is BB84, using four distinct states. Recently, Phoenix et al. proposed a three state protocol. We explain the protocol and discuss its security proof. The three state protocol also has an interesting structure that allows for errors estimation from the inconclusive results (i.e.. where Alice and Bob choose different bases). This eliminates the need for sampling, potentially useful when qubits are limited. We discuss the effectiveness of this approach compared to BB84 for the case where a good error estimate is required. (author)

  7. Altered Mitochondria, Protein Synthesis Machinery, and Purine Metabolism Are Molecular Contributors to the Pathogenesis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

    Ansoleaga, Belén; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Llorens, Franc; Hernández-Ortega, Karina; Carmona Tech, Margarita; Antonio Del Rio, José; Zerr, Inga; Ferrer, Isidro

    2016-06-12

    Neuron loss, synaptic decline, and spongiform change are the hallmarks of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), and may be related to deficiencies in mitochondria, energy metabolism, and protein synthesis. To investigate these relationships, we determined the expression levels of genes encoding subunits of the 5 protein complexes of the electron transport chain, proteins involved in energy metabolism, nucleolar and ribosomal proteins, and enzymes of purine metabolism in frontal cortex samples from 15 cases of sCJD MM1 and age-matched controls. We also assessed the protein expression levels of subunits of the respiratory chain, initiation and elongation translation factors of protein synthesis, and localization of selected mitochondrial components. We identified marked, generalized alterations of mRNA and protein expression of most subunits of all 5 mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes in sCJD cases. Expression of molecules involved in protein synthesis and purine metabolism were also altered in sCJD. These findings point to altered mRNA and protein expression of components of mitochondria, protein synthesis machinery, and purine metabolism as components of the pathogenesis of CJD. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Decoy State Quantum Key Distribution

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2005-10-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows two parties to communicate in absolute security based on the fundamental laws of physics. Up till now, it is widely believed that unconditionally secure QKD based on standard Bennett-Brassard (BB84) protocol is limited in both key generation rate and distance because of imperfect devices. Here, we solve these two problems directly by presenting new protocols that are feasible with only current technology. Surprisingly, our new protocols can make fiber-based QKD unconditionally secure at distances over 100km (for some experiments, such as GYS) and increase the key generation rate from O(η2) in prior art to O(η) where η is the overall transmittance. Our method is to develop the decoy state idea (first proposed by W.-Y. Hwang in "Quantum Key Distribution with High Loss: Toward Global Secure Communication", Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 057901 (2003)) and consider simple extensions of the BB84 protocol. This part of work is published in "Decoy State Quantum Key Distribution", . We present a general theory of the decoy state protocol and propose a decoy method based on only one signal state and two decoy states. We perform optimization on the choice of intensities of the signal state and the two decoy states. Our result shows that a decoy state protocol with only two types of decoy states--a vacuum and a weak decoy state--asymptotically approaches the theoretical limit of the most general type of decoy state protocols (with an infinite number of decoy states). We also present a one-decoy-state protocol as a special case of Vacuum+Weak decoy method. Moreover, we provide estimations on the effects of statistical fluctuations and suggest that, even for long distance (larger than 100km) QKD, our two-decoy-state protocol can be implemented with only a few hours of experimental data. In conclusion, decoy state quantum key distribution is highly practical. This part of work is published in "Practical Decoy State for Quantum Key Distribution

  9. Protein Structure Prediction by Protein Threading

    Xu, Ying; Liu, Zhijie; Cai, Liming; Xu, Dong

    The seminal work of Bowie, Lüthy, and Eisenberg (Bowie et al., 1991) on "the inverse protein folding problem" laid the foundation of protein structure prediction by protein threading. By using simple measures for fitness of different amino acid types to local structural environments defined in terms of solvent accessibility and protein secondary structure, the authors derived a simple and yet profoundly novel approach to assessing if a protein sequence fits well with a given protein structural fold. Their follow-up work (Elofsson et al., 1996; Fischer and Eisenberg, 1996; Fischer et al., 1996a,b) and the work by Jones, Taylor, and Thornton (Jones et al., 1992) on protein fold recognition led to the development of a new brand of powerful tools for protein structure prediction, which we now term "protein threading." These computational tools have played a key role in extending the utility of all the experimentally solved structures by X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), providing structural models and functional predictions for many of the proteins encoded in the hundreds of genomes that have been sequenced up to now.

  10. Key distillation in quantum cryptography

    Slutsky, Boris Aron

    1998-11-01

    Quantum cryptography is a technique which permits two parties to communicate over an open channel and establish a shared sequence of bits known only to themselves. This task, provably impossible in classical cryptography, is accomplished by encoding the data on quantum particles and harnessing their unique properties. It is believed that no eavesdropping attack consistent with the laws of quantum theory can compromise the secret data unknowingly to the legitimate users of the channel. Any attempt by a hostile actor to monitor the data carrying particles while in transit reveals itself through transmission errors it must inevitably introduce. Unfortunately, in practice a communication is not free of errors even when no eavesdropping is present. Key distillation is a technique that permits the parties to overcome this difficulty and establish a secret key despite channel defects, under the assumption that every particle is handled independently from other particles by the enemy. In the present work, key distillation is described and its various aspects are studied. A relationship is derived between the average error rate resulting from an eavesdropping attack and the amount of information obtained by the attacker. Formal definition is developed of the security of the final key. The net throughput of secret bits in a quantum cryptosystem employing key distillation is assessed. An overview of quantum cryptographic protocols and related information theoretical results is also given.

  11. [PIWI protein as a nucleolus visitor in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Mikhaleva, E A; Iakushev, E Iu; Stoliarenko, A D; Klenov, M S; Pozovskiĭ, Ia M; Gvozdev, V A

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved nuclear Piwi protein of Drosophila melanogaster is a representative of the Argonaute small RNA binding protein family. Guided by small piRNAs, Piwi functions in transposon silencing in somatic and germ cells of the gonad. We found that in ovarian somatic and germ cells, as well as in the established ovarian somatic cell line, Piwi is concentrated predominantly in the nucleolus--the main nuclear compartment, participating not only in rRNA synthesis, but also in various cell stress responses. We demonstrated the colocalization of Piwi with nucleolar marker proteins--fibrillarin and Nopp140. A mutation preventing Piwi transport to the nucleus and disturbing transposon silencing (piwi(Nt)) leads to 6-8-fold upregulation of rRNA genes expression, as evaluated by the level of transcripts of transposon insertions in 28S rRNA genes. RNase treatment of live cultured ovarian somatic cells depletes Piwi from the nucleolus. The same effect is observed upon inhibiting RNA polymerase I which transcribes rRNA, but not RNA polymerase II. In contrast, upon heat shock Piwi is concentrated in the nucleolus and is depleted from the nucleoplasm. These results implicate Piwi in RNA polymerase activity modulation and stress response in the nucleolus. We discuss possible noncanonical Piwi functions along with its canonical role in transposon silencing by piRNAs.

  12. Biophysical characterization of the structural change of Nopp140, an intrinsically disordered protein, in the interaction with CK2α

    Na, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Won-Kyu; Kim, Yuyoung; Jeong, Cherlhyun; Song, Seung Soo; Cha, Sun-Shin; Han, Kyou-Hoon; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Yu, Yeon Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar phosphoprotein 140 (Nopp140) is a nucleolar protein, more than 80% of which is disordered. Previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Nopp140 (residues 568–596) interacts with protein kinase CK2α, and inhibits the catalytic activity of CK2. Although the region of Nopp140 responsible for the interaction with CK2α was identified, the structural features and the effect of this interaction on the structure of Nopp140 have not been defined due to the difficulty of structural characterization of disordered protein. In this study, the disordered feature of Nopp140 and the effect of CK2α on the structure of Nopp140 were examined using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The interaction with CK2α was increased conformational rigidity of the CK2α-interacting region of Nopp140 (Nopp140C), suggesting that the disordered and flexible conformation of Nopp140C became more rigid conformation as it binds to CK2α. In addition, site specific spin labeling and EPR analysis confirmed that the residues 574–589 of Nopp140 are critical for binding to CK2α. Similar technical approaches can be applied to analyze the conformational changes in other IDPs during their interactions with binding partners. - Highlights: • Nopp140 is intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). • Conformation of Nopp140 became more rigid conformation due to interaction with CK2α. • smFRET and EPR could be applied to analyze the structural changes of IDPs.

  13. Biophysical characterization of the structural change of Nopp140, an intrinsically disordered protein, in the interaction with CK2α

    Na, Jung-Hyun [Department of Chemistry, Kookmin University, Jeongneung-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02707 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 03760 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Kyu [Department of Chemistry, Kookmin University, Jeongneung-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yuyoung; Jeong, Cherlhyun [Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Seung Soo [Department of Chemistry, Kookmin University, Jeongneung-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02707 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Sun-Shin [Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 03760 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyou-Hoon [Division of Biosystems Research, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yeon-Kyun [Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Yu, Yeon Gyu, E-mail: ygyu@kookmin.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Kookmin University, Jeongneung-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-19

    Nucleolar phosphoprotein 140 (Nopp140) is a nucleolar protein, more than 80% of which is disordered. Previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Nopp140 (residues 568–596) interacts with protein kinase CK2α, and inhibits the catalytic activity of CK2. Although the region of Nopp140 responsible for the interaction with CK2α was identified, the structural features and the effect of this interaction on the structure of Nopp140 have not been defined due to the difficulty of structural characterization of disordered protein. In this study, the disordered feature of Nopp140 and the effect of CK2α on the structure of Nopp140 were examined using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The interaction with CK2α was increased conformational rigidity of the CK2α-interacting region of Nopp140 (Nopp140C), suggesting that the disordered and flexible conformation of Nopp140C became more rigid conformation as it binds to CK2α. In addition, site specific spin labeling and EPR analysis confirmed that the residues 574–589 of Nopp140 are critical for binding to CK2α. Similar technical approaches can be applied to analyze the conformational changes in other IDPs during their interactions with binding partners. - Highlights: • Nopp140 is intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). • Conformation of Nopp140 became more rigid conformation due to interaction with CK2α. • smFRET and EPR could be applied to analyze the structural changes of IDPs.

  14. Key Lake spill. Final report

    1984-03-01

    On January 5, 1984 contaminated water overflowed a storage reservoir at the Key Lake uranium mill onto the ice on a neighboring lake, into a muskeg area and onto a road. Outflow continued for two days, partially undercutting a retaining dyke. This report concludes the spill was the result of poor operation by the Key Lake Mining Corp.. The environmental impact will be minimal after cleanup. Improvements can be made in the regulatory process, and it is necessary to prepare for possible future mishaps

  15. Key World Energy Statistics 2013

    NONE

    2013-08-01

    The IEA produced its first handy, pocket-sized summary of key energy data in 1997 and every year since then it has been more and more successful. Key World Energy Statistics contains timely, clearly-presented data on supply, transformation and consumption of all major energy sources. The interested businessman, journalist or student will have at his or her fingertips the annual Canadian production of coal, the electricity consumption in Thailand, the price of diesel oil in Spain and thousands of other useful energy facts.

  16. Key China Energy Statistics 2012

    Levine, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fridley, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lu, Hongyou [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fino-Chen, Cecilia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    The China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) was established in 1988. Over the years the Group has gained recognition as an authoritative source of China energy statistics through the publication of its China Energy Databook (CED). The Group has published seven editions to date of the CED (http://china.lbl.gov/research/chinaenergy-databook). This handbook summarizes key statistics from the CED and is expressly modeled on the International Energy Agency’s “Key World Energy Statistics” series of publications. The handbook contains timely, clearly-presented data on the supply, transformation, and consumption of all major energy sources.

  17. Key China Energy Statistics 2011

    Levine, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fridley, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lu, Hongyou [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fino-Chen, Cecilia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) was established in 1988. Over the years the Group has gained recognition as an authoritative source of China energy statistics through the publication of its China Energy Databook (CED). In 2008 the Group published the Seventh Edition of the CED (http://china.lbl.gov/research/chinaenergy-databook). This handbook summarizes key statistics from the CED and is expressly modeled on the International Energy Agency’s “Key World Energy Statistics” series of publications. The handbook contains timely, clearly-presented data on the supply, transformation, and consumption of all major energy sources.

  18. Protein - Which is Best?

    Hoffman, Jay R; Falvo, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids), whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function) are also reviewed. Key PointsHigher protein needs are seen in athletic populations.Animal proteins is an important source of protein, however potential health concerns do exist from a diet of protein

  19. Analysis of protein incorporation of radioactive isotopes in the Chinese hamster ovary cell cycle by electronic sorting and gel microelectrophoresis

    Pipkin, J.L.; Anson, J.F.; Hinson, W.G.; Schol, H.; Burns, E.R.; Casciano, D.A.

    1986-03-01

    The patterns of (3H)-leucine and (32P)-phosphate incorporation of proteins extracted with varying molarities of sodium chloride were analyzed from nuclei physically sorted from six fluorescence windows after propidium iodine staining of the G0 + G1 and G2 + M phases of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cycle. Eight hundred nanograms of protein were used in each electrophoretic analysis obtained from 200,000 nuclei, a portion of the sample, from each window. Autoradiography was performed in a two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel ultra-microelectrophoresis apparatus (UMEA) designed and fabricated in this laboratory. There was a net reduction and/or loss of (3H)-leucine- and (32P)-phosphate-labeled protein regions from the autoradiographs occurring primarily in the G2 + M phase. Two phosphorylated proteins that were stage specific were observed in partitions of the G2 + M phase. The use of isolated proteins and the coelectrophoresis of these markers demonstrated the similarity in mobility of a number of proteins seen in the autoradiographs of proteins extracted with high and low salt molarities and implied they are synonymous. Coelectrophoresis indicated that a substantial number of high molecular weight proteins that decreased or disappeared at late stages of G2 + M and early mitosis were composed, in part, of nucleolar proteins.

  20. Grouted Connections with Shear Keys

    Pedersen, Ronnie; Jørgensen, M. B.; Damkilde, Lars

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a finite element model in the software package ABAQUS in which a reliable analysis of grouted pile-to-sleeve connections with shear keys is the particular purpose. The model is calibrated to experimental results and a consistent set of input parameters is estimated so that dif...... that different structural problems can be reproduced successfully....

  1. Key to marine arthropod larvae

    John A. Fornshell

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this key is restricted to the larvae of marine arthropods. The key is based solely on their morphology, patterns of body segmentation, numbers of appendages, and mode of locomotion. An effort has been made to treat all traditionally named larval forms, both planktonic and benthic. It is intended that this key be useful for a researcher working with archived museum specimens and therefore, does not include habitat information as a identifying trait, even though this information is usually available in the archived records. Within the phylum Arthropoda there are two sub-phyla and eleven classes having larval stages in the marineenvironment. Where feasible the original names of the various larval types have been used. Because this nomenclature is less commonly used today compared to the past, the more recent taxonomic affinities are included in parentheses after the original larval name. The key includes the following thirty-four larvae: Branchhiopoda nauplii; Cephalocarida nauplii; Mystacocarida nauplii; trilobite larva; protonymphon; hexapod larvae; Remipedia nauplii; nauplius - Y larvae; Cirripedia nauplii; Ascothoracida nauplii; Ostracoda nauplii; Euphausiacea nauplii; Penaeidea nauplii; Cyclopoida nauplii; Calanoida nauplii; Harpacticoida nauplii;Polyarthra nauplii; cypris larva; eryonecius larva; cypris-Y larva; elapthocaris larvae; mysis larvae; lucifer zoea; acetes zoea; acanthosoma larva; phyllosoma; antizoea larva; anomuran zoea; brachyuran zoea; calyptopis larvae; furcilia larva; crytopia larva; puerulus larva; alima larva.

  2. Symmetric Key Authentication Services Revisited

    Crispo, B.; Popescu, B.C.; Tanenbaum, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Most of the symmetric key authentication schemes deployed today are based on principles introduced by Needham and Schroeder [15] more than twenty years ago. However, since then, the computing environment has evolved from a LAN-based client-server world to include new paradigms, including wide area

  3. Key World Energy Statistics 2012

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Key World Energy Statistics contains timely, clearly-presented data on supply, transformation and consumption of all major energy sources. The interested businessman, journalist or student will have at his or her fingertips the annual Canadian production of coal, the electricity consumption in Thailand, the price of diesel oil in Spain and thousands of other useful energy facts.

  4. [Key informers. When and How?].

    Martín González, R

    2009-03-01

    When information obtained through duly designed and developed studies is not available, the solution to certain problems that affect the population or that respond to certain questions may be approached by using the information and experience provided by the so-called key informer. The key informer is defined as a person who is in contact with the community or with the problem to be studied, who is considered to have good knowledge of the situation and therefore who is considered an expert. The search for consensus is the basis to obtain information through the key informers. The techniques used have different characteristics based on whether the experts chosen meet together or not, whether they are guided or not, whether they interact with each other or not. These techniques include the survey, the Delphi technique, the nominal group technique, brainwriting, brainstorming, the Phillips 66 technique, the 6-3-5 technique, the community forum and the community impressions technique. Information provided by key informers through the search for consensus is relevant when this is not available or cannot be obtained by other methods. It has permitted the analysis of the existing neurological care model, elaboration of recommendations on visit times for the out-patient neurological care, and the elaboration of guidelines and recommendations for the management of prevalent neurological problems.

  5. The Key to School Security.

    Hotle, Dan

    1993-01-01

    In addition to legislative accessibility requirements, other security issues facing school administrators who select a security system include the following: access control; user friendliness; durability or serviceability; life safety precautions; possibility of vandalism, theft, and tampering; and key control. Offers steps to take in considering…

  6. Protein-Protein Docking in Drug Design and Discovery.

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Bartuzi, Damian; Stępniewski, Tomasz Maciej; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Selent, Jana

    2018-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are responsible for a number of key physiological processes in the living cells and underlie the pathomechanism of many diseases. Nowadays, along with the concept of so-called "hot spots" in protein-protein interactions, which are well-defined interface regions responsible for most of the binding energy, these interfaces can be targeted with modulators. In order to apply structure-based design techniques to design PPIs modulators, a three-dimensional structure of protein complex has to be available. In this context in silico approaches, in particular protein-protein docking, are a valuable complement to experimental methods for elucidating 3D structure of protein complexes. Protein-protein docking is easy to use and does not require significant computer resources and time (in contrast to molecular dynamics) and it results in 3D structure of a protein complex (in contrast to sequence-based methods of predicting binding interfaces). However, protein-protein docking cannot address all the aspects of protein dynamics, in particular the global conformational changes during protein complex formation. In spite of this fact, protein-protein docking is widely used to model complexes of water-soluble proteins and less commonly to predict structures of transmembrane protein assemblies, including dimers and oligomers of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In this chapter we review the principles of protein-protein docking, available algorithms and software and discuss the recent examples, benefits, and drawbacks of protein-protein docking application to water-soluble proteins, membrane anchoring and transmembrane proteins, including GPCRs.

  7. Key mediators modulating TAG synthesis and accumulation in ...

    the key mediators on TAG synthesis and accumulation, among which diacylglycerol acyltransferases (DGATs) is discussed for its clear role in TAG amount and composition. Furthermore TAG-accosiated proteins called oleosins are also discussed in depth due to their determination on the amount and size of oil bodies.

  8. Tyrosine phosphorylation of WW proteins

    Reuven, Nina; Shanzer, Matan

    2015-01-01

    A number of key regulatory proteins contain one or two copies of the WW domain known to mediate protein–protein interaction via proline-rich motifs, such as PPxY. The Hippo pathway components take advantage of this module to transduce tumor suppressor signaling. It is becoming evident that tyrosine phosphorylation is a critical regulator of the WW proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on the involved tyrosine kinases and their roles in regulating the WW proteins. PMID:25627656

  9. Key drivers of airline loyalty.

    Dolnicar, Sara; Grabler, Klaus; Grün, Bettina; Kulnig, Anna

    2011-10-01

    This study investigates drivers of airline loyalty. It contributes to the body of knowledge in the area by investigating loyalty for a number of a priori market segments identified by airline management and by using a method which accounts for the multi-step nature of the airline choice process. The study is based on responses from 687 passengers. Results indicate that, at aggregate level, frequent flyer membership, price, the status of being a national carrier and the reputation of the airline as perceived by friends are the variables which best discriminate between travellers loyal to the airline and those who are not. Differences in drivers of airline loyalty for a number of segments were identified. For example, loyalty programs play a key role for business travellers whereas airline loyalty of leisure travellers is difficult to trace back to single factors. For none of the calculated models satisfaction emerged as a key driver of airline loyalty.

  10. Key papers in prostate cancer.

    Rodney, Simon; Shah, Taimur Tariq; Patel, Hitendra R H; Arya, Manit

    2014-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer and second leading cause of death in men. The evidence base for the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer is continually changing. We aim to review and discuss past and contemporary papers on these topics to provoke debate and highlight key dilemmas faced by the urological community. We review key papers on prostate-specific antigen screening, radical prostatectomy versus surveillance strategies, targeted therapies, timing of radiotherapy and alternative anti-androgen therapeutics. Previously, the majority of patients, irrespective of risk, underwent radical open surgical procedures associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Evidence is emerging that not all prostate cancers are alike and that low-grade disease can be safely managed by surveillance strategies and localized treatment to the prostate. The question remains as to how to accurately stage the disease and ultimately choose which treatment pathway to follow.

  11. Key Topics in Sports Medicine

    2006-01-01

    Key Topics in Sports Medicine is a single quick reference source for sports and exercise medicine. It presents the essential information from across relevant topic areas, and includes both the core and emerging issues in this rapidly developing field. It covers: 1) Sports injuries, rehabilitation and injury prevention, 2) Exercise physiology, fitness testing and training, 3) Drugs in sport, 4) Exercise and health promotion, 5) Sport and exercise for special and clinical populations, 6) The ps...

  12. Key issues for passive safety

    Hayns, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    The paper represents a summary of the introductory presentation made at this Advisory Group Meeting on the Technical Feasibility and Reliability of Passive Safety Systems. It was intended as an overview of our views on what are the key issues and what are the technical problems which might dominate any future developments of passive safety systems. It is, therefore, not a ''review paper'' as such and only record the highlights. (author)

  13. Human Resources Key Performance Indicators

    Gabčanová Iveta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article brings out a proposed strategy map and respective key performance indicators (KPIs in human resources (HR. The article provides an overview of how HR activities are supported in order to reach the partial goals of HR as defined in the strategic map. Overall the aim of the paper is to show the possibilities of using the modern Balanced Scorecard method in human capital.

  14. Key issues for passive safety

    Hayns, M R [AEA Technology, Harwell, Didcot (United Kingdom). European Institutions; Hicken, E F [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    The paper represents a summary of the introductory presentation made at this Advisory Group Meeting on the Technical Feasibility and Reliability of Passive Safety Systems. It was intended as an overview of our views on what are the key issues and what are the technical problems which might dominate any future developments of passive safety systems. It is, therefore, not a ``review paper`` as such and only record the highlights. (author).

  15. Low carbon development. Key issues

    Urban, Frauke; Nordensvaard, Johan (eds.)

    2013-03-07

    This comprehensive textbook addresses the interface between international development and climate change in a carbon constrained world. It discusses the key conceptual, empirical and policy-related issues of low carbon development and takes an international and interdisciplinary approach to the subject by drawing on insights from across the natural sciences and social sciences whilst embedding the discussion in a global context. The first part explores the concept of low carbon development and explains the need for low carbon development in a carbon constrained world. The book then discusses the key issues of socio-economic, political and technological nature for low carbon development, exploring topics such as the political economy, social justice, financing and carbon markets, and technologies and innovation for low carbon development. This is followed by key issues for low carbon development in policy and practice, which is presented based on cross-cutting issues such as low carbon energy, forestry, agriculture and transportation. Afterwards, practical case studies are discussed from low carbon development in low income countries in Africa, middle income countries in Asia and Latin America and high income countries in Europe and North America.

  16. Detector decoy quantum key distribution

    Moroder, Tobias; Luetkenhaus, Norbert; Curty, Marcos

    2009-01-01

    Photon number resolving detectors can enhance the performance of many practical quantum cryptographic setups. In this paper, we employ a simple method to estimate the statistics provided by such a photon number resolving detector using only a threshold detector together with a variable attenuator. This idea is similar in spirit to that of the decoy state technique, and is especially suited to those scenarios where only a few parameters of the photon number statistics of the incoming signals have to be estimated. As an illustration of the potential applicability of the method in quantum communication protocols, we use it to prove security of an entanglement-based quantum key distribution scheme with an untrusted source without the need for a squash model and by solely using this extra idea. In this sense, this detector decoy method can be seen as a different conceptual approach to adapt a single-photon security proof to its physical, full optical implementation. We show that in this scenario, the legitimate users can now even discard the double click events from the raw key data without compromising the security of the scheme, and we present simulations on the performance of the BB84 and the 6-state quantum key distribution protocols.

  17. Grow-ING, Age-ING and Die-ING: ING proteins link cancer, senescence and apoptosis

    Russell, Michael; Berardi, Philip; Gong Wei; Riabowol, Karl

    2006-01-01

    The INhibitor of Growth (ING) family of plant homeodomain (PHD) proteins induce apoptosis and regulate gene expression through stress-inducible binding of phospholipids with subsequent nuclear and nucleolar localization. Relocalization occurs concomitantly with interaction with a subset of nuclear proteins, including PCNA, p53 and several regulators of acetylation such as the p300/CBP and PCAF histone acetyltransferases (HATs), as well as the histone deacetylases HDAC1 and hSir2. These interactions alter the localized state of chromatin compaction, subsequently affecting the expression of subsets of genes, including those associated with the stress response (Hsp70), apoptosis (Bax, MDM2) and cell cycle regulation (p21 WAF1 , cyclin B) in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. The expression levels and subcellular localization of ING proteins are altered in a significant number of human cancer types, while the expression of ING isoforms changes during cellular aging, suggesting that ING proteins may play a role in linking cellular transformation and replicative senescence. The variety of functions attributed to ING proteins suggest that this tumor suppressor serves to link the disparate processes of cell cycle regulation, cell suicide and cellular aging through epigenetic regulation of gene expression. This review examines recent findings in the ING field with a focus on the functions of protein-protein interactions involving ING family members and the mechanisms by which these interactions facilitate the various roles that ING proteins play in tumorigenesis, apoptosis and senescence

  18. Key Concepts in Microbial Oceanography

    Bruno, B. C.; Achilles, K.; Walker, G.; Weersing, K.; Team, A

    2008-12-01

    The Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) is a multi-institution Science and Technology Center, established by the National Science Foundation in 2006. C-MORE's research mission is to facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the diverse assemblages of microorganisms in the sea, ranging from the genetic basis of marine microbial biogeochemistry including the metabolic regulation and environmental controls of gene expression, to the processes that underpin the fluxes of carbon, related bioelements, and energy in the marine environment. The C-MORE education and outreach program is focused on increasing scientific literacy in microbial oceanography among students, educators, and the general public. A first step toward this goal is defining the key concepts that constitute microbial oceanography. After lengthy discussions with scientists and educators, both within and outside C-MORE, we have arrived at six key concepts: 1) Marine microbes are very small and have been around for a long time; 2) Life on Earth could not exist without microbes; 3) Most marine microbes are beneficial; 4) Microbes are everywhere: they are extremely abundant and diverse; 5) Microbes significantly impact our global climate; and 6) There are new discoveries every day in the field of microbial oceanography. A C-MORE-produced brochure on these six key concepts will be distributed at the meeting. Advanced copies may be requested by email or downloaded from the C-MORE web site(http://cmore.soest.hawaii.edu/downloads/MO_key_concepts_hi-res.pdf). This brochure also includes information on career pathways in microbial oceanography, with the aim of broadening participation in the field. C-MORE is eager to work in partnership to incorporate these key concepts into other science literacy publications, particularly those involving ocean and climate literacy. We thank the following contributors and reviewers: P Chisholm, A Dolberry, and A Thompson (MIT); N Lawrence

  19. Mutation of the N-Terminal Region of Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein: Implications for Vaccine Design.

    Taylor, Adam; Liu, Xiang; Zaid, Ali; Goh, Lucas Y H; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Hall, Roy A; Merits, Andres; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2017-02-21

    Mosquito-transmitted chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for frequent outbreaks of arthritic disease in humans. Capsid protein, a structural protein encoded by the CHIKV RNA genome, is able to translocate to the host cell nucleolus. In encephalitic alphaviruses, nuclear translocation induces host cell transcriptional shutoff; however, the role of capsid protein nucleolar localization in arthritogenic alphaviruses remains unclear. Using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged expression constructs and CHIKV infectious clones, we describe a nucleolar localization sequence (NoLS) in the N-terminal region of capsid protein, previously uncharacterized in CHIKV. Mutation of the NoLS by site-directed mutagenesis reduced efficiency of nuclear import of CHIKV capsid protein. In the virus, mutation of the capsid protein NoLS (CHIKV-NoLS) attenuated replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, producing a small-plaque phenotype. Attenuation of CHIKV-NoLS is likely due to disruption of the viral replication cycle downstream of viral RNA synthesis. In mice, CHIKV-NoLS infection caused no disease signs compared to wild-type CHIKV (CHIKV-WT)-infected mice; lack of disease signs correlated with significantly reduced viremia and decreased expression of proinflammatory factors. Mice immunized with CHIKV-NoLS, challenged with CHIKV-WT at 30 days postimmunization, develop no disease signs and no detectable viremia. Serum from CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice is able to efficiently neutralize CHIKV infection in vitro Additionally, CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice challenged with the related alphavirus Ross River virus showed reduced early and peak viremia postchallenge, indicating a cross-protective effect. The high degree of CHIKV-NoLS attenuation may improve CHIKV antiviral and rational vaccine design. IMPORTANCE CHIKV is a mosquito-borne pathogen capable of causing explosive epidemics of incapacitating joint pain

  20. Modified Protein Improves Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice

    ... Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice Spotlight on Research Modified Protein Improves Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice By Colleen Labbe, ... D., Ph.D., Rush University. Altering a key protein involved in the development of vitiligo may protect ...

  1. Arabinogalactan proteins have deep roots in eukaryotes

    Hervé, Cécile; Siméon, Amandine; Jam, Murielle

    2016-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly glycosylated, hydroxyproline-rich proteins found at the cell surface of plants, where they play key roles in developmental processes. Brown algae are marine, multicellular, photosynthetic eukaryotes. They belong to the phylum Stramenopiles, which...

  2. Protein stability: a crystallographer’s perspective

    Deller, Marc C.; Kong, Leopold; Rupp, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of protein stability is essential for optimizing the expression, purification and crystallization of proteins. In this review, discussion will focus on factors affecting protein stability on a somewhat practical level, particularly from the view of a protein crystallographer. Protein stability is a topic of major interest for the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and food industries, in addition to being a daily consideration for academic researchers studying proteins. An understanding of protein stability is essential for optimizing the expression, purification, formulation, storage and structural studies of proteins. In this review, discussion will focus on factors affecting protein stability, on a somewhat practical level, particularly from the view of a protein crystallographer. The differences between protein conformational stability and protein compositional stability will be discussed, along with a brief introduction to key methods useful for analyzing protein stability. Finally, tactics for addressing protein-stability issues during protein expression, purification and crystallization will be discussed

  3. Protein stability: a crystallographer’s perspective

    Deller, Marc C., E-mail: mdeller@stanford.edu [Stanford University, Shriram Center, 443 Via Ortega, Room 097, MC5082, Stanford, CA 94305-4125 (United States); Kong, Leopold [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Building 8, Room 1A03, 8 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Rupp, Bernhard [k.-k. Hofkristallamt, 91 Audrey Place, Vista, CA 92084 (United States); Medical University of Innsbruck, Schöpfstrasse 41, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-01-26

    An understanding of protein stability is essential for optimizing the expression, purification and crystallization of proteins. In this review, discussion will focus on factors affecting protein stability on a somewhat practical level, particularly from the view of a protein crystallographer. Protein stability is a topic of major interest for the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and food industries, in addition to being a daily consideration for academic researchers studying proteins. An understanding of protein stability is essential for optimizing the expression, purification, formulation, storage and structural studies of proteins. In this review, discussion will focus on factors affecting protein stability, on a somewhat practical level, particularly from the view of a protein crystallographer. The differences between protein conformational stability and protein compositional stability will be discussed, along with a brief introduction to key methods useful for analyzing protein stability. Finally, tactics for addressing protein-stability issues during protein expression, purification and crystallization will be discussed.

  4. Fibre Optic Communication Key Devices

    Grote, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The book gives an in-depth description of the key devices of current and next generation fibre optic communication networks. In particular, the book covers devices such as semiconductor lasers, optical amplifiers, modulators, wavelength filters, and detectors but the relevant properties of optical fibres as well. The presentations include the physical principles underlying the various devices, the technologies used for the realization of the different devices, typical performance characteristics and limitations, and development trends towards more advanced components are also illustrated. Thus the scope of the book spans relevant principles, state-of-the-art implementations, the status of current research and expected future components.

  5. Symmetric autocompensating quantum key distribution

    Walton, Zachary D.; Sergienko, Alexander V.; Levitin, Lev B.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.; Teich, Malvin C.

    2004-08-01

    We present quantum key distribution schemes which are autocompensating (require no alignment) and symmetric (Alice and Bob receive photons from a central source) for both polarization and time-bin qubits. The primary benefit of the symmetric configuration is that both Alice and Bob may have passive setups (neither Alice nor Bob is required to make active changes for each run of the protocol). We show that both the polarization and the time-bin schemes may be implemented with existing technology. The new schemes are related to previously described schemes by the concept of advanced waves.

  6. Key energy technologies for Europe

    Jørgensen, B.H.

    2005-01-01

    This report on key energy technologies is part of the work undertaken by the High-Level Expert Group to prepare a report on emerging science and technology trends and the implications for EU and Member State research policies. Senior Scientist BirteHolst Jørgensen, Risø National Laboratory...... contributed by Scientific Officer Edgar Thielmann, DG TREN, Head of Department Hans Larsen, RisøNational Laboratory, Senior Asset Manager Aksel Hauge Pedersen, DONG VE, Consultant Timon Wehnert, IZT-Berlin, and Senior Scientist Martine Uyterlinde, ECN...

  7. Key concepts in social pedagogy

    Harbo, Lotte Junker

    2011-01-01

    and activities around key social pedagogical concepts, such as the Common Third, the 3 P’s, the Zone of Proximal Development and the Learning Zone model. In the article we explore how a joint activity, for example playing soccer, can be seen as a pedagogical activity and with what intentions it is undertaken......“Now I can actually play soccer with the young people without fearing that my colleagues think I am escaping the paper work.” These were the words from a participant in a social pedagogy training course in England a few years ago. This understanding emerged through in-depth discussions...

  8. Public/private key certification authority and key distribution. Draft

    Long, J.P.; Christensen, M.J.; Sturtevant, A.P.; Johnston, W.E.

    1995-09-25

    Traditional encryption, which protects messages from prying eyes, has been used for many decades. The present concepts of encryption are built from that heritage. Utilization of modern software-based encryption techniques implies much more than simply converting files to an unreadable form. Ubiquitous use of computers and advances in encryption technology coupled with the use of wide-area networking completely changed the reasons for utilizing encryption technology. The technology demands a new and extensive infrastructure to support these functions. Full understanding of these functions, their utility and value, and the need for an infrastructure, takes extensive exposure to the new paradigm. This paper addresses issues surrounding the establishment and operation of a key management system (i.e., certification authority) that is essential to the successful implementation and wide-spread use of encryption.

  9. G2E3 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with DNA damage responsive localization

    Brooks, William S.; Banerjee, Sami; Crawford, David F.

    2007-01-01

    G2E3 was originally described as a G2/M-specific gene with DNA damage responsive expression. The presence of a conserved HECT domain within the carboxy-terminus of the protein indicated that it likely functions as a ubiquitin ligase or E3. Although HECT domains are known to function in this capacity for many proteins, we demonstrate that a portion of the HECT domain from G2E3 plays an important role in the dynamic subcellular localization of the protein. We have shown that G2E3 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with nuclear export mediated by a novel nuclear export domain that functions independently of CRM1. In full-length G2E3, a separate region of the HECT domain suppresses the function of the NES. Additionally, G2E3 contains a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) in its amino terminus. Localization of G2E3 to the nucleolus is a dynamic process, and the protein delocalizes from the nucleolus rapidly after DNA damage. Cell cycle phase-specific expression and highly regulated subcellular localization of G2E3 suggest a possible role in cell cycle regulation and the cellular response to DNA damage

  10. The spliceosome-associated protein Mfap1 binds to VCP in Drosophila.

    Sandra Rode

    Full Text Available Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression contributes to many developmental transitions. Previously, we found that the AAA chaperone Valosin-Containing Protein (VCP regulates ecdysone-dependent dendrite pruning of Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization (c4da neurons via an effect on RNA metabolism. In a search for RNA binding proteins associated with VCP, we identified the spliceosome-associated protein Mfap1, a component of the tri-snRNP complex. Mfap1 is a nucleolar protein in neurons and its levels are regulated by VCP. Mfap1 binds to VCP and TDP-43, a disease-associated RNA-binding protein. via distinct regions in its N- and C-terminal halfs. Similar to vcp mutations, Mfap1 overexpression causes c4da neuron dendrite pruning defects and mislocalization of TDP-43 in these cells, but genetic analyses show that Mfap1 is not a crucial VCP target during dendrite pruning. Finally, rescue experiments with a lethal mfap1 mutant show that the VCP binding region is not essential for Mfap1 function, but may act to increase its stability or activity.

  11. Three key affordances for serendipity

    Björneborn, Lennart

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Serendipity is an interesting phenomenon to study in information science as it plays a fundamental – but perhaps underestimated – role in how we discover, explore, and learn in all fields of life. The purpose of this paper is to operationalize the concept of serendipity by providing termi...... terminological “building blocks” for understanding connections between environmental and personal factors in serendipitous encounters. Understanding these connections is essential when designing affordances in physical and digital environments that can facilitate serendipity. Design....../methodology/approach In this paper, serendipity is defined as what happens when we, in unplanned ways, encounter resources (information, things, people, etc.) that we find interesting. In the outlined framework, serendipity is understood as an affordance, i.e., a usage potential when environmental and personal factors correspond...... the three key affordances and three key personal serendipity factors: curiosity, mobility, and sensitivity. Ten sub-affordances for serendipity and ten coupled personal sub-factors are also briefly outlined. Related research is compared with and mapped into the framework aiming at a theoretical validation...

  12. Key energy technologies for Europe

    Holst Joergensen, Birte

    2005-09-01

    The report is part of the work undertaken by the High-Level Expert Group to prepare a report on emerging science and technology trends and the implications for EU and Member State research policies. The outline of the report is: 1) In the introductory section, energy technologies are defined and for analytical reasons further narrowed down; 2) The description of the socio-economic challenges facing Europe in the energy field is based on the analysis made by the International Energy Agency going back to 1970 and with forecasts to 2030. Both the world situation and the European situation are described. This section also contains an overview of the main EU policy responses to energy. Both EU energy R and D as well as Member State energy R and D resources are described in view of international efforts; 3) The description of the science and technology base is made for selected energy technologies, including energy efficiency, biomass, hydrogen, and fuel cells, photovoltaics, clean fossil fuel technologies and CO 2 capture and storage, nuclear fission and fusion. When possible, a SWOT is made for each technology and finally summarised; 4) The forward look highlights some of the key problems and uncertainties related to the future energy situation. Examples of recent energy foresights are given, including national energy foresights in Sweden and the UK as well as links to a number of regional and national foresights and roadmaps; 5) Appendix 1 contains a short description of key international organisations dealing with energy technologies and energy research. (ln)

  13. Biological significance of 5S rRNA import into human mitochondria: role of ribosomal protein MRP-L18

    Smirnov, Alexandre; Entelis, Nina; Martin, Robert P.; Tarassov, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    5S rRNA is an essential component of ribosomes of all living organisms, the only known exceptions being mitochondrial ribosomes of fungi, animals, and some protists. An intriguing situation distinguishes mammalian cells: Although the mitochondrial genome contains no 5S rRNA genes, abundant import of the nuclear DNA-encoded 5S rRNA into mitochondria was reported. Neither the detailed mechanism of this pathway nor its rationale was clarified to date. In this study, we describe an elegant molecular conveyor composed of a previously identified human 5S rRNA import factor, rhodanese, and mitochondrial ribosomal protein L18, thanks to which 5S rRNA molecules can be specifically withdrawn from the cytosolic pool and redirected to mitochondria, bypassing the classic nucleolar reimport pathway. Inside mitochondria, the cytosolic 5S rRNA is shown to be associated with mitochondrial ribosomes. PMID:21685364

  14. Identification of novel markers that demarcate the nucleolus during severe stress and chemotherapeutic treatment.

    Su, Haitong; Kodiha, Mohamed; Lee, Sunghoon; Stochaj, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    The nucleolus, the ribosomal factory of the cell, has emerged as a key player that regulates many aspects of cell biology. Several thousand proteins associate at least transiently with nucleoli, thereby generating a highly dynamic compartment with a protein profile which is sensitive to changes in cell physiology and pharmacological agents. Powerful tools that reliably demarcate the nucleoli are a prerequisite to measure their composition and activities. Previously, we developed quantitative methods to measure fluorescently labeled molecules in nucleoli. While these tools identify nucleoli under control and mild stress conditions, the accurate detection of nucleolar boundaries under harsh experimental conditions is complicated by the lack of appropriate markers for the nucleolar compartment. Using fluorescence microscopy we have now identified new marker proteins to detect nucleoli upon (a) severe stress and (b) drug treatments that trigger a pronounced reorganization of nucleoli. Our results demonstrate that nucleolin is an ideal marker to delimit nucleoli when cells are exposed to heat or oxidative stress. Furthermore, we show for the first time that cellular apoptosis susceptibility protein (CAS) and human antigen R protein (HuR) are excluded from nucleoli and can be employed to delimit these compartments under severe conditions that redistribute major nucleolar proteins. As proof-of-principle, we used these markers to demarcate nucleoli in cells treated with pharmacological compounds that disrupt the nucleolar organization. Furthermore, to gain new insights into the biology of the nucleolus, we applied our protocols and quantified stress- and drug-induced changes in nucleolar organization and function. Finally, we show that CAS, HuR and nucleolin not only identify nucleoli in optical sections, but are also suitable to demarcate the nucleolar border following 3D reconstruction. Taken together, our studies present novel marker proteins that delimit nucleoli with

  15. Identification of novel markers that demarcate the nucleolus during severe stress and chemotherapeutic treatment.

    Haitong Su

    Full Text Available The nucleolus, the ribosomal factory of the cell, has emerged as a key player that regulates many aspects of cell biology. Several thousand proteins associate at least transiently with nucleoli, thereby generating a highly dynamic compartment with a protein profile which is sensitive to changes in cell physiology and pharmacological agents. Powerful tools that reliably demarcate the nucleoli are a prerequisite to measure their composition and activities. Previously, we developed quantitative methods to measure fluorescently labeled molecules in nucleoli. While these tools identify nucleoli under control and mild stress conditions, the accurate detection of nucleolar boundaries under harsh experimental conditions is complicated by the lack of appropriate markers for the nucleolar compartment. Using fluorescence microscopy we have now identified new marker proteins to detect nucleoli upon (a severe stress and (b drug treatments that trigger a pronounced reorganization of nucleoli. Our results demonstrate that nucleolin is an ideal marker to delimit nucleoli when cells are exposed to heat or oxidative stress. Furthermore, we show for the first time that cellular apoptosis susceptibility protein (CAS and human antigen R protein (HuR are excluded from nucleoli and can be employed to delimit these compartments under severe conditions that redistribute major nucleolar proteins. As proof-of-principle, we used these markers to demarcate nucleoli in cells treated with pharmacological compounds that disrupt the nucleolar organization. Furthermore, to gain new insights into the biology of the nucleolus, we applied our protocols and quantified stress- and drug-induced changes in nucleolar organization and function. Finally, we show that CAS, HuR and nucleolin not only identify nucleoli in optical sections, but are also suitable to demarcate the nucleolar border following 3D reconstruction. Taken together, our studies present novel marker proteins that

  16. Protein scaffolds and higher-order complexes in synthetic biology

    den Hamer, A.; Rosier, B.J.H.M.; Brunsveld, L.; de Greef, T.F.A.; Ryadnov, M.; Brunsveld, L.; Suga, H.

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between proteins control molecular functions such as signalling or metabolic activity. Assembly of proteins via scaffold proteins or in higher-order complexes is a key regulatory mechanism. Understanding and functionally applying this concept requires the construction, study, and

  17. Key to Language Learning Success

    Oktavian Mantiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the important elements of language learning and teaching i.e. the role of teachers as well as the attitude and motivation of learners. Teachers undoubtedly play crucial roles in students’ language learning outcome which could ignite or diminish students’ motivation. Positive attitudes and motivation – instrumental or integrative and intrinsic or extrinsic – are key to successful learning. Therefore it is paramount for language teachers as well as learners to know these roles and nurture the best possible ways where language teaching and learning will thrive. This paper also suggested that both stake-holders should be open to holistic approach of language learning and that other factors such as the environment could play an important part in language teaching and learning success.

  18. Cogeneration: Key feasibility analysis parameters

    Coslovi, S.; Zulian, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper first reviews the essential requirements, in terms of scope, objectives and methods, of technical/economic feasibility analyses applied to cogeneration systems proposed for industrial plants in Italy. Attention is given to the influence on overall feasibility of the following factors: electric power and fuel costs, equipment coefficients of performance, operating schedules, maintenance costs, Italian Government taxes and financial and legal incentives. Through an examination of several feasibility studies that were done on cogeneration proposals relative to different industrial sectors, a sensitivity analysis is performed on the effects of varying the weights of different cost benefit analysis parameters. With the use of statistical analyses, standard deviations are then determined for key analysis parameters, and guidelines are suggested for analysis simplifications

  19. Fibre optic communication key devices

    Grote, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    The book gives an in-depth description of key devices of current and next generation fibre optic communication networks. Devices treated include semiconductor lasers, optical amplifiers, modulators, wavelength filters and other passives, detectors, all-optical switches, but relevant properties of optical fibres and network aspects are included as well. The presentations include the physical principles underlying the various devices, technologies used for their realization, typical performance characteristics and limitations, but development trends towards more advanced components are also illustrated. This new edition of a successful book was expanded and updated extensively. The new edition covers among others lasers for optical communication, optical switches, hybrid integration, monolithic integration and silicon photonics. The main focus is on Indium phosphide-based structures but silicon photonics is included as well. The book covers relevant principles, state-of-the-art implementations, status of curren...

  20. Key energy technologies for Europe

    Holst Joergensen, Birte

    2005-09-01

    The report is part of the work undertaken by the High-Level Expert Group to prepare a report on emerging science and technology trends and the implications for EU and Member State research policies. The outline of the report is: 1) In the introductory section, energy technologies are defined and for analytical reasons further narrowed down; 2) The description of the socio-economic challenges facing Europe in the energy field is based on the analysis made by the International Energy Agency going back to 1970 and with forecasts to 2030. Both the world situation and the European situation are described. This section also contains an overview of the main EU policy responses to energy. Both EU energy R and D as well as Member State energy R and D resources are described in view of international efforts; 3) The description of the science and technology base is made for selected energy technologies, including energy efficiency, biomass, hydrogen, and fuel cells, photovoltaics, clean fossil fuel technologies and CO{sub 2} capture and storage, nuclear fission and fusion. When possible, a SWOT is made for each technology and finally summarised; 4) The forward look highlights some of the key problems and uncertainties related to the future energy situation. Examples of recent energy foresights are given, including national energy foresights in Sweden and the UK as well as links to a number of regional and national foresights and roadmaps; 5) Appendix 1 contains a short description of key international organisations dealing with energy technologies and energy research. (ln)

  1. Artificially Engineered Protein Polymers.

    Yang, Yun Jung; Holmberg, Angela L; Olsen, Bradley D

    2017-06-07

    Modern polymer science increasingly requires precise control over macromolecular structure and properties for engineering advanced materials and biomedical systems. The application of biological processes to design and synthesize artificial protein polymers offers a means for furthering macromolecular tunability, enabling polymers with dispersities of ∼1.0 and monomer-level sequence control. Taking inspiration from materials evolved in nature, scientists have created modular building blocks with simplified monomer sequences that replicate the function of natural systems. The corresponding protein engineering toolbox has enabled the systematic development of complex functional polymeric materials across areas as diverse as adhesives, responsive polymers, and medical materials. This review discusses the natural proteins that have inspired the development of key building blocks for protein polymer engineering and the function of these elements in material design. The prospects and progress for scalable commercialization of protein polymers are reviewed, discussing both technology needs and opportunities.

  2. PROTEIN - WHICH IS BEST?

    Michael J. Falvo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids, whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function are also reviewed

  3. 25 CFR 502.14 - Key employee.

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Key employee. 502.14 Section 502.14 Indians NATIONAL....14 Key employee. Key employee means: (a) A person who performs one or more of the following functions... gaming operation. (d) Any other person designated by the tribe as a key employee. [57 FR 12392, Apr. 9...

  4. VICKEY: Mining Conditional Keys on Knowledge Bases

    Symeonidou, Danai; Prado, Luis Antonio Galarraga Del; Pernelle, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    A conditional key is a key constraint that is valid in only a part of the data. In this paper, we show how such keys can be mined automatically on large knowledge bases (KBs). For this, we combine techniques from key mining with techniques from rule mining. We show that our method can scale to KBs...

  5. Quantum key distribution and cryptography

    Alleaume, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Originally proposed by classical cryptographers, the ideas behind Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) have attracted considerable interest among the quantum optics community, which has significantly helped bring these ideas to reality. Experimental realizations have quickly evolved from early lab demonstrations to QKD systems that are now deployed in real conditions and targeting commercial applications. Although QKD can be theoretically proven to rely on 'unconditional security proofs' and should thus be able to provide security levels unachievable through computationally-based cryptographic techniques, the debate on the cryptographic applications of QKD remains somehow controversial. It seems that a consensus on that matter cannot be reached without a careful analysis of assumptions and definitions related to security models used in classical or in quantum cryptography. In this talk, we will try to present a comprehensive synthesis on this topic. We have initiated this work as a contribution to the European IP SECOQC project, confronting views and knowledge among experimental and theoretical quantum physicists, as well as classical cryptographers. (author)

  6. Simple Web-based interactive key development software (WEBiKEY) and an example key for Kuruna (Poaceae: Bambusoideae).

    Attigala, Lakshmi; De Silva, Nuwan I; Clark, Lynn G

    2016-04-01

    Programs that are user-friendly and freely available for developing Web-based interactive keys are scarce and most of the well-structured applications are relatively expensive. WEBiKEY was developed to enable researchers to easily develop their own Web-based interactive keys with fewer resources. A Web-based multiaccess identification tool (WEBiKEY) was developed that uses freely available Microsoft ASP.NET technologies and an SQL Server database for Windows-based hosting environments. WEBiKEY was tested for its usability with a sample data set, the temperate woody bamboo genus Kuruna (Poaceae). WEBiKEY is freely available to the public and can be used to develop Web-based interactive keys for any group of species. The interactive key we developed for Kuruna using WEBiKEY enables users to visually inspect characteristics of Kuruna and identify an unknown specimen as one of seven possible species in the genus.

  7. Actual Proliferating Index and p53 protein expression as prognostic marker in odontogenic cysts.

    Gadbail, A R; Chaudhary, M; Patil, S; Gawande, M

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biological aggressiveness of odontogenic keratocyst/keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT), radicular cyst (RC) and dentigerous cyst (DC) by observing the actual proliferative activity of epithelium, and p53 protein expression. The actual proliferative activity was measured by Ki-67 Labelling Index and argyrophilic nucleolar organizing regions (AgNOR) count per nucleus. The p53 protein expression was also evaluated. Ki-67 positive cells were observed higher in suprabasal cell layers of KCOT with uniform distribution, a few of them were predominantly observed in basal cell layer in RC and DC. The AgNOR count was significantly higher in suprabasal cell layers of KCOT. The actual proliferative activity was noted to be higher in suprabasal cell layers of KCOT. The p53 immunolabelling was dense and scattered in basal and suprabasal cell layers in KCOT. The weakly stained p53 positive cells were observed diffusely distributed in KCOT, whereas they were mainly seen in basal cell layer of RC and DC. The quantitative and qualitative differences of the proliferative activity and the p53 protein expression in sporadic KCOT may be associated with intrinsic growth potential that could play a role in its development and explain locally aggressive biological behaviour. AgNOR count and p53 protein detection in odontogenic lesions can be of great consequence to predict the biological behaviour and prognosis.

  8. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus

    Kitamura, Hiroshi; Matsumori, Haruka; Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Saitoh, Noriko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis. - Highlights: • ARP6, an actin related protein, is important for nucleolar function and structure. • A population of ARP6 is localized in the center of nucleolus. • Depletion of ARP6 resulted in aberrant shape of the nucleolus. • ARP6 maintains the active rDNA transcription under high glucose. • ARP6 is required for the repression of rDNA transcription under starvation

  9. The actin family protein ARP6 contributes to the structure and the function of the nucleolus

    Kitamura, Hiroshi [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori-Amamiyamachi 1-1, Aoka-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Matsumori, Haruka [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Kalendova, Alzbeta; Hozak, Pavel [Department of Biology of the Cell Nucleus, Institute of Molecular Genetics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Goldberg, Ilya G. [Image Informatics and Computational Biology Unit, Laboratory of Genetics, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 251 Bayview Boulevard, Suite 100, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Nakao, Mitsuyoshi [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan); Saitoh, Noriko [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Harata, Masahiko, E-mail: mharata@biochem.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Tsutsumidori-Amamiyamachi 1-1, Aoka-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan)

    2015-08-21

    The actin family members, consisting of actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), are essential components of chromatin remodeling complexes. ARP6, one of the nuclear ARPs, is part of the Snf-2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein (SRCAP) chromatin remodeling complex, which promotes the deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into the chromatin. In this study, we showed that ARP6 influences the structure and the function of the nucleolus. ARP6 is localized in the central region of the nucleolus, and its knockdown induced a morphological change in the nucleolus. We also found that in the presence of high concentrations of glucose ARP6 contributed to the maintenance of active ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription by placing H2A.Z into the chromatin. In contrast, under starvation, ARP6 was required for cell survival through the repression of rDNA transcription independently of H2A.Z. These findings reveal novel pleiotropic roles for the actin family in nuclear organization and metabolic homeostasis. - Highlights: • ARP6, an actin related protein, is important for nucleolar function and structure. • A population of ARP6 is localized in the center of nucleolus. • Depletion of ARP6 resulted in aberrant shape of the nucleolus. • ARP6 maintains the active rDNA transcription under high glucose. • ARP6 is required for the repression of rDNA transcription under starvation.

  10. Dynamic conformations of nucleophosmin (NPM1 at a key monomer-monomer interface affect oligomer stability and interactions with granzyme B.

    Wei D Duan-Porter

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin (NPM1 is an abundant, nucleolar tumor antigen with important roles in cell proliferation and putative contributions to oncogenesis. Wild-type NPM1 forms pentameric oligomers through interactions at the amino-terminal core domain. A truncated form of NPM1 found in some hepatocellular carcinoma tissue formed an unusually stable oligomer and showed increased susceptibility to cleavage by granzyme B. Initiation of translation at the seventh methionine generated a protein (M7-NPM that shared all these properties. We used deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS to perform a detailed structural analysis of wild-type NPM1 and M7-NPM, and found dynamic conformational shifts or local "unfolding" at a specific monomer-monomer interface which included the β-hairpin "latch." We tested the importance of interactions at the β-hairpin "latch" by replacing a conserved tyrosine in the middle of the β-hairpin loop with glutamic acid, generating Y67E-NPM. Y67E-NPM did not form stable oligomers and further, prevented wild-type NPM1 oligomerization in a dominant-negative fashion, supporting the critical role of the β-hairpin "latch" in monomer-monomer interactions. Also, we show preferential cleavage by granzyme B at one of two available aspartates (either D161 or D122 in M7-NPM and Y67E-NPM, whereas wild-type NPM1 was cleaved at both sites. Thus, we observed a correlation between the propensity to form oligomers and granzyme B cleavage site selection in nucleophosmin proteins, suggesting that a small change at an important monomer-monomer interface can affect conformational shifts and impact protein-protein interactions.

  11. Fluorogen-activating proteins: beyond classical fluorescent proteins

    Shengnan Xu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence imaging is a powerful technique for the real-time noninvasive monitoring of protein dynamics. Recently, fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs/fluorogen probes for protein imaging were developed. Unlike the traditional fluorescent proteins (FPs, FAPs do not fluoresce unless bound to their specific small-molecule fluorogens. When using FAPs/fluorogen probes, a washing step is not required for the removal of free probes from the cells, thus allowing rapid and specific detection of proteins in living cells with high signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, with different fluorogens, living cell multi-color proteins labeling system was developed. In this review, we describe about the discovery of FAPs, the design strategy of FAP fluorogens, the application of the FAP technology and the advances of FAP technology in protein labeling systems. KEY WORDS: Fluorogen activating proteins, Fluorogens, Genetically encoded sensors, Fluorescence imaging, Molecular imaging

  12. KEY TOPICS IN SPORTS MEDICINE

    Amir Ali Narvani

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Key Topics in Sports Medicine is a single quick reference source for sports and exercise medicine. It presents the essential information from across relevant topic areas, and includes both the core and emerging issues in this rapidly developing field. It covers: 1 Sports injuries, rehabilitation and injury prevention, 2 Exercise physiology, fitness testing and training, 3 Drugs in sport, 4 Exercise and health promotion, 5 Sport and exercise for special and clinical populations, 6 The psychology of performance and injury. PURPOSE The Key Topics format provides extensive, concise information in an accessible, easy-to-follow manner. AUDIENCE The book is targeted the students and specialists in sports medicine and rehabilitation, athletic training, physiotherapy and orthopaedic surgery. The editors are authorities in their respective fields and this handbook depends on their extensive experience and knowledge accumulated over the years. FEATURES The book contains the information for clinical guidance, rapid access to concise details and facts. It is composed of 99 topics which present the information in an order that is considered logical and progressive as in most texts. Chapter headings are: 1. Functional Anatomy, 2. Training Principles / Development of Strength and Power, 3. Biomechanical Principles, 4. Biomechanical Analysis, 5. Physiology of Training, 6. Monitoring of Training Progress, 7. Nutrition, 8. Hot and Cold Climates, 9. Altitude, 10. Sport and Travelling, 11. Principles of Sport Injury Diagnosis, 12. Principles of Sport and Soft Tissue Management, 13. Principles of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, 14. Principles of Sport Injury Prevention, 15. Sports Psychology, 16. Team Sports, 17. Psychological Aspects of Injury in Sport, 18. Injury Repair Process, 19. Basic Biomechanics of Tissue Injury, 20. Plain Film Radiography in Sport, 21. Nuclear Medicine, 22. Diagnostic Ultrasound, 23. MRI Scan, 24. Other Imaging, 5. Head Injury, 26. Eye

  13. A Machine Learning Approach for Hot-Spot Detection at Protein-Protein Interfaces

    Melo, Rita; Fieldhouse, Robert; Melo, André; Correia, João D G; Cordeiro, Maria Natália D S; Gümüş, Zeynep H; Costa, Joaquim; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; de Sousa Moreira, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions is a key challenge in biochemistry. In this work, we describe a more accurate methodology to predict Hot-Spots (HS) in protein-protein interfaces from their native complex structure compared to previous published Machine Learning (ML) techniques. Our model

  14. Introduction strategies raise key questions.

    Finger, W R; Keller, S

    1995-09-01

    Key issues that must be considered before a new contraceptive is introduced center on the need for a trained provider to begin or terminate the method, its side effects, duration of use, method's ability to meet users' needs and preferences, and extra training or staff requirements. Logistics and economic issues to consider are identifying a dependable way of effectively supplying commodities, planning extra services needed for the method, and cost of providing the method. Each contraceptive method presents a different side effect pattern and burdens the service delivery setting differently. The strategy developed to introduce or expand the 3-month injectable Depo-Provera (DMPA) can be used for any method. It includes a needs assessment and addresses regulatory issues, service delivery policies and procedures, information and training, evaluation, and other concerns. Viet Nam's needs assessment showed that Norplant should not be introduced until the service delivery system becomes stronger. Any needs assessment for expansion of contraceptive services should cover sexually transmitted disease/HIV issues. A World Health Organization strategy helps officials identify the best method mix for local situations. Introductory strategies must aim to improve the quality of family planning programs and expand choices. Many begin by examining existing data and conducting interviews with policymakers, users, providers, and women's health advocates. Introductory programs for Norplant focus on provider training, adequate counseling and informed consent for users, and ready access to removal. They need a well-prepared service delivery infrastructure. The first phase of the DMPA introductory strategy for the Philippines comprised a social marketing campaign and DMPA introduction at public clinics in 10 pilot areas with strong service delivery. Successful AIDS prevention programs show that people tend to use barrier methods when they are available. USAID is currently studying

  15. Key issues in transplant tourism.

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2012-02-24

    Access to organ transplantation depends on national circumstances, and is partly determined by the cost of health care, availability of transplant services, the level of technical capacity and the availability of organs. Commercial transplantation is estimated to account for 5%-10% (3500-7000) of kidney transplants performed annually throughout the world. This review is to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation associated with transplant tourism (TT) and the key challenges with such transplantation. The stakeholders of commercial transplantation include: patients on the waiting lists in developed countries or not on any list in developing countries; dialysis funding bodies; middlemen, hosting transplant centres; organ-exporting countries; and organ vendors. TT and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection which cause major morbidity and mortality. There are ethical and medical concerns regarding the management of recipients of organs from vendors. The growing demand for transplantation, the perceived failure of altruistic donation in providing enough organs has led to calls for a legalised market in organ procurement or regulated trial in incentives for donation. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool and making TT unnecessary. Meanwhile there is a need to re-examine intrinsic attitudes to TT bearing in mind the cultural and economic realities of globalisation. Perhaps the World Health Organization in conjunction with The Transplantation Society would set up a working party of stakeholders to study this matter in greater detail and make recommendations.

  16. Key Distribution and Changing Key Cryptosystem Based on Phase Retrieval Algorithm and RSA Public-Key Algorithm

    Tieyu Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical image encryption has attracted more and more researchers’ attention, and the various encryption schemes have been proposed. In existing optical cryptosystem, the phase functions or images are usually used as the encryption keys, and it is difficult that the traditional public-key algorithm (such as RSA, ECC, etc. is used to complete large numerical key transfer. In this paper, we propose a key distribution scheme based on the phase retrieval algorithm and the RSA public-key algorithm, which solves the problem for the key distribution in optical image encryption system. Furthermore, we also propose a novel image encryption system based on the key distribution principle. In the system, the different keys can be used in every encryption process, which greatly improves the security of the system.

  17. Synthesis of Lipidated Proteins.

    Mejuch, Tom; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-08-17

    Protein lipidation is one of the major post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins. The attachment of the lipid moiety frequently determines the localization and the function of the lipoproteins. Lipidated proteins participate in many essential biological processes in eukaryotic cells, including vesicular trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the immune response. Malfunction of these cellular processes usually leads to various diseases such as cancer. Understanding the mechanism of cellular signaling and identifying the protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in which the lipoproteins are involved is a crucial task. To achieve these goals, fully functional lipidated proteins are required. However, access to lipoproteins by means of standard expression is often rather limited. Therefore, semisynthetic methods, involving the synthesis of lipidated peptides and their subsequent chemoselective ligation to yield full-length lipoproteins, were developed. In this Review we summarize the commonly used methods for lipoprotein synthesis and the development of the corresponding chemoselective ligation techniques. Several key studies involving full-length semisynthetic lipidated Ras, Rheb, and LC3 proteins are presented.

  18. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    Michael H. Herbert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range.

  19. Quantum key distribution network for multiple applications

    Tajima, A.; Kondoh, T.; Ochi, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Yoshino, K.; Iizuka, H.; Sakamoto, T.; Tomita, A.; Shimamura, E.; Asami, S.; Sasaki, M.

    2017-09-01

    The fundamental architecture and functions of secure key management in a quantum key distribution (QKD) network with enhanced universal interfaces for smooth key sharing between arbitrary two nodes and enabling multiple secure communication applications are proposed. The proposed architecture consists of three layers: a quantum layer, key management layer and key supply layer. We explain the functions of each layer, the key formats in each layer and the key lifecycle for enabling a practical QKD network. A quantum key distribution-advanced encryption standard (QKD-AES) hybrid system and an encrypted smartphone system were developed as secure communication applications on our QKD network. The validity and usefulness of these systems were demonstrated on the Tokyo QKD Network testbed.

  20. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Key Facts Infographic

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Explore the Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Key Facts Infographic which outlines key facts related to electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), including...

  1. Quantum key distribution via quantum encryption

    Yong Sheng Zhang; Guang Can Guo

    2001-01-01

    A quantum key distribution protocol based on quantum encryption is presented in this Brief Report. In this protocol, the previously shared Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen pairs act as the quantum key to encode and decode the classical cryptography key. The quantum key is reusable and the eavesdropper cannot elicit any information from the particle Alice sends to Bob. The concept of quantum encryption is also discussed. (21 refs).

  2. SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT – KEY FACTORS

    Magdalena Daniela DINU

    2014-01-01

    This paper exposes Supply Chain Management by its key factors. Briefly, where the Supply Chain Management is treated as strategic part of a company then maintaining both control and influence throughout the entire supply chain are key factors and critical to success. On the other hand, finding the right partner to manage the non-strategic Supply Chains would be another key factor too. To define the most important key factors within Supply Chain Management means a deeply understanding of bot...

  3. Improved Anonymity for Key-trees

    Veugen, P.J.M.; Beye, M.

    2013-01-01

    Randomized hash-lock protocols for Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) tags offer forward untraceability, but incur heavy search on the server. Key trees have been proposed as a way to reduce search times, but because partial keys in such trees are shared, key compromise affects several tags.

  4. Harry Potter and the Dichotomous Key

    Crowther, David T.

    2003-01-01

    In this lesson, students use Bertie Bott's Every Flavor Beans--a "wild" candy written about in the Harry Potter books and now available in stores--to learn about classification and dichotomous keys. In these activities, students sort jelly beans according to a key and then construct a key for a "new" flavor of beans. Students then build on their…

  5. Nucleolar remodeling in nuclear transfer embryos

    Laurincik, Jozef; Maddox-Hyttel, Poul

    2007-01-01

    Transcription of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes occurs in the nucleolus and results in ribosome biogenesis. The rRNA gene activation and the associated nucleolus formation may be used as a marker for the activation of the embryonic genome in mammalian embryos and, thus serve to evaluate the devel......Transcription of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes occurs in the nucleolus and results in ribosome biogenesis. The rRNA gene activation and the associated nucleolus formation may be used as a marker for the activation of the embryonic genome in mammalian embryos and, thus serve to evaluate...... nucleoli are not apparent until the 5th cell cycle, whereas in somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos the functional nucleoli emerge already during the 3rd cell cycle. Intergeneric reconstructed embryos produced by the fusion of bovine differentiated somatic cell to a nonactivated ovine cytoplast fail...

  6. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Extracting knowledge from protein structure geometry

    Røgen, Peter; Koehl, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    potential from geometric knowledge extracted from native and misfolded conformers of protein structures. This new potential, Metric Protein Potential (MPP), has two main features that are key to its success. Firstly, it is composite in that it includes local and nonlocal geometric information on proteins...

  8. Electron microscopy of cyanobacterial membrane proteins

    Folea, Ioana Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is photosynthetic protein complexes, and their organization within the membrane of cyanobacteria. In cyanobacteria large proteins catalyze the light reactions of photosynthesis. One of the key proteins is photosystem II. We have found for the first time by electron

  9. Approaches to automated protein crystal harvesting

    Deller, Marc C., E-mail: mdeller@scripps.edu; Rupp, Bernhard, E-mail: mdeller@scripps.edu

    2014-01-28

    Approaches to automated and robot-assisted harvesting of protein crystals are critically reviewed. While no true turn-key solutions for automation of protein crystal harvesting are currently available, systems incorporating advanced robotics and micro-electromechanical systems represent exciting developments with the potential to revolutionize the way in which protein crystals are harvested.

  10. VICKEY: Mining Conditional Keys on Knowledge Bases

    Symeonidou , Danai; Galárraga , Luis; Pernelle , Nathalie; Saïs , Fatiha; Suchanek , Fabian

    2017-01-01

    International audience; A conditional key is a key constraint that is valid in only a part of the data. In this paper, we show how such keys can be mined automatically on large knowledge bases (KBs). For this, we combine techniques from key mining with techniques from rule mining. We show that our method can scale to KBs of millions of facts. We also show that the conditional keys we mine can improve the quality of entity linking by up to 47 percentage points.

  11. Total protein

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  12. Proteins engineering

    2000-01-01

    At the - Departement d'Ingenierie et d'etudes de proteines (Deip) of the CEA more than seventy researchers are working hard to understand the function of proteins. For that they use the molecular labelling technique (F.M.)

  13. Whey Protein

    ... reliable information about the safety of taking whey protein if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use. Milk allergy: If you are allergic to cow's milk, avoid using whey protein.

  14. Protein stability: a crystallographer’s perspective

    Deller, Marc C.; Kong, Leopold; Rupp, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability is a topic of major interest for the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and food industries, in addition to being a daily consideration for academic researchers studying proteins. An understanding of protein stability is essential for optimizing the expression, purification, formulation, storage and structural studies of proteins. In this review, discussion will focus on factors affecting protein stability, on a somewhat practical level, particularly from the view of a protein crystallographer. The differences between protein conformational stability and protein compositional stability will be discussed, along with a brief introduction to key methods useful for analyzing protein stability. Finally, tactics for addressing protein-stability issues during protein expression, purification and crystallization will be discussed. PMID:26841758

  15. Identification of the Key Genes and Pathways in Esophageal Carcinoma.

    Su, Peng; Wen, Shiwang; Zhang, Yuefeng; Li, Yong; Xu, Yanzhao; Zhu, Yonggang; Lv, Huilai; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Mingbo; Tian, Ziqiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective . Esophageal carcinoma (EC) is a frequently common malignancy of gastrointestinal cancer in the world. This study aims to screen key genes and pathways in EC and elucidate the mechanism of it. Methods . 5 microarray datasets of EC were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened by bioinformatics analysis. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment, and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network construction were performed to obtain the biological roles of DEGs in EC. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to verify the expression level of DEGs in EC. Results . A total of 1955 genes were filtered as DEGs in EC. The upregulated genes were significantly enriched in cell cycle and the downregulated genes significantly enriched in Endocytosis. PPI network displayed CDK4 and CCT3 were hub proteins in the network. The expression level of 8 dysregulated DEGs including CDK4, CCT3, THSD4, SIM2, MYBL2, CENPF, CDCA3, and CDKN3 was validated in EC compared to adjacent nontumor tissues and the results were matched with the microarray analysis. Conclusion . The significantly DEGs including CDK4, CCT3, THSD4, and SIM2 may play key roles in tumorigenesis and development of EC involved in cell cycle and Endocytosis.

  16. Identification of the Key Genes and Pathways in Esophageal Carcinoma

    Peng Su

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Esophageal carcinoma (EC is a frequently common malignancy of gastrointestinal cancer in the world. This study aims to screen key genes and pathways in EC and elucidate the mechanism of it. Methods. 5 microarray datasets of EC were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs were screened by bioinformatics analysis. Gene Ontology (GO enrichment, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG enrichment, and protein-protein interaction (PPI network construction were performed to obtain the biological roles of DEGs in EC. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR was used to verify the expression level of DEGs in EC. Results. A total of 1955 genes were filtered as DEGs in EC. The upregulated genes were significantly enriched in cell cycle and the downregulated genes significantly enriched in Endocytosis. PPI network displayed CDK4 and CCT3 were hub proteins in the network. The expression level of 8 dysregulated DEGs including CDK4, CCT3, THSD4, SIM2, MYBL2, CENPF, CDCA3, and CDKN3 was validated in EC compared to adjacent nontumor tissues and the results were matched with the microarray analysis. Conclusion. The significantly DEGs including CDK4, CCT3, THSD4, and SIM2 may play key roles in tumorigenesis and development of EC involved in cell cycle and Endocytosis.

  17. Secret-key expansion from covert communication

    Arrazola, Juan Miguel; Amiri, Ryan

    2018-02-01

    Covert communication allows the transmission of messages in such a way that it is not possible for adversaries to detect that the communication is occurring. This provides protection in situations where knowledge that two parties are talking to each other may be incriminating to them. In this work, we study how covert communication can be used for a different purpose: secret key expansion. First, we show that any message transmitted in a secure covert protocol is also secret and therefore unknown to an adversary. We then propose a covert communication protocol where the amount of key consumed in the protocol is smaller than the transmitted key, thus leading to secure secret key expansion. We derive precise conditions for secret key expansion to occur, showing that it is possible when there are sufficiently low levels of noise for a given security level. We conclude by examining how secret key expansion from covert communication can be performed in a computational security model.

  18. Establishing Key Performance Indicators : Case company X

    Singh, Jatinder

    2015-01-01

    The key performance indicators serve as the navigational tools for a business organization to monitor its performance. They enable the management team to take real time decisions to keep organization’s resources aligned to its business strategy to accomplish its strategic objec-tives. This research was conducted to analyse the process of establishing successful key per-formance indicators for a business organization. The research was conducted to recommend key performance indicators developme...

  19. Competency Assessment Using Key Performance Indicators

    Elena Alexandra Toader; Laura Brad

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a method for computing the scores of the key performance indicators resulted in the competency assessment process. The key performance indicators are estimated considering four performance levels that an IT professional can obtain at the end of the assessment process. We suggest as the best approach for estimating the performance key indicators an online questionnaire filled by 60 employees that work in IT Romanian companies. The results provide evidence that the difference...

  20. Enciphered Data Steganography Using Secret Key

    BANGALORE G.Tilak

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A new method is proposed to maintain thesecrecy of data by enciphering and embedding using asecret key. There is no restriction on the length of thekey used to encipher and embed the data. Since the keyis not stored for validation, it prevents unauthorizedaccess to the key, even if decoding procedure is known.The correct message can be recovered only with thespecific key used in encipherment and embedding. Thismethod can also be used for multiple levelsteganography.