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Sample records for karlsruhe nuclear research

  1. Karlsruhe nuclear research center. Main activities

    The article reports on problems of securing the fuel supply for nuclear power generation, on reprocessing and ultimate storage of radioactive material, on the safety of nuclear facilities, on new technologies and basic research, and on the infrastructure of the Karlsruhe nuclear research center, as well as finance and administration. (HK) [de

  2. Information on the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    Reuter, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    A short overview is given about the origins of Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. The historical development of the different companies operating the Center is shown. Because the original task assigned to the Center was the construction and testing of the first German reactor exclusively built by German companies, a detailed description of this reactor and the changes made afterwards is presented. Next, today's organizational structure of the Center is outlined and the development of the Center's financing since its foundation is shown. A short overview about the structure of employees from the Center's beginning up to now is also included as well as a short description of today's main activities. (orig.)

  3. List of scientific publications of Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe 1983

    1984-04-01

    This report contains the titles of the publications edited in the year 1983. The scientific and technical-scientific publications of the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe are printed as books, as original contributions in scientific or technical specialists' journals, as scripts for habilitation, thesis, scripts for diploma, as patents, as KfK-Reports (KfK=Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe) and are being presented as lectures on scientific meetings. No further separate abstracts of this list of publications were prepared. (orig./HBR) [de

  4. List of publications of Karlsruhe University (T.H.) and Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre

    1977-01-01

    This 19th volume of the list of publications compiled by Karlsruhe University (T.H.) in cooperation with Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre and some other institutions closely connected with the university gives the publications of the year 1976 as well as some supplements from 1975. The publications listed are books and journals, articles from journals and symposia, research reports, dissertations and theses for habilitation published by these institutions, their organs and institutes, their staff and scientific personnel, as well as patents. As a rule, theses for diplomas, newspaper articles, book reviews, internal reports and information have been left out. (orig.) [de

  5. List of publications of the Karlsruhe University and the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre

    1987-01-01

    This 19th annual bibliography of publications from the Karlsruhe University, the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre, and some closely cooperating institutions covers all publications prepared in the year 1986, and a few supplementary data on 1985 publications. The bibliography refers to books and journals, contributions to journals or serial publications, research reports, doctoral theses and theses qualifying for lecturing at a university, and to patents. Diploma theses, contributions to newspapers, book reviews, internal reports or communications generally do not form part of the bibliography. (orig./GG) [de

  6. Materials research in the Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe

    Kleykamp, H.

    1990-03-01

    This report gives a survey of the research work done at the Institute for Material and Solids Research at Karlsruhe. The following subjects are dealt with: Instrumental analysis; producing thin films; corrosion; failure mechanism and damage analysis; fuel elements, ceramic nuclear fuels and can and structure materials for fast breeder reactors; material problems and ceramic breeding materials for nuclear fusion plants; glass materials for the treatment of radioactive waste; super-conducting materials; amorphous metals, new high alloyed steels; ceramic high performance materials; hard materials; compound materials and polymers. (MM) [de

  7. The Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre is being re-equipped

    Boehm, H.; Koerting, K.; Huncke, W.; Knapp, W.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Research Centre in Karlsruhe was established over 25 years ago for the express purpose of studying nuclear engineering and its peaceful use. This goal has been achieved - what now. For some time a change has been taking place at the Research Centre: in the direction of man and environmental engineering. 'Bild der Wwissenschaft' has talked to Professor Horst Boehm, the chairman of the Nuclear Centre, about this change and the new areas of research to be concentrated on. (orig.) [de

  8. Bituminization of radioactive wastes at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe

    Hild, W.; Kluger, W.; Krause, H.

    1976-05-01

    A summary is given of the main operational experience gained at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe in 4 years operation of the bituminization plant for evaporator concentrates from low- and medium level wastes. At the same time some of the essential results are compiled that have been obtained in the R + D activities on bituminization. (orig.) [de

  9. Publications of the University of Karlsruhe (T.H.) and the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe 1981

    1982-01-01

    This is the 14th volume of the joint list of publications of the University of Karlsruhe (T.H.), the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe and some institutions which are closely linked to the University. It contains the publications of the year 1981 as well as some addenda from 1980. Included were books and journals, journal articles and contributions from compilations, research reports, dissertations and habilitation theses which were written or published by these institutions, their bodies and institutes as well as their teachers and scientific staff, and also patents. Not included were, as a rule, diploma theses, newspaper articles, reviews, internal reports and bulletins. The list of publications from University is mainly based on entries made by the institutes and chairs; its completeness can not be granted here. (orig./RW) [de

  10. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre. Programme budget 1988

    1987-01-01

    Following a general survey of tasks, planned activities and developmental trends of the nuclear research centre, the report gives an account of the activities to be performed in the subject fields of main interest, showing the budgeting figures for annual expenditure (for personnel, investments, operating costs) up to the year 1991. Further information explains the infrastructure of the centre and the distribution of overall expenditure as well as the budgetary planning. (UA) [de

  11. List of scientific publications, Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe 1984

    1985-04-01

    The report abstracted contains a list of works published in 1984. Papers not in print yet are listed separately. Patent entries take account of all patent rights granted or published in 1984, i.e. patents or patent specifications. The list of publications is classified by institutes. The project category lists but the respective reports and studies carried out and published by members of the project staff concerned. Also listed are publications related to research and development projects of the 'product engineering project' (PFT/Projekt 'Fertigungstechnik'). With different companies and institutes cooperating, PFT is sponsored by Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe GmbH. The latter is also responsible for printing above publications. Moreover the list contains the publications of a branch of the Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Ernaehrung which is located on the KfK-premises. The final chapter of the list summarizes publications dealing with guest-experiments and research at Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe. (orig./PW) [de

  12. Past and present situation of nuclear research at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    Scholtyssek, W.

    2001-01-01

    The case of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe is presented which had to transform from a centre devoted to nuclear power R and D to one in which this activity is allocated only 20% of the resources. A large number of operating nuclear power reactors coupled with the Government decision to phase out nuclear power is causing serious concerns regarding the availability of human resources for meeting the long term needs of nuclear facilities. The Energy Division of the research centre currently focuses mainly on safety research and on nuclear fusion. Another Division of the centre has nuclear facility decommissioning as one of the programmes. Independent research in areas of essential need for nuclear facilities must be carried out to maintain know how. (author)

  13. Current research and development at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe

    Kuesters, H.

    1982-01-01

    The Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe (KfK) is funded to 90% by the Federal Republic of Germany and to 10% by the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg. Since its foundation in 1956 the main objective of the Center is research and development (R and D) in the aera of the nuclear technology and about 2/3 of the research capacity is now devoted to this field. Since 1960 a major activity of KfK is R and D work for the design of fast breeder reactors, including material research, physics, and safety investigations; a prototype of 300 MWe is under construction now in the lower Rhine Valley. For enrichment of 235 U fissile material KfK developed the separation nozzle process; its technical application is realized within an international contract between the Federal Republic of Germany and Brazil. Within the frame of the European Programme on fusion technology KfK develops and tests superconducting magnets for toroidal fusion systems; a smaller activity deals with research on inertial confinement fusion. A broad research programme is carried through for safety investigations of nuclear installations, especially for PWRs; this activity is supplemented by research and development in the field of nuclear materials' safeguards. Development of fast reactors has to initiate research for the reprocessing of spent fuel and waste disposal. In the pilot plant WAK spent fuel from LKWs is reprocessed; research especially tries e.g. to improve the PUREX-process by electrochemical means, vitrification of high active waste is another main activity. First studies are being performed now to clarify the necessary development for reprocessing fast reactor fuel. About 1/3 of the research capacity of KfK deals with fundamental research in nuclear physics, solid state physics, biology and studies on the impact of technology on environment. Promising new technologies as e.g. the replacement of gasoline by hydrogen cells as vehicle propulsion are investigated. (orig.)

  14. Twenty-fifth anniversary of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    Harde, R.

    1981-01-01

    The Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center was founded on July 19, 1956. The initial company, in which the Federal Republic of Germany held a 30% interest, the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg 20%, and German industry 50%, was founded mainly for the purposes of building and operating a German-designed research reactor. In 1959, the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung mbH was founded for execution of the research and development activities, in which the Federal Republic of Germany held 75%, the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg 25% of the shares. The two companies were merged in 1963, after industry had donated its holdings in the initial company to the new company. In 1972, the financial holdings of the Federal Government were raised to 90%. On January 1, 1978, the company was named Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (KfK). Over the past 25 years, KfK has received approx. DM 7 billion out of public funds. Important milestones in the development of nuclear technology in the Federal Republic contributed by KfK include the development of the fast breeder line and responsibility for construction of the first German fast breeder reactor, KNK; development of reprocessing technologies and responsibility for construction of the first German reprocessing plant, WAK; development of a uranium enrichment technique (separation nozzle method); important contributions to reactor safety, fusion research, and training in nuclear technology. (orig.) [de

  15. Waste management at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    Hoehlein, G.; Lins, W.

    1982-01-01

    In the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center the responsibility for waste management is concentrated in the Decontamination Department which serves to collect and transport all liquid waste and solid material from central areas in the center for further waste treatment, clean radioactive equipment for repair and re-use or for recycling of material, remove from the liquid effluents any radioactive and chemical pollutants as specified in legislation on the protection of waters, convert radioactive wastes into mechanically and chemically stable forms allowing them to be transported into a repository. (orig./RW)

  16. 30th anniversary of Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre

    Koerting, K.

    1986-01-01

    One of the main goals in mind in 1956 when the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre was founded, was to promote the peaceful uses of nuclear energy in the Federal Republic of Germany. The work accomplished since then by the various institutes of the Centre was particularly successful in the following: Development and construction of the first research reactor as an entirely national achievement; installation and operation of the MZFR reactor, as well as the compact sodium-cooled KNK reactor; the Nuclear Safety Project; the development of the separation nozzle method for uranium enrichment; and specific methods and equipment developed for safeguards systems to prevent nuclear materials diversion. Looking into the future, the tasks ahead will concentrate on the technology of energy generation by thermonuclear fusion, and on environmental pollution control and related methods, as well as industrial processes such as materials handling and process control by PDV and CAD. (orig./PW) [de

  17. Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe, Central Safety Department. Annual report 1992

    Koelzer, W.

    1993-05-01

    The Central Safety Department is responsible for handling all problems of radiation protection, safety and security of the institutes and departments of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, for waste water activity measurements and environmental monitoring of the whole area of the Center, and for research and development work mainly focusing on nuclear safety and radiation protection measures. The research and development work concentrates on the following aspects: Physical and chemical behavior of trace elements in the environment, biophysics of multicellular systems, behavior of tritium in the air/soil-plant system, improvement in radiation protection measurement and personnel dosimetry. This report gives details of the different duties, indicates the results of 1992 routine tasks and reports about results of investigations and developments of the working groups of the Department. The reader is referred to the English translation of Chapter 1 describing the duties and organization of the Central Safety Department. (orig.) [de

  18. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, Central Safety Department. Annual report 1993

    Koelzer, W.

    1994-04-01

    The Central Safety Department is responsible for handling all tasks of radiation protection, safety and security of the institutes and departments of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, for waste water activity measurements and environmental monitoring of the whole area of the Center, and for research and development work mainly focusing on nuclear safety and radiation protection measures. The research and development work concentrates on the following aspects: behavior of trace elements in the environment and decontamination of soil, behavior of tritium in the air/soil-plant system, improvement in radiation protection measurements and personnel dosimetry. This report gives details of the different duties, indicates the results of 1993 routine tasks and reports about results of investigations and developments of the working groups of the Department. (orig.) [de

  19. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. Research and development program 1991

    1990-01-01

    The R and D activities of the KfK are classified in 8 main research activities: 1) project nuclear fusion; 2) project pollutant mitigation in the environment; 3) solid state and materials research; 4) nuclear and elementary particle physics; 5) microtechnics e.g. X-ray lithography; 6) materials handling; 7) project nuclear safety research; 8) radioactive waste management. (orig.) [de

  20. Incineration of radioactive wastes at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe

    Baehr, W; Hempelmann, W; Krause, H

    1976-06-01

    In 1971 a large incineration plant started operation in the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe. This plant is serving for routine incineration of up to 100 kg of combustible radioactive solids or 40 l of contaminated organic liquids and oils per hour. A dry off-gas cleaning system has been developed for this installation in which the fumes are cleaned by ceramic filter candles. After passing the filtering system and cooling, the off-gas is discharged directly through a stack. The activity concentration in the off-gas is measured by a continuous monitoring system. The ashes arising from the incineration are mixed with cement grout and filled into 200 l-drums. By this way approximately one drum of fixed ashes results from 100 drums of combustible wastes. During the first four years of operation, more than 4,000 m/sup 3/ of combustible solids and about 60 m/sup 3/ organic solvents have been incinerated in the plant. The operating experiences are presented.

  1. The economic and structural effects of the Nuclear Research Centre in Karlsruhe on its area

    Tebbert, H.; Sperling, P.

    The great building activity on the site of the Nuclear Research Centre in Karlsruhe, the setting up and maintenance of technical installations from an experimental setup on a laborytory scale to a prototype nuclear-powered system are of considerable, economic importance for numerous firms in the near and broader vicinity. In 1979, for example orders worth DM 100 million were placed with 850 firms in the town and the rural district of Karlsruhe by the Nuclear Research Centre. (orig.) [de

  2. Karlsruhe Research Center, Nuclear Safety Research Project (PSF). Annual report 1994; Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Projekt Nukleare Sicherheitsforschung. Jahrsbericht 1994

    Hueper, R. [ed.

    1995-08-01

    The reactor safety R and D work of the Karlsruhe Research Centre (FZKA) has been part of the Nuclear Safety Research Projet (PSF) since 1990. The present annual report 1994 summarizes the R and D results. The research tasks are coordinated in agreement with internal and external working groups. The contributions to this report correspond to the status of early 1995. An abstract in English precedes each of them, whenever the respective article is written in German. (orig.) [Deutsch] Seit Beginn 1990 sind die F+E-Arbeiten des Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZKA) zur Reaktorsicherheit im Projekt Nukleare Sicherheitsforschung (PSF) zusammengefasst. Der vorliegende Jahresbericht 1994 enthaelt Beitraege zu aktuellen Fragen der Sicherheit von Leichtwasserreaktoren und innovativen Systemen sowie der Umwandlung von minoren Aktiniden. Die konkreten Forschungsthemen und -vorhaben werden mit internen und externen Fachgremien laufend abgestimmt. An den beschriebenen Arbeiten sind die folgenden Institute und Abteilungen des FZKA beteiligt: Institut fuer Materialforschung IMF I, II, III; Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik INR; Institut fuer Angewandte Thermo- und Fluiddynamik IATF; Institut fuer Reaktorsicherheit IRS; Hauptabteilung Ingenieurtechnik HIT; Hauptabteilung Versuchstechnik HVT sowie vom KfK beauftragte externe Institutionen. Die einzelnen Beitraege stellen den Stand der Arbeiten zum Fruehjahr 1995 dar und sind entsprechend dem F+E-Programm 1994 numeriert. Den in deutscher Sprache verfassten Beitraege sind Kurzfassungen in englischer Sprache vorangestellt. (orig.)

  3. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. Research and development program 1992

    1991-01-01

    The KfK R and D activities are classified by ten point-of-main-effort projects: 1) low-pollution/low-waste methods, 2) environmental energy and mass transfers, 3) nuclear fusion, 4) nuclear saftey research, 5) radioactive waste management, 6) superconduction, 7) microtechnics, 8) materials handling, 9) materials and interfaces, 10) basic physical research. (orig.) [de

  4. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. Research and development programme 1988

    1987-01-01

    A general survey of planned activities and developmental trends of the nuclear research centre is followed by a more detailed account of projects and goals. The various institutes and laboratories are presented together with their specific task schedules. (UA) [de

  5. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. Research and development programme 1989

    1988-01-01

    The R and D activities of the KfK are classified in 10 main research activities: 1) Project fast breeder; 2) separation nozzle method; 3) project nuclear fusion; 4) project reprocessing and waste processing; 5) ultimate storage; 6) environment and safety; 7) solid-state and materials research; 8) nuclear and elementary particle physics; 9) microtechnics e.g. X-ray lithography; 10) materials handling. (HP) [de

  6. Karlsruhe Research Center, Nuclear Safety Research Project (PSF). Annual report 1994

    Hueper, R.

    1995-08-01

    The reactor safety R and D work of the Karlsruhe Research Centre (FZKA) has been part of the Nuclear Safety Research Projet (PSF) since 1990. The present annual report 1994 summarizes the R and D results. The research tasks are coordinated in agreement with internal and external working groups. The contributions to this report correspond to the status of early 1995. An abstract in English precedes each of them, whenever the respective article is written in German. (orig.) [de

  7. Program budget 1992 of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. As of November 19, 1991

    1992-01-01

    In the future, the research program of the Nuclear Research Center in Karlsruhe will concentrate on three areas, which are of the same status over the medium term: Environmental research, energy research and micro system technology and fundamental research. The central infrastructure, the financial planning and the assignment of research and development projects of the Nuclear Research Center are presented in tables. (orig./HP) [de

  8. List of scientific publications from the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre of the year 1977

    1978-03-01

    The scientific and technical-scientific publications from the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre comprise books, original papers in scientific or technical journals, diploma, doctoral and habilitation theses, as well as papers held at scientific conferences, patents, KfK reports, and external reports (KfK = Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe). The present report, KfK 2625, contains the titles of the 1977 publications, scientific papers being listed only after the manusscript has been filed in the Central Library of the research centre. As for patents, the titles given refer to either first issues of a patent, or to patents laid open for inspection. Progress reports are listed according to subjects involved. The whole list of publications is ordered according to the names of institutes and of projects, the latter group covering the titles of published project reports and of publications written by individual cooperators of a given project, as well as publications printed by the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre, written by cooperators of the following projects: 'Process control with data processing plants', (PDV), and 'Computer-assisted development' (CAD). These projects are carried out together with other firms and instutes. Yet another group of publications covered are those of the Federal Institute for Food Research, and of guest scientists working in the Centre. (orig./HK) [de

  9. The meterological information system of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    Holleuffer-Kypke, R. von; Huebschmann, W.G.; Thomas, P.; Suess, F.

    1984-01-01

    The Meteorological Information System (MIS) comprising the meteorological instruments, the computers, and the software for data processing and recording, is part of the KfK safety and control system. In 1982 is was equipped with an independent data processing system. The report explains the arrangement and the operation of the sensors and thw two process computers. For selected meteorological situations the ability of the system is demonstrated, i.e., the presentation of the vertical profiles of wind, temperature and turbulence in the lower atmospheric boundary layer as well as the calculation and graphical representation of the transport and dispersion into the KfK environment of radioactive pollutants being released by the nuclear installations of the KfK into the atmosphere. (orig.) [de

  10. Radiation exposure to the staff of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, 1969-1981

    Koelzer, W.

    1983-07-01

    Evaluation of the data from the personnel dosimetry of the staff monitored from 1969 until 1981 at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH) gives a total external dose of 6,335 rem including natural radiaiton background. The occupational exposure of the radiation workers within this period comes to 3,076 rem, which gives an average annual external occupational exposure of 0.14 rem. In 1,832 cases an annual dose between 0.5 and 1.5 rem per year and in 353 cases a dose of more than 1.5 rem per year have been measured. The highest value, measured in 1972, amounted to 6.8 rem. During the period from 1969 until 1981 more than 34,000 incorporation measurements were performed with the whole body counter and the lung counter, 1,963 cases with positive findings. In 96% of the cases the values of incorporated activity were inferior to 1% - in 70% even inferior to 0.1% - of the maximum permissible body burden values of ICRP 2. Only 5 cases exceeded these values. (orig.) [de

  11. Experiences in the management of plutonium-containing solid-wastes at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe

    Baehr, W.; Hild, W.; Scheffler, K.

    1974-10-01

    Solid-plutonium-containing wastes from a fuel production plant, a reprocessing plant and several research laboratories are treated at the decontamination department of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center for disposal in the Asse salt mine. Conditioning as well as future aspects in α-waste management are the subject of this Paper. (orig.) [de

  12. KNK II, Compact Sodium-Cooled Reactor in the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe

    1978-01-01

    The report gives an overview of the project of the sodium-cooled fast reactor KNK II in the nuclear research center KfK in Karlsruhe. This test reactor was the preparatory stage of the prototype plant SNR 300 and had several goals: to train operating personal, to practice the licensing procedures in Germany, to get experience with the sodium technology and to serve as a test bed for fast breeder core components. The report contains contributions of KfK as the owner and project managing organization, of INTERATOM as the design and construction company and of the KBG as the plant operating organization. Experience with and results of relevant aspects of the project are tackled: project management, reactor core and component design, safety questions and licensing, plant design and test programs [de

  13. Bituminization of radioactive wastes at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe. Experience from plant operation and development work

    Hild, W; Kluger, W; Krause, H

    1976-05-01

    A summary is given of the main operational experience gained at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe in 4 years operation of the bituminization plant for evaporator concentrates from low- and medium level wastes. At the same time some of the essential results are compiled that have been obtained in the R + D activities on bituminization.

  14. Developement of technologies for nuclear fusion at the Karlsruhe Research Center. Pt. 1

    Bahm, W.; Dammertz, G.; Glugla, M.; Janeschitz, G.; Komarek, P.; Mack, A.

    2002-01-01

    The planned ITER plant needs plasma heating powers of approx. 70-150 MW. Work performed at the Karlsruhe Research Center under this heading mainly comprises the development of microwave oscillators (gyrotrons) and their use for an electron cyclotron resonance heating system and for non-inductive plasma current operation. The plasma, which is approx. 100 million C hot, is confined in a 'magnetic cage' so as to avoid any contact with the wall structures of the vacuum vessel. Building up a magnetic field of this magnitude requires field strengths of at least 2-5 tesla in the plasma; field strengths of 11-13 tesla at the magnet coils are required for future fusion plants, such as ITER. Consequently, the development of the required future superconducting magnet coils enjoys high priority. The blanket, i.e. the enclosure around the combustion chamber of a fusion reactor, plays a major role in the design of a future fusion power plant. Blanket concepts meeting technical requirements are being developed and studied. A blanket must meet three requirements: It must convert the neutron energy into heat, breed the tritium fuel by nuclear reactions, and shield the magnets from neutron and gamma radiations. The fuel cycle of fusion reactors is determined by the gaseous phase of the two hydrogen isotopes, deuterium and tritium. In general, hydrogen handling technologies have been developed to a high level, but can be transferred to the handling of deuterium and radioactive tritium only to a very limited extent. Consequently, the necessary development work is carried out. The state of the plasma, also with respect to its purity, is a factor of special importance, as impurities will cause the plasma to dissolve and thus the fusion reaction to break down. Primary vacuum pumps, another area of activity of the Karlsruhe Research Center, first must evacuate the reactor vessel and then, during operation, maintain the necessary atmosphere. (orig.) [de

  15. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research. Progress report on research and development work in 1993

    1994-03-01

    The Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research is operated by Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre in cooperation with Karlsruhe University. It investigates mesoscale and global atmospheric processes. Work on mesoscale processes focuses on interactions between atmosphere, soil and vegetation via the exchange of momentum, energy, water, and materials. Another field of primary interest are the flow processes and turbulent exchange processes in the lower troposphere. Parallel to the experiments, numerical simulation models for describing and predicting mesospheric climate-relevant processes and atmospheric exchange processes were used and improved upon. For remote processing of atmospheric parameters, a satellite-based data processing system was used for recording land surface parameters and vertical profiles and meteorological variables that are applicable for climatological studies and for the validation of numerical models. For recording and interpretation of the spatial and time-dependent distribution of trace elements, measuring instruments in the field of air chemistry were newly developed or improved upon, especially with a view towards high time resolution of the measured data. Ozone research is a key issue of the remote measurements. Contributions were made primarily in the framework of international research programmes (e.g. EASOE) on the degradation of the atmospheric ozone layer in the higher latitudes of the northern hemisphere. In addition to the experimental investigations, the transport of stratospheric trace elements was simulated numerically. (orig./KW) [de

  16. Status of nuclear data activities at Karlsruhe

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This is a brief introduction to nuclear data activity at Karlsruhe Research Center. Some URLs concerned are given. Topics mentioned here are, the FENDL and JEF/EFF project at INR, and measurements of neutron capture cross sections at IK III. (author)

  17. Public relations activities of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center - a national research center contributes to opinion forming

    Koerting, K.

    1988-01-01

    At the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, the Public Relations Department directly reports to the Chief Executive Officer. The head of the Public Relation Department acts as spokesman of the center in the public, which requires him to be fully informed of the work of all units and of the policy goals of the executive board. The key tools used by the Public Relations Department are KfK-Hausmitteilungen, accident information, the scientific journal KfK-Nachrichten, press releases, exhibitions, fairs, guided tours, and nuclear energy information staff. (DG)

  18. Investigation of the tritium level in the environment of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    Koenig, L.A.; Winter, M.; Schueler, H.; Tachlinski, W.

    1976-06-01

    Under an IAEA sponsored measurement program the tritium level is investigated in the immediate and more distant environment of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. The tritium concentration in precipitations, surface, ground and drinking water is measured within a long-term program. In addition, relationships existing between the tritium concentration of plants and the concentrations of ground water, precipitation, soil and air humidities are investigated at three points in special series of measurement. A summary report is presented on recent measured results. According to these results, the annual mean values for precipitations and surface water tend to rise. In 1975 the annual mean values amounted to 0.89 nCi/l of tritium concentration in precipitations in the more distant environment of the Nuclear Research Center and to 0.68 nCi/l in the Rhine river. In plants tritium concentrations were observed which correspond to that measured in the humidity of the air. The radiation exposure of people living in large towns is calculated to be about 50 μrem/a in the region monitored, due to the presence of tritium in the drinking water. A little group of the population takes up as much as 110 μrem/a. (orig.) [de

  19. Incineration plant for radioactive waste at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe

    Baehr, W.; Hempelmann, W.; Krause, H.

    1977-02-01

    In 1971 a large incineration plant started operation in the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe. This plant is serving for routine incineration of up to 100 kg of combustible radioactive solids or 40 l of contaminated organic liquids and oils per hour. A dry off-gas cleaning system has been developed for this installation in which the flue gases are cleaned by ceramic filter candles. After passing the filtering system and cooling the off-gas is discharged directly through a stack. The activity concentration in the off-gas is measured by a continuous monitoring system. The ashes arising from the incineration are mixed with cement grout and filled into 200 ldrums. By this way approximately one drum of fixed ashes results from 100 drums of combustible wastes. During the first four years of operation, more than 4,000 m 3 of combustible solids and about 60 m 3 organic solvents have been incinerated in the plant. The operating experiences are presented. (orig.) [de

  20. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre. Report on the results of research and development 1985

    1986-01-01

    The report contains a description of the research projects, a list of the institutes and departments of the scientific-technical range with short articles concerning the results of the institutional work, and a bibliography of all publications of 1985. The main aspects of the projects and research programs are fast breeder, separation nozzle process, nuclear fusion, waste recycling and reprocessing, final storage, nuclear safety, the range of technique-man-environment, solid state and materials research, nuclear and elementary particle physics, and research programs of different institutes. (HK)

  1. 9th PEF status colloquium from March 9-11, 1993 at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe

    Horsch, F.; Filby, W.G.; Fund, N.; Gross, S.; Kaendler, G.; Reinhardt, W.

    1993-04-01

    During the 9-11th of March 1993 the ninth status report of the project ''European Research Centre for Air Pollution Prevention Measures'' (PEF) took place at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe. Progress reports on the following topics were presented: investigation into damage and elucidation of the causes and effects of forest decline (task 1A); research into atmospheric dispersion, conversion and deposition of airborne pollutants (task 2); development and optimization of industrial-technical processes to reduce or avoid emissions (task 3); and providing instruments and making recommendations to the industrial and political sectors (task 4). (orig./BBR) [de

  2. Research and development at Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. Progress report 1993

    1994-01-01

    The Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe progress report is the 1993 issue of the scientific reports the institution is bound to submitt each year according to para. 13.4 of its articles of partnership. The points of main effort which are discussed reflect the institution's R and D scheme. The summaries submitted by the different institutes and departments are compiled by the topics and fields they deal with. The report gives an account of the progress under each of the KfK R and D projects. This correlation facilitates comparisons between the targets and actual achievements and elucidates the general relation between the individual tasks which often are in the care of several institutes at a time. The departments and institutes and their respective tasks are introduced, and a comprehensive appendix is attached which lists the 1993 publications. (orig.) [de

  3. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. Progress report on research and development work in 1987

    1988-01-01

    This summary of R and D work is the scientific annual report to be prepared by the research center in compliance with its statutes. The material is arranged by items of main activities, as given in the overall R and D programme set up for the research center. The various reports prepared by the individual institutes and principal departments are presented under their relevant subject headings. The annual report is intended to demonstrate the progress achieved in the tasks and activities assigned by the R and D programme of the research center, by referring to the purposes and goals stated in the programme, showing the joint or separate efforts and achievements of the institutes. Details and results of activities are found in the scientific-technical publications given in the bibliographical survey, and in the internal primary surveys. The main activities of the research center include the following: Fast Breeder Project (PSB), Nuclear Fusion Project (PKF), Separation Nozzle Project (TDV), and Reprocessing and Waste Treatment Project (PWA), Ultimate Disposal of Radioactive Waste (ELA), Environment and Safety (U and S), Solids and Materials (FM), Nuclear and Particle Physics (KTP), Microtechniques (MT), Materials Handling (HT), Other Research Activities (SF). Organisational aspects and institutes and the list of publications conclude the report. (orig./HK) [de

  4. The determination of Pu-241 by liquid scintillation counting in liquid effluents of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    Godoy, J.M.; Schuettelkopf, H.; Pimpl, M.

    1983-04-01

    A procedure was developed to measure Pu-241 by liquid scintillation counting. Sample preparation was performed by electroplating of plutonium on stainless steel planchets. To correct the selfabsorption, the linear dependence of counting efficiency in the liquid scintillation counter from the resolution in the alpha spectrometer was used. Pu-238, Pu-239+240 and Pu-241 were measured in the liquid effluents of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center (KfK). The concentrations in monthly mixed samples ranged from 0.07 until 46 nCi Pu-238/m 3 , from 0.13 until 2.1 nCi Pu-239+240/m 3 and from 25 until 190 nCi Pu-241/m 3 . Between 5.4% and 41% of the plutonium content of the KfK waste water are released to the River Old Rhine. The values for the activity ratio Pu-238/Pu-239+240 are between 0.39 and 1.1 and for Pu-241/Pu-239+240 are between 11 and 300. The mean value for Pu-241/Pu-239+240 is 61. The dose exposure of the environmental population of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center caused by released Pu-241 is negligible low. (orig./HP) [de

  5. List of the scientific publications of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center in 1989

    1990-05-01

    The scientific and technological-scientific publications of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe appear as books, ar original articles in scientific or technological periodicals, as postdoctoral theses, theses, dissertations, patents and KfK reports and are given as lectures at scientific conferences. The report KfK 4625 contains the titles of all publications from 1989. In the case of patents, all rights established or published during 1989 are indicated: patents, information sheets (DE-OS). The list of publications is ordered according to institutes. Under projects, only published project reports and publications by staff working on the particular projects are listed. Also included are publications printed in the Kernforschungszentrum from research and development plans within the Production Technology Project (PFT) and the project called 'European Research Center for the Control of Air Pollution' (PEF), which were carried out by the Kernforschungszentrum as project sponsor in cooperation with firms and institutes. The list also includes publications of the branch of the Federal Research Institute for Nutrition based at the Kernforschungszentrum. (orig./HK) [de

  6. List of the scientific publications of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center in 1987

    1988-05-01

    The scientific and technological-scientific publications of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe appear as books, as original articles in scientific or technological periodicals, as postdoctoral theses, theses, dissertations, patents and KfK reports and are given as lectures at scientific conferences. The report KfK 4425 contains the titles of all publications from 1987. In the case of patents, all rights established or published during 1987 are indicated: patents, information sheets (DE-OS). The list of publications is ordered according to institutes. Under projects, only published project reports and publications by staff working on the particular projects are listed. Also included are publications printed in the Kernforschungszentrum from research and development plans within the Production Technology Project (PFT) and the project called 'European Research Center for the Control of Air Pollution' (PEF), which were carried out by the Kernforschungszentrum as project sponsor in cooperation with firms and institutes. The list also includes publications of the Federal Research Institute for Nutrition based at the Kernforschungszentrum. (orig./HK) [de

  7. Coordinated and government-sponsored research in the Federal Republic of Germany. The Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre: Baking a new cake with the old mixture

    Mock, W.

    1986-01-01

    This article in the series gives an outline of the main research projects of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre, reviewing the formerly purely nuclear research tasks and going over to the new projects which increasingly encompass non-nuclear research subjects. Still, about 50% of the KfK research activities will be devoted in future to projects such as the fast breeder reactor, nuclear fuel reprocessing, and thermonuclear fusion. The programme modifications have been made paying due attention to a best possible utilization of existing equipment and manpower. (UA) [de

  8. Coordinated and government-sponsored research in the Federal Republic of Germany. The Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre: Baking a new cake with the old mixture

    Mock, W.

    1986-12-12

    This article in the series gives an outline of the main research projects of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre, reviewing the formerly purely nuclear research tasks and going over to the new projects which increasingly encompass non-nuclear research subjects. Still, about 50% of the KfK research activities will be devoted in future to projects such as the fast breeder reactor, nuclear fuel reprocessing, and thermonuclear fusion. The programme modifications have been made paying due attention to a best possible utilization of existing equipment and manpower.

  9. Decommissioning of the MZFR nuclear power plant at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    Demant, W.; Engelhardt, G.

    1991-01-01

    The MZFR multipurpose research reactor was permanently shut down on May 3, 1984. The envisaged decommissioning concept provides for disposal in five steps. The first two steps are devoted to preparatory work on dismantling and simplification of the systems needed for dismantling. In the third step the reactor auxiliary systems in the auxiliary building and in the fourth step the reactor systems in the reactor building will be dismantled. In the fifth step remote dismantling of the reactor pressure vessel and demolition of the building will take place. The scheduled date of completion is the year 2001. (author)

  10. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, Institute of Radiochemistry. Progress report on research and development work in 1993

    1994-03-01

    The IRCH microsystems technology activities are dedicated to the development of chemical sensors and probes which meet the practical sensitivity, selectivity or specificity and stability requirements. The devices are miniaturized for integration into microsystems technology solutions and are designed for a wide range of process management, process control and process analysis uses including, e.g. pollution monitoring and medical diagnosis. The nuclear fusion project focuses on investigations into chemical and technical tritium technology problems which may occur, e.g. during tritium recovery from tritiated compounds in the internal and external fusion reactor fuel cycles. Additional efforts go into the physico-ceramic characterization of ceramic breeder materials, the extraction of bred tritium from the blanket, and the development of the necessary process analysis methods. (orig.) [de

  11. Radiochemistry Institute of Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre. Progress report on R and D work in 1985

    1986-02-01

    The Radiochemistry Institute carried out R and D work within the framework of the following projects: Project PWA, Reprocessing and Waste Treatment; project PSB, Fast Breeder Reactor; project PKF, Nuclear Fusion. Basic and applied problems in the field of surface chemistry and surface analysis were studied under the working programme 'Solids and Materials Research', and 'Technology - Man - Environment' was a point of main interest that gathered a number of working programmes in the field of water chemistry. (orig./RB) [de

  12. Generallandesarchiv Karlsruhe. Inventory 69, Karlruhe Nuclear Research Center. Records of the management of Kernreaktor Bau- und Betriebsgesellschaft mbH and of Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung mbH, Karlsruhe (1956-1974)

    Gleitsmann, R.J.; Hochstuhl, K.; Wagner, H.; Miller, A.; Cramer, D.; Oetzel, G.

    1995-01-01

    The Karlsruhe Research Center is Germany's largest multidisciplinary research establishment in the fields of natural sciences and technology. In its relatively short period of existence, the Research Center has experienced vivid evolution and modification of original research goals, and even a profound change of the major tasks and goals laid down at the time of its foundation, which most obviously expresses itself in the change of name from Nuclear Research Center into Research Center, effective since January 1995. The wealth of important material accumulated in the archives of the Center throughout the almost 40 years of existence is a treasure for the historian and offered the tempting and useful task to process the material into a historical survey offering the many facettes of the history: in the end, the result combines an important piece of history of technology with the history of the Land of Baden-Wuerttemberg, the region, and the neighbouring city of Karlsruhe. In addition, the publication in hand also offers insight into the sociological aspects of the research work performed in the Center, and the interactive impetus of research and development in the interest of society at large. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Experience with cleaning of sodium-wetted components and decontamination at Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe

    Menzenhauer, P; Borgstedt, U; Stamm, H H; Dippel, Th; Kunze, S; Hentschel, D [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1978-08-01

    Within the framework of the Fast Breeder Project various institutes of the KarIsruhe Nuclear Research Center operate sodium loops for corrosion studies and component tests under sodium. The operation of these loops has led to extensive experience in cleaning sodium-wetted components. This experience relates to the alcohol method, the removal of sodium by melting, storage in air, and to cleaning by means of steam. Deposition samples from radioactive sodium loops were used for decontamination experiments employing various decontaminating agents. The department concerned with the treatment of radioactive waste studied the use of molten salts and paste type cleansers for components unsuitable for mechanical decontamination, primarily with the objective to reduce the amount of radioactive waste. (author)

  14. List of scientific and technical publications of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre, 1985

    1986-05-01

    The report lists the titles and other bibliographic data of the publications released in 1985. Lectures not yet available in printed form are listed separately. The patent section gives information on patent rights granted or published in 1985. Technical lectures or material prepared for courses held by the SKT (Nuclear Engineering School) are not part of the list. The data are arranged by institutes, information on project activities is given referring to published project reports and other publications prepared by project staff. The list also presents R and D reports printed by KfK for informationn on the PFT project, fabrication technologies, which is a joint enterprise by KfK, several other institutes, and industry. Publications of the branch institute of the Federal Food Research Institute are also given, followed by a list of publications prepared by guest scientists of the KfK. (orig./PW) [de

  15. Experience with cleaning of sodium-wetted components and decontamination at Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe

    Menzenhauer, P.; Borgstedt, U.; Stamm, H.H.; Dippel, Th.; Kunze, S.; Hentschel, D.

    1978-01-01

    Within the framework of the Fast Breeder Project various institutes of the KarIsruhe Nuclear Research Center operate sodium loops for corrosion studies and component tests under sodium. The operation of these loops has led to extensive experience in cleaning sodium-wetted components. This experience relates to the alcohol method, the removal of sodium by melting, storage in air, and to cleaning by means of steam. Deposition samples from radioactive sodium loops were used for decontamination experiments employing various decontaminating agents. The department concerned with the treatment of radioactive waste studied the use of molten salts and paste type cleansers for components unsuitable for mechanical decontamination, primarily with the objective to reduce the amount of radioactive waste. (author)

  16. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, Institute of Materials Research. Progress report on research and development work in 1993

    1994-03-01

    The Institute consists of three parts IMF I, IMF II and IMF III. The tasks are divided into applied material physics (IMF I), material and structural mechanics (IMF II) and material process technology (IMF III). IMF I works preferably on the development of metallic, non-metallic and compound materials and on questions of the structure and properties of boundary surfaces and surface protection coatings. The main work of IMF II is the reliability of components, failure mechanics and the science of damage. IMF III examines process technology questions in the context of the manufacture of ceramic materials and fusion materials and the design of nuclear components. The Institute works on various main points of the Kernforschungszentrum in its research work, particularly in nuclear fusion, micro-system technique, nuclear safety research, superconductivity and in processes with little harmful substances and waste. Material and strength problems for future fusion reactors and fission reactors, in powerful micro systems and safety-related questions of nuclear technology are examined. Also, research not bound to projects in the field of metallic, ceramic and polymer materials for high stresses is carried out. (orig.) [de

  17. List of scientific publications of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center in 1993

    1994-03-01

    The report contains the titles of all publications from 1993. In the case of patents, all rights established or published during 1993 are indicated: patents, information sheets (DE-OS). The list of publications is ordered according to institutes. Under projects, only published project reports and publications by staff working on the particular projects are listed. Also included are publications printed in the Kernforschungszentrum from research and development plans within the production Technology Project (PFT) and the project called 'European Research Center for the Control of Air Pollution' (PEF), which were carried out by the Kernforschungszentrum as project sponsor in cooperation with firms and institutes. The list also includes publications of the branch of the Federal Research Institute for Nutrition based at the Kernforschungszentrum. (orig.) [de

  18. List of the scientific publications of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center in 1990

    1991-05-01

    The report contains the titles of all publications from 1990. In the case of patents, all rights established or published during 1990 are indicated: patents, information sheets (DE-OS). The list of publications is ordered according to institutes. Under projects, only published project reports and publications by staff working on the particular projects are listed. Also included are publications printed in the Kernforschungszentrum from research and development plans within the Production Technology Project (PFT) and the project called 'European Research Center for the Control of Air Pollution' (PEF), which were carried out by the Kernforschungszentrum as project sponsor in cooperation with firms and institutes. The list also includes publications of the branch of the Federal Research Institute for Nutrition based at the Kernforschungszentrum. (orig./HP) [de

  19. List of scientific publications of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center in 1992

    1993-05-01

    The report contains the titles of all publications from 1992. In the case of patents, all rights established or published during 1992 are indicated: patents, information sheets (DE-OS). The list of publications is ordered according to institutes. Under projects, only published project reports and publications by staff working on the particular projects are listed. Also included are publications printed in the Kernforschungszentrum from research and development plans within the Production Technology Project (PFT) and the project called 'European Research Center for the Control of Air Pollution' (PEF), which were carried out by the Kernforschungszentrum as project sponsor in cooperation with firms and institutes. The list also includes publications of the branch of the Federal Research Institute for Nutrition based at the Kernforschungszentrum. (orig.) [de

  20. Determination and behaviour of plutonium emitted with liquid effluents and exhaust air into the environment of the Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe

    Schuettelkopf, H.; Pimpl, M.

    1986-01-01

    The plutonium concentrations in the surroundings of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre (KfK) are in the range of variation of the global plutonium contamination caused by fallout of atmospheric nuclear tests. Exclusively in the sediments of the Old River Rhine, which serves as main canal for the liquid effluents, higher plutonium concentrations could be detected. The dose exposure of the population living in the environment of the KfK caused by the measured plutonium concentrations is negligible low. From the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK) and the facilities needed to decontaminate radioactive wastes 0.48 GBq (13 mCi) plutonium alpha activity has been emitted within 11 years of operation until 1982 - 1/3 with the liquid effluents and 2/3 with the exhaust air. Following the pathway with the exhaust air, plutonium concentrations in the environment of the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant were measured in groundlevel air, in soil, in plants, in food and in animal tissues. Radioecological parameters like dispersion factors, deposition velocities, migration velocities in soil and transfer soil-to-plant were investigated. Following the pathway with the liquid effluents, plutonium concentrations were measured in surface waters, sediments, water plants, plankton and animals. Dilution and sedimentation behaviour were studied as well as the transfer water-to-plant and water-to-animals. (orig.) [de

  1. 9. PEF status colloquium, Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe, March 9-11, 1993

    1993-04-01

    This report compiles the summarizing reviews of the program management at the PEF Statuskolloquium of March 1993. Seven papers, which are not individually recorded, deal with the four subject areas of the project: Monitoring and analysis of the effect of air pollutants on forest ecosystems and delimitation against possible other causes of novel forest damage; research into the atmospheric propagation, conversion and deposition of air pollutants; development and optimization of technic-economic methods for cutting down or avoiding emissions; provision of instruments and recommendations for the economic and political sector. (UWa) [de

  2. 25 years of financing and accountancy of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    Neck, E.

    1980-11-01

    It will be first described how the system of financing has progressed since the establishment of the Center. A distinction will be made between four different financing models in succession. The presentation of these financing models will be accompanied by a description of building up and development of the Center, mainly under financial aspects. The second part will show the development of accountancy and balance striking. Particular courses will be indicated which are typical of large research establishments funded by the government, thus providing the picture of an accountancy system specifically adapted to research establishments. It differs from classical business accounting by laying a bridge to the cameralistic accountancy of public authorities. Besides, the organization and tools of KfK cost accounting will be described. Finally, the third part will present statistical time series (1956 to 1979) including both the annual balances, annual expenditures and some average numbers (per capita numbers). These time series will be supplemented each by short comments. (orig./HP) [de

  3. The scientific publications of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre in the year 1974

    1975-04-01

    Report KFK 2125 contains all the titles of those publications which were printed in 1974. Lectures are included then when the written version is available in the Central Library. Concerning patents, only those specified in a certain way (Ersterteilung, Auslegeschrift, Offenlegungsschrift) are listed. The list of publications is arranged according to institutes. Under the heading 'Projekt' there are only project reports and publications of project staff members. The list also includes those publications printed in the Kernforschungszentrum concerned with the research and development projects' Prozesslenkung mit DV-Anlagen (PDV)' und 'Rechnerunterstuetztes Entwickeln und Konstruieren (CAD)' which are carried out by the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung in cooperation with other firms and organizations. In addition, the publications of the Institut fuer Strahlentechnologie der Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Lebensmittelfrischhaltung, situated on the premises of the Kernforschungszentrum, are given. (orig./HK) [de

  4. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, Institute of Nuclear Solid State Physics. Progress report on research and development work in 1993

    1994-03-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Solids Physics carried out about 90% of its work in the year of the report, 1993, on the main point of superconductivity. The work on high temperature superconductors on a cuprate basis was continued on a large scale. The availability of better samples (eg: non-twinned single crystals) make it possible to clear up a series of important detailed questions regarding the structure, grid dynamics and electronic structure. The activities closely related to applications of superconducting films were concentrated on the growth of a-axis and c-axis orientated films on technically relevant substrates (above all on sapphire, including suitable buffer layers and the examination of these films regarding their high frequency behaviour. Considerable progress was achieved in the manufacture of wafers coated on both sides. The work on Fullerene (carbon molecules C 60 , C 70 etc) and Fullerene compounds was continued. The Institute quickly succeeded not only in preparing these systems, but also in making a considerable contribution to a physical understanding of them. Among the Institute's activities, which are not directly connected to superconductivity (about 10%), one should mention above all, the experimental and theoretical work on the physics of surfaces and boundary surfaces, on polymer physics and on the physics of mesoscopic systems. (orig.) [de

  5. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Engineering. Progress report on research and development work in 1993

    1994-03-01

    The Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Engineering is concerned with research work in the field of nuclear engineering related to the safety of thermal reactors as well as with specific problems of fusion reactor technology. Under the project of nuclear safety research, the Institute works on concepts designed to drastically improve reactor safety. Apart from that, methods to estimate and minimize the radiological consequences of reactor accidents are developed. Under the fusion technology project, the Institute deals with neutron physics and technological questions of the breeding blanket. Basic research covers technico-physical questions of the interaction between light ion radiation of a high energy density and matter. In addition and to a small extent, questions of employing hydrogen in the transport area are studied. (orig.) [de

  6. Progress report on research and development work 1991 of the Department of Hot Chemistry, Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    1991-03-01

    In the year under review, the Institute of Hot Chemistry (IHCH) was in the midst of a thematic reorientation process. The priority of future chemical-technical work will be in the field of the development of supercriticality processes. The objective of such work consists in seeking new ways for getting rid of resistant chemical pollutants (halogenated organic compounds). The following projects are presented in detail: 1) Waste control in the environment (communal waste management; water and soil; emission-reducing processes; highly polluted soils); 2) Solid state and materials research (chemistry of materials research); basic physical research (neutrino and particle physics); 3) Nuclear waste management (concluding work on reprocessing technology), and 4) Other research projects (Institute-related research). The Annex lists the publications made by the IHCH staff. (BBR) [de

  7. Activities at the Institute of Materials and Solid State Research of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre in the field of fuel pin modelling

    Elbel, H.

    1979-01-01

    Fuel pin modelling has been pursued at the Institute of Materials and Solid State Research (IMF) of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre (KfK) with the main objective to provide a detailed quantitative analysis of the fuel pin behaviour in a LMFBR under normal and off-normal operation conditions. The computer programs and models developed at the IMF serve the purpose to aid effectively in the development of an optimized fuel pin concept for a LMFBR. What extent of clad deformation can be tolerated without running into clad failure? What is the influence of neutron dose, temperature, corrosion attack, arid cyclic forces on the state of the clad? What may be the reasons for clad failure? In answering these questions computer programs can play an important role. The activities at the IMF in the field of fuel pin modelling cover the following topics: development of computer programs and models; validation of these programs and models, application to the design of fuel pins for irradiation experiments; assistance in the evaluation of operation data and post- irradiation results, and parametric studies on the influence of design parameters, operation conditions and certain material phenomena on the in-pile behaviour of the fuel pin

  8. Experimental determination of the atmospheric dispersion at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center for 160 m and 195 m emission heights. Pt. 1

    Thomas, P.; Huebschmann, W.; Schuettelkopf, H.; Vogt, S.

    1983-03-01

    Diffusion experiments have been carried out at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center in order to investigate the atmospheric diffusion of pollutants and to determine specifically the influence on atmospheric diffusion of topographic conditions specific to the site. For this purpose, halogenated hydrocarbons are emitted at 160 m and 195 m height, their local concentration distribution is measured at ground level downwind of the source. Part 1 of the report describes the diffusion experiments performed and presents the detailed data of measurements. These include the coordinates of the sampling positions, the measured concentrations and the relevant meteorological data recorded during the experiments. The stability classes prevailing during the experiments are derived from these data and are indicated. (orig.) [de

  9. Experimental determination of the atmospheric dispersion parameters at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center for 60 m and 100 m emission heights. Pt. 1

    Thomas, P.; Dilger, H.; Huebschmann, W.; Schuettelkopf, H.; Vogt, S.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H.

    1981-09-01

    Experiments have been carried out at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center in order to investigate the atmospheric diffusion of pollutants. The influence on atmospheric diffusion of topographic conditions specific to the site is to be determined. For this purpose, halogenated hydrocarbons are emitted at 60 m and 100 m height; their local concentration distribution is measured at ground level downwind of the source. Part 1 of the report describes the diffusion experiments performed and presents the measured data in a detailed manner. The data include the coordinates of the sampling positions, the measured concentrations and the relevant meteorological data recorded during the experiments. The stability classes prevailing during the experiments are derived from these data and are indicated. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Mapping the nuclear landscape. 50 years of the Karlsruher Nuklidkarte

    Normand, C.; Pfennig, G.; Magill, J.; Dreher, R.

    2009-01-01

    Radioactivity has been known for more than a hundred years. Nuclear data compilations through nuclide charts began in the 1920s with the work of Soddy, and were later rationalized in the Karlsruher Nuklidkarte. For 50 years, it has depicted the status of our nuclear knowledge in an easy reading form. It was born as an educational and scientific tool that gives access to the basic bricks that the nuclear Physics community needs to build the physics knowledge at the femtometer (10 -15 m) level. Nuclide data is a bridge between research and development. On the one hand, the nucleus can be regarded as a vast laboratory with, the possibility to test from fundamental concepts of the Standard Model to the genesis of the elements in the Universe. On the other hand, this data is also leading to applications in many areas of everyday life such as health care or environmental monitoring. (author)

  11. Drawing the nuclear landscape: 50 years of the Karlsruhe Nuklidkarte; Trazando el paisaje nuclear 50 anos de historia de la Karlsruher Nuklidkarte

    Garcia Borge, M. J.; Normand, C.

    2010-07-01

    The map has been Nuklidkarte Karlsruhe nuclei since 1958 the work of thousands of physicists and hundreds of thousands experimental results produced in institutes research worldwide. With excellence as rule, has become over the years a reference the field of nuclear information. (Author) 19 refs.

  12. Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe Technik und Umwelt. Research and development program 2002

    2001-01-01

    The five main fields of research and the activities under the R and D program 2002 are explained in great detail in five chapters with the following captions: 1. ENVIRONMENT. Programs: - Sustainable development, energy and environmental engineering (UMWELT). - Earth atmosphere and climate research (ATMO). 2. PUBLIC HEALTH. Programs: - Biomedical research (BIOMED). - Medical engineering (MEDTECH). 3. ENERGY. Programs: - Thermonuclear fusion (FUSION). - Nuclear safety (NUKLEAR). 4. KEY TECHNOLOGIES. Programs: - Microsystems engineering (MIKRO). - Nanotechnology (NANO). - Materials science (MATERIAL). - Chemical process engineering (CHEMIE). - Superconductivity (SUPRA). 5. MATTER and STRUCTURE. Program: The structure of matter (STRUKTUR). The sixth chapter presents cross-cutting activities under the program: Technology transfer and marketing (TTM). The concluding chapter lists and briefly presents the activities of the scientific and technical institutes of the Karlsruhe Research Center. (CB) [de

  13. The calculated radiological impact on the environment of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center due to radioactive emissions to the atmosphere in the years 1975 and 1976

    Huebschmann, W.; Nagel, D.; Papadopoulos, D.

    1976-08-01

    The radiological impact by radioactive offgas and exhaust air on the environment of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center (KNRC) is calculated every year and compared with the permissible equivalent doses. This report includes both the forecasted maximum doses from maximum releases scheduled for the year 1976 and the actual doses of 1975 based on the measured releases in 1975. According to the various irradiation mechanisms of the nuclides emitted, the following doses are indicated, each calculated for an adult person: whole body dose by γ-irradiation and tritium inhalation, skin dose by external β-irradiation, lung dose by aerosol inhalation, bone dose by plutonium inhalation, and effective integral dose. The maximum infant thyroid dose due to iodine ingestion via the pasture-cow-milk-pathway is also calculated. The respective maximum doses indicate that the dose limits of 30 mrem/a whole body dose (adult) and 90 mrem/a thyroid dose (Infant) which are to be observed by the KNRC since the year 1975 are not exceeded at any point, provided the emissions remain below the scheduled maximum level. The doses in 1975 were markedly below the dose limits mentioned above. This is even true when partial body and organ doses are integrated in an 'effective dose'. (orig.) [de

  14. Compilation of papers presented to the KTG conference on 'Advanced LWR fuel elements: Design, performance and reprocessing', 17-18 November 1988, Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    Bahm, W.

    1989-05-01

    The two expert groups of the Nuclear Society (KTG), 'chemistry and waste disposal' and 'fuel elements' discussed interdisciplinary problems concerning the development and reprocessing of advanced fuel elements. The 10 lectures deal with waste disposal, mechanical layout, operating behaviour, operating experiences and new developments of fuel elements for water moderated reactors as well as operational experiences of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant (WAK) with reprocessing of high burnup LWR and MOX fuel elements, the distribution of fission products, the condition of the fission products during dissolution and with the effects of the higher burnup of fuel elements on the PUREX process. (DG) [de

  15. Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe Technik und Umwelt. Research and development programme 1999

    1999-01-01

    The Karlsruhe Research Center is a national research establishment placed under the responsibility of the Federal Republic of Germany and the Federal Land of Baden-Wuerttemberg, and as a member of the Hermann von Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren belongs to the most important and independent research centers in Germany working in the fields of the natural sciences and engineering sciences. The center's research and development activities are defined in coordination with the policy and programmes of the two responsible Federal and Land Governments and span the range from pre-industrial research through to product and process development, research of a provident nature, and fundamental scientific research work, with almost all R and D activities of the center relating in one way or other to technology and the environment. The research programme of the center today covers subjects and aspects relating to the environment, energy, key technologies, and fundamental research, whereas at the time the center was founded, nuclear science and engineering was the dominating field of activities. The current spectrum of activities reflects the evolution in the past and is characterized by a great complexity of problems involved, which requires cross-disciplinary cooperation, and foresight in the definition of tasks and time horizons. (orig./CB) [de

  16. The ''Nuclear-Karlsruhe'' air-filter system

    Berliner, P.; Ohlmeyer, M.; Stotz, W.

    1976-01-01

    Increasing requirements for exhaust-air filter systems used in nuclear facilities induced the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung to develop the ''Nuclear-Karlsruhe'' HEPA filter system. This novel development has profited by experience gained in previous incidents as well as by maitenance and decontamination work performed with different HEPA filter systems. The proved ''Nuclear-Karlsruhe'' system takes equally into account the demands for optimum safety, maximum efficiency and economy, and is distinguished by the following features: (1) The air current is defected by 180 0 in the casing. Deflection causes quite a number of improvements, results in substantial reduction of space requirements, and avoids the dispersion of pollutants to the clean-air side. Besides, the HEPA filter is protected from damage by condensed particles or foreign materials entrained; (2) The ''Nuclear-Karlsruhe'' system allows gas-tight filter replacement. Special replacement collars have been provided at the casing, which allow the tight fastening of replacement bags which are self-locking. (3) In-place testing in the operating condition can be carried out very conveniently because the air is deflected. Minimum leaks in the filter medium or in the filter gasket can be detected by the high-sensitivity visual oil-thread test, which makes leaks distinctly visible as oil mist threads through a transparent front window provided on the clean-air side. The test takes only some minutes and its sensitivity is hardly matched by any other technique. (4) The clamping mechanism is installed outside the casing, i.e. outside the polluted or aggressive media. The contact force is spring-loaded absolutely uniformly to the circular filter gasket. (5) For practical and econmic reasons the filter casings can be locked individually so as to be gas-tight. (6) The entire system is made of stainless or coated steel and metal parts which are corrosion and fire-resistant. (author)

  17. Annual report 1995 of the Central Safety Department, Research Center Karlsruhe

    Koelzer, W.

    1996-04-01

    The Central Safety Department is responsible for supervising, monitoring and, to some extent, also executing measures of radiation protection, industrial health and safety as well as physical protection and security at and for the institutes and departments of the Karlsruhe Research Center (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH), and for monitoring liquid effluents and the environment of all facilities and nuclear installations on the premises of the Research Center. In addition, research and development work is carried out in the fields of behavior of tritium in the air/soil/plant system, tritium balances for nuclear fusion fuel cycles, and assessments of mining and ore dressing spoils. This report gives details of the different duties and reports the results of 1995 routine tasks, investigations and developments of the working groups of the Department. The reader is referred to the English translation of Chapter 1 describing the duties and organization of the Central Safety Department. (orig.) [de

  18. Papers presented as part of the status report of the Nuclear Safety Research Project of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Center on 23 March 1994

    Hueper, R.

    1994-05-01

    The ten papers deal with the state of safety requirements on future LWR plants and with nuclear safety research with regard to fast reactors and future PWR plants. In particular, passive after-heat removal, core disruptive accidents, and actinide burning in fast reactors are analysed. For PWR type plants the fuel element behaviour in the event of accidents, hydrogen distribution and hydrogen fires, and the origin and effects of steam explosions on the reactor pressure vessel and the containment are examined. Core meltdown cooling systems are suggested. (DG) [de

  19. Annual report 1991 on R and D work by the Institute for Materials and Solid State Research (IMF), Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    1992-03-01

    The annual report summarises the activities of the IMF in the following subject areas: 1) Contributions to the PKF (fusion technology project (refewing to structural materials, superconducting magnets, blanket development); 2) PSU, project for the management of pollutants in the environment (treatment and recycling of hazardous waste); 3) solid state and materials research (high-temperature materials, ceramic materials as protective coatings, polymer materials, high-performance ceramics, high-TC superconducting materials; biomechanics, laser technology); 4) microtechnology (development and testing of compact or layered materials in microtechnology); 5) PSF project, nuclear safety, research (safety and materials aspects of fast breeder reactors, transient behaviour of fuel elements in fact breeder reactors, LWR-specific safety research, containment design concepts for the next generation of PWR-type reactors); 6) NE project, nuclear waste management (analysis of solid wastes from the dissolution of spent LWR fuels, materials testing in nitric acid). The primary reports and other publications of the Institute issued in 1991 are listed in an annex. (orig./MM) [de

  20. Research and development at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe - brief report 1991

    1992-01-01

    Research at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe in the nineties is focussed on environmentally compatible high technologies with emphasis on environmental engineering, power engineering, microsystems technology, and selected fields of fundamental research. The KfK research and development trends are reflected by this brief report. The facts and figures inform researchers and specialists by summarizing the major results of the current research projects and by informing about the main targets and trends of long-time research programs and individual projects. The brief reports are completed by comprehensive, annual progress reports which discuss the implementation and results of the KfK research activities and compile references which list the various scientifico-technical reports, contributions to journals, conference papers, and other publications. (orig.) [de

  1. Progress report on research and development work 1991 of the Institute of Genetics and Toxicology of Fissionable Materials, Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    1991-03-01

    The present annual report describes the results of research work done by the Institute of Genetics and Toxicology of Fissionable Materials (IGT) in 1991. The following eight subjects were dealt with: genetic repair; genetic regulation; biological carcinogenesis; molecular genetics of eukaryontic genes; genetic mouse models for human illnesses; radiation toxicology of actinides; molecular and cellular environmental toxicology, and in vivo fractionation and speciation of actinides. (MG) [de

  2. Compact sodium cooled nuclear power plant with fast core (KNK II- Karlsruhe), Safety Report

    1977-09-01

    After the operation of the KNK plant with a thermal core (KNK I), the installation of a fast core (KNK II) had been realized. The planning of the core and the necessary reconstruction work was done by INTERATOM. Owner and customer was the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe (KfK), while the operating company was the Kernkraftwerk-Betriebsgesellschaft mbH (KBG) Karlsruhe. The main goals of the KNK II project and its special experimental test program were to gather experience for the construction, the licensing and operation of future larger plants, to develop and to test fuel and absorber assemblies and to further develop the sodium technology and the associated components. The present safety report consists of three parts. Part 1 contains the description of the nuclear plant. Hereby, the reactor and its components, the handling facilities, the instrumentation with the plant protection, the design of the plant including the reactor core and the nominal operation processes are described. Part 2 contains the safety related investigation and measures. This concerns the reactivity accidents, local cooling perturbations, radiological consequences with the surveillance measures and the justification of the choice of structural materials. Part three finally is the appendix with the figures, showing the different buildings, the reactor and its components, the heat transfer systems and the different auxiliary facilities [de

  3. Scientists from all over the world attend the Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn summer school at the Karlsruhe Research Center; Wissenschaftler aus aller Welt bei der Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School im Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    Heinzel, V.

    2003-11-01

    The Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School organized jointly by the Karlsruhe Research Center and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique was held in Karlsruhe in 2003 for the third time. The main topics this year focused on recent developments and findings in the fields of fuels and materials for reactors. Applications of nuclear technology beyond the confines of electricity generation were covered in discussions shout methods of hydrogen production. Specialized seminars dealt with current aspects of fusion research and the activities of the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU). (orig.)

  4. Karlsruhe international conference on analytical chemistry in nuclear technology

    1985-01-01

    This volume presents 218 abstracts of contributions by researchers working in the analytical chemistry field of nuclear technology. The majority of the papers deal with analysis with respect to process control in fuel reprocessing plants, fission and corrosion product characterization throughout the fuel cycle as well as studies of the chemical composition of radioactive wastes. Great interest is taken in the development and optimization of methods and instrumentation especially for in-line process control. About 3/4 of the papers have been entered into the data base separately. (RB)

  5. Institute of Genetics and Toxicology of Fission Products (IGT) of Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre. Progress report on R and D work in 1985

    1986-02-01

    The main research activities of the IGT in 1985 according to the R and D programme set up for that year have been carried out under the roof of eight different projects or programmes: Gene repair; gene regulation; biological cancerogenesis; molecular genetics of eukaryotes; radiotoxicology of actinides; biochemistry of actinides and other heavy metals; biophysics of organometallic compounds; biochemical principles of decorporation therapy. (orig./MG) [de

  6. List of reports and conference papers on the Fast Breeder Project published by the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe from 1972 to 1975

    Hueper, R.

    1976-12-01

    This list is a continuation of the list of publications contained in the final report on work completed by GfK during Phase IIa of the Fast Breeder Project (KFK-Ext. 25/72-1). In addition, short accounts of the results of the research work done in the framework of the Fast Breeder Project of GfK have been published in the quarterly reports KFK 1972/1 through 1975/4. These reports have not been included in the present list. (orig.) [de

  7. Research and development at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe - progress report 1991

    1992-01-01

    The Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe progress report is the 1991 issue of the scientific reports the institution is bound to submitt each year according to para. 13.4 of its articles of partnership. The points of main effort which are discussed reflect the institution's R and D scheme. The summaries submitted by the different institutes and departments are compiled by the topics and fields they deal with. The report gives an account of the progress under each of the KfK R and D projects. This correlation facilitates comparisons between the targets and actual achievements and elucidates the general relation between the individual tasks which often are in the care of several institutes at a time. The departments and institutes and their respective tasks are introduced, and a comprehensive appendix is attached which lists the 1991 publications. (orig./UA) [de

  8. Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe Technik und Umwelt. Research and development program 2001 and program budget 2001

    2001-01-01

    The Karlsruhe Research Center is a national research center founded and substantially funded by the German Federal Government and the Land government of Baden-Wuerttemberg, the federal state where it is located. It is a member of the Hermann von Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren and is one of the most important, independent research centers in Germany working in the fields of the natural sciences and engineering sciences. The Center's R and D programmes encompass research activities up to pre-industrial scale as well as product and process development, research for precautionary policy and purposes, and fundamental research. The focal points of the R and D programme 2001 are explained under the following subject titles: - Environment - Public Health - Energy - Key Technologies - Fundamental Research. The programme reveals the shift of emphasis of activities which commenced in the early 1980s, away from nuclear engineering as the major focus in the early days towards a much wider spectrum of activities today, characterized by aspects such as complexity of tasks, long-term planning, and the need for cross-disciplinary and multilateral cooperation. The second volume of the publication explains the programme budget and apportionment of funds. (orig./CB) [de

  9. Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe Technik und Umwelt. Program budget for research and development 2001. Planning period 2001 - 2004

    2000-11-01

    The Karlsruhe Research Center is a national research center founded and substantially funded by the German Federal Government and the Land government of Baden-Wuerttemberg, the federal state where it is located. It is a member of the Hermann von Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren and is one of the most important, independent research centers in Germany working in the fields of the natural sciences and engineering sciences. The Center's R and D programmes encompass research activities up to pre-industrial scale as well as product and process development, research for precautionary policy and purposes, and fundamental research. The focal points of the R and D programme 2001 are explained under the following subject titles: - Environment - Public Health - Energy - Key Technologies - Fundamental Research. The programme reveals the shift of emphasis of activities which commenced in the early 1980s, away from nuclear engineering as the major focus in the early days towards a much wider spectrum of activities today, characterized by aspects such as complexity of tasks, long-term planning, and the need for cross-disciplinary and multilateral cooperation. The second volume of the publication explains the programme budget and apportionment of funds. (orig./CB) [de

  10. Report on the first two IAEA-courses on nuclear power project planning and implementation in Karlsruhe

    Reuter, H.H.

    1977-01-01

    There is no more doubt about the necessity of utilizing nuclear energy to cover the world energy requirements. A growing number of developing countries find themselves compelled to use nuclear energy in order to meet their rising energy demands and, hence, to improve their conditions of life. On the other hand, the lack of suitable experts having gathered experience is particularly perceptible in these countries. For this reason, IAEA has organized training courses on an international level, which are held in Karlsruhe (Federal Republic of Germany), Saclay (France), and Argonne (USA). Taking into account the situation in the respective developing country, independent courses are being offered on ''Nuclear Power Project Planning and Implementation'' and on ''Construction and Operation Management.'' The first course of this type was held at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center from September 8 until December 17, 1975. It was attended by 35 participants from 20 countries. In cooperation with industry and national as well as international authorities the syllabus proposed by IAEA was translated into a training program including all essential questions on the introduction of nuclear energy in developing countries. The next course will take place from September 6 until November 30, 1976. A detailed analysis is presented of the extent to which the expectations of participants have been fulfilled. The status of nuclear technology and the number of candidates having sufficient knowledge is of particular importance in this context. A very significant aspect consists in teaching not only theoretical knowledge but integrating practical application in such training courses, which is demonstrated by examples

  11. Removing of the fuel element storage basin by explosive technique in the course of decommissioning of the Nuclear research reactor FR 2 in the research center Karlsruhe. Permission and technical execution

    Jehle, P.; Freund, H.U.

    1999-01-01

    The fuel element storage basin was removed by explosive technique in the course of the decommissioning of the nuclear research reactor FR 2. This basin consisted of 6.800 tons of heavily reinforced concrete with 25 tons of stainless steel lining. The reactor building including residual radioactive inventory was constructionally connected to the basin and had to stay undamaged. For this reason and due to the fact that the storage basin as operational part of the nuclear facility was subject to the German nuclear law the dismantling had to follow stringent licensing and control requirements. Special restrictions concerned the tolerable reactor building vibrations and the direct blast loadings which could affect the structural integrity of the building enclosing the basin. The explosive dismantling operations which also included the final removal of the building foundation were successfully performed in 90 separate blasts employing 490 kg of commercial explosives. (orig.) [de

  12. 1991 annual report of the Karlsruhe Federal Food Research Institute

    1992-01-01

    The Federal Food Research Institute does research in the field of nutrition, food and household sciences as well as in related special fields. Among its working priorities are the determination of foreign matter and radionuclides in food as well as food preservation by means of irradiation including dosimetry. The results of those priorities are represented. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Cost accounting at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH

    Neck, E.

    1979-01-01

    A presentation of the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe and its main research activities is given. Company structure, planning and control system in the R and D field are explained. The cost accounting system of the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe is discussed in detail, a survey of cost accounting as practiced by other German research establishments and comments on cost accounting as a tool of performance gauging are given. (A.N.)

  14. In-situ testing of HEPA filters in the nuclear Karlsruhe filter system

    Ohlmeyer, M.; Stotz, W.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear plant operators and filter manufacturers are endeavouring to improve environmental protection by intensifying process control and/or improving filter quality. In-situ testing is an important element in these efforts since it represents a direct means of checking the success or otherwise of a particular development. The arrangements for in-situ testing should satisfy the following minimum requirements: the staff should not be exposed to risk during the test; the test method should be objective and reproducible as well as being as sensitive as possible; the test method should permit detection of individual leaks in the filter system so that they can be remedied as efficiently as possible; the test equipment should not necessitate modifications to the extract systems or plant construction; the test should be simple and capable of being carried out with a minimum of effort and equipment. GfK has developed the 'Nuclear-Karlsruhe' filter housing in accordance with these principles. This housing permits in-situ testing similar to the DIN 24184 visual oil-fog test or the DOP test. External visual checks on the general condition of the filter is also possible. A safe system of filter changing with a specially designed plastic bag attachment at an accessible height considerably increases the degree of protection of operating personnel

  15. Fusion Technologies: 2nd Karlsruhe International Summer School

    Bahm, W.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear fusion promises to deliver a future non-polluting energy supply with nearly unlimited fuel reserves. To win young scientists and engineers for nuclear fusion, the Karlsruhe Research Center, together with other partners in the European Fusion Education Network being established by the European Commission, organizes the 2nd Karlsruhe International Summer School on Fusion Technologies on September 1-12, 2008. The program covers all key technologies necessary for construction and operation of a fusion reactor. (orig.)

  16. Scientists and professionals from all around the world in Karlsruhe. Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn summer school 2013 on nuclear reactors 'Physics, Fuels and Systems'

    Sanchez-Espinoza, V.H.; Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Scientific Secretariat FJOHSS

    2014-02-15

    Every 2 years the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) organizes the Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn (FJOH) Summer School together with the Commissariat a l'-Energie Atomique (CEA) since 1999. In 2013, the FJOH Summer School took place in Karlsruhe from 21 to 30 August. The topic of this year's school was 'Advanced Nuclear Systems with Transuranium Fuels'. Experts from internationally well recognized research institutions and Universities from USA, Japan, Asia and Europe gave lectures about the current status and trends on the related fields. (orig.)

  17. Overview of LWR severe accident research activities at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

    Miassoedov, Alexei; Albrecht, Giancarlo; Foit, Jerzy-Jan; Jordan, Thomas; Steinbrück, Martin; Stuckert, Juri; Tromm, Walter

    2012-01-01

    The research activities in the light water reactor (LWR) severe accidents domain at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are concentrated on the in- and ex-vessel core melt behavior. The overall objective is to investigate the core melt scenarios from the beginning of core degradation to melt formation and relocation in the vessel, possible melt dispersion to the reactor cavity and to the containment, corium concrete interaction and corium coolability in the reactor cavity, and hydrogen behaviour in reactor systems. The results of the experiments contribute to a better understanding of the core melt sequences and thus improve safety of existing and, in the long-term, of future reactors by severe accident mitigation measures and by safety installations where required. This overview paper describes the experimental facilities used at KIT for severe accident research and gives an overview of the main directions and objectives of the R&D work. (author)

  18. Partitioning of minor actinides: research at Juelich and Karlsruhe Research Centres

    Geist, A.; Weigl, M.; Gompper, K.; Modolo, G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. The work on minor actinide (MA) partitioning carried out at Karlsruhe and Juelich is integrated in the EC FP6 programme, EUROPART. Studies include the DIAMEX process (co-extraction of MA and lanthanides from PUREX raffinate) and the SANEX process (separation of MA from lanthanides). Aspects ranging from developing and improving highly selective and efficient extraction reagents, to fundamental structural studies, to process development and testing are covered. SANEX is a challenge in separation chemistry because of the chemical similarity of trivalent actinides and lanthanides. The extracting agents 2,6-di(5,6-di-propyl-1,2,4-triazine-3-yl)pyridine (n-Pr-BTP), developed at Karlsruhe, and the synergetic mixture of di(chloro-phenyl)di-thio-phosphinic acid (R2PSSH) with tri-n-octyl-phosphine oxide (TOPO), developed at Juelich, are considered a breakthrough because of their high separation efficiency in acidic systems. Separation factors for americium over lanthanides of more than 30 (R2PSSH+TOPO) and 130 (n-Pr-BTP) are achieved. To gain understanding of these selectivities, comparative investigations on the structures of curium and europium complexed with these SANEX ligands were performed at Karlsruhe. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis revealed distinct structural differences between curium and europium complexed with R2PSSH + TOPO, though no such differences were found for n-Pr-BTP. These investigations were therefore complemented by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopic investigations (TRLFS), showing complex stabilities and speciation to differ between n-Pr-BTP complexes of curium and europium. Kinetics of mass transfer was studied for both R2PSSH+TOPO and n-Pr-BTP systems. For the R2PSSH + TOPO system, diffusion was identified to control extraction rates. For the n-Pr-BTP system, a slow chemical reaction was identified as the rate-controlling process. These results were implemented into computer

  19. Research on transmutation and accelerator-driven systems at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    Knebel, J.U.; Heusener, G.

    2000-01-01

    Transmutation is considered a promising technology worldwide for significantly reducing the amount and, thereby, the long-term radiotoxicity of high active waste (HAW) produced by the operation of nuclear power plants such as light water reactors (LWR). The maximum reduction of radiotoxicity could be by a factor of about 100. Transmutation is thus an alternative to the direct deposition of large volumes of highly radioactive waste. Transmutation presents the possibility of closing the fuel cycle including the minor actinides. Plutonium, minor actinides and long-lived fission products can be transmuted in a so called Accelerator Driven Sub-critical System (ADS), which consists of an accelerator, a target module and a subcritical blanket. This paper describes the work performed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe which is critically evaluating an ADS mainly with respect to its potential for transmuting minor actinides, to its feasibility and to safety aspects. The work is being done in the area of core design, neutronics, safety, system analyses, materials and corrosion. (orig.) [de

  20. List of publications of the University of Karlsruhe and the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre

    1985-01-01

    This list covers books and periodicals, articles in periodicals and collective publications, scientific reports, theses and habilitations composed or edited by institutions, their organs and institutes as well as their teaching staff and scientific collaborators, and indicates moreover patents. (orig./PW) [de

  1. List of scientific publications of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Reseach Centre for the year 1986

    1987-05-01

    This report contains the titles of the publications which appeared during the year 1986. Lectures which have not been printed yet are listed separately from the literature. All the patents awarded or published in 1986 are given; i.e. patents and publications of patents. Summarising lectures and practical instructions from the courses at the College for Nuclear Technology are not included in the list. The list of publications is arranged according to Institutes. Among the projects, only the published project reports and publications by members of the staff of the project are listed. The publications printed at the Nuclear Research Centre from the research and development projects of the Manufacturing Technique Project (PFT) and the project on the 'European Research Centre for Measures for Keeping the Air Clean' (PEF), which are being carried out by the Nuclear Research Centre in collaboration with firms and institutions, are also included in the list. The list also contains publications by the external office of the West German Institute of Food resident in the Nuclear Research Centre. The last chapter of the list contains publications on guest experiments at the Nuclear Research Centre. The list has an alphabetical index, which gives page and registry numbers. (orig./GG) [de

  2. An overview of the severe accident research activities within the LACOMERA platform at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    Miassoedov, A.; Alsmeyer, H.; Meyer, L.; Steinbrueck, M.; Tromm, W.

    2006-01-01

    The LACOMERA project at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, is a 4 year action within the 5th Framework Programme of the EU which started in September 2002. Overall objective of the project is to offer research institutions from the EU member countries and associated states access to four large-scale experimental facilities QUENCH, LIVE, DISCO, and COMET. These facilities can be used to investigate core melt scenarios from the beginning of core degradation to melt formation and relocation in the vessel, possible melt dispersion to the reactor cavity, and finally corium concrete interaction and corium coolability in the reactor cavity. The paper summarises the main results obtained in the following experiments performed up to now. QUENCH-L1: Impact of air ingression on core degradation. The test provides unique data for the investigation of air ingress phenomenology in conditions as representative of a spent fuel pool accident as possible; QUENCH-L2: Boil-off of a flooded bundle. The test is of a generic interest for all reactor types, provided a link between the severe accident and design basis areas, and would deliver oxidation and thermal hydraulic data at high temperatures. DISCO-L1: Thermal hydraulic behaviour of the corium melt dispersion neglecting the chemical effects such as hydrogen generation and combustion. COMET-L1: Long-term 2D concrete ablation in a siliceous concrete cavity at intermediate decay heat power level with a top flooding phase after a phase of dry concrete erosion. COMET-L2: Investigation of long-term melt-concrete interaction of metallic corium in a cylindrical siliceous concrete cavity under dry conditions with decay heat simulation of intermediate power during the first test phase, and subsequently at reduced power during the second test phase. (author)

  3. Processing and monitoring liquid, radioactive effluents from the Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe

    Hoehlein, G.; Huppert, K.L.; Winter, M.

    1977-01-01

    The Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe (WAK) serves as a demonstration plant for the processing of highly-irradiated uranous oxide. The high active waste concentrates find interim storage at the WAK until they are solidified at a later stage. In contrast to this, the slightly- and the medium-active liquid wastes are transported to the decontamination facility of the Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe, where they are immediately processed. These liquid wastes contain about 1 per thousand of the activity inventary of the fuel elements processed. Monitoring of the radioactive waste water of the WAK is carried out by the Nuclear Research Centre's department radiation protection and safety. (orig.) [de

  4. The meteorological measurement system of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    Dilger, H.

    1976-08-01

    The system mainly serves to record the parameters which are important for the diffusion of offgas plume. The system includes 47 instruments in total which are used to measure the wind velocity, the wind direction, the wind vector, the temperature, the dew point, the solar and heat radiation, the precipitations and the atmospheric pressure, most of them mounted at the 200 m high meteorological tower. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Putting teeth in the nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament regime. 25 March 2006, Karlsruhe, Germany

    ElBaradei, M.

    2006-01-01

    The factors, contributing to the world's changes in respect to peace, security and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons are presented in the document. Five necessary and urgent measures are proposed in order to meet the current challenges: 1)tighten control for assess to nuclear fuel cycle technology; 2)accelerate global efforts tp protect nuclear material; 3)support effective nuclear verification; 4) reinvigorate disarmament efforts; 5) increase the effectiveness of the UN Security Council. The importance and necessity to place nuclear operations under multinational control is outlined

  6. Dispersion factors - tables and diagrams for the Karlsruhe site

    Papadopoulos, D.; Baer, M.; Honcu, S.

    1984-02-01

    Dispersion experiments were performed at the Nuclear Research Center for the Karlsruhe site. The evaluation of these experiments allowed to determine the parameters of lateral or vertical atmospheric dispersions. This report is a compilation of tables and diagrams showing the dispersion factors calculated with the help of the dispersion parameters. These dispersion factors are valid for the Karlsruhe site. They have been normalized to 1 m/s wind speed and to 1 g/s (or 1 Bq/s) source strength. (orig.) [de

  7. Nuclear safety research project. Annual report 1995

    Hueper, R.

    1996-08-01

    The reactor safety R and D work of the Karlsruhe Research Centre (FZK) has been part of the Nuclear Safety Research Project (PSF) since 1990. The present annual report 1995 summarizes the R and D results. The research tasks are coordinated in agreement with internal and external working groups. The contributions to this report correspond to the status of early 1996. An abstract in English precedes each of them, whenever the respective article is written in German. (orig.) [de

  8. Releases of radioiodine from the Karlsruhe nuclear fuel reprocessing plant as a result of spontaneous fission of actinides

    Schuettelkopf, H.

    1977-02-01

    Fro, 23,7,1976 to 28.7.76 and from 8.3.76 to 9.16.76 50 pCi 131 I/m 3 , 116 pCi 133 I/m 3 und 195 pCi 135 I/m 3 were measured on an average in 11 samples of waste air from the Karlsruhe Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant (WAK). During these time intervals no dissolution of fuel material was performed. From 16.9.76 to 27.10.76 18 charges of nuclear fuel were dissolved. During this period 3.3 pCi 131 I/m 3 and 7.9 pCi 133 I/m 3 were obtained as mean waste air concentrations which were higher than the lower detection limit of the method of measurement used. 244 Cm, 242 Cm, 242 Pu, 240 Pu and 238 Pu are responsible for the production of radioiodine in nuclear fuel by spontaneous fission. 244 Cm is the most important nuclide in highly active waste solutions (HAL). The cumulative fission yield is well approximated by 3% for 13 I and by 6% for 133 I. The radioiodine is set free during fuel dissolution by venting of tanks and HAL pipes and during the vritification of such solutions. The radioiodine produced by spontaneous fission is released from WAK only by venting of tanks and HAL pipes. Corresponding to the conditions of venting, air concentrations as high as 4.4 pCi 131 I/m 3 and 8.2 pCi 133 I/m 3 are expected. These concentrations agree well with air concentrations measured during the period of fuel dissolution. Based on plausible assumptions the 131 I and 133 I waste air concentrations for the period of outage are calculated from an evaporated volume of HAL in the pipes corresponding to about 10 g of 244 Cm and with 40% equilibrium between I 2 in evaporated HAL and in waste air. In the worst case 131 I-concentrations in the waste air of WAK result in an annual release of 0.2 mCi 131 I. This value is less than 1% of the authorized annual releases of 1976. For a reprocessing plant of 1,400 t/a capacity the annual expected release of 131 I lies in the mCi range. (orig.) [de

  9. Nuclear energy research in Germany 2008. Research centers and universities

    Tromm, Walter

    2009-01-01

    This summary report presents nuclear energy research at research centers and universities in Germany in 2008. Activities are explained on the basis of examples of research projects and a description of the situation of research and teaching in general. Participants are the - Karlsruhe Research Center, - Juelich Research Center (FZJ), - Dresden-Rossendorf Research Center (FZD), - Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V. (VKTA), - Technical University of Dresden, - University of Applied Sciences, Zittau/Goerlitz, - Institute for Nuclear Energy and Energy Systems (IKE) at the University of Stuttgart, - Reactor Simulation and Reactor Safety Working Group at the Bochum Ruhr University. (orig.)

  10. Nuclear energy research in Germany 2009

    2010-01-01

    Research and development (R and D) in the fields of nuclear reactor safety and safety of nuclear waste and spent fuel management in Germany are carried out at research centers and, in addition, some 32 universities. In addition, industrial research is conducted by plant vendors, and research in plant and operational safety of power plants in operation is organized by operators and by organizations of technical and scientific research and expert consultant organizations. This summary report presents nuclear energy research conducted at research centers and universities in Germany in 2009, including examples of research projects and descriptions of the situation of research and teaching. These are the organizations covered: - Hermann von Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers, - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT, responsibility of the former Karlsruhe Research Center), - Juelich Research Center (FZJ), - Nuclear Technology Competence Center East, - Dresden-Rossendorf Research Center (FZD), - Rossendorf Nuclear Process Technology and Analysis Association (VKTA), - Dresden Technical University, - Zittau/Goerlitz University of Applied Science, - Institute of Nuclear Energy and Energy Systems (IKE) of the University of Stuttgart. (orig.)

  11. Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe Technik und Umwelt. Research and development program 1995. As of December 2, 1994

    1995-01-01

    After giving a survey of the major research areas of the Centre the author explains the projects in the fields of environment, energy, microsystems engineering and fundamental research. The medium-term aim, present state of development, 1995 programme, cooperation within the centre, cooperation with external partners and financial expenditure are explained on a project-by-project basis. (UA) [de

  12. Research and development projects in the frame of the technology transfer program of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    Wuest, J.

    1984-01-01

    Within the framework of the Technology Transfer Programme carried through by kfk for some years now, a specific technology transfer model has been developed for the purpose of efficient utilization of the spin-off. This model showing means and methods of ensuring a continuous, purposeful and controllable organization of the transfer of know-how, is accompanied by experience in the appropriate contractual activities adjusted to the various conditions encountered, as e.g. cooperation and licence agreements, services, consultative agreements, personnel transfer, selling agreements, committed research agreements, and development contracts. Consuming about 2 p.c. of the annual overall expenses of the kfk, the Technology Transfer Programme belongs to the minor projects of the research centre. (DG) [de

  13. Nuclear research and development in the European community

    1979-01-01

    Research programmes undertaken by the European Atomic Energy Community and the European Economic Community are discussed. These programmes are carried out both at the Communities own Joint Research Centres (at Ispra, Karlsruhe, Geel and Petten) and also, although centrally managed by the Commission, at research organizations in the Member States. Such research projects include radioactive waste management and storage, decommissioning of nuclear power stations and nuclear fusion. Culham Laboratory is not only the centre for the UKAEA's research into controlled thermonuclear fusion but is also host to the Joint European Torus Joint Undertaking. (U.K.)

  14. Establishing a Research Information System as Part of an Integrated Approach to Information Management: Best Practice at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT

    Frank Scholze

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT is one of the largest research and higher education organisations in the world focusing on engineering and natural sciences. At present KIT, under the chairmanship of its executive board, is installing an extensive current research information system (CRIS covering all institutes and facilities of the organisation. The assumption underlying the project is that a consistent overview of research performance has become fundamental for the international competitiveness of research institutions and is increasingly important for strategic decisions at the executive level. Ultimately, it also leads to better data and control in rankings at higher education assessments. The new research information system systematically maps all of KIT’s processes and instruments to obtain, connect, present and utilise the research metadata of active researchers. This reduces the documentation workload for researchers, for the executive level and central units such as the library, and at the same time allows for and facilitates an overall view and the aggregation and visualisation of research metadata. Our vision is to build a federally structured network of systems that gathers information on KIT’s publications, research competence, research projects, patents and technological offers by retrieving data from external and internal sources as well as directly from the researchers. The network facilitates linking and aggregating of data and provides unique identifiers for individual researchers and organizational units. With its consistent data model the research information system also fosters the organisational development of KIT, which was formed in 2009 by the merger of a university and a national research centre. The researchers and their activities are at the core of the research information system. The system substantially reduces their administrative burden in documenting project information and publications. Automatic

  15. Operation of the Karlsruhe Isochronous Cyclotron in 1975

    Schulz, F.; Schweickert, H.

    1976-06-01

    The operation of the Karlsruhe Isochronous Cyclotron in 1975 is briefly surveyed. The main reasons for a very short period for maintenance, repair and installation, and several additional efforts to improve the reliability of the accelerator installation, are discussed. The status and the results of several technical developments for the cyclotron are described: 1) the axial injection system; 2) computer aided cyclotron operation; 3) ion source development; 4) capacitive current measurement at the external beam; 5) new correction coils for the cyclotron; 6) improvement of the neutron time-of-flight spectrometer. As there is an increasing interest in using this type of accelerator for research in fields other than nuclear physics, it was felt appropriate to present short surveys on investigations at our cyclotron in 1975 in the fields of: 1) solid state physics; 2) engineering; 3) materials research; 4) nuclear medicine; 5) nuclear chemistry. (orig.) [de

  16. Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe. Institut fuer Datenverarbeitung in der Technik: Progress report on research and development works in 1984

    1985-02-01

    The Institut fuer Datenverarbeitung in der Technik (Institute for Data Processing in Engineering) works in the field of applied computer and systems analysis. The present report describes the activities of this Institute within the following KfK-projects: Reprocessing, Fusion Technology, Nuclear Material Safeguards, Nuclear Safety, and the Fast Breeder Project. (WB) [de

  17. Labour Court Karlsruhe, decision of October 15, 1985 (co-determination in matters of security control)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    In its decision of October 15, 1985, the Labour Court of Karlsruhe deals with the order for security controls in nuclear research centres. The co-determination of the works council in this field is excluded, if the operator is obliged by the licensing authority to carry out these controls pursuant to the operating licence according to sec. 7 and sec. 17 of the Atomic Energy Act. (WG) [de

  18. List of scientific publications issued in 1991 by Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    1992-05-01

    This report KfK 5025 presents the titles of scientific publications issued in 1991. Conference papers or other papers not yet available in printed from are listed separately. Patent documents of the year 1991 are listed in two categories: patent specifications and unexamined laid-open patent applications (DE-OS). Reviews on specific subjects or training documents prepared for courses in the KfK's Center for Advanced Training are not included in this report. (orig.) [de

  19. Nuclear safety research in HGF 2012

    Anon.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Competence Association. The Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, HZDR Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the KIT Karlsruhe Institute of Technology are involved in the Nuclear Safety Research Program within the Helmholtz Association. The work and results in 2012 are presented. (orig.)

  20. Scientists from all over the world attend the 2005 Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn summer school at Karlsruhe; Wissenschaftler aus aller Welt bei der ''Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School 2005'' in Karlsruhe

    Sanchez, V.H.; Fischer, U. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Reaktorsicherheit, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    The Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School annually organized alternately by the Karlsruhe Research Center and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Cadarche, France, this year was held at the Karlsruhe Congress Center. In line with the mission of the School to disseminate nuclear competence an a broad basis among young scientists from all over the world, lectures covered reactor physics, nuclear fuels, and nuclear systems. Speakers from leading international research institutions presented introductions to their respective fields, outlined the current state of the art, and also highlighted areas in need of further development and, thus, likely to offer challenges to young scientists. Next year's Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School will be organized by CEA and held at Cadarache, France. (orig.)

  1. Example of End States of Decommissioning Phases from the Decommissioning of the Multipurpose Research Reactor MZFR, Karlsruhe, Germany

    NONE

    2013-06-15

    The multipurpose reactor MZFR was a pressurized water reactor, cooled and moderated with heavy water. It was built from 1961 to 1966, and went critical for the first time on 29 September 1965. After 19 years of successful operation, the reactor was shut down on 3 May 1984. The reactor had a thermal output of 200 MW, and an electrical output of 50 MW. In addition to generating electricity, the MZFR had the following functions: - Testing fuel assemblies and various materials for reactor construction; - Gaining experience in the design, erection and operation of heavy water reactor systems; - Training scientific and technical reactor personnel; - Providing heat (first nuclear combined heat and power system (1979-1984)). In 1989, it was decided to dismantle the reactor completely, step by step. The decommissioning concept for the plant, down to a greenfield site, provides for eight distinct decommissioning steps (phases). A separate decommissioning licence was required for each step. The decommissioning work was carried out according to pre-approved work schedules. About 72 000 t of concrete and 7200 t of metal were to be removed. About 1000 t of concrete (500 t biological shield) and 1680 t of metal were to be classified as radioactive waste.

  2. Program nuclear safety research: report 2000

    Muehl, B.

    2001-09-01

    The reactor safety R and D work of forschungszentrum karlsruhe (FZK) had been part of the nuclear safety research project (PSF) since 1990. In 2000, a new organisational structure was introduced and the Nuclear Safety Research Project was transferred into the nuclear safety research programme (NUKLEAR). In addition to the three traditional main topics - Light Water Reactor safety, Innovative systems, Studies related to the transmutation of actinides -, the new Programme NUKLEAR also covers Safety research related to final waste storage and Immobilisation of HAW. These new topics, however, will only be dealt with in the next annual report. Some tasks related to the traditional topics have been concluded and do no longer appear in the annual report; other tasks are new and are described for the first time. Numerous institutes of the research centre contribute to the work programme, as well as several external partners. The tasks are coordinated in agreement with internal and external working groups. The contributions to this report, which are either written in German or in English, correspond to the status of early/mid 2001. (orig.)

  3. Scientists from all over the world attend the 2005 Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn summer school at Karlsruhe

    Sanchez, V.H.; Fischer, U.

    2005-01-01

    The Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School annually organized alternately by the Karlsruhe Research Center and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Cadarche, France, this year was held at the Karlsruhe Congress Center. In line with the mission of the School to disseminate nuclear competence an a broad basis among young scientists from all over the world, lectures covered reactor physics, nuclear fuels, and nuclear systems. Speakers from leading international research institutions presented introductions to their respective fields, outlined the current state of the art, and also highlighted areas in need of further development and, thus, likely to offer challenges to young scientists. Next year's Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School will be organized by CEA and held at Cadarache, France. (orig.)

  4. Tehran Nuclear Research Center

    Taherzadeh, M.

    1977-01-01

    The Tehran Nuclear Research Center was formerly managed by the University of Tehran. This Center, after its transformation to the AEOI, has now become a focal point for basic research in the area of Nuclear Energy in Iran

  5. List of the scientific publications of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe published in the year 1973

    1974-05-01

    The scientific and technical/scientific publications of the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung m.b.H. Karlsruhe are published as books, as primary publications in scientific or technical journals, as habilitations, theses, papers submitted for diplomas, as papers presented at scientific conferences, as patents, KFK (= Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe)-reports or as external reports. Report KFK 2025 contains all titles of the publications published in 1973. The list is arranged according to institutes. Under the heading 'Projekt' are only those reports which deal with projects and the publications of members of the project staff. Supplementary to the publications of the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung are those of the Institut fuer Strahlentechnologie der Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Lebensmittelfrischhaltung, as this institute is situated on the premises of the nuclear research centre. (orig./LN) [de

  6. Nuclear research reactors

    1985-01-01

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.) [pt

  7. Nuclear energy related research

    Mattila, L.; Vanttola, T.

    1991-10-01

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes the publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1991. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities and industry also contribute to many projects

  8. Nuclear energy related research

    Rintamaa, R.

    1992-05-01

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1992. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities and industry also contribute to many projects

  9. Operation of the Karlsruhe Isochronous Cyclotron in 1976

    Schulz, F.; Schweickert, H.

    1977-08-01

    The operation of the Karlsruhe Isochronous Cyclotron in 1976 is briefly surveyed. The status and the results of the following technical developments are briefly described: 1) Computer aided cyclotron operation; 2) New correction coils for the cyclotron; 3) Non-intercepting measurement of the extraction rate; 4) Lambshift source for polarized deuterons; 5) Improvements of the 6 Li 3+ -Penning ion source; 6) New beam line to an irradiation room for machine parts; 7) Nova 2 computer system for nuclear physics experiments; 8) Routine production of Iodine-123 for nuclear medicine. - In the annual report 1975 we have included a section consisting of a series of brief reports on applied research in progress. This year we give a compilation of the current basic nuclear physics work at our cyclotron. The short papers prepared by the experimental groups are arranged according to the following topics: 1) Experiments using the 156 MeV 6 Li 3+ -beam; 2) Experiments using the 52 MeV polarized deuteron beam; 3) Further nuclear reactions; 4) Nuclear spectroscopy; 5) Measurements of nuclear magnetic moments; 6) Measurements with the neutron time-of-flight spectrometer. (orig.) [de

  10. Nuclear science research report

    1977-01-01

    Research activities in nuclear science carried out during 1976 are summarized. Research centers around nuclear structure and the application of nuclear techniques to solid state science, materials, engineering, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Reactor and accelerator operations are reported. (E.C.B.)

  11. Nuclear waste repository research at the micro- to nanoscale

    Schäfer, T.; Denecke, M. A.

    2010-04-01

    Micro- and nano-focused synchrotron radiation techniques to investigate determinant processes in contaminant transport in geological media are becoming especially an increasingly used tool in nuclear waste disposal research. There are a number of reasons for this but primarily they are driven by the need to characterize actinide speciation localized in components of heterogeneous natural systems. We summarize some of the recent research conducted by researchers of the Institute of Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE) at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology using micro- and nano-focused X-ray beams for characterization of colloids and their interaction with minerals and of elemental and phase distributions in potential repository host rocks and actinide speciation in a repository natural analogues sample. Such investigations are prerequisite to ensuring reliable assessment of the long term radiological safety for proposed nuclear waste disposal sites.

  12. Nuclear energy related research

    Salminen, Pertti

    1989-03-01

    This annual Research Programme Plan covers the publicly funded nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1989. The research will be financed by the Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT itself

  13. Nuclear energy related research

    Salminen, P.; Mattila, L.

    1990-08-01

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes the publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1990. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Utilities and industry also contribute to some projects

  14. Nuclear energy related research

    Salminen, P.

    1988-02-01

    This annual Research Programme Plan covers the publicly funded nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1988. The research will be financed by the Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT itself

  15. Work of the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on the measurement and evaluation of transactinium-isotope nuclear-decay data

    Reich, C.W.

    1982-01-01

    In 1977, the IAEA organized a Coordinated Research Program to address the needs for precise actinide-isotope decay data identified at the first Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Isotope Nuclear Data, held in Karlsruhe in 1975. During the years of its existence, this CRP has made significant strides toward achieving the goals outlined at Karlsruhe. In this paper, we discuss the make-up of the CRP and its work in the areas of decay-data evaluation and measurement. The objectives of the evaluation effort and some of the results to date are summarized. The measurement activity being carried out within the various participating laboratories is presented. Finally, the significant accomplishments resulting from the work of the CRP participants are discussed, together with those tasks which remain to be done in order to be fully responsive to the goals of the Program as envisioned at Karlsruhe

  16. Nuclear Research and Compliance

    Noramly Muslim

    2012-01-01

    In his speech, Professor Noramly stressed on any research conducted in Malaysian Nuclear Agency must be comply with the national and international regulations. This to avoid any problems in the future. Moreover, research conducted in Malaysian Nuclear Agency are based on nuclear matters that seems sensitive to the public communities. In order to attract the publics on the benefit of nuclear technologies in many applications, researcher also must aware about the regulations and must take care on their safety during their experiment and working. This to make the public feels that nuclear are not the bad things and erased the worseness of nuclear technology into public minds. This strategies can be used for Malaysia in embarking for their first nuclear power program and the public feels that nuclear power are not threatened to them and consequently, they will accept that program without any issues. (author)

  17. Nuclear safety research

    1999-01-01

    The NNSA checked and coordinated in 1999 the research project of the Surveillance Technology on Nuclear Installations under the National 9th-Five-Year Program to promote the organizations that undertake the research work on schedule and lay a foundation of obtaining achievements and effectiveness for the 9th-five-year plan on nuclear safety research

  18. First Ph.D. Student Workshop of the Hermann von Helmholtz Association of National Research Centers (HGF) on ''Nuclear Safety Research''

    Knebel, J.U.; Sanchez Espinoza, V.H.

    2006-03-01

    The First Ph.D. Student Workshop ''Nuclear Safety Research'' of the Helmholtz Association of National Research Centers (HGF)'' was jointly organized by the Research Center Karlsruhe GmbH and the Energie Baden-Wuerttemberg AG (EnBW) from Wednesday 9th to Friday 11th March 2005. The workshop was opened with welcome greetings by Dr. Peter Fritz, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. Subsequently Dr. Joachim U. Knebel explained the main goals and the content of the workshop. The young scientists reported in 28 high-level presentations about their research work which covered a wide spectrum from reactor safety, partitions and transmutation, and innovative reactor systems, to safety research for nuclear waste disposal. The junior researchs showed excellent professional competence and demonstrated presentation qualities at the highest level. The successful funding of two Virtual Institutes, namely: the ''Competence in Nuclear Technologies'' and ''Functional Characteristics of Aquatic Interfaces both co-ordinated by Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe'', by the President of the Helmholtz Association Prof. Walter Kroell was the motivation for the organization of this first Ph.D. Student Workshop. Thanks to these two Virtual Institutes, the Reseach Center Karlsruhe and Juelich together with several univer-sities i.e. RWTH Aachen, Heidelberg, Karlsruhe, Muenster, and Stuttgart, have successfully financed eight Ph.D. and two post-doctoral students. Moreover, young scientists of the European Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) and additional seven Ph.D. Students, who are sponsored by the German nuclear industry (Framatome ANP, RWE Power, EnBW) in the frame of the Alliance Competence in on Nuclear Technology, and who are trained at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, actively contributed to this workshop. The EnBW-Award was handed over by Dr. Hans-Josef Zimmer, member of the board of directors of the EnBW-Kraftwerksgesellschaft, to Mrs. Ayelet Walter from the University of Stuttgart for the best

  19. Proceedings of the IEA-technical workshop on the test cell system for an international fusion materials irradiation facility, Karlsruhe, Germany, July 3-6, 1995. IEA-implementing agreement for a programme of research and development on fusion materials

    Moeslang, A.; Lindau, R.

    1995-09-01

    After a Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) study on an International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been launched under the auspices of the IEA, working groups and relevant tasks have been defined and agreed in an IEA-workshop that was held September 26-29 1994 at Karlsruhe. For the Test Cell System 11 tasks were identified which can be grouped into the three major fields neutronics, test matrix/users and test cell engineering. In order to discuss recently achieved results and to coordinate necessary activities for an effective design integration, a technical workshop on the Test Cell System was initiated. This workshop was organized on July 3-6 1995 by the Institute for Materials Research I at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and attended by 20 specialists working in the fields neutronics, fusion materials R and D and test cell engineering in the European Union, Japan, and the United States of America. The presentations and discussions during this workshop have shown together with the elaborated lists of action items, that has been achieved in all three fields, and that from the future IFMIF experimental program for a number of materials a database covering widerspread loading conditions up to DEMO-reactor relevant end-of-life damage levels can be expected. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear energy related research

    Toerroenen, K.; Kilpi, K.

    1985-01-01

    This research programme plan for 1985 covers the nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and funded by the Ministry of Trade and Industry in Finland, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT

  1. Nuclear energy related research

    Salminen, Pertti

    1987-02-01

    This annual Research Programme Plan covers the nuclear related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1987 and funded by the Ministry of Trade and Industry in Finland, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT itself

  2. List of scientific publications of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe in 1975

    1976-04-01

    The scientific and technical-scientific publications of the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung mbH Karlsruhe are published in the form of books, as primary contributions to scientific or technical journals, as theses as such for habilitation, or submitted for a diploma, as lectures at meetings, as patents, as 'KFK' reports, or as external reports. This report KFK 2325 contains the titles of documents published in 1975. Lectures have been included if the written text is available in the central library. In the case of patents, only first grants of a patent, patent specifications, or patents for public inspection have been considered. The list of publications is arranged according to institutes. Under projects, only the project reports and the publications by members of the project staff are listed. Registered, too, are the publications from the R+D activities within the projects entitled Process Control by Data Processing Systems (PDU) and Computer Aided Design and Development (CAD) which were published in the Nuclear Research Centre; the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung carries out these projects in cooperation with industrial enterprises and institutes. In addition to the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung's publications, those of the Institut fuer Strahlentechnologie of the Bundesanstalt fuer Ernaehrung have been included. The last chapter contains publications on experiments in the irradiation facilities of the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung, carried out by scientists, institutes, etc. not belonging to the Nuclear Research Centre. (orig./HK) [de

  3. Nuclear safety research project (PSF). 1999 annual report

    Muehl, B.

    2000-08-01

    The reactor safety R and D work of the Karlsruhe Research Centre (FZK) has been part of the Nuclear Safety Research Project (PSF) since 1990. The present annual report summarizes the R and D results of PSF during 1999. The research tasks cover three main topics: Light Water Reactor safety, innovative systems, and studies related to the transmutation of actinides. The importance of the Light Water Reactor safety, however, has decreased during the last year in favour of the transmutation of actinides. Numerous institutes of the research centre contribute to the PSF programme, as well as several external partners. The tasks are coordinated in agreement with internal and external working groups. The contributions to this report, which are either written in German or in English, correspond to the status of early/mid 2000. (orig.) [de

  4. Thailand's nuclear research centre

    Yamkate, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Thailand, is charged with three main tasks, namely, Nuclear Energy development Plan, Utilization of Nuclear Based technology Plan and Science and Technology Plan. Its activities are centred around the research reactor TRR-1/M1. The main areas of contribution include improvement in agricultural production, nuclear medicine and nuclear oncology, health care and nutrition, increasing industrial productivity and efficiency and, development of cadre competent in nuclear science and technology. The office also has the responsibility of ensuring nuclear safety, radiation safety and nuclear waste management. The office has started a new project in 1997 under which a 10 MWt research reactor, an isotope production facility and a waste processing and storage facility would be set up by General Atomic of USA. OAEP has a strong linkage with the IAEA and has been an active participant in RCA programmes. In the future OAEP will enhance its present capabilities in the use of radioisotopes and radiation and look into the possibility of using nuclear energy as an alternative energy resource. (author)

  5. Progress report on research and development work 1991 of the Department for Applied Systems Analysis, Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    1991-03-01

    The following technology-oriented studies were conducted in the time period of the report: Technology assesment regarding 'Renewable Resources'; Environmental and health impact of the manufacturing and application and waste management of components and integrated circuits of micro- and optoelectronics; studies on product-oriented reduction of pollution, an innovative electronic form of presenting results of scientific projects: developing an electronic book prototype; expert systems and application of knowledge. (orig.) [de

  6. Materials specific work at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and in cooperation with the industrial partners ALKEM and Interatom for the development of nuclear oxide fuels for fission reactors

    Kleykamp, H.; Muehling, G.

    2005-09-01

    The fabrication of uranium-plutonium oxide fuel started in Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and at ALKEM company to begin for the criticality experiments in the SNEAK reactor and subsequently for stationary fuel pin irradiations in the FR2, BR2, DFR, Rapsodie, Phenix and KNK II reactors. The production methods comprised first the mechanical blending of UO2 and PuO2 followed by direct pressing and sintering of the pellets, later the advanced methods such as optimized comilling and ammonium uranyl plutonyl coprecititation. The fabrication of pellets was described in the main, further the alternative fuel pin manufacturing processes by vibrational compaction and hot-impact densification were discussed. The first capsule and pin irradiations in the FR2 and BR2 reactors contributed to the assessment of the maximum operation parameters within the fuel pin development such as linear heat rating, cladding temperature and burnup. Subsequently, small-bundle and largebundle irradiations were made in fast reactors in cooperation with Interatom company in order to verify the specifications for the commercial fast reactor SNR 300. Milestones were the maximum burnup of 175 GWd/t metal, corresponding 18.6 % of the heavy atoms, obtained in one of the KNK II fuel pin assemblies, and the displacement rates in the cladding materials of 140 dpa NRT attained in the Phenix reactor. Higher implications gained later the stationary irradiations of defected mixed-oxide pins, the mild fuel pin transient operations, the local blockage experiments and the severe hypothetic accidents in the respective Siloe, HFR, BR2 and CABRI reactors. These experiments were made solely in international partnership. Further activities were the chemical analyses of solid residues and coprecipitations of irradiated mixed-oxide fuels in the head-end of the reprocessing. All these actions were coordinated in the then fast breeder project. Furthermore, irradiated fuels and fuel pins of other reactor types were

  7. Annual report on nuclear physics activities

    Heeringa, W.; Voss, F.

    1988-02-01

    This report surveys the activities in basic research from July 1, 1986 to June 30, 1987 at the Institute for Nuclear Physics (IK) of the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe. The research program of this institute comprises laser spectroscopy, nuclear reactions with light ions, neutron physics, neutrino physics and high energy physics, as well as detector technology. (orig.) [de

  8. Nuclear wastes: research programs

    Anon.

    2003-01-01

    The management of long-living and high level radioactive wastes in France belongs to the framework of the December 30, 1991 law which defines three ways of research: the separation and transmutation of radionuclides, their reversible storage or disposal in deep geologic formations, and their processing and surface storage during long duration. Research works are done in partnership between public research and industrial organizations in many French and foreign laboratories. Twelve years after its enforcement, the impact of this law has overstepped the simple research framework and has led to a deep reflection of the society about the use of nuclear energy. This short paper presents the main results obtained so far in the three research ways, the general energy policy of the French government, the industrial progresses made in the framework of the 1991 law and the international context of the management of nuclear wastes. (J.S.)

  9. The determination of Pu-241 by liquid scintillation counting in gaseous effluents of an incineration facility, FERAB, and the Karlsruhe Nuclear Reprocessing Plant, WAK

    Godoy, J.M.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1983-03-01

    Although the concentration of Pu-241 in nuclear fuel to be reprocessed is high, there are only few results published about the emission of Pu-241 with gaseous and liquid effluents. Nearly no information is available, too, about the environmental contamination of nuclear installations by Pu-241. Therefore a procedure was developed to measure Pu-241 by liquid scintillation counting. Sample preparation was performed by electroplating of plutonium on stainless steel planchets. To correct the selfabsorption the linear dependence of counting efficiency in the liquid scintillation counter and the resolution in the α-spectrometer was used. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Research in nuclear astrophysics

    Lattimer, J.M.; Yahil, A.

    1989-01-01

    The interaction between nuclear theory and some outstanding problems in astrophysics is examined. We are actively researching both the astrophysics of gravitational collapse, neutron star birth, and the emission of neutrinos from supernovae, on the one hand, and the nuclear physics of the equation of state of hot, dense matter on the other hand. There is close coupling between nuclear theory and the supernova phenomenon; in fact, nuclear matter properties, especially at supernuclear densities, might be best delineated by astrophysical considerations. Our research has also focused on the neutrinos emitted from supernovae, since they are the only available observables of the internal supernova mechanism. The recent observations of neutrinos from SN 1987A proved to be in remarkable agreement with models we pioneered in the one and one half years prior to its explosion in February 1987. We have also developed a novel hydrodynamical code in which shocks are treated via Riemann resolution rather than with artificial viscosity. We propose to modify it to use implicit differencing and to include multi-group neutrino diffusion and General Relativity. In parallel, we are extending calculations of the birth of a neutron star to include convection and mass accretion, by incorporating a hydrodynamic envelope onto a hydrostatic core. In view of the possible recent discovery of a pulsar in SN1987A, we are including the effects of rotation. We are undertaking a detailed comparison of current equations of state, focusing on disagreements regarding the nuclear incompressibly, symmetry energy and specific heat. Especially important is the symmetry energy, which below nuclear density controls free proton fractions and weak interaction rates and above this density critically influences the neutron star maximum mass and binding energy. 60 refs

  11. Recent advancements in fault tree methodology at Karlsruhe

    Caldarola, L.; Wickenhaeuser, A.

    1977-01-01

    A very fast analytical computer program for fault tree evaluation has already been developed at the German nuclear research center of Karlsruhe. This program can evaluate coherent systems assuming binary component states. Four different classes of components can be handled by the program: (1) unrepairable components, (2) repairable components with revealed faults, (3) repairable components with faults remaining unrevealed until next demand occurs and (4) repairable components with faults which are detected upon inspection. The program can perform also time dependent calculations. In particular the program can analyse systems characterized by two phases, one following the other in time (two time axis). A new computer program is also being developed. This computer program will be capable to analyse noncoherent systems with multistate components. The mathematical theory supporting the new program is described in the paper. In particular the algorithm for the identification of the prime implicants and the theory for the calculation of the occurrence probability and of the first occurrence probability of the TOP event are discussed

  12. Scientists from all over the world attended the 'Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School 2011' at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

    Sanchez, Victor H.; Fischer, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the Commissariat r leEnergie Atomique et Aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Cadarache, alternate in organizing the annual 'Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School.' This year's event, the 17th since its inception, was held in Karlsruhe, Germany on August 25 to September 3. Its topic was 'High-fidelity Modeling for Nuclear Reactors: Challenges and Prospects.' Here is a list of the subjects covered: - Status and perspectives of modeling and its role in design, operation, and safety. - Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactors and simulation of 2 phase flows. - Structural mechanics, structure? fluid interaction, and seismic safety. - Advanced simulation in neutronics and reactor physics. - Progress in simulating fuel and materials behavior. - Multiphysics and uncertainty analysis methods. Experts from eight leading international research institutions and universities presented, and discussed with the 59 participants from 19 countries, the current state of the art and most recent development trends in the subjects listed above. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear safety research

    1996-01-01

    The topics 'Large-sized PWR-NPP Safety Techniques Research',and 'The Key Techniques Research on the Safety Supervision and Control for Operation of Nuclear Installations' have been adopted as an apart of 'the National 9th five Year Programs for Tacking the Key Scientific and Technical Topics' which are organized by the State Planning Commission (SPC) and State Science and Technology Commission (SSTC) respectively, and have obtained a financial support from them. To play a better role with the limited fund, the NNSA laid special stress on selecting key sub-topics on nuclear safety, and carefully choosing units which would undertake sub-topics and signing technical contracts with them

  14. Annual report of the Nuclear Physics Section (July 1, 1974 - June 30, 1975)

    Dickmann, F.; Rebel, H.

    1975-12-01

    This annual report of the Nuclear Physics Section of the Institute of Applied Nuclear Physics covers the period from July 1, 1974, to June 30, 1975. This was the first year following a thorough reorganisation of the nuclear physics activities at the Karlsruhe Research Centre. The two areas of research of the Nuclear Physics Section are basic nuclear physics and the application of nuclear methods mainly to problems of nuclear engineering. The latter activities include contributions to the Karlsruhe fast breeder and safeguards projects. The basic research activities mainly make use of the accelerators of the institute (cyclotron, 3 MV, van de Graaff.) (orig.) [de

  15. Current status of nuclear decay data and report on the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme on the measurement and evaluation of transactinium isotope nuclear decay data

    Reich, C.W.; Vaninbroukx, R.

    1984-01-01

    In 1977, the IAEA organized a Coordinated Research Programme to address the needs for highly accurate actinide-nuclide decay data identified at the first Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Isotope Nuclear Data, held in Karlsruhe in 1975. During the years of its existence, this CRP has made significant strides towards achieving the goals outlined at Karlsruhe and subsequently refined at a second Advisory Group Meeting, held in Cadarache in 1979. In this paper, the make-up of the CRP and its work in the areas of decay-data measurement and evaluation are presented and its significant accomplishments summarized. We also discuss the contents and philosophy of the final report, containing the results of the measurements and evaluations carried out by the CRP participants, to be published following the planned termination of this Programme in November, 1984. 82 references

  16. Innovative ways of decontaminating nuclear facilities

    Bremmer, Jan; Gentes, Sascha; Ambos, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The great variety of surfaces to be decontaminated in a nuclear power plant increases demand for economic solutions and efficient processing systems. The Institute for Technology and Management in Building (TMB) of the University of Karlsruhe (TH) is working on this task in the new professorship of Sascha Gentes and, together with sat Kerntechnik GmbH, developing innovative techniques and tools for surface decontamination. In this effort, sat.Kerntechnik GmbH contributes 50% to the funding of the new professorship at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, the merger of the University of Karlsruhe and the Karlsruhe Research Center. The new professorship will extend its work also to various other innovative concepts to be employed not only in demolition but also in maintenance and operation of nuclear facilities. Above and beyond theoretical approaches, practical solutions are in the focus of work. For this reason, new developments are elaborated in close cooperation with the respective users. (orig.)

  17. Activities performed within the program of nuclear safety research on structural and cladding materials for innovative reactor system able to transmute nuclear waste

    Fazio, C.; Rieth, M.; Lindau, R.; Aktaa, J.; Schneider, H-C.; Konys, J.; Yurechko, M.; Mueller, G.; Weisenburger, A.

    2009-01-01

    The transmutation of nuclear waste to reduce the burden on a geological repository is a relevant topic within the Program of Nuclear Safety Research of the Research Centre Karlsruhe. Several studies have confirmed that a high efficiency of transmutation of actinides is reached in fast neutron spectrum reactor system. Therefore, an important effort is dedicated to the study of transmutation strategies with different fast reactors and their associated technologies. Moreover, in international contexts as Generation IV International Forum (GIF) and Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNETP), fast reactors are considered in the frame of sustainable development of nuclear energy and reduction of waste. The systems that are currently under investigation, in the frame of the different fuel cycle scenarios, are liquid metal cooled and gas cooled fast reactors as well as Accelerator Driven Sub-critical Transmutation devices (ADS). These innovative reactor systems, call for structural and clad materials, which are able to perform in a safe manner under the envisaged operational and postulated transient conditions. In this context the European Commission supports the FP7 project GETMAT, with the objective to contribute to the development and selection of reference structure materials for core components and primary systems of fast neutron reactors. Several institutes of the Research Centre Karlsruhe are involved in this project with activities in the area of 9Cr ODS steel development and mechanical characterisation; optimisation and ranking of weld and joining techniques as Electron Beam, TIG and Diffusion Bonding; assessment of materials behaviour in corrosive environment and in neutron and neutron/proton irradiation field; and development of corrosion protection barriers for cladding and primary system components and their characterisation. The objective of this contribution is to describe the context in which the GETMAT activities are embedded in the Program

  18. Progress report on nuclear data research in the Federal Republic of Germany for the period April 1, 1992 to March 31, 1993

    Qaim, S.M.

    1993-07-01

    This report has been prepared to promote the exchange of nuclear data research information between the Federal Republic of Germany and other member states of OECD/NEA and IAEA. It covers progress reports from KfK Karlsruhe, KFA Juelich, the universities of Dresden, Hannover, Koeln, Mainz, Marburg as well as from PTB Braunschweig and FIZ Karlsruhe. The emphasis in the work reported here is on measurement, compilation and evaluation of nuclear data for pure and applied science programmes, such as those relevant to fission- and fusion-reactor technology, radioactive waste management, accelerator shielding and development, astrophysics research, cosmogenic and meteoritic investigations, production of medically important radioisotopes, etc. Each contribution is presented under the laboratory heading from where the work is reported. The names of other participating laboratories are also mentioned. When the work is relevant to the World Request List for Nuclear Data, WRENDA 87/88 (INDC(SEC)-095/URSF), the corresponding identification numbers are given. (orig.)

  19. Nuclear Research and Society

    Eggermont, G

    2000-07-01

    In 1998, SCK-CEN took the initiative to include social sciences and humanities into its research programme. Within this context, four projects were defined, respectively on sustainability and nuclear development; transgenerational ethics related to the disposal of long-lived radioactive waste; legal aspects and liability; emergency communication and risk perception. Two reflection groups were established, on expert culture and ethical choices respectively, in order to deepen insight while creating exchange of disciplinary approaches of the committed SCK-CEN researchers and social scientists. Within the context of SCK-CEN's social sciences and humanities programme, collaborations with various universities were initiated, teams consisting of young doctorate and post-doctorate researchers and university promotors with experience in interaction processes of technology with society were established and steering committees with actors and external experts were set up for each project. The objectives and main achievements in the four projects are summarised.

  20. Nuclear Research and Society

    Eggermont, G.

    2000-01-01

    In 1998, SCK-CEN took the initiative to include social sciences and humanities into its research programme. Within this context, four projects were defined, respectively on sustainability and nuclear development; transgenerational ethics related to the disposal of long-lived radioactive waste; legal aspects and liability; emergency communication and risk perception. Two reflection groups were established, on expert culture and ethical choices respectively, in order to deepen insight while creating exchange of disciplinary approaches of the committed SCK-CEN researchers and social scientists. Within the context of SCK-CEN's social sciences and humanities programme, collaborations with various universities were initiated, teams consisting of young doctorate and post-doctorate researchers and university promotors with experience in interaction processes of technology with society were established and steering committees with actors and external experts were set up for each project. The objectives and main achievements in the four projects are summarised

  1. Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Science

    Stamenov, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences is the leading Bulgarian Institute for scientific investigations and applications of nuclear science. The main Institute's activities in the field of elementary particles and nuclear physics, high energy physics and nuclear energy, radiochemistry, radioecology, radioactive wastes treatment, monitoring of the environment, nuclear instruments development ect. are briefly described. Several examples for: environmental radiation monitoring; monitoring of the radioactivity and heavy metals in aerosols, 99m Tc clinical use, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy application of IRT-2000 Research Reactor, neutron fluence for reactor vessel embrittlement, NPP safety analysis, nuclear fuel modelling are also presented

  2. Researches in nuclear safety

    Souchet, Y.

    2009-01-01

    This article comprises three parts: 1 - some general considerations aiming at explaining the main motivations of safety researches, and at briefly presenting the important role of some organisations in the international conciliation, and the most common approach used in safety researches (analytical experiments, calculation codes, global experiments); 2 - an overview of some of the main safety problems that are the object of worldwide research programs (natural disasters, industrial disasters, criticality, human and organisational factors, fuel behaviour in accidental situation, serious accidents: core meltdown, corium spreading, failure of the confinement building, radioactive releases). Considering the huge number of research topics, this part cannot be exhaustive and many topics are not approached; 3 - the presentation of two research programs addressing very different problems: the evaluation of accidental releases in the case of a serious accident (behaviour of iodine and B 4 C, air infiltration, fission products release) and the propagation of a fire in a facility (PRISME program). These two programs belong to an international framework involving several partners from countries involved in nuclear energy usage. (J.S.)

  3. Ten years statistics of wind direction and wind velocity measurements performed at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    Becker, M.; Dilger, H.

    1979-06-01

    The measurements of wind direction and wind velocity performed at 60 m and 200 m height were evaluated for one year each and frequency distributions of the measured values were established. The velocity was divided into 1 m/s steps and the direction into 10 0 sectors. The frequency distribution of the wind direction reveals three maxima located in the southwest, northeast and north, respectively. The maximum of the frequency distribution of the wind velocity occurs between 4 and 5 m/s at 200 m height and between 3 and 4 m/s at 60 m height. (orig.) [de

  4. Destruction of the BETA experimental facility for core meltdown experiments in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center on 21 March 1992

    Feige, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    The BETA experiment V 6.2 was intended to yield information on the processes involved in a lateral containment meltdown starting in a concrete wall with external water cooling. The unexpected overpressure that caused the explosion occurred 1896 seconds after the melt had been fed into the crucible, inducing the melt-water interaction. The explosion destroyed only the inner space of the facility. (orig.) [de

  5. The importance of on-line monitoring systems within the environmental monitoring program of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    Koenig, L.A.; Winter, M.; Schmitt, A.

    1980-10-01

    The two on-line monitoring systems used in KfK environmental monitoring should be taken as measures of accident precaution and they are restricted to measurement of gamma local dose rates and of the (β + γ)-radiation levels. One of the systems serves to monitor the KfK operational area, the second serves to monitor the surrounding communities up to a radius of 8 km. By use of two different types of detectors the first system covers a range of measurement of 10 μrem/h to 1000 rem/h. By the second system only increases in the radiation level can be detected. It allows to record accidents in which countermeasures must be taken very urgently. The two monitoring systems are described which have been operated and partly been developed at the KfK. The possibilities and limits of using them for environmental monitoring are discussed. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Nuclear physics research report 1988

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents the 1988 Nuclear Physics Research Report for the University of Surrey, United Kingdom. The report includes both experimental nuclear structure physics and theoretical nuclear physics research work. The experimental work has been carried out predominantly with the Nuclear Structure Facility at the SERC Daresbury Laboratory, and has concerned nuclear shapes, shape coexistence, shape oscillations, single-particle structures and neutron-proton interaction. The theoretical work has involved nuclear reactions with a variety of projectiles below 1 GeV per nucleon incident energy, and aspects of hadronic interactions at intermediate energies. (U.K.)

  7. Prospects for nuclear safety research

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-04-01

    This document is the text of a paper presented by Eric S. Beckjord (Director, Nuclear Regulatory Research/NRC) at the 22nd Water Reactor Safety Meeting in Bethesda, MD in October 1994. The following topics are briefly reviewed: (1) Reactor vessel research, (2) Probabilistic risk assessment, (3) Direct containment heating, (4) Advanced LWR research, (5) Nuclear energy prospects in the US, and (6) Future nuclear safety research. Subtopics within the last category include economics, waste disposal, and health and safety.

  8. HSE Nuclear Safety Research Program

    Bagley, M.J. [Health and Safety Executive, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    HSE funds two programmes of nuclear safety research: a programme of {approx} 2.2M of extramural research to support the Nuclear Safety Division`s regulatory activities and a programme of {approx} 11M of generic safety research managed by the Nuclear Safety Research Management Unit (NSRMU) in Sheffield, UK. This paper is concerned only with the latter programme; it describes how it is planned and procured and outlines some of the work on structural integrity problems. It also describes the changes that are taking place in the way nuclear safety research is procured in the UK. (author).

  9. HSE Nuclear Safety Research Program

    Bagley, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    HSE funds two programmes of nuclear safety research: a programme of ∼ 2.2M of extramural research to support the Nuclear Safety Division's regulatory activities and a programme of ∼ 11M of generic safety research managed by the Nuclear Safety Research Management Unit (NSRMU) in Sheffield, UK. This paper is concerned only with the latter programme; it describes how it is planned and procured and outlines some of the work on structural integrity problems. It also describes the changes that are taking place in the way nuclear safety research is procured in the UK. (author)

  10. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias, E-mail: aplc@cdtn.b, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  11. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias

    2011-01-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  12. 2nd Karlsruhe International Summer School on Fusion Technologies

    Bahm, W.; Stycz, K.

    2008-01-01

    For the second time, the Karlsruhe Research enter together with European research institutions and industries invited young scientists and engineers to its ''International Summer School on Fusion Technologies.'' Fifty participants from all over Europe attended the lectures by 35 experts preesenting contributions from their areas of competence. Ten young scientists from India and another 10 from China were connected to the events by video link. Physics student Kornelia Stycz describes her impressions as a participant in the ''2 nd International Summer School on Fusion Technologies.'' (orig.)

  13. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    1993-06-01

    The introductory section describes the goals, main thrusts, and interrelationships between the various activities in the program and principal achievements of the Stony Brook Nuclear Theory Group during 1992--93. Details and specific accomplishments are related in abstract form. Current research is taking place in the following areas: strong interaction physics (the physics of hadrons, QCD and the nucleus, QCD at finite temperature and high density), relativistic heavy-ion physics, nuclear structure and nuclear many- body theory, and nuclear astrophysics

  14. Design of a simple magnetic spectrograph for the Karlsruhe isochronous cyclotron

    Gils, H.J.

    1980-12-01

    The ion-optical design of a simple magnetic spectrograph for studies of nuclear reactions on the Karlsruhe cyclotron is described. The spectrograph allows to determine the nuclear charge, the mass number, the reaction angle and the impulse (energy) of charged particles, which are emitted from the target. The spectrographs possibilities cover an appropriate range of likely nuclear reactions which are induced by light and heavy particles up to mass number A=20 and energies of 26 MeV per nucleon [de

  15. Contact arc metal cutting (CAMC), a young cutting technique has matured. Successful use under water in the demolition of the Karlsruhe multipurpose research reactor (MFZR)

    Stanke, D.; Bienia, H.; Loeb, A.; Thoma, M.; Eisenmann, B.; Prechtl, E.; Suessdorf, W.; Kremer, G.; Ruemenapp, T.

    2006-01-01

    Dismantling radiologically burdened large components is among the most complex and difficult jobs in the demolition of nuclear installations. The technologies used and their safe operation play a key role in demolition. Dismantling highly activated components as a rule requires shielding by water. As a consequence, the techniques employed must be designed for use under water. A variety of technologies are available for these applications. One established mechanical cutting method is water abrasive suspension jet cutting (WASS). Because of the small cutting nozzle employed, this highly flexible cutting technique can be used nearly anywhere together with different guiding systems. In the course of disassembly under water of the MZFR, plasma cutting has been found to be a reliable and efficient technique for remote operation. Contact arc metal cutting is a thermal cutting technique allowing all electrically conducting materials, including those with claddings, to be cut nearly irrespective of their component geometries. The methods, technology, possible uses, and practical operation of contact arc metal cutting in the demolition of the MZFR are covered in this article. (orig.)

  16. The School for Nuclear Engineering is 25 years old: Where teachers go to school

    Knapp, W.

    1986-01-01

    For a quarter of a century the School for Nuclear Engineering at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre has provided further education in all areas of nuclear engineering. The courses are attended by all kinds of people: school teachers, shift managers in nuclear power stations and engineers from the Third World, for example. (orig.) [de

  17. Nuclear energy research in Indonesia

    Supadi, S.; Soentono, S.; Djokolelono, M.

    1988-01-01

    Indonesia's National Atomic Energy Authority, BATAN (Badan Tenaga Atom Nasional), was founded to implement, regulate and monitor the development and launching of programs for the peaceful uses of nuclear power. These programs constitute part of the efforts made to change to a more industrialized level the largely agricultural society of Indonesia. BATAN elaborated extensive nuclear research and development programs in a variety of fields, such as medicine, the industrial uses of isotopes and radiation, the nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear technology and power generation, and in fundamental research. The Puspiptek Nuclear Research Center has been equipped with a multi-purpose research reactor and will also have a fuel element fabrication plant, a facility for treating radioactive waste, a radiometallurgical laboratory, and laboratories for working with radioisotopes and for radiopharmaceutical research. (orig.) [de

  18. Nuclear safety research master plan

    Ha, Jae Joo; Yang, J. U.; Jun, Y. S. and others

    2001-06-01

    The SRMP (Safety Research Master Plan) is established to cope with the changes of nuclear industry environments. The tech. tree is developed according to the accident progress of the nuclear reactor. The 11 research fields are derived to cover the necessary technologies to ensure the safety of nuclear reactors. Based on the developed tech. tree, the following four main research fields are derived as the main safety research areas: 1. Integrated nuclear safety enhancement, 2. Thermal hydraulic experiment and assessment, 3. Severe accident management and experiment, and 4. The integrity of equipment and structure. The research frame and strategies are also recommended to enhance the efficiency of research activity, and to extend the applicability of research output.

  19. Annual report on nuclear physics activities. July 1, 1987 - June 30, 1988

    Doll, P.; Meisel, G.

    1989-02-01

    This report surveys the activities in basic research from July 1, 1987 to June 30, 1988 at the Institute for Nuclear Physics (IK) of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The research program of this institute comprises nuclear astropysics, laser spectroscopy, nuclear reactions with light ions, neutron physics, neutrino physics and high energy physics, as well as detector technology. (orig.) [de

  20. From nuclear research to multidisciplinary research

    Theenhaus, R.; Baurmann, K.W.

    1996-01-01

    Forty years ago, the North Rhine-Westphalian State Government founded the then Juelich Nuclear Research Center. After a growth period of the reactor engineering program until 1980, claiming a share of 42% of R and D resources, that share declined continuously to a present level of 8%. This development is an expression of the activities successfully completed in the past, of progress achieved in industrial reactor development, but also of the fact that the high temperature reactor, which had been run successfully for twenty years, failed as a technical scale THTR-300 version. The Center has reorientated its line of research in a process of structural reshuffle beginning some fifteen years ago and still going on. Information technology, materials research, life sciences, environmental research, and energy technology have become main activities of equal weight. Activities specific to nuclear reactors have been incorporated in this new line of work as nuclear safety research and work on safe repository storage. (orig.) [de

  1. TASKA - Tandem Spiegelmaschine Karlsruhe. Vol. 1

    1982-06-01

    TASKA (Tandem Spiegelmaschine Karlsruhe) is a near term engineering test facility based on a tandem mirror concept with thermal barriers. The main objectives of this study were to develop a preconceptual design of a facility that could provide engineering design information for a Demonstration Fusion Power Reactor. Thus TASKA has to serve as testbed for technologies of plasma engineering, superconducting magnets, materials, plasma heating, breeding and test blankets, tritium technology, and remote handling. (orig.) [de

  2. TASKA - Tandem Spiegelmaschine Karlsruhe. Vol. 2

    1982-06-01

    TASKA (Tandem Spiegelmaschine Karlsruhe) is a near term engineering test facility based on a tandem mirror concept with thermal barriers. The main objectives of this study were to develop a preconceptual design of a facility that could provide engineering design information for a Demonstration Fusion Power Reactor. Thus TASKA has to serve as testbed for technologies of plasma engineering, superconducting magnets, materials, plasma heating, breeding and test blankets, tritium technology, and remote handling. (orig.) [de

  3. [Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    1993-01-01

    Research in progress and plans for future investigations are briefly summarized for the following areas: light-ion structure and reactions; nuclear structure; peripheral heavy-ion reactions at medium and high energy; medium-energy heavy-ion collisions and properties of highly excited nuclear matter; and high-energy heavy-ion collisions and QCD plasma

  4. Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research

    Vogt, J. R. [ed.

    1977-01-01

    The topics considered in the seven sessions were nuclear methods in atmospheric research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in tracer applications; energy exploration, production, and utilization; nuclear methods in environmental monitoring; nuclear methods in water research; and nuclear methods in biological research. Individual abstracts were prepared for each paper. (JSR)

  5. Nuclear research center transformation experience

    Diaz, J. L.; Jimenez, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    As consequence of the changes in the energy polities of each countries in the 80th. many of the Nuclear Research Centres suffered a transformation (more of less deep) in other Research and Development Centres with a wider spectrum that the exclusively nuclear one. This year is the 50 anniversary of the Spanish Centre of Nuclear Research-Junta de Energia Nuclear.The JEN the same as other suffered a deep renovation to become the CIEMAT Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology). This paper is focussed on the evolution of JEN to CIEMAT besides analysing the reach of this re-foundation considering the political reasons and technical aspect that justified it and the laws in those it is based on. (Author)

  6. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    Kapusta, J.I.

    1990-01-01

    Research programs in nuclear theory are discussed in this paper. The topics discussed are: neutron stars and pulsars; transverse momentum distribution; intermittency and other correlations; photon and delepton production; electroweak theory at high temperature; and fractional statistics

  7. The Belgian nuclear research centre

    Moons, F.

    2001-01-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre is almost exclusively devoted to nuclear R and D and services and is able to generate 50% of its resources (out of 75 million Euro) by contract work and services. The main areas of research include nuclear reactor safety, radioactive waste management, radiation protection and safeguards. The high flux reactor BR2 is extensively used to test fuel and structural materials. PWR-plant BR3 is devoted to the scientific analysis of decommissioning problems. The Centre has a strong programme on the applications of radioisotopes and radiation in medicine and industry. The centre has plans to develop an accelerator driven spallation neutron source for various applications. It has initiated programmes to disseminate correct information on issues of nuclear energy production and non-energy nuclear applications to different target groups. It has strong linkages with the IAEA, OECD-NEA and the Euratom. (author)

  8. Nuclear energy research until 2000

    Reiman, L.; Rintamaa, R.; Vanttola, T.

    1994-03-01

    The working group was to assess the need and orientation of nuclear energy research (apart from research on nuclear waste management and fusion technology) up until the year 2000 in Finland and to propose framework schemes and organization guidelines for any forthcoming publicly financed research programmes from 1995 onwards. The main purpose of nuclear energy research is to ensure the safety and continued development of Finland's existing nuclear power plants. Factors necessarily influencing the orientation of research are Parliaments decision of late 1993 against further nuclear capacity in the country, the need to assess reactor safety in the eastern neighbour regions, and Finland's potential membership in the European Union. The working group proposes two new research programmes similar to the current ones but with slightly modified emphasis. Dedicated to reactor safety and structural safety respectively, they would both cover the four years from 1995 to 1998. A separate research project is proposed for automation technology. In addition, environmental research projects should have a joint coordination unit. (9 figs., 4 tabs.)

  9. Nuclear instrumentation for research reactors

    Hofer, Carlos G.; Pita, Antonio; Verrastro, Claudio A.; Maino, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear instrumentation for research reactors in Argentina was developed in 70'. A gradual modernization of all the nuclear instrumentation is planned. It includes start-up and power range instrumentation, as well as field monitors, clamp, scram and rod movement control logic. The new instrumentation is linked to a computer network, based on real time operating system for data acquisition, display and logging. This paper describes the modules and whole system aspects. (author). 2 refs

  10. The Karlsruhe program system KAPROS. Pt. 2

    Bachmann, H.; Kleinheins, S.

    1976-07-01

    The system nucleus of the Karlsruhe modular program system KAPROS is described from the point of view of the system programmer. In short reviews it is explained, how the module management, the data management, the buffer management, the error handling and the statistics work. The tables, the datasets, the routines and the commons of the system nucleus as well as some utility programs for the handling of system datasets are explained in full detail. The program listening of the system nucleus belongs to this documentation as a separate appendix. (orig.) [de

  11. Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal. Annual Report 2011

    Geckeis, H.; Stumpf, T.

    2012-01-01

    The R and D at the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal, INE, (Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung) of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) focuses on (i) long term safety research for nuclear waste disposal, (ii) immobilization of high level radioactive waste (HLW), (iii) separation of minor actinides from HLW and (iv) radiation protection.

  12. Annual colloquium 1976 of the project nuclear safety

    1976-11-01

    The present report gives the full text of the nine papers read during the annual colloquium 1976 of the Project Nuclear Safety at Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre, in which the main activities and findings of the project in 1976 are contained. (RW) [de

  13. Nuclear Stewardship Research

    C.W. Beausang

    2006-01-01

    This report covers the period from June 2005 through May 2006. During this, the third year of our program, our research has focused mainly on applying the surrogate reaction technique and our newly developed surrogate ratio method to deduce neutron induced fission cross sections on uranium nuclei. The year has been marked by continued scientific progress, by the arrival of new personnel, by a growth in the numbers of students working in the group and by a continuation of our experimental program and close collaboration with staff and scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  14. LAMPF: a nuclear research facility

    Livingston, M.S.

    1977-09-01

    A description is given of the recently completed Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) which is now taking its place as one of the major installations in this country for the support of research in nuclear science and its applications. Descriptions are given of the organization of the Laboratory, the Users Group, experimental facilities for research and for applications, and procedures for carrying on research studies

  15. Nuclear plant aging research program

    Eissenberg, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, has established the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program in its Division of Engineering Technology. Principal contractors for this program include Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The program goals are: to identify and characterize time-dependent degradation (aging) of nuclear plant safety-related electrical and mechanical components which could lead to loss of safety function; to identify and recommend methods for detecting and trending aging effects prior to loss of safety function so that timely maintenance can be implemented; and to recommend maintenance practices for mitigating the effects of aging. Research activities include prioritization of system and component aging in nuclear plants, characterization of aging degradation of specific components including identification of functional indicators useful for trending degradation, and testing of practical methods and devices for measuring the functional indicators. Aging assessments have been completed on electric motors, snubbers, motor-operated valves, and check valves. Testing of trending methods and devices for motor-operated valves and check valves is in progress

  16. Annual report on nuclear physics activities July 1, 1983 - June 30, 1984

    Fries, D.C.; Matussek, P.; Weddigen, C.

    1984-10-01

    This report surveys the activities in fundamental research from July 1, 1983 to June 30, 1984 at the Institute for Nuclear Physics (IK) of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The research program of this institute comprises laser spectroscopy, nuclear reactions with light ions, neutron physics, neutrino physics and physics at medium and higher energies. (orig.) [de

  17. Annual report on nuclear physics activities. July 1, 1985 - June 30, 1986

    Bueche, G.; Doll, P.; Friedrich, L.

    1986-12-01

    This report surveys the activities in basic research from July 1, 1985 to June 30, 1986 at the Institute for Nuclear Physics (IK) of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The research program of this institute comprises laser spectroscopy, nuclear reactions with light ions, neutron physics, neutrino physics and physics at medium and high energies. (orig.) [de

  18. Nuclear Energy Research in Europe

    Schenkel, Roland; Haas, Didier

    2008-01-01

    The energy situation in Europe is mainly characterized by a growth in consumption, together with increasing import dependence in all energy resources. Assuring security of energy supply is a major goal at European Union level, and this can best be achieved by an adequate energy mix, including nuclear energy, producing now 32 % of our electricity. An increase of this proportion would not only improve our independence, but also reduce greenhouse gases emissions in Europe. Another major incentive in favor of nuclear is its competitiveness, as compared to other energy sources, and above all the low dependence of the electricity price on variation of the price of the raw material. The European Commission has launched a series of initiatives aiming at better coordinating energy policies and research. Particular emphasis in future European research will be given on the long-term sustainability of nuclear energy through the development of fast reactors, and to potential industrial heat applications. (authors)

  19. Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research

    Vogt, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 75 papers were presented on nuclear methods for analysis of environmental and biological samples. Sessions were devoted to software and mathematical methods; nuclear methods in atmospheric and water research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in biology and medicine; and nuclear methods in energy research

  20. Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research

    Vogt, J R [ed.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 75 papers were presented on nuclear methods for analysis of environmental and biological samples. Sessions were devoted to software and mathematical methods; nuclear methods in atmospheric and water research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in biology and medicine; and nuclear methods in energy research.

  1. Supercomputer applications in nuclear research

    Ishiguro, Misako

    1992-01-01

    The utilization of supercomputers in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is mainly reported. The fields of atomic energy research which use supercomputers frequently and the contents of their computation are outlined. What is vectorizing is simply explained, and nuclear fusion, nuclear reactor physics, the hydrothermal safety of nuclear reactors, the parallel property that the atomic energy computations of fluids and others have, the algorithm for vector treatment and the effect of speed increase by vectorizing are discussed. At present Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute uses two systems of FACOM VP 2600/10 and three systems of M-780. The contents of computation changed from criticality computation around 1970, through the analysis of LOCA after the TMI accident, to nuclear fusion research, the design of new type reactors and reactor safety assessment at present. Also the method of using computers advanced from batch processing to time sharing processing, from one-dimensional to three dimensional computation, from steady, linear to unsteady nonlinear computation, from experimental analysis to numerical simulation and so on. (K.I.)

  2. Nuclear safeguards research and development

    Henry, C. N.

    1981-11-01

    The status of a nuclear safeguard research and development program is presented. Topics include nondestructive assay technology development and applications, international safeguards, training courses, technology transfer, analytical chemistry methods for fissionable materials safeguards, the Department of Energy Computer Security Technical Center, and operational security.

  3. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    Udagawa, T.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the accomplishments in basic research in nuclear physics carried out by the theoretical nuclear physics group in the Department of Physics at the University of Texas at Austin, during the period of November 1, 1992 to October 31, 1993. The work done covers three separate areas, low-energy nuclear reactions, intermediate energy physics, and nuclear structure studies. Although the subjects are thus spread among different areas, they are based on two techniques developed in previous years. These techniques are a powerful method for continuum-random-phase-approximation (CRPA) calculations of nuclear response and the breakup-fusion (BF) approach to incomplete fusion reactions, which calculation on a single footing of various incomplete fusion reaction cross sections within the framework of direct reaction theories. The approach was developed as a part of a more general program for establishing an approach to describing all different types of nuclear reactions, i.e., complete fusion, incomplete fusion and direct reactions, in a systematic way based on single theoretical framework

  4. Social Sciences in Nuclear Research

    Eggermont, G

    2001-04-01

    In 1998, an initiative was taken by SCK-CEN to include social sciences and humanities into its research programme. As a result, two working groups were created to discuss two broad items: (1) ethical choices in radiation protection; and (2) the role and culture of nuclear experts. The general objectives of SCK-CEN's social sciences programme are: (1) to improve the nuclear research approach by integrating social sciences - where needed- to solve complex problems in interaction with society; (2) to stimulate university collaboration with social disciplines in learning process towards transdisciplinary and improved social responsibility; (3) to improve the training of nuclear experts of SCK-CEN by gaining insight in their expert culture and implicit ethical choices; (4) to develop projects and an original transdisciplinary programme and project management by involving young and senior scientists, a variety of university opinions and relevant actors from industry and society. Along these lines, projects were developed on sustainability and nuclear development, transgenerational ethics related to disposal of long-lived radioactive waste and cognitive dissonance effects, legal aspects and liability, non-radiological aspects of nuclear emergencies and safety. Progress and major achievements in SCK-CEN's social science programme in 2000 are summarised.

  5. Social Sciences in Nuclear Research

    Eggermont, G.

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, an initiative was taken by SCK-CEN to include social sciences and humanities into its research programme. As a result, two working groups were created to discuss two broad items: (1) ethical choices in radiation protection; and (2) the role and culture of nuclear experts. The general objectives of SCK-CEN's social sciences programme are: (1) to improve the nuclear research approach by integrating social sciences - where needed- to solve complex problems in interaction with society; (2) to stimulate university collaboration with social disciplines in learning process towards transdisciplinary and improved social responsibility; (3) to improve the training of nuclear experts of SCK-CEN by gaining insight in their expert culture and implicit ethical choices; (4) to develop projects and an original transdisciplinary programme and project management by involving young and senior scientists, a variety of university opinions and relevant actors from industry and society. Along these lines, projects were developed on sustainability and nuclear development, transgenerational ethics related to disposal of long-lived radioactive waste and cognitive dissonance effects, legal aspects and liability, non-radiological aspects of nuclear emergencies and safety. Progress and major achievements in SCK-CEN's social science programme in 2000 are summarised

  6. Future of nuclear energy research

    Fuketa, Toyojiro

    1989-09-01

    In spite of the easing of worldwide energy supply and demand situation in these years, we believe that research efforts towards the next generation nuclear energy are indispensably necessary. Firstly, the nuclear colleagues believe that nuclear energy is the best major energy source from many points of view including the global environmental viewpoint. Secondly, in the medium- and long-range view, there will once again be a high possibility of a tight supply and demand situation for oil. Thirdly, nuclear energy is the key energy source to overcome the vulnerability of the energy supply structure in industrialized countries like Japan where virtually no fossil energy source exists. In this situation, nuclear energy is a sort of quasi-domestic energy as a technology-intensive energy. Fourthly, the intensive efforts to develop the nuclear technology in the next generation will give rise to a further evolution in science and technology in the future. A few examples of medium- and long-range goals of the nuclear energy research are development of new types of reactors which can meet various needs of energy more flexibly and reliably than the existing reactors, fundamental and ultimate solution of the radioactive waste problems, creation and development of new types of energy production systems which are to come beyond the fusion, new development in the biological risk assessment of the radiation effects and so on. In order to accomplish those goals it is quite important to introduce innovations in such underlying technologies as materials control in more microscopic manners, photon and particle beam techniques, accelerator engineering, artificial intelligence, and so on. 32 refs, 2 figs

  7. News from the Library: The 8th edition Karlsruhe nuclide chart has been released

    CERN Library

    2012-01-01

    The 8th edition of the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart contains new data not found in the 7th edition.   Since 1958, the well-known Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart has provided scientists with structured, valuable information on the half-lives, decay modes and energies of radioactive nuclides. The chart is used in many disciplines in physics (health physics, radiation protection, nuclear and radiochemistry, astrophysics, etc.) but also in the life and earth sciences (biology, medicine, agriculture, geology, etc.). The 8th edition of the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart contains new data on 737 nuclides not found in the 7th edition. In total, nuclear data on 3847 experimentally observed ground states and isomers are presented. A new web-based version of this chart is in the final stages of development for use within the Nucleonica Nuclear Science Portal - a portal for which CERN has an institutional license. The chart is also available in paper format.   If you want to buy a paper version of the chart, ple...

  8. Casa Wächter Karlsruhe Alemania Federal

    Lehmann, Friedrich

    1979-06-01

    Full Text Available Wächter Residence, Karlsruhe - West Germany The design of this home in Karlsruhe v/as presided over by two basic criteria: function and human scale, carried up to their ultimate consequences. The first criteria had a decisive influence on the roof arrangement, as an extension of the neighboring buildings, and on the selection of construction materials to match the suburban environment where the site is located, not to forget the shaping of Windows and skylights, reflecting the internal functions and providing lighting while protecting the privacy of the interior from the exterior lines of view. The second criteria affects aspects so different from one another as the unexpected but valid room arrangement following a spiral path leading from the entrance to the master bedroom at the other end with the remaining rooms at intermediate levels affording the required degree of privacy; or the arrangement of the mechanical installations, resembling the human backbone; or, finally, the paint finish chosen, pleasing man's taste for ornamentality.

    La realización de esta vivienda, en Karlsruhe, estuvo marcada por dos criterios fundamentales: la funcionalidad y la escala humana, llevadas ambas hasta sus últimas consecuencias. La primera influyó desde la disposición de las cubiertas, como prolongación de las construcciones vecinas, hasta la elección de los materiales constructivos, acordes con el entorno suburbano de la parcela, sin olvidar la configuración de las ventanas y lucernarios que, con sus diferentes formatos, indican el uso del interior, al tiempo que posibilitan la iluminación, protegiendo de las vistas exteriores. La segunda característica afecta a aspectos tan dispares como la original, pero válida, secuencia de habitaciones —según una espiral que, desde la entrada, conduce, en el extremo opuesto, al dormitorio de los padres, quedando las restantes dependencias situadas en los niveles intermedios según su exigencia

  9. Nuclear Structure Research at TRIUMF

    Garrett, P. E.; Andreyev, A.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Becker, J. A.; Boston, A. J.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Cline, D.; Cooper, R. J.; Churchman, R.; Cross, D.; Dashdorj, D.; Demand, G. A.; Dimmock, M. R.; Drake, T. E.; Finlay, P.; Gagon-Miosan, F.; Gallant, A. T.; Green, K. L.; Grint, A. N.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Harkness, L. J.; Hayes, A. B.; Kanungo, R.; Kulp, W. D.; Leach, K. G.; Lee, G.; Leslie, J. R.; Martin, J.-P.; Mattoon, C.; Mills, W. J.; Morton, A. C.; Mythili, S.; Nelson, L.; Newman, O.; Nolan, P. J.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Pearson, C. J.; Phillips, A. A.; Porter-Peden, M.; Ressler, J. J.; Roy, R.; Ruiz, C.; Savajols, H.; Sarazin, F.; Schumaker, M. A.; Scraggs, D. P.; Scraggs, H. C.; Strange, M. D.; Svensson, C. E.; Waddington, J. C.; Wan, J. M.; Whitbeck, A.; Williams, S. J.; Wong, J.; Wood, J. L.; Wu, C. Y.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2007-04-01

    The radioactive beam laboratory at TRIUMF is currently the highest power ISOL facility in the world. Taking advantage of the high-intensity beams, major programs in nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and weak interaction studies have begun. The low-energy area, ISAC-I, is capable of delivering beams up to mass 30 at approx 1.7 MeV/u or 60 keV up to the mass of the primary target, whereas ISAC-II will ultimately provide beams up to mass 150 and approx 6.5 MeV/u. Major gamma -ray spectrometers for nuclear structure research consist of the 8pi spectrometer at ISAC-I, and the TIGRESS spectrometer now being constructed for ISAC-II. Results from recent experiments investigating the beta -decay of nuclei near N=90 and Coulomb excitation of 20,21Na are presented that highlight the capabilities of the spectrometers.

  10. Nuclear safety research in France

    Tanguy, P.

    1976-01-01

    As a consequence of the decision of choosing light water reactors (PWR) for the French nuclear plants of the next ten years, a large safety program has been launched referring to three physical barriers against fission product release: the fuel element cladding, main primary system boundary and the containment. The parallel development of French-designed fast breeder reactors involved safety studies on: sodium boiling, accidental fuel behavior, molten fuel-sodium interaction, core accident and protection, and external containment. The rapid development of nuclear energy resulted in a corresponding development of safety studies relating to nuclear fuel facilities. French regulations also required a special program to be developed for the realistic evaluation of the consequences of external agressions, the French cooperation to multinational safety research being also intensive

  11. Progress of nuclear safety research. 2001

    Anoda, Yoshinari; Sasajima, Hideo; Nishiyama, Yutaka (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-10-01

    JAERI is conducting nuclear safety research primarily at the Nuclear Safety Research Center in close cooperation with the related departments in accordance with the Long Term Plan for Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy or the Safety Research Annual Plan issued by the Japanese government. The safety research at JAERI concerns the engineering safety of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and radioactive waste management as well as advanced technology for safety improvement or assessment. Also, JAERI has conducted international collaboration to share the information on common global issues of nuclear safety. This report summarizes the nuclear safety research activities of JAERI from April 1999 through March 2001. (author)

  12. Karlsruhe nuclide chart - new 9. edition 2015

    Soti, Zsolt [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, DE-76125 Karlsruhe, (Germany); Magill, Joseph; Pfennig, Gerda; Derher, Raymond [Nucleonica GmbH, c/o European Commission, Postfach 2340, DE-76125 Karlsruhe, (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Following the success of the 8. Edition of the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart 2012, a new edition is planned for 2015. Since the 2012 edition, more than 100 nuclides have been discovered and about 1400 nuclides have been updated. In summary, the new 9. edition contains decay and radiation data on approximately 3230 ground state nuclides and 740 isomers from 118 chemical elements. The accompanying booklet provides a detailed explanation of the nuclide box structure used in the Chart. An expanded section contains many additional nuclide decay schemes to aid the user to interpret the highly condensed information in the nuclide boxes. The booklet contains - in addition to the latest values of the physical constants and physical properties - a periodic table of the elements, tables of new and updated nuclides, and a difference chart showing the main changes in the Chart graphically. (authors)

  13. Karlsruhe nuclide chart - new 9. edition 2015

    Soti, Zsolt; Magill, Joseph; Pfennig, Gerda; Derher, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Following the success of the 8. Edition of the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart 2012, a new edition is planned for 2015. Since the 2012 edition, more than 100 nuclides have been discovered and about 1400 nuclides have been updated. In summary, the new 9. edition contains decay and radiation data on approximately 3230 ground state nuclides and 740 isomers from 118 chemical elements. The accompanying booklet provides a detailed explanation of the nuclide box structure used in the Chart. An expanded section contains many additional nuclide decay schemes to aid the user to interpret the highly condensed information in the nuclide boxes. The booklet contains - in addition to the latest values of the physical constants and physical properties - a periodic table of the elements, tables of new and updated nuclides, and a difference chart showing the main changes in the Chart graphically. (authors)

  14. Nuclear Research and Society: Introduction

    Meskens, G.

    2007-01-01

    Throughout the last decades, the ever growing use of technology in our society has brought along the need to reflect on the related impact on the ecosystem and on society as such. There is growing evidence that the complexity of issues of risk governance and ethics coming with applications of nuclear technology, fossil fuels, human cloning and genetically modified crops cannot be tackled by pure rational technological and economical reasoning alone. In order to provide an answer to the concerns of civil society, this complexity needs a transdisciplinary approach, taking into account social and ethical aspects. Starting from the insight that a full understanding of the benefits and risks of applications of radioactivity and nuclear technology requires also an understanding of the context of application and a sense for the social and ethical aspects of the situation, SCK-CEN started in 1999 with its PISA research programme (Programme of Integration of Social Aspects into nuclear research). The aim of the research was (and still is) to give the nuclear researchers more insight into the complex social and ethical aspects of nuclear applications and to shed at the same time new lights on how to organise in a more effective way the dialogue and interaction with civil society. Originally, the programme was set up along thematic research tracks, involving nuclear scientists, engineers, philosophers and social scientists, and focussing on specific projects carried out by way of PhD- or post-doc research in cooperation with universities. The research tracks focussed on themes such as Sustainability and nuclear development, Transgenerational ethics of radioactive waste management, Legal aspects and liability, Risk governance and Expert culture. In addition to this thematic research, PISA organised reflection groups in interaction with universities, authorities and private actors. These interdisciplinary discussion sessions aimed to exchange knowledge and views on typical

  15. The United Nuclear Research Institute

    Kiss, D.

    1978-01-01

    The UNRI, the only common institute of the socialist countries was founded in 1956 in Dubna. The scientists of small countries have the opportunity to take part in fundamental research with very expensive devices which are usually not available for them. There are six research laboratories and one department in the UNRI namely: the theoretical physical laboratory; the laboratory of high energies - there is a synchrophasotron of 1a GeV there; the laboratory of nuclear problems - there is a synchrocyclotron of 680 MeV there; the laboratory of nuclear reactions with the cyclotron U-300 which can accelerate heavy ions; the neutronphysical laboratory with the impulse reactor IBM-30; the laboratory of computation and automatization with two big computers; the department of new acceleration methods. The main results obtained by Hungarian scientist in Dubna are described. (V.N.)

  16. Report on research and development work 1985 on the nuclear fusion project. Annual report of the Association KfK-Euratom

    Finken, D.

    1986-05-01

    The Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe and the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics together form the Nuclear Fusion Development Association. The partners collaborate with the aim of creating the physical and technical preconditions for the use of the energy released by nuclear fusion and to plan and carry out future large-scale experiments. The work of the Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe on fusion with magnetic containment is included in the nuclear fusion project and is part of the European fusion technology programme. The work is supported by an association contract between KfK and Euratom by the European Commission. Connections are built up between areas of work and new projects are prepared by supplementary KfK contributions, mostly studies. This is done with regard to the expansion of the technology programme to be expected for future years and the planning activities for NET. The reports collected here are contributions of the KfK institutes in 1985. The appendix contains a list of the tasks which KfK has taken over from the fusion technology programme of the EEC. References to the institutes' contributions make the assignment of textual contributions easier. (orig.) [de

  17. Nuclear generation cost and nuclear research development fund

    Kim, S. S.; Song, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to analyze the effects of nuclear R and D fund to nuclear generation cost and to assess the adaptability of fund size through the comparison with the nuclear research fund in Japan. It was estimated that nuclear R and D fund increased the average annual unit cost of nuclear power generation by 1.14 won/kWh. When the size of nuclear R and D fund is compared with that in Japan, this study suggests that the current nuclear R and D fund should be largely increased taking into consideration the ratio of R and D fund to nuclear generation

  18. Nuclear Safety Research Review Committee

    Todreas, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Research Review Committee has had a fundamental difficulty because of the atmosphere that has existed since it was created. It came into existence at a time of decreasing budgets. For any Committee the easiest thing is to tell the Director what additional to do. That does not really help him a lot in this atmosphere of reduced budgets which he reviewed for you on Monday. Concurrently the research arm of Nuclear Regulatory Commission has recognized that the scope of its activity needed to be increased rather than decreased. In the last two-and-a-half-year period, human factors work was reinstated, radiation and health effects investigations were reinvigorated, research in the waste area was given significant acceleration. Further, accident management came into being, and the NRC finally got back into the TMI-2 area. So with all of those activities being added to the program at the same time that the research budget was going down, the situation has become very strained. What that leads to regarding Committee membership is a need for technically competent generalists who will be able to sit as the Division Directors come in, as the contractors come in, and sort the wheat from the chaff. The Committee needs people who are interested in and have a broad perspective on what regulatory needs are and specifically how safety research activities can contribute to them. The author summarizes the history of the Committee, the current status, and plans for the future

  19. Utilization of nuclear research reactors

    1980-01-01

    Full text: Report on an IAEA interregional training course, Budapest, Hungary, 5-30 November 1979. The course was attended by 19 participants from 16 Member States. Among the 28 training courses which the International Atomic Energy Agency organized within its 1979 programme of technical assistance was the Interregional Training Course on the Utilization of Nuclear Research Reactors. This course was held at the Nuclear Training Reactor (a low-power pool-type reactor) of the Technical University, Budapest, Hungary, from 5 to 30 November 1979 and it was complemented by a one-week Study Tour to the Nuclear Research Centre in Rossendorf near Dresden, German Democratic Republic. The training course was very successful, with 19 participants attending from 16 Member States - Bangladesh, Bolivia, Czechoslovakia, Ecuador, Egypt, India, Iraq, Korean Democratic People's Republic, Morocco, Peru, Philippines, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, Vietnam and Yugoslavia. Selected invited lecturers were recruited from the USA and Finland, as well as local scientists from Hungarian institutions. During the past two decades or so, many research reactors have been put into operation around the world, and the demand for well qualified personnel to run and fully utilize these facilities has increased accordingly. Several developing countries have already acquired small- and medium-size research reactors mainly for isotope production, research in various fields, and training, while others are presently at different stages of planning and installation. Through different sources of information, such as requests to the IAEA for fellowship awards and experts, it became apparent that many research reactors and their associated facilities are not being utilized to their full potential in many of the developing countries. One reason for this is the lack of a sufficient number of trained professionals who are well acquainted with all the capabilities that a research reactor can offer, both in research and

  20. The Russian nuclear data research programme

    1995-11-01

    The report contains the Russian programme of nuclear data research, approved by the Russian Nuclear Data Committee on 16 December 1994. It gives surveys on nuclear data needs, on the structure of nuclear data activities, on experimental facilities for nuclear data measurements at five Russian institutes, on theoretical model work, nuclear data evaluation, and nuclear data testing. It describes four Russian nuclear data centers and their relations to the International Nuclear Data Centres Network, and their holdings of nuclear data libraries of Russian and international origin. A summary of nuclear data applications in energy and non-energy fields is given. An appendix contains a detail nuclear data research programme for the years 1995 - 2005. (author). 16 refs, 1 fig., 6 tabs

  1. National Nuclear Research Institute Annual Report 2013

    2014-01-01

    The report highlights the activities of the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 2013, grouped under the following headings: Centres under the institute namely Nuclear Reactors Research Centre (NRRC); Accelerator Research Centre (ARC); Engineering Services Centre (ESC); National Radioactive Waste Management Centre (NRWMC); Nuclear Chemistry and Environmental Research Centre (NCERC); Nuclear Applications Centre (NAC) and National Data Centre (NDC). (A. B.)

  2. Gordon Conference on Nuclear Research

    Austin, S.M.

    1983-09-01

    Session topics were: quarks and nuclear physics; anomalons and anti-protons; the independent particle structure of nuclei; relativistic descriptions of nuclear structure and scattering; nuclear structure at high excitation; advances in nuclear astrophysics; properties of nuclear material; the earliest moments of the universe; and pions and spin excitations in nuclei

  3. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    Bayman, B.F.

    1982-01-01

    Research progress on the following subjects is summarized: (1) first and second order contributions to two-neutron transfer, (2) proximity potential in coupled-channel calculations, (3) spin-dependent interactions in heavy ion reactions, (4) nuclear field theory and standard Goldstone perturbation theory, (5) effective operators with potential from meson theory, (6) microscopic study of the 3 He(α,γ) 7 Be electric-dipole capture reaction, and (7) influence of target clustering on internuclear antisymmetrization. Project proposals are reviewed and publications are listed

  4. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    1991-06-01

    This report contains abstracts of ongoing projects in the following areas: strong interaction physics; relativistic heavy ion physics; nuclear structure and nuclear many-body theory; and nuclear astrophysics

  5. Progress of nuclear safety research-2004

    Anoda, Yoshinari; Ebine, Noriya; Chuto, Toshinori; Sato, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Jun; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Munakata, Masahiro; Asakura, Toshihide; Yamaguchi, Tetsuji; Kida, Takashi; Matsui, Hiroki; Haneishi, Akihiro; Araya, Fumimasa

    2005-03-01

    JAERI is conducting nuclear safety research primarily at the Nuclear Safety Research Center in close cooperation with the related departments in accordance with the Long Term Plan for Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy and Annual Plan for Safety Research issued by the Japanese government. The fields of conducting safety research at JAERI are the engineering safety of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and radioactive waste management as well as advanced technology for safety improvement or assessment. Also, JAERI has conducted international collaboration to share the information on common global issues of nuclear safety and to supplement own research. Moreover, when accidents occurred at nuclear facilities, JAERI has taken a responsible role by providing technical experts and investigation for assistance to the government or local public body. This report summarizes the nuclear safety research activities of JAERI from April 2002 through March 2004 and utilized facilities. (author)

  6. Gas chromatography at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe

    Laesser, R.; Gruenhagen, S.

    2003-08-01

    Among the analytical techniques (mass spectrometry, laser Raman spectroscopy, gas chromatography, use of ionisation chambers) employed at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK), gas chromatography plays a prominent role. The main reasons for that are the simplicity of the gas chromatographic separation process, the small space required for the equipment, the low investment costs in comparison to other methods, the robustness of the equipment, the simple and straightforward analysis and the fact that all gas species of interest (with the exception of water) can easily be detected by gas chromatographic means. The conventional gas chromatographs GC1 and GC2 used in the Tritium Measurement Techniques (TMT) System of the TLK and the gas chromatograph GC3 of the experiment CAPER are presented in detail, by discussing their flow diagrams, their major components, the chromatograms measured by means of various detectors, shortcomings and possible improvements. One of the main disadvantages of the conventional gas chromatography is the long retention times required for the analysis of hydrogen gas mixtures. To overcome this disadvantage, micro gas chromatography for hydrogen analysis was developed. Reduction of the retention times by one order of magnitude was achieved. (orig.)

  7. Cooperation between NIEP and Karlsruhe University in crust and upper mantle studies of the Vrancea area

    Prodehl, Claus

    2002-01-01

    Active cooperation between seismologists at Bucharest and Karlsruhe started in 1974 with the installation of seismic stations at Romanian dam sites. These stations also recorded the destructive earthquake of 1977 and formed the nucleus for a broader cooperation between seismologists at Bucharest and Karlsruhe and was followed by a continuing exchange of knowledge by vice versa research visits. The cooperation was finally intensively increased by the installation of a major priority research program on earthquake risk problems of Karlsruhe University with Romanian research institutions in 1996, when Romanian and German scientists from various fields (geology, seismology, civil engineering, operation research) organized themselves in the Collaborative Research Center 461 (CRC 461) 'Strong earthquakes: a challenge for geosciences and civil engineering' (Germany) and the Romanian Group for Strong Vrancea Earthquakes (RGVE) in a multidisciplinary attempt towards earthquake mitigation. The cooperation between the Geophysical and Geological Institutes of Karlsruhe University with both NIEP and the Faculty of Geology of Bucharest University focussed in particular on the deep geology of the Vrancea area and surrounding provinces with emphasis on seismicity studies and crust and upper-mantle investigations. Two long-range seismic wide-angle profiles from Bacau to the Danube south of Bucharest recorded in 1999 and from Transylvania to the Dobrogea recorded in 2001, both crossing each other in the Vrancea area, will provide a detailed 3-dimensional crustal structure image of Vrancea and adjacent Carpathians and their surrounding basins, while a temporary array of 120 mobile stations distributed throughout southeastern Romania recorded local and far-distant earthquakes for about 6 months in 1999 which will allow to derive a 3-dimensional tomographic image of the underlying uppermost mantle to depths of about 300 km. (author)

  8. ENSAR, a Nuclear Science Project for European Research Area

    Turzó, Ketel; Lewitowicz, Marek; Harakeh, Muhsin N.

    2015-01-01

    During the period from September 2010 to December 2014, the European project European Nuclear Science and Applications Research (ENSAR) coordinated research activities of the Nuclear Physics community performing research in three major subfields: Nuclear Structure, Nuclear Astrophysics, and Nuclear

  9. [Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    Kapusta, J.I.

    1993-01-01

    The main subject of research was the physics of matter at energy densities greater than 0.15 GeV/fm 3 . Theory encompasses the relativistic many-body/quantum field theory aspects of QCD and the electroweak interactions at these high energy densities, both in and out of thermal equilibrium. Applications range from neutron stars/pulsars to QCD and electroweak phase transitions in the early universe, from baryon number violation in cosmology to the description of nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN and at Brookhaven. Recent activity to understand the properties of matter at energy densities where the electroweak W and Z boson degrees of freedom are important is reported. This problem has applications to cosmology and has the potential to explain the baryon asymmetry produced in the big bang at energies where the particle degrees of freedom will soon be experimentally, probed. This problem is interesting for nuclear physics because of the techniques used in many-body, physics of nuclei and the quark-gluon plasma may be extended to this new problem. The was also interested in problems related to multiparticle production. This includes work on production of particles in heavy-ion collisions, the small x part, of the nuclear and hadron wave function, and multiparticle production induced by instantons in weakly coupled theories. These problems have applications in the heavy ion program at RHIC and the deep inelastic scattering experiments at HERA

  10. Experimental nuclear physics research in Hungary

    Koltay, Ede.

    1984-01-01

    The status and recent results of experimental nuclear physics in Hungary is reviewed. The basic nuclear sciences, instrumental background and international cooperation are discussed. Personal problems and the effects of the international scientific deconjuncture are described. The applied nuclear and interdisciplinary researches play an important role in Hungarian nuclear physics. Some problems of cooperation of Hungarian nuclear and other research institutes applying or producing nuclear analytical technology are reviewed. The new instrument, the Debrecen cyclotron under construction gives new possibilities to basic and applied researches. A new field of Hungarian nuclear physics is the fusion and plasma research using tokamak equipment, the main topics of which are plasma diagnostics and fusion control systems. Some practical applications of Hungarian nuclear physical results, e.g. establishment of new analytical techniques like PIXE, RBS, PIGE, ESCA, etc. are summarized. (D.Gy.)

  11. The Karlsruhe 4π barium fluoride detector

    Wisshak, K.; Guber, K.; Kaeppeler, F.; Krisch, J.; Mueller, H.; Rupp, G.; Voss, F.

    1989-12-01

    A new experimental approach has been implemented for accurate measurements of neutron capture cross sections in the energy range from 5 to 200 keV. The Karlsruhe 4π Barium Fluoride Detector consists of 42 crystals shaped as hexagonal and pentagonal truncated pyramids forming a spherical shell with 10 cm inner radius and 15 cm thickness. All crystals are supplied with reflector and photomultiplier, thus representing independent gamma-ray detectors. Each detector module covers the same solid angle with respect to a gamma-ray source located in the centre. The energy resolution of the 4π detector is 14% at 662 keV and 7% at 2.5 MeV gamma-ray energy, the overall time reslution is 500 ps and the peak efficiency 90% at 1 MeV. The detector allows to register capture cascades with 95% probability above a threshold energy of 2.5 MeV in the sum energy spectrum. Neutrons are produced via the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction using the pulsed proton beam of a Van de Graaff accelerator. The neutron spectrum can be taylored according to the experimental requirements in an energy range from 5 to 200 keV by choosing appropriate proton energies. A collimated neutron beam is passing through the detector and hits the sample in the centre. The energy of captured neutrons is determined via time of flight, the primary flight path being 77 cm. The combination of short primary flight path, a 10 cm inner radius of the spherical BaF 2 shell, and the low capture cross section of barium allows to discriminate background due to capture of sample scattered neutrons in the scintillator by time of flight, leaving part of the neutron energy range completely undisturbed. (orig./HSI) [de

  12. Scientists from all over the world attended the 'Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School 2011' at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT); Wissenschaftler aus aller Welt bei der 'Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School 2011' am Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

    Sanchez, Victor H.; Fischer, Ulrich [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (DE). Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR)

    2011-12-15

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the Commissariat r leEnergie Atomique et Aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Cadarache, alternate in organizing the annual 'Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School.' This year's event, the 17th since its inception, was held in Karlsruhe, Germany on August 25 to September 3. Its topic was 'High-fidelity Modeling for Nuclear Reactors: Challenges and Prospects.' Here is a list of the subjects covered: - Status and perspectives of modeling and its role in design, operation, and safety. - Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactors and simulation of 2 phase flows. - Structural mechanics, structure? fluid interaction, and seismic safety. - Advanced simulation in neutronics and reactor physics. - Progress in simulating fuel and materials behavior. - Multiphysics and uncertainty analysis methods. Experts from eight leading international research institutions and universities presented, and discussed with the 59 participants from 19 countries, the current state of the art and most recent development trends in the subjects listed above. (orig.)

  13. Overview of research potential of Institute for Nuclear Research

    Ciocanescu, Marin

    2007-01-01

    The main organizations involved in nuclear power production in Romania, under supervision of Presidency, Prime Minister and Parliament are: CNCAN (National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control), Nuclear Agency, Ministry of Economy and Commerce, ANDRAD (Waste Management Agency), SNN (Nuclearelectrica National Society), RAAN (Romanian Authority for Nuclear Activities), ICN (Institute for Nuclear Research - Pitesti), SITON (Center of Design and Engineering for Nuclear Projects- Bucharest); ROMAG-PROD (Heavy Water Plant), CNE-PROD (Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant - Production Unit), CNE-INVEST (Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant -Investments Unit), FCN (Nuclear Fuel Factory). The Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti INR, Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti is endowed with a TRIGA Reactor, Hot Cells, Materials Laboratories, Nuclear Fuel, Nuclear Safety Laboratories, Nuclear Fuel, Nuclear Safety. Waste management. Other research centers and laboratories implied in nuclear activities are: ICIT, National Institute for cryogenics and isotope technologies at Rm Valcea Valcea. with R and D activity devoted to heavy water technologies, IFIN, Institute for nuclear physics and engineering, Bucharest, as well as the educational institutions involved in atomic energy applications and University research, Politechnical University Bucharest, University of Bucharest, University of Pitesti, etc. The INR activity outlined, i.e. the nuclear power research as a scientific and technical support for the Romanian nuclear power programme, mainly dedicated to the existing NPP in the country (CANDU). Focused with priority are: - Nuclear Safety (behavior of plant materials, components, installations during accident conditions and integrity investigations); - Radioactive Waste Management Radioactive; - Radioprotection; Product and services supply for NPP. INR Staff numbers 320 R and D qualified and experienced staff, 240 personnel in devices and prototype workshops and site support

  14. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    Udagawa, T.

    1991-10-01

    The work done during the past year covers three separate areas, low energy nuclear reactions intermediate energy physics, and nuclear structure studies. This manuscript summarizes our achievements made in these three areas

  15. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    1989-08-01

    This report discusses the following areas of investigation of the Stony Brook Nuclear Theory Group: the physics of hadrons; QCD and the nucleus; QCD at finite temperature and high density; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure and many-body theory; and heavy ion physics

  16. Nuclear safety research at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre

    Toerroenen, K.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear power plants currently generate some 35 % of electricity used in the European Union and applicant countries. Nuclear safety will therefore remain a priority for the EU, particularly in view of enlargement, the need to monitor ageing nuclear installations and the licencing of advanced new reactor systems. The European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC), with its long involvement and recognised competence in nuclear safety related activities, provides direct support to the European Commission services responsible for nuclear safety and civil protection. (author)

  17. The nuclear research centre at Bariloche, Argentina

    Abriata, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear research centre at Bariloche (CAB) is one of the four centres under the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA). The research programme of CAB addresses various issues like nuclear reactor development, nuclear fuel and fuel cycle, applications of radioisotopes and radiation, and waste management. There is also a basic nuclear science component. The human resource development in the areas of physics and nuclear engineering is done in an associated Balseiro Institute which has undergraduate and graduate programmes as well as doctoral and postdoctoral research. The Centre interacts well with the society and provides services in the nuclear area. It has a close interaction with the nuclear sector of Argentina as also with many international organisations. Regulatory control over the Centre is carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina. (author)

  18. Status of nuclear safety research - 2000

    Sobajima, Makoto; Sasajima, Hideo; Umemoto, Michitaka; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Tadao; Togashi, Yoshihiro; Nakata, Masahito

    2000-11-01

    The nuclear safety research at JAERI is performed in accordance with the long term plan on nuclear research, development and use and the safety research yearly plan determined by the government and under close relationship to the related departments in and around the Nuclear Safety Research Center. The criticality accident having occurred in Tokai-mura in 1999 has been the highest level nuclear accident in Japan and ensuring safety in whole nuclear cycle is severely questioned. The causes of such an accident have to be clarified not only technical points but also organizational points, and it is extremely important to make efforts in preventing recurrence, to fulfill emergency plan and to improve the safety of whole nuclear fuel cycle for restoring the reliability by the people to nuclear energy system. The fields of conducting safety research are engineering safety research on reactor facilities and nuclear fuel cycle facilities including research on radioactive waste processing and disposal and research and development on future technology for safety improvement. Also, multinational cooperation and bilateral cooperation are promoted in international research organizations in the center to internationally share the recognition of world-common issues of nuclear safety and to attain efficient promotion of research and effective utilization of research resources. (author)

  19. Nuclear safety research in HGF 2011

    Tromm, Walter

    2012-01-01

    After the events at the Japanese nuclear power plant of Fukushima Daiichi, the German federal government decided that Germany will give up electricity generation from nuclear power within a decade. The last reactor will be disconnected from the power grid in 2022. Helping to make this opt-out as safe as possible is one of the duties of the Helmholtz Association with its Nuclear Safety Research Program within the Energy Research Area. Also the demolition of nuclear power plants and the repository problem will keep society, and thus also research, busy for a number of decades to come. Giving up electricity production from nuclear power thus must not mean giving up the required nuclear technology competences. In the fields of reactor safety, demolition, final storage, radiation protection, and crisis management, in critical support of international developments, and for competent evaluation of nuclear facilities around Germany, these competences will be in demand far beyond the German opt-out. This is the reason why the final report by the Ethics Committee on 'Safe Energy Supply' emphasizes the importance of nuclear technology research. Close cooperation on national, European and international levels is indispensable in this effort. Also nuclear safety research in the Helmholtz Association is aligned with the challenges posed by the opt-out of the use of nuclear power. It is important that the high competences in the areas of plant safety and demolition, handling of radioactive waste, and safe final storage as well as radiation protection be preserved. The Nuclear Safety Research Program within the Energy Research Area of the Helmholtz Association therefore will continue studying scientific and technical aspects of the safety of nuclear reactors and the safety of nuclear waste management. These research activities are provident research conducted for society and must be preserved for a long period of time. The work is closely harmonized with the activities of the

  20. Application of the accident consequences model of the German risk study to assessments of accident risks in different types of nuclear power plants

    Ehrhardt, J.; Bayer, A.

    1982-01-01

    Within the scope of the 'German Risk Study for Nuclear Power Plants' (Phase A) the accident consequence model UFOMOD was developed in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. This model originally developed for pressurized water reactors has now been extended in order to obtain results about accidental releases of activity from fast breeder and high-temperature reactors, too. (RW) [de

  1. Report on the IAEA coordinated research program on the measurement and evaluation of transactinium isotope nuclear decay data

    Reich, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    As one result of the First IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Isotope Nuclear Data, held in November 1975 at Karlsruhe, an IAEA Coordinated Research Program was set up to address certain identified actinide-isotope decay-data needs in reactor technology. At present, laboratories from five nations are involved in this effort. This paper gives an overview of this program, including its origin and the present status of the measurements being carried out. The current status of the actinide-nuclide half-life, spontaneous-fission branching ratio, α-intensity and γ-intensity data of concern to the Coordinated Research Program is presented and briefly discussed. 3 figures, 9 tables

  2. Progress of nuclear safety research. 2003

    Anoda, Yoshinari; Amagai, Masaki; Tobita, Tohru

    2004-03-01

    JAERI is conducting nuclear safety research primarily at the Nuclear Safety Research Center in close cooperation with the related departments in accordance with the Long Term Plan for Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy and Annual Plan for Safety Research issued by the Japanese government. The fields of conducting safety research at JAERI are the engineering safety of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and radioactive waste management as well as advanced technology for safety improvement or assessment. Also, JAERI has conducted international collaboration to share the information on common global issues of nuclear safety and to supplement own research. Moreover, when accidents occurred at nuclear facilities, JAERI has taken a responsible role by providing technical experts and investigation for assistance to the government or local public body. This report summarizes the nuclear safety research activities of JAERI from April 2001 through March 2003 and utilized facilities. This report also summarizes the examination of the ruptured pipe performed for assistance to the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) for investigation of the accident at the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit-1 on November, 2001, and the integrity evaluation of cracked core shroud of BWRs of the Tokyo Electric Power Company performed for assistance to the Nuclear Safety Commission in reviewing the evaluation reports by the licensees. (author)

  3. Spanish Nuclear Safety Research under International Frameworks

    Herranz, L. E.; Reventos, F.; Ahnert, C.; Jimenez, G.; Queral, C.; Verdu, G.; Miro, R.; Gallardo, S.

    2013-10-01

    The Nuclear Safety research requires a wide international collaboration of several involved groups. In this sense this paper pretends to show several examples of the Nuclear Safety research under international frameworks that is being performed in different Universities and Research Institutions like CIEMAT, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM) and Universitat Politenica de Valencia (UPV). (Author)

  4. Progress of nuclear safety research, 1990

    1990-07-01

    Since the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) was founded as a nonprofit, general research and development organization for the peaceful use of nuclear energy, it has actively pursued the research and development of nuclear energy. Nuclear energy is the primary source of energy in Japan where energy resources are scarce. The safety research is recognized at JAERI as one of the important issues to be clarified, and the safety research on nuclear power generation, nuclear fuel cycle, waste management and environmental safety has been conducted systematically since 1973. As of the end of 1989, 38 reactors were in operation in Japan, and the nuclear electric power generated in 1988 reached 29 % of the total electric power generated. 50 years have passed since nuclear fission was discovered in 1939. The objective of the safety research at JAERI is to earn public support and trust for the use of nuclear energy. The overview of the safety research at JAERI, fuel behavior, reliability of reactor structures and components, reactor thermal-hydraulics during LOCA, safety assessment of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, radioactive waste management and environmental radioactivity are reported. (K.I.)

  5. Scientists from all over the world attend the 2007 - Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School on Nuclear Reactors, ''Physics, Fuels and Systems''

    Fischer, U.; Sanchez-Espinoza, V.H.

    2007-01-01

    For more than ten years, the Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School has been organized alternately by the Karlsruhe Research Center in Germany and the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Cadarache, in France. This year, the Summer School was held at the Center for Advanced Training in Technology and the Environment of the Karlsruhe Research Center on August 29 to September 7. The overarching topic of the event was the sustainability of nuclear power, including topical issues of generation-IV reactor concepts, transmutation and actinide separation, and geologic final storage. Next year's Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School will be organized by CEA at Aix-en-Provence together with the Nuclear Safety Research Program of the Karlsruhe Research Center. (orig.)

  6. Research for nuclear power. A Swiss perspective

    Foskolos, K.; Yadigaroglu, G.; Chawla, R.; Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear energy research in Switzerland is concentrated in the Department for Nuclear Energy and Safety Research of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Nuclear research at PSI is structured around three main poles: safety and related operational issues for existing NPPs, nuclear waste management, and safety characteristics of future reactor concepts. Further, global aspects of energy systems are examined with regard to safety, economics and environmental impact. Presently, a total effort of about 200 py/a is invested in the nuclear research. Government funding of nuclear research was relatively stable during recent years, reaching about 35 MCHF/a. External funding of about 15 MCHF/a is expected to remain stable. (R.P.)

  7. Review on transactinium isotope build-up and decay in reactor fuel and related sensitivities to cross section changes and results and main conclusions of the IAEA-Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Nuclear Data, held at Karlsruhe, November 1975

    Kuesters, H.; Lalovic, M.

    1976-04-01

    In this report a review is given on the actinium isotope build-up and decay in LWRs, LMFBRs and HTRs. The dependence of the corresponding physical aspects on reactor type, fuel cycle strategy, calculational methods and cross section uncertainties is discussed. Results from postirradiation analyses and from integral experiments in fast zero power assemblies are compared with theoretical predictions. Some sensitivity studies about the influence of actinium nuclear data uncertainties on the isotopic concentration, decay heat, and the radiation out-put in fuel and waste are presented. In a second part, the main results of the IAEA-Advisory Group Meeting on Transactinium Nuclear Data are summarized and discussed. (orig.) [de

  8. Research nuclear reactor operation management

    Preda, M.; Carabulea, A.

    2008-01-01

    Some aspects of reactor operation management are highlighted. The main mission of the operational staff at a testing reactor is to operate it safely and efficiently, to ensure proper conditions for different research programs implying the use of the reactor. For reaching this aim, there were settled down operating plans for every objective, and procedure and working instructions for staff training were established, both for the start-up and for the safe operation of the reactor. Damages during operation or special situations which can arise, at stop, start-up, maintenance procedures were thoroughly considered. While the technical skill is considered to be the most important quality of the staff, the organising capacity is a must in the operation of any nuclear facility. Staff training aims at gaining both theoretical and practical experience based on standards about staff quality at each work level. 'Plow' sheet has to be carefully done, setting clear the decision responsibility for each person so that everyone's own technical level to be coupled to the problems which implies his responsibility. Possible events which may arise in operation, e.g., criticality, irradiation, contamination, and which do not arise in other fields, have to be carefully studied. One stresses that the management based on technical and scientific arguments have to cover through technical, economical and nuclear safety requirements a series of interlinked subprograms. Every such subprograms is subject to some peculiar demands by the help of which the entire activity field is coordinated. Hence for any subprogram there are established the objectives to be achieved, the applicable regulations, well-defined responsibilities, training of the personnel involved, the material and documentation basis required and activity planning. The following up of positive or negative responses generated by experiments and the information synthesis close the management scope. Important management aspects

  9. Medical applications in a nuclear research centre

    Vanhavere, F.; Eggermont, G.

    2001-01-01

    In these days of public aversion to nuclear power, it can be important to point at the medical applications of ionising radiation. Not only the general public, but also the authorities and research centres have to be aware of these medical applications, which are not without risk for public health. Now that funding for nuclear research is declining, an opening to the medical world can give new opportunities to a nuclear research centre. A lot of research could be done where the tools developed for the nuclear power world are very useful. Even new applications for the research reactors like BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy) can be envisaged for the near future. In this contribution an overview will be given of the different techniques used in the medical world with ionising radiation. The specific example of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre will be given where the mission statement was changed to include a certain number of medical research topics. (authors)

  10. Progress of nuclear safety research - 2005

    Anoda, Yoshinari; Amaya, Masaki; Saito, Junichi; Sato, Atsushi; Sono, Hiroki; Tamaki, Hitoshi; Tonoike, Kotaro; Nemoto, Yoshiyuki; Motoki, Yasuo; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Yamaguchi, Tetsuji; Araya, Fumimasa

    2006-03-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), one of the predecessors of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), had conducted nuclear safety research primarily at the Nuclear Safety Research Center in close cooperation with the related departments in accordance with the Long Term Plan for Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy and Five-Years Program for Safety Research issued by the Japanese government. The fields of conducting safety research at JAERI were the engineering safety of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and radioactive waste management as well as advanced technology for safety improvement or assessment. Also, JAERI had conducted international collaboration to share the information on common global issues of nuclear safety and to supplement own research. Moreover, when accidents occurred at nuclear facilities, JAERI had taken a responsible role by providing experts in assistance to conducting accident investigations or emergency responses by the government or local government. These nuclear safety research and technical assistance to the government have been taken over as an important role by JAEA. This report summarizes the nuclear safety research activities of JAERI from April 2003 through September 2005 and utilized facilities. (author)

  11. Nuclear reactor safety research in Idaho

    Zeile, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed information about the performance of nuclear reactor systems, and especially about the nuclear fuel, is vital in determining the consequences of a reactor accident. Fission products released from the fuel during accidents are the ultimate safety concern to the general public living in the vicinity of a nuclear reactor plant. Safety research conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has provided the NRC with detailed data relating to most of the postulated nuclear reactor accidents. Engineers and scientists at the INEL are now in the process of gathering data related to the most severe nuclear reactor accident - the core melt accident. This paper describes the focus of the nuclear reactor safety research at the INEL. The key results expected from the severe core damage safety research program are discussed

  12. Progress of nuclear safety research. 2002

    Anoda, Yoshinari; Kudo, Tamotsu; Tobita, Tohru (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] (and others)

    2002-11-01

    JAERI is conducting nuclear safety research primarily at the Nuclear Safety Research Center in close cooperation with the related departments in accordance with the Long Term Plan for Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy and Annual Plan for Safety Research issued by the Japanese government. The fields of conducting safety research at JAERI are the engineering safety of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and radioactive waste management as well as advanced technology for safety improvement or assessment. Also, JAERI has conducted international collaboration to share the information on common global issues of nuclear safety and to supplement own research. Moreover, when accidents occurred at nuclear facilities, JAERI has taken a responsible role by providing technical experts and investigation for assistance to the government or local public body. This report summarizes the nuclear safety research activities of JAERI from April 2000 through April 2002 and utilized facilities. This report also summarizes the examination of the ruptured pipe performed for assistance to the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) for investigation of the accident at the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit-1 on November, 2001. (author)

  13. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    Udagawa, Takeshi.

    1990-10-01

    The work done during the past year or so may be divided into three separate areas, low energy nuclear reactions, intermediate energy physics and nuclear structure studies. In this paper, we shall separately summarize our achievements made in these three areas

  14. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    1990-06-01

    We shall organize the description of our many activities under following broad headings: Strong Interaction Physics: the physics of hadrons; QCD and the nucleus; and QCD at finite temperature and high density. Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics. Nuclear Structure and Many-body Theory. Nuclear Astrophysics. While these are the main areas of activity of the Stony Brood group, they do not cover all activities

  15. Termination of past nuclear activities at the nuclear research institute

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2006-01-01

    Many countries, particularly in Europe, started with nuclear programs in the fifties of the last century. As a consequence nuclear research institutes were established, among them also the Institute Jozef Stefan (IJS) in Slovenia. The nuclear activities at the IJS were related to the development of uranium ore processing technology and technologies comprising uranium oxide and hexafluoride. After very intensive period of nuclear activities the decline began step by step due to different reasons. Various approaches of the termination and decommissioning of facilities were used. The inspectors of the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA), the responsible authority, started intensive activities at the IJS at the end of 2004. All together 22 research laboratories or research units were included in the inspection program and around 50 researchers of the IJS were involved into the inspection procedures. The inspection was very intensive in the laboratories and storages where past nuclear activities took place and were later on abandoned. As a result several contaminated equipments and sites in addition to around 200 unregistered sources were found. The majority of these sources is related to past nuclear activities. The inspection program related to the terminated research activities is still in progress. The IJS immediately started with the remediation activities including the development of methodology related to decontamination of radioactive liquids. The decontamination of two nuclear laboratories and three different storages of radioactive waste at its sites is in progress. Sixty of the above mentioned sources have been already stored in the Central Interim Storage for Radioactive Waste. (author)

  16. Scientists from all over the world attend the 2007 - Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School on Nuclear Reactors, 'Physics, Fuels and Systems'; Wissenschaftler aus aller Welt bei der 2007 Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School on Nuclear Reactors 'Physics, Fuels and Systems'

    Fischer, U.; Sanchez-Espinoza, V.H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Reaktorsicherheit

    2007-12-15

    For more than ten years, the Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School has been organized alternately by the Karlsruhe Research Center in Germany and the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Cadarache, in France. This year, the Summer School was held at the Center for Advanced Training in Technology and the Environment of the Karlsruhe Research Center on August 29 to September 7. The overarching topic of the event was the sustainability of nuclear power, including topical issues of generation-IV reactor concepts, transmutation and actinide separation, and geologic final storage. Next year's Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School will be organized by CEA at Aix-en-Provence together with the Nuclear Safety Research Program of the Karlsruhe Research Center. (orig.)

  17. Coordinating Space Nuclear Research Advancement and Education

    Bess, John D.; Webb, Jonathon A.; Gross, Brian J.; Craft, Aaron E.

    2009-01-01

    The advancement of space exploration using nuclear science and technology has been a goal sought by many individuals over the years. The quest to enable space nuclear applications has experienced many challenges such as funding restrictions; lack of political, corporate, or public support; and limitations in educational opportunities. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) was established at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with the mission to address the numerous challenges and opportunities relevant to the promotion of space nuclear research and education.1 The CSNR is operated by the Universities Space Research Association and its activities are overseen by a Science Council comprised of various representatives from academic and professional entities with space nuclear experience. Program participants in the CSNR include academic researchers and students, government representatives, and representatives from industrial and corporate entities. Space nuclear educational opportunities have traditionally been limited to various sponsored research projects through government agencies or industrial partners, and dedicated research centers. Centralized research opportunities are vital to the growth and development of space nuclear advancement. Coordinated and focused research plays a key role in developing the future leaders in the space nuclear field. The CSNR strives to synchronize research efforts and provide means to train and educate students with skills to help them excel as leaders.

  18. Problems with the disposal of run-out high-activity fission product solution in the Hot Cells of Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    Schreibmaier, J.

    1979-05-01

    During decanting of 50 l high-level radioactive waste (120 Ci/l) from a transport container about 1 l HAW leaked to the floor of the transfer chamber. The causes for the incident and the removal of the consequences are described. The costs incurred and the losses resulting from the cell facility not having been used are said to amount to 6-8 million DM. Decontamination and repair work took more than 18 months, sometimes more than 80 persons were occupied. The radiation exposure of all persons involved amounted to 80 man-rem. (HP) [de

  19. Safety problems encountered in construction and operation of the sodium test facilities of the Institute of Reactor Development (IRD) at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    Schleisiek, K.

    1971-01-01

    In this report the safety aspects of the design and construction of a sodium boiling loop and a sodium tank test facility are discussed. Subsequently two experiments concerning the safety of the facilities are described: the testing of a drip basin to collect the sodium and to limit the rate of burning in the case of a leak, and the investigation of the chemical reaction of sodium with the insulating materials. Finally some general emergency procedures in the case of sodium incidents are discussed. A 16 mm-film demonstrating sodium fires and fire fighting methods will be shown. (author)

  20. PSI nuclear energy research progress report 1988

    Alder, H.P.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1989-07-01

    The progress report at hand deals with nuclear energy research at PSI. The collection of articles covers a large number of topics: different reactor systems, part of the fuel cycle, the behaviour of structural materials. Examples of the state of knowledege in different disciplines are given: reactor physics, thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, fracture mechanics, instrumental analysis, mathematical modelling. The purpose of this collection is to give a fair account of nuclear energy research at PSI. It should demonstrate that nuclear energy research is a central activity also in the new institute, the scientific basis for the continuing exploitation of nuclear power in Switzerland is preserved, work has continued not only along established lines but also new research topics were tackled, the quality of work corresponds to international standards and in selected areas is in the forefront, the expertise acquired also finds applications in non-nuclear research tasks. (author) 92 figs., 18 tabs., 316 refs

  1. An overview of nuclear physics research

    Kapoor, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    This overview is aimed to give a general picture of the global developments in nuclear physics research over the years since the beginning. It is based on the inaugural talk given at the 54th annual nuclear physics symposium organized by the Department of Atomic Energy, which was held as an International Symposium at BARC, Mumbai during Dec 8-12, 2009. The topics of nuclear fission, nuclear shell effects, super-heavy nuclei, and expanding frontiers of nuclear physics research with the medium to ultra-relativistic energy heavy-ion reactions are in particular highlighted. Accelerator driven sub-critical reactor system (ADS) is briefly described in the end as an example of spin-off of nuclear physics research. (author)

  2. Nuclear data and low energy nuclear research in Israel

    Yiftah, S.

    1977-04-01

    The Israel Nuclear Data and Low Energy Nuclear Research relevant to the International Nuclear Data Committee was continued in various institutions. The major experimental facilities consist of: A 5 Megawatt swimming pool enriched uranium reactor at the Soreq Nuclear Research Centre; A 26 Megawatt heavy water tank-type natural uranium reactor at the Negev Research Centre; A 6-million volt EN tandem accelerator at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot; The new most modern high energy 14 UD pelletron accelerator manufactured by the National Electrostatic Corporation of Middleton, Wisconsin, installed inside the Koffler Accelerator Tower at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot. Brief abstracts of the research work, both published and unpublished, listed according to the various laboratories, are reported in the following pages. (author)

  3. Nuclear safety research in HGF 2012; Fortschrittsbericht 2012. Programm 'Nukleare Sicherheitsforschung' Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft

    Anon.

    2013-06-15

    in the Nuclear Competence Association. The Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, HZDR Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the KIT Karlsruhe Institute of Technology are involved in the Nuclear Safety Research Program within the Helmholtz Association. The work and results in 2012 are presented. (orig.)

  4. Nuclear Capacity Building through Research Reactors

    2017-01-01

    Four Instruments: •The IAEA has recently developed a specific scheme of services for Nuclear Capacity Building in support of the Member States cooperating research reactors (RR) willing to use RRs as a primary facility to develop nuclear competences as a supporting step to embark into a national nuclear programme. •The scheme is composed of four complementary instruments, each of them being targeted to specific objective and audience: Distance Training: Internet Reactor Laboratory (IRL); Basic Training: Regional Research Reactor Schools; Intermediate Training: East European Research Reactor Initiative (EERRI); Group Fellowship Course Advanced Training: International Centres based on Research Reactors (ICERR)

  5. Nuclear data and low energy nuclear research in Israel

    Yiftah, S.

    1978-07-01

    The Israel Nuclear Data and Low Energy Nuclear Research relevant to the International Nuclear Data Committee was continued in the various institutions listed in previous Progress Reports (LS-270 for 1976). The latest major experimental facility, the 14 UD pelletron, was installed in the Koffler Accelerator Tower at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, and accepted on April 1st 1977. A report in Revue de Physique Appliquee of October 1977 including a description of the facility, acceptance performance, as well as some supplementary devices, is reproduced in the beginning of this report. Brief abstracts of the research work, both published and unpublished, are presented. (author)

  6. Nuclear Fusion Fuel Cycle Research Perspectives

    Chung, Hongsuk; Koo, Daeseo; Park, Jongcheol; Kim, Yeanjin; Yun, Sei-Hun

    2015-01-01

    As a part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project, we at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and our National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) colleagues are investigating nuclear fusion fuel cycle hardware including a nuclear fusion fuel Storage and Delivery System (SDS). To have a better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we present our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). To have better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we presented our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). Our efforts to enhance the tritium confinement will be continued for the development of cleaner nuclear fusion power plants

  7. Computer aided operation of the Karlsruhe isochronous cyclotron using CAMAC

    Kappel, W.; Karbstein, W.; Kneis, W.; Moellenbeck, J.; Schweickert, H.; Volk, B.

    1976-01-01

    An extensive branch system is used with a NOVA 2/10 computer as an aid to the operation of the Karlsruhe Isochronous Cyclotron. The accelerator operator calls the different tasks by an interactive program system ''CICERO'' under BASIC. CAMAC operations are called by means of the ordinary BASIC Call mechanism through assembler routines

  8. Karlsruhe: En route to a superconducting r.f. separator

    1973-01-01

    A superconducting r.f. separator is under construction at Karlsruhe for use at the SPS in the beam-line to the Omega spectrometer. Tests on a section of the first 3 m deflector have given results close to the desired parameters.

  9. Nuclear Research Institute Rez view

    Biza, K.; Pazdera, F.; Vasa, I.; Zdarek, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with the present state and perspectives of nuclear energy in the Czech Republic and in the Slovak Republic. It is concluded that lifetime extension and finalization of Mochovce NPP Units 3 and 4 is the cheapest solution for base load production of electricity and is in line with the European union energy challenges: - decrease of carbon dioxide emissions; dependence on energy sources from politically unstable regions; decrease import dependence on energy sources. Nuclear energy is one of important sources for long term sustainability in energy. GEN IV is successful with meet the new requirements after 2025. We should participate on this long term development effort

  10. Nuclear Research Centre of Maamora Morocco

    Marfak, T.; Boufraqech, A.

    2010-01-01

    Morocco has a long and rich history in nuclear technology which began in the 1950s with the development of nuclear techniques in several important socio-economic fields such as medicine, agriculture and industrial applications. The development of nuclear technology evolved over various organizations, primarily within the Ministry of Education. However, with the formation of the National Centre for Nuclear Energy and Technology (CNESTEN) the development of nuclear technology in Morocco has been reinforced. Morocco is looking forward and actively pursuing alternative sources of energy and has a very strong interest in nuclear power generation and associated technologies such as nuclear desalination. Entry into these new technologies is required since there are no natural sources of energy, Morocco currently imports most of its energy needs from abroad and has a rapidly expanding energy need. In this paper, we present CNESTEN and its main facilities, missions, research programmes, human resources, training, education, national and international cooperation, etc

  11. Central Institute for Nuclear Research (1956 - 1979)

    Flach, G.; Bonitz, M.

    1979-12-01

    The Central Institute for Nuclear Research (ZfK) of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR is presented. This first overall survey covers the development of the ZfK since 1956, the main research activities and results, a description of the departments responsible for the complex implementation of nuclear research, the social services for staff and the activities of different organizations in the largest central institute of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR. (author)

  12. Nuclear reactor instrumentation at research reactor renewal

    Baers, B.; Pellionisz, P.

    1981-10-01

    The paper overviews the state-of-the-art of research reactor renewals. As a case study the instrumentation reconstruction of the Finnish 250 kW TRIGA reactor is described, with particular emphasis on the nuclear control instrumentation and equipment which has been developed and manufactured by the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest. Beside the presentation of the nuclear instrument family developed primarily for research reactor reconstructions, the quality assurance policy conducted during the manufacturing process is also discussed. (author)

  13. Safety-related LWR research. Annual report 1993

    Hueper, R.

    1994-06-01

    The reactor safety R and D work of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre (KfK) has been part of the Nuclear Safety Research Project (PSF) since 1990. The present annual report 1993 summarizes the results on LWR safety. The research tasks are coordinated in agreement with internal and external working groups. The contributions to this report correspond to the status at the end of 1993. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Research of nuclear fragmentation characteristics

    Richert, J.

    1989-01-01

    Motivations for the study of nuclear fragmentation are presented. Different models and methods which were developed in the past are reviewed, critically discussed and confronted in connection with the experimental information gathered over the past years. Specific aspects related to the onset of the process, its characteristics and the mechanism which governs it are discussed [fr

  15. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    Liu, Keh-Fei.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses: the role of nuclear binding in EMC effect; skyrmion quantization and phenomenology; lattice gauge Monte Carlo calculations; identification of tensor glueball; evidence of mesoniums in bar pm annihilation and γγ reactions; Skyrme-Landau parameterization of effective NN interactions; and quark-gluon plamsa

  16. Nuclear Physics Research at ELI-NP

    Zamfir, N. V.

    2018-05-01

    The new research facility Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is under construction in Romania, on the Magurele Physics campus. Valued more than 300 Meuros the center will be operational in 2019. The research center will use a high brilliance Gamma Beam and a High-power Laser beam, with unprecedented characteristics worldwide, to investigate the interaction of very intense radiation with matter with specific focus on nuclear phenomena and their applications. The energetic particle beams and radiation produced by the 2x10 PW laser beam interacting with matter will be studied. The precisely tunable energy and excellent bandwidth of the gamma-ray beam will allow for new experimental approaches regarding nuclear astrophysics, nuclear resonance fluorescence, and applications. The experimental equipment is presented, together with the main directions of the research envisioned with special emphasizes on nuclear physics studies.

  17. PSI nuclear energy research progress report 1989

    Alder, H.P.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    This report gives on overview on the PSI's nuclear energy research in the field of reactor physics and systems, thermal-hydraulics, materials technology and nuclear processes, waste management program and LWR safety program. It contains also papers dealing with reactor safety, high temperature materials, decontamination, radioactive waste management and materials testing. 74 figs., 20 tabs., 256 refs

  18. Nuclear research with heavy ions

    Kaplan, M.

    1991-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Asymmetric fission of 149 Tb* from the finite-range, rotating-liquid-drop model: mean total kinetic energies for binary fragmentation; charged-particle evaporation from hot composite nuclei: evidence over a broad Z range for distortions from cold nuclear profiles; the role of reversed kinematics and double kinematic solutions in nuclear reactions studies; production of intermediate-mass-fragments in the reaction 98 Mo + 51 V at an excitation energy E* = 224-MeV; emission of light charged particles in the reaction 344-MeV 28 Si + 121 Sb; continued developments of the statistical evaporation code LILITA N90; and planning for heavy-ion-collision studies at very high energies: the STAR collaboration at RHIC

  19. Progress of nuclear safety research, (1)

    Amano, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Hiroei; Nozawa, Masao

    1981-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute was established in 1956 in conformity with the national policy to extensively conduct the research associated with nuclear energy. Since then, the research on nuclear energy safety has been conducted. In 1978, the Division of Reactor Safety was organized to conduct the large research programs with large scale test facilities. Thereafter, the Divisions of Reactor Safety Evaluation, Environmental Safety Research and Reactor Fuel Examination were organized successively in the Reactor Safety Research Center. The subjects of research have ranged from the safety of nuclear reactors to that in the recycling of nuclear fuel. In this pamphlet, the activities in JAERI associated with the safety research are reported, which have been carried out in the past two years. Also, the international cooperation research program in which JAERI participated is included. This pamphlet consists of two parts, and in this Part 1, the reactor safety research is described. The safety of nuclear fuel, the integrity and safety of pressure boundary components, the engineered safety in LOCA, fuel behavior in accident and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  20. Nuclear technology in research and everyday life

    2015-12-01

    The paper.. discusses the impact of nuclear technology in research and everyday life covering the following issues: miniaturization of memory devices, neutron radiography in material science, nuclear reactions in the universe, sterilization of food, medical applies, cosmetics and packaging materials using beta and gamma radiation, neutron imaging for radioactive waste analysis, microbial transformation of uranium (geobacter uraniireducens), nuclear technology knowledge preservation, spacecrafts voyager 1 and 2, future fusion power plants, prompt gamma activation analysis in archeology, radiation protection and radioecology and nuclear medicine (radiotherapy).

  1. Planning and implementation of nuclear research programmes

    Lopes, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The planning and implementation of nuclear research programmes in developed and developing countries is discussed. The main aspects of these programmes in USA, France, Japan, India and Brazil are reported. (M.W.O.) [pt

  2. Final report on research and development work 1979 by the Institute for Radiochemistry

    1980-02-01

    The report gives a brief survey of the state of the research, development, and service activities in the Institute for Radiochemistry in Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre. The work is to be classified in the main points analytics, nuclear chemistry, isotope service, and water chemistry, with the analytic and nuclear-chemical tasks being mainly project-related. A bibliography of the publications made by the staff of the institute during 1979 is annected. (RB) [de

  3. EARTHQUAKE RESEARCH PROBLEMS OF NUCLEAR POWER GENERATORS

    Housner, G. W.; Hudson, D. E.

    1963-10-15

    Earthquake problems associated with the construction of nuclear power generators require a more extensive and a more precise knowledge of earthquake characteristics and the dynamic behavior of structures than was considered necessary for ordinary buildings. Economic considerations indicate the desirability of additional research on the problems of earthquakes and nuclear reactors. The nature of these earthquake-resistant design problems is discussed and programs of research are recommended. (auth)

  4. Nuclear Safety Research Department annual report 2000

    Majborn, B.; Nielsen, Sven Poul; Damkjær, A.

    2001-01-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department in 2000. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: "Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety" and "Radioecology andTracer Studies". In addtion the department...

  5. Nuclear Safety Research Department annual report 2001

    Majborn, B.; Damkjær, A.; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2002-01-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department in 2001. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: "Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety" and "Radioecology andTracer Studies". In addition the department...

  6. Medium energy nuclear physics research

    Peterson, G.A.; Dubach, J.F.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    The University of Massachusetts (UMass) Nuclear Physics Program continues to concentrate upon the use of the electromagnetic interaction in a joint experimental and theoretical approach to the study of nucleon and nuclear properties. During the past year the activities of the group involved data analysis, design and construction of equipment, planning for new experiments, completion of papers and review articles for publication, writing of proposals for experiments, but very little actual data acquisition. Section II.A. described experiments at Bates Linear Accelerator Center. They include the following: electrodisintegration of deuteron; measurement of the elastic magnetic form factor of 3 He; coincidence measurement of the D(e,e'p) cross section; transverse form factors of 117 Sn; ground state magnetization density of 89 Y; and measurement of the 5th structure function in deuterium and 12 C. Section II.B. includes the following experiments at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center: deuteron threshold electrodisintegration; separation of charge and magnetic form factors of the neutron and proton; measurement of the X-, Q 2 , and A-dependence of R = σ L /σ T ; and analysis of 14.5 GeV electrons and positions scattered from gases in the PEP Storage Ring. Section III.C. includes the following experiments at NIKHEF and Lund: complementary studies of single-nucleon knockout and single-nucleon wave functions using electromagnetic interactions and single-particle densities of sd-shell nuclei. Section II.D. discusses preparations for future work at CEBAF: electronics for the CLAS region 1 drift chamber Section III. includes theoretical work on parity-violating electron scattering and nuclear structure

  7. Nuclear methods in coal research

    Lyon, W.S.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear methods, particularly neutron activation analysis (NAA) provide useful information about elemental constituents in coal and fly ash, but often other techniques are required to supplement NAA data. Spark source mass spectrometry and atomic absorption have been studied as methods for determination of certain elements in coal that are not easily measured by NAA. In work concerned with the chemical speciation of elements in fly ash, a number of analytical techniques have been used; these include NAA, chemical etching and separation, optical and electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction

  8. Information for nuclear medicine researchers and practitioners

    Bartlett, W.

    1987-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has a major research program in nuclear medicine; this article describes the information support given to the program by the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories (LHRL) Library. The INIS database is a prime indicator of the information held at LHRL Library, however, other databases also cover nuclear medicine. As part of the Australian library system the ANSTO Library's resources are accessed by subscription. The ANSTO Library staff can also search INIS for a fee for external enquiries but the other databases can presently only be searched for LHRL staff and affiliates. Even so, most major library and information services can provide access to these databases

  9. Preparation fo nuclear research reactors operators

    Roedel, G.

    1986-01-01

    The experience obtained with the training of operators of nuclear research reactors is presented. The main tool used in the experiments is the IPR-R1 reactor, a TRIGA MARK I type, owned by Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN) of NUCLEBRAS. The structures of the Research Reactors Operators Training Course and of the Radiological Protection Course, as well as the Operators Qualifying and Requalifying Program, all of them prepared at CDTN are also presented. Mention is made of the application of similar experiments to other groups, such as students coming from Nuclear Sciences and Techniques Course of the Federal University of Minas Gerais. (Author) [pt

  10. Preparation of nuclear research reactors operators

    Roedel, G.

    1986-01-01

    The experience obtained with the training of operators of nuclear research reactors is presented. The main tool used in the experiments is the IPR-R1 reactor, a TRIGA MARK I type, owned by Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN) of NUCLEBRAS. The structures of the Research Reactors Operators Training Course and of the Radiological Protection Course, as well as the Operators Qualifying and Requalifying Program, all of them prepared at CDTN, are also presented. Mention is made of the application of similar experiments to other groups, such as students coming from Nuclear Sciences and Techniques Course of the Federal University of Minas Gerais. (Author) [pt

  11. Nuclear research with heavy ions

    Kaplan, M.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics; studies of light-charged-particle emission from fission and er reactions in the system 344-MeV 28 Si+ 121 Sb → 149 Tb; the role of reversed kinematics and double kinematic solutions in nuclear reactions studies; improvements in interactive data analysis and graphical representations; studies of the reaction 856-MeV 98 Mo + 51 V→ 149 Tb(E*=224-MeV): emission of intermediate-mass fragments; particle-particle correlations in compound nucleus reactions: preliminary consideration of lifetime estimates from small angle data; light particle emission studies using a new scintillator array; statistical evaporation calculations: developments with the computer codes LILITA-N90 and CASCADE; star collaboration studies: simulations for the conceptual design of the STAR detector system at RHIC; asymmetric fission of 149Tb* from the finite-range, rotating-liquid-drop model: mean total kinetic energies for binary fragmentation; and charged-particle evaporation from hot composite nuclei: evidence over a broad z range for distortions from cold nuclear profiles

  12. Nuclear fusion research in Australia

    Cheetham, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the recently formed National Plasma Fusion Research Facility centred around the H-1NF Heliac, located at the Australian National University, the Institute of Advanced Studies is described in the context of the international Stellarator program and the national collaboration with the Australian Fusion Research Group. The objectives of the facility and the planned physics research program over the next five years are discussed and some recent results will be presented. The facility will support investigations in the following research areas: finite pressure equilibrium and stability, transport in high temperature plasmas, plasma heating and formation, instabilities and turbulence, edge plasma physics and advanced diagnostic development

  13. Summaries of FY 1978 research in nuclear physics

    1978-12-01

    Programs funded in Fiscal Year 1978 by the Division of Nuclear Physics Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, U.S. Department of Energy are briefly summarized. Long-range goals and major objectives of nuclear physics are stated. Research projects are listed alphabetically by institution under the following headings: medium-energy nuclear physics--research; medium-energy nuclear physics--operations; heavy-ion nuclear physics--research; heavy-ion nuclear physics--operations; and nuclear theory. (RWR)

  14. Activation Analysis and Nuclear Research in Burma

    Thiele, R. W.

    1971-07-01

    Research endeavours in the field of Nuclear Sciences in Burma appear to be concentrated in three main Institutions. These are the Chemistry and Physics Departments of the Rangoon Arts & Science University and the Union of Burma Applied Research Institute (UBARI). In view of possible forthcoming developments an expanded research programme, which is to be implemented on the basis of a five year plan, has been drawn up. Research topics included in this programme are predominantly of practical interest and aimed at a contribution by nuclear methods, in particular activation analysis, to the technological and industrial needs of the country.

  15. Research method of nuclear patent information

    Mo Dan; Gao An'na; Sun Chenglin; Wang Lei; You Xinfeng

    2010-01-01

    When faced with a huge amount of nuclear patent information, the key to effective research include: (1) Choose convenient way to search, quick access to nuclear technology related patents; (2) To overcome the language barrier, analysis the technical content of patent information; (3) Organize the publication date of retrieved patent documents, analysis the status and trends of nuclear technology development; (4) Research the patented technology of main applicants; (5) Always pay attention to the legal status of patent information, free use the invalid patents, at the same time avoid the patent infringement. Summary, patent information is important to obtain the latest technical information source, and the research work of patent information is a comprehensive understanding and mastery way for advanced nuclear technology. (authors)

  16. Progress of nuclear safety research, (2)

    Amano, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Hiroei; Nozawa, Masao

    1981-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute was established in 1956 in conformity with the national policy to extensively conduct the research associated with nuclear energy. Since then, the research on nuclear energy safety has been conducted. In 1978, the Division of Reactor Safety was organized to conduct the large research programs with large scale test facilities. Thereafter, the Divisions of Reactor Safety Evaluation, Environmental Safety Research and Reactor Fuel Examination were organized successevely in the Reactor Safety Research Center. The subjects of research have ranged from the safety of nuclear reactors to that in the recycling of nuclear fuel. In this pamphlet, the activities in JAERI associated with the safety research are reported, which have been carried out in the past two years. Also the international cooperation research program in which JAERI participated is included. This pamphlet consists of two parts and in this Part 2, the environmental safety research is described. The evaluation and analysis of environmental radioactivity, the study on radioactive waste management and the studies on various subjects related to environmental safety are reported. (Kako, I.)

  17. Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    Weiss, A.J.; Azarm, A.; Baum, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through September 30, 1988

  18. Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety

    Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of

  19. Japan's contribution to nuclear medical research

    Rahman, M.; Sakamoto, Junichi; Fukui, Tsuguya

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the degree of Japan's contribution to the nuclear medical research in the last decade. Articles published in 1991-2000 in highly reputed nuclear medical journals were accessed through the MEDLINE database. The number of articles having affiliation with a Japanese institution was counted along with publication year. In addition, shares of top-ranking countries were determined along with their trends over time. Of the total number of articles (7,788), Japan's share of articles in selected nuclear medical journals was 11.4% (889 articles) and ranked 2nd in the world after the USA (2,645 articles). The recent increase in the share was statistically significant for Japan (p=0.02, test for trend). Japan's share in nuclear medical research output is much higher than that in other biomedical fields. (author)

  20. Focus on nuclear fusion research

    Křenek, Petr; Mlynář, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 61, - (2011), s. 62-63 ISSN 0375-8842 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : ITER * COMPASS * fusion energy * tokamak * EURATOM Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.ipp.cas.cz/Tokamak/clanky/energetika_COMPASS.pdf

  1. Nuclear medicine. Medical technology research

    Lerch, H.; Jigalin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Aim, method: the scientific publications in the 2003 and 2004 issues of the journal Nuklearmedizin were analyzed retrospectively with regard to the proportion of medical technology research. Results: out of a total of 73 articles examined, 9 (12%) were classified as medical technology research, that is, 8/15 of the original papers (16%) and one of the case reports (5%). Of these 9 articles, 44% (4/9) focused on the combination of molecular and morphological imaging with direct technical appliance or information technology solutions. Conclusion: medical technology research is limited in the journal's catchment area. The reason for this is related to the interdependency between divergent development dynamics in the medical technology industry's locations, the many years that the area of scintigraphic technology has been underrepresented, research policy particularly in discrepancies in the promotion of molecular imaging and a policy in which health is not perceived as a predominantly good and positive economic factor, but more as a curb to economic development. (orig.)

  2. The situation of nuclear research in Brazil

    Alves, R.N.

    1989-04-01

    In order to understand the nuclear research situation in Brazil, one must examine the historical facts and their political, economical and social dimensions. In the first part of this work, the international aspects of the nuclear area and the corresponding measures adopted in Brazil are examined. The reasons that caused the country to adopt the current development model are presented. A proposal that will permit Brazil to develop and use nuclear energy in the way it wants and not as it might be imposed is presented. 4 tabs

  3. Second Karlsruhe international conference on analytical chemistry in nuclear technology

    1989-01-01

    Around 180 abstracts of invited lectures and poster presentations of the international analytical conference are presented in this book. They cover analytical applications throughout the fuel cycle and radioanalysis of manifold materials. Most of the abstracts are prepared separately for input in INIS and EDB. (RB)

  4. Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal. Annual Report 2009

    Geckeis, H.; Stumpf, T.

    2010-01-01

    On October 01, 2009, the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) was founded by a merger of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and Universitaet Karlsruhe (TH). KIT bundles the missions of both precursory institutions: a university of the state of Baden- Wuerttemberg with teaching and research tasks and a large-scale research institution of the Helmholtz Association conducting program-oriented provident research on behalf of the Federal Republic of Germany. Within these missions, KIT is operating along the three strategic fields of action, research, teaching, and innovation. With about 8000 employees and an annual budget of about EUR 700 million, KIT is one of the largest research and teaching institutions worldwide. It has the potential to assume a top position worldwide in selected fields of research. The objective: KIT will become an institution of excellent research and scientific education, as well as a prominent location of academic life, life-long learning, comprehensive advanced training, unrestricted exchange of know-how and sustainable innovation culture. The largest organizational units of KIT are the KIT Centers. They focus on problems of fundamental importance to the existence and further development of our society or on key issues of basic science. KIT Centers are characterized by the uniqueness of their scientific approach, their strategic objective and mission and by a long-term perspective. The Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, INE, (Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal) belongs to the KIT Energy Center. The KIT Energy Center comprises some 40 institutes of the Universitaet Karlsruhe (TH) and 18 large institutes of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with, at present, a total of approx. 1100 staff members. The participating institutes and research groups are the operating research units. An interdisciplinary KIT School of Energy establishes ideal framework conditions for teaching. For external partners from industry, the KIT Center develops solutions in

  5. Medium energy nuclear physics research

    Peterson, G.A.; Dubach, J.F.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    The UMass group has concentrated on using electromagnetic probes, particularly the electron in high-energy scattering experiments at the Stanford Liner Accelerator Center (SLAC). Plans are also being made for high energy work at the Continuous Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The properties of this accelerator should permit a whole new class of coincidence experiments to be carried out. At SLAC UMass has made major contributions toward the plans for a cluster-jet gas target and detector system at the 16 GeV PEP storage ring. For the future CEBAF accelerator, tests were made of the feasibility of operating wire drift chambers in the vicinity of a continuous electron beam at the University Illinois microtron. At the same time a program of studies of the nuclear structure of more complex nuclei has been continued at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center and in Amsterdam at the NIKHEF-K laboratory. At the MIT-Bates Accelerator, because of an unforeseen change in beam scheduling as a result of problems with the T 20 experiment, the UMass group was able to complete data acquisition on experiments involving 180 degrees elastic magnetic scattering on 117 Sn and 41 Ca. A considerable effort has been given to preparations for a future experiment at Bates involving the high-resolution threshold electrodisintegration of the deuteron. The use of these chambers should permit a high degree of discrimination against background events in the measurement of the almost neutrino-like small cross sections that are expected. In Amsterdam at the NIKHEF-K facility, single arm (e,e') measurements were made in November of 1987 on 10 B in order to better determine the p 3/2 wave function from the transition from the J pi = 3 + ground state to the O + excited state at 1.74 MeV. In 1988, (e,e'p) coincidence measurements on 10 B were completed. The objective was to obtain information on the p 3/2 wave function by another means

  6. Research program on nuclear technology and nuclear safety

    Dreier, J.

    2010-04-01

    This paper elaborated for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the synthesis report for 2009 made by the SFOE's program leader on the research program concerning nuclear technology and nuclear safety. Work carried out, knowledge gained and results obtained in the various areas are reported on. These include projects carried out in the Laboratory for Reactor Physics and System Behaviour LRS, the LTH Thermohydraulics Laboratory, the Laboratory for Nuclear Materials LNM, the Laboratory for Final Storage Safety LES and the Laboratory for Energy Systems Analysis LEA of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI. Work done in 2009 and results obtained are reported on, including research on transients in Swiss reactors, risk and human reliability. Work on the 'Proteus' research reactor is reported on, as is work done on component safety. International co-operation in the area of serious accidents and the disposal of nuclear wastes is reported on. Future concepts for reactors and plant life management are discussed. The energy business in general is also discussed. Finally, national and international co-operation is noted and work to be done in 2010 is reviewed

  7. Directory of Nuclear Research Reactors 1994

    1995-08-01

    The Directory of Nuclear Research Reactors is an output of the Agency's computerized Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB). It contains administrative, technical and utilization information on research reactors known to the Agency at the end of December 1994. The data base converted from mainframe to PC is written in Clipper 5.0 and the publication generation system uses Excel 4. The information was collected by the Agency through questionnaires sent to research reactor owners. All data on research reactors, training reactors, test reactors, prototype reactors and critical assemblies are stored in the RRDB. This system contains all the information and data previously published in the Agency's publication, Directory of Nuclear Research Reactor, as well as updated information

  8. Introduction of nuclear medicine research in Japan

    Inubushi, Masayuki [Kawasaki Medical School, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Higashi, Tatsuya [National Institutes of Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Chiba (Japan); Kuji, Ichiei [Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hidaka-shi, Saitama (Japan); Sakamoto, Setsu [Dokkyo University School of Medicine, PET Center, Mibu, Tochigi (Japan); Tashiro, Manabu [Tohoku University, Division of Cyclotron Nuclear Medicine, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Momose, Mitsuru [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    There were many interesting presentations of unique studies at the Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine, although there were fewer attendees from Europe than expected. These presentations included research on diseases that are more frequent in Japan and Asia than in Europe, synthesis of original radiopharmaceuticals, and development of imaging devices and methods with novel ideas especially by Japanese manufacturers. In this review, we introduce recent nuclear medicine research conducted in Japan in the five categories of Oncology, Neurology, Cardiology, Radiopharmaceuticals and Technology. It is our hope that this article will encourage the participation of researchers from all over the world, in particular from Europe, in scientific meetings on nuclear medicine held in Japan. (orig.)

  9. Current status of nuclear safety research

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Efforts at nuclear safety research have expanded year by year in Japan, in term of money and technical achievement. The Atomic Energy Commission set last year the five year nuclear safety research program, a guideline by which various research institutes will be able to develop their own efforts in a concerted manner. From the results of the nuclear safety research which cover very wide areas ranging from reactor engineering safety, safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, prevention of radiation hazards to the adequate treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, AIJ hereafter focuses of LWR engineering safety and prevents two articles, one introducing the current results of the NSSR program developed by JAERI and the other reporting the LWR reliability demonstration testing projects being promoted by MITI. The outline of these demonstration tests was reported in this report. The tests consist of earthquake resistance reliability test of nuclear power plants, steam generator reliability tests, valve integrity tests, fuel assembly reliability tests, reliability tests of heat affected zones and reliability tests of pumps. (Kobatake, H.)

  10. Nuclear Safety Research Department annual report 2000

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P.; Nonboel, E.

    2001-08-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department in 2000. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department was responsible for the tasks 'Applied Health Physics and Emergency Preparedness', 'Dosimetry', 'Environmental Monitoring', and Irradiation and Isotope Services'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  11. Technology transfer from nuclear research

    1989-01-01

    A number of processes, components and instruments developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, (BARC), Bombay, find application in industry and are available for transfer to private or public sector undertakings for commercial exploitation. The Technology Transfer Group (TTG) constituted in January 1980 identifies such processes and prototypes which can be made available for transfer. This catalogue contains brief descriptions of such technologies and they are arranged under three groups, namely, Group A containing descriptions of technologies already transferred, Group B containing descriptions of technologies ready for transfer and Group C containing descriptions of technology transfer proposals being processed. The position in the above-mentioned groups is as on 1 March 1989. The BARC has also set up a Technology Corner where laboratory models and prototypes of instruments, equipment and components are displayed. These are described in the second part of the catalogue. (M.G.B.)

  12. Idaho national laboratory - a nuclear research center

    Zaidi Mohammed, K.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is committed to providing international nuclear leadership for the 21st Century, developing and demonstrating compelling national security technologies, and delivering excellence in science and technology as one of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) multi program national laboratories. INL runs three major programs - Nuclear, Security and Science. Nuclear programs covers the Advanced test reactor, Six Generation IV technology concepts selected for Rand D, targeting tumors - Boron Neutron Capture therapy. Homeland Security establishes the Control System Security and Test Center, Critical Infrastructure Test Range evaluates technologies on a scalable basis, INL conducts high performance computing and visualization research and science. To provide leadership in the education and training, INL has established an Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (INSE) under the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) and the Idaho State University (ISU). INSE will offer a four year degree based on a newly developed curriculum - two year of basic science course work and two years of participation in project planning and development. The students enrolled in this program can continue to get a masters or a doctoral degree. This summer INSE is the host for the training of the first international group selected by the World Nuclear University (WNU) - 75 fellowship holders and their 30 instructors from 40 countries. INL has been assigned to provide future global leadership in the field of nuclear science and technology. Here, at INL, we keep safety first above all things and our logo is 'Nuclear leadership synonymous with safety leadership'. (author)

  13. Dossier: management of nuclear wastes. Research, results

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    The researches carried out since many years on nuclear wastes have led to two main ways of management: the long-term conditioning of radio-elements and their advanced separation. The French atomic energy commission (CEA) has chosen to take up also the transmutation challenge, a way to transform long-living radioactive wastes into short-living radioactive wastes or stable compounds. The transmutation programs are based both on simulation and experiments with a huge international collaboration. This dossier presents in a digest way the research activity carried out on nuclear wastes processing and management at the CEA. (J.S.)

  14. Medium energy nuclear physics research

    Peterson, G.A.; Dubach, J.F.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.

    1991-06-01

    This report discusses research conducted on the following topics: transverse from factors of 117 Sn; elastic magnetic electron scattering from 13 C at Q 2 = 1 GeV 2 /c 2 ; a re-analysis of 13 C elastic scattering; deuteron threshold electrodisintegration; measurement of the elastic magnetic form factor of 3 He at high momentum transfer; coincidence measurement of the D(e,e'p) cross-section at low excitation energy and high momentum transfer; measurement of the quadrupole contribution to the N → Δ excitation; measurement of the x-, Q 2 -, and A-dependence of R = σ L /σ T ; the PEGASYS project; PEP beam-gas event analysis; plans for other experiments at SLAC: polarized electron scattering on polarized nuclei; experiment PR-89-015: study of coincidence reactions in the dip and delta-resonance regions; experiment PR-89-031: multi-nulceon knockout using the CLAS detector; drift chamber tests; a memorandum of understanding and test experiments; photoprotons from 10 B; and hadronic electroproduction at LEP

  15. Consoil '98 ; 6th international FZK/TNO conference on contaminated soil, organized by Research Centre Karlsruhe (KZK, D), TNO, in cooperation with Scottish enterprise, May 17-21, 1998, EICC Edinburgh; vol. 1 en 2.

    Harder, W.; Ahrendt, F.; Hart, I.

    1998-01-01

    These volumes present the proceedings of ConSoil '98, the sixth international FZK/TNO conference on contaminated soil. This series of conferences focuses on policies, research and development, regulation, practical implementation and experience related to contaminated sites. Legal, financial and

  16. Consoil 2000 : 7th international FZK/TNO conference on contaminated soil, organized by Research Centre Karlsruhe (KZK, D), TNO, in cooperation with UFZ Leipzig, 18-22 Sept 2000. Vol. 1 en 2

    2000-01-01

    These volumes present the proceedings of ConSoil 2000, the 7th international FZK/TNO conference on contaminated soil (in cooperation with UFZ Leipzig-Halle). This series of conferences focuses on policies, research and development, regulations, practical implementation and experiences related to

  17. Nuclear data usage for research reactors

    Nakano, Yoshihiro; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Amano, Toshio

    1996-01-01

    In the department of research reactor, many neutronics calculations have been performed to construct, to operate and to modify research reactors of JAERI with several kinds of nuclear data libraries. This paper presents latest two neutronic analyses on research reactors. First one is design work of a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for JRR-4 (Japan Research Reactor No.4). The other is design of a uranium silicon dispersion type (silicide) fuel of JRR-3M (Japan Research Reactor No.3 Modified). Before starting the design work, to estimate the accuracy of computer code and calculation method, experimental data are calculated with several nuclear data libraries. From both cases of calculations, it is confirmed that JENDL-3.2 gives about 1 %Δk/k higher excess reactivity than JENDL-3.1. (author)

  18. Applications of nuclear techniques and research 1990

    1990-01-01

    The application of nuclear techniques, i.e. those techniques where use is made of isotopes and radiation, continues to contribute to progress in science, technology, agriculture, industry and medicine. Nuclear applications found their way into the IAEA's activities from the very beginning, and their promotion constitutes today a substantial fraction of the IAEA's Technical Co-operation and Research Contract Programmes. The 1990 selection is opened by a review of the role and function of the IAEA's Research Contract Programme, which is one of the Agency's most effective tools for promoting and developing nuclear applications. Applications in agriculture are covered in two articles dealing respectively with issues affecting the acceptance of food irradiation by governments, the food industry and consumers and with the use of radiation to induce plant mutation, a practical tool available to plant breeders in their effort to develop better quality crops. The following article deals with a typical nuclear application in medicine, i.e. the use of radionuclides in the diagnosis of lung diseases and in investigations related to the respiratory function. The use of environmental isotopes to assess the energy potential of geothermal fields is the next subject, a good example of nuclear methods applied to the evaluation of natural resources. The 1990 review concludes with a presentation prepared by the Third World Academy of Sciences on magnetic fusion research activity in the developing countries and its connection with the IAEA's own fusion programme

  19. Idaho National Laboratory - Nuclear Research Center

    Zaidi, M.K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The Idaho National Laboratory is committed to the providing international nuclear leadership for the 21st Century, developing and demonstrating compiling national security technologies, and delivering excellence in science and technology as one of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) multiprogram national laboratories. INL runs three major programs - Nuclear, Security and Science. nuclear programs covers the Advanced test reactor, Six Generation technology concepts selected for R and D, Targeting tumors - Boron Neutron capture therapy. Homeland security - Homeland Security establishes the Control System Security and Test Center, Critical Infrastructure Test Range evaluates technologies on a scalable basis, INL conducts high performance computing and visualization research and science - INL facility established for Geocentrifuge Research, Idaho Laboratory, a Utah company achieved major milestone in hydrogen research and INL uses extremophile bacteria to ease bleaching's environmental cost. To provide leadership in the education and training, INL has established an Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (Inset). The institute will offer a four year degree based on a newly developed curriculum - two year of basic science course work and two years of participation in project planning and development. The students enrolled in this program can continue to get a masters or a doctoral degree. This summer Inset is the host for the training of the first international group selected by the World Nuclear University (WNU) - 75 fellowship holders and their 30 instructors from 40 countries. INL has been assigned to provide future global leadership in the field of nuclear science and technology. Here, at INL, we keep safety first above all things and our logo is 'Nuclear leadership synonymous with safety leadership'

  20. Scientific publications of Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe in 1980

    1981-04-01

    The report gives the titles of the publications that appeared in 1980. It is the first time that such reports are not available in print yet are separated from the bibliography. As regards the patents all patent rights granted and published in 1980 are mentioned: patents, patent applications, and patent specifications for public inspection. The publications list is classified according to institutes. As to the projects only the published project reports and publications from collaborators of the respective project staff are specified. The list also contains the publications printed in the Kernforschungszentrum and concerning the following research- and development projects: Prozesslenkung mit DV-Anlagen (PDV), Rechenunterstuetztes Entwickeln, Konstruieren und Fertigen (CAD), and Fertigungstechnik (PFT) ; the Kernforschungszentrum is effecting these projects in co-operation with other firms and institutes with the Kernforschungszentrum being project manager. Moreover, the list contains the publications from the branch office of the Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Ernaehrung (federal research institute for alimentation) situated in the KFK-area. The last section of the list gives publications on guest experiments carried out in the Kernforschungszentrum. The list is provided with an alphabetic author register referring to page- and recording-numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Basis for snubber aging research: Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program

    Brown, D.P.; Palmer, G.R.; Werry, E.V.; Blahnik, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes a research plan to address the safety concerns of aging in snubbers used on piping and equipment in commercial nuclear power plants. The work is to be performed under Phase 2 of the Snubber Aging Study of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the prime contractor. Research conducted by PNL under Phase 1 provided an initial assessment of snubber operating experience and was primarily based on a review of licensee event reports. The work proposed is an extension of Phase 1 and includes research at nuclear power plants and in test laboratories. Included is technical background on the design and use of snubbers in commercial nuclear power applications; the primary failure modes of both hydraulic and mechanical snubbers are discussed. The anticipated safety, technical, and regulatory benefits of the work, along with concerns of the NRC and the utilities, are also described. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  2. Portuguese research program on nuclear fusion

    Varandas, C.A.F.; Cabral, J.A.C.; Manso, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Portuguese research program on nuclear fusion is presented. The experimental activity associated with the tokamak ISTTOK as well as the work carried out in the frame of international collaboration are summarized. The main technological features of ISTTOK are described along with studies on microwave reflectometry. Future plans are briefly described

  3. The Nordic Research programme on nuclear safety

    1992-06-01

    Only two of the five Nordic countries (Denmark, Iceland, Finland, Norway and Sweden) - Sweden and Finland - operate nuclear power plants, but there are a number of nuclear installations close to their borders. Regular 4-year programmes were initiated in 1977, designated NKS-programmes. (NKS: Nordisk KerneSikkerhedsforskning - Nordic nuclear-safety research). The current fourth NKS-programme is, influenced by the Chernobyl accident, dominated by the necessity for acquiring knowledge on unexpected events and release of radioactive material from nuclear installations. The present programme is divided into the areas of emergency preparedness, waste and decommissioning, radioecology and reactor safety. It comprises a total of 18 projects, the results of which will later be published in the form of handbooks for use in cases of emergency etc. The future of joint Nordic project work in the nuclear safety field must be seen in the light of changing conditions in and around the Nordic countries, such as the opening of relations to neighbours in the east, the move towards the European Communities and the need for training a new generation of specialists in the nuclear field etc. Each project is described in considerable detail and a list of reports resulting from the third NKS-programme 1985-1989 is given. (AB)

  4. Inr training programme in nuclear research

    Cretu, I.; Ionila, M.; Gyongyosi, E.; Dragan, E.; Petra, M.

    2013-01-01

    The field of scientific research goes through rapid changes to which organizations must dinamically and efficiently adapt, which leads to the need to develop a continuous learning process that should be the basis for a long-term operational performance. Thus, human resource management systems and continuous learning should be perfectly correlated/alligned with the organizational strategy and knowledge. The research institutes through the nature of their activity are constantly undergoing a transformation process by exploring new research areas which presumes ensuring competent human resources who have to continuously learn and improve. The «learning organization » concept represents a metaphor rooted in the search of a strategy for promoting the personal development of the individual within an organization through a continuous transformation. Learning is associated with the idea of continuous transformation based on the individual and organizational development. Within « learning organizations » the human development strategy occupies a central role in management strategies. It was learned that organizations which perform excellently depend on the employees committment, especially in the budget constraints environment. For this, the human resources have to be used at maximum capacity but this is possible only with an increased committment of the employee towards the organization. The purpose of this paper is to present the basic training programme for the new employees which is part of the training strategy which carry out activities in the nuclear field of SCN Pitesti. With the majority of the research personnel aged between 45 and 60 years old there is the risk of loosing the knowledge gained in this domain. The expertise gained by experienced experts in the institute nationally and internationally can be exploited through the knowledge transfer to the new employees by organizing training programmes. The knowledge transfer between generations is one of the

  5. Contributions to radiochemical and nuclear materials research

    Matzke, H.

    1982-01-01

    Series of talks given during a seminar of the European Institute for Transuranium Elements in april 1981 in honor of R. LINDNER on the occasion of his 60th birth day. The topics include general aspects of research practice and science prognosis, retrospective essays about the discovery of nuclear fission by O. HAHN as well as surveys of actual research activities concerning a radiochemistry and the use of radioactivity in material science

  6. Nuclear Research Center IRT reactor dynamics calculation

    Aleman Fernandez, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The main features of the code DIRT, for dynamical calculations are described in the paper. With the results obtained by the program, an analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the Research Reactor IRT of the Nuclear Research Center (CIN) is performed. Different transitories were considered such as variation of the system reactivity, coolant inlet temperature variation and also variations of the coolant velocity through the reactor core. 3 refs

  7. Nuclear physics methods in materials research

    1980-01-01

    The brochure contains the abstracts of the papers presented at the 7th EPS meeting 1980 in Darmstadt. The main subjects were: a) Neutron scattering and Moessbauer effect in materials research, b) ion implantation in micrometallurgy, c) applications of nuclear reactions and radioisotopes in research on solids, d) recent developments in activation analysis and e) pions, positrons, and heavy ions applied in solid state physics. (RW) [de

  8. Neutrinos oscillations researches near a nuclear reactor

    Laiman, M.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis deals with the research of neutrinos oscillations near the Chooz B nuclear power plant in the Ardennes. The first part presents the framework of the researches and the chosen detector. The second part details the antineutrinos flux calculus from the reactors and the calculus of the expected events. The analysis procedure is detailed in the last part from the calibration to the events selection. (A.L.B.)

  9. Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program plan

    1991-06-01

    A comprehensive Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program was implemented by the US NRC office of Nuclear Regulatory Research in 1985 to identify and resolve technical safety issues related to the aging of systems, structures, and components in operating nuclear power plants. This is Revision 2 to the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program Plant. This planes defines the goals of the program the current status of research, and summarizes utilization of the research results in the regulatory process. The plan also describes major milestones and schedules for coordinating research within the agency and with organizations and institutions outside the agency, both domestic and foreign. Currently the NPAR Program comprises seven major areas: (1) hardware-oriented engineering research involving components and structures; (2) system-oriented aging interaction studies; (3) development of technical bases for license renewal rulemaking; (4) determining risk significance of aging phenomena; (5) development of technical bases for resolving generic safety issues; (6) recommendations for field inspection and maintenance addressing aging concerns; (7) and residual lifetime evaluations of major LWR components and structures. The NPAR technical database comprises approximately 100 NUREG/CR reports by June 1991, plus numerous published papers and proceedings that offer regulators and industry important insights to aging characteristics and aging management of safety-related equipment. Regulatory applications include revisions to and development of regulatory guides and technical specifications; support to resolve generic safety issues; development of codes and standards; evaluation of diagnostic techniques; (e.g., for cables and valves); and technical support for development of the license renewal rule. 80 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs

  10. Nuclear energy research and development in France

    Patarin, L.

    1981-02-01

    Having described the general organization and main participants in charge of nuclear energy development in France, headed by the C.E.A. since the start of this activity at the end of World War II, the author gives a glimpse of the programmes shared out between four main headings: fundamental research, reactors, fuel cycle and nuclear safety. Two tables sum up the financial means of the C.E.A. in 1981 on the one hand and the personnel strengths on the other. A graph also shows the operational framework of the C.E.A. and its main subsidiaries and participations [fr

  11. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion research

    Gill, Richard D

    1981-01-01

    Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research covers the theoretical and experimental aspects of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. The book starts by providing an overview and survey of plasma physics; the theory of the electrodynamics of deformable media and magnetohydrodynamics; and the particle orbit theory. The text also describes the plasma waves; the kinetic theory; the transport theory; and the MHD stability theory. Advanced theories such as microinstabilities, plasma turbulence, anomalous transport theory, and nonlinear laser plasma interaction theory are also considered. The book furthe

  12. InfiniBand-Experiences at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    Schwickerath, Ulrich; Heiss, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The Institute for Scientific Computing (IWR) at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe has been evaluating the InfiniBand [InfiniBand Trade Association, InfiniBand Architecture Specification, Release 1.0, October 24, 2000] technology since end of the year 2002. The performance of the interconnect has been tested on different platforms and architectures using MPI. Sequential file transfer performance was measured with the RFIO protocol running on native InfiniBand [Ulrich Schwickerath, Andreas Heiss, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 534 (2004) 130, http://www.fzk.de/infiniband], and a newly developed InfiniBand-enabled version of the XROOTD

  13. Status report on the Karlsruhe prototype superconducting proton linerar accelerator

    Citron, A.

    1974-01-01

    A short intoduction about linear accelerators in general and the advantage of using superconducting resonators is given. Subsequently some basic efforts on r.f. superconductivity are recalled and the status of technology of surface preparations is reported. The status of the Karlsruhe accelerator is given. In the low energy region some difficulties caused by mechanical instabilities had to be overcome. Protons have been accelerated in this part. Model studies for the subsequent sections of the accelerator have been started and look promising. (author)

  14. Research-based approaches to nuclear education

    Donev, J.M.K.C., E-mail: jason.donev@ucalgary.ca [Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Carpenter, Y., E-mail: ycarpenter@gmail.com [Univ.ty of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Teaching nuclear power requires an expert to communicate a significant number of abstract concepts from diverse disciplines, and assemble these into a larger intellectual framework for the students. Scholarly education research, particularly in individual science disciplines, has provided significant advances in teaching core subject material by breaking away from traditional lecturing. Thus far, however,little work has applied these results to introductory nuclear power classes. This paper explores a method of engaging introductory nuclear students deeply by using a combination of Socratic and mastery methods of teaching. Students develop conceptual understanding of the material through the group work and the use of diverse resources, including textbooks, online references, and computer models that encourage free exploration of these concepts. Marks have improved considerably, and students engage with the material at a significantly deeper level than in previous lecture-based iterations of this course. (author)

  15. Research-based approaches to nuclear education

    Donev, J.M.K.C.; Carpenter, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching nuclear power requires an expert to communicate a significant number of abstract concepts from diverse disciplines, and assemble these into a larger intellectual framework for the students. Scholarly education research, particularly in individual science disciplines, has provided significant advances in teaching core subject material by breaking away from traditional lecturing. Thus far, however,little work has applied these results to introductory nuclear power classes. This paper explores a method of engaging introductory nuclear students deeply by using a combination of Socratic and mastery methods of teaching. Students develop conceptual understanding of the material through the group work and the use of diverse resources, including textbooks, online references, and computer models that encourage free exploration of these concepts. Marks have improved considerably, and students engage with the material at a significantly deeper level than in previous lecture-based iterations of this course. (author)

  16. Nuclear Safety Research Department annual report 2000

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P.; Nonboel, E

    2001-08-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department in 2000. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department was responsible for the tasks 'Applied Health Physics and Emergency Preparedness', 'Dosimetry', 'Environmental Monitoring', and Irradiation and Isotope Services'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  17. Progress of laser nuclear fusion research

    Shiraga, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the principle and features of nuclear fusion using laser, as well as its basic concepts such as high-temperature / high-density implosion system and fast ignition of fuel. At present, researches aiming at nuclear fusion ignition have been developing. As the current state of researches, this paper reviews the situations of FIREX (Fast Ignition Realization Experiment) project of Japan focusing on direct irradiation implosion and fast ignition system, as well as NIF (National Ignition Facility) project of the U.S. aiming at ignition combustion based on indirect irradiation implosion and central ignition system. In collaboration with the National Institute for Fusion Science, Osaka University started FIREX-1 project in 2003. It built a heating laser LFEX of 10 kJ/1 to 10ps, and started an implosion/heating integration experiment in 2009. Currently, it is developing experiment to achieve heating to 5 keV. At NIF, the self-heating of central sparks via energy of α particles generated in the nuclear fusion reaction has been realized. This paper also overviews R and D issues surrounding the lasers for reactors for use in laser nuclear fusion power generators. (A.O.)

  18. Germany: INIS — 45 years of Reliable Nuclear Energy Information

    Rehme, Silke; Eck, Sabrina; Mutschelknauss, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Federal Republic of Germany has been an official INIS member since 1970. The first 78 citations from German publications can be found in Issue 2 of Volume 1 of the INIS Atomindex. At that time, the Zentralstelle für Atomenergie-Dokumentation (ZAED) was the INIS center in Western Germany. To ensure that the documentation on nuclear energy was directly serving the interests of researchers working in this field, the ZAED had been recently moved from Frankfurt to the neighborhood of Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany’s most important nuclear research institution. After 1977, the ZAED, together with other documentation centers, was merged into what is today FIZ Karlsruhe. At the same time, publications from Eastern Germany were analyzed by the Staatliches Amt für Atomsicherheit und Strahlenschutz in Berlin from 1974 to 1989. After the German reunification, FIZ Karlsruhe became responsible for this. The share of German contributions made to the INIS database amounts to 7% of the total number of contributions. Germany has regularly ranked among the top 5 contributing Member States in the annual statistics. Regarding cooperation in INIS, Germany — represented by FIZ Karlsruhe and its predecessors — has always been actively involved, not only in contributing publications, but also in strategic planning, organization, and technical and subject matters throughout the past five decades. Germany was part of the INIS Study Team during the planning stage of INIS. Germany also hosted two ILO meetings in Karlsruhe: one in 1979 and one on the occasion of the 30th anniversary in 2000. Staff from various INIS centers worldwide often visit FIZ Karlsruhe in order to gain insight into our INIS production or to participate in internships and training sessions on workflow management, application of rules, and FIBRE usage. FIZ Karlsruhe’s many years of participation in the Voluntary Input Program, and the editing of input provided as a service to sometimes as many as 7

  19. Where is the future of nuclear chemistry

    1980-01-01

    The future potentials of nuclear chemistry as a natural science with a strong orientation towards practical applications has been discussed at this meeting of 45 experts coming from research institutes and laboratories working in the fields of radiochemistry, nuclear chemistry, inorganic and applied chemistry, hot-atom chemistry, radiobiology, and nuclear biology, and from the two nuclear research centres at Juelich and Karlsruhe. The discussion centred around the four main aspects of future work, namely 1. basic research leading to an extension of the periodic table, nuclear reactions, the chemistry of superheavy elements, cosmochemistry; 2. radionuclide technology and activation analysis; 3. nuclear fuel cycle and reprocessing processes together with ultimate disposal methods; 4. radiochemistry in the life sciences, including nuclear chemistry and applications. (HK) [de

  20. Dispersion fuel for nuclear research facilities

    Kushtym, A.V.; Belash, M.M.; Zigunov, V.V.; Slabospitska, O.O.; Zuyok, V.A.

    2017-01-01

    Designs and process flow sheets for production of nuclear fuel rod elements and assemblies TVS-XD with dispersion composition UO_2+Al are presented. The results of fuel rod thermal calculation applied to Kharkiv subcritical assembly and Kyiv research reactor VVR-M, comparative characteristics of these fuel elements, the results of metallographic analyses and corrosion tests of fuel pellets are given in this paper

  1. Studies of the CNESTEN's Nuclear Research Centre

    Alami, R.

    1988-11-01

    The different steps of the methodology applied to the site selection of Maamora's Nuclear Research Centre, within a 20 km wide coastal band preliminarily fixed between Kenitra and Casablanca cities, are outlined: delimitation of potential zones, identification of potential sites, selection of preferred sites. A particular attention is given to the criterium of the methodology applied to the preferred sites classifying. 1 map, 2 tabs, 2 refs. (F.M.)

  2. Inside CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research

    Pol, Andri; Heuer, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    For most people locations that hold a particular importance for the development of our society and for the advancement of science and technology remain hidden from view. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is best known for its giant particle accelerator. Here researchers take part in a diverse array of fundamental physical research, in the pursuit of knowledge that will perhaps one dayrevolutionize our understanding of the universe and life on our planet. The Swiss photographer Andri Pol mixed with this multicultural community of researchers and followed their work over an extended period of time. In doing so he created a unique portrait of this fascinating “underworld.” The cutting-edge research is given a human face and the pictures allow us to perceive how in this world of the tiniest particles the biggest connections are searched for. With an essay by Peter Stamm.

  3. Research on the improvement of nuclear safety

    Yoo, Keon Joong; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Hui Dong; Park, Chang Kyu

    1993-06-01

    To improve the nuclear safety, this project is divided into three areas which are the development of safety analysis technology, the development of severe accident analysis technology and the development of integrated safety assessment technology. 1. The development of safety analysis technology. The present research aims at the development of necessary technologies for nuclear safety analysis in Korea. Establishment of the safety analysis technologies enables to reduce the expenditure both by eliminating excessive conservatisms incorporated in nuclear reactor design and by increasing safety margins in operation. It also contributes to improving plant safety through realistic analyses of the Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP). 2. The development of severe accident analysis technology. By the computer codes (MELCOR and CONTAIN), the in-vessel and the ex-vessel severe accident phenomena are simulated. 3. The development of integrated safety assessment technology. In the development of integrated safety assessment techniques, the included research areas are the improvement of PSA computer codes, the basic study on the methodology for human reliability analysis (HRA) and common cause failure (CCF). For the development of the level 2 PSA computer code, the basic research for the interface between level 1 and 2 PSA, the methodology for the treatment of containment event tree are performed. Also the new technologies such as artificial intelligence, object-oriented programming techniques are used for the improvement of computer code and the assessment techniques

  4. Examining the decontaminability of surfaces from the beginnings of nuclear technology

    Kunze, S.

    2003-01-01

    Parallel with the development of nuclear technology in the 1950s, methods of examining the decontaminability of surface materials were elaborated, improved, and partly standardized in many countries. In 1988, ISO 8690 was adopted as an internationally accepted method of examination (technically identical to DIN 25 415, Part 1). A first range of coatings for nuclear applications were compiled from the large number of commercial products available on the market on the basis of the test method developed since 1962 at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center and then at the Karlsruhe Research Center. Subsequently, the continuously improved test method was used to study, in mainly chemically curing two-component coatings, the reduction of gloss by dulling agents and fillers as well as various shades of color. Floor and container coatings were also examined for their resistance to radiation and to chemicals as well as wear. (orig.) [de

  5. Nuclear physics and heavy element research at LLNL

    Stoyer, M A; Ahle, L E; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Bleuel, D L; Burke, J T; Dashdorj, D; Henderson, R A; Hurst, A M; Kenneally, J M; Lesher, S R; Moody, K J; Nelson, S L; Norman, E B; Pedretti, M; Scielzo, N D; Shaughnessy, D A; Sheets, S A; Stoeffl, W; Stoyer, N J; Wiedeking, M; Wilk, P A; Wu, C Y

    2009-05-11

    This paper highlights some of the current basic nuclear physics research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The work at LLNL concentrates on investigating nuclei at the extremes. The Experimental Nuclear Physics Group performs research to improve our understanding of nuclei, nuclear reactions, nuclear decay processes and nuclear astrophysics; an expertise utilized for important laboratory national security programs and for world-class peer-reviewed basic research.

  6. 2010 annual meeting on nuclear technology. Workshop on ''Preservation of competence in nuclear technology''

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Within the two-day workshop on ''Preservation of Competence in Nuclear Technology'', 21 young scientists competed for the ''Competence Prize'' awarded by Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik for the twelfth time. They reported about their term papers, diploma or doctoral theses focusing on reactor technology and reactor safety, the development of innovative reactor systems, and waste management. For the first time, contributions this year were presented also from the field of radiation protection. The jury composed of Prof. T. Schulenberg (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology), Prof. M.K. Koch (Ruhr University, Bochum), and Dr. W. Steinwarz (Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik) assessed the advance compacts as well as the oral presentations. The winner of the 2010 Competence Prize is Heiko Herbell of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Cornelia Heintze of the Dresden-Rossendorf Research Center, and Carola Hartel of the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research won the second and third prizes. (orig.)

  7. Current state of nuclear fusion research

    Naraghi, M.

    1985-01-01

    During the past quarter century, plasma physics and nuclear fusion research have gone through impressive development. Tokamak, is realized to be the number one candidate for nuclear fusion reactor. Two large experiments, one called Joint European Torus (JET) at Culham, England, and the other JT-60 project in Japan have been completed and have reported preliminary results. In JET an average electron density of 4x10 13 pcls/ cm 3 , ion temperatures of 3Kev and energy confinement of 0.8 sec have been achieved. However, the Zeff has been even equal to 10 which unfortunately is a source of plasma energy loss. JT-60 has not offered any appreciable results yet, however, the objectives and initial tests promise long pulse duration, with very high ion and plasma densities. Both experiments have promised to achieve conditions approaching those needed in a fusion reactor. Other important experiments will be discussed and the role of third world countries will be emphasized. (Author)

  8. Research in nuclear chemistry: current status and future perspectives

    Reddy, A.V.R.

    2007-01-01

    Research in nuclear chemistry has seen a huge growth over the last few decades. The large umbrella of nuclear chemistry includes several research areas such as nuclear fission, reactions, spectroscopy, nuclear probes and nuclear analytical techniques. Currently, nuclear chemistry research has extended its horizon into various applications like nuclear medicine, isotopes for understanding physico chemical processes, and addressing environmental and biomedical problems. Tremendous efforts are going on for synthesizing new elements (isotopes), isolating physically or chemically wherever possible and investigating their properties. Theses studies are useful to understand nuclear and chemical properties at extreme ends of instability. In addition, nuclear chemists are making substantial contribution to astrophysics and other related areas. During this talk, a few of the contributions made by nuclear chemistry group of BARC will be discussed and possible future areas of research will be enumerated. (author)

  9. Nuclear and nuclear related analytical methods applied in environmental research

    Popescu, Ion V.; Gheboianu, Anca; Bancuta, Iulian; Cimpoca, G. V; Stihi, Claudia; Radulescu, Cristiana; Oros Calin; Frontasyeva, Marina; Petre, Marian; Dulama, Ioana; Vlaicu, G.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Analytical Methods can be used for research activities on environmental studies like water quality assessment, pesticide residues, global climatic change (transboundary), pollution and remediation. Heavy metal pollution is a problem associated with areas of intensive industrial activity. In this work the moss bio monitoring technique was employed to study the atmospheric deposition in Dambovita County Romania. Also, there were used complementary nuclear and atomic analytical methods: Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). These high sensitivity analysis methods were used to determine the chemical composition of some samples of mosses placed in different areas with different pollution industrial sources. The concentrations of Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn were determined. The concentration of Fe from the same samples was determined using all these methods and we obtained a very good agreement, in statistical limits, which demonstrate the capability of these analytical methods to be applied on a large spectrum of environmental samples with the same results. (authors)

  10. Recent nuclear physics research at IMP

    Jin Genming

    1998-01-01

    The recent progresses in the nuclear physics research in IMP (Institute of Modern Physics) are reviewed including the synthesis and studies of nuclei far from stability and properties of hot nuclei. Heavy Ion Research Facility Lanzhou (HIRFL) is of cyclotron family delivering intermediate energy heavy ions. During the recent years, progresses have been made in the studies of heavy ion physics as well as in the development of the HIRFL. This paper will begin with the recent upgrading of HIRFL with an emphasis on the development of Radioactive Ion Beam Line Lanzhou (RIBLL), and then be focused on the physics research in IMP including intermediate energy heavy ion collisions and hot nuclei, synthesis and studies of nuclei far from stability. (J.P.N)

  11. Overview of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Nguyen Nhi Dien; Nguyen Thai Sinh; Luong Ba Vien

    2016-01-01

    The present reactor called Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) has been reconstructed from the former TRIGA Mark II reactor which was designed by General Atomic (GA, San Diego, California, USA), started building in early 1960s, put into operation in 1963 and operated until 1968 at nominal power of 250 kW. In 1975, all fuel elements of the reactor were unloaded and shipped back to the USA. The DNRR is a 500-kW pool-type research reactor using light water as both moderator and coolant. The reactor is used as a neutron source for the purposes of: (1) radioactive isotope production; (2) neutron activation analysis; and (3) research and training

  12. Research in artificial intelligence for nuclear facilities

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The application of artificial intelligence, in the form of expert systems and neural networks, to the control room activities in a nuclear power plant has the potential to reduce operator error and increase plant safety, reliability, and efficiency. Furthermore, artificial intelligence can increase efficiency and effectiveness in a large number of nonoperating activities (testing, routine maintenance, outage planning, equipment diagnostics, and fuel management) and in research facility experiments. Recent work at the University of Tennessee has demonstrated the feasibility of using neural networks to identify six different transients introduced into the simulation of a steam generator of a nuclear power plant. This work is now being extended to utilize data from a nuclear power plant training simulator. In one configuration, the inputs to the neural network are a subset of the quantities that are typical of those available from the safety parameter display system. The outputs of the network represent the various states of the plant (e.g., normal operation, coolant leakage, inadequate core flow, excessive peak fuel temperature, etc.). Training of the neural network is performed by introducing various faults or conditions to be diagnosed into the simulator. The goal of this work is to demonstrate a neural network diagnostic system that could provide advice to the operators in accordance with the emergency operating procedures

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in pharmaceutical research

    Sarkar, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has important applications in pharmaceutical research since it allows specific tissue and disease characterization in animal models noninvasively with excellent anatomical resolution and therefore provides improved ability to monitor the efficacy of novel drugs. The utility of NMR imaging in renal studies to monitor the mechanism of drug action and renal function in rats is described. The extension of the resolution of an NMR image to microscopic domain at higher magnetic field strengths and the utility of NMR microimaging in cerebrovascular and tumour metastasis studies in mice are discussed. (author). 40 refs., 14 figs

  14. State of controlled nuclear fusion research

    Rodrigo, A.B.

    1978-04-01

    The development of a commercial fusion reactor requires an adequate solution to the problems of heating and confinement of the nuclear fuel, as well as a considerable effort in materials technology and reactor engineering. A general discussion is presented of the status of the research connected with the most advanced concepts, indicating in each case the present situation and the main problems that must be solved to meet the requeriments estimated for power reactors. In particular, the laser-inertial concept is reviewed in detail. (author) [es

  15. Scientific activities 1980 Nuclear Research Center ''Democritos''

    1982-01-01

    The scientific activities and achievements of the Nuclear Research Center Democritos for the year 1980 are presented in the form of a list of 76 projects giving title, objectives, responsible of each project, developed activities and the pertaining lists of publications. The 16 chapters of this work cover the activities of the main Divisions of the Democritos NRC: Electronics, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Health Physics, Reactor, Scientific Directorate, Radioisotopes, Environmental Radioactivity, Soil Science, Computer Center, Uranium Exploration, Medical Service, Technological Applications, Radioimmunoassay and Training. (N.C.)

  16. Nuclear instrumentation for research reactors; Instrumentacion nuclear para reactores nucleares de investigacion

    Hofer, Carlos G.; Pita, Antonio; Verrastro, Claudio A.; Maino, Eduardo J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Unidad de Actividades de Reactores y Centrales Nucleares. Sector Instrumentacion y Control

    1997-10-01

    The nuclear instrumentation for research reactors in Argentina was developed in 70`. A gradual modernization of all the nuclear instrumentation is planned. It includes start-up and power range instrumentation, as well as field monitors, clamp, scram and rod movement control logic. The new instrumentation is linked to a computer network, based on real time operating system for data acquisition, display and logging. This paper describes the modules and whole system aspects. (author). 2 refs.

  17. Research and Development on nuclear fission

    2007-01-01

    Research and development activities on advanced and innovative reactors are performed within a domestic programme and international initiatives. The ongoing New Nuclear Fission National Programme is synergic and complementary to the International Nuclear Energy Initiative (INERI) and EURATOM framework programmes and is managed by ENEA through a specific agreement signed in June 2007 by the Italian Ministry for Economic Development (MSE). The activities concern an integral advanced pressurised light-water-cooled reactor (IRIS nuclear power plant [NPP]) and several Generation-4. fast reactors: lead-cooled, very high temperature and sodium-cooled. A summary of the main results achieved in 2007 follows. In the framework of the INERI programme ENEA and other Italian organisations are involved in the design of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS NPP), particularly in the design certification. An appropriate integral testing programme will be performed in the SPES-3 facility to be built at the SIET laboratories in Piacenza. The facility will be located inside the building of the decommissioned Emilia oil-fired power plant. Once erected, the facility will simulate IRIS at full height, full pressure and temperature, and with volumes and power scaled by factors of 1:100 and 1:150, respectively. The activity will be carried out in a collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA under an international initiative concerning cooperation in the field of nuclear-related technologies of mutual interest. In 2007 activities were mainly devoted to the conceptual design of the SPES-3 facility, the development of SPES-3 nodalization and the seismic isolation analysis of the IRIS auxiliary building

  18. Report of results on the research and development work 1979 of the Institute for Technical Chemistry

    1980-02-01

    The results report on the research and development work in 1979 carried out at the Institute for Technical Physics of the Nuclear Research Centre, Karlsruhe is concerned here. The main field of this development work is the research into superconducting magnets for fusion reactors. Studies are published on the material, processing and shape of these magnets. Furthermore, a report is given on fusion magnet technology, superconducting fundamentals and technical superconductors, as well as an cryonergy technique and cryotechnique. (KBI) [de

  19. Research Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy

    Ait Abderrahim, H.

    1996-01-01

    The proceedings of the ENS Class 1 Topical Meeting on Research facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy include contributions on large research facilities, designed for tests in the field of nuclear energy production. In particular, issues related to facilities supporting research and development programmes in connection to the operation of nuclear power plants as well as the development of new concepts in material testing, nuclear data measurement, code validation, fuel cycle, reprocessing, and waste disposal are discussed. The proceedings contain 63 papers

  20. Nuclear I and C research and education under UNENE program

    Jiang, J.

    2006-01-01

    Univ. Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE) is a not-for-profit organization. It is a unique industry - Univ. alliance in carrying out research to support Canadian nuclear industries. At this time, there are six major research areas in this network. One of them is Control, Instrumentation, and Electrical Systems for Nuclear Power plants. In this paper, a brief description of the structure and research activities of nuclear I and C at the Univ. of Western Ontario is provided. (authors)

  1. Current status of nuclear physics research

    Bertulani, Carlos A.; Hussein, Mahir S.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the current status of research in nuclear physics which is being carried out in different centers in the world. For this purpose, we supply a short account of the development in the area which evolved over the last nine decades, since the discovery of the neutron. The evolution of the physics of the atomic nucleus went through many stages as more data became available. We briefly discuss models introduced to discern the physics behind the experimental discoveries, such as the shell model, the collective model, the statistical model, the interacting boson model, etc., some of these models may be seemingly in conflict with each other, but this was shown to be only apparent. The richness of the ideas and abundance of theoretical models attests to the important fact that the nucleus is a really singular system in the sense that it evolves from two-body bound states such as the deuteron, to few-body bound states, such as 4 He, 7 Li, 9 Be, etc. and up the ladder to heavier bound nuclei containing up to more than 200 nucleons. Clearly, statistical mechanics, usually employed in systems with very large number of particles, would seemingly not work for such finite systems as the nuclei, neither do other theories which are applicable to condensed matter. The richness of nuclear physics stems from these restrictions. New theories and models are presently being developed. Theories of the structure and reactions of neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclei, called exotic nuclei, halo nuclei, or Borromean nuclei, deal with the wealth of experimental data that became available in the last 35 years. Furthermore, nuclear astrophysics and stellar and Big Bang nucleosynthesis have become a more mature subject. Due to limited space, this review only covers a few selected topics, mainly those with which the authors have worked on. Our aimed potential readers of this review are nuclear physicists and physicists in other areas, as well as graduate students interested

  2. Current status of nuclear physics research

    Bertulani, Carlos A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University-Commerce (United States); Hussein, Mahir S., E-mail: hussein@if.usp.br [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2015-12-15

    In this review, we discuss the current status of research in nuclear physics which is being carried out in different centers in the world. For this purpose, we supply a short account of the development in the area which evolved over the last nine decades, since the discovery of the neutron. The evolution of the physics of the atomic nucleus went through many stages as more data became available. We briefly discuss models introduced to discern the physics behind the experimental discoveries, such as the shell model, the collective model, the statistical model, the interacting boson model, etc., some of these models may be seemingly in conflict with each other, but this was shown to be only apparent. The richness of the ideas and abundance of theoretical models attests to the important fact that the nucleus is a really singular system in the sense that it evolves from two-body bound states such as the deuteron, to few-body bound states, such as {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, etc. and up the ladder to heavier bound nuclei containing up to more than 200 nucleons. Clearly, statistical mechanics, usually employed in systems with very large number of particles, would seemingly not work for such finite systems as the nuclei, neither do other theories which are applicable to condensed matter. The richness of nuclear physics stems from these restrictions. New theories and models are presently being developed. Theories of the structure and reactions of neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclei, called exotic nuclei, halo nuclei, or Borromean nuclei, deal with the wealth of experimental data that became available in the last 35 years. Furthermore, nuclear astrophysics and stellar and Big Bang nucleosynthesis have become a more mature subject. Due to limited space, this review only covers a few selected topics, mainly those with which the authors have worked on. Our aimed potential readers of this review are nuclear physicists and physicists in other areas, as well as graduate

  3. Nuclear fuel cycle requirements in WOCA

    Klumpp, P.

    1982-02-01

    OECD/NEA will publsih an updated version of its study 'Nuclear Fuel Cycle Requirements and Supply Considerations, Through the Long-Term.' The Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe (KfK) was involved in the work necessary to provide this book. Although KfK had only responsiblility for part of the required computations it performed all the calculations for its own documentation interests. This documentation was felt to be a helpful background material for the reader of the second 'Yellow Book'. In this sense the original strategy computer outprints are published now without any discussion of assumptions and results. (orig.) [de

  4. Range of applications of modern superconducting synchrotron radiation sources using the source planned at Karlsruhe (KSSQ) as an example

    Moser, H.O.

    1989-06-01

    The performance of the Karlsruhe synchrotron radiation source which was designed originally for X-ray deep-etch lithography comes close to that of first and second generation synchrotron radiation sources. The range of applications spanned by KSSQ is therefore quite similar to that of those machines. The present report displays a first collection of topics from the fields of surface analysis, solid state and materials research, and biology which could be investigated using KSSQ by interested groups coming from KfK and its surroundings. (orig.) [de

  5. Nuclear science and engineering education at a university research reactor

    Loveland, W.

    1993-01-01

    The role of an on-site irradiation facility in nuclear science and engineering education is examined. Using the example of a university research reactor, the use of such devices in laboratory instruction, public outreach programs, special instructional programs, research, etc. is discussed. Examples from the Oregon State University curriculum in nuclear chemistry, nuclear engineering and radiation health are given. (author) 1 tab

  6. Nuclear chemistry research for the safe disposal of nuclear waste

    Fanghaenel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel is of key importance for the future sustainable development of nuclear energy. Concepts foresee the isolation of the nuclear waste in deep geological formations. The long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear waste is dominated by plutonium and the minor actinides. Hence it is essential for the performance assessment of a nuclear waste disposal to understand the chemical behaviour of actinides in a repository system. The aqueous chemistry and thermodynamics of actinides is rather complex in particular due to their very rich redox chemistry. Recent results of our detailed study of the Plutonium and Neptunium redox - and complexation behaviour are presented and discussed. (author)

  7. Nuclear fusion research at Tokamak Energy Ltd

    Windridge, Melanie J.; Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Kingham, David

    2017-01-01

    Tokamak Energy's approach is close to the mainstream of nuclear fusion, and chooses a spherical tokamak, which is an economically developed form of Tokamak reactor design, as research subjects together with a high-temperature superconducting magnet. In the theoretical prediction, it is said that spherical tokamak can make tokamak reactor's scale compact compared with ITER or DEMO. The dependence of fusion energy multiplication factor on reactor size is small. According to model studies, it has been found that the center coil can be protected from heat and radiation damage even if the neutron shielding is optimized to 35 cm instead of 1 m. As a small tokamak with a high-temperature superconducting magnet, ST25 HTS, it demonstrated in 2015 continuous operation for more than 24 hours as a world record. Currently, this company is constructing a slightly larger ST40 type, and it is scheduled to start operation in 2017. ST40 is designed to demonstrate that it can realize a high magnetic field with a compact size and aims at attaining 8-10 keV (reaching the nuclear fusion reaction temperature at about 100 million degrees). This company will verify the startup and heating technology by the coalescence of spherical tokamak expected to have plasma current of 2 MA, and will also use 2 MW of neutral particle beam heating. In parallel with ST40, it is promoting a development program for high-temperature superconducting magnet. (A.O.)

  8. Nuclear structure research. Annual progress report

    Wood, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    The most significant development this year has been the outcome of a survey of EO transition strength, ρ 2 (EO), in heavy nuclei. The systematics of ρ 2 (EO) reveals that the strongest EO's are between pairs of excited states with the same spin and parity. This is observed in the regions Z,N = 38,60; 48,66; 64,88; and 80,106. Unlike other multipoles it is rare that nuclear ground states are strongly connected to excited states by monopole transitions. Another significant finding is in the results of the experimental study of levels in 187 Au. Two bands of states are observed with identical spin sequences, very similar excitation energies, and EO transitions between the favored band members but not between the unfavored band members. This is interpreted in terms of nearly identical diabatic structures. Experimental data sets for the radioactive decays of 183 Pt and 186 Au to 183 Ir and 186 Pt, respectively, have been under analysis. The studies are aimed at elucidating shape coexistence and triaxiality in the A = 185 region. An extensive program of systematics for nuclei at and near N = Z has been continued in preparation for the planned nuclear structure research program using the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge. A considerable effort has been devoted to HRIBF target development

  9. Evolution of international nuclear cooperation

    Goldschmidt, Bertrand

    1978-01-01

    The various stages of the history of the International Cooperation in nuclear matters are reviewed: isolationism period at the end of the war with the anglosaxon monopoly; opening period with the 1955 Geneva Conference and the creation of organisms within the framework of Euratom (the six European countries), of OCED (NEA) and of UNO (IAEA); industrial realizations period with Euratom research centres (Ispra, Geel, Karlsruhe and Petten) and the NEA enterprises (Halden, Dragon project, Eurochemic). The international industrial accords in the domains of exploitation and uranium enrichment are recalled and the program for the international evaluating of the fuel cycle (INFCE) is mentioned [fr

  10. US Department of Energy nuclear energy research initiative

    Ross, F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) that has been established to address and help overcome the principal technical and scientific issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy in the United States. (author)

  11. Research nuclear reactor RA - Annual Report 1989

    Sotic, O.

    1989-12-01

    Annual report concerning the project 'RA research nuclear reactor' for 1989, financed by the Serbian ministry of science is divided into two parts. First part is concerned with RA reactor operation and maintenance, which is the task of the Division for reactor engineering of the Institute for multidisciplinary studies and RA reactor engineering. Second part deals with radiation protection activities at the RA reactor which is the responsibility of the Institute for radiation protection. Scientific council of the Institute for multidisciplinary studies and RA reactor engineering has stated that this report describes adequately the activity and tasks fulfilled at the RA reactor in 1989. The scope and the quality of the work done were considered successful both concerning the maintenance and reconstruction, as well as radiation protection activities [sr

  12. RA Research nuclear reactor - Annual report 1987

    1987-12-01

    Annual report concerning the project 'RA research nuclear reactor' for 1987, financed by the Serbian ministry of science is divided into two parts. First part is concerned with RA reactor operation and maintenance, which is the task of the Division for reactor engineering of the Institute for multidisciplinary studies and RA reactor engineering. Second part deals with radiation protection activities at the RA reactor which is the responsibility of the Institute for radiation protection. Scientific council of the Institute for multidisciplinary studies and RA reactor engineering has stated that this report describes adequately the activity and tasks fulfilled at the RA reactor in 1989. The scope and the quality of the work done were considered successful both concerning the maintenance and reconstruction, as well as radiation protection activities [sr

  13. Nuclear radioactive techniques applied to materials research

    Correia, João Guilherme; Wahl, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we review materials characterization techniques using radioactive isotopes at the ISOLDE/CERN facility. At ISOLDE intense beams of chemically clean radioactive isotopes are provided by selective ion-sources and high-resolution isotope separators, which are coupled on-line with particle accelerators. There, new experiments are performed by an increasing number of materials researchers, which use nuclear spectroscopic techniques such as Mössbauer, Perturbed Angular Correlations (PAC), beta-NMR and Emission Channeling with short-lived isotopes not available elsewhere. Additionally, diffusion studies and traditionally non-radioactive techniques as Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy, Hall effect and Photoluminescence measurements are performed on radioactive doped samples, providing in this way the element signature upon correlation of the time dependence of the signal with the isotope transmutation half-life. Current developments, applications and perspectives of using radioactive ion beams and tech...

  14. Research nuclear reactor start-up simulator

    Sofo Haro, M.; Cantero, P.

    2009-01-01

    This work presents the design and FPGA implementation of a research nuclear reactor start-up simulator. Its aim is to generate a set of signals that allow replacing the neutron detector for stimulated signals, to feed the measurement electronic of the start-up channels, to check its operation, together with the start-up security logic. The simulator presented can be configured on three independent channels and adjust the shape of the output pulses. Furthermore, each channel can be configured in 'rate' mode, where you can specify the growth rate of the pulse frequency in %/s. Result and details of the implementation on FPGA of the different functional blocks are given. (author)

  15. A Study on Research Trend in Nuclear Forensics

    Kim, Kyungmin; Yim, Hobin; Lee, Seungmin; Hong, Yunjeong; Kim, Jae Kwang

    2014-01-01

    The international community has recognized the serious threat posed by nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control. To address these concerns, the Office of Nuclear Security of the international Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is developing, inter alia, guidance for nuclear forensics to assist Member States. According to the IAEA Incident and Trafficking Database (ITDB) of the IAEA to record the illegal trade and trafficking incidents of nuclear material or other radioactive material, incidents of 2331 have been reported in 1993 to 2012. These incidents mean that we are not safe for nuclear material. In order to solve the case generated by the illicit trafficking of nuclear material and the efficient management of nuclear material, the study of nuclear forensics is very important. In this study, we investigated the analytical techniques and the current status of nuclear forensics research. In this study, we investigated the current status of research of nuclear forensics, procedures for analysis and nuclear forensics analysis technique. A result of the study, we have been found that the major institutes and laboratory actively research on analysis technique and nuclear forensics. However, research on nuclear forensics is still in early stage, ROK is necessary preliminary survey of analysis technique and foundation of physical, chemical, and morphology characteristics of nuclear materials

  16. Knowledge Management for Nuclear Research and Development Organizations

    2012-05-01

    This publication elaborates on the role of nuclear knowledge management in a research and development (R and D) context, and on the importance of facilitating innovation and future development of nuclear technologies for nuclear power, its associated fuel cycles and nuclear applications in medicine, industry and agriculture. It highlights aspects including transferring and preserving knowledge, exchanging information, establishing and supporting cooperative networks, and training the next generation of nuclear experts. It concludes with basic concepts, trends and key drivers for nuclear knowledge management to R and D project managers and other workers from nuclear R and D organizations.

  17. Knowledge Management for Nuclear Research and Development Organizations (Russian Edition)

    2016-01-01

    This publication elaborates on the role of nuclear knowledge management in a research and development (R&D) context, and on the importance of facilitating innovation and future development of nuclear technologies for nuclear power, its associated fuel cycles, and nuclear applications in medicine, industry and agriculture. It highlights aspects such as transferring and preserving knowledge, exchanging information, establishing and supporting cooperative networks, and training the next generation of nuclear experts. It concludes with basic concepts, trends and key drivers for nuclear knowledge management for R&D project managers and other workers from nuclear R&D organizations.

  18. Present status of nuclear fusion research and development

    Discussions are included on the following topics: (1) plasma confinement theoretical research, (2) torus plasma research, (3) plasma measurement research, (4) technical development of equipment, (5) plasma heating, (6) vacuum wall surface phenomena, (7) critical plasma test equipment design, (8) noncircular cross-sectional torus test equipment design, (9) nuclear fusion reactor design, (10) nuclear fusion reactor engineering, (11) summary of nuclear fusion research in foreign countries, and (12) long range plan in Japan

  19. Institute for transuranium elements Karlsruhe Annual Report 1988

    1989-01-01

    The present report summarizes the results of the work which has been performed in 1988 at the Institute for Transuranium Elements of the Joint Research Centre of the Commission of the European Communities. While, as in the past, major efforts were devoted to the Programme on Nuclear Fuels and Actinide Research, important contributions were made to other JRC Specific Programmes, i.e. Reactor Safety, Radioactive Waste Management, and Safeguards and Fissile Materials Control. In addition, The Institute has carried out analytical work for the EURATOM Safeguards Directorate and executed research tasks in the safeguards context, both, for the Commission of the European Communities and for the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna. Exploratory Research, finally, dealt with an investigation of possibilities of acoustic aerosol scavenging

  20. Nuclear power plant Severe Accident Research Plan

    Larkins, J.T.; Cunningham, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The Severe Accident Research Plan (SARP) will provide technical information necessary to support regulatory decisions in the severe accident area for existing or planned nuclear power plants, and covers research for the time period of January 1982 through January 1986. SARP will develop generic bases to determine how safe the plants are and where and how their level of safety ought to be improved. The analysis to address these issues will be performed using improved probabilistic risk assessment methodology, as benchmarked to more exact data and analysis. There are thirteen program elements in the plan and the work is phased in two parts, with the first phase being completed in early 1984, at which time an assessment will be made whether or not any major changes will be recommended to the Commission for operating plants to handle severe accidents. Additionally at this time, all of the thirteen program elements in Chapter 5 will be reviewed and assessed in terms of how much additional work is necessary and where major impacts in probabilistic risk assessment might be achieved. Confirmatory research will be carried out in phase II to provide additional assurance on the appropriateness of phase I decisions. Most of this work will be concluded by early 1986

  1. Nuclear phenomena in low-energy nuclear reaction research.

    Krivit, Steven B

    2013-09-01

    This is a comment on Storms E (2010) Status of Cold Fusion, Naturwissenschaften 97:861-881. This comment provides the following remarks to other nuclear phenomena observed in low-energy nuclear reactions aside from helium-4 make significant contributions to the overall energy balance; and normal hydrogen, not just heavy hydrogen, produces excess heat.

  2. Application and development of dismantling technologies for decommissioning of nuclear installations

    Bach, W.; Kremer, G.; Ruemenapp, T.

    2006-01-01

    The decommissioning of nuclear installations poses a challenge to high performance underwater cutting technologies because of complex limiting conditions, like radioactive contamination, accessibility, geometry of work piece, material thickness and composition. For the safe dismantling of the moderator tank and the thermal shield of the Multi-purpose Research Reactor (MZFR) Karlsruhe the development and the use of thermal cutting tools will be demonstrated, in this case the underwater plasma arc cutting and the contact arc metal cutting (CAMC). (orig.)

  3. 19 February 2015 - Professor Holger Hanselka President Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Federal Republic of Germany

    Gadmer, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    visiting the CMS cavern with CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson K. Borras and CMS Collaboration, Team Leader, Karlsruhe Institut fur Technologie T. Muller and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. C. Schaefer present throughout.

  4. Future for nuclear data research. Human resources

    Baba, Mamoru

    2006-01-01

    A comment is given on the problem of human resources to support the future nuclear data activity which will be indispensable for advanced utilization of nuclear energy and radiations. Emphasis is put in the importance of the functional organization among the nuclear data center (JAEA), industries and universities for provision of human resources. (author)

  5. Proceedings of national symposium on advanced instrumentation for nuclear research

    1993-01-01

    The National Symposium on Advanced Instrumentation for Nuclear Research was held in Bombay during January 27-29, 1993 at BARC. Progress of modern nuclear research is closely related to the availability of state of the art instruments and systems. With the advancements in experimental techniques and sophisticated detector developments, the performance specifications have become more stringent. State of the art techniques and diverse applications of sophisticated nuclear instrumentation systems are discussed along with indigenous efforts to meet the specific instrumentation needs of research programs in nuclear sciences. Papers of relevance to nuclear science and technology are indexed separately. (original)

  6. Nuclear Criticality Experimental Research Center (NCERC) Overview

    Goda, Joetta Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grove, Travis Justin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hayes, David Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sanchez, Rene Gerardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-03

    The mission of the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) is to conduct experiments and training with critical assemblies and fissionable material at or near criticality in order to explore reactivity phenomena, and to operate the assemblies in the regions from subcritical through delayed critical. One critical assembly, Godiva-IV, is designed to operate above prompt critical. The Nuclear Criticality Experimental Research Center (NCERC) is our nation’s only general-purpose critical experiments facility and is only one of a few that remain operational throughout the world. This presentation discusses the history of NCERC, the general activities that makeup work at NCERC, and the various government programs and missions that NCERC supports. Recent activities at NCERC will be reviewed, with a focus on demonstrating how NCERC meets national security mission goals using engineering fundamentals. In particular, there will be a focus on engineering theory and design and applications of engineering fundamentals at NCERC. NCERC activities that relate to engineering education will also be examined.

  7. Experiment research on cognition reliability model of nuclear power plant

    Zhao Bingquan; Fang Xiang

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to improve the reliability of operation on real nuclear power plant of operators through the simulation research to the cognition reliability of nuclear power plant operators. The research method of the paper is to make use of simulator of nuclear power plant as research platform, to take present international research model of reliability of human cognition based on three-parameter Weibull distribution for reference, to develop and get the research model of Chinese nuclear power plant operators based on two-parameter Weibull distribution. By making use of two-parameter Weibull distribution research model of cognition reliability, the experiments about the cognition reliability of nuclear power plant operators have been done. Compared with the results of other countries such USA and Hungary, the same results can be obtained, which can do good to the safety operation of nuclear power plant

  8. Strategic Nuclear Research Collaboration - FY99 Annual Report

    T. J. Leahy

    1999-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has created the Strategic Nuclear Research Collaboration. The SNRC brings together some of America's finest laboratory and university nuclear researchers in a carefully focused research program intended to produce ''breakthrough'' solutions to the difficult issues of nuclear economics, safety, non-proliferation, and nuclear waste. This integrated program aims to address obstacles that stand in the way of nuclear power development in the US These include fuel cycle concerns related to waste and proliferation, the need for more efficient regulatory practices, and the high cost of constructing and operating nuclear power plants. Funded at an FY99 level of $2.58M, the SNRC is focusing the efforts of scientists and engineers from the INEEL and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to solve complex nuclear energy challenges in a carefully chosen, integrated portfolio of research topics. The result of this collaboration will be research that serves as a catalyst for future direct-funded nuclear research and technology development and which preserves and enhances the INEEL's role as America's leading national laboratory for nuclear power research. In its first year, the SNRC has focused on four research projects each of which address one or more of the four issues facing further nuclear power development (economics, safety, waste disposition and proliferation-resistance). This Annual Report describes technical work and accomplishments during the first year of the SNRC's existence.

  9. Research on aerosol formation, aerosol behaviour, aerosol filtration, aerosol measurement techniques and sodium fires at the Laboratory for Aerosol Physics and Filter Technology at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe

    Jordan, S; Schikarski, W; Schoeck, W [Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung mbH, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1977-01-01

    The behaviour of aerosols in LMFBR plant systems is of great importance for a number of problems, both normal operational and accident kind. This paper covers the following: aerosol modelling for LMFBR containment systems; aerosol size spectrometry by laser light scattering; experimental facilities and experimental results concerned with aerosol release under accident conditions; filtration of sodium oxide aerosols by multilayer sand bed filters.

  10. Research on aerosol formation, aerosol behaviour, aerosol filtration, aerosol measurement techniques and sodium fires at the Laboratory for Aerosol Physics and Filter Technology at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe

    Jordan, S.; Schikarski, W.; Schoeck, W.

    1977-01-01

    The behaviour of aerosols in LMFBR plant systems is of great importance for a number of problems, both normal operational and accident kind. This paper covers the following: aerosol modelling for LMFBR containment systems; aerosol size spectrometry by laser light scattering; experimental facilities and experimental results concerned with aerosol release under accident conditions; filtration of sodium oxide aerosols by multilayer sand bed filters

  11. Research reactor status for future nuclear research in Europe

    Raymond, Patrick; Bignan, Gilles; Guidez, Joel [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique - CEA (France)

    2010-07-01

    During the 1950's and 60's, the European countries built several research reactors, partially to support their emerging nuclear-powered electricity programs. Now, over forty years later, the use and operation of these reactors have both widened and grown more specialized. The irradiation reactors test materials and fuels for power reactors, produce radio-isotopes for medicine, neutro-graphies, doping silicon, and other materials. The neutron beam reactors are crucial to science of matter and provide vital support to the development of nano-technologies. Other reactors are used for other specialized services such as teaching, safety tests, neutron physics measurements... The modifications to the operating uses and the ageing of the nuclear facilities have led to increasing closures year after year. Since last ENC, for example, we have seen, only in France, the closure of the training reactor Ulysse in 2007, the closure of the safety test dedicated reactor Phebus in 2008 and recently the Phenix reactor, last fast breeder in operation in the European Community, has been shut down after a set of 'end of life' technological and physical tests. For other research reactors, safety re-evaluations have had to take place, to enable extension of reactor life. However, in the current context of streamlining and reorganization, new European tools have emerged to optimally meet the changing demands for research. However the operation market of these reactors seems now increasing in all fields. For the neutron beams reactors (FRMII, ORPHEE, ILL, ISIS,..) the experimental needs are increasing years after years, especially for nano sciences and bio sciences new needs. The measurement of residual stress on manufactured materials is also more and more utilised. All these reactors have increasing utilizations, and their future seems promising. A new project project based on a neutron spallation is under definition in Sweden (ESSS: European Spallation Source

  12. Research reactor status for future nuclear research in Europe

    Raymond, Patrick; Bignan, Gilles; Guidez, Joel

    2010-01-01

    During the 1950's and 60's, the European countries built several research reactors, partially to support their emerging nuclear-powered electricity programs. Now, over forty years later, the use and operation of these reactors have both widened and grown more specialized. The irradiation reactors test materials and fuels for power reactors, produce radio-isotopes for medicine, neutro-graphies, doping silicon, and other materials. The neutron beam reactors are crucial to science of matter and provide vital support to the development of nano-technologies. Other reactors are used for other specialized services such as teaching, safety tests, neutron physics measurements... The modifications to the operating uses and the ageing of the nuclear facilities have led to increasing closures year after year. Since last ENC, for example, we have seen, only in France, the closure of the training reactor Ulysse in 2007, the closure of the safety test dedicated reactor Phebus in 2008 and recently the Phenix reactor, last fast breeder in operation in the European Community, has been shut down after a set of 'end of life' technological and physical tests. For other research reactors, safety re-evaluations have had to take place, to enable extension of reactor life. However, in the current context of streamlining and reorganization, new European tools have emerged to optimally meet the changing demands for research. However the operation market of these reactors seems now increasing in all fields. For the neutron beams reactors (FRMII, ORPHEE, ILL, ISIS,..) the experimental needs are increasing years after years, especially for nano sciences and bio sciences new needs. The measurement of residual stress on manufactured materials is also more and more utilised. All these reactors have increasing utilizations, and their future seems promising. A new project project based on a neutron spallation is under definition in Sweden (ESSS: European Spallation Source Scandinavia). The nuclear

  13. Preservation of the first research nuclear reactor in Korea

    2008-06-01

    This book describes preservation of the first research nuclear reactor in Korea and necessity of building memorial hall, sale of the Institute of Atomic Energy Research in Seoul and dismantlement of the first and the second nuclear reactor, preservation of the first research nuclear reactor and activity about memorial hall of the atomic energy reactor, assignment and leaving the report, and the list of related data.

  14. NuclearFACTS: public engagement about the impacts of nuclear research

    Dalzell, M.T.J.; Alexander, R.N.; Main, M.G., E-mail: matthew.dalzell@fedorukcentre.ca [Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation, Saskatoon, SK, (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    The Forum for Accountability and Communities Talking nuclear Science - nuclearFACTS - is a cornerstone of the Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation's efforts to engage the people of Saskatchewan in evidence-based conversations about the impacts of the nuclear research, development and training activities supported by the Fedoruk Centre. The second annual nuclearFACTS public colloquium was held 20 November 2014, and featured the participation of 16 research projects. This paper discusses the continued development of the nuclearFACTS concept and its role in the Fedoruk Centre's upstream engagement efforts. (author)

  15. Research and development for the nuclear energy of the future

    Bernard, P.

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the energy demand increase facing the environment protection, the three main objectives of the research and development for the nuclear energy are developed in this document: to support the today nuclear industry, to answer the public anxiety concerning the sanitary and environmental impact of nuclear activities, to design, evaluate and develop new reactors. (A.L.B.)

  16. Research in theoretical nuclear physics: Progress report

    1988-08-01

    In April 1988 we, along with the nuclear theory groups of Brookhaven and MIT, submitted a proposal to the Department of Energy for a national Institute of Theoretical Nuclear Physics. The primary areas of investigation proposed for this Institute are: Strong Interaction Physics--including (1) The physics of hadrons, (2) QCD and the nucleus, (3) QCD at finite temperatures and high density; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure and nuclear many-body theory; and nuclear tests of fundamental interactions. It is, of course, no coincidence that these are the main areas of activity of the three groups involved in this proposal and of our group in particular. Here, we will organize an outline of the progress made at Stony Brook during the past year along these lines. These four areas do not cover all of the activities of our group

  17. Research and exploration on nuclear safety culture construction

    Zhang Lifang; Zhao Hongtao; Wang Hongwei

    2012-01-01

    This thesis mainly researched the definition, characteristics, development stage and setup procedure concerning nuclear safety culture, based on practice and experiences in Technical Physics Institute of Heilongjian. Academy of Science. The author discussed the importance of nuclear safety culture construction for an enterprise of nuclear technology utilization, and emphasized all the enterprise and individual who engaged in nuclear and radiation safety should acquire good nuclear safety culture quality, and ensure the application and development of the nuclear safety cult.ure construction in the enterprises of nu- clear technological utilization. (authors)

  18. Summaries of FY 1986 research in nuclear physics

    1987-03-01

    This report summarizes the research projects supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics in the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, during FY 1986. This Division is a component of the Office of Energy Research, the basic research branch of the US Department of Energy, and provides about 80% of the funding for nuclear physics research in the United States. The objective of the Nuclear Physics program is to understand the interactions, properties, and structures of nuclei and nuclear matter and to understand the fundamental forces of nature as manifested in atomic nuclei. These summaries are intended to provide a convenient guide for those interested in the research supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics

  19. Nuclear safety research - risk and other risks

    Rossin, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear power industry deals in many kinds of risks, complicated by political stress and communication problems. Power plant design must prepare for the unexpected attack, physical as well as psychological, but a zero-defects technology is not possible. The public has not been made sufficiently aware of the risk the US takes if there is not enough energy because nuclear power has been curtailed. Energy shortages could drive industry and jobs abroad, force the public to turn to government for a solution, drive the country to energy allocation, and cause a nuclear war. Policies that prevent closing the nuclear fuel cycle are ineffective in preventing proliferation and counterproductive to national needs

  20. Nuclear science and engineering education at a university research reactor

    Loveland, W.

    1990-01-01

    The research and teaching operations of the Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Dept. of Chemistry and the Dept. of Nuclear Engineering are housed at the Oregon State University Radiation Center. This facility which includes a 1.1 MW TRIGA reactor was used for 53 classes from a number of different academic departments last year. About one-half of these classes used the reactor and ∼25% of the reactor's 45 hour week was devoted to teaching. Descriptions will be given of reactor-oriented instructional programs in nuclear engineering, radiation health and nuclear chemistry. In nuclear chemistry, classes in (a) nuclear chemistry for nuclear engineers, (b) radiotracer methods, (c) elementary and advanced activation analysis, and (d) advanced nuclear instrumentation will be described in detail. The use of the facility to promote general nuclear literacy among college students, high school and grade school students and the general population will also be covered

  1. Central Institute of Nuclear Research Rossendorf 25 years old

    Hohmuth, K.; Kaun, K.H.; Schmidt, A.; Hennig, K.; Brinckmann, H.F.; Lehmann, E.; Rossbander, W.; Bitterlich, H.; Weibrecht, R.; Fuelle, R.; Nebel, D.; Reetz, T.; Beyer, G.J.; Muenze, R.

    1981-12-01

    A colloquium dedicated the 25th anniversary of the foundation of the Central Institute for Nuclear Research of the GDR Academy of Sciences was held on January, 21st, '81. 13 papers were given which dealt with aspects of the institute's history as well as with modern trends in nuclear and solid state physics, nuclear energy and chemistry, radioisotope production, radiation protection and nuclear information. (author)

  2. Shanghai institute of nuclear research, academia sinica annual report 1991

    1992-01-01

    The Annual Report is a comprehensive review of achievements made by Shanghai Institute of Nuclear Research (SINR), Academia Sinica in 1991, Which concerns nuclear physics (theories, experimentation, and application), nuclear chemistry (radiochemistry, radiopharmaceuticals, labelled compounds, analytical chemistry), radiation chemistry, accelerator physics and technology, nuclear detectors, computer application and maintenance, laboratory engineering, radiation protection and waste treatment. The maintenance, reconstruction and operation of its major facilities are also described

  3. Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program plan

    1985-07-01

    The nuclear plant aging research described in this plan is intended to resolve issues related to the aging and service wear of equipment and systems at commercial reactor facilities and their possible impact on plant safety. Emphasis has been placed on identification and characterization of the mechansims of material and component degradation during service and evaluation of methods of inspection, surveillance, condition monitoring and maintenance as means of mitigating such effects. Specifically the goals of the program are as follows: (1) to identify and characterize aging and service wear effects which, if unchecked, could cause degradation of structures, components, and systems and thereby impair plant safety; (2) to identify methods of inspection, surveillance and monitoring, or of evaluating residual life of structures, components, and systems, which will assure timely detection of significant aging effects prior to loss of safety function; and (3) to evaluate the effectiveness of storage, maintenance, repair and replacement practices in mitigating the rate and extent of degradation caused by aging and service wear

  4. The Swiss Institute for Nuclear Research SIN

    Pritzker, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    This book tells the story of the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Research (SIN). The institute was founded in 1968 and became part of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in 1988. Its founding occurred at a time when physics was generally considered the key discipline for technological and social development. This step was unusual for a small country like Switzerland and showed courage and foresight. Equally unusual were the accomplishments of SIN, compared with similar institutes in the rest of the world, as well as its influence on Swiss, and partially also on international politics of science. That this story is now available in a widely understandable form is due to the efforts of some physicists, who took the initiative as long as contemporary witnesses could still be questioned. As is usually the case, official documents always show just an excerpt of what really happened. An intimate portrayal of people who contributed to success requires personal memories. This text relies on both sources. In addition, the e...

  5. Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    Lee, K. W.; Kang, Y. A.; Kim, G. H.

    2007-06-01

    It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely

  6. Research on optical applications in nuclear industry

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Shin, Jang Soo; Lee, Sang Mock; Baik, Sung Hoon; Kwon, Seong Ouk; Hong, Suc Kyoung; Kim, Duk Hyeon

    1988-12-01

    The laser fluorometer developed in 1987 has been modified to compensate the inner filter and quenching effects. The signal processing electronic circuit was redesigned and a computer interface was introduced for data processing. It has been already used in routine chemical analysis in the chemical analysis division. Its application to uranium monitoring in conversion plant is being investigated. Also, we found that it can be used in trace analysis of samarium and europium with detection limit of 1 ppb and 0.1 ppb, respectively. The IRMPA/D process of CDF 3 and CHF 3 have been studied. The pressure effects of CDF 3 ,CHF 3 and added buffer gas were investigated. Mainly, the change in reaction rate was examined while varying the pressure of CDF 3 , CHF 3 and buffer gas. The IRMPD reaction ratio of CDF 3 and CHF 3 from below 0.1 torr up to a few torr was studied and the buffer gas pressure effect was investigated at constant pressure of CDF 3 or CHF 3 of 1 torr. Several kinds of buffer gas, Ar, N 2 , and SF 6 , were used to investigate the buffer gas pressure effect. We applied double exposure holographic interferometry, and analyzed qualitatively the distortion due to thermal heat and vibration. The research on holographic remote inspection will be achieved to apply this technique to the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (Author)

  7. Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    Lee, K. W.; Kang, Y. A.; Kim, G. H. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely.

  8. Future plant of basic research for nuclear energy by university researchers

    Shibata, Toshikazu

    1984-01-01

    National Committee for Nuclear Energy Research, Japan Science Council has completed a future plan for basic nuclear energy research by university researchers. The JSC has recommended the promotion of basic research for nuclear energy based on the plan in 1983. The future plan consists of four main research fields, namely, (1) improvements of reactor safety, (2) down stream, (3) thorium fuel reactors, and (4) applications of research reactor and radioisotopes. (author)

  9. Releases of 14CO2 from nuclear facilities with gaseous effluents; Die Emission von 14C02 mit der Abluft kerntechnischer Anlagen

    Schuettelkopf, H.

    1977-06-01

    Since only little information is available about the extent and type of the 14C emission from nuclear facilities, the Radiation Protection and Safety Department of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center has measured the 14C stack vent emission from various facilities. The measurement was restricted to 14CO2 because it is only this coumpound which can lead to exposure doses as a result of ingestion and inhalation. Sampling was carried out with 200 ml of 5 M NaOH in a scrubber. The sample flow was 1 l/min. The sampling period was one week. The 14CO2 emission was measured in the stack vent air of the FR-2 research reactor, the Multi-purpose Research Reactor (MZFR), the combustion facility for burnable radioactive waste (FERAB), the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK), all of which are located on the premises of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, and in the exhaust air of the Obrigheim (KWO) and Biblis A Nuclear Power Stations.

  10. Dismantling the nuclear research reactor Thetis

    Michiels, P. [Belgoprocess, 2480 Dessel (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    The research reactor Thetis, in service since 1967 and stopped in 2003, is part of the laboratories of the institution of nuclear science of the University of Ghent. The reactor, of the pool-type, was used as a neutron-source for the production of radio-isotopes and for activation analyses. The reactor is situated in a water pool with inner diameter of 3 m. and a depth of 7.5 m. The reactor core is situated 5.3 m under water level. Besides the reactor, the pool contains pneumatic loops, handling tools, graphite blocks for neutron moderation and other experimental equipment. The building houses storage rooms for fissile material and sources, a pneumatic circuit for transportation of samples, primary and secondary cooling circuits, water cleaning resin circuits, a ventilation system and other necessary devices. Because of the experimental character of the reactor, laboratories with glove boxes and other tools were needed and are included in the dismantling program. The building is in 3 levels with a crawl-space. The ground-floor contains the ventilation installation, the purification circuits with tanks, cooling circuits and pneumatic transport system. On the first floor, around the reactor hall, the control-room, visiting area, end-station for pneumatic transport, waste-storage room, fuel storage room and the labs are located. The second floor contains a few laboratories and end stations of the two high speed transfer tubes. The lowest level of the pool is situated under ground level. The reactor has been operated at a power of 150 kW and had a max operating power of 250 kW. Belgoprocess has been selected to decommission the reactor, the labs, storage halls and associated circuits to free release the building for conventional reuse and for the removal of all its internals as legal defined. Besides the dose-rate risk and contamination risk, there is also an asbestos risk of contamination. During construction of the installation, asbestos-containing materials were

  11. Status of Nuclear-Pumped Laser research

    Prelas, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    The field of Nuclear-Pumped lasers (NPLs) has progressed in many directions since the discovery of the first NPL in 1974. This paper discusses developments in the area of coupling nuclear energy to a laser media, kinetics, and the integration of nuclear reactors to a laser (or other types of energy conversion medium). Many questions about the process of nuclear-pumping have been examined since the discovery of the first NPL in 1974. During a period of time between 1974 and 1981, several types of lasers have been driven by nuclear reactions (ie rare gas lasers, impurity type lasers, molecular lasers, and an ion laser). Three of the lasers discovered, had demonstrated efficiencies of >1%. In addition, volume scaling of NPLs was demonstrated

  12. Treatment of tritiated exhaust gases at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe

    Hutter, E.; Besserer, U. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Jacqmin, G. [NUKEM GmbH, Industreistr, Alzenau (Germany)

    1995-02-01

    The Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK) accomplished commissioning; tritium involving activities will start this year. The laboratory is destined mainly to investigating processing of fusion reactor fuel and to developing analytic devices for determination of tritium and tritiated species in view of control and accountancy requirements. The area for experimental work in the laboratory is about 800 m{sup 2}. The tritium infrastructure including systems for tritium storage, transfer within the laboratory and processing by cleanup and isotope separation methods has been installed on an additional 400 m{sup 2} area. All tritium processing systems (=primary systems), either of the tritium infrastructure or of the experiments, are enclosed in secondary containments which consist of gloveboxes, each of them connected to the central depressurization system, a part integrated in the central detritiation system. The atmosphere of each glovebox is cleaned in a closed cycle by local detritiation units controlled by two tritium monitors. Additionally, the TLK is equipped with a central detritiation system in which all gases discharged from the primary systems and the secondary systems are processed. All detritiation units consist of a catalyst for oxidizing gaseous tritium or tritiated hydrocarbons to water, a heat exchanger for cooling the catalyst reactor exhaust gas to room temperature, and a molecular sieve bed for adsorbing the water. Experiments with tracer amounts of tritium have shown that decontamination factors >3000 can be achieved with the TLK detritiation units. The central detritiation system was carefully tested and adjusted under normal and abnormal operation conditions. Test results and the behavior of the tritium barrier preventing tritiated exhaust gases from escaping into the atmosphere will be reported.

  13. General problems specific to hot nuclear materials research facilities

    Bart, G.

    1996-01-01

    During the sixties, governments have installed hot nuclear materials research facilities to characterize highly radioactive materials, to describe their in-pile behaviour, to develop and test new reactor core components, and to provide the industry with radioisotopes. Since then, the attitude towards the nuclear option has drastically changed and resources have become very tight. Within the changed political environment, the national research centres have defined new objectives. Given budgetary constraints, nuclear facilities have to co-operate internationally and to look for third party research assignments. The paper discusses the problems and needs within experimental nuclear research facilities as well as industrial requirements. Special emphasis is on cultural topics (definition of the scope of nuclear research facilities, the search for competitive advantages, and operational requirements), social aspects (overageing of personnel, recruitment, and training of new staff), safety related administrative and technical issues, and research needs for expertise and state of the art analytical infrastructure

  14. Research in theoretical nuclear physics, Nuclear Theory Group. Progress report

    Brown, G.E.; Jackson, A.D.; Kuo, T.T.S.

    1984-01-01

    Primary emphasis is placed on understanding the nature of nucleon-nucleon and meson-nucleon interactions and on determining the consequences of such microscopic interactions in nuclear systems. We have constructed models of baryons which smoothly interpolate between currently popular bag and Skyrme models of hadrons and provide a vehicle for introducing the notions of quantum chromodynamics to low energy nuclear physics without violating the constraints of chiral invariance. Such models have been used to study the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the spectrum of baryons, and the important question of the radius of the quark bag. We have used many-body techniques to consider a variety of problems in finite nuclei and infinite many-body systems. New light has been shed on the nuclear coexistence of spherical and deformed states in the A = 18 region as well as the role of genuine three-body forces in this region. Phenomenological studies of infinite systems have led to a number of predictions particularly regarding the spin-polarized quantum liquids of current experimental interest. Microscopic many-body theories, based on the parquet diagrams, have been improved to a fully quantitative level for the ground state properties of infinite many-body systems. Finite temperature theories of nuclear matter, important in the study of heavy ion reactions, have been constructed. An expanded program in heavy ion theory has led to major advances in the multi-dimensional barrier penetration problem. Activities in nuclear astrophysics have provided a far more reliable description of the role of electron capture processes in stellar collapse. As a consequence, we have been able to perform legitimate calculations of the unshocked mass in Type II supernovae

  15. Summaries of FY 1992 research in nuclear physics

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the research projects supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics in the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics during FY 1992. This Division is a component of the Office of Energy Research and provides about 85% of the funding for nuclear physics research in the United States. The objectives of the Nuclear Physics Program are two-fold: (1) to understand the interactions and structures of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter and the fundamental forces of nature as manifested in nuclear matter and (2) to foster application of this knowledge to other sciences and technical disciplines. These summaries are intended to provide a convenient guide for those interested in the research supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics. We remind the readers that this compilation is just an overview of the Nuclear Physics Program. What we attempt to portray correctly is the breadth of the program and level of activity in the field of nuclear physics research as well as the new capabilities and directions that continually alter the public face of the nuclear sciences. We hope that the limitations of space, constraints of fon-nat, and rigors of editing have not extinguished the excitement of the science as it was originally portrayed

  16. Summaries of FY 1992 research in nuclear physics

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the research projects supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics in the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics during FY 1992. This Division is a component of the Office of Energy Research and provides about 85% of the funding for nuclear physics research in the United States. The objectives of the Nuclear Physics Program are two-fold: (1) to understand the interactions and structures of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter and the fundamental forces of nature as manifested in nuclear matter and (2) to foster application of this knowledge to other sciences and technical disciplines. These summaries are intended to provide a convenient guide for those interested in the research supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics. We remind the readers that this compilation is just an overview of the Nuclear Physics Program. What we attempt to portray correctly is the breadth of the program and level of activity in the field of nuclear physics research as well as the new capabilities and directions that continually alter the public face of the nuclear sciences. We hope that the limitations of space, constraints of fon-nat, and rigors of editing have not extinguished the excitement of the science as it was originally portrayed.

  17. Perspectives of experimental nuclear physics research at RBI Croatia

    Soic, N.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental nuclear physics has been one of the top research activities at the Rudjer Boskovic Institute, the largest and leading Croatian research center in science and applications. The RBI nuclear physics group has strong link with the researchers at the University of Zagreb. RBI scientists perform experiments at the RBI Tandem accelerator facility and at the top European experimental facilities in collaboration with the prominent research groups in the field. Current status of the RBI experimental nuclear physics research and our recent activities aimed to strengthen our position at the RBI and to increase our international reputation and impact in collaborative projects will be presented. Part of these activities is focused on local accelerator facilities, at present mainly used for application research, and their increased usage for nuclear physics research and for development and testing of novel research equipment for large international facilities. Upgrade of the local research equipment is on the way through FP7 REGPOT project 'CLUNA: Clustering phenomena in nuclear physics: strengthening of the Zagreb-Catania-Birmingham partnership'. Recently, steps to exploit potential of the facility for nuclear astrophysics research have been initiated. Possible future actions for further strengthening of the RBI experimental nuclear physics research will be discussed.(author)

  18. Neutrons in basic and applied nuclear research - a review

    Bhattacharya, Sailajananda

    2013-01-01

    Energetic neutron sources, both white and mono-energetic, are widely used In basic nuclear physics as well as various multidisciplinary research. Precise measurement of various neutron induced reaction cross-sections are crucial for the design and development of new generation of reactors, like accelerator driven subcritical systems, nuclear incinerators, etc. A review of some recent trends in neutron induced basic and applied nuclear research will be presented in this talk. (author)

  19. Activities report 1991-1992: Nuclear Research Center of Strasbourg

    1993-01-01

    This activities report of the Nuclear Research Centre of Strasbourg for the years 1991 and 1992, presents nine research axis: theoretical physics, mechanisms of reactions and nuclear structure, extreme forms of nuclei, exotic nuclei, hot and dense nuclear matter, ultra-relativistic heavy ions, physics of LEP (European Large Electron-Positron storage ring) at 'DELPHI', chemistry and physics of radiations, physics and applications of semi-conductors

  20. Removal efficiency of silver impregnated filter materials and performance of iodie filters in the off-gas of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK

    Herrmann, F.J.; Herrmann, B.; Hoeflich, V.

    1997-01-01

    An almost quantitative retention of iodine is required in reprocessing plants. For the iodine removal in the off-gas streams of a reprocessing plant various sorption materials had been tested under realistic conditions in the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK in cooperation with the Karlsruhe research center FZK. The laboratory results achieved with different iodine sorption materials justified long time performance tests in the WAK Plant. Technical iodine filters and sorption materials for measurements of iodine had been tested from 1972 through 1992. This paper gives an overview over the most important results, Extended laboratory, pilot plant, hot cell and plant experiences have been performed concerning the behavior and the distribution of iodine-129 in chemical processing plants. In a conventional reprocessing plant for power reactor fuel, the bulk of iodine-129 and iodine-127 is evolved into the dissolver off-gas. The remainder is dispersed over many aqueous, organic and gaseous process and waste streams of the plant. Iodine filters with silver nitrate impregnated silica were installed in the dissolver off-gas of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK in 1975 and in two vessel vent systems in 1988. The aim of the Karlsruhe iodine research program was an almost quantitative evolution of the iodine during the dissolution process to remove as much iodine with the solid bed filters as possible. After shut down of the WAK plant in December 1990 the removal efficiency of the iodine filters at low iodine concentrations had been investigated during the following years. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Removal efficiency of silver impregnated filter materials and performance of iodie filters in the off-gas of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK

    Herrmann, F.J.; Herrmann, B.; Hoeflich, V. [Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe (Germany)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    An almost quantitative retention of iodine is required in reprocessing plants. For the iodine removal in the off-gas streams of a reprocessing plant various sorption materials had been tested under realistic conditions in the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK in cooperation with the Karlsruhe research center FZK. The laboratory results achieved with different iodine sorption materials justified long time performance tests in the WAK Plant. Technical iodine filters and sorption materials for measurements of iodine had been tested from 1972 through 1992. This paper gives an overview over the most important results, Extended laboratory, pilot plant, hot cell and plant experiences have been performed concerning the behavior and the distribution of iodine-129 in chemical processing plants. In a conventional reprocessing plant for power reactor fuel, the bulk of iodine-129 and iodine-127 is evolved into the dissolver off-gas. The remainder is dispersed over many aqueous, organic and gaseous process and waste streams of the plant. Iodine filters with silver nitrate impregnated silica were installed in the dissolver off-gas of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK in 1975 and in two vessel vent systems in 1988. The aim of the Karlsruhe iodine research program was an almost quantitative evolution of the iodine during the dissolution process to remove as much iodine with the solid bed filters as possible. After shut down of the WAK plant in December 1990 the removal efficiency of the iodine filters at low iodine concentrations had been investigated during the following years. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Brief overview of American Nuclear Society's research reactor standards

    Richards, Wade J.

    1984-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) established the research reactor standards group in 1968. The standards group, known as ANS-15, was established for the purpose of developing, preparing, and maintaining standards for the design, construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of nuclear reactors intended for research and training

  3. Processing of LLRW arising from AECL nuclear research centres

    Buckley, L.P.; Le, V.T.; Beamer, N.V.; Brown, W.P.; Helbrecht, R.A.

    1988-11-01

    Operation of nuclear research reactors and laboratories results in the generation of a wide variety of solid and liquid radioactive wastes. This paper describes practical experience with processing of low-level radioactive wastes at two major nuclear research centres in Canada

  4. The role of universities in the US nuclear research enterprise

    Taylor, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The vitally important role of the universities in nuclear research is embodied in the three functions of education, research, and policymaking. These three functions are discussed from the perspective of nuclear power's unique demands for quality and its pioneering interface with societal and environmental aspirations

  5. National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI) - Annual Report 2015

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 report of the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) lists various programmes undertaken by the Institute under the following headings: Water resources programme, Energy Research programme, Environmental and Health Safety Programme, Digital Instrumentation programme, Nuclear Applications and Materals programme and Radiation Occupational safety programme. Also, included are abstracts of publications and technical reports.

  6. Operation and utilizations of Dalat nuclear research reactor

    Hien, P.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The reconstructed Dalat nuclear research reactor was commissioned in March 1984 and up to September 1988 more than 6200 hours of operation at nominal power have been recorded. The major utilizations of the reactor include radioisotope production, activation analysis, nuclear data research and training. A brief review of the utilizations of the reactor is presented. Some aspects of reactor safety are also discussed. (author)

  7. Research nuclear reactor RA, Annual Report 2001

    Sotic, O.

    2002-01-01

    During 2001, activities at the RA research nuclear reactor in were performed according to the Contract about financing of the RA reactor for the period January-December 2001, signed by the Ministry of Science, technology and development of the Republic of Serbia. RA reactor was not operated since shutdown in August 1984. Although, the most of the planned reconstruction activities were finished until 1991, the most important, which was concerned with exchange of the reactor instrumentation, financed by the IAEA, was interrupted due to international sanctions imposed on the country. Since 1992, all the renewal and reconstruction activities were ceased. Continuous aging and degradation of the equipment and facilities demand decision making about the future status of the Ra reactor. Until this decision is made it is an obligation to maintain control and maintenance of ventilation system, power supply, internal transportation system, spent fuel storage, hot cells, electronic fuel surveillance system, and part of the stationary dosimetry system. In 2001, apart from the mentioned activities, actions were undertaken related to maintenance of the reactor building and installations. The most important tasks fulfilled were: protection of the roof of the ventilation system building, purchase and installing the fire protection system and twelve new battery cells in the reactor building. There were no actions concerned with improvement of the conditions for intermediate spent fuel storage. With the support of IAEA, actions were initiated for possible transport of the spent fuel tu Russia. At the end of 2001, preparations were started for possible future decommissioning of the RA reactor. After, renewal of the membership of our country in the IAEA, the Government of Yugoslavia has declared its attitude about the intention of RA reactor decommissioning at the General Conference in September 2001 [sr

  8. Proposed nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel: Appendix B, foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel characteristics and transportation casks. Volume 2

    1995-03-01

    This is Appendix B of a draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel. It discusses relevant characterization and other information of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel that could be managed under the proposed action. It also discusses regulations for the transport of radioactive materials and the design of spent fuel casks

  9. Radionuclide metrology research for nuclear site decommissioning

    Judge, S. M.; Regan, P. H.

    2017-11-01

    The safe and cost-effective decommissioning of legacy nuclear sites relies on accurate measurement of the radioactivity content of the waste materials, so that the waste can be assigned to the most appropriate disposal route. Such measurements are a new challenge for the science of radionuclide metrology which was established largely to support routine measurements on operating nuclear sites and other applications such as nuclear medicine. In this paper, we provide a brief summary of the international measurement system that is established to enable nuclear site operators to demonstrate that measurements are accurate, independent and fit for purpose, and highlight some of the projects that are underway to adapt the measurement system to meet the changing demands from the industry.

  10. Nuclear physics methods in materials research

    Bethge, K.; Baumann, H.; Jex, H.; Rauch, F.

    1980-01-01

    Proceedings of the seventh divisional conference of the Nuclear Physics Division held at Darmstadt, Germany, from 23rd through 26th of September, 1980. The scope of this conference was defined as follows: i) to inform solid state physicists and materials scientists about the application of nuclear physics methods; ii) to show to nuclear physicists open questions and problems in solid state physics and materials science to which their methods can be applied. According to the intentions of the conference, the various nuclear physics methods utilized in solid state physics and materials science and especially new developments were reviewed by invited speakers. Detailed aspects of the methods and typical examples extending over a wide range of applications were presented as contributions in poster sessions. The Proceedings contain all the invited papers and about 90% of the contributed papers. (orig./RW)

  11. Nuclear theory research. Technical progress report

    1982-01-01

    Progress is briefly described on the following studies: (1) Dirac phenomenology for deuteron elastic scattering, (2) Dirac wave functions in nuclear distorted wave calculations, (3) impulse approximation for p→p → dπ + reaction above the 3-3 resonance, (4) coherent π production, (5) nuclear potentials from Dirac bound state wavefunctions, (6) nonlocality effects in nuclear reactions, (7) unhappiness factors in DWBA description of (t,p) and (p,t) reactions, (8) absolute normalization of three-nucleon transfer reactions, (9) formulation of a finite-range CCBA computer program, (10) crossing symmetric solutions of the low equations, (11) pion scattering from quark bags, (12) study of the p 11 channel in the delta model, (13) isovector corrections in pion-nucleus scattering, (14) pionic excitation of nuclear giant resonances, and (15) isospin dependence of the second-order pion-nucleus optical potential

  12. Graduate nuclear engineering programmes motivate educational and research activities

    Mavko, B.

    2000-01-01

    Some fifteen years ago the University of Ljubljana, Faculty for Mathematics and Physics together with the national research organisation the J. Stefan jointly established a Graduate programme of Nuclear Engineering. From the onset, the programme focused on nuclear technology, nuclear safety, and reactor physics and environment protection. Over the years this graduate programme has became the focal point of nuclear related, research and educational activities in Slovenia. It has grown into a meeting ground for recognised national and distinguished foreign educators and experienced professionals from the industry. In conjunction with an important national project, supported by the Slovenian government, entitled 'Jung Researcher' it also enhances the knowledge transfer to the next generation. Since the programme was introduced, the interest for this programme has been steadily growing. Accordingly, a number of PhD and MS degrees in NE have been awarded. The graduates of this programme have encountered very good job opportunities in nuclear as well as in non-nuclear sector. (author)

  13. Progress report on research and development work 1983 of the nuclear fusion project

    Finken, D.

    1984-02-01

    The studies of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe on fusion using magnetic confinement are included in the nuclear fusion project and embedded into the European Fusion Technology Programme. The studies are promoted via an association contract between KfK and Euratom by the European Commission. Some of the studies exceed the volume defined in the technology programme. These contributions, most of them studies, help to connect the various sectors and prepare new tasks, with regard to the extension of the technology programme to be expected in the coming years and the planning activities for NET. The reports summarized here are contributions of the institutes and thus arranged according to organization units. The tasks which the KfK has taken over from the Fusion Technology Programme of the EC are compiled in the appendix. (orig./GG) [de

  14. Progress report on research of nuclear data and applied nuclear physics at nuclear research institute Viet Nam. For the period January 1 - December 31 1996

    Vuong Huu Tan

    1997-03-01

    This report contains information on activities of nuclear data and applied physics at the Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat, Vietnam for the period January 1st-December 31st 1996. The specific topics covered are the following: Development of filtered neutron beams. Investigation of average characteristics of nuclei in the unresolved enrgy region, Nuclear structure, Nuclear data for applications, Neutron beam utilization for applications, Nuclear analytical techniques and sedimentology

  15. Summaries of FY 1988 research in nuclear physics

    1989-02-01

    This report summarizes the research projects supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics in the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, during FY 1986. This Division is a component of the Office of Energy Research, the basic research branch of the US Department of Energy, and provides about 80% of the funding for nuclear physics research in the United States. The objective of the Nuclear Physics program is to understand the interactions, properties, and structures of nuclei and nuclear matter and to understand the fundamental forces of nature as manifested in atomic nuclei. These summaries are intended to provide a convenient guide for those interested in the research supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics. The nuclear physics research summaries in this document were initially prepared by the investigators, then reviewed and edited by DOE staff. They describe the general character and goals of the research programs, current research efforts, especially significant recent results, and plans for the near future. The research summaries are organized into two groups: research programs at national laboratories and those at universities, with the material arranged alphabetically by institution. The names of all Ph.D.-level personnel who are primarily associated with the work are included. The FY 1988 funding levels are also provided. Included for the first time are activities of the nuclear data program, which was incorporated within nuclear physics in FY 1987. We remind the readers that this compilation is just an overview of the Nuclear Physics program. Primary publications should be used for reference to the work and for a more complete and accurate understanding

  16. Radioactivity and nuclear energy

    Hoffmann, J.; Kuczera, B.

    2001-05-01

    The terms radioactivity and nuclear energy, which have become words causing irritation in the political sphere, actually represent nothing but a large potential for innovative exploitation of natural resources. The contributions to this publication of the Karlsruhe Research Center examine more closely three major aspects of radioactivity and nuclear energy. The first paper highlights steps in the history of the discovery of radioactivity in the natural environment and presents the state of the art in health physics and research into the effects of exposure of the population to natural or artificial radionuclides. Following contributions focus on: Radiochemical methods applied in the medical sciences (diagnostic methods and devices, therapy). Nuclear energy and electricity generation, and the related safety policies, are an important subject. In this context, the approaches and pathways taken in the field of nuclear science and technology are reported and discussed from the angle of nuclear safety science, and current trends are shown in the elaboration of advanced safety standards relating to nuclear power plant operation and ultimate disposal of radioactive wastes. Finally, beneficial aspects of nuclear energy in the context of a sustainable energy policy are emphasized. In particular, the credentials of nuclear energy in the process of building an energy economy based on a balanced energy mix which combines economic and ecologic advantages are shown. (orig./CB) [de

  17. Approach to a generalized real-time nuclear materials control system

    Jarsch, V.; Onnen, S.; Polster, F.J.; Woit, J.

    1978-01-01

    Untrained users and a large amount of--at first glance incompatible--processes and materials are the environment of computer-aided nuclear materials control systems. To find an efficient model of the real processes and materials descriptions and to allow the operating personnel to communicate with the system in his everyday symbolism are goals in the development of the concept presented in this paper. According to this concept a real-time minicomputer-based materials control system is being implemented in the Nuclear Research Center of Karlsruhe. The chosen approach satisfies the heterogeneous requirements of the various institutes of the Center and is also applicable to other nuclear plants

  18. International Nuclear Information System 25 years

    Behrens, H.; Prinz, H.

    1996-01-01

    In May 1970, the first information was published in the International Nuclear Information System (Inis). This makes Inis the first system in the world to establish a decentralized international database. In creating Inis, the International Atomic Energy Agency wanted to promote the exchange of information about the peaceful uses of nuclear energy among its members. References to the nuclear literature were to be compiled in the most complete way possible. The number of IAEA member countries participating in Inis has increased from an original 38 to 90, that of international organizations, from 12 to 17. The database holds more than 1.8 million documentation units; stocks grow by some 75,000 units annually. The German literature about nuclear research and nuclear technology is collected, evaluated and entered into Inis by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe. (orig.) [de

  19. Role of nuclear safety research and future plan

    Kim, W. S.; Lee, J. I.; Kang, S. C.; Park, Y. W.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. W.; Lee, C. J.; Park, Y. I.

    2000-01-01

    For promoting and improving nuclear safety research activities, this report gives an insight on the scope of safety research and its role in the safety management of nuclear installations, and suggests measures to adequately utilize the research results through taking an optimized role share among research organizations. Several measures such as cooperative planning of common research areas and proper role assignment, improvement of the interfaces among researchers, and reflection of end-users' opinion in the course of planning and conducting research to promote application of research results are identified. It is expected that the identified measures will contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear safety research, if they are implemented after deliberating with the government and safety research organizations

  20. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    Vuori, S.

    1993-06-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  1. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    Vuori, S.

    1992-07-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  2. Nuclear power reactor safety research activities in CIAE

    Pu Shendi; Huang Yucai; Xu Hanming; Zhang Zhongyue

    1994-01-01

    The power reactor safety research activities in CIAE are briefly reviewed. The research work performed in 1980's and 1990's is mainly emphasised, which is closely related to the design, construction and licensing review of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant and the safety review of Guangdong Nuclear Power Station. Major achievements in the area of thermohydraulics, nuclear fuel, probabilistic safety assessment and severe accident researches are summarized. The foreseeable research plan for the near future, relating to the design and construction of 600 MWe PWR NPP at Qinshan Site (phase II development) is outlined

  3. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    Vuori, S.

    1991-07-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  4. IAEA fast reactor knowledge preservation initiative. Project focus: KNK-II reactor, Karlsruhe, Germany

    2004-08-01

    This Working Material (including the attached CD-ROM) documents progress made in the IAEA's initiative to preserve knowledge in the fast reactor domain. The brochure describes briefly the context of the initiative and gives an introduction to the contents of the CD-ROM. In 2003/2004 a first focus of activity was concentrated on the preservation of knowledge related to the KNK-II experimental fast reactor in Karlsruhe, Germany. The urgency of this project was given by the impending physical destruction of the installation, including the office buildings. Important KNK-II documentation was brought to safety and preserved just in time. The CD-ROM contains the full texts of 264 technical and scientific documents describing research, development and operating experience gained with the KNK-II installation over a period of time from 1965 to 2002, extending through initial investigations, 17 years of rich operating experience, and final shutdown and decommissioning. The index to the documents on the CD-ROM is printed at the end of this booklet in chronological order and is accessible on the CD by subject index and chronological index. The CD-ROM contains in its root directory also the document 'fr c lassification.pdf' which describes the classification system used for the present collection of documents on the fast reactor KNK-II

  5. Research and development for Canadian nuclear power

    Robertson, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Rapid expansion of the successful CANDU reactor system offers immediate substitution for scarce oil and gas, combined with long-term security of energy supplies. A continuing large and vigorous R and D program on nuclear power is essential to achieve these objectives. The program, described here, consists of tactical R and D in support of the current CANDU reactor system, strategic R and D to develop and demonstrate advanced CANDU systems, and exploratory R and D to put Canada in a position to exploit any fusion opportunities. Two support activities, management of radioactive wastes and techniques to safeguard nuclear materials against diversion, although integral components of the nuclear power programs, are identified separately because they are currently of special public interest. (author)

  6. Structural materials for innovative nuclear systems (SMINS)

    2008-01-01

    Structural materials research is a field of growing relevance in the nuclear sector, especially for the different innovative reactor systems being developed within the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), for critical and subcritical transmutation systems, and of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) the Workshop on Structural Materials for Innovative Nuclear Systems (SMINS) was organised in collaboration with the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe in Germany. The objectives of the workshop were to exchange information on structural materials research issues and to discuss ongoing programmes, both experimental and in the field of advanced modelling. These proceedings include the papers and the poster session materials presented at the workshop, representing the international state of the art in this domain. (author)

  7. Researches on nuclear criticality safety evaluation

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Suyama, Kenya; Nomura, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-10-01

    For criticality safety evaluation of burnup fuel, the general-purpose burnup calculation code, SWAT, was revised, and its precision was confirmed through comparison with other results from OECD/NEA's burnup credit benchmarks. Effect by replacing the evaluated nuclear data from JENDL-3.2 to ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 was also studied. Correction factors were derived for conservative evaluation of nuclide concentrations obtained with the simplified burnup code ORIGEN2.1. The critical masses of curium were calculated and evaluated for nuclear criticality safety management of minor actinides. (author)

  8. Researches on nuclear criticality safety evaluation

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Suyama, Kenya; Nomura, Yasushi

    2003-01-01

    For criticality safety evaluation of burnup fuel, the general-purpose burnup calculation code, SWAT, was revised, and its precision was confirmed through comparison with other results from OECD/NEA's burnup credit benchmarks. Effect by replacing the evaluated nuclear data from JENDL-3.2 to ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 was also studied. Correction factors were derived for conservative evaluation of nuclide concentrations obtained with the simplified burnup code ORIGEN2.1. The critical masses of curium were calculated and evaluated for nuclear criticality safety management of minor actinides. (author)

  9. An example of a United States Nuclear Research Center

    Bhattacharyya, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    Under the likely scenario in which public support for nuclear energy remains low and fossil fuels continue to be abundant and cheap, government supported nuclear research centers must adapt their missions to ensure that they tackle problems of current significance. It will be critical to be multidisciplinary, to generate economic value, and to apply nuclear competencies to current problems. Addressing problems in nuclear safety, D and D, nuclear waste management, nonproliferation, isotope production are a few examples of current needs in the nuclear arena. Argonne's original mission, to develop nuclear reactor technology, was a critical need for the U.S. in 1946. It would be wise to recognize that this mission was a special instance of a more general one--to apply unique human and physical capital to long term, high risk technology development in response to society's needs. International collaboration will enhance the collective chances for success as the world moves into the 21st century

  10. Nuclear platform research and development - 2008-09 highlights

    Sadhankar, R.R.

    2009-08-01

    The Nuclear Platform R and D Program has lead responsibility for the maintenance and further development of the CANDU intellectual property covering the safety, licensing and design basis for nuclear facilities. The Nuclear Platform R and D Program is part of the Research and Technology Operation (RTO) unit of AECL and is managed through the Research and Development division, which has responsibility for maintaining and enhancing the knowledge and technology base. The RTO is also responsible for managing AECL's nuclear facilities and infrastructure (including laboratories and R and D facilities), the nuclear waste management program and other legacy liabilities (e.g., decommissioning) to demonstrate and grow shareholder value. The Nuclear Platform also provides the technology base from which new products and services can be developed to meet customer needs (including ACR and commercial products and services). (author)

  11. Overview of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's safety research program

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    Accomplishments during 1988 of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and the program of safety research are highlighted, and plans, expections, and needs of the next year and beyond are discussed. Topics discussed include: ECCS Appendix K Revision; pressurized thermal shock; NUREG-1150, or the PRA method performance document; resolution of station blackout; severe accident integration plan; nuclear safety research review committee; and program management

  12. The role of nuclear research centers for the introduction of a nuclear power programme

    Perovic, B.; Frlec, B.; Kundic, V.

    1977-01-01

    Full development of nuclear energy has imposed a new role on nuclear energy centers. Nuclear technology for different reactor concepts is also now in a phase of high development. Several reactor concepts have been developed for industrial use and electric power production. Development of fast reactors is still under way and needs further research efforts. Having in mind these two main guidelines, research programmes in nuclear energy centers should be geared to the development of the activities vital to the implementation of national nuclear energy programmes. In this respect, national nuclear centers should devote their attention to three major tasks. First, to establish a background for the introduction of nuclear energy into the national energy system and to support a national safety system. Second, to support the national programme by skilled manpower, to provide the basic training in nuclear technology for future staff of nuclear power stations and to assist the universities in establishing the necessary educational programme in nuclear energy. Third, to follow the development of nuclear energy technology for the fast breeder reactor concepts. This paper describes some experience in introducing a new programme to the national nuclear energy centers in Yugoslavia. Recently, Yugoslavia has started building its first nuclear power station. Further introduction of nuclear power stations in the national electric energy system is also planned. This implies the need to reconsider the current nuclear energy programme in the nuclear energy centers. It has been decided to evaluate past experience and further needs for research activities regarding the nuclear power programme. Yugoslavia has three main nuclear energy centers whose activities are devoted to the development of national manpower in the field of nuclear sciences. Besides these three organizations, there are several others whose activities are concentrated on specific tasks in nuclear technology. In the

  13. Nuclear structure research at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    Mitchell, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    Studies of fundamental symmetries by the TRIPLE collaboration using the unique capabilities at LAMTF have found unexpected systematics in the parity-violating amplitudes for epithermal-neutron scattering. Tests to lower the present limits on time-reversal-invariance violation in the strong interaction are being made at in experiments on the scattering of polarized fast neutrons from aligned holmium targets. Studies of few-nucleon systems have received increasing emphasis over the past year, involving a broad program for testing the low- to medium-energy internucleon interactions, from the tensor component in n-p scattering and the n-n scattering lengths, through three-nucleon systems and the alpha particle, on up to 8 Be. Of particular interest are three-nucleon systems, both in elastic scattering and in three-body breakup. Beam requirements range from production of intense and highly-polarized neutron beams to tensor-polarized beams for measurements at both very low energies (25--80 keV) and at tandem energies for definitive measurements of D-state components of the triton, 3 He, and 4 He obtained from transfer reactions. The program in nuclear astrophysics expanded during 1991--1992. Several facets of the nuclear many-body problem and of excitation mechanisms of the nucleus are being elucidated, including measurements and analyses to elucidate the neutron--nucleus elastic-scattering interaction over a wide range of nuclei and energies. Several projects involved developments in electronuclear physics, instrumentation, rf-transition units, and low-temperature bolometric particle detectors

  14. Research in heavy-ion nuclear physics

    Sanders, S.J.; Prosser, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Fusion-fission in light nuclear systems; High-resolution Q-value measurement for the 24 Mg+ 24 Mg reaction; Heavy-ion reactions and limits to fusion; and Hybrid MWPC-Bragg curve detector development

  15. Nuclear Research and Development Capabilities Needed to Support Future Growth

    Wham, Robert M. [ORNL, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6154 (United States); Kearns, Paul [Battelle Memorial Institute (United States); Marston, Ted [Marston Consulting (United States)

    2009-06-15

    The energy crisis looming before the United States can be resolved only by an approach that integrates a 'portfolio' of options. Nuclear energy, already an important element in the portfolio, should play an even more significant role in the future as the U.S. strives to attain energy independence and reduce carbon emissions. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy asked Battelle Memorial Institute to obtain input from the commercial power generation industry on industry's vision for nuclear energy over the next 30-50 years. With this input, Battelle was asked to generate a set of research and development capabilities necessary for DOE to support the anticipated growth in nuclear power generation. This presentation, based on the report generated for the Office of Nuclear Energy, identifies the current and future nuclear research and development capabilities required to make this happen. The capabilities support: (1) continued, safe operation of the current fleet of nuclear plants; (2) the availability of a well qualified and trained workforce; (3) demonstration of the next generation nuclear plants; (4) development of a sustainable fuel cycle; (5) advanced technologies for maximizing resource utilization and minimization of waste and (6) advanced modeling and simulation for rapid and reliable development and deployment of new nuclear technologies. In order to assure these capabilities are made available, a Strategic Nuclear Energy Capability Initiative is proposed to provide the required resources during this critical period of time. (authors)

  16. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research

    1980-01-01

    Full text: During the last decade, growing efforts have been devoted to studying the possible forms an electricity-producing thermonuclear reactor might take and the various technical problems that will have to be overcome. Previous IAEA Conferences took place in Salzburg (1961), Culham (1965), Novosibirsk (1968), Madison (1971), Tokyo (1974), Berchtesgaden (1976) and Innsbruck (1978) The exchange of information that has characterized this series of meetings is an important example of international co-operation and has contributed substantially to progress in controlled fusion research. The results of experiments in major research establishments, as well as the growing scientific insights in the field of plasma physics, give hope that the realization of nuclear fusion will be made possible on a larger scale and beyond the laboratory stage by the end of this century. The increase of the duration of existing tokamak discharges requires solution of the impurity control problem. First results from the new big machines equipped with the poloidal divertor recently came into operation. PDX (USA) and ASDEX (F.R. of Germany) show that various divertor configurations can be established and maintained and that the divertors function in the predicted manner. The reduction of high-Z impurities on these machines by a factor 10 was achieved. As a result of extensive research on radio-frequency (RF) plasma heating on tokamaks: PLT (USA), TFR (France), JFT-2 (Japan), the efficiency of this attractive method of plasma heating comparable to neutral beam heating was demonstrated. It was shown that the density of the input power of about 5-10 kW/cm 2 is achievable and this limit is high enough for application to reactor-like machines. One of the inspiring results reported at the conference was the achievement of value (the ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic field pressure) of ∼ 3% on tokamaks T-11 (USSR) and ISX-B (USA). It is important to note that this value exceeds the

  17. Twenty-fifth anniversary of the Juelich Nuclear Research Center

    Haefele, W.

    1982-01-01

    On December 10, 1981, KFA Juelich celebrated its 25th year of existence; on December 11, 1956, the land parliament of North Rhine Westphalia had decided in favour of the erection of a joint nuclear research facility of the land of North Rhine Westphalia. In contrast to other nuclear research centers, the Juelich centre was to develop and operate large-scale research equipment and infrastructure for joint use by the universities of the land. This cooperation has remained an important characteristic in spite of the independent scientific work of KFA institutes, Federal government majorities, and changes in research fields and tasks. KFA does fundamental research in nuclear and plasma physics, solid state research, medicine, life sciences, and environmental research; other activities are R + D tasks for the HTR reactor and its specific applications as well as energy research in general. (orig.) [de

  18. Bolivia. The new nuclear research center in El Alto

    Nogarin, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Research reactors in Latin America have become a priority in public policy in the last decade. Bolivia wants to become the 8th country to implement peaceful nuclear technology in this area with the new Center for Research and Development in the Nuclear Technology. The Center will be the most advanced in Latin America. It will provide for a wide use of radiation technologies in agriculture, medicine, and industry. After several negotiations Bolivia and the Russian Federation signed the Intergovernmental Agreement on cooperation in the peaceful use of atomic energy and the construction of the Nuclear Research and Technology Center.

  19. A safety decision analysis for Saudi Arabian nuclear research facility

    Abulfaraj, W.H.; Abdul-Fattah, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    Establishment of a nuclear research facility should be the first step in planning for introducing the nuclear energy to Saudi Arabia. The fuzzy set decision theory is selected among different decision theories to be applied for this analysis. Four research reactors from USA are selected for the present study. The IFDA computer code, based on the fuzzy set theory is applied. Results reveal that the FNR reactor is the best alternative for the case of Saudi Arabian nuclear research facility, and MITR is the second best. 17 refs

  20. Bolivia. The new nuclear research center in El Alto

    Nogarin, Mauro

    2016-05-15

    Research reactors in Latin America have become a priority in public policy in the last decade. Bolivia wants to become the 8th country to implement peaceful nuclear technology in this area with the new Center for Research and Development in the Nuclear Technology. The Center will be the most advanced in Latin America. It will provide for a wide use of radiation technologies in agriculture, medicine, and industry. After several negotiations Bolivia and the Russian Federation signed the Intergovernmental Agreement on cooperation in the peaceful use of atomic energy and the construction of the Nuclear Research and Technology Center.

  1. Creation of a new-generation research nuclear facility

    Girchenko, A.A.; Matyushin, A.P.; Kudryavtsev, E.M.; Skopin, V.P.; Shchepelev, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    The SO-2M research nuclear facility operated on the industrial area of the institute. The facility is now removed from service. In view of this circumstance, it is proposed to restore the facility at the new qualitative level, i.e., to create a new-generation research nuclear facility with a very high safety level consisting of a subcritical bench and a proton accelerator (electronuclear facility). Competitive advantages and design features have been discussed and the productive capacity of the research nuclear facility under development has been evaluated [ru

  2. Nuclear Explosion Monitoring History and Research and Development

    Hawkins, W. L.; Zucca, J. J.

    2008-12-01

    Within a year after the nuclear detonations over Hiroshima and Nagasaki the Baruch Plan was presented to the newly formed United Nations Atomic Energy Commission (June 14, 1946) to establish nuclear disarmament and international control over all nuclear activities. These controls would allow only the peaceful use of atomic energy. The plan was rejected through a Security Council veto primarily because of the resistance to unlimited inspections. Since that time there have been many multilateral, and bilateral agreements, and unilateral declarations to limit or eliminate nuclear detonations. Almost all of theses agreements (i.e. treaties) call for some type of monitoring. We will review a timeline showing the history of nuclear testing and the more important treaties. We will also describe testing operations, containment, phenomenology, and observations. The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) which has been signed by 179 countries (ratified by 144) established the International Monitoring System global verification regime which employs seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic and radionuclide monitoring techniques. The CTBT also includes on-site inspection to clarify whether a nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of the Treaty. The US Department of Energy (DOE) through its National Nuclear Security Agency's Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring R&D Program supports research by US National Laboratories, and universities and industry internationally to detect, locate, and identify nuclear detonations. This research program builds on the broad base of monitoring expertise developed over several decades. Annually the DOE and the US Department of Defense jointly solicit monitoring research proposals. Areas of research include: seismic regional characterization and wave propagation, seismic event detection and location, seismic identification and source characterization, hydroacoustic monitoring, radionuclide monitoring, infrasound monitoring, and

  3. Animals in nuclear research: where ethics and expediency meet

    Newton, P.J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has a direct involvement in nuclear medicine, microbiological and environmental studies which utilise animals in the research work. The opposition to experiments on animals is briefly discussed. The Australia codes of practice for the care and use of animals for experimental purposes are outlined

  4. Specific features of occupational medicine in nuclear research and industry

    Giraud, J.M.; Quesne, B.

    2003-01-01

    Measures to prevent the exposure of personnel to ionising radiation were taken as soon as the first nuclear laboratories were set up. This branch of occupational preventive medicine has since kept pace with advances in research and in the industrial applications of nuclear energy. (authors)

  5. Research on psychological evaluation method for nuclear power plant operators

    Fang Xiang; He Xuhong; Zhao Bingquan

    2007-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative psychology evaluation methods to the nuclear power plant operators were analyzed and discussed in the paper. The comparison analysis to the scope and result of application was carried out between method of outline figure fitted and method of fuzzy synthetic evaluation. The research results can be referenced to the evaluation of nuclear power plant operators. (authors)

  6. A new context for the nuclear research and industry

    2000-01-01

    Pascal Colombani, general administrator of the CEA, develops in this presentation the situation of the nuclear industry to introduce the new orientations of the CEA group. The energy context, the deregulation impacts, the energy dependence and the greenhouse effect project are discussed before the presentation of the research programs and the necessary reorganizing of the nuclear industry. (A.L.B.)

  7. Nanotechnology and nuclear medicine; research and preclinical applications.

    Assadi, Majid; Afrasiabi, Kolsoom; Nabipour, Iraj; Seyedabadi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    The birth of nanotechnology in human society was around 2000 years ago and soon found applications in various fields. In this article, we highlight the current status of research and preclinical applications and also future prospects of nanotechnology in medicine and in nuclear medicine. The most important field is cancer. A regular nanotechnology training program for nuclear medicine physicians may be welcome.

  8. Status of nuclear regulatory research and its future perspectives

    Lee, J. I.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, M. W.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the regulatory research comprising an examination of the research system, its areas and contents, and the goals and financial resources is undertaken. As a result of this study, the future direction of regulatory research and its implementation strategies are suggested to resolve the current issues emerging from this examination. The major issues identified in the study are; (a) an insufficient investment in nuclear regulatory and safety research, (b) an interfacial discrepancy between similar research areas, and (c) a limitation of utilizing research results. To resolve these issues, several measures are proposed : (1) developing a lead project to establish a comprehensive infrastructure for enhancing research cooperation between nuclear organizations including institutes, industry, and universities, with an aim to improve cooperation between projects and to strengthen overall coordination functions among research projects, (2) introducing a certification system on research outcome to promote the proliferation of both research results themselves and their application with a view to enhancing the research quality, (3) strengthening the cooperative system to promote the international cooperative research, and (4) digitalizing all documents and materials relevant to safety and regulatory research to establish KIMS (knowledge and information based management system). It is expected that the aforementioned measures suggested in this study will enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of both nuclear regulatory and safety research, if they are implemented after deliberating with the government and related nuclear industries in the near future

  9. Department of Nuclear Safety Research and Nuclear Facilities annual report 1995

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Damkjaer, A.; Floto, H.; Jacobsen, U.; Oelgaard, P.L. [eds.

    1996-03-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Department of Nuclear Safety Research and Nuclear Facilities in 1995. The department`s research and development activities are organized in three research programmes: Radiation Protection, Reactor Safety, and Radioanalytical Chemistry. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the Research Reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment Plant, and the Educational Reactor DR1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff`s participation in national and international committees. (au) 5 tabs., 21 ills.

  10. Department of Nuclear Safety Research and Nuclear Facilities annual report 1995

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Damkjaer, A.; Floto, H.; Jacobsen, U.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    1996-03-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Department of Nuclear Safety Research and Nuclear Facilities in 1995. The department's research and development activities are organized in three research programmes: Radiation Protection, Reactor Safety, and Radioanalytical Chemistry. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the Research Reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment Plant, and the Educational Reactor DR1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in national and international committees. (au) 5 tabs., 21 ills

  11. Digital instrumentation system for nuclear research reactors

    Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Carvalho, Paulo Vitor R.

    2002-01-01

    This work describes a proposal for a system of nuclear instrumentation and safety totally digital for the Argonauta Reactor. The system divides in the subsystems: channel of pulses, channel of current, conventional instrumentation and safety system. The connection of the subsystems is made through redundant double local net, using the protocol modbus/rtu. So much the channel of pulses, the current channel and safety's system use modules operating in triple redundancy. (author)

  12. Importance of basic research in nuclear physics

    Bogolyubov, N.N.

    1976-01-01

    A brief survey is given of the significance of fundamental discoveries in nuclear physics. It is shown how theoretical and experimental discoveries transform our current views of the world around us and how in their practical implementation these discoveries bring revolutionary technical development. The latest progress in the field of elementary particles and their interactions and in the field of the atomic nucleus are briefly discussed. (I.W.)

  13. International guidelines for fire protection at nuclear installations including nuclear fuel plants, nuclear fuel stores, teaching reactors, research establishments

    The guidelines are recommended to designers, constructors, operators and insurers of nuclear fuel plants and other facilities using significant quantities of radioactive materials including research and teaching reactor installations where the reactors generally operate at less than approximately 10 MW(th). Recommendations for elementary precautions against fire risk at nuclear installations are followed by appendices on more specific topics. These cover: fire protection management and organization; precautions against loss during construction alterations and maintenance; basic fire protection for nuclear fuel plants; storage and nuclear fuel; and basic fire protection for research and training establishments. There are numerous illustrations of facilities referred to in the text. (U.K.)

  14. The role of nuclear research centres in the introduction of a nuclear power programme

    Afgan, N.; Anastasijevic, P.; Kolar, D.; Strohal, P.

    1977-01-01

    Full development of nuclear energy has imposed a new role on nuclear energy centres. Nuclear technology for different reactor concepts is also now in a phase of high development. Several reactor concepts have been developed for industrial use and electric power production. Development of fast reactors is still under way and needs further research efforts. Having in mind these two main guidelines, research programmes in nuclear energy centres should be geared to the development of the activities vital to the implementation of national nuclear energy programmes. In this respect, national nuclear centres should devote their attention to three major tasks. First, to establish a background for the introduction of nuclear energy into the national energy system and to support a national safety system. Secondly, to support the national programme by skilled manpower, to provide the basic training in nuclear technology for future staff of nuclear power stations and to assist the universities in establishing the necessary educational programme in nuclear energy. Thirdly, to follow the development of nuclear energy technology for fast breeder reactor concepts. (author)

  15. Nuclear research with electromagnetic probe. Progress report

    1990-01-01

    The electromagnetic probe is used to address some of the forefront questions in nuclear physics. Two questions are of special interest in this project, one is related to the electromagnetic properties of the nucleon in the nuclear medium, the other concerns the transition between nucleons-mesons and quarks-gluons degrees of freedom when describing nuclei at medium energies. The electromagnetic properties of free protons have been extensively studied and are used as basic input to describe any of the electric or magnetic properties of nuclei. However, inclusive and semi-exclusive experiments measurements in the quasielastic and the deep inelastic region seem to indicate that the properties of bound nucleons are modified significantly in the nuclear medium. It is therefore of first importance to understand how the free properties of nucleons are modified in order to have a realistic description of nuclei. It was suggested, for example, that nucleons are swollen in nuclei. The physical consequences of such an idea are of great impact on the description of nuclei

  16. Funding nuclear power research 1956 to 2015. Update

    Anon.

    2016-01-01

    In the debates about the use and the benefits of nuclear power plants the allegation is being made that nuclear power to this day had received public subsidies. That was the only reason why electricity from nuclear power plants was economically viable. That statement is wrong. A brief overview is given about the public funds for nuclear energy research and development. In relation to the electricity production less than 0.16 Euro Cents per kilowatt-hour have been spend by public funds for R and D.

  17. Nuclear Security Management for Research Reactors and Related Facilities

    2016-03-01

    This publication provides a single source guidance to assist those responsible for the implementation of nuclear security measures at research reactors and associated facilities in developing and maintaining an effective and comprehensive programme covering all aspects of nuclear security on the site. It is based on national experience and practices as well as on publications in the field of nuclear management and security. The scope includes security operations, security processes, and security forces and their relationship with the State’s nuclear security regime. The guidance is provided for consideration by States, competent authorities and operators

  18. Nuclear medicine research: an evaluation of the ERDA program

    1976-08-01

    Legislation which established the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) January 19, 1975, stipulated that this new agency should be responsible for all activities previously assigned to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and not specifically assigned to other agencies. Such activities included the nuclear medicine research program of the AEC Division of Biomedical and Environmental Research (DBER). To determine whether continuation of this program under the broader ERDA mission of energy-related research was in fact appropriate, a special task force was appointed in January 1975 by Dr. James L. Liverman, the director of DBER. This task force, comprised of established scientists knowledgeable about issues related to nuclear medicine either currently or in the past, was charged specifically to assess the historical impact of the AEC/ERDA nuclear medicine program on the development of nuclear medicine, the current status of this program, and its future role within the structure of ERDA. The specific recommendations, in brief form, are as follows: the federal government should continue to support the medical application of nuclear technology; ERDA should retain primary responsibility for support and management of federal nuclear medicine research programs; and management and emphasis of the ERDA nuclear medicine program require modification in certain areas, which are set forth

  19. Health and safety at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment

    LeNeveu, D.M.

    1982-04-01

    This report outlines the health and safety program at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment. It describes the procedures in place to ensure that a high standard of conventional industrial and radiation safety is maintained in the workplace

  20. Tunnel Boring Machine for nuclear waste repository research project

    Janzon, H.A.

    1994-01-01

    A description is presented of a Tunnel Boring Machine and its intended use on a research project underway in Sweden for demonstrating and testing methods for rock investigation at a suitable depth for a deep repository for nuclear waste

  1. Research on assurance system of nuclear fuel supply (Contract research)

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Naoi, Yosuke; Wakabayashi, Shuji; Tazaki, Makiko; Senzaki, Masao

    2010-03-01

    Assurance of supply (AOS) of nuclear fuel is a special arrangement in case of nuclear fuel supply disruption caused by political reasons other than nonproliferation. It aims to support a stable supply of nuclear fuel while avoiding unnecessary spread of sensitive enrichment technology. Current discussions on AOS have been initiated by the IAEA Director-General's article published in The Economist entitled 'Towards a Safer World' Oct. 2003. Since then, various proposals on AOS have been presented. In order to facilitate international discussions on AOS, authors have conducted studies of AOS system based on Japanese Government's proposal 'IAEA Standby Arrangement System (INFCIRC/683)'. In this paper, we gave an overview of discussions on AOS since World War II, and elaborated on some of current proposals. We have been able to discuss feasibility of AOS system more specifically by including additional costs and period required for AOS, and to present a system which could work as a practical system. Issues we have tried to tackle here include definitions of AOS, and roles of consumer states, supplier states, IAEA and nuclear industries. We present some solutions including broadening coverage of AOS, declaration by supplier states on AOS, establishing advisory committee in the IAEA on the actual application of AOS, and setting up an IAEA fund for AOS. (author)

  2. Research on assurance system of nuclear fuel supply (Contract research)

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Naoi, Yosuke; Wakabayashi, Shuji; Tazaki, Makiko; Senzaki, Masao

    2010-08-01

    Assurance of supply (AOS) of nuclear fuel is a special arrangement in case of nuclear fuel supply disruption caused by political reasons other than nonproliferation. It aims to support a stable supply of nuclear fuel while avoiding spread of sensitive enrichment technology. Current discussions on AOS have been initiated by the IAEA Director-General's article published in The Economist entitled 'Towards a Safer World' Oct. 2003. Since then, various proposals on AOS have been presented. In order to facilitate international discussions on AOS, authors have conducted studies of AOS system based on Japanese Government's proposal 'IAEA Standby Arrangement System (INFCIRC/683)'. In this paper, we have been able to discuss feasibility of AOS system more specifically by including additional costs and period required for AOS, and to present a system which could work as a practical system. Issues we have tried to tackle here include definitions of AOS, and roles of consumer States, supplier States, IAEA and nuclear industries. We present some solutions including broadening coverage of AOS, declaration by supplier States on AOS, establishing advisory committee in the IAEA on the actual application of AOS, and setting up an IAEA fund for AOS. (author)

  3. Vom auf der Planeten im Spiegel des Chorgesangs. Knabenchor Tallinn und Orchester aus Estland geben ein Konzert in der Karlsruher Stephanskirche / Bernd Willimek

    Willimek, Bernd

    1992-01-01

    Planeetide liikumise peegeldus koorilaulus. Tallinna poistekoor ja orkester Eestist andsid kontserdi Karlsruhe Stephanskirhes. Eesti kultuuripäevadest Karlsruhes. Eesti muusikast esitati Urmas Sisaski, Mihkel Lüdigi, Veljo Tormise ja Rudolf Tobiase loomingut

  4. The importance of university research in maintaining the nuclear option

    Bruschi, H.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    The role of the university in maintaining and revitalizing the nuclear option should have four goals. First, it must attract highly skilled students who have an interest in math and science and help foster their interest in nuclear science and engineering. Next, it must present a state-of-the-art educational program that contains meaningful research to maintain these students. The third goal of nuclear engineering departments is to provide the nontechnical student a fair assessment of benefits and risks associated with commercial nuclear power relative to other sources of electricity. Lastly, it must effectively communicate to all students a compelling vision of nuclear power as a vital energy resource that will grow. The most difficult role for the university is to successfully convey a future for those in the nuclear science and engineering program

  5. Research in theoretical nuclear physics. Annual progress report No. 18

    1986-01-01

    Research programs in four major areas are described: the structure of the nucleon and the nucleon-nucleon interaction, strangeness, and strange baryons; the equation of state of dense matter with specific concern both for the problems of stellar collapse and supernova explosions and of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, nuclear structure physics; and relativistic effects in nuclear particularly heavy ion reactions and quark matter physics. New research efforts in many-body theory are also described

  6. Radiological safety research for nuclear excavation projects - Interoceanic canal studies

    Klement, A.W. Jr.

    1969-01-01

    The general radiological problems encountered in nuclear cratering and nuclear excavation projects are discussed. Procedures for assessing radiological problems in such projects are outlined. Included in the discussions are source term, meteorology, fallout prediction and ecological factors. Continuing research requirements as well as pre- and post-excavation studies are important considerations. The procedures followed in the current interoceanic canal feasibility studies provide examples of radiological safety problems, current solutions and needed research. (author)

  7. Radiological safety research for nuclear excavation projects - Interoceanic canal studies

    Klement, Jr, A W [U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The general radiological problems encountered in nuclear cratering and nuclear excavation projects are discussed. Procedures for assessing radiological problems in such projects are outlined. Included in the discussions are source term, meteorology, fallout prediction and ecological factors. Continuing research requirements as well as pre- and post-excavation studies are important considerations. The procedures followed in the current interoceanic canal feasibility studies provide examples of radiological safety problems, current solutions and needed research. (author)

  8. Institute of Nuclear Physics, mission and scientific research activities

    Zoto, J.; Zaganjori, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) was established in 1971 as a scientific research institution with main goal basic scientific knowledge transmission and transfer the new methods and technologies of nuclear physics to the different economy fields. The organizational structure and main research areas of the Institute are described. The effects of the long transition period of the Albanian society and economy on the Institution activity are also presented

  9. Nuclear research centres in Pakistan: Status and prospects

    Akhtar, K.M.; Khan, H.A.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear research centres (NRCs) played an important role in the introduction of nuclear techniques in their respective countries. These centres are now faced with changes in public and government attitudes, pressures from anti-nuclear groups, competition from non-nuclear technologies, budget cuts and privatization, etc. These NRCs are still making useful contribution in the field of science and technology but need to change their strategy to operate under these pressures. The Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) has a record of 34 years of successful operation. Salient features and achievements of this Institute are presented as a model for a research centre in a developing country. The elements that are contributed for the success are described. The IAEA and other cooperative agencies can help to overcome the negative factors posed to these NRCs. (author)

  10. Integration of Social Sciences in Nuclear Research

    Bovy, M.; Eggermont, G.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, SCK-CEN initiated a programme to integrate social sciences into its scientific and technological projects. Activities were started on the following issues: (1) sustainable development; (2) ethics and decision making in nuclear waste management (transgenerational ethics/retrievability; socio-psychological aspect and local involvement); (3) law and liability (medical applications and the basic safety standards implementation); (4) decision making (emergency management); safety culture; ALARA and ethical choices in protection). Two working groups were created to discuss two broad items: (1) ethical choices in radiation protection; and (2) the role and culture of the expert. Progress and major achievements in SCK-CEN's social science programme in 2001 are summarised

  11. Russian Minatom nuclear safety research strategic plan. An international review

    Royen, J.

    1999-01-01

    An NEA study on safety research needs of Russian-designed reactors, carried out in 1996, strongly recommended that a strategic plan for safety research be developed with respect to Russian nuclear power plants. Such a plan was developed at the Russian International Nuclear Safety Centre (RINSC) of the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom). The Strategic Plan is designed to address high-priority safety-research needs, through a combination of domestic research, the application of appropriate foreign knowledge, and collaboration. It represents major progress toward developing a comprehensive and coherent safety-research programme for Russian nuclear power plants (NPPs). The NEA undertook its review of the Strategic Plan with the objective of providing independent verification on the scope, priority, and content of the research described in the Plan based upon the experience of the international group of experts. The principal conclusions of the review and the general comments of the NEA group are presented. (K.A.)

  12. Accounting for and control of nuclear material at the Central Institute of Nuclear Research, Rossendorf

    Heidel, S.; Rossbander, W.; Helming, M.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of the system of accounting for and control of nuclear material at the Central Institute for Nuclear Research, Rossendorf. It includes 3 material balance areas. Control is implemented at both the institute and the MBA levels on the basis of concepts which are coordinated with the national control authority of the IAEA. The system applied enables national and international nuclear material control to be carried out effectively and economically at a minimum of interference with operational procedures. (author)

  13. Cyberattack analysis through Malaysian Nuclear Agency experience as nuclear research center

    Mohd Dzul Aiman Aslan; Mohd Fauzi Haris; Saaidi Ismail; Nurbahyah Hamdan

    2011-01-01

    As a nuclear research center, Nuclear Malaysia is one of the Critical National Information Infrastructure (CNII) in the country. One of the easiest way to launch a malicious attack is through the online system, whether main web site or online services. Recently, we also under port scanning and hack attempts from various sources. This paper will discuss on analysis based on Nuclear Malaysia experience regarding these attempts which keep arising nowadays. (author)

  14. 30 years of Central Institute for Nuclear Research at Rossendorf

    Scheler, W.; Flach, G.; Hennig, K.; Collatz, S.; Muenze, R.; Baldeweg, F.

    1986-10-01

    A celebration and a scientific colloquium dedicated the 30th anniversary of the foundation of the Central Institute for Nuclear Research (CINR) of the GDR Academy of Sciences were held on January, 23rd and 24th, '86 at Rossendorf. The speaches and lectures given by the president of the GDR Academy of Sciences and by scientists of the CINR dealt with problems of policy of science, history of the CINR, nuclear methods, microelectronics, nuclear energy research, development and production of radioisotopes and scientific instruments. (author)

  15. In-depth research of domestic nuclear patent information

    Mo Dan; Gao Anna; Li Dongbin; Lu Yanjia; Ren Chao

    2014-01-01

    Based on the domestic patent information, combined with examples, this article makes an in-depth discussion on the domestic nuclear patent information. The author puts forward for the patent information research, the appropriate retrieval of patent documents is the basis,and the correct quantitative statistical analysis of patent documents is the key, and in-depth qualitative analysis of patent documents is the core. It is expected to provide information support and guarantee for the technical innovation and scientific research personnel in the nuclear field through in-depth study of domestic nuclear information. (authors)

  16. Research and test facilities required in nuclear science and technology

    2009-01-01

    Experimental facilities are essential research tools both for the development of nuclear science and technology and for testing systems and materials which are currently being used or will be used in the future. As a result of economic pressures and the closure of older facilities, there are concerns that the ability to undertake the research necessary to maintain and to develop nuclear science and technology may be in jeopardy. An NEA expert group with representation from ten member countries, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the European Commission has reviewed the status of those research and test facilities of interest to the NEA Nuclear Science Committee. They include facilities relating to nuclear data measurement, reactor development, neutron scattering, neutron radiography, accelerator-driven systems, transmutation, nuclear fuel, materials, safety, radiochemistry, partitioning and nuclear process heat for hydrogen production. This report contains the expert group's detailed assessment of the current status of these nuclear research facilities and makes recommendations on how future developments in the field can be secured through the provision of high-quality, modern facilities. It also describes the online database which has been established by the expert group which includes more than 700 facilities. (authors)

  17. Nuclear structure research. Annual progress report

    Wood, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The most significant development this year has been the realization that EO transition strength is a fundamental manifestation of nuclear mean-square charge radius differences. Thus, EO transitions provide a fundamental signature for shape coexistence in nuclei. In this sense, EO transitions are second only to E2 transitions for signaling (quadrupole) shapes in nuclei and do so when shape differences occur. A major effort has been devoted to the review of EO transitions in nuclei. Experiments have been carried out or are scheduled at: ATLAS/FMA (α decay of very neutron-deficient Bi isotopes); MSU/NSCL (β decay of 56 Cu); and HRIBF/RMS (commissioning of tape collector, internal conversion/internal-pair spectrometer; β decay of 58 Cu). A considerable effort has been devoted to planning the nuclear structure physics that will be pursued using HRIBF. Theoretical investigations have continued in collaboration with Prof. K. Heyde, Prof. D.J. Rowe, Prof. J.O. Rasmussen, and Prof. P.B. Semmes. These studies focus on shape coexistence and particle-core coupling

  18. Safety research in nuclear fuel cycle at PNC

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This report collects the results of safety research in nuclear fuel cycle at Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, in order to answer to the Questionnaire of OECD/NEA. The Questionnaire request to include information concerning to research topic, description, main results (if available), reference documents, research institutes involved, sponsoring organization and other pertinent information about followings: a) Recently completed research projects. b) Ongoing (current) research projects. Achievements on following items are omitted by the request of OECD/NEA, uranium mining and milling, uranium refining and conversion to UF{sub 6}, uranium enrichment, fuel manufacturers, spent fuel storage, radioactive waste management, transport of radioactive materials, decommissioning. We select topics from the fields of a) nuclear installation, b) seismic, and c) PSA, in projects from frame of annual safety research plan for nuclear installations established by Nuclear Safety Commission. We apply for the above a) and b) projects as follows: a) Achievements in Safety Research, fiscal 1991-1995, b) fiscal 1996 Safety Research Achievements: Progress. (author)

  19. Safety research in nuclear fuel cycle at PNC

    1998-09-01

    This report collects the results of safety research in nuclear fuel cycle at Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, in order to answer to the Questionnaire of OECD/NEA. The Questionnaire request to include information concerning to research topic, description, main results (if available), reference documents, research institutes involved, sponsoring organization and other pertinent information about followings: a) Recently completed research projects. b) Ongoing (current) research projects. Achievements on following items are omitted by the request of OECD/NEA, uranium mining and milling, uranium refining and conversion to UF 6 , uranium enrichment, fuel manufacturers, spent fuel storage, radioactive waste management, transport of radioactive materials, decommissioning. We select topics from the fields of a) nuclear installation, b) seismic, and c) PSA, in projects from frame of annual safety research plan for nuclear installations established by Nuclear Safety Commission. We apply for the above a) and b) projects as follows: a) Achievements in Safety Research, fiscal 1991-1995, b) fiscal 1996 Safety Research Achievements: Progress. (author)

  20. Nuclear research centres - The Egyptian experiment

    Abdelrazek, I.D.

    2001-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Authority of Egypt has four research centres located at two sites. Its research reactors are devoted to the production of isotopes, neutron beam experiments, activation analysis and materials research. The accelerators are devoted to the production of short lived isotopes for medical applications and materials R and D. Irradiation technology is used for sterilization of medical supplies and food preservation. High level of expertise in those centres is also useful for other developmental activities in Egypt. (author)