WorldWideScience

Sample records for kaonic atom x-rays

  1. X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms at SIDDHARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cargnelli M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The X-ray measurements of kaonic atoms play an important role for understanding the low-energy QCD in the strangeness sector. The SIDDHARTA experiment studied the X-ray transitions of 4 light kaonic atoms (H, D, 3He, and 4He using the DAFNE electron-positron collider at LNF (Italy. Most precise values of the shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s state were determined, which have been now used as fundamental information for the low-energy K−p interaction in theoretical studies. An upper limit of the X-ray yield of kaonic deuterium was derived, important for future K−d experiments. The shifts and widths of the kaonic 3He and 4He 2p states were obtained, confirming the end of the “kaonic helium puzzle”. In this contribution also the plans for new experiments of kaonic deuterium are being presented.

  2. Future projects of light kaonic atom X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsuno, H.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Bellotti, G.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, A.M.; Bosnar, D.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu, C.; Butt, A.D.; D’Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Ghio, F.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R.S.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Sandri, P. Levi; Marton, J.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Piscicchia, K.; Vidal, A. Romero; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D.L.; Sirghi, F.; Doce, O. Vazquez; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy of light kaonic atoms is a unique tool to provide precise information on the fundamental K̄N interaction at the low-energy limit and the in-medium nuclear interaction of K"−. The future experiments of kaonic deuterium strong-interaction shift and width (SIDDHARTA-2 and J-PARC E57) can extract the isospin dependent K"−N interaction at threshold. The high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic helium with microcalorimeters (J-PARC E62) has the possibility to solve the long-standing potential-strength problem of the attractive K"−-nucleus interaction. Here, the recent experimental results and the future projects of X-ray spectroscopy of light kaonic atoms are presented.

  3. Kaon mass by critical absorption of kaonic atom x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lum, G.K.

    1979-10-01

    The energy of the kaonic 6h → 5g transition has been determined using the calculated μ/rho curve. Because the detectors used could not resolve the noncircular transitions, the predictions from a calculated cascade program were used. According to the cascade results for potassium, the number of noncircular x-rays was about 10% of all the transitions between n = 6 to n = 5. Based on the available information, the mass of the kaon was measured to be 493.576/sub -0.069//sup +0.044/ MeV

  4. X-ray transition yields of low-Z kaonic atoms produced in Kapton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzi, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Beer, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 1700 STN CNC, Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2 (Canada); Berucci, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Bombelli, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bragadireanu, A.M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); IFIN-HH, Institutul National pentru Fizica si Inginerie Nucleara Horia Hulubei, Reactorului 30, Magurele (Romania); Cargnelli, M. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Curceanu, C.; D' Uffizi, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Fiorini, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ghio, F. [INFN Sezione di Roma I and Instituto Superiore di Sanita, I-00161 Roma (Italy); Guaraldo, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Hayano, R.S. [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Iliescu, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Ishiwatari, T., E-mail: tomoichi.ishiwatari@assoc.oeaw.ac.at [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Iwasaki, M. [RIKEN, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); and others

    2013-10-23

    The X-ray transition yields of kaonic atoms produced in Kapton polyimide (C{sub 22}H{sub 10}N{sub 2}O{sub 5}) were measured for the first time in the SIDDHARTA experiment. X-ray yields of the kaonic atoms with low atomic numbers (Z=6,7, and 8) and transitions with high principal quantum numbers (n=5–8) were determined. The relative yields of the successive transitions in the same atoms and the yield ratios of carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) and carbon-to-oxygen (C:O) for the same transitions were also determined. These X-ray yields provide important information for understanding the capture ratios and cascade mechanisms of kaonic atoms produced in a compound material, such as Kapton.

  5. Cascade processes in kaonic and muonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faifman, M.P.; Men'shikov, L.I.

    2003-01-01

    Cascade processes in exotic (kaonic and muonic) hydrogen/deuterium have been studied with the quantum-classical Monte Carlo code (QCMC) developed for 'ab initio' - calculations. It has been shown that the majority of kaonic hydrogen atoms during cascade are accelerated to high energies E ∼ 100 eV, which leads to a much lower value for the calculated yields Y of x-rays than predicted by the 'standard cascade model'. The modified QCMC scheme has been applied to the study of the cascade in μp and μd muonic atoms. A comparison of the calculated yields for K-series x-rays with experimental data directly indicates that the molecular structure of the hydrogen target and new types of non-radiative transitions are essential for the light muonic atoms, while they are negligible for heavy (kaonic) atoms. These processes have been considered and estimates of their probabilities are presented. (author)

  6. K$_{-}$ and K$_{-}$ polarizability from kaonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Backenstoss, Gerhard; Bergström, I; Bunaciu, T; Egger, J; Hagelberg, R; Hultberg, S; Koch, H; Lynen, Y; Ritter, H G; Schwitter, A; Tauscher, L

    1973-01-01

    The K/sup -/ mass was determined from kaonic atomic X-rays from Au and Ba to be 493.691+or-0.040 MeV. An upper limit for the polarizability of the K/sup -/ was found to be 0.020 fm/sup 3/ at 90% confidence. (18 refs).

  7. Intensities and strong interaction attenuation of kaonic x-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Backenstoss, Gerhard; Koch, H; Povel, H P; Schwitter, A; Tauscher, Ludwig

    1974-01-01

    Relative intensities of numerous kaonic X-ray transitions have been measured for the elements C, P, S, and Cl, from which level widths due to the strong K-nucleus absorption have been determined. From these and earlier published data, optical potential parameters have been derived and possible consequences on the nuclear matter distribution are discussed. (10 refs).

  8. Kaonic atoms – studies of the strong interaction with strangeness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marton J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The strong interaction of charged antikaons (K− with nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime is a fascinating topic. The antikaon plays a peculiar role in hadron physics due to the strong attraction antikaon-nucleon which is a key question for possible kaonic nuclear bound states. A rather direct experimental access to the antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths is provided by precision X-ray spectroscopy of transitions to low-lying states in light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen and deuterium. After the successful completion of precision measurements on kaonic hydrogen and helium isotopes by SIDDHARTA at DAΦNE/LNF, new X-ray studies with the focus on kaonic deuterium are in preparation (SIDDHARTA2. In the future with kaonic deuterium data the antikaon-nucleon isospin-dependent scattering lengths can be extracted for the first time. An overview of the experimental results of SIDDHARTA and an outlook to future perspectives in the SIDDHARTA2 experiments in this frontier research field will be given.

  9. Preliminary study of kaonic deuterium X-rays by the SIDDHARTA experiment at DAΦNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzi, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Beer, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria BC V8W3P6 (Canada); Berucci, C. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Bombelli, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bragadireanu, A.M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); IFIN-HH, Institutul National pentru Fizica si Inginerie Nucleara Horia Hulubei, Reactorului 30, Magurele (Romania); Cargnelli, M., E-mail: michael.cargnelli@oaaw.ac.at [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Curceanu, C.; D' Uffizi, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Fiorini, C.; Frizzi, T. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ghio, F. [INFN Sezione di Roma I and Instituto Superiore di Sanita, I-00161 Roma (Italy); Guaraldo, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Hayano, R. [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Iliescu, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Ishiwatari, T. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Iwasaki, M. [RIKEN, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); and others

    2013-06-03

    The study of the K{sup ¯}N system at very low energies plays a key role for the understanding of the strong interaction between hadrons in the strangeness sector. At the DAΦNE electron–positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati we studied kaonic atoms with Z=1 and Z=2, taking advantage of the low-energy charged kaons from Φ-mesons decaying nearly at rest. The SIDDHARTA experiment used X-ray spectroscopy of the kaonic atoms to determine the transition yields and the strong interaction induced shift and width of the lowest experimentally accessible level (1s for H and D and 2p for He). Shift and width are connected to the real and imaginary part of the scattering length. To disentangle the isospin dependent scattering lengths of the antikaon–nucleon interaction, measurements of K{sup −}p and of K{sup −}d are needed. We report here on an exploratory deuterium measurement, from which a limit for the yield of the K-series transitions was derived: Y(K{sub tot})<0.0143 and Y(K{sub α})<0.0039 (CL 90%). Also, the upcoming SIDDHARTA-2 kaonic deuterium experiment is introduced.

  10. Non-local effects in kaonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, M.; Florkowski, W.

    2000-04-01

    Optical potentials with non-local (gradient) terms are used to describe the spectra of kaonic atoms. The strength of the non-local terms is determined from a many-body calculation of the kaon self-energy in nuclear matter. The optical potentials show strong non-linearities in the nucleon density and sizeable non-local terms. We find that the non-local terms are quantitatively important and the results depend strongly on the way the gradient terms are arranged. Phenomenologically successful fits are obtained for p-wave like optical potentials. It is suggested that the microscopic form of the non-local interaction terms is obtained systematically by means of a semi-classical expansion of the nucleus structure. We conclude that a microscopic description of kaonic atom data requires further detailed studies of the microscopic K - nuclear dynamics. (orig.)

  11. Non-Local Effects in Kaonic Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, M.; Florkowski, W.

    2000-01-01

    Optical potentials with non-local (gradient) terms are used to describe the spectra of kaonic atoms. The strength of the non-local terms is determined from a many-body calculation of the kaon self energy in nuclear matter. We find that the non-local terms are quantitatively important and the results depend strongly on the way the gradient terms are arranged. Phenomenologically successful description is obtained for p-wave like optical potentials. It is suggested that the microscopic form of the non-local interaction terms is obtained systematically by means of a semi-classical expansion of the nucleus structure. (author)

  12. The E1 transitions in kaonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, I.E.

    1984-01-01

    The electric dipole transition rates in kanonic atoms are calculated by using distorted relativistic wave functions. The kaon-nucleus strong interaction which is responsible for the distortion of atomic states is considered to be proportional to the nuclear density and the effective isospin-averaged kaon-nucleon scattering length. Six atoms have been studied for which the last observed X-rays correspond to 3d-2p, 4f-3d, 5g-4f, 6h-5g, 7i-6h and 8j-7i transitions. It is found that the electric dipole transition rate is enhanced by an amount (0.3-7.6)x10 13 s -1 . (orig.)

  13. Atom-resolving x-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, B.; Hiort, T.; Materlik, G.; Nishino, Y.; Novikov, D. V.

    2000-01-01

    The current state of atomic resolution x-ray holography is discussed on the basis of theory and experimental results. X-ray holography is theoretically described in quantum theory. Presently-used experimental implementations are shown together with the data analysis used. Reconstructions of experimental and simulated holograms are compared for a Cu 3 Au crystal structure. Rigorous experimental realizations of pure direct and reciprocal x-ray holography methods are demonstrated, and future developments and applications of the method are suggested

  14. Microscopic kaonic-atom optical potential in finite nuclei with Λ(1405) and Σ(1385) resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Masaki; Hirenzaki, Satoru; Toki, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    We derive kaonic-atom optical potentials in finite nuclei microscopically by taking into account the K - NΛ(1405) and K - NΣ(1385) interactions. Using the microscopic optical potentials we solve kaonic atoms with the Klein-Gordon equation in momentum space and obtain the kaonic-atom level shifts and the widths. The experimental data are reproduced well. We discuss also phenomenological optical potentials and compare them with the microscopic ones. In addition, we derive optical potentials in the local-density approximation with the use of the finite-matter kaon self-energy. We find a similarity with the microscopic optical potential derived with finite geometry. (orig.)

  15. E2 nuclear resonance effects in pionic and kaonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batty, C.J.; Biagi, S.F.; Blecher, M.

    1977-09-01

    The attenuation due to the E2 nuclear resonance effect has been measured in hadronic atoms using pions with 111 Cd and 112 Cd, and for kaons with 122 Sn. Energies of the relevant X-ray and γ-ray transitions and of the X-ray cascade intensities have also been measured so as to give a self-consistent set of information. The results are found to be in very good agreement with theoretical calculations. (author)

  16. X-ray absorption in atomic potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomilsek, Jana Padeznik; Kodre, Alojz; Arcon, Iztok; Nemanic, Vincenc

    2008-01-01

    A new high-temperature absorption cell for potassium vapor is described. X-ray absorption coefficient of atomic potassium is determined in the energy interval of 600 eV above the K edge where thresholds for simultaneous excitations of 1s and outer electrons, down to [1s2p] excitation, appear. The result represents also the atomic absorption background for XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) structure analysis. The K ionization energy in the potassium vapor is determined and compared with theoretical data and with the value for the metal

  17. X-ray spectroscopy from exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    Why do experimentalists study exotic atoms, in particular antiprotonic atoms? The answer is simple: the information about electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions that can be obtained by doing X-ray spectroscopy from exotic atoms is really worth the effort. It is possible to (1) enlarge the knowledge about the properties of exotic particles (such as mass and magnetic moment); (2) open a possibility to test quantum electrodynamics; (3) get detailed insight into the shape of nuclei (characterized by the nuclear radium and higher momenta) and even into the neutron distribution in the nucleus (neutron halo); and (4) use it as a powerful tool to learn about the strong interaction at very low relative hadron-nucleon velocities

  18. Resonant x-ray Raman scattering from atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering and elastic x-ray scattering are fundamentally related processes. When the x-ray photon energy is near the ionization threshold for an inner shell, the inelastic channel is dominated by resonant x-ray Raman scattering. Studies of this emission not only illuminate the resonant scattering process in general, they also point to new opportunities for spectral studies of electronic structure using x-rays. Atoms in the form of a free gas provide an ideal target for testing the current theoretical understanding of resonant x-ray Raman scattering. In addition, x-ray scattering from molecular gases demonstrates the effect of bonding symmetry on the polarization and angular distribution of the scattered x-rays. Comparisons of experimental data with theory demonstrate both the successes and limitations of simple, single-electron interpretations of the scattering process

  19. X-ray holography. Atoms in three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegze, M.

    2005-01-01

    The principles of atomic resolution X-ray holography was elaborated in 1991. X-ray photons scatter thousand times less on atoms than electrons of the same wavelength. As a result, both free path and penetration depth are higher which giver information about the bulk material. X-ray holography is realized by irradiating the single crystal sample with radiation from external X-ray source. The incident radiation is ionizing the atoms of the sample to emit fluorescent radiation. The angle dependence of the fluorescent radiation results an image containing the hologram. The hologram itself is extremely small compared to the background that needs 10 10 capturing photons to recover image. Using Thomas Gog's method and synchrotron radiation the X-ray holography becomes more usable, but the method still needs refining both experimentally and theoretically. (TRA)

  20. Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Geffert, Otfried; Santra, Robin

    2017-03-01

    Compton scattering is the nonresonant inelastic scattering of an x-ray photon by an electron and has been used to probe the electron momentum distribution in gas-phase and condensed-matter samples. In the low x-ray intensity regime, Compton scattering from atoms dominantly comes from bound electrons in neutral atoms, neglecting contributions from bound electrons in ions and free (ionized) electrons. In contrast, in the high x-ray intensity regime, the sample experiences severe ionization via x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics. Thus, it becomes necessary to take into account all the contributions to the Compton scattering signal when atoms are exposed to high-intensity x-ray pulses provided by x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). In this paper, we investigate the Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity, using an extension of the integrated x-ray atomic physics toolkit, xatom. As the x-ray fluence increases, there is a significant contribution from ionized electrons to the Compton spectra, which gives rise to strong deviations from the Compton spectra of neutral atoms. The present study provides not only understanding of the fundamental XFEL-matter interaction but also crucial information for single-particle imaging experiments, where Compton scattering is no longer negligible. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. B. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Sang-Kil Son was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. B as an Emerging Leader.

  1. Studying atomic-resolution by X-ray fluorescence holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hongyi; Chen Jianwen; Xie Honglan; Zhu Huafeng; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the results of numerical simulations of X-ray fluorescence holograms and the reconstructed atomic images for Fe single crystal are given. The influences of the recording angles ranges and the polarization effect on the reconstruction of the atomic images are discussed. The process for removing twin images by multiple energy fluorescence holography and expanding the energy range of the incident X-rays to improve the resolution of the reconstructed images is presented

  2. X-ray holography with an atomic scatterer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mityureva, A.A.; Smirnov, V.V., E-mail: valery_smirnov@mail.ru

    2016-08-15

    X-ray holography scheme with reference scatterer consisting of heavy atom as reference center and its link to an object consisting of several light atoms and using controlled variation of the alignment is represented. The scheme can reproduce an object in three dimensions with atomic resolution. The distorting factors of reconstruction are considered. - Highlights: • X-ray holography scheme with a reference wave formed by atomic scatterer. • 3D object reconstruction with atomic resolution from the set of holograms. • Simple formula for the distorting factor in reconstruction.

  3. Roadmap of ultrafast x-ray atomic and molecular physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Linda; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Gühr, Markus; Bucksbaum, Philip H.; Simon, Marc; Mukamel, Shaul; Rohringer, Nina; Prince, Kevin C.; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Meyer, Michael; Rudenko, Artem; Rolles, Daniel; Bostedt, Christoph; Fuchs, Matthias; Reis, David A.; Santra, Robin; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François; Vrakking, Marc; Isinger, Marcus; Kroon, David; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; L'Huillier, Anne; Wörner, Hans Jakob; Leone, Stephen R.

    2018-02-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) and table-top sources of x-rays based upon high harmonic generation (HHG) have revolutionized the field of ultrafast x-ray atomic and molecular physics, largely due to an explosive growth in capabilities in the past decade. XFELs now provide unprecedented intensity (1020 W cm-2) of x-rays at wavelengths down to ˜1 Ångstrom, and HHG provides unprecedented time resolution (˜50 attoseconds) and a correspondingly large coherent bandwidth at longer wavelengths. For context, timescales can be referenced to the Bohr orbital period in hydrogen atom of 150 attoseconds and the hydrogen-molecule vibrational period of 8 femtoseconds; wavelength scales can be referenced to the chemically significant carbon K-edge at a photon energy of ˜280 eV (44 Ångstroms) and the bond length in methane of ˜1 Ångstrom. With these modern x-ray sources one now has the ability to focus on individual atoms, even when embedded in a complex molecule, and view electronic and nuclear motion on their intrinsic scales (attoseconds and Ångstroms). These sources have enabled coherent diffractive imaging, where one can image non-crystalline objects in three dimensions on ultrafast timescales, potentially with atomic resolution. The unprecedented intensity available with XFELs has opened new fields of multiphoton and nonlinear x-ray physics where behavior of matter under extreme conditions can be explored. The unprecedented time resolution and pulse synchronization provided by HHG sources has kindled fundamental investigations of time delays in photoionization, charge migration in molecules, and dynamics near conical intersections that are foundational to AMO physics and chemistry. This roadmap coincides with the year when three new XFEL facilities, operating at Ångstrom wavelengths, opened for users (European XFEL, Swiss-FEL and PAL-FEL in Korea) almost doubling the present worldwide number of XFELs, and documents the remarkable progress in HHG capabilities since

  4. International Workshop on Exotic Hadronic Atoms, Deeply Bound Kaonic Nuclear States and Antihydrogen : Present Results, Future Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, E; Curceanu, C; Trento 2006; Trento06

    2006-01-01

    These are the miniproceedings of the workshop "Exotic hadronic atoms, deeply bound kaonic nuclear states and antihydrogen: present results, future challenges," which was held at the European Centre for Theoretical Nuclear Physics and Related Studies (ECT*), Trento (Italy), June 19-24, 2006. The document includes a short presentation of the topics, the list of participants, and a short contribution from each speaker.

  5. Auger electron and X-ray spectroscopy of hollow atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morgenstern, R; Johnson, RL; Schmidtbocking, H; Sonntag, BF

    1997-01-01

    Hollow atoms as formed during collisions of multiply charged ions on metallic, semiconducting and insulating surfaces have in recent years successfully been investigated by various spectroscopic methods: low- and high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy as well as high resolution Auger electron

  6. Single atom identification by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovejoy, T. C.; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Falke, M.; Kaeppel, A.; Terborg, R.; Zan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, single, isolated impurity atoms of silicon and platinum in monolayer and multilayer graphene are identified. Simultaneously acquired electron energy loss spectra confirm the elemental identification. Contamination difficulties are overcome by employing near-UHV sample conditions. Signal intensities agree within a factor of two with standardless estimates.

  7. X-ray spectroscopy with normal and exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, I.E.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is a powerful analytical tool for elemental analysis and also for the study of nuclear properties. In recent years these has been extensive utilization of x-ray spectral analysis for the purpose of plasma diagnostics. These studies are vital for the development of controlled nuclear fusion technology. The formation of special atoms containing particles heavier than electrons is another area in which x-ray spectra give detailed knowledge of the sizes and shapes of atomic nuclei, masses and magnetic momenta of bound particles and the nature of interaction between bound particle and the nucleus. All these aspects make x-ray spectra of uniquely rich source of information on material and nuclear properties. The present article provides some glimpses of how this information is extracted. The choice of topics is biased towards nuclear physics. The presentation is not attempted to the exhaustive and is aimed at conveying the essential physical ideas without going into technical details. (author) 6 figs

  8. X-ray refractive index of laser-dressed atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Buth, Christian; Santra, Robin

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the complex index of refraction in the x-ray regime of atoms in laser light. The laser (intensity up to 10^13 W/cm^2, wavelength 800nm) modifies the atomic states but, by assumption, does not excite or ionize the atoms in their electronic ground state. Using quantum electrodynamics, we devise an ab initio theory to calculate the dynamic dipole polarizability and the photoabsorption cross section, which are subsequently used to determine the real and imaginary part, respectivel...

  9. Soft x-ray photoionization of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, Svante

    2005-01-01

    A review of resonant and non-resonant electron spectroscopy on atoms and molecules at third generation synchrotron radiation facilities is given. The high brilliance of the soft x-ray radiation has made possible new types of experiments giving information on the fundamental behaviour of photoionization. The relevance of Einstein's photoelectric law, and notably the question of when electron energies disperse or do not disperse with the photon energy, is given special attention

  10. Compilation of data from hadronic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poth, H.

    1979-01-01

    This compilation is a survey of the existing data of hadronic atoms (pionic-atoms, kaonic-atoms, antiprotonic-atoms, sigmonic-atoms). It collects measurements of the energies, intensities and line width of X-rays from hadronic atoms. Averaged values for each hadronic atom are given and the data are summarized. The listing contains data on 58 pionic-atoms, on 54 kaonic-atoms, on 23 antiprotonic-atoms and on 20 sigmonic-atoms. (orig./HB) [de

  11. X-ray holography: atoms in 3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegze, M.; Faigel, G.; Bortel, G.; Marchesini, S.; Belakhovsky, M.; Simionovici, A.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray holography is a novel method for the investigation of local atomic arrangements in solids. In conventional diffraction experiments only the intensity of the scattered radiation is measured, its phase is lost. This loss of information makes difficult to reconstruct the atomic arrangements. In holography both the intensity and the phase information is recorded. Using one of the atoms of the solid as source or detector of the x-radiation, atomic resolution can be reached. A three-dimensional picture of the atoms surrounding the source/detector atom can be easily reconstructed from the measured hologram. While in principle the measurement is very simple, in practice the weak signal-to-background ratio (∼ 10-3) makes it difficult. Using high intensity synchrotron radiation the measurement time can be reduced and high quality holograms can be recorded. In this talk we review the principles and experimental techniques of atomic resolution x-ray holography and present a few examples of its application. (author)

  12. X-ray core states, atomic size and Moseley's law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.Y.; Karstens, William

    2000-01-01

    Vinti's dipolar sum-rule for the spatial extent of quantum states was tested on atomic K-shell and ns valence states. Agreement between radii derived from absorption spectra and from atomic-structure calculations is excellent, provided Pauli-principle-prohibited transitions are accounted for. These many-electron corrections to the single-electron sum-rule contributed less than 20% to the radii, which supports application of single-electron rules to electron-excess defects as a first approximation. We found the oscillator strength for K-shell excitations decreases rapidly with atomic number because of strength transfer to higher-lying p states. Hence, K-shell contributions to radiation damage decrease with increasing atomic number. A new interpretation of Moseley's law for the X-ray K edge in terms of K-shell radii is described

  13. X-ray fluorescence holography and multiple-energy x-ray holography: A critical comparison of atomic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Len, P.M.; Gog, T.; Fadley, C.S.; Materlik, G.

    1997-01-01

    We compare x-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) and multiple-energy x-ray holography (MEXH), two techniques that have recently been used to obtain experimental three-dimensional atomic images. For single-energy holograms, these methods are equivalent by virtue of the optical reciprocity theorem. However, XFH can only record holographic information at the characteristic fluorescence energies of the emitting species, while MEXH can record holographic information at any energy above the fluorescent edge of the emitter, thus enabling the suppression of real-twin overlaps and other aberrations and artifacts in atomic images. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  14. Production of hollow atoms by high brightness x-ray sources and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moribayashi, Kengo

    2004-01-01

    We study x-ray emissions from the (multi-)inner-shell states and hollow atoms of Si ions excited by high intensity x-ray sources. It is found that the x-ray number from multi-inner-shell excited states (1s 2 2s 2 2p k 3s 2 3p 2 , k=1-4) and hollow atoms (1s 2 2s 2 3p 2 ) is affected greatly by the high intensity short-pulse x-rays and little by weak intensity post-long pulse x-rays. The ratio of the x-ray intensities from hollow atoms to those from the multi-inner-shell excited states becomes almost independent of the pulses and dependent on the intensities of x-ray sources. This ratio may be used for the measurement of intensities of high intensity short pulse x-ray sources. (author)

  15. Atomic Physics Measurements in Support of X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. E.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M.; Porter, F. S.; Obst, M.; Lepson, J. K.; Desai, P.; Gu, M. F.

    2010-10-01

    X-ray astronomy has been a voracious consumer of atomic data, especially after the launch of the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray Observatories, which have produced very high-resolution grating spectra of point sources. One of the important issues has been to understand the physics underlying the Fe L-shell spectra, and the Fe XVII spectrum in particular. A lot of progress has been made, including measurements of the electron-impact and resonance excitation cross sections, which now provides a rather clear picture of the production mechanism of the Fe XVII spectrum. Recent measurements of the radiative rates provide additional information on the deexcitation channels, while investigations of dielectronic satellite transitions provide a measure of the electron temperature. Many questions, however, still remain. Work at LLNL was performed under the auspices of DOE under contract DE-AC53-07NA27344 and supported by NASA's APRA program under contracts NNH07AF81I and NNG06WF08I. Part of this work was supported by Chandra Cycle 10 Award AR9-0002X.

  16. A Comprehensive X-Ray Absorption Model for Atomic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyca, T. W.; Bautista, M. A.; Hasoglu, M. F.; Garcia, J.; Gatuzz, E.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kallman, T. R.; Manson, S. T.; Mendoza, C.; Raassen, A. J. J.; hide

    2013-01-01

    An analytical formula is developed to accurately represent the photoabsorption cross section of atomic Oxygen for all energies of interest in X-ray spectral modeling. In the vicinity of the K edge, a Rydberg series expression is used to fit R-matrix results, including important orbital relaxation effects, that accurately predict the absorption oscillator strengths below threshold and merge consistently and continuously to the above-threshold cross section. Further, minor adjustments are made to the threshold energies in order to reliably align the atomic Rydberg resonances after consideration of both experimental and observed line positions. At energies far below or above the K-edge region, the formulation is based on both outer- and inner-shell direct photoionization, including significant shake-up and shake-off processes that result in photoionization-excitation and double-photoionization contributions to the total cross section. The ultimate purpose for developing a definitive model for oxygen absorption is to resolve standing discrepancies between the astronomically observed and laboratory-measured line positions, and between the inferred atomic and molecular oxygen abundances in the interstellar medium from XSTAR and SPEX spectral models.

  17. Two-energy twin image removal in atomic-resolution x-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Hayashi, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Matsubara, E.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a two-energy twin image removal algorithm for atomic-resolution x-ray holography. The validity of the algorithm is shown in a theoretical simulation and in an experiment of internal detector x-ray holography using a ZnSe single crystal. The algorithm, compared to the widely used multiple-energy algorithm, allows efficient measurement of holograms, and is especially important when the available x-ray energies are fixed. It enables twin image free holography using characteristic x rays from laboratory generators and x-ray pulses of free-electron lasers

  18. Ultrafast atomic process in X-ray emission by using inner-shell ionization method for sodium and carbon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-07-01

    An ultrafast inner-shell ionization process with X-ray emission stimulated by high-intensity short-pulse X-ray is studied. Carbon and sodium atoms are treated as target matter. It is shown that atomic processes of the target determine the necessary X-ray intensity for X-ray laser emission as well as the features of X-ray laser such as wavelength and duration time. The intensity also depends on the density of initial atoms. Furthermore, we show that as the intensity of X-ray source becomes high, the multi-inner-shell ionization predominates, leading to the formation of hollow atoms. As the density of hollow atoms is increased by the pumping X-ray power, the emission of X-rays is not only of significance for high brightness X-ray measurement but also is good for X-ray lasing. New classes of experiments of pump X-ray probe and X-ray laser are suggested. (author)

  19. Atomic x-ray production by relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioannou, J.G.

    1977-12-01

    The interaction of heavy ion projectiles with the electrons of target atoms gives rise to the production, in the target, of K-, L- or higher shell vacancies which are in turn followed by the emission of characteristic x-rays. The calculation of the theoretical value of the K- and L-shells vacancy production cross section was carried out for heavy ion projectiles of any energy. The transverse component of the cross section is calculated for the first time in detail and extensive tables of its numerical value as a function of its parameters are also given. Experimental work for 4.88 GeV protons and 3 GeV carbon ions is described. The K vacancy cross section has been measured for a variety of targets from Ti to U. The agreement between the theoretical predictions and experimental results for the 4.88 GeV protons is rather satisfactory. For the 3 GeV carbon ions, however, it is observed that the deviation of the theoretical and experimental values of the K vacancy production becomes larger with the heavier target element. Consequently, the simple scaling law of Z 1 2 for the cross section of the heavy ion with atomic number Z 1 to the proton cross section is not true, for the K-shell at least. A dependence on the atomic number Z 2 of the target of the form (Z 1 - αZ 2 ) 2 , instead of Z 1 2 , is found to give extremely good agreement between theory and experiment. Although the exact physical meaning of such dependence is not yet clearly understood, it is believed to be indicative of some sort of screening effect of the incoming fast projectile by the fast moving in Bohr orbits K-shell electrons of the target. The enhancement of the K-shell ionization cross section by relativistic heavy ions on heavy targets is also discussed in terms of its practical applications in various branches of science and technology

  20. Numerical simulation study for atomic-resolution x-ray fluorescence holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Honglan; Gao Hongyi; Chen Jianwen; Xiong Shisheng; Xu Zhizhan; Wang Junyue; Zhu Peiping; Xian Dingchang

    2003-01-01

    Based on the principle of x-ray fluorescence holography, an iron single crystal model of a body-centred cubic lattice is numerically simulated. From the fluorescence hologram produced numerically, the Fe atomic images were reconstructed. The atomic images of the (001), (100), (010) crystallographic planes were consistent with the corresponding atomic positions of the model. The result indicates that one can obtain internal structure images of single crystals at atomic-resolution by using x-ray fluorescence holography

  1. Kaonic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oset E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available I make a short review of the situation of the kaonic systems, with novel information supporting the two Λ(1405 states from the K-d → nπΣ reaction. A review is made of the K¯$ar K$NN system with recent calculations converging to smaller bindings and larger widths. Novel systems involving two kaons and one nucleon or three kaons are also reported and finally a short discussion is made of the analogous state DNN for which recent studies find a large binding and a small width.

  2. A Comprehensive X-Ray Absorption Model for Atomic Oxygen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorzyca, T.W.; Bautista, M.A.; Hasoglu, M.F.; García, J.; Gatuzz, E.; Kaastra, J.S.; Kallman, T.R.; Manson, S.T.; Mendoza, C.; Raassen, A.J.J.; de Vries, C.P.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2013-01-01

    An analytical formula is developed to accurately represent the photoabsorption cross section of O I for all energies of interest in X-ray spectral modeling. In the vicinity of the K edge, a Rydberg series expression is used to fit R-matrix results, including important orbital relaxation effects,

  3. Ultra fast atomic process in X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Tajima, T

    1998-03-01

    An ultra-fast atomic process together with X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization using high intensity (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse (20fs) X-ray is studied. A new class of experiment is proposed and a useful pumping source is suggested. In this method, it is found that the gain value of X-ray laser amounts to larger than 1000(1/cm) with use of the density of 10{sup 22}/cm{sup 3} of carbon atom. Electron impact ionization effect and initial density effect as well as intensity of pumping source effect are also discussed. (author)

  4. AtomDB Progress Report: Atomic data and new models for X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cumbee, Renata; Mullen, Patrick Dean; AtomDB Team

    2018-06-01

    The AtomDB project collects atomic data from both theoretical and observational/experimental sources, providing both a convenient interface (http://www.atomdb.org/Webguide/webguide.php) as well as providing input to spectral models for many types of astrophysical X-ray plasmas. We have released several updates to AtomDB in response to the Hitomi data, including new data for the Fe K complex, and have expanded the range of models available in AtomDB to include the Kronos charge exchange models from Mullen at al. (2016, ApJS, 224, 2). Combined with the previous AtomDB charge exchange model (http://www.atomdb.org/CX/), these data enable a velocity-dependent model for X-ray and EUV charge exchange spectra. We also present a new Kappa-distribution spectral model, enabling plasmas with non-Maxwellian electron distributions to be modeled with AtomDB. Tools are provided within pyAtomDB to explore and exploit these new plasma models. This presentation will review these enhancements and describe plans for the new few years of database and code development in preparation for XARM, Athena, and (hopefully) Arcus.

  5. AtomDB: Expanding an Accessible and Accurate Atomic Database for X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall

    Since its inception in 2001, the AtomDB has become the standard repository of accurate and accessible atomic data for the X-ray astrophysics community, including laboratory astrophysicists, observers, and modelers. Modern calculations of collisional excitation rates now exist - and are in AtomDB - for all abundant ions in a hot plasma. AtomDB has expanded beyond providing just a collisional model, and now also contains photoionization data from XSTAR as well as a charge exchange model, amongst others. However, building and maintaining an accurate and complete database that can fully exploit the diagnostic potential of high-resolution X-ray spectra requires further work. The Hitomi results, sadly limited as they were, demonstrated the urgent need for the best possible wavelength and rate data, not merely for the strongest lines but for the diagnostic features that may have 1% or less of the flux of the strong lines. In particular, incorporation of weak but powerfully diagnostic satellite lines will be crucial to understanding the spectra expected from upcoming deep observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton, as well as the XARM and Athena satellites. Beyond incorporating this new data, a number of groups, both experimental and theoretical, have begun to produce data with errors and/or sensitivity estimates. We plan to use this to create statistically meaningful spectral errors on collisional plasmas, providing practical uncertainties together with model spectra. We propose to continue to (1) engage the X-ray astrophysics community regarding their issues and needs, notably by a critical comparison with other related databases and tools, (2) enhance AtomDB to incorporate a large number of satellite lines as well as updated wavelengths with error estimates, (3) continue to update the AtomDB with the latest calculations and laboratory measurements, in particular velocity-dependent charge exchange rates, and (4) enhance existing tools, and create new ones as needed to

  6. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barty, C.P.J.

    2000-01-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  7. Higher-order processes in x-ray photoionization of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanter, E. P.; Dunford, R. W.; Krassig, B.; Southworth, S. H.; Young, L.

    2006-01-01

    There are several fourth-generation X-ray light source projects now underway around the world and it is anticipated that by the end of the decade, one or more of these X-ray free-electron lasers will be operational. In this contribution, we describe recent measurements and future plans to study both multielectron and multiphoton atomic photoionization. Although such higher-order processes are rare with present third-generation sources, they will be commonplace in experimental work with the new sources. The topics we discuss here are double K-shell ionization and two-photon X-ray photoionization

  8. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C.P.J. [University of California, Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science, Urey Hall, Mali Code 0339, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  9. Hydrogen atoms in protein structures: high-resolution X-ray diffraction structure of the DFPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrogen atoms represent about half of the total number of atoms in proteins and are often involved in substrate recognition and catalysis. Unfortunately, X-ray protein crystallography at usual resolution fails to access directly their positioning, mainly because light atoms display weak contributions to diffraction. However, sub-Ångstrom diffraction data, careful modeling and a proper refinement strategy can allow the positioning of a significant part of hydrogen atoms. Results A comprehensive study on the X-ray structure of the diisopropyl-fluorophosphatase (DFPase) was performed, and the hydrogen atoms were modeled, including those of solvent molecules. This model was compared to the available neutron structure of DFPase, and differences in the protein and the active site solvation were noticed. Conclusions A further examination of the DFPase X-ray structure provides substantial evidence about the presence of an activated water molecule that may constitute an interesting piece of information as regard to the enzymatic hydrolysis mechanism. PMID:23915572

  10. High-resolution measurements of x rays from ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudson, A.R.

    1974-01-01

    High resolution measurements of K x-ray spectra produced by ion-atom collisions at MeV energies are presented. These measurements indicate that a distribution of L-shell vacancies accompanies K-shell excitation. The variation of these spectra as a function of incident ion energy and atomic number is discussed. Difficulties in the analysis of these spectra due to rearrangement of vacancies between the time of the collision and the time of x-ray emission are considered. The use of high resolution x-ray measurements to obtain information on projectile ion vacancy configurations is demonstrated by data for Ar ions in KCl. X-ray spectra from Al projectiles in a variety of targets were measured and the effect of target composition on these spectra is discussed

  11. Rayleigh scatter in kilovoltage x-ray imaging: is the independent atom approximation good enough?

    OpenAIRE

    Poludniowski, G; Evans, PM; Webb, S

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is the gold standard method for modelling scattering processes in medical x-ray imaging. General-purpose Monte Carlo codes, however, typically use the independent atom approximation (IAA). This is known to be inaccurate for Rayleigh scattering, for many materials, in the forward direction. This work addresses whether the IAA is sufficient for the typical modelling tasks in medical kilovoltage x-ray imaging. As a means of comparison, we incorporate a more realistic 'inte...

  12. Nano-fabrication of diffractive optics for soft X-ray and atom beam focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehbein, S.

    2002-01-01

    Nano-structuring processes are described for manufacturing diffractive optics for the condenser-monochromator set-up of the transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) and for the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) at the BESSY II electron storage ring in Berlin. Furthermore, a process for manufacturing free-standing nickel zone plates for helium atom beam focusing experiments is presented. (author)

  13. Influence of experimental conditions on atom column visibility in energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dycus, J.H.; Xu, W.; Sang, X. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partners Way Engineering Building 1, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); D' Alfonso, A.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Chen, Z. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Weyland, M. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Allen, L.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Findlay, S.D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); LeBeau, J.M., E-mail: jmlebeau@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partners Way Engineering Building 1, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Here we report the influence of key experimental parameters on atomically resolved energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). In particular, we examine the role of the probe forming convergence semi-angle, sample thickness, lattice spacing, and dwell/collection time. We show that an optimum specimen-dependent probe forming convergence angle exists to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of the atomically resolved signal in EDX mapping. Furthermore, we highlight that it can be important to select an appropriate dwell time to efficiently process the X-ray signal. These practical considerations provide insight for experimental parameters in atomic resolution energy dispersive X-ray analysis. - Highlights: • Impacts of microscope operating conditions on EDX signal and atom column contrast are demonstrated. • Influence of sample thickness and lattice spacing is shown. • Conditions for obtaining optimal signal and contrast for different sample types are discussed. • Effects of dwell time during EDX acquisition are discussed.

  14. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms

  15. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms.

  16. X-ray fluorescence from the element with atomic number Z=120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fregeau, M.O.; Morjean, M.; Bonnet, E.; Chbihi, A.; Frankland, J.D.; Jacquet, D.; Rivet, M.F.; Tassan-Got, L.; Dechery, F.; Drouart, A.; Nalpas, L.; Ledoux, X.; Parlog, M.; Parlog, M.; Ciortea, C.; Dumitriu, D.; Fluerasu, D.; Gugiu, M.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V.L.; Marchi, T.; Marchi, T.; Fabris, D.; Corsi, A.; Barlini, S.

    2012-01-01

    An atomic clock based on x-ray fluorescence yields has been used to estimate the mean characteristic time for fusion followed by fission in reactions 238 U + 64 Ni at 6.6 MeV/A. Inner shell vacancies are created during the collisions in the electronic structure of the possibly formed Z = 120 compound nuclei. The filling of these vacancies accompanied by a x-ray emission with energies characteristic of Z = 120 can take place only if the atomic transitions occur before nuclear fission. Therefore, the x-ray yield characteristic of the united atom with 120 protons is strongly related to the fission time and to the vacancy lifetimes. K x rays from the element with Z = 120 have been unambiguously identified from a coupled analysis of the involved nuclear reaction mechanisms and of the measured photon spectra. A minimum mean fission time τ f = 2.5 * 10 -18 s has been deduced for Z = 120 from the measured x-ray multiplicity. (authors)

  17. Nonspherical atomic ground-state densities and chemical deformation densities from x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedenberg, K.; Schwarz, W.H.E.

    1990-01-01

    Presuming that chemical insight can be gained from the difference between the molecular electron density and the superposition of the ground-state densities of the atoms in a molecule, it is pointed out that, for atoms with degenerate ground states, an unpromoted ''atom in a molecule'' is represented by a specific ensemble of the degenerate atomic ground-state wave functions and that this ensemble is determined by the anisotropic local surroundings. The resulting atomic density contributions are termed oriented ground state densities, and the corresponding density difference is called the chemical deformation density. The constraints implied by this conceptual approach for the atomic density contributions are formulated and a method is developed for determining them from x-ray scattering data. The electron density of the appropriate promolecule and its x-ray scattering are derived, the determination of the parameters of the promolecule is outlined, and the chemical deformation density is formulated

  18. Direct observation of ultrafast atomic motion using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shymanovich, U.

    2007-11-13

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the atomic motion in laser irradiated solids on a picosecond to subpicosecond time-scale using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique. In the second chapter, the laser system, the laser-plasma based X-ray source and the experimental setup for optical pump / X-ray probe measurements were presented. Chapter 3 is devoted to the characterization and comparison of different types of X-ray optics. Chapter 4 presented the time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments performed for this thesis. The first two sections of this chapter discuss the measurements of initially unexpected strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity of the X-ray probe beam. The elimination of the strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity represented an important prerequisite to perform the study of lattice heating in Germanium after femtosecond optical excitation by measuring the transient Debye-Waller effect. The third section describes the investigations of acoustic waves upon ultrafast optical excitation and discusses the two different pressure contributions driving them: the thermal and the electronic ones. (orig.)

  19. Direct observation of ultrafast atomic motion using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shymanovich, U.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the atomic motion in laser irradiated solids on a picosecond to subpicosecond time-scale using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique. In the second chapter, the laser system, the laser-plasma based X-ray source and the experimental setup for optical pump / X-ray probe measurements were presented. Chapter 3 is devoted to the characterization and comparison of different types of X-ray optics. Chapter 4 presented the time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments performed for this thesis. The first two sections of this chapter discuss the measurements of initially unexpected strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity of the X-ray probe beam. The elimination of the strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity represented an important prerequisite to perform the study of lattice heating in Germanium after femtosecond optical excitation by measuring the transient Debye-Waller effect. The third section describes the investigations of acoustic waves upon ultrafast optical excitation and discusses the two different pressure contributions driving them: the thermal and the electronic ones. (orig.)

  20. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  1. Broadband X-ray Imaging in the Near-Field Region of an Airblast Atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Danyu; Bothell, Julie; Morgan, Timothy; Heindel, Theodore

    2017-11-01

    The atomization process has a close connection to the efficiency of many spray applications. Examples include improved fuel atomization increasing the combustion efficiency of aircraft engines, or controlled droplet size and spray angle enhancing the quality and speed of the painting process. Therefore, it is vital to understand the physics of the atomization process, but the near-field region is typically optically dense and difficult to probe with laser-based or intrusive measurement techniques. In this project, broadband X-ray radiography and X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging were performed in the near-field region of a canonical coaxial airblast atomizer. The X-ray absorption rate was enhanced by adding 20% by weight of Potassium Iodide to the liquid phase to increase image contrast. The radiographs provided an estimate of the liquid effective mean path length and spray angle at the nozzle exit for different flow conditions. The reconstructed CT images provided a 3D map of the time-average liquid spray distribution. X-ray imaging was used to quantify the changes in the near-field spray characteristics for various coaxial airblast atomizer flow conditions. Office of Naval Research.

  2. X-ray atomic scattering factors of low-Z ions with a core hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.

    2007-01-01

    Short and intense x-ray pulses may be used for atomic-resolution diffraction imaging of single biological molecules. One of the dominant damage mechanisms is atomic ionization, resulting in a large fraction of atoms with core holes. We calculated the atomic scattering factor of atoms with atomic charge numbers between 3 and 10 in different ionization states with and without a core hole. Our results show that orbital occupation and the change of the orbitals upon core ionization (core relaxation) have a significant impact on the diffraction pattern

  3. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  4. Atomic holography with electrons and x-rays: Theoretical and experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Len, P.M.

    1997-06-01

    Gabor first proposed holography in 1948 as a means to experimentally record the amplitude and phase of scattered wavefronts, relative to a direct unscattered wave, and to use such a open-quotes hologramclose quotes to directly image atomic structure. But imaging at atomic resolution has not yet been possible in the way he proposed. Much more recently, Szoeke in 1986 noted that photoexcited atoms can emit photoelectron of fluorescent x-ray wavefronts that are scattered by neighboring atoms, thus yielding the direct and scattered wavefronts as detected in the far field that can then be interpreted as holographic in nature. By now, several algorithms for directly reconstructing three-dimensional atomic images from electron holograms have been proposed (e.g. by Barton) and successfully tested against experiment and theory. Very recently, Tegze and Faigel, and Grog et al. have recorded experimental x-ray fluorescence holograms, and these are found to yield atomic images that are more free of the kinds of aberrations caused by the non-ideal emission or scattering of electrons. The basic principles of these holographic atomic imaging methods are reviewed, including illustrative applications of the reconstruction algorithms to both theoretical and experimental electron and x-ray holograms. The author also discusses the prospects and limitations of these newly emerging atomic structural probes

  5. An x ray scatter approach for non-destructive chemical analysis of low atomic numbered elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, H. Richard

    1993-01-01

    A non-destructive x-ray scatter (XRS) approach has been developed, along with a rapid atomic scatter algorithm for the detection and analysis of low atomic-numbered elements in solids, powders, and liquids. The present method of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) makes the analysis of light elements (i.e., less than sodium; less than 11) extremely difficult. Detection and measurement become progressively worse as atomic numbers become smaller, due to a competing process called 'Auger Emission', which reduces fluorescent intensity, coupled with the high mass absorption coefficients exhibited by low energy x-rays, the detection and determination of low atomic-numbered elements by x-ray spectrometry is limited. However, an indirect approach based on the intensity ratio of Compton and Rayleigh scattered has been used to define light element components in alloys, plastics and other materials. This XRS technique provides qualitative and quantitative information about the overall constituents of a variety of samples.

  6. Investigation of atomic correlations in amorphous substances in the event of x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkelund, K.; Dahl Jensen, K.

    1990-06-01

    The aim was to determine a procedure for the experimental investigation of atomic correlations in monatomic amorphous substances (exemplified in amorphic germanium) that occur in relation to X-ray diffractometry, based on the classic theory of spreading. The underlying theory and a description of the experimental procedures are presented. (AB)

  7. Electron and X-ray emission in collisions of multiply charged ions and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerlee, P.H.

    1979-01-01

    The author presents experimental results of electron and X-ray emission following slow collisions of multiply charged ions and atoms. The aim of the investigation was to study the mechanisms which are responsible for the emission. (G.T.H.)

  8. Annealing induced atomic rearrangements on (Ga,In) (N,As) probed by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Higashi, Kotaro; Fuyuno, Satoshi; Morifuji, Masato; Kondow, Masahiko; Trampert, Achim

    2018-04-13

    We study the effects of annealing on (Ga 0.64 ,In 0.36 ) (N 0.045 ,As 0.955 ) using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure measurements. We observed surface oxidation and termination of the N-As bond defects caused by the annealing process. Specifically, we observed a characteristic chemical shift towards lower binding energies in the photoelectron spectra related to In. This phenomenon appears to be caused by the atomic arrangement, which produces increased In-N bond configurations within the matrix, as indicated by the X-ray absorption fine structure measurements. The reduction in the binding energies of group-III In, which occurs concomitantly with the atomic rearrangements of the matrix, causes the differences in the electronic properties of the system before and after annealing.

  9. Extending synchrotron-based atomic physics experiments into the hard X-ray region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBrun, T.

    1996-01-01

    The high-brightness, hard x-ray beams available from third-generation synchrotron sources are opening new opportunities to study the deepest inner shells of atoms, an area where little work has been done and phenomena not observed in less tightly bound inner-shells are manifested. In addition scattering processes which are weak at lower energies become important, providing another tool to investigate atomic structure as well as an opportunity to study photon/atom interactions beyond photoabsorption. In this contribution the authors discuss some of the issues related to extending synchrotron-based atomic physics experiments into the hard x-ray region from the physical and the experimental point of view. They close with a discussion of a technique, resonant Raman scattering, that may prove invaluable in determining the spectra of the very highly-excited states resulting from the excitation of deep inner shells

  10. Detection of hot muonic hydrogen atoms emitted in vacuum using x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Bailey, J.M.; Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M.; Huber, T.M.; Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.; Petitjean, C.

    1992-01-01

    Negative muons are stopped in solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. It was found that the time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law where the rate is the same as the disappearance rate of μ - p atoms. The ppμ-formation rate and the muon transfer rate to deuterium are deduced

  11. Hydrogen atoms can be located accurately and precisely by x-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woińska, Magdalena; Grabowsky, Simon; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-05-01

    Precise and accurate structural information on hydrogen atoms is crucial to the study of energies of interactions important for crystal engineering, materials science, medicine, and pharmacy, and to the estimation of physical and chemical properties in solids. However, hydrogen atoms only scatter x-radiation weakly, so x-rays have not been used routinely to locate them accurately. Textbooks and teaching classes still emphasize that hydrogen atoms cannot be located with x-rays close to heavy elements; instead, neutron diffraction is needed. We show that, contrary to widespread expectation, hydrogen atoms can be located very accurately using x-ray diffraction, yielding bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms (A-H) that are in agreement with results from neutron diffraction mostly within a single standard deviation. The precision of the determination is also comparable between x-ray and neutron diffraction results. This has been achieved at resolutions as low as 0.8 Å using Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR). We have applied HAR to 81 crystal structures of organic molecules and compared the A-H bond lengths with those from neutron measurements for A-H bonds sorted into bonds of the same class. We further show in a selection of inorganic compounds that hydrogen atoms can be located in bridging positions and close to heavy transition metals accurately and precisely. We anticipate that, in the future, conventional x-radiation sources at in-house diffractometers can be used routinely for locating hydrogen atoms in small molecules accurately instead of large-scale facilities such as spallation sources or nuclear reactors.

  12. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeley, Matthew P; Hasnain, Samar S; Antonyuk, Svetlana V

    2015-07-01

    The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å) has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden) and Sirius (Brazil) under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å), for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59%) were released since 2010. Sub-mm(3) crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å) are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H(+)) remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place. Neutron

  13. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Blakeley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden and Sirius (Brazil under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å, for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59% were released since 2010. Sub-mm3 crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H+ remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place

  14. Atomic structure of large angle grain boundaries determined by quantitative X-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Sass, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray diffraction techniques have been used to determine the atomic structure of the Σ = 5 and 13 [001] twist boundaries in Au with a resolution of 0.09 Angstrom or better. The reciprocal lattices of these boundaries were mapped out using synchrotron radiation. The atomic structures were obtained by testing model structures against the intensity observations with a chi square analysis. The boundary structure were modeled using polyhedra, including octahedra, special configurations of tetrahedra and Archimedian anti-prisms, interwoven together by the boundary symmetry. The results of this work point to the possibility of obtaining general rules for grain boundary structure based on X-ray diffraction observations that give the atomic positions with high resolution

  15. Propagation and scattering of high-intensity X-ray pulses in dense atomic gases and plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weninger, Clemens

    2015-10-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy in the X-ray domain is a promising technique to explore the dynamics of elementary excitations in matter. X-rays provide an element specificity that allows them to target individual chemical elements, making them a great tool to study complex molecules. The recent advancement of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) allows to investigate non-linear processes in the X-ray domain for the first time. XFELs provide short femtosecond X-ray pulses with peak powers that exceed previous generation synchrotron X-ray sources by more than nine orders of magnitude. This thesis focuses on the theoretical description of stimulated emission processes in the X-ray regime in atomic gases. These processes form the basis for more complex schemes in molecules and provide a proof of principle for nonlinear X-ray spectroscopy. The thesis also includes results from two experimental campaigns at the Linac Coherent Light Source and presents the first experimental demonstration of stimulated X-ray Raman scattering. Focusing an X-ray free electron laser beam into an elongated neon gas target generates an intense stimulated X-ray emission beam in forward direction. If the incoming X-rays have a photon energy above the neon K edge, they can efficiently photo-ionize 1s electrons and generate short-lived core excited states. The core-excited states decay mostly via Auger decay but have a small probability to emit a spontaneous X-ray photon. The spontaneous emission emitted in forward direction can stimulate X-ray emission along the medium and generate a highly directional and intense X-ray laser pulse. If the photon energy of the incoming X-rays however is below the ionization edge in the region of the pre-edge resonance the incoming X-rays can be inelastically scattered. This spontaneous X-ray Raman scattering process has a very low probability, but the spontaneously scattered photons in the beginning of the medium can stimulate Raman scattering along the medium. The

  16. Atoms in Action: Observing Atomic Motion with Dynamic in situ X-ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jordan Michael

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) materials are rich in both structural diversity and application. These materials are comprised of metal atoms or clusters which are connected in a three-dimensional polymer-like network by bridging organic linker molecules. One of the major attractive features in MOFs is their permanent pore space which can potentially be used to adsorb or exchange foreign molecules from/with the surrounding environment. While MOFs are an active area of scientific interest, MOF materials are still relatively new, only 20 years old. As such, there is still much that needs to be understood about these materials before they can be effectively applied to widespread chemical problems like CO2 sequestration or low-pressure hydrogen fuel storage. One of the most important facets of MOF chemistry to understand in order to rationally design MOF materials with tailor-made properties is the relationship between the structural features in a MOF and the chemical and physical properties of that material. By examining in detail the atomic structure of a MOF with known properties under a variety of conditions, scientists can begin to unravel the guiding principles which govern these relationships. X-ray diffraction remains one of the most effective tools for determining the structure of a crystalline material with atomic resolution, and has been applied to the determination of MOF structures for years. Typically these experiments have been carried out using powder X-ray diffraction, but this technique lacks the high-resolution structural information found in single-crystal methods. Some studies have been reported which use specialized devices, sometimes called Environmental Control Cells, to study single crystalline MOFs under non-ambient chemical conditions in situ . However, these in situ studies are performed under static conditions. Even in cases where the ECC provides continued access to the local chemical environment during diffraction data collections, the

  17. Single atom spectroscopy: Decreased scattering delocalization at high energy losses, effects of atomic movement and X-ray fluorescence yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizei, Luiz H G; Iizumi, Yoko; Okazaki, Toshiya; Nakanishi, Ryo; Kitaura, Ryo; Shinohara, Hisanori; Suenaga, Kazu

    2016-01-01

    Single atom localization and identification is crucial in understanding effects which depend on the specific local environment of atoms. In advanced nanometer scale materials, the characteristics of individual atoms may play an important role. Here, we describe spectroscopic experiments (electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS, and Energy Dispersed X-ray spectroscopy, EDX) using a low voltage transmission electron microscope designed towards single atom analysis. For EELS, we discuss the advantages of using lower primary electron energy (30 keV and 60 keV) and higher energy losses (above 800 eV). The effect of atomic movement is considered. Finally, we discuss the possibility of using atomically resolved EELS and EDX data to measure the fluorescence yield for X-ray emission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Single atom spectroscopy: Decreased scattering delocalization at high energy losses, effects of atomic movement and X-ray fluorescence yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tizei, Luiz H.G.; Iizumi, Yoko; Okazaki, Toshiya; Nakanishi, Ryo; Kitaura, Ryo; Shinohara, Hisanori; Suenaga, Kazu

    2016-01-01

    Single atom localization and identification is crucial in understanding effects which depend on the specific local environment of atoms. In advanced nanometer scale materials, the characteristics of individual atoms may play an important role. Here, we describe spectroscopic experiments (electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS, and Energy Dispersed X-ray spectroscopy, EDX) using a low voltage transmission electron microscope designed towards single atom analysis. For EELS, we discuss the advantages of using lower primary electron energy (30 keV and 60 keV) and higher energy losses (above 800 eV). The effect of atomic movement is considered. Finally, we discuss the possibility of using atomically resolved EELS and EDX data to measure the fluorescence yield for X-ray emission.

  19. Local detection of X-ray spectroscopies with an in-situ Atomic Force Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M S; Dhez, O; Denmat, S Le; Felici, R; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2008-01-01

    The in situ combination of Scanning Probe Microscopies with X-ray microbeams adds a variety of new possibilities to the panoply of synchrotron radiation techniques. This paper describes an optics-free Atomic Force Microscope that can be directly installed on most of the synchrotron radiation end-stations for combined X-ray and atomic force microscopy experiments. The instrument can be used for atomic force imaging of the investigated sample or to locally measure the X-ray absorption or diffraction, or it can also be used to mechanically interact with the sample while simultaneously taking spectroscopy or diffraction measurements. The local character of these measurements is intrinsically linked with the use of the Atomic Force Microscope tip. It is the sharp tip that gives the opportunity to measure the photons flux impinging on it, or to locally measure the absorption coefficient or the shape of the diffraction pattern. At the end an estimation of the limits of the various techniques presented is also discussed.

  20. Experimental determination of the x-ray atomic fundamental parameters of nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménesguen, Y.; Lépy, M.-C.; Hönicke, P.; Müller, M.; Unterumsberger, R.; Beckhoff, B.; Hoszowska, J.; Dousse, J.-Cl; Błachucki, W.; Ito, Y.; Yamashita, M.; Fukushima, S.

    2018-02-01

    The x-ray atomic properties of nickel (Ni) were investigated in a unique approach combining different experimental techniques to obtain new, useful and reliable values of atomic fundamental parameters for x-ray spectrometric purposes and for comparison with theoretical predictions. We determined the mass attenuation coefficients in an energy range covering the L- and K-absorption edges, the K-shell fluorescence yield and the Kβ/Kα and Kβ1, 3/Kα1, 2 transition probability ratios. The obtained line profiles and linewidths of the Kα and Kβ transitions in Ni can be considered as the contribution of the satellite lines arising from the [KM] shake processes suggested by Deutsch et al (1995 Phys. Rev. A 51 283) and Ito et al (2016 Phys. Rev. A 94 042506). Comparison of the new data with several databases showed good agreement, but also discrepancies were found with existing tabulated values.

  1. Structure of ordered polyelectrolyte films from atomic-force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, V.V.; Tolstikhina, A.L.; Stepina, N.D.; Kayushina, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    The possible application of atomic-force microscopy and X-ray reflectometry methods to structural studies of polyelectrolyte films obtained due to alternating adsorption of oppositely charged polyanion [sodium polysterenesulfonate (PSS)] and polycation [poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAA)] layers on solid substrates has been considered. The atomic-force microscopy study has revealed the characteristic features of the surface topography of samples consisting of different numbers of polyelectrolyte layers deposited from solutions characterized by different ionic strength values. It is shown that the shape of the reflectivity curves obtained from thin polyelectrolyte films depends on their surface structure

  2. Electron density and effective atomic number (Zeff) determination through x-ray Moiré deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia Leiva, Maria Pia; Stutman, Dan; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Talbot-Lau based Moiré deflectometry is a powerful density diagnostic capable of delivering refraction information and attenuation from a single image, through the accurate detection of X-ray phase-shift and intensity. The technique is able to accurately measure both the real part of the index of refraction δ (directly related to electron density) and the attenuation coefficient μ of an object placed in the x-ray beam. Since the atomic number Z (or Zeff for a composite sample) is proportional to these quantities, an elemental map of the effective atomic number can be obtained with the ratio of the phase and the absorption image. The determination of Zeff from refraction and attenuation measurements with Moiré deflectometry could be of high interest in various fields of HED research such as shocked materials and ICF experiments as Zeff is linked, by definition, to the x-ray absorption properties of a specific material. This work is supported by U.S. DoE/NNSA Grant No. 435 DENA0001835.

  3. Quantum electrodynamics tests and X-rays standards using pionic atoms and highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martino, Trassinelli

    2005-12-01

    The object of this thesis is to present a new measurement of the pion mass using pionic nitrogen X-ray spectroscopy and results on helium-like argon and sulphur spectroscopy. The new pion mass has been measured with an accuracy of 1.7 ppm, 30% better that the present world average value, and it is obtained from Bragg spectroscopy of 5 ->4 pionic nitrogen transitions using the theoretical predictions provided by quantum electrodynamics. We have got: m(π - ) = (139.571042 ± 0.000210 ± 0.000110) where the first error is due to the statistics and the second is the systematic error. I present the calculation of the hyperfine structure and recoil corrections for pionic atoms using a new perturbation method for the Klein-Gordon equation. The spectrometer used for this measurement has been characterized with the relativistic M1 transitions from helium-like ions produced with a new device, the Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Ion Trap. High statistics spectra from these ions have enabled us to measure transition energies with an accuracy of some ppm which has allowed us to compare theoretical predictions with experiment data. X-ray emission from pionic atoms and multicharged ions can be used to define new types of X-ray standards for energies of a few keV

  4. Atomic vibration amplitudes in fcc and hcp 4He through x-ray diffraction measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataraman, C.T.; Simmons, R.O.

    2003-01-01

    Atomic vibration amplitudes in dense fcc and hcp 4 He crystals have been measured using synchrotron x rays from the dependence of integrated Bragg intensities up to wave vectors of 91 nm -1 . Observed raw Bragg x-ray integrated intensities cover an extraordinary range, greater than 10 5 , due to the combined effect of the Debye-Waller factor and electronic form factor. From analysis of these intensities mean-square atomic vibration amplitudes Q 2 > and Lindemann ratios are determined. Path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) computations of Draeger and Ceperley, extrapolated to the thermodynamic limit, provide excellent agreement with these experimental results. For both present measurements and the PIMC results, one finds both a predominantly Gaussian distribution in Q 2 > and an extraordinarily large Lindemann ratio. In contrast, these directly measured x-ray values are significantly larger than published values inferred from Born-von Karman fitting to phonon dispersion measured by neutron scattering. Mildly anharmonic neon, which is fairly well described by self-consistent phonon theories, is contrasted with present results on fcc 4 He at corresponding densities

  5. X-ray fluorescence/Auger-electron coincidence spectroscopy of vacancy cascades in atomic argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arp, U.

    1996-01-01

    Argon L 2.3 -M 2.3 M 2.3 Auger-electron spectra were measured in coincidence with Kα fluorescent x-rays in studies of Ar K-shell vacancy decays at several photon energies above the K-threshold and on the 1s-4p resonance in atomic argon. The complex spectra recorded by conventional electron spectroscopy are greatly simplified when recorded in coincidence with fluorescent x-rays, allowing a more detailed analysis of the vacancy cascade process. The resulting coincidence spectra are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations which include shake-up transitions in the resonant case. Small energy shifts of the coincidence electron spectra are attributed to post-collision interaction with 1s photoelectrons

  6. Atomic force microscopy employed as the final imaging stage for soft x-ray contact microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotton, R.A.; Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W.; Fletcher, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    Soft X-ray contact microscopy (SXCM) enables a high resolution image of a living biological specimen to be recorded in an X-ray sensitive photoresist at unity magnification. Until recently scanning electron microscopes (SEM) have been employed to obtain the final magnified image. Although this has been successful in producing many high resolution images, this method of viewing the resist has several disadvantages. Firstly, a metallic coating has to be applied to the resist surface to provide electrical conductivity, rendering further development of the resist impossible. Also, electron beam damage to the resist surface can occur, in addition to poor resolution and image quality. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows uncoated resists to be imaged at a superior resolution, without damage to the surface. The use of AFM is seen as a major advancement in SXCM. The advantages and disadvantages of the two technologies are discussed, with illustrations from recent studies of a wide variety of hydrated biological specimens imaged using SXCM

  7. Rayleigh scatter in kilovoltage x-ray imaging: is the independent atom approximation good enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poludniowski, G.; Evans, P. M.; Webb, S.

    2009-11-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is the gold standard method for modelling scattering processes in medical x-ray imaging. General-purpose Monte Carlo codes, however, typically use the independent atom approximation (IAA). This is known to be inaccurate for Rayleigh scattering, for many materials, in the forward direction. This work addresses whether the IAA is sufficient for the typical modelling tasks in medical kilovoltage x-ray imaging. As a means of comparison, we incorporate a more realistic 'interference function' model into a custom-written Monte Carlo code. First, we conduct simulations of scatter from isolated voxels of soft tissue, adipose, cortical bone and spongiosa. Then, we simulate scatter profiles from a cylinder of water and from phantoms of a patient's head, thorax and pelvis, constructed from diagnostic-quality CT data sets. Lastly, we reconstruct CT numbers from simulated sets of projection images and investigate the quantitative effects of the approximation. We show that the IAA can produce errors of several per cent of the total scatter, across a projection image, for typical x-ray beams and patients. The errors in reconstructed CT number, however, for the phantoms simulated, were small (typically < 10 HU). The IAA can therefore be considered sufficient for the modelling of scatter correction in CT imaging. Where accurate quantitative estimates of scatter in individual projection images are required, however, the appropriate interference functions should be included.

  8. X-ray determination of static displacements of atoms in alloyed Ni3Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morinaga, M.; Sone, K.; Kamimura, T.; Ohtaka, K.; Yukawa, N.

    1988-01-01

    Single crystals of Ni 3 (Al, M) were grown by the Bridgman method, where M is Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Nb, Mo and Ta. The composition was controlled to be about Ni 75 Al 20 M 5 so that the alloying element, M, substitutes mainly for Al. With these crystals conventional X-ray structural analysis was performed. The measured static displacements of atoms from the average lattice points depended largely on the alloying elements and varied in the range 0.00-0.13 A for Ni atoms and 0.09-0.18 A for Al atoms. It was found that these atomic displacements correlated well with the atomic radius of the alloying element, M. For example, when the atomic radius of M is larger than that of Al, the static displacements are large for the atoms in the Al sublattice but small for the atoms in the Ni sublattice. By contrast, when the atomic radius of M is smaller than that of Al, the displacements are more enhanced in the Ni sublattice than in the Al sublattice. Thus, there is an interesting correlation between the atomic displacements in both the Al and Ni sublattices in the presence of alloying elements. This seems to be one of the characteristics of alloyed compounds with several sublattices. (orig.)

  9. X-ray holographic microscopy using the atomic-force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.; Jacobsen, C.J.; Lindaas, S.

    1993-09-01

    The present authors have been seeking for some time to improve the resolution of holographic microscopy and have engaged in a continuing series of experiments using the X1A soft x-ray undulator beam line at Brookhaven. The principle strategy for pushing the resolution lower in these experiments has been the use of polymer resists as x-ray detectors and the primary goal has been to develop the technique to become useful for examining wet biological material. In the present paper the authors report on progress in the use of resist for high-spatial-resolution x-ray detection. This is the key step in in-line holography and the one which sets the ultimate limit to the image resolution. The actual recording has always been quite easy, given a high-brightness undulator source, but the difficult step was the readout of the recorded pattern. The authors describe in what follows how they have built a special instrument: an atomic force microscope (AFM) to read holograms recorded in resist. They report the technical reasons for building, rather than buying, such an instrument and they give details of the design and performance of the device. The authors also describe the first attempts to use the system for real holography and the authors show results of both recorded holograms and the corresponding reconstructed images. Finally, the authors try to analyze the effect that these advances are likely to have on the future prospects for success in applications of x-ray holography and the degree to which the other technical systems that are needed for such success are available or within reach

  10. Atomic motion of resonantly vibrating quartz crystal visualized by time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Shinobu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Takeda, Shoichi; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Transient atomic displacements during a resonant thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut α-quartz are revealed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction under an alternating electric field. The lattice strain resonantly amplified by the alternating electric field is ∼10 4 times larger than that induced by a static electric field. The resonantly amplified lattice strain is achieved by fast displacements of oxygen anions and collateral resilient deformation of Si−O−Si angles bridging rigid SiO 4 tetrahedra, which efficiently transduce electric energy into elastic energy

  11. A double cell for X-ray absorption spectrometry of atomic Zn

    CERN Document Server

    Mihelic, A; Arcon, I; Padeznik-Gomilsek, J; Borowski, M

    2002-01-01

    A high-temperature cell with a double wall design has been constructed for X-ray absorption spectrometry of metal vapors. The inner cell, assembled from a corundum tube and thin plates without welding or reshaping, serves as a container of the vapor sample. It is not vacuum tight: instead, the outer tube provides inert atmosphere. Several spectra of K-edge atomic absorption of Zn were obtained in the stationary working regime below the Zn boiling point. The K-edge profile shows an extremely strong resonance and, above the continuum threshold, coexcitations of the outer electrons.

  12. Atomic dynamics in fluids studied by inelastic x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, Masanori; Kajihara, Yukio; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Baron, Alfred Q.

    2010-01-01

    Studies on atomic dynamics in supercritical fluids at high temperature and high pressure have remarkably been advanced by using an inelastic x-ray scattering technique that achieved a meV-energy resolution in the middle of 1990's. In this article, we describe a brief review of the theoretical background on liquid dynamics, our own high-temperature high-pressure technique and recent results of atomic dynamics in supercritical fluids. In particular, we report the results of inelastic x-ray scattering measurements for expanding fluid Hg at high temperature and high pressure, which were conduced at BL35XU/SPring-8. We found that in the metal-nonmetal transition in fluid Hg, the excitation energy of the acoustic mode disperses three times faster than the adiabatic sound velocity obtained by ultrasonic measurements. This phenomenon must be crucial to understand how a metallic state is formed during atomic condensation accurately. Finally we put a future development of this field in perspective. (author)

  13. Determination of electronic and atomic properties of surface, bulk and buried interfaces: Simultaneous combination of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio-Zuazo, J., E-mail: rubio@esrf.fr [SpLine, Spanish CRG BM25 Beamline at the ESRF, ESRF, B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Castro, G.R. [SpLine, Spanish CRG BM25 Beamline at the ESRF, ESRF, B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •We have developed a novel and exceptional tool for non-destructive characterization of bulk and buried interfaces that combine XRD and HAXPES. •We studied the correlation between the atomic, electronic and transport properties of oxygen deficient manganite thin films. •The diffraction data showed a cooperative tilt of the MnO{sub 6} block along the out-of-plane direction. •We shown the absence of the conventional basal plane rotation for the oxygen deficient samples. -- Abstract: Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a powerful novel emerging technique for bulk compositional, chemical and electronic properties determination in a non-destructive way. It benefits from the exceptionally large escape depth of high kinetic energy photoelectrons enabling the study of bulk and buried interfaces up to several tens of nanometres depth. Its advantage over conventional XPS is based on the long mean free path of high kinetic energetic photoelectrons. Using the advantage of tuneable X-ray radiation provided by synchrotron sources the photoelectron kinetic energy, i.e. the information depth can be changed and consequently electronic and compositional depth profiles can be obtained. The combination of HAXPES with an atomic structure sensitive technique, as X-ray diffraction, opens a new research field with great potential for many systems in which their electronic properties are intimately linked to their crystallographic structure. At SpLine, the Spanish CRG Beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) we have developed a novel and exceptional set-up that combine grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and HAXPES. Both techniques can be operated simultaneously on the same sample and using the same excitation source. The set-up includes a heavy 2S+3D diffractometer and UHV chamber equipped with an electrostatic analyzer. The UHV chamber has also MBE evaporation sources, an ion gun, a LEED optic, a sample heating and cooling

  14. Semi-empirical atom-atom interaction models and X-ray crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braam, A.W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Several aspects of semi-empirical energy calculations in crystallography are considered. Solid modifications of ethane have been studied using energy calculations and a fast summation technique has been evaluated. The structure of tetramethylpyrazine has been determined at room temperature and at 100K and accurate structure factors have been derived from measured Bragg intensities. Finally electrostatic properties have been deduced from X-ray structure factors. (C.F.)

  15. The atomic structure of Fe100-xCux nanoalloys: X-ray absorption analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsova, A.N.; Yalovega, G.E.; Soldatov, A.V.; Yan, W.S.; Wei, S.Q.

    2009-01-01

    The local atomic structure of Fe 100-x Cu x nanoalloys (x = 0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 70, 80 and 100%) has been investigated by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis. Local environment around copper and iron atoms in Fe 100-x Cu x has been studied by comparing the experimental XANES with corresponding theoretical spectra calculated for several structural models. It has been established that the most probable structure of the Fe 100-x Cu x nanoalloys for a low concentration of copper (x = 10-20%) is a homogenous bcc structure, for a high copper concentration (x = 60-80%)-a homogenous fcc structure, while at an intermediate copper concentration (about 40%) the nanoalloys have an inhomogeneous structure consisting of clusters of fcc solid solution (90%) and of clusters of bcc solid solution (10%)

  16. XUV and x-ray elastic scattering of attosecond electromagnetic pulses on atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmej, F. B.; Astapenko, V. A.; Lisitsa, V. S.

    2017-12-01

    Elastic scattering of electromagnetic pulses on atoms in XUV and soft x-ray ranges is considered for ultra-short pulses. The inclusion of the retardation term, non-dipole interaction and an efficient scattering tensor approximation allowed studying the scattering probability in dependence of the pulse duration for different carrier frequencies. Numerical calculations carried out for Mg, Al and Fe atoms demonstrate that the scattering probability is a highly nonlinear function of the pulse duration and has extrema for pulse carrier frequencies in the vicinity of the resonance-like features of the polarization charge spectrum. Closed expressions for the non-dipole correction and the angular dependence of the scattered radiation are obtained.

  17. Atomic physics studies of highly charged ions on tokamaks using x-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.

    1989-07-01

    An overview is given of atomic physics issues which have been studied on tokamaks with the help resolution x-ray spectroscopy. The issues include the testing of model calculations predicting the excitation of line radiation, the determination of rate coefficients, and accurate atomic structure measurements. Recent research has focussed primarily on highly charged heliumlike (22 ≤ Z ≤ 28) and neonlike (34 ≤ Z ≤ 63) ions, and results are presented from measurements on the PLT and TFTR tokamaks. Many of the measurements have been aided by improved instrumental design and new measuring techniques. Remarkable agreement has been found between measurements and theory in most cases. However, in this review those areas are stressed where agreement is worst and where further investigations are needed. 19 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Unambiguous determination of H-atom positions: comparing results from neutron and high-resolution X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardberg, Anna S; Del Castillo, Alexis Rae; Weiss, Kevin L; Meilleur, Flora; Blakeley, Matthew P; Myles, Dean A A

    2010-05-01

    The locations of H atoms in biological structures can be difficult to determine using X-ray diffraction methods. Neutron diffraction offers a relatively greater scattering magnitude from H and D atoms. Here, 1.65 A resolution neutron diffraction studies of fully perdeuterated and selectively CH(3)-protonated perdeuterated crystals of Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin (D-rubredoxin and HD-rubredoxin, respectively) at room temperature (RT) are described, as well as 1.1 A resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the same protein at both RT and 100 K. The two techniques are quantitatively compared in terms of their power to directly provide atomic positions for D atoms and analyze the role played by atomic thermal motion by computing the sigma level at the D-atom coordinate in simulated-annealing composite D-OMIT maps. It is shown that 1.65 A resolution RT neutron data for perdeuterated rubredoxin are approximately 8 times more likely overall to provide high-confidence positions for D atoms than 1.1 A resolution X-ray data at 100 K or RT. At or above the 1.0sigma level, the joint X-ray/neutron (XN) structures define 342/378 (90%) and 291/365 (80%) of the D-atom positions for D-rubredoxin and HD-rubredoxin, respectively. The X-ray-only 1.1 A resolution 100 K structures determine only 19/388 (5%) and 8/388 (2%) of the D-atom positions above the 1.0sigma level for D-rubredoxin and HD-rubredoxin, respectively. Furthermore, the improved model obtained from joint XN refinement yielded improved electron-density maps, permitting the location of more D atoms than electron-density maps from models refined against X-ray data only.

  19. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    A method for a direct measurement of X-ray projections of the atomic structure is described. Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO 3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO 3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples

  20. Atomic imaging by x-ray-fluorescence holography and electron-emission holography: A comparative theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Len, P.M.; Thevuthasan, S.; Fadley, C.S.; Kaduwela, A.P.; Van Hove, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    We consider from a theoretical viewpoint the direct imaging of atoms at and near the surfaces of solids by both x-ray-fluorescence holography (XFH) and electron-emission holography (EEH). The more ideal nature of x-ray scattering makes XFH images superior to those in single-energy EEH. The overlap of real and twin features for pairs of atoms at ±a can cause their XFH or EEH atomic images to cancel for certain combinations of wave vector and |a|. The relative merits of XFH and EEH for structure studies are considered

  1. Direct observation of X-ray induced atomic motion using scanning tunneling microscope combined with synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akira; Tanaka, Takehiro; Takagi, Yasumasa; Hosokawa, Hiromasa; Notsu, Hiroshi; Ohzeki, Gozo; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Yuji; Kikuta, Seishi; Aono, Masakazu

    2011-04-01

    X-ray induced atomic motion on a Ge(111)-c(2 x 8) clean surface at room temperature was directly observed with atomic resolution using a synchrotron radiation (SR)-based scanning tunneling microscope (STM) system under ultra high vacuum condition. The atomic motion was visualized as a tracking image by developing a method to merge the STM images before and after X-ray irradiation. Using the tracking image, the atomic mobility was found to be strongly affected by defects on the surface, but was not dependent on the incident X-ray energy, although it was clearly dependent on the photon density. The atomic motion can be attributed to surface diffusion, which might not be due to core-excitation accompanied with electronic transition, but a thermal effect by X-ray irradiation. The crystal surface structure was possible to break even at a lower photon density than the conventionally known barrier. These results can alert X-ray studies in the near future about sample damage during measurements, while suggesting the possibility of new applications. Also the obtained results show a new availability of the in-situ SR-STM system.

  2. Sub-atomic dimensional metrology: developments in the control of x-ray interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoot, Andrew; Kuetgens, Ulrich

    2012-07-01

    Within the European Metrology Research Programme funded project NANOTRACE, the nonlinearity of the next generation of optical interferometers has been measured using x-ray interferometry. The x-ray interferometer can be regarded as a ruler or translation stage whose graduations or displacement steps are based on the lattice spacing of the crystallographic planes from which the x-rays are diffracted: in this case the graduations are every 192 pm corresponding to the spacing between the (2 2 0) planes in silicon. Precise displacement of the x-ray interferometer's monolithic translation stage in steps corresponding to discrete numbers of x-ray fringes requires servo positioning capability at the picometre level. To achieve this very fine control, a digital control system has been developed which has opened up the potential for advances in metrology using x-ray interferometry that include quadrature counting of x-ray fringes.

  3. Sub-atomic dimensional metrology: developments in the control of x-ray interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacoot, Andrew; Kuetgens, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Within the European Metrology Research Programme funded project NANOTRACE, the nonlinearity of the next generation of optical interferometers has been measured using x-ray interferometry. The x-ray interferometer can be regarded as a ruler or translation stage whose graduations or displacement steps are based on the lattice spacing of the crystallographic planes from which the x-rays are diffracted: in this case the graduations are every 192 pm corresponding to the spacing between the (2 2 0) planes in silicon. Precise displacement of the x-ray interferometer's monolithic translation stage in steps corresponding to discrete numbers of x-ray fringes requires servo positioning capability at the picometre level. To achieve this very fine control, a digital control system has been developed which has opened up the potential for advances in metrology using x-ray interferometry that include quadrature counting of x-ray fringes. (paper)

  4. Determination of dopant atomic positions with kinematical X-ray standing waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walz, Bente

    2011-11-01

    Recent advances in the kinematic X-ray standing wave technique (KXSW) for the determination of the atomic coordinates and displacement parameters in nonperfect crystalline materials are described in this thesis. The methodology has been improved by considering three significant aspects: - the inclusion of weak multiple beam contributions - the excitation of secondary fluorescence in multiple-element samples - the influence of the crystal mosaicity on the fluorescence yield. The improvements allowed to successfully apply the method to investigate complex oxide materials of current interest for potential device applications. The thermally-induced interdiffusion of cobalt and manganese thin films on zinc oxide single crystals has been studied to determine which lattice sites are occupied preferentially. The data analysis revealed that after thermal diffusion the adsorbed atoms occupied zinc sites in the host lattice. The mean deviation of the cobalt atomic position from the zinc lattice site was comparable to the thermal displacement parameter of the zinc atoms. In the case of manganese a secondary phase was found on the surface. Measurements performed on LaSrMnO 4 provided new insight concerning the rotation of the oxygen octahedron around the manganese atoms and the concomitant displacements of the strontium and lanthanum atoms. It was found that the oxygen octahedra are rotated around the [100]-direction by 4,5 . The measurements in transmission geometry performed on titanium dioxide (rutile) demonstrated that KXSW measurements in the Laue geometry is a viable technique. By performing KXSW under grazing-incidence conditions it is possible to achieve depth resolution. The results clearly show that the extended KXSW technique is a versatile method for characterizing complex material systems. (orig.)

  5. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mosher, D.; De Groot, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single-exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal-production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission. (author). 3 figs., 10 refs

  6. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mosher, D.; De Groot, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single- exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal- production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly- collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission

  7. Pt thermal atomic layer deposition for silicon x-ray micropore optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kazuma; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ishikawa, Kumi; Numazawa, Masaki; Terada, Masaru; Ishi, Daiki; Fujitani, Maiko; Sowa, Mark J; Ohashi, Takaya; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2018-04-20

    We fabricated a silicon micropore optic using deep reactive ion etching and coated by Pt with atomic layer deposition (ALD). We confirmed that a metal/metal oxide bilayer of Al 2 O 3 ∼10  nm and Pt ∼20  nm was successfully deposited on the micropores whose width and depth are 20 μm and 300 μm, respectively. An increase of surface roughness of sidewalls of the micropores was observed with a transmission electron microscope and an atomic force microscope. X-ray reflectivity with an Al Kα line at 1.49 keV before and after the deposition was measured and compared to ray-tracing simulations. The surface roughness of the sidewalls was estimated to increase from 1.6±0.2  nm rms to 2.2±0.2  nm rms. This result is consistent with the microscope measurements. Post annealing of the Pt-coated optic at 1000°C for 2 h showed a sign of reduced surface roughness and better angular resolution. To reduce the surface roughness, possible methods such as the annealing after deposition and a plasma-enhanced ALD are discussed.

  8. Advances in low atomic number element analysis by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrebos, B.

    1996-01-01

    Traditionally, the analysis of low atomic number has been a chal1enging task for wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Among the most important factors influencing analysis of the low atomic number elements (from Z=11 downwards) are the fluorescence yield, absorption and the dispersion. The effect of each of these factors on the overall performance will be illustrated. The long wavelengths involved (longer than I nm) used to pose severe problems concerning the monochromator used. Early instruments relied on lead stearate or Blodgett Langmuir soap films for the diffraction of the characteristic radiation. Nowadays, synthetic multilayers are commonly used. The performance of these multilayers is determined by the reflectivity, the resolution and the absorption of the characteristic radiation to be diffracted. These parameters can be optimised by adequately selecting the composition of the materials involved. The sensitivity of the modem instruments is sufficient to allow quantitative analysis. However, this aspect of WDS XRF is still met with considerable scepticism. Examples of quantitative analysis will be given to illustrate the current capability

  9. Quantitative atomic resolution elemental mapping via absolute-scale energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Weyland, M. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Sang, X.; Xu, W.; Dycus, J.H.; LeBeau, J.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); D' Alfonso, A.J.; Allen, L.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott.findlay@monash.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2016-09-15

    Quantitative agreement on an absolute scale is demonstrated between experiment and simulation for two-dimensional, atomic-resolution elemental mapping via energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. This requires all experimental parameters to be carefully characterized. The agreement is good, but some discrepancies remain. The most likely contributing factors are identified and discussed. Previous predictions that increasing the probe forming aperture helps to suppress the channelling enhancement in the average signal are confirmed experimentally. It is emphasized that simple column-by-column analysis requires a choice of sample thickness that compromises between being thick enough to yield a good signal-to-noise ratio while being thin enough that the overwhelming majority of the EDX signal derives from the column on which the probe is placed, despite strong electron scattering effects. - Highlights: • Absolute scale quantification of 2D atomic-resolution EDX maps is demonstrated. • Factors contributing to remaining small quantitative discrepancies are identified. • Experiment confirms large probe-forming apertures suppress channelling enhancement. • The thickness range suitable for reliable column-by-column analysis is discussed.

  10. X-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faigel, G.; Tegze, M.; Belakhovsky, M.; Marchesini, S.; Bortel, G.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade holographic methods using hard X-rays were developed. They are able to resolve atomic distances, and can give the 3D arrangement of atoms around a selected element. Therefore, hard X-ray holography has potential applications in chemistry, biology and physics. In this article we give a general description of these methods and discuss the developments in the experimental technique. The capabilities of hard X-ray holography are demonstrated by examples

  11. On the multiphoton emission during U.V. and X-ray absorption by atoms in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, L.C.M.

    1981-09-01

    A discussion of the u.v. and x-ray absorption cross section by a hydrogen atom in the presence of an intense i.r. laser field is presented, taking into account the influence of laser field on the electronic states. (Author) [pt

  12. The role of total-reflection x-ray fluorescence in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelg, G.; Klockenkaemper, R.

    1993-01-01

    Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is a universal and economic method for the simultaneous determination of elements with atomic numbers > 11 down to the lower pg-level. It is a microanalytical tool for the analysis of small sample amounts placed on flat carriers and for contaminations on flat sample surfaces. Analyses of stratified near-surface layers are made possible by varying the incident angle of the primary beam in the region of total-reflection. This non-destructive method is especially suitable for thin layers of a few nanometres, deposited on wafer material although not usable as a microprobe method with a high lateral resolution. Furthermore, depth profiles of biological samples can be recorded by means of microtome sectioning of only a few micrometres, as, for example in the gradient analysis of human organs. In addition to micro- and surface-layer analysis, TXRF is effectively applied to element trace analysis. Homogeneous solutions, for example aqueous solutions, high-purity acids or body fluids, are pipetted onto carriers and, after evaporation, the dry residues are analyzed directly down to the pg/ml region. Particularly advantageous is the absence of matrix effects, so that an easy calibration can be carried out by adding a single internal standard element. A digestion or separation step preceding the actual determination becomes necessary if a more complex matrix is to be analysed or especially low detection limits have to be reached. A critical evaluation of the recent developments in atomic spectroscopy places TXRF in a leading position. Its outstanding features compete with those of e.g. electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), microwave induced plasma optical emission spectroscopy (MIP-OES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in the field of micro- and trace analysis and with Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in the surface-layer analysis. (author)

  13. Joint application of neutron and X-ray scattering for determination of atomic and electronic structures of molecules and crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozerov, R.P.; Tsirel'son, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with the main principles of methods based on the joint neutron and x-ray diffraction studies. The methods allow one to obtain the information on the charge distribution in molecules in detail. Neutron scattering makes it possible to locate very closely the nucleus of atom or, more precisely, the gravity center of the ellipsoid of nuclear thermal oscillations. X-ray diffraction gives the distribution of electronic density at some distance from the shell gravity center. The joint diffraction method holds the promise and importance for solving physical-chemical problems

  14. Concept of effective atomic number and effective mass density in dual-energy X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnin, Anne; Duvauchelle, Philippe; Kaftandjian, Valérie; Ponard, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on dual-energy X-ray computed tomography and especially the decomposition of the measured attenuation coefficient in a mass density and atomic number basis. In particular, the concept of effective atomic number is discussed. Although the atomic number is well defined for chemical elements, the definition of an effective atomic number for any compound is not an easy task. After reviewing different definitions available in literature, a definition related to the method of measurement and X-ray energy, is suggested. A new concept of effective mass density is then introduced in order to characterize material from dual-energy computed tomography. Finally, this new concept and definition are applied on a simulated case, focusing on explosives identification in luggage

  15. Time-resolved X-ray scattering by electronic wave packets: analytic solutions to the hydrogen atom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmermacher, Mats; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2017-01-01

    Modern pulsed X-ray sources permit time-dependent measurements of dynamical changes in atoms and molecules via non-resonant scattering. The planning, analysis, and interpretation of such experiments, however, require a firm and elaborated theoretical framework. This paper provides a detailed...... description of time-resolved X-ray scattering by non-stationary electronic wave packets in atomic systems. A consistent application of the Waller-Hartree approximation is discussed and different contributions to the total differential scattering signal are identified and interpreted. Moreover......, it is demonstrated how the scattering signal of wave packets in the hydrogen atom can be expressed analytically. This permits simulations without numerical integration and establishes a benchmark for both efficiency and accuracy. Based on that, scattering patterns of an exemplary wave packet in the hydrogen atom...

  16. Atomic layer deposition to prevent metal transfer from implants: An X-ray fluorescence study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilo, Fabjola [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Borgese, Laura, E-mail: laura.borgese@unibs.itl [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Prost, Josef; Rauwolf, Mirjam; Turyanskaya, Anna; Wobrauschek, Peter; Kregsamer, Peter; Streli, Christina [Atominstitut, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Pazzaglia, Ugo [Dipartimento Specialità Medico Chirurgiche Sc. Radiol. e Sanità Pubblica, University of Brescia, v.le Europa, 11, 25121 Brescia (Italy); Depero, Laura E. [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Co and Cr migrate from bare alloy implant to the surrounding tissue showing a cluster distribution. • Co and Cr migrate from the TiO{sub 2} coated implant to the surrounding tissue showing a decreasing gradient distribution from the alloy surface. • TiO{sub 2} coating layers obtained by ALD on Co–Cr alloy show a barrier effect for the migration of metals. • The thicker the TiO{sub 2} layer deposited by ALD, the lower the metal migration. • The migration of metals from bare alloy toward the surrounding tissue increases with time. This effect is not detected in the coated samples. - Abstract: We show that Atomic Layer Deposition is a suitable coating technique to prevent metal diffusion from medical implants. The metal distribution in animal bone tissue with inserted bare and coated Co–Cr alloys was evaluated by means of micro X-ray fluorescence mapping. In the uncoated implant, the migration of Co and Cr particles from the bare alloy in the biological tissues is observed just after one month and the number of particles significantly increases after two months. In contrast, no metal diffusion was detected in the implant coated with TiO{sub 2}. Instead, a gradient distribution of the metals was found, from the alloy surface going into the tissue. No significant change was detected after two months of aging. As expected, the thicker is the TiO{sub 2} layer, the lower is the metal migration.

  17. X-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES - A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alp, E.E.; Mini, S.M.; Ramanathan, M.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) had been an essential tool to gather spectroscopic information about atomic energy level structure in the early decades of this century. The correct interpretation of the oscillatory structure in the x-ray absorption cross-section above the absorption edge has transformed XAS from a spectroscopic tool to a structural technique. EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) yields information about the interatomic distances, near neighbor coordination numbers, and lattice dynamics. XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure), on the other hand, gives information about the valence state, energy bandwidth and bond angles. Today, there are about 50 experimental stations in various synchrotrons around the world dedicated to collecting x-ray absorption data from the bulk and surfaces of solids and liquids. In this chapter, they will give the basic principles of XAS, explain the information content of essentially two different aspects of the absorption process leading to EXAFS and XANES, and discuss the source and sample limitations

  18. Spectral effects on some physical coefficients of x-Ray interaction with materials of low atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Kazzaz, S.A.; Youssef, M.; EL-Hadad, S.; and EL-Nadi, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray spectra were measured before and after passing through some materials of medical importance applying X-ray diffraction. The mass absorption coefficients of these materials were determined at X-ray peak voltages 27, 30 and 42 kV-p making use the measured spectrum and also by using the direct beam absorption. It has been found that the mass absorption coefficients calculated from the X-ray spectral distribution analysis are in general lower than those obtained considering the direct beam method. From the study of the atomic number and energy dependence of the mass absorption coefficients it has been found that the dependence of the coefficients calculated from the spectral distribution is good agreement with the previously studied data for monoenergetic x-ray beam. Also the roentgen - to - Rad conversion factors were determined at the different used energies and materials. The value of the mass absorption coefficients calculated from the spectral distribution is recommended for use in dose calculation

  19. Kaonic nuclei and kaon-nucleus interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ikuta, K; Masutani, K

    2002-01-01

    Although kaonic atoms provide valuable information concerning the K sup - -nucleus interaction at low energies, they cannot fully determine the K sup - - nucleus optical potential. We demonstrate that K sup - nuclear bound states, if they exist, can be useful in investigating the K sup - -nucleus interaction, especially in the interior of the nucleus. In order to show this possibility, we calculate the double differential cross sections for (K sup - , P) using the Green function method. (author)

  20. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  1. Atomic physics for fusion plasma spectroscopy; a soft x-ray study of molybdenum ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, K.B.

    1996-01-01

    Understanding the radiative patterns of the ions of heavy atoms (Z approx-gt 18) is crucial to fusion experiments. The present thesis applies ab initio, relativistic calculations of atomic data to modeling the emission of molybdenum (Z = 42) ions in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The models are compared to observations made in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak (Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade. Experimental confirmation of these models allows confidence in calculations of the total molybdenum concentration and quantitative estimates of the total power lost from the plasmas due to molybdenum line radiation. Charge states in the plasma core (Mo 33+ to Mo 29+ ) emit strong x-ray and XUV spectra which allow benchmarking of models for the spatial distribution of highly stripped molybdenum ions; the models only achieve agreement with observations when the rates of indirect ionization and recombination processes are included in the calculation of the charge state distribution of the central molybdenum ions. The total concentration of molybdenum in the core of the plasma is found, and the total power radiated from the plasma core is computed. Observations of line emission from more highly charged molybdenum ions (Mo 36+ to Mo 34+ ) are presented. open-quotes Bulkclose quotes molybdenum charge states (Mo 25+ to Mo 23+ ) emit complicated XUV spectra from a position in the plasma near C-Mod's half radius; spatial profiles of these ions' emission are analyzed. Models for the line-emission spectra of adjacent ions (Mo 28+ to Mo 26+ ) are offered, and the accuracy and limits of ab initio energy level calculations are discussed. open-quotes Edgeclose quotes charge states (Mo 22+ to Mo 15 ) extend to the last closed magnetic flux surface of the C-Mod plasma. The strongest features from these charge states are emitted in a narrow band from ∼70 Angstrom

  2. Ultrabright multikilovolt x-ray source: saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Charles K.; Boyer, Keith

    2004-02-17

    An apparatus and method for the generation of ultrabright multikilovolt x-rays from saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states is described. Conditions for x-ray amplification in this spectral region combine the production of cold, high-Z matter, with the direct, selective multiphoton excitation of hollow atoms from clusters using ultraviolet radiation and a nonlinear mode of confined, self-channeled propagation in plasmas. Data obtained is consistent with the presence of saturated amplification on several transition arrays of the hollow atom Xe(L) spectrum (.lambda..about.2.9 .ANG.). An estimate of the peak brightness achieved is .about.10.sup.29 .gamma..multidot.s.sup.-1.multidot.mm.sup.-2.multidot.mr.sup.-2 (0.1% Bandwidth).sup.-1, that is .about.10.sup.5 -fold higher than presently available synchotron technology.

  3. X-ray diffraction analysis of LiCu2O2 crystals with additives of silver atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirotinkin, V. P.; Bush, A. A.; Kamentsev, K. E.; Dau, H. S.; Yakovlev, K. A.; Tishchenko, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Silver-containing LiCu 2 O 2 crystals up to 4 × 8 × 8 mm in size were grown by the crystallization of 80(1-x)CuO · 20 x AgNO 3 · 20Li 2 CO 3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) mixture melt. According to the X-ray spectral and Rietveld X-ray diffraction data, the maximum amount of silver incorporated in the LiCu 2 O 2 structure is about 4 at % relative to the copper content. It was established that silver atoms occupy statistically crystallographic positions of lithium atoms. The incorporation of silver atoms is accompanied by a noticeable increase in parameter c of the LiCu 2 O 2 rhombic unit cell, a slight increase in parameter a, and a slight decrease in parameter b

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the functionalization of carbon metal-containing nanotubes with phosphorus atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabanova, I.N.; Terebova, N.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Carbon metal-containing nanotubes (Me–Cu, Ni, Fe) were functionalized with chemical groups containing different concentrations of phosphorous. •The C1s and Me3s spectra were measured by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. •The values of the atomic magnetic moment of the carbon metal-containing nanotubes were determined. -- Abstract: In the present paper, carbon metal-containing (Me: Cu, Ni, Fe) nanotubes functionalized with phosphorus atoms (ammonium polyphosphate) were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on an X-ray electron magnetic spectrometer. It is found that the functionalization leads to the change of the metal atomic magnetic moment, i.e. the value of the atomic magnetic moment in the functionalized carbon metal-containing (Cu, Ni, Fe) nanotubes increases and is higher than that in pristine nanotubes. It is shown that the covalent bond of Me and P atoms is formed. This leads to an increase in the activity of the nanostructure surface which is necessary for the modification of materials

  5. X-Ray Emission from a Merger Remnant, NGC 7252 (the ``Atoms-for-Peace'' Galaxy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaki, Hisamitsu; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tomida, Hiroshi

    2002-03-01

    We observed a nearby merger remnant NGC 7252 with the X-ray satellite ASCA and detected X-ray emission with the X-ray flux of (1.8+/-0.3)×10-13 ergs s-1 cm-2 in the 0.5-10 keV band. This corresponds to the X-ray luminosity of 8.1×1040 ergs s-1. The X-ray emission is well described with a two-component model: a soft component with kT=0.72+/-0.13 keV and a hard component with kT>5.1 keV. Although NGC 7252 is referred to as a dynamically young protoelliptical, the 0.5-4 keV luminosity of the soft component is about 2×1040 ergs s-1, which is low for an early-type galaxy. The ratio of LX/LFIR suggests that the soft component originated from the hot gas due to star formation. Its low luminosity can be explained by the gas ejection from the galaxy as galaxy winds. Our observation reveals the existence of hard X-ray emission with the 2-10 keV luminosity of 5.6×1040 ergs s-1. This may indicate the existence of nuclear activity or an intermediate-mass black hole in NGC 7252.

  6. The atomic scale structure of CXV carbon: wide-angle x-ray scattering and modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawelek, L; Brodka, A; Dore, J C; Honkimaki, V; Burian, A

    2013-11-13

    The disordered structure of commercially available CXV activated carbon produced from finely powdered wood-based carbon has been studied using the wide-angle x-ray scattering technique, molecular dynamics and density functional theory simulations. The x-ray scattering data has been converted to the real space representation in the form of the pair correlation function via the Fourier transform. Geometry optimizations using classical molecular dynamics based on the reactive empirical bond order potential and density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31g* level have been performed to generate nanoscale models of CXV carbon consistent with the experimental data. The final model of the structure comprises four chain-like and buckled graphitic layers containing a small percentage of four-fold coordinated atoms (sp(3) defects) in each layer. The presence of non-hexagonal rings in the atomic arrangement has been also considered.

  7. Composition measurement in substitutionally disordered materials by atomic resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Taplin, D J; Weyland, M; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2017-05-01

    The increasing use of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy invites the question of whether its success in precision composition determination at lower magnifications can be replicated in the atomic resolution regime. In this paper, we explore, through simulation, the prospects for composition measurement via the model system of Al x Ga 1-x As, discussing the approximations used in the modelling, the variability in the signal due to changes in configuration at constant composition, and the ability to distinguish between different compositions. Results are presented in such a way that the number of X-ray counts, and thus the expected variation due to counting statistics, can be gauged for a range of operating conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples. PMID:21997909

  9. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-03-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E c , below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E c . These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production

  10. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-ionized atoms in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrs, R.E.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged-ions (q /le/ 70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of dielectronic recombination, electron impact excitation and transition energies are presented. 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  11. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte; Filsinger, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Cohere...

  12. Determination of Atomic Number Exponent for Elemental Absorber at Am-241 Energy in X-Ray Attenuation Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najim, L.A.; Shamoon, S.K.; Atalah, S.T.

    2012-01-01

    In X-ray absorption experiment, the dependence of the photoelectric absorption cross-section varied with atomic number Z.In this paper, the dependence on Z of the cross-section or coefficient of photoelectric absorption is first evaluated from published data for (20) elements ranging from Al-Sn, and then the cross-section for Fe is obtained experimentally by measuring the X-ray intensity with and without the Fe absorber and compared with the theoretical value, the variation of the photoelectric absorption coefficient (μ/ρ m ) showed less dependence on Z for the two tested of Z regions.This is because of the inclusion of mass density (ρ m ) of the absorber in the coefficient.The values of m obtained in the present work increases linearly with energy for both ranges of elements

  13. Improvement of analysis precision upon the atomic number and electron density measurement by the dual x-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imura, Yukino; Morii, Hisashi; Koike, Akifumi; Okunoyama, Takaharu; Neo, Yoichiro; Mimura, Hidenori; Aoki, Toru

    2010-08-01

    To identify the factor impairing the material identification parameters, which is provided by the dual-energy X-ray computed tomography method using a conventional X-ray tube and a CdTe detector, linear attenuation coefficient was measured by the radioactivity of radio isotopes and compared with theoretical figure. In our study, the atomic number and the electron density is calculated from the linear attenuation coefficient obtained in CT measurement by 64-channel CdTe line detector. To estimate accuracy of CdTe line sensor, it is needed to obtain the linear attenuation coefficient accurately. Using a single detector, the linear attenuation coefficient is verified for accuracy. The energy resolution of CdTe detectors and the method of reconstruction are discussed.

  14. High-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering to study the high-frequency atomic dynamics of disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monaco, G.

    2008-01-01

    The use of momentum-resolved inelastic X-ray scattering with meV energy resolution to study the high-frequency atomic dynamics in disordered systems is here reviewed. The typical realization of this experiment is described together with some common models used to interpret the measured spectra and to extract parameters of interest for the investigation of disordered systems. With the help of some selected examples, the present status of the field is discussed. Particular attention is given to those results which are still open for discussion or controversial, and which will require further development of the technique to be fully solved. Such an instrumental development seems nowadays possible at the light of recently proposed schemes for advanced inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometers. (author)

  15. Self-referenced coherent diffraction x-ray movie of Ångstrom- and femtosecond-scale atomic motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glownia, J. M.; Natan, A.; Cryan, J. P.; Hartsock, R.; Kozina, M.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved femtosecond x-ray diffraction patterns from laser-excited molecular iodine are used to create a movie of intramolecular motion with a temporal and spatial resolution of 30 fs and 0.3 Å. This high fidelity is due to interference between the nonstationary excitation and the stationary initial charge distribution. The initial state is used as the local oscillator for heterodyne amplification of the excited charge distribution to retrieve real-space movies of atomic motion on ångstrom and femtosecond scales. This x-ray interference has not been employed to image internal motion in molecules before. In conclusion, coherent vibrational motion and dispersion, dissociation, and rotational dephasing are all clearly visible in the data, thereby demonstrating the stunning sensitivity of heterodyne methods.

  16. Conference proceedings on X84 International Conference on X-ray and Inner-Shell Processes in Atoms, Molecules and Solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisel, A.; Finster, J.

    1984-01-01

    The proceedings contain 46 lectures and contributions presented at the 1984 conference. Topics of the conference were ion-atom collisions, inner-shell ionization phenomena, X-ray spectroscopy and electron spectroscopy

  17. Projectile X-ray emission in relativistic ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, Shadi Mohammad Ibrahim

    2010-03-16

    This work reports on the study of the projectile X-ray emission in relativistic ion-atom collisions. Excitation of K-shell in He-like uranium ions, electron capture into H-like uranium ions and Simultaneous ionization and excitation of initially He-like uranium ions have been studied using the experimental storage ring at GSI. For the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} and K{sub {alpha}}{sub 2} transitions originating from the excitation of the He-like uranium ions, no alignment was observed. In contrast, the Ly{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} radiation from the simultaneous ionization-excitation process of the He-like uranium ions shows a clear alignment. The experimental value leads to the inclusion of a magnetic term in the interaction potential. The capture process of target electrons into the highly-charged heavy ions was studied using H-like uranium ions at an incident energy of 220 MeV/u, impinging on N{sub 2} gas-target. It was shown that, the strongly aligned electrons captured in 2p{sub 3/2} level couple with the available 1s{sub 1/2} electron which shows no initial directional preference. The magnetic sub-state population of the 2p{sub 3/2} electron is redistributed according to the coupling rules to the magnetic sub-states of the relevant two-electron states. This leads to the large anisotropy in the corresponding individual ground state transitions contributing to the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} emission. From the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1}/K{sub {alpha}}{sub 2} ratio, the current results show that the incoherent addition of the E1 and M2 transition components yield to an almost isotropic emission of the total K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1}. In contrast to the radiative electron capture, the experimental results for the K-shell single excitation of He-like uranium ions indicate that only the {sup 1}P{sub 1} level contributes to the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} transition. For this case, the anisotropy parameter {beta}{sub 20} was found to be -0.20{+-}0.03. This work also reports on the study of a two

  18. X ray Production. Chapter 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowotny, R. [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    The differential absorption of X rays in tissues and organs, owing to their atomic composition, is the basis for the various imaging methods used in diagnostic radiology. The principles in the production of X rays have remained the same since their discovery. However, much refinement has gone into the design of X ray tubes to achieve the performance required for today’s radiological examinations. In this chapter, an outline of the principles of X ray production and a characterization of the radiation output of X ray tubes will be given. The basic processes producing X rays are dealt with in Section 1.4.

  19. Measurements of x-rays and γ-rays from stopped kaons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, G.L.

    1975-01-01

    Intensities of x rays and γ rays from negative kaons stopped in elements, pure isotopes, and some compounds ranging from Z = 2 through Z = 92 have been measured. Included were x rays from K - atoms, Σ - atoms, and π - atoms. Also some nuclear γ rays associated with the stopped kaons were observed. The kaonic x-ray intensities for low n, Δn = 1 transitions, varied from .1 to .5 x rays/K/sub stop/ and showed a remarkable oscillation as Z changed. Peaks occurred near elements with closed electron shells. Within experimental accuracy, isotopes of the same elements yielded equal intensities. By searching for μ - from K - → μ - anti ν it was concluded that less than or equal to 5 percent of the stopped kaons decayed before nuclear capture in those elements studied. A cascade calculation was performed that reasonably reproduced the Δn = 1 intensities but gave Δn = 2 intensities high by a factor of 2. Initial kaon distributions in n = 30 proportional to (2l + 1) out to some l/sub max/ were used to begin the cascade. The value of l/sub max/ changed with Z. It is suggested that l/sub max/ might be related to an impact parameter picture with the lever arm equal to one-half the distance between the atoms in their lattice. (U.S.)

  20. Detailed assessment of diesel spray atomization models using visible and X-ray extinction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnotti, G.M.; Genzale, C.L. (GIT)

    2017-12-01

    The physical mechanisms characterizing the breakup of a diesel spray into droplets are still unknown. This gap in knowledge has largely been due to the challenges of directly imaging this process or quantitatively measuring the outcomes of spray breakup, such as droplet size. Recent x-ray measurements by Argonne National Laboratory, utilized in this work, provide needed information about the spatial evolution of droplet sizes in selected regions of the spray under a range of injection pressures (50–150 MPa) and ambient densities (7.6–22.8 kg/m3) relevant for diesel operating conditions. Ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS) measurements performed at the Advanced Photon Source are presented, which quantify Sauter mean diameters (SMD) within optically thick regions of the spray that are inaccessible by conventional droplet sizing measurement techniques, namely in the near-nozzle region, along the spray centerline, and within the core of the spray. To quantify droplet sizes along the periphery of the spray, a complementary technique is proposed and introduced, which leverages the ratio of path-integrated x-ray and visible laser extinction (SAMR) measurements to quantify SMD. The SAMR and USAXS measurements are then utilized to evaluate current spray models used for engine computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations. We explore the ability of a carefully calibrated spray model, premised on aerodynamic wave growth theory, to capture the experimentally observed trends of SMD throughout the spray. The spray structure is best predicted with an aerodynamic primary and secondary breakup process that is represented with a slower time constant and larger formed droplet size than conventionally recommended for diesel spray models. Additionally, spray model predictions suggest that droplet collisions may not influence the resultant droplet size distribution along the spray centerline in downstream regions of the spray.

  1. Using Lasers and X-rays to Reveal the Motion of Atoms and Electrons (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenlein, Robert [Deputy Director, Advanced Light Source

    2009-07-07

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: The ultrafast motion of atoms and electrons lies at the heart of chemical reactions, advanced materials with exotic properties, and biological processes such as the first event in vision. Bob Schoenlein, Deputy Director for Science at the Advanced Light Source, will discuss how such processes are revealed by using laser pulses spanning a millionth of a billionth of a second, and how a new generation of light sources will bring the penetrating power of x-rays to the world of ultrafast science.

  2. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of hollow atoms created in plasma heated by subpicosecond laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faenov, A.Ya.; Magunov, A.I.; Pikuz, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    The investigations of ultrashort (0.4-0.6 ps) laser pulse radiation interaction with solid targets have been carried out. The Trident subpicosecond laser system was used for plasma creation. The X-ray plasma emission was investigated with the help of high-resolution spectrographs with spherically bent mica crystals. It is shown that when high contrast ultrashort laser pulses were used for plasma heating its emission spectra could not be explained in terms of commonly used theoretical models, and transitions in so called hollow atoms must be taken into account for adequate description of plasma radiation

  3. A survey on respiratory diseases of atomic bomb survivors using chest X-ray examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Hideo; Noma, Koji; Ito, Chikako; Mitsuyama, Toyofumi; Kamitsuna, Akimitsu; Nishimoto, Yukio; Katsuta, Shizutomo.

    1986-01-01

    From April 1981 through March 1986, 39,363 A-bomb survivors older than 50 years of age underwent chest X-ray examination. The incidence of abnormal findings was higher in men (28 %) than in women (13 %). The most common disease was old pulmonary tuberculosis in both men and women. The incidence of pulmonary fibrosis was remarkably high in survivors exposed directly to A-bomb radiation, when compared with controls. There was no data suggesting the relationship between the incidence of respiratory disease and exposure status such as the distance from ground zero. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. X-ray spectroscopy of highly ionised atoms of Ti through Zn in a dense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Shiguro; Fujita, Junji

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra for several elements have been observed from a high-temperature plasma produced in a vacuum spark using a curved-crystal spectrometer. The transition wavelengths of the He-like resonance lines for Ti through Zn are determined for the first time under careful experimental treatments. The result is compared with theoretical predictions. The transition wavelengths of the Fe He-like resonance series lines up to 1s6p-1s 2 and the Kβ transition energies of Ti partially M-shell-ionised ions (Ti VI-XIII) are also determined. As a result, several satelite lines are found. (orig.)

  5. Resonant inelastic X-ray spectroscopy of atoms and simple molecules: Satellite features and dependence on energy detuning and photon polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žitnik, M., E-mail: matjaz.zitnik@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Jadranska 21, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kavčič, M.; Bohinc, R.; Bučar, K.; Mihelič, A. [Jožef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Cao, W. [Research Centre for Molecular Materials, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Guillemin, R.; Journel, L.; Marchenko, T.; Carniato, S.; Kawerk, E. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Piancastelli, M.N. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Simon, M. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-10-15

    We summarize recent results dealing with high resolution (resonant) X-ray spectroscopy of atomic and molecular targets in the tender X-ray energy region. We comment on advantages, new possibilities and problems related to RIXS spectroscopy with respect to the standard photoabsorption technique, where scanning the probe energy is the only option. In particular, three research areas are covered: X-ray emission mediated by energy dependent photoabsorption to multi-electron excited states, the Cl K core-hole clock studies exemplified by systematic study of chloro(fluoro)-hydrocarbon targets and the polarization dependent X-ray emission studies. Due to its spectral selectivity and simultaneous detection capability, high resolution wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has the capability to resolve structural and dynamical properties of matter within new instrumentation frontiers.

  6. Resonant inelastic X-ray spectroscopy of atoms and simple molecules: Satellite features and dependence on energy detuning and photon polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Žitnik, M.; Kavčič, M.; Bohinc, R.; Bučar, K.; Mihelič, A.; Cao, W.; Guillemin, R.; Journel, L.; Marchenko, T.; Carniato, S.; Kawerk, E.; Piancastelli, M.N.; Simon, M.

    2015-01-01

    We summarize recent results dealing with high resolution (resonant) X-ray spectroscopy of atomic and molecular targets in the tender X-ray energy region. We comment on advantages, new possibilities and problems related to RIXS spectroscopy with respect to the standard photoabsorption technique, where scanning the probe energy is the only option. In particular, three research areas are covered: X-ray emission mediated by energy dependent photoabsorption to multi-electron excited states, the Cl K core-hole clock studies exemplified by systematic study of chloro(fluoro)-hydrocarbon targets and the polarization dependent X-ray emission studies. Due to its spectral selectivity and simultaneous detection capability, high resolution wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has the capability to resolve structural and dynamical properties of matter within new instrumentation frontiers.

  7. A survey on respiratory diseases of atomic bomb survivors using chest X-ray examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsubara, Naoka; Isobe, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kenji

    1994-01-01

    Chest X-ray films, taken from 48,160 A-bomb survivors aged 40 years or more during a 5-year period 1988-1992, were reviewed. Abnormal X-ray findings were obtained in 26.7% for men and 18.2% for women. The incidence of necessary detailed examination was 2.6%. Of these A-bomb survivors, 93.7% participated in it. Pulmonary fibrosis, chronic emphysema, and pulmonary cyst yielded higher prevalence per population of 100,000 in men, irrespective of exposure distance. In comparing with the results obtained during a 5-year period 1981-1985, the detection rate of primary lung cancer was not different from that in the present 5-year survey. For active pulmonary tuberculosis, pulmonary fibrosis, and chronic emphysema, however, the prevalence tended to decrease. Primary lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis were more frequently detected with aging in both men and women. This was independent of exposure distance. (N.K.)

  8. Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy: Watching atoms dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Chris J.; Pham, Van-Thai; Gawelda, Wojciech; van der Veen, Renske M.; El Nahhas, Amal; Johnson, Steven L.; Beaud, Paul; Ingold, Gerhard; Lima, Frederico; Vithanage, Dimali A.; Benfatto, Maurizio; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Kaiser, Maik; Hauser, Andreas; Abela, Rafael; Bressler, Christian; Chergui, Majed

    2009-11-01

    The introduction of pump-probe techniques to the field of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has allowed the monitoring of both structural and electronic dynamics of disordered systems in the condensed phase with unprecedented accuracy, both in time and in space. We present results on the electronically excited high-spin state structure of an Fe(II) molecular species, [FeII(bpy)3]2+, in aqueous solution, resolving the Fe-N bond distance elongation as 0.2 Å. In addition an analysis technique using the reduced χ2 goodness of fit between FEFF EXAFS simulations and the experimental transient absorption signal in energy space has been successfully tested as a function of excited state population and chemical shift, demonstrating its applicability in situations where the fractional excited state population cannot be determined through other measurements. Finally by using a novel ultrafast hard x-ray 'slicing' source the question of how the molecule relaxes after optical excitation has been successfully resolved using femtosecond XANES.

  9. X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetten, N.R.; Houston, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    An ionization chamber for use in determining the spatial distribution of x-ray photons in tomography systems comprises a plurality of substantially parallel, planar anodes separated by parallel, planar cathodes and enclosed in a gas of high atomic weight at a pressure from approximately 10 atmospheres to approximately 50 atmospheres. The cathode and anode structures comprise metals which are substantially opaque to x-ray radiation and thereby tend to reduce the resolution limiting effects of x-ray fluoresence in the gas. In another embodiment of the invention the anodes comprise parallel conductive bars disposed between two planar cathodes. Guard rings eliminate surface leakage currents between adjacent electrodes. 8 figures

  10. Inhibition of d-xylose isomerase by polyols: atomic details by joint X-ray/neutron crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalevsky, Andrey, E-mail: ayk@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, MS M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hanson, B. Leif [University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Mason, Sax A. [Institut Laue–Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Forsyth, V. Trevor [Institut Laue–Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Keele University, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Fisher, Zoe [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, MS M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mustyakimov, Marat [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, MS M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, MS 6475, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Blakeley, Matthew P. [Institut Laue–Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Keen, David A. [Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Langan, Paul [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, MS 6475, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, MS M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    A joint X-ray/neutron structure of d-xylose isomerase in complex with the inhibitor sorbitol was determined at room temperature at an acidic pH of 5.9. Protonation of the O5 O atom of the sugar was directly observed in the nuclear density maps. Under acidic conditions sorbitol gains a water-mediated interaction with the enzyme active site, which may explain the increased potency of the inhibitor at low pH. d-Xylose isomerase (XI) converts the aldo-sugars xylose and glucose to their keto analogs xylulose and fructose, but is strongly inhibited by the polyols xylitol and sorbitol, especially at acidic pH. In order to understand the atomic details of polyol binding to the XI active site, a 2.0 Å resolution room-temperature joint X-ray/neutron structure of XI in complex with Ni{sup 2+} cofactors and sorbitol inhibitor at pH 5.9 and a room-temperature X-ray structure of XI containing Mg{sup 2+} ions and xylitol at the physiological pH of 7.7 were obtained. The protonation of oxygen O5 of the inhibitor, which was found to be deprotonated and negatively charged in previous structures of XI complexed with linear glucose and xylulose, was directly observed. The Ni{sup 2+} ions occupying the catalytic metal site (M2) were found at two locations, while Mg{sup 2+} in M2 is very mobile and has a high B factor. Under acidic conditions sorbitol gains a water-mediated interaction that connects its O1 hydroxyl to Asp257. This contact is not found in structures at basic pH. The new interaction that is formed may improve the binding of the inhibitor, providing an explanation for the increased affinity of the polyols for XI at low pH.

  11. Iridium-coated micropore x-ray optics using dry etching of a silicon wafer and atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Tomohiro; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Moriyama, Teppei; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Kakiuchi, Takuya; Ohashi, Takaya; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Putkonen, Matti

    2013-08-20

    To enhance x-ray reflectivity of silicon micropore optics using dry etching of silicon (111) wafers, iridium coating is tested by use of atomic layer deposition. An iridium layer is successfully formed on sidewalls of tiny micropores with a pore width of 20 μm and depth of 300 μm. The film thickness is ∼20  nm. An enhanced x-ray reflectivity compared to that of silicon is confirmed at Ti Kα 4.51 keV, for what we believe to be the first time, with this type of optics. Some discrepancies from a theoretical reflectivity curve of iridium-coated silicon are noticed at small incident angles <1.3°. When a geometrical shadowing effect due to occultation by a ridge existing on the sidewalls is taken into account, the observed reflectivity becomes well represented by the modified theoretical curve. An estimated surface micro roughness of ∼1  nm rms is consistent with atomic force microscope measurements of the sidewalls.

  12. Hadronic atoms at a kaon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, M.

    1982-01-01

    Beyond doubt, the advent of a kaon factory will be of immense significance for the study of hadronic atoms. Here we will discuss some classes of experiments that certainly can and will be done at a kaon factory, as well as some very interesting possibilities which deserve investigation. Among the certains we include the observation of hadronic x rays from kaonic and μ - atoms, for both Z greater than one and for the isotopes of hydrogen, mainly for strong interaction information. More conjectural is the possibility of measuring Xi - and Ω - x rays

  13. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors

  14. X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  15. Studies of x-ray localization and thickness dependence in atomic-scale elemental mapping by STEM energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy using single-frame scanning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Moya, Jaime M; Yuan, Renliang; Zuo, Jian Min

    2018-03-01

    The delocalization of x-ray signals limits the spatial resolution in atomic-scale elemental mapping by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). In this study, using a SrTiO 3 [001] single crystal, we show that the x-ray localization to atomic columns is strongly dependent on crystal thickness, and a thin crystal is critical for improving the spatial resolution in atomic-scale EDS mapping. A single-frame scanning technique is used in this study instead of the multiple-frame technique to avoid peak broadening due to tracking error. The strong thickness dependence is realized by measuring the full width at half maxima (FWHM) as well as the peak-to-valley (P/V) ratio of the EDS profiles for Ti K and Sr K + L, obtained at several crystal thicknesses. A FWHM of about 0.16 nm and a P/V ratio of greater than 7.0 are obtained for Ti K for a crystal thickness of less than 20 nm. With increasing crystal thickness, the FWHM and P/V ratio increases and decreases, respectively, indicating the advantage of using a thin crystal for high-resolution EDS mapping. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Proton Induced X-Rays Emission (PIXE) and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) applied in the environmental sample analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Ion V.; Iordan, M.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Busuioc, G.; Ciupina, V.; Belc, M.; Badica, T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the elemental composition of tree leaves using Proton-Induced X-Rays Emission (PIXE) and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS) methods. By PIXE Spectrometry we identified and determined the concentration of S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu Zn, As, Br, Sr and by AAS method the concentration of elements: Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd. Pb was identified in only 2 samples from 29. For tree leave samples collected at a large distance to the polluting source the Sr concentration decreased and the Mg, Ca, Se, Zn and Fe concentrations increased. Also, we can observe a small affinity of these leaves for the environmental Pb which was detected for two samples at a small distance to polluting source. (authors)

  17. Combined use of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry for cell surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dague, Etienne; Delcorte, Arnaud; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2008-04-01

    Understanding the surface properties of microbial cells is a major challenge of current microbiological research and a key to efficiently exploit them in biotechnology. Here, we used three advanced surface analysis techniques with different sensitivity, probing depth, and lateral resolution, that is, in situ atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry, to gain insight into the surface properties of the conidia of the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. We show that the native ultrastructure, surface protein and polysaccharide concentrations, and amino acid composition of three mutants affected in hydrophobin production are markedly different from those of the wild-type, thereby providing novel insight into the cell wall architecture of A. fumigatus. The results demonstrate the power of using multiple complementary techniques for probing microbial cell surfaces.

  18. Generalized atomic processes for interaction of intense femtosecond XUV- and X-ray radiation with solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschaud, B.; Peyrusse, O.; Rosmej, F.B.

    2014-01-01

    Generalized atomic processes are proposed to establish a consistent description from the free-atom approach to the heated and even up to the cold solid. It is based on a rigorous introduction of the Fermi-Dirac statistics, Pauli blocking factors and on the respect of the principle of detailed balance via the introduction of direct and inverse processes. A probability formalism driven by the degeneracy of the free electrons enables to establish a link of atomic rates valid from the heated atom up to the cold solid. This allows to describe photoionization processes in atomic population kinetics and subsequent solid matter heating on a femtosecond time scale. The Auger effect is linked to the 3-body recombination via a generalized 3-body recombination that is identified as a key mechanism, along with the collisional ionization, that follows energy deposition by photoionization of inner shells when short, intense and high-energy radiation interacts with matter. Detailed simulations are carried out for aluminum that highlight the importance of the generalized approach. (authors)

  19. Inhomogeneous thermal expansion of metallic glasses in atomic-scale studied by in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taghvaei, Amir Hossein, E-mail: amirtaghvaei@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakur Shahabi, Hamed [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Bednarčik, Jozef [Photon Science DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Eckert, Jürgen [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-01-28

    Numerous investigations have demonstrated that the elastic strain in metallic glasses subjected to mechanical loading could be inhomogeneous in the atomic-scale and it increases with distance from an average atom and eventually reaches the macroscopic strain at larger inter-atomic distances. We have observed a similar behavior for the thermal strain imposed by heating of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} glassy particles below the glass transition temperature by analysis of the scattering data obtained by in-situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results imply that the volumetric thermal strains calculated from the shift in position of the principal diffraction maximum and reduced pair correlation function (PDF) peaks are in good agreement for the length scales beyond 0.6 nm, corresponding to the atoms located over the third near-neighbor shell. However, smaller and even negative volumetric thermal strains have been calculated based on the shifts in the positions of the second and first PDF peaks, respectively. The structural changes of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} glassy particles are accompanied by decreasing the average coordination number of the first near-neighbor shell, which manifests the occurrence of local changes in the short-range order upon heating. It is believed that the detected length-scale dependence of the volumetric thermal strain is correlated with the local atomic rearrangements taking place in the topologically unstable regions of the glass governed by variations in the atomic-level stresses.

  20. Quantitative x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Simple algorithm to determine the amount of atoms in the outermost few nanometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tougaard, Sven

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that due to inelastic electron scattering, the measured x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peak intensity depends strongly on the in-depth atom distribution. Quantification based only on the peak intensity can therefore give large errors. The problem was basically solved by developing algorithms for the detailed analysis of the energy distribution of emitted electrons. These algorithms have been extensively tested experimentally and found to be able to determine the depth distribution of atoms with nanometer resolution. Practical application of these algorithms has increased after ready-to-use software packages were made available and they are now being used in laboratories worldwide. These software packages are easy to use but they need operator interaction. They are not well suited for automatic data processing and there is an additional need for simplified quantification strategies that can be automated. In this article we report on a very simple algorithm. It is a slightly more accurate version of our previous algorithm. The algorithm gives the amount of atoms within the outermost three inelastic mean free paths and it also gives a rough estimate for the in-depth distribution. An experimental example of its application is also presented

  1. In situ surface X-ray diffraction studies of the copper-electrolyte interface. Atomic structure and homoepitaxial grwoth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golks, Frederik

    2011-05-19

    Copper electrodeposition is the predominantly used technique for on-chip wiring in the fabrication of ultra-large scale integrated (ULSI) microchips. In this 'damascene copper electroplating' process, multicomponent electrolytes containing organic additives realize void-free filling of trenches with high aspect ratio ('superconformal deposition'). Despite manifold studies, motivated by the continuous trend to shrink wiring dimensions and thus the demand of optimized plating baths, detailed knowledge on the growth mechanism - in presence and absence of additives - is still lacking. Using a recently developed hanging meniscus X-ray transmission cell, brilliant synchrotron x-rays and a fast, one-dimensional detector system, unique real-time in situ surface X-ray diffraction studies of copper electrodeposition were performed under realistic reaction conditions, approaching rates of technological relevance. Preparatory measurements of the electrochemical dissolution of Au(001) in chloride-containing electrolyte demonstrated the capability of this powerful technique, specifically the possibility to follow atomic-scale deposition or dissolution processes with a time resolution down to five milliseconds. The electrochemical as well as structural characterization of the Cu(001)- and Cu(111)-electrolyte interfaces provided detailed insight into the complex atomic-scale structures in presence of specifically adsorbed chloride on these surfaces. The interface of Cu(001) in chloride-containing electrolyte exhibits a continuous surface phase transition of a disordered Cl adlayer to a c(2 x 2) Cl adlayer with increasing potential. The latter was found to induce a small vertical corrugation of substrate atoms, which can be ascribed to lattice relaxations induced by the presence of coadsorbed water molecules and cations in the outer part of the electrochemical double layer. The study of the specific adsorption of chloride on Cu(111) from acidic aqueous

  2. In situ surface X-ray diffraction studies of the copper-electrolyte interface. Atomic structure and homoepitaxial grwoth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golks, Frederik

    2011-05-19

    Copper electrodeposition is the predominantly used technique for on-chip wiring in the fabrication of ultra-large scale integrated (ULSI) microchips. In this 'damascene copper electroplating' process, multicomponent electrolytes containing organic additives realize void-free filling of trenches with high aspect ratio ('superconformal deposition'). Despite manifold studies, motivated by the continuous trend to shrink wiring dimensions and thus the demand of optimized plating baths, detailed knowledge on the growth mechanism - in presence and absence of additives - is still lacking. Using a recently developed hanging meniscus X-ray transmission cell, brilliant synchrotron x-rays and a fast, one-dimensional detector system, unique real-time in situ surface X-ray diffraction studies of copper electrodeposition were performed under realistic reaction conditions, approaching rates of technological relevance. Preparatory measurements of the electrochemical dissolution of Au(001) in chloride-containing electrolyte demonstrated the capability of this powerful technique, specifically the possibility to follow atomic-scale deposition or dissolution processes with a time resolution down to five milliseconds. The electrochemical as well as structural characterization of the Cu(001)- and Cu(111)-electrolyte interfaces provided detailed insight into the complex atomic-scale structures in presence of specifically adsorbed chloride on these surfaces. The interface of Cu(001) in chloride-containing electrolyte exhibits a continuous surface phase transition of a disordered Cl adlayer to a c(2 x 2) Cl adlayer with increasing potential. The latter was found to induce a small vertical corrugation of substrate atoms, which can be ascribed to lattice relaxations induced by the presence of coadsorbed water molecules and cations in the outer part of the electrochemical double layer. The study of the specific adsorption of chloride on Cu(111) from acidic aqueous electrolyte revealed a

  3. A summary of the low angle x-ray atomic scattering factors which have been measured by the critical voltage effect in High Energy Electron Diffraction (HEED)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, A.G.; Fisher, R.M.

    1987-08-01

    A tabulated summary of all the accurate (/approximately/0.1%) low-angle x-ray atomic scattering (form) factors which have been determined by the systematic critical voltage technique in HEED is presented. For low atomic number elements (Z/approx lt/40) the low angle form factors can be significantly different to best free atom values, and so the best band structure calculated and/or x-ray measured form factors consistent with the critical voltage measurements are also indicated. At intermediate atomic numbers Z≅40→50 only the very low-angle form factors appear to be different to the best free atom values, and even then only by a small amount. For heavy elements (Z/approx lt/70) the best free atom form factors appear to agree very closely with the critical voltage measured values and so, in this case, critical voltage measurements give very accurate measurements of Debye-Waller factors. 48 refs

  4. Exploring the atomic structure and conformational flexibility of a 320 Å long engineered viral fiber using X-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, Anshul [Thomas Jefferson University, 233 South 10th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Casjens, Sherwood R. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Cingolani, Gino, E-mail: gino.cingolani@jefferson.edu [Thomas Jefferson University, 233 South 10th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This study presents the crystal structure of a ∼320 Å long protein fiber generated by in-frame extension of its repeated helical coiled-coil core. Protein fibers are widespread in nature, but only a limited number of high-resolution structures have been determined experimentally. Unlike globular proteins, fibers are usually recalcitrant to form three-dimensional crystals, preventing single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the absence of three-dimensional crystals, X-ray fiber diffraction is a powerful tool to determine the internal symmetry of a fiber, but it rarely yields atomic resolution structural information on complex protein fibers. An 85-residue-long minimal coiled-coil repeat unit (MiCRU) was previously identified in the trimeric helical core of tail needle gp26, a fibrous protein emanating from the tail apparatus of the bacteriophage P22 virion. Here, evidence is provided that an MiCRU can be inserted in frame inside the gp26 helical core to generate a rationally extended fiber (gp26-2M) which, like gp26, retains a trimeric quaternary structure in solution. The 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of this engineered fiber, which measures ∼320 Å in length and is only 20–35 Å wide, was determined. This structure, the longest for a trimeric protein fiber to be determined to such a high resolution, reveals the architecture of 22 consecutive trimerization heptads and provides a framework to decipher the structural determinants for protein fiber assembly, stability and flexibility.

  5. Exploring the atomic structure and conformational flexibility of a 320 Å long engineered viral fiber using X-ray crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, Anshul; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Cingolani, Gino

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the crystal structure of a ∼320 Å long protein fiber generated by in-frame extension of its repeated helical coiled-coil core. Protein fibers are widespread in nature, but only a limited number of high-resolution structures have been determined experimentally. Unlike globular proteins, fibers are usually recalcitrant to form three-dimensional crystals, preventing single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the absence of three-dimensional crystals, X-ray fiber diffraction is a powerful tool to determine the internal symmetry of a fiber, but it rarely yields atomic resolution structural information on complex protein fibers. An 85-residue-long minimal coiled-coil repeat unit (MiCRU) was previously identified in the trimeric helical core of tail needle gp26, a fibrous protein emanating from the tail apparatus of the bacteriophage P22 virion. Here, evidence is provided that an MiCRU can be inserted in frame inside the gp26 helical core to generate a rationally extended fiber (gp26-2M) which, like gp26, retains a trimeric quaternary structure in solution. The 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of this engineered fiber, which measures ∼320 Å in length and is only 20–35 Å wide, was determined. This structure, the longest for a trimeric protein fiber to be determined to such a high resolution, reveals the architecture of 22 consecutive trimerization heptads and provides a framework to decipher the structural determinants for protein fiber assembly, stability and flexibility

  6. Precise X-Ray spectroscopy of the hydrogenlike and heliumlike heavy ions and of the exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manil, B.

    2001-10-01

    In this thesis, we present four experiments designed to study hydrogenlike and heliumlike heavy ions, or exotic atoms. These experiments have been run at the Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforchung (GSI) and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). In the first part of this text, we begin with the description of a focusing, curved-crystal spectrometer in transmission geometry, coupled with a microstrip, germanium position-sensitive detector, which diffract X-ray photons in the range 50-100 keV. With this spectrometer, which can be mounted on the GSI accelerator, we will increase, by one order of magnitude, the accuracy on the measurement of the 1 s Lamb shift in hydrogenlike uranium ions, in order to test QED in strong coulomb field. Next, we detail an experiment that will soon give a new value of the charged-pion mass with a relative accuracy of 1 ppm. For that, we perform X-ray spectroscopy of pionic nitrogen, at PSI. The experimental set-up is made up of a cyclotron trap, a spherical Bragg-crystal focusing spectrometer, in reflection geometry, and a CCD sensitive-position cooled detector. This set-up allows also test QCD and chiral perturbation theory by measurements of radiative transitions of pionic hydrogen. The main subject of the second part is a lifetime measurement of the metastable 2 3 P 0 state in heliumlike gold ions, by Beam Foil Spectroscopy. With this experiment, which provides an important test of relativistic many-body theory, we give, for the first time, an accurate value of the lifetime of this state for an ion with a Z larger than 64, our result is τ(exp) = (22.12 ± 1.21) ps

  7. Cascade Processes in Muonic Hydrogen Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faifman, M. P.; Men'Shikov, L. I.

    2001-01-01

    The QCMC scheme created earlier for cascade calculations in heavy hadronic atoms of hydrogen isotopes has been modified and applied to the study of cascade processes in the μp muonic hydrogen atoms. The distribution of μp atoms over kinetic energies has been obtained and the yields of K-series X-rays per one stopped muon have been calculated.Comparison with experimental data indicated directly that for muonic and pionic atoms new types of non-radiative transitions are essential, while they are negligible for heavy (kaonic, antiprotonic, etc.) atoms. These processes have been considered and their probabilities have been estimated.

  8. Fast Atomic-Scale Elemental Mapping of Crystalline Materials by STEM Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy Achieved with Thin Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Yuan, Renliang; Zuo, Jian Min

    2017-02-01

    Elemental mapping at the atomic-scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) provides a powerful real-space approach to chemical characterization of crystal structures. However, applications of this powerful technique have been limited by inefficient X-ray emission and collection, which require long acquisition times. Recently, using a lattice-vector translation method, we have shown that rapid atomic-scale elemental mapping using STEM-EDS can be achieved. This method provides atomic-scale elemental maps averaged over crystal areas of ~few 10 nm2 with the acquisition time of ~2 s or less. Here we report the details of this method, and, in particular, investigate the experimental conditions necessary for achieving it. It shows, that in addition to usual conditions required for atomic-scale imaging, a thin specimen is essential for the technique to be successful. Phenomenological modeling shows that the localization of X-ray signals to atomic columns is a key reason. The effect of specimen thickness on the signal delocalization is studied by multislice image simulations. The results show that the X-ray localization can be achieved by choosing a thin specimen, and the thickness of less than about 22 nm is preferred for SrTiO3 in [001] projection for 200 keV electrons.

  9. Atomic physics with high-brightness synchrotron x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Meron, M.

    1985-11-01

    A description of atomic physics experiments that we intend to carry out at the National Synchrotron Light Source is given. Emphasis is given to work that investigates the properties of multiply charged ions. The use of a synchrotron storage ring for highly charged heavy ions is proposed as a way to produce high current beams which will make possible experiments to study the photoexcitation and ionization of multiply charged ions for the first time. Experiments along the same lines which are feasible at the proposed Advanced Light Source are considered briefly. 7 refs., 2 figs

  10. X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.; Whetten, N.R.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber for use in determining the spatial distribution of x-ray photons in tomography systems comprises a plurality of substantially parallel, planar anodes separated by parallel, planar cathodes and enclosed in a gas of high atomic weight at a pressure from approximately 10 atmospheres to approximately 50 atmospheres. The cathode and anode structures comprise metals which are substantially opaque to x-ray radiation and thereby tend to reduce the resolution limiting effects of xray fluoresence in the gas. In another embodiment of the invention the anodes comprise parallel conductive bars disposed between two planar cathodes. Guard rings eliminate surface leakage currents between adjacent electrodes

  11. X-ray spectrum determination of elements with low atomic number with use of electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.N.

    1982-01-01

    Separate assemblies of a commercial analytical electron microscope-microanalyzer EMMA-2 have been modified to study objects, containing elements with the atomic number Z=5-9, in particular: 1) the range of changing the accelerating voltages is expanded to be in the range of 25 down to 10 kV with 5 kV interval. 2) image intensifier using microchannel plate MKP-40-19 is applied; 3) for elements of carbon, oxygen, boron, nitrogen type a unit with flow-type proportional counter is used. The sensitivity of carbon- and oxygen determination in carbides and oxides is 0.15-0.3% at the measurement time of 100 s. Results of microanalysis of the particles of B 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , SiO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 , Fe 3 C, WC for the contents of oxygen and carbon are presented

  12. Efficient focusing of 8 keV X-rays with multilayer Fresnel zone plates fabricated by atomic layer deposition and focused ion beam milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, Marcel; Keskinbora, Kahraman; Grévent, Corinne; Szeghalmi, Adriana; Knez, Mato; Weigand, Markus; Snigirev, Anatoly; Snigireva, Irina; Schütz, Gisela

    2013-01-01

    The fabrication and performance of multilayer Al 2 O 3 /Ta 2 O 5 Fresnel zone plates in the hard X-ray range and a discussion of possible future developments considering available materials are reported. Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) recently showed significant improvement by focusing soft X-rays down to ∼10 nm. In contrast to soft X-rays, generally a very high aspect ratio FZP is needed for efficient focusing of hard X-rays. Therefore, FZPs had limited success in the hard X-ray range owing to difficulties of manufacturing high-aspect-ratio zone plates using conventional techniques. Here, employing a method of fabrication based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) and focused ion beam (FIB) milling, FZPs with very high aspect ratios were prepared. Such multilayer FZPs with outermost zone widths of 10 and 35 nm and aspect ratios of up to 243 were tested for their focusing properties at 8 keV and shown to focus hard X-rays efficiently. This success was enabled by the outstanding layer quality thanks to ALD. Via the use of FIB for slicing the multilayer structures, desired aspect ratios could be obtained by precisely controlling the thickness. Experimental diffraction efficiencies of multilayer FZPs fabricated via this combination reached up to 15.58% at 8 keV. In addition, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy experiments at 1.5 keV were carried out using one of the multilayer FZPs and resolved a 60 nm feature size. Finally, the prospective of different material combinations with various outermost zone widths at 8 and 17 keV is discussed in the light of the coupled wave theory and the thin-grating approximation. Al 2 O 3 /Ir is outlined as a promising future material candidate for extremely high resolution with a theoretical efficiency of more than 20% for as small an outermost zone width as 10 nm at 17 keV

  13. Skull x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  14. Neck x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - neck; Cervical spine x-ray; Lateral neck x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored so that the lowest amount of radiation is used to produce the image. Pregnant women and ...

  15. Peculiar atomic dynamics in liquid GeTe with asymmetrical bonding: Observation by inelastic x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, M.; Koura, A.; Kajihara, Y.; Hosokawa, S.; Chiba, A.; Kimura, K.; Shimojo, F.; Tsutsui, S.; Baron, A. Q. R.

    2018-05-01

    Collective dynamics in liquid GeTe was investigated by inelastic x-ray scattering at 2 ≤Q ≤31 nm-1 . The dynamic structure factor shows clear inelastic excitations. The excitation energies at low Q disperse with increasing Q , consistent with the behavior of a longitudinal-acoustic excitation. The dispersion curve has a flat-topped region around the pseudo-Brillouin-zone boundary, similar to what is observed in liquid Bi [Inui et al., Phys. Rev. B 92, 054206 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.054206]. The dynamic structure factor shows a low-frequency excitation, and its coupling with the longitudinal-acoustic mode plays an important role for a flat-topped dispersion. From these results, it is inferred that atomic dynamics in liquid GeTe is strongly affected by a Peierls distortion similar to liquid Bi. By comparing the momentum transfer dependence of the excitation energy and quasielastic linewidth to partial structure factors obtained by our own ab initio molecular dynamics simulation for liquid GeTe, the quasielastic and inelastic components were found to be correlated with Te-Te and Ge-(Ge,Te) partial structure factors, respectively.

  16. Localized holes and delocalized electrons in photoexcited inorganic perovskites: Watching each atomic actor by picosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio G. Santomauro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on an element-selective study of the fate of charge carriers in photoexcited inorganic CsPbBr3 and CsPb(ClBr3 perovskite nanocrystals in toluene solutions using time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 80 ps time resolution. Probing the Br K-edge, the Pb L3-edge, and the Cs L2-edge, we find that holes in the valence band are localized at Br atoms, forming small polarons, while electrons appear as delocalized in the conduction band. No signature of either electronic or structural changes is observed at the Cs L2-edge. The results at the Br and Pb edges suggest the existence of a weakly localized exciton, while the absence of signatures at the Cs edge indicates that the Cs+ cation plays no role in the charge transport, at least beyond 80 ps. This first, time-resolved element-specific study of perovskites helps understand the rather modest charge carrier mobilities in these materials.

  17. Aspherical-atom modeling of coordination compounds by single-crystal X-ray diffraction allows the correct metal atom to be identified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Birger; Wandtke, Claudia M; Meents, Alke; Pröpper, Kevin; Mondal, Kartik Chandra; Samuel, Prinson P; Amin Sk, Nurul; Singh, Amit Pratap; Roesky, Herbert W; Sidhu, Navdeep

    2015-02-02

    Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) is often considered the gold standard in analytical chemistry, as it allows element identification as well as determination of atom connectivity and the solid-state structure of completely unknown samples. Element assignment is based on the number of electrons of an atom, so that a distinction of neighboring heavier elements in the periodic table by XRD is often difficult. A computationally efficient procedure for aspherical-atom least-squares refinement of conventional diffraction data of organometallic compounds is proposed. The iterative procedure is conceptually similar to Hirshfeld-atom refinement (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. A- 2008, 64, 383-393; IUCrJ. 2014, 1,61-79), but it relies on tabulated invariom scattering factors (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. B- 2013, 69, 91-104) and the Hansen/Coppens multipole model; disordered structures can be handled as well. Five linear-coordinate 3d metal complexes, for which the wrong element is found if standard independent-atom model scattering factors are relied upon, are studied, and it is shown that only aspherical-atom scattering factors allow a reliable assignment. The influence of anomalous dispersion in identifying the correct element is investigated and discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of pyrolytically coated graphite platforms submitted to simulated electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, Frine; Benzo, Zully; Quintal, Manuelita; Garaboto, Angel; Albornoz, Alberto; Brito, Joaquin L.

    2006-01-01

    The present work is part of an ongoing project aiming to a better understanding of the mechanisms of atomization on graphite furnace platforms used for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). It reports the study of unused pyrolytic graphite coated platforms of commercial origin, as well as platforms thermally or thermo-chemically treated under simulated ETAAS analysis conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to study the elements present at the surfaces of the platforms. New, unused platforms showed the presence of molybdenum, of unknown origin, in concentrations up to 1 at.%. Species in two different oxidations states (Mo 6+ and Mo 2+ ) were detected by analyzing the Mo 3d spectral region with high resolution XPS. The analysis of the C 1s region demonstrated the presence of several signals, one of these at 283.3 eV related to the presence of Mo carbide. The O 1s region showed also various peaks, including a signal that can be attributed to the presence of MoO 3 . Some carbon and oxygen signals were consistent with the presence of C=O and C-O- (probably C-OH) groups on the platforms surfaces. Upon thermal treatment up to 2900 deg. C, the intensity of the Mo signal decreased, but peaks due to Mo oxides (Mo 6+ and Mo 5+ ) and carbide (Mo 2+ ) were still apparent. Thermo-chemical treatment with 3 vol.% HCl solutions and heating up to 2900 deg. C resulted in further diminution of the Mo signal, with complete disappearance of Mo carbide species. Depth profiling of unused platforms by Ar + ion etching at increasing time periods demonstrated that, upon removal of several layers of carbonaceous material, the Mo signal disappears suggesting that this contamination is present only at the surface of the pyrolytic graphite platform

  19. X-ray diffraction analysis of LiCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} crystals with additives of silver atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirotinkin, V. P., E-mail: irotinkin.vladimir@mail.ru; Bush, A. A.; Kamentsev, K. E. [Moscow State Technical University of Radio Engineering, Electronics, and Automation (Russian Federation); Dau, H. S. [People’s Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation); Yakovlev, K. A. [Moscow State Technical University of Radio Engineering, Electronics, and Automation (Russian Federation); Tishchenko, E. A. [People’s Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Silver-containing LiCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} crystals up to 4 × 8 × 8 mm in size were grown by the crystallization of 80(1-x)CuO · 20{sub x}AgNO{sub 3} · 20Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) mixture melt. According to the X-ray spectral and Rietveld X-ray diffraction data, the maximum amount of silver incorporated in the LiCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} structure is about 4 at % relative to the copper content. It was established that silver atoms occupy statistically crystallographic positions of lithium atoms. The incorporation of silver atoms is accompanied by a noticeable increase in parameter c of the LiCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} rhombic unit cell, a slight increase in parameter a, and a slight decrease in parameter b.

  20. High-resolution inner-shell spectroscopies of free atoms and molecules using soft-x-ray beamlines at the third-generation synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the current status of inner-shell spectroscopies of free atoms and molecules using high-resolution soft-x-ray monochromators installed in the soft-x-ray beamlines at the third-generation synchrotron radiation facilities. Beamlines and endstations devoted to atomic and molecular inner-shell spectroscopies and various types of experimental techniques, such as ion yield spectroscopy, resonant photoemission spectroscopy and multiple-coincidence momentum imaging, are described. Experimental results for K-shell excitation of Ne, O K-shell excitation of H 2 O and CO 2 , C K-shell excitation and ionization of CO 2 and B K-shell excitation of BF 3 , obtained at beamline 27SU of SPring-8 in Japan, are discussed as examples of atomic and molecular inner-shell spectroscopies using the third-generation synchrotron radiation sources. (topical review)

  1. Hadronic atoms and leptonic conservations: Final technical report, February 1, 1984-January 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunselman, R.

    1987-01-01

    X rays from pionic atoms were studied to determine nuclear distributions, to determine pion-nuclear interaction parameters, and to test energy calculations; x rays from sigmonic and kaonic atoms were studied to determine the sigma-minus magnetic moment, as well as to determine sigma-nuclear interaction parameters, and to determine the sigma-minus and kaon mass. A search for the rare decay μ + → e + γ at a sensitivity less than 10 -13 is being constructed. A more sensitive search was begun for muonium conversion μ + e - → μ - e + . 6 refs

  2. Davisson-Germer Prize in Atomic or Surface Physics Talk: Soft X-Ray Studies of Surfaces, Interfaces and Thin Films: From Spectroscopy to Ultrafast Nanoscale Movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Joachim

    2011-03-01

    My talk will review the development of soft x-ray spectroscopy and microscopy and its impact on our understanding of chemical bonding, magnetism and dynamics at surfaces and interfaces. I will first outline important soft x-ray spectroscopy and microscopy techniques that have been developed over the last 30 years and their key strengths such as elemental and chemical specificity, sensitivity to small atomic concentrations, separation of charge and spin properties, spatial resolution down to the nanometer scale, and temporal resolution down to the intrinsic femtosecond timescale of atomic and electronic motions. I will then present scientific breakthroughs based on soft x-ray studies in three selected areas: the nature of molecular bonding and reactivity on metal surfaces, the molecular origin of liquid crystal alignment on surfaces, and the microscopic origin of interface-mediated spin alignments in modern magnetic devices. My talk will also cover the use of soft x-rays for revealing the temporal evolution of electronic structure, addressing the key problem of ``function,'' down to the intrinsic femtosecond time scale of charge and spin configuration changes. As examples I will present the formation and breaking of chemical bonds in surface complexes and the motion of the magnetization in magnetic devices. Work supported by the Office of Basic Energy Science of the US Department of Energy.

  3. Technical Note: Effect of explicit M and N-shell atomic transitions on a low-energy x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Peter G. F., E-mail: peter.watson@mail.mcgill.ca; Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H4A 3J1 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: In EGSnrc, atomic transitions to and from the M and N-shells are treated in an average way by default. This approach is justified in which the energy difference between explicit and average M and N-shell binding energies is less than 1 keV, and for most applications can be considered negligible. However, for simulations of low energy x-ray sources on thin, high-Z targets, characteristic x-rays can make up a significant portion of the source spectra. As of release V4-2.4.0, EGSnrc has included an option to enable a more complete algorithm of all atomic transitions available in the EADL compilation. In this paper, the effect of M and N-shell averaging on the calculation of half-value layer (HVL) and relative depth dose (RDD) curve of a 50 kVp intraoperative x-ray tube with a thin gold target was investigated. Methods: A 50 kVp miniature x-ray source with a gold target (The INTRABEAM System, Carl Zeiss, Germany) was modeled with the EGSnrc user code cavity, both with and without M and N-shell averaging. From photon fluence spectra simulations, the source HVLs were determined analytically. The same source model was then used with egs-chamber to calculate RDD curves in water. Results: A 4% increase of HVL was reported when accounting for explicit M and N-shell transitions, and up to a 9% decrease in local relative dose for normalization at 3 mm depth in water. Conclusions: The EGSnrc default of using averaged M and N-shell binding energies has an observable effect on the HVL and RDD of a low energy x-ray source with high-Z target. For accurate modeling of this class of devices, explicit atomic transitions should be included.

  4. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  5. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein, J.R.; Wei, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  6. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  7. Atomic level study of water-gas shift catalysts via transmission electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatay, Mehmed Cem

    Water-gas shift (WGS), CO + H2O ⇆ CO2 + H2 (DeltaH° = -41 kJ mol -1), is an industrially important reaction for the production of high purity hydrogen. Commercial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts are employed to accelerate this reaction, yet these catalysts suffer from certain drawbacks, including costly regeneration processes and sulfur poisoning. Extensive research is focused on developing new catalysts to replace the current technology. Supported noble metals stand out as promising candidates, yet comprise intricate nanostructures complicating the understanding of their working mechanism. In this study, the structure of the supported Pt catalysts is explored by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of the supporting phase and the use of secondary metals on the reaction kinetics is investigated. Structural heterogeneities are quantified and correlated with the kinetic descriptors of the catalysts to develop a fundamental understanding of the catalytic mechanism. The effect of the reaction environment on catalyst structure is examined by in-situ techniques. This study benefitted greatly from the use of model catalysts that provide a convenient medium for the atomic level characterization of nanostructures. Based on these studies, Pt supported on iron oxide nano islands deposited on inert spherical alumina exhibited 48 times higher WGS turnover rate (normalized by the total Pt surface area) than Pt supported on bulk iron oxide. The rate of aqueous phase glycerol reforming reaction of Pt supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) is promoted by co-impregnating with cobalt. The synthesis resulted in a variety of nanostructures among which Pt-Co bimetallic nanoparticles are found to be responsible for the observed promotion. The unprecedented WGS rate of Pt supported on Mo2C is explored by forming Mo 2C patches on top of MWCNTs and the rate promotion is found to be caused by the Pt-Mo bimetallic entities.

  8. Studies on production of metastable core-excited atoms by laser-produced x-rays. Final report, 1 October 1984-30 September 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, S.E.; Young, J.F.

    1986-04-01

    The overall objective of the work on this program was to study methods for production of core-excited metastable atoms by laser-generated x-rays. We are interested in the spectroscopy of these levels, their autoionizing and radiative rates, and their metastability in the presence of hot electrons and ions. The concept of using x-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma to excite large densities of energetic excited levels in atoms and ions has been thoroughly experimentally investigated using modest, 100 mJ, plasma-producing lasers. One of the objectives of this work was to verify that these techniques could be scaled up to higher energies, such as 20 J. Thus a major effort this year has been devoted to the design and construction of the high energy (20 J) 1064 nm plasma-forming laser system and the tunable probe/transfer laser

  9. Precision Survey of X-Rays from $\\overline{p}p (\\overline{p}d)$ Atoms Using the Initial LEAR Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment searches for the K and L X-ray series from @*p~(@*d) atoms, then measures their shift and width relative to QED predictions, and investigates their yields as a function of gas density. \\\\ \\\\ The @* are stopped in 1 atmosphere of H2 (D2) gas in a large aluminium flask whose 1 mm wall thickness eliminates externally produced low energy X-rays. The gas is cooled from a remote helium refrigerator and its temperature varied between 30|0K and 300|0K, giving a density range of 10 and large changes in relative line intensities. With 300~mm|2 area and 250~eV resolution FWHM at 5.9~keV, the Si(Li) X-ray detector penetrates the vacuum to come very close to a large beryllium window. Withstanding the large, charged particle flux from @*p annihilations has required special development of the Si(Li) detector. High purity metals are used for flask, window and detector end-housing to reduce background X-ray lines. A NaI ring suppresses the continuum background that comes principally from Compton scattering in t...

  10. Coupled-cluster response theory for near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure of atoms and molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coriani, Sonia; Christiansen, Ove; Fransson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    triple corrected excitation energies CCSDR(3). This work is a first step toward the extension of these theoretical electronic structure methods of well-established high accuracy in UV-vis absorption spectroscopies to applications concerned with x-ray radiation. From the imaginary part of the linear...... response function, the near K-edge x-ray absorption spectra of neon, water, and carbon monoxide are determined and compared with experiment. Results at the CCSD level show relative peak intensities in good agreement with experiment with discrepancies in transition energies due to incomplete treatment...

  11. X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enema. What you can expect During the X-ray X-rays are performed at doctors' offices, dentists' offices, ... as those using a contrast medium. Your child's X-ray Restraints or other techniques may be used to ...

  12. Abdominal x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal film; X-ray - abdomen; Flat plate; KUB x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the ... treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray ...

  14. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacconi, R.; Gursky, H.

    1974-01-01

    This text contains ten chapters and three appendices. Following an introduction, chapters two through five deal with observational techniques, mechanisms for the production of x rays in a cosmic setting, the x-ray sky and solar x-ray emission. Chapters six through ten include compact x-ray sources, supernova remnants, the interstellar medium, extragalactic x-ray sources and the cosmic x-ray background. Interactions of x rays with matter, units and conversion factors and a catalog of x-ray sources comprise the three appendices. (U.S.)

  15. X-ray diffraction from ideal mosaic crystals in external fields of certain types. I. Atomic displacements and the corresponding diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treushnikov, E.N.

    2000-01-01

    The problem of the theoretical description of X-ray diffraction from ideal mosaic crystals under the effect of various external fields has been formulated. Electric, magnetic, electromagnetic, and acoustic perturbations are considered. The atomic displacements in crystals under the effect of external fields and the types of the corresponding diffraction patterns are analyzed for various types of perturbations. The crystal classes are determined in which atomic displacements can be recorded experimentally. Diffraction patterns formed under the effect of various external factors are considered on the basis of the derived dependence of the structure factor on the characteristics of an applied force field

  16. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of nitridation on 4H-SiC (0001) surface by direct nitrogen atomic source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, J. W.; Pan, J. S.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, S. J.; Chen, Q.; Huan, C. H. A.

    2008-01-01

    A Si 3 N 4 passivation layer has been successfully grown on the 4H-SiC (0001) surface by direct atomic source nitridation at various substrate temperatures. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that higher substrate temperature leads to higher nitridation rate and good crystallinity of the passivation layer. A thin oxynitride layer on the top of the Si 3 N 4 was observed due to the residual O in the vacuum system, but was decomposed during annealing. In the meantime, excess C was found to be effectively removed by the reactive atomic N source

  17. Determination of frequencies of atomic oscillations along the fourth order symmetry axis in indium arsenide according to thermal diffusion scattering of X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlova, N.S.

    1978-01-01

    Intensity of diffusion scattering of X-rays from the plane of a monocrystal of indium arsenide has been measured on the monochromatized CuKsub(α)-radiation. The samples are made of Cl indium arsenide monocrystal of the n-type with the 1x10 18 cm -3 concentration of carriers in the form of a plate with the polished parallel cut-off with the +-5' accuracy. The investigations have been carried out on the URS-5 IM X-ray diffractometer at room temperature in vacuum. Intensities of thermal diffusion scattering of the second order have been calculated by the two-atomic chain model with different mass and four interaction paramaters. Based upon the analysis of intensity of single-phonon diffusion scattering the curves of frequencies of atomic oscillations along the direction [100] have been determined. The values of frequencies obtained experimentally on the thermal diffusion scattering of X-rays are in a satisfactory agreement with the calculated data. The frequencies obtained are compared with the results of calculation and the analysis of multiphonon spectra of IR-absorption made elsewhere

  18. Very large-scale structures in sintered silica aerogels as evidenced by atomic force microscopy and ultra-small angle X-ray scattering experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Marliere, C; Etienne, P; Woignier, T; Dieudonné, P; Phalippou, J

    2001-01-01

    During the last few years the bulk structure of silica aerogels has been extensively studied mainly by scattering techniques (neutrons, X-rays, light). It has been shown that small silica particles aggregate to constitute a fractal network. Its spatial extension and fractal dimension are strongly dependent on the synthesis conditions (e.g., pH of gelifying solutions). These typical lengths range from 1 to 10 nm. Ultra-small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments have been carried out on aerogels at different steps of densification. The results presented in this paper reveal the existence of a spatial arrangement of the solid part at a very large length scale. The evolution of this very large-scale structure during the densification process has been studied and reveals a contraction of this macro-structure made of aggregates of clusters. (16 refs).

  19. Effect of Injector Geometry on Atomization of a Liquid-Liquid Double Swirl Coaxial Injector Using Non-invasive Laser, Optical and X-ray Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, C. R.; Meyer, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    The spray characteristics of a liquid-liquid double swirl coaxial injector were studied using non-invasive optical, laser, and X-ray diagnostics. A parametric study of injector exit geometry demonstrated that spray breakup time, breakup type and sheet stability could be controlled with exit geometry. Phase Doppler interferometry was used to characterize droplet statistics and non-dimensional droplet parameters over a range of inlet conditions and for various fluids allowing for a study on the role of specific fluid properties in atomization. Further, X-ray radiography allowed for investigation of sheet thickness and breakup length to be quantified for different recess exit diameters and inlet pressures. Finally, computed tomography scans revealed that the spray cone was distinctively non-uniform and comprised of several pockets of increased mass flux.

  20. Atomic structure of glassy Mg60Cu30Y10 investigated with EXAFS, x-ray and neutron diffraction, and reverse Monte Carlo simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jovari, P.; Saksl, K.; Pryds, Nini

    2007-01-01

    Short range order of amorphous Mg60Cu30Y10 was investigated by x-ray and neutron diffraction, Cu and Y K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements, and the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique. We found that Mg-Mg and Mg-Cu nearest neighbor distances are very similar to values found...... in crystalline Mg2Cu. The Cu-Y coordination number is 1.1 +/- 0.2, and the Cu-Y distance is similar to 4% shorter than the sum of atomic radii, suggesting that attraction between Cu and Y plays an important role in stabilizing the glassy state. Thermal stability and structure evolution upon annealing were also...

  1. Detection of nanocrystallinity by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in thin film transition metal/rare-earth atom, elemental and complex oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edge, L.F.; Schlom, D.G.; Stemmer, S.; Lucovsky, G.; Luning, J.

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystallinity has been detected in the X-ray absorption spectra of transition metal and rare-earth oxides by (i) removal of d-state degeneracies in the (a) Ti and Sc L 3 spectra of TiO 2 and LaScO 3 , respectively, and (b) O K 1 spectra of Zr(Hf)O 2 , Y 2 O 3 , LaScO 3 and LaAlO 3 , and by the (ii) detection of the O-atom vacancy in the O K 1 edge ZrO 2 -Y 2 O 3 alloys. Spectroscopic detection is more sensitive than X-ray diffraction with a limit of ∼2 nm as compared to >5 mm. Other example includes detection of ZrO 2 nanocrystallinity in phase-separated Zr(Hf) silicate alloys

  2. High resolution inner-shell spectroscopies of atoms and molecules in gas phase using the soft x-ray photochemistry beamline at SPring-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    This article describes recent activities on inner-shell spectroscopies of atoms and molecules on beamline 27SU, nicknamed soft X-ray photochemistry beamline, at SPring-8, an 8-GeV synchrotron radiation facility in Japan. This beamline provides linearly polarized monochromatic soft X-rays at the resolution higher than 10,000. The end station is designed so that one can perform various kinds of excitation and de-excitation spectroscopies as well as coincidence spectroscopies. Following the description of the beamline and the end station, we present recent results for inner-shell spectroscopies on Ne, CO 2 , BF 3 , and CF 4 . Emphasis is given to illustrate the strategy of the research on this beamline and performance of the beamline and the end station. (author)

  3. Electronic damage in S atoms in a native protein crystal induced by an intense X-ray free-electron laser pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Galli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Current hard X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL sources can deliver doses to biological macromolecules well exceeding 1 GGy, in timescales of a few tens of femtoseconds. During the pulse, photoionization can reach the point of saturation in which certain atomic species in the sample lose most of their electrons. This electronic radiation damage causes the atomic scattering factors to change, affecting, in particular, the heavy atoms, due to their higher photoabsorption cross sections. Here, it is shown that experimental serial femtosecond crystallography data collected with an extremely bright XFEL source exhibit a reduction of the effective scattering power of the sulfur atoms in a native protein. Quantitative methods are developed to retrieve information on the effective ionization of the damaged atomic species from experimental data, and the implications of utilizing new phasing methods which can take advantage of this localized radiation damage are discussed.

  4. Mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Zeff) and measurement of x-ray energy spectra using based calcium phosphate biomaterials: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes Z, M. A.; Da Silva, T. A.; Nogueira, M. S.; Goncalves Z, E.

    2015-10-01

    In dentistry, alveolar bone regeneration procedures using based calcium phosphate biomaterials have been shown effective. However,there are not reports in the literature of studies the interaction of low energy radiation in these biomaterials used as attenuator and not being then allowed a comparison between the theoretical values and experimental.The objective of this study was to determine the interaction of radiation parameters of four dental biomaterials - BioOss, Cerasorb M Dental, Straumann Boneceramic and Osteogen for diagnostic radiology qualities. As a material and methods, the composition of the biomaterials was determined by the analytical techniques. The samples with 0.181 cm to 0,297 cm thickness were experimentally used as attenuators for the measurement of the transmitted X-rays spectra in X-ray equipment with 50 to 90 kV range by spectrometric system comprising the Cd Te detector. After this procedure, the mass attenuation coefficient, the effective atomic number were determined and compared between all the specimens analyzed, using the program WinXCOM in the range of 10 to 200 keV. In all strains examined observed that the energy spectrum of x-rays transmitted through the BioOss has the mean energy slightly smaller than the others biomaterials for close thickness. The μ/ρ and Z eff of the biomaterials showed its dependence on photon energy and atomic number of the elements of the material analyzed. It is concluded according to the methodology employed in this study that the measurements of x-ray spectrum, μ/ρ and Z eff using biomaterials as attenuators confirmed that the thickness, density, composition of the samples, the incident photon energy are factors that determine the characteristics of radiation in a tissue or equivalent material. (Author)

  5. X-ray electromagnetic application technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The investigating committee aimed at research on electromagnetic fields in functional devices and X-ray fibers for efficient coherent X-ray generation and their material science, high-precision manufacturing, particularly for X-ray electromagnetic application technology from January 2006 to December 2008. In this report, we describe our research results, in particular, on the topics of synchrotron radiation and free-electron laser, Saga Synchrotron Project, X-ray waveguides and waveguide-based lens-less hard-X-ray imaging, X-ray nanofocusing for capillaries and zone plates, dispersion characteristics in photonics crystal consisting of periodic atoms for nanometer waveguides, electromagnetic characteristics of grid structures for scattering fields of nano-meter electromagnetic waves and X-rays, FDTD parallel computing of fundamental scattering and attenuation characteristics of X-ray for medical imaging diagnosis, orthogonal relations of electromagnetic fields including evanescent field in dispersive medium. (author)

  6. X-ray fluorescence holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu, Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-03-07

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy.

  7. X-ray fluorescence holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy. (topical review)

  8. Natural widths of atomic K and L levels, Kα X-ray lines and several KLL Auger lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, M.O.; Oliver, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Semi-empirical values of the natural widths of K, L 1 , L 2 , and L 3 levels, Kα 1 and Kα 2 x-ray lines, and KL 1 L 1 , KL 1 L 2 and KL 2 L 3 Auger lines for the elements 10 1 ,L 2 , L 3 ) is obtained from the relation GAMMA/sub i/=GAMMA/sub R/,i/ω/sub i/, using the theoretical radiative rate GAMMA/sub R/,i from Scofield's relativistic, relaxed Hartree-Fock calculation and the fluorescence yield ω/sub i/ from Krause's evaluation. X-ray and Auger lines widths are calculated as the sums of pertinent level widths. This tabulation of natural level and line widths is internally consistent, and is compatible with all relevant experimental and theoretical information. Present semi-empirical widths, especially those of Kα 1 and Kα 2 x-rays, are compared with measured widths. Uncertainties of semi-empirical values are estimated

  9. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ... of the inside of the chest. A chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and ...

  10. Correlation between Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) analysis of hardened concrete for chlorides vs. Atomic Absorption (AA) analysis in accordance with AASHTO T- 260; sampling and testing for chloride ion in concrete and concrete raw mater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    A correlation between Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence(WDXRF) analysis of Hardened : Concrete for Chlorides and Atomic Absorption (AA) analysis (current method AASHTO T-260, procedure B) has been : found and a new method of analysis has been ...

  11. X-ray sky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, M.; Koubsky, P.

    1977-01-01

    The history is described of the discoveries of X-ray sources in the sky. The individual X-ray detectors are described in more detail, i.e., gas counters, scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, and the principles of X-ray spectrometry and of radiation collimation aimed at increased resolution are discussed. Currently, over 200 celestial X-ray sources are known. Some were identified as nebulae, in some pulsations were found or the source was identified as a binary star. X-ray bursts of novae were also observed. The X-ray radiation is briefly mentioned of spherical star clusters and of extragalactic X-ray sources. (Oy)

  12. Observation of Structure of Surfaces and Interfaces by Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction: Atomic-Scale Imaging and Time-Resolved Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Yusuke; Shirasawa, Tetsuroh; Voegeli, Wolfgang; Takahashi, Toshio

    2018-06-01

    The recent developments in synchrotron optics, X-ray detectors, and data analysis algorithms have enhanced the capability of the surface X-ray diffraction technique. This technique has been used to clarify the atomic arrangement around surfaces in a non-contact and nondestructive manner. An overview of surface X-ray diffraction, from the historical development to recent topics, is presented. In the early stage of this technique, surface reconstructions of simple semiconductors or metals were studied. Currently, the surface or interface structures of complicated functional materials are examined with sub-Å resolution. As examples, the surface structure determination of organic semiconductors and of a one-dimensional structure on silicon are presented. A new frontier is time-resolved interfacial structure analysis. A recent observation of the structure and dynamics of the electric double layer of ionic liquids, and an investigation of the structural evolution in the wettability transition on a TiO2 surface that utilizes a newly designed time-resolved surface diffractometer, are presented.

  13. DiSCaMB: a software library for aspherical atom model X-ray scattering factor calculations with CPUs and GPUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodkiewicz, Michał L; Migacz, Szymon; Rudnicki, Witold; Makal, Anna; Kalinowski, Jarosław A; Moriarty, Nigel W; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Afonine, Pavel V; Adams, Paul D; Dominiak, Paulina Maria

    2018-02-01

    It has been recently established that the accuracy of structural parameters from X-ray refinement of crystal structures can be improved by using a bank of aspherical pseudoatoms instead of the classical spherical model of atomic form factors. This comes, however, at the cost of increased complexity of the underlying calculations. In order to facilitate the adoption of this more advanced electron density model by the broader community of crystallographers, a new software implementation called DiSCaMB , 'densities in structural chemistry and molecular biology', has been developed. It addresses the challenge of providing for high performance on modern computing architectures. With parallelization options for both multi-core processors and graphics processing units (using CUDA), the library features calculation of X-ray scattering factors and their derivatives with respect to structural parameters, gives access to intermediate steps of the scattering factor calculations (thus allowing for experimentation with modifications of the underlying electron density model), and provides tools for basic structural crystallographic operations. Permissively (MIT) licensed, DiSCaMB is an open-source C++ library that can be embedded in both academic and commercial tools for X-ray structure refinement.

  14. Catalysis of GTP hydrolysis by small GTPases at atomic detail by integration of X-ray crystallography, experimental, and theoretical IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudack, Till; Jenrich, Sarah; Brucker, Sven; Vetter, Ingrid R; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2015-10-02

    Small GTPases regulate key processes in cells. Malfunction of their GTPase reaction by mutations is involved in severe diseases. Here, we compare the GTPase reaction of the slower hydrolyzing GTPase Ran with Ras. By combination of time-resolved FTIR difference spectroscopy and QM/MM simulations we elucidate that the Mg(2+) coordination by the phosphate groups, which varies largely among the x-ray structures, is the same for Ran and Ras. A new x-ray structure of a Ran·RanBD1 complex with improved resolution confirmed this finding and revealed a general problem with the refinement of Mg(2+) in GTPases. The Mg(2+) coordination is not responsible for the much slower GTPase reaction of Ran. Instead, the location of the Tyr-39 side chain of Ran between the γ-phosphate and Gln-69 prevents the optimal positioning of the attacking water molecule by the Gln-69 relative to the γ-phosphate. This is confirmed in the RanY39A·RanBD1 crystal structure. The QM/MM simulations provide IR spectra of the catalytic center, which agree very nicely with the experimental ones. The combination of both methods can correlate spectra with structure at atomic detail. For example the FTIR difference spectra of RasA18T and RanT25A mutants show that spectral differences are mainly due to the hydrogen bond of Thr-25 to the α-phosphate in Ran. By integration of x-ray structure analysis, experimental, and theoretical IR spectroscopy the catalytic center of the x-ray structural models are further refined to sub-Å resolution, allowing an improved understanding of catalysis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Catalysis of GTP Hydrolysis by Small GTPases at Atomic Detail by Integration of X-ray Crystallography, Experimental, and Theoretical IR Spectroscopy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudack, Till; Jenrich, Sarah; Brucker, Sven; Vetter, Ingrid R.; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Small GTPases regulate key processes in cells. Malfunction of their GTPase reaction by mutations is involved in severe diseases. Here, we compare the GTPase reaction of the slower hydrolyzing GTPase Ran with Ras. By combination of time-resolved FTIR difference spectroscopy and QM/MM simulations we elucidate that the Mg2+ coordination by the phosphate groups, which varies largely among the x-ray structures, is the same for Ran and Ras. A new x-ray structure of a Ran·RanBD1 complex with improved resolution confirmed this finding and revealed a general problem with the refinement of Mg2+ in GTPases. The Mg2+ coordination is not responsible for the much slower GTPase reaction of Ran. Instead, the location of the Tyr-39 side chain of Ran between the γ-phosphate and Gln-69 prevents the optimal positioning of the attacking water molecule by the Gln-69 relative to the γ-phosphate. This is confirmed in the RanY39A·RanBD1 crystal structure. The QM/MM simulations provide IR spectra of the catalytic center, which agree very nicely with the experimental ones. The combination of both methods can correlate spectra with structure at atomic detail. For example the FTIR difference spectra of RasA18T and RanT25A mutants show that spectral differences are mainly due to the hydrogen bond of Thr-25 to the α-phosphate in Ran. By integration of x-ray structure analysis, experimental, and theoretical IR spectroscopy the catalytic center of the x-ray structural models are further refined to sub-Å resolution, allowing an improved understanding of catalysis. PMID:26272610

  16. Study of the atomic ordering in the alloys Ni-Ir using diffuse X-ray scattering and pseudopotentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, T.

    1982-06-01

    Experiments were performed on the Ni-Ir alloys to measure the diffuse X-ray scattering intensity after annealing from high temperatures. It was established that the short-range order exists in these alloys when the samples are quenched from 1200 0 C and 1400 0 C. The ordering potentials for various concentrations of Ir in Ni were calculated using the pseudopotentials of Animalu. The method of incorporating the d electrons in the dielectric screening function was proposed. It was shown that the ordering potential is severely affected by the new type of screening. (author)

  17. A high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for a kaon mass measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelan, Kevin, E-mail: kevin.phelan@oeaw.ac.at [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of The Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Suzuki, Ken; Zmeskal, Johann [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of The Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Tortorella, Daniele [Payr Engineering GmbH, Wiederschwing 25, A-9564 Patergassen (Austria); Bühler, Matthias; Hertrich, Theo [Low Temperature Solutions UG, Bahnhofstraße 21, D-85737 Ismaning (Germany)

    2017-02-11

    The ASPECT consortium (Adaptable Spectrometer Enabled by Cryogenic Technology) is currently constructing a generalised cryogenic platform for cryogenic detector work which will be able to accommodate a wide range of sensors. The cryogenics system is based on a small mechanical cooler with a further adiabatic demagnetisation stage and will work with cryogenic detectors at sub-Kelvin temperatures. The commercial aim of the consortium is to produce a compact, user-friendly device with an emphasis on reliability and portability which can easily be transported for specialised on-site work, such as beam-lines or telescope facilities. The cryogenic detector platform will accommodate a specially developed cryogenic sensor, either a metallic magnetic calorimeter or a magnetic penetration-depth thermometer. The detectors will be designed to work in various temperatures regions with an emphasis on optimising the various detector resolutions for specific temperatures. One resolution target is of about 10 eV at the energies range typically created in kaonic atoms experiments (soft x-ray energies). A following step will see the introduction of continuous, high-power, sub-Kelvin cooling which will bring the cryogenic basis for a high resolution spectrometer system to the market. The scientific goal of the project will produce an experimental set-up optimised for kaon-mass measurements performing high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy on a beam-line provided foreseeably by the J-PARC (Tokai, Japan) or DAΦNE (Frascati, Italy) facilities.

  18. X-ray scattering of calcite thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition: Studies in air and in calcite saturated water solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hudak, Michael R.; Lerner, Allan [Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Grubbs, Robert K. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Wang, Shanmin [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zhang, Zhan; Karapetrova, Evguenia [Advance Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hickmott, Donald [Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Majewski, Jaroslaw, E-mail: jarek@lanl.gov [Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    Carbonates are one of the most abundant groups of minerals in earth systems and are important in many geological settings and industrial processes. Calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) thin films produced by atomic layer deposition offer a method to evaluate the surficial properties of carbonates as well as interactions at the carbonate–fluid interface. Using synchrotron X-ray reflectivity and X-ray diffraction, these films are observed to be porous, polycrystalline, and have crystallites oriented with the major (104) calcite cleavage plane parallel to the surface of the z-cut single crystal quartz substrate. An Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer layer, present between quartz and the calcite film, does not affect the as-deposited film, but does influence how the films reorganize in contact with fluid. Without a buffer layer, calcite reorients its crystallites to have populations of (006) and (030) parallel to the substrate, while those with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} buffer layer become more amorphous. Amorphous films may represent an analog to amorphous calcium carbonate and provide insights into that material's thermophysical behavior. Due to a higher percentage of pore spaces available for fluid infiltration, films deposited at higher temperature make the calcite thin films more susceptible to amorphization. These films are chemically similar, but structurally dissimilar to bulk natural calcite. Nevertheless, they can be a complementary system to traditional single crystal X-ray surface scattering studies on carbonates, particularly for important but less common minerals, to evaluate mineral–fluid interfacial interactions. - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition (ALD) used to produce calcite films. • Calcite film orientation and crystallinity depend on ALD parameters. • ALD calcite films can be both crystalline and amorphous. • Interaction of water with films can re-orient or amorphize the films. • ALD calcite films may be useful to study carbonate–fluid interfacial

  19. X-ray scattering of calcite thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition: Studies in air and in calcite saturated water solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Peng; Hudak, Michael R.; Lerner, Allan; Grubbs, Robert K.; Wang, Shanmin; Zhang, Zhan; Karapetrova, Evguenia; Hickmott, Donald; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Carbonates are one of the most abundant groups of minerals in earth systems and are important in many geological settings and industrial processes. Calcite (CaCO 3 ) thin films produced by atomic layer deposition offer a method to evaluate the surficial properties of carbonates as well as interactions at the carbonate–fluid interface. Using synchrotron X-ray reflectivity and X-ray diffraction, these films are observed to be porous, polycrystalline, and have crystallites oriented with the major (104) calcite cleavage plane parallel to the surface of the z-cut single crystal quartz substrate. An Al 2 O 3 buffer layer, present between quartz and the calcite film, does not affect the as-deposited film, but does influence how the films reorganize in contact with fluid. Without a buffer layer, calcite reorients its crystallites to have populations of (006) and (030) parallel to the substrate, while those with an Al 2 O 3 buffer layer become more amorphous. Amorphous films may represent an analog to amorphous calcium carbonate and provide insights into that material's thermophysical behavior. Due to a higher percentage of pore spaces available for fluid infiltration, films deposited at higher temperature make the calcite thin films more susceptible to amorphization. These films are chemically similar, but structurally dissimilar to bulk natural calcite. Nevertheless, they can be a complementary system to traditional single crystal X-ray surface scattering studies on carbonates, particularly for important but less common minerals, to evaluate mineral–fluid interfacial interactions. - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition (ALD) used to produce calcite films. • Calcite film orientation and crystallinity depend on ALD parameters. • ALD calcite films can be both crystalline and amorphous. • Interaction of water with films can re-orient or amorphize the films. • ALD calcite films may be useful to study carbonate–fluid interfacial interactions

  20. Fast calculator for X-ray emission due to Radiative Recombination and Radiative Electron Capture in relativistic heavy-ion atom collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdrich, M. O.; Weber, G.; Gumberidze, A.; Wu, Z. W.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2017-10-01

    In experiments with highly charged, fast heavy ions the Radiative Recombination (RR) and Radiative Electron Capture (REC) processes have significant cross sections in an energy range of up to a few GeV / u . They are some of the most important charge changing processes in collisions of heavy ions with atoms and electrons, leading to the emission of a photon along with the formation of the ground and excited atomic states. Hence, for the understanding and planning of experiments, in particular for X-ray spectroscopy studies, at accelerator ring facilities, such as FAIR, it is crucial to have a good knowledge of these cross sections and the associated radiation characteristics. In the frame of this work a fast calculator, named RECAL, for the RR and REC process is presented and its capabilities are demonstrated with the analysis of a recently conducted experiment at the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt, Germany. A method is presented to determine unknown X-ray emission cross sections via normalization of the recorded spectra to REC cross sections calculated by RECAL.

  1. Major constituent quantitative determination in uranium alloys by coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and X ray fluorescence wavelength dispersive spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Luis Claudio de; Silva, Adriana Mascarenhas Martins da; Gomide, Ricardo Goncalves; Silva, Ieda de Souza

    2013-01-01

    A wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) spectrometric method for determination of major constituents elements (Zr, Nb, Mo) in Uranium/Zirconium/Niobium and Uranium/Molybdenum alloy samples were developed. The methods use samples taken in the form of chips that were dissolved in hot nitric acid and precipitate particles melted with lithium tetraborate and dissolved in hot nitric acid and finally analyzed as a solution. Studies on the determination by inductively coupled plasma optic emission spectrometry (ICP OES) using matched matrix in calibration curve were developed. The same samples solution were analyzed in both methods. The limits of detection (LOD), linearity of the calibrations curves, recovery study, accuracy and precision of the both techniques were carried out. The results were compared. (author)

  2. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a ... posted: How to Obtain and Share ...

  3. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey Rubin, a radiologist ... about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! Spotlight Recently posted: ...

  4. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sell, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    A diagnostic x-ray device, readily convertible between conventional radiographic and tomographic operating modes, is described. An improved drive system interconnects and drives the x-ray source and the imaging device through coordinated movements for tomography

  5. X-ray - skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003381.htm X-ray - skeleton To use the sharing features on this ... Degenerative bone conditions Osteomyelitis Risks There is low radiation exposure. X-rays machines are set to provide the smallest ...

  6. Atomic Layer Deposition Re Ective Coatings For Future Astronomical Space Telescopes And The Solar Corona Viewed Through The Minxss (Miniature X-Ray Solar Spectrometer) Cubesats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christopher Samuel

    2017-11-01

    Advances in technology and instrumentation open new windows for observing astrophysical objects. The first half of my dissertation involves the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) coatings to create high reflectivity UV mirrors for future satellite astronomical telescopes. Aluminum (Al) has intrinsic reflectance greater than 80% from 90 – 2,000 nm, but develops a native aluminum oxide (Al2O3) layer upon exposure to air that readily absorbs light below 250 nm. Thus, Al based UV mirrors must be protected by a transmissive overcoat. Traditionally, metal-fluoride overcoats such as MgF2 and LiF are used to mitigate oxidation but with caveats. We utilize a new metal fluoride (AlF3) to protect Al mirrors deposited by ALD. ALD allows for precise thickness control, conformal and near stoichiometric thin films. We prove that depositing ultra-thin ( 3 nm) ALD ALF3 to protect Al mirrors after removing the native oxide layer via atomic layer etching (ALE) enhances the reflectance near 90 nm from 5% to 30%.X-ray detector technology with high readout rates are necessary for the relatively bright Sun, particularly during large flares. The hot plasma in the solar corona generates X-rays, which yield information on the physical conditions of the plasma. The second half of my dissertation includes detector testing, characterization and solar science with the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSats. The MinXSS CubeSats employ Silicon Drift Diode (SDD) detectors called X123, which generate full sun spectrally resolved ( 0.15 FWHM at 5.9 keV) measurements of the sparsely measured, 0.5 – 12 keV range. The absolute radiometric calibration of the MinXSS instrument suite was performed at the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF) and spectral resolution determined from radioactive sources. I used MinXSS along with data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES), Reuven Ramaty

  7. Real-time growth study of plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy of InN films by synchrotron x-ray methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nepal, Neeraj [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375; Anderson, Virginia R. [American Society for Engineering Education, 1818 N Street NW, Washington, DC 20036; Johnson, Scooter D. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375; Downey, Brian P. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375; Meyer, David J. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375; DeMasi, Alexander [Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215; Robinson, Zachary R. [Department of Physics, SUNY College at Brockport, 350 New Campus Dr, Brockport, New York 14420; Ludwig, Karl F. [Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215; Eddy, Charles R. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375

    2017-03-13

    The temporal evolution of high quality indium nitride (InN) growth by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy (ALEp) on a-plane sapphire at 200 and 248 °C was probed by synchrotron x-ray methods. The growth was carried out in a thin film growth facility installed at beamline X21 of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at beamline G3 of the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University. Measurements of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) during the initial cycles of growth revealed a broadening and scattering near the diffuse specular rod and the development of scattering intensities due to half unit cell thick nucleation islands in the Yoneda wing with correlation length scale of 7.1 and 8.2 nm, at growth temperatures (Tg) of 200 and 248 °C, respectively. At about 1.1 nm (two unit cells) of growth thickness nucleation islands coarsen, grow, and the intensity of correlated scattering peak increased at the correlation length scale of 8.0 and 8.7 nm for Tg = 200 and 248 °C, respectively. The correlated peaks at both growth temperatures can be fitted with a single peak Lorentzian function, which support single mode growth. Post-growth in situ x-ray reflectivity measurements indicate a growth rate of ~0.36 Å/cycle consistent with the growth rate previously reported for self-limited InN growth in a commercial ALEp reactor. Consistent with the in situ GISAXS study, ex situ atomic force microscopy power spectral density measurements also indicate single mode growth. Electrical characterization of the resulting film revealed an electron mobility of 50 cm2/V s for a 5.6 nm thick InN film on a-plane sapphire, which is higher than the previously reported mobility of much thicker InN films grown at higher temperature by molecular beam epitaxy directly on sapphire. These early results indicated that in situ synchrotron x-ray study of the epitaxial growth kinetics of InN films is a very powerful method to

  8. Algorithms for solving atomic structures of nanodimensional clusters in single crystals based on X-ray and neutron diffuse scattering data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrushevskii, N.M.; Shchedrin, B.M.; Simonov, V.I.

    2004-01-01

    New algorithms for solving the atomic structure of equivalent nanodimensional clusters of the same orientations randomly distributed over the initial single crystal (crystal matrix) have been suggested. A cluster is a compact group of substitutional, interstitial or other atoms displaced from their positions in the crystal matrix. The structure is solved based on X-ray or neutron diffuse scattering data obtained from such objects. The use of the mathematical apparatus of Fourier transformations of finite functions showed that the appropriate sampling of the intensities of continuous diffuse scattering allows one to synthesize multiperiodic difference Patterson functions that reveal the systems of the interatomic vectors of an individual cluster. The suggested algorithms are tested on a model one-dimensional structure

  9. Electronic dipole moment and tunneling state of hydrogen atom in hydrogen-bond materials revealed by neutron and X-ray structure analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Noda, Yukio; Mochida, Tomoyuki; Sugawara, Tadashi

    2007-01-01

    The isolated hydrogen-bonded materials, 5-methyl-9-hydroxyphenalenone (MeHPLN) and 5-bromo-9-hydroxyphenalenone (Br-HPLN), were studied by means of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. It was found that the position of the nucleus of the hydrogen atom in the hydrogen-bond region does not agree with the center of mass of the electron cloud of the hydrogen atom. This leads to a local electronic dipole moment in the hydrogen-bond region. Using the experimentally obtained dipole moment, phase transition temperatures for MeHPLN and BrHPLN were calculated based on a tunneling model. Result shows good agreement with the ones obtained by a dielectric measurement. (author)

  10. Study of X-Ray and $\\gamma$-Ray Spectra from Antiprotonic Atoms at the Slowly Extracted Antiproton Beam of LEAR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will study the X-ray spectra of antiprotonic atoms and the $\\gamma$ spectra of residual nuclei after the antiproton absorption. We intend to begin with measurements on selected isotopically pure targets. Strong interaction effects, the antiproton absorption and the atomic cascade are analysed through the measurement of energies, lineshapes, relative and absolute intensities of all observable lines. The experiments are continued to determine st in resolved fine structure levels and in different isotopes of the same element. Coincidence techniques may be applied. All components of the experimental set-up are already existing from previous experiments and we could begin the measurements with any slowly extracted beam of low energy at LEAR.

  11. Studies of atomic diffusion in binary alloys by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy with particular attention to B2 phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stana, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    The way single atoms change places in a condensed system determines many of its properties. Insight into the mechanisms controlling such processes, therefore, yields a better understanding of matter which in turn allows for improving fabrication and tailoring of material properties. Intermetallic alloys have many attractive features for industrial applications, such as high specific strength, good corrosion and oxidation resistance and low raw material cost. Their application is, however, still strongly limited by properties such as high brittleness at low temperatures. Methods capable of studying diffusion on an atomistic level have been restricted to high temperatures close to the melting point of intermetallics until now. The new method of atomic- scale X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy provides a means of studying these materials at technically relevant working temperatures. This thesis demonstrates the application of this new technique to binary intermetallic alloys. In the first part the theoretical concepts underlying atomic-scale X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy such as correlation, rate equations, scattering and reciprocal space will be tho- roughly discussed. As computer simulation techniques play an important role in data evaluation, a chapter is dedicated to this topic. The experimental preconditions are then treated. The last chapters are devoted to the presentation of experimental results. It is shown that a new diffusion mechanism is required to explain atomic hops at relatively low temperature in a B2 Fe-Al alloy with a few percent of excess Fe, while in a B2 Ag-Mg alloy with excess Ag commonly known mechanisms can explain the observed diffusion behavior. (author) [de

  12. Abstract ID: 176 Geant4 implementation of inter-atomic interference effect in small-angle coherent X-ray scattering for materials of medical interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternò, Gianfranco; Cardarelli, Paolo; Contillo, Adriano; Gambaccini, Mauro; Taibi, Angelo

    2018-01-01

    Advanced applications of digital mammography such as dual-energy and tomosynthesis require multiple exposures and thus deliver higher dose compared to standard mammograms. A straightforward manner to reduce patient dose without affecting image quality would be removal of the anti-scatter grid, provided that the involved reconstruction algorithms are able to take the scatter figure into account [1]. Monte Carlo simulations are very well suited for the calculation of X-ray scatter distribution and can be used to integrate such information within the reconstruction software. Geant4 is an open source C++ particle tracking code widely used in several physical fields, including medical physics [2,3]. However, the coherent scattering cross section used by the standard Geant4 code does not take into account the influence of molecular interference. According to the independent atomic scattering approximation (the so-called free-atom model), coherent radiation is indistinguishable from primary radiation because its angular distribution is peaked in the forward direction. Since interference effects occur between x-rays scattered by neighbouring atoms in matter, it was shown experimentally that the scatter distribution is affected by the molecular structure of the target, even in amorphous materials. The most important consequence is that the coherent scatter distribution is not peaked in the forward direction, and the position of the maximum is strongly material-dependent [4]. In this contribution, we present the implementation of a method to take into account inter-atomic interference in small-angle coherent scattering in Geant4, including a dedicated data set of suitable molecular form factor values for several materials of clinical interest. Furthermore, we present scatter images of simple geometric phantoms in which the Rayleigh contribution is rigorously evaluated. Copyright © 2017.

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... I’d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most ... far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! ...

  14. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  15. Exploring the atomic structure and conformational flexibility of a 320 Å long engineered viral fiber using X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anshul; Casjens, Sherwood R; Cingolani, Gino

    2014-02-01

    Protein fibers are widespread in nature, but only a limited number of high-resolution structures have been determined experimentally. Unlike globular proteins, fibers are usually recalcitrant to form three-dimensional crystals, preventing single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the absence of three-dimensional crystals, X-ray fiber diffraction is a powerful tool to determine the internal symmetry of a fiber, but it rarely yields atomic resolution structural information on complex protein fibers. An 85-residue-long minimal coiled-coil repeat unit (MiCRU) was previously identified in the trimeric helical core of tail needle gp26, a fibrous protein emanating from the tail apparatus of the bacteriophage P22 virion. Here, evidence is provided that an MiCRU can be inserted in frame inside the gp26 helical core to generate a rationally extended fiber (gp26-2M) which, like gp26, retains a trimeric quaternary structure in solution. The 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of this engineered fiber, which measures ∼320 Å in length and is only 20-35 Å wide, was determined. This structure, the longest for a trimeric protein fiber to be determined to such a high resolution, reveals the architecture of 22 consecutive trimerization heptads and provides a framework to decipher the structural determinants for protein fiber assembly, stability and flexibility.

  16. Flash X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Eiichi

    2003-01-01

    Generation of quasi-monochromatic X-ray by production of weakly ionized line plasma (flash X-ray), high-speed imaging by the X-ray and high-contrast imaging by the characteristic X-ray absorption are described. The equipment for the X-ray is consisted from the high-voltage power supply and condenser, turbo molecular pump, and plasma X-ray tube. The tube has a long linear anticathode to produce the line plasma and flash X-ray at 20 kA current at maximum. X-ray spectrum is measured by the imaging plate equipped in the computed radiography system after diffracted by a LiF single crystal bender. Cu anticathode generates sharp peaks of K X-ray series. The tissue images are presented for vertebra, rabbit ear and heart, and dog heart by X-ray fluoroscopy with Ce anticathode. Generation of K-orbit characteristic X-ray with extremely low bremsstrahung is to be attempted for medical use. (N.I.)

  17. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culhane, J.L.; Sanford, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray astronomy has been established as a powerful means of observing matter in its most extreme form. The energy liberated by sources discovered in our Galaxy has confirmed that collapsed stars of great density, and with intense gravitational fields, can be studied by making observations in the X-ray part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The astronomical objects which emit detectable X-rays include our own Sun and extend to quasars at the edge of the Universe. This book describes the history, techniques and results obtained in the first twenty-five years of exploration. Space rockets and satellites are essential for carrying the instruments above the Earth's atmosphere where it becomes possible to view the X-rays from stars and nebulae. The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: the birth of X-ray astronomy; the nature of X-radiation; X-rays from the Sun; solar-flare X-rays; X-rays from beyond the solar system; supernovae and their remnants; X-rays from binary stars; white dwarfs and neutron stars; black holes; X-rays from galaxies and quasars; clusters of galaxies; the observatories of the future. (author)

  18. Atomic structure of CaF2/MnF2-Si(1 1 1) superlattices from X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcock, Simon G.; Nicklin, C.L.; Howes, P.B.; Norris, C.A.; Kyutt, R.N.; Sokolov, N.S.; Yakovlev, N.L.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray reflectivity and non-specular crystal truncation rod scans have been used to determine the three-dimensional atomic structure of the buried CaF 2 -Si(1 1 1) interface and ultrathin films of MnF 2 and CaF 2 within a superlattice. We show that ultrathin films of MnF 2 , below a critical thickness of approximately four monolayers, are crystalline, pseudomorphic, and adopt the fluorite structure of CaF 2 . High temperature deposition of the CaF 2 buffer layer produces a fully reacted, CaF 2 -Si(1 1 1) type-B interface. The mature, 'long' interface is shown to consist of a partially occupied layer of CaF bonded to the Si substrate, followed by a distorted CaF layer. Our atomistic, semi-kinematical scattering method extends the slab reflectivity method by providing in-plane structural information

  19. O-Alkylated heavy atom carbohydrate probes for protein X-ray crystallography: Studies towards the synthesis of methyl 2-O-methyl-L-selenofucopyranoside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Sommer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Selenoglycosides are used as reactive glycosyl donors in the syntheses of oligosaccharides. In addition, such heavy atom analogs of natural glycosides are useful tools for structure determination of their lectin receptors using X-ray crystallography. Some lectins, e.g., members of the tectonin family, only bind to carbohydrate epitopes with O-alkylated ring hydroxy groups. In this context, we report the first synthesis of an O-methylated selenoglycoside, specifically methyl 2-O-methyl-L-selenofucopyranoside, a ligand of the lectin tectonin-2 from the mushroom Laccaria bicolor. The synthetic route required a strategic revision and further optimization due to the intrinsic lability of alkyl selenoglycosides, in particular for the labile fucose. Here, we describe a successful synthetic access to methyl 2-O-methyl-L-selenofucopyranoside in 9 linear steps and 26% overall yield starting from allyl L-fucopyranoside.

  20. O-Alkylated heavy atom carbohydrate probes for protein X-ray crystallography: Studies towards the synthesis of methyl 2-O-methyl-L-selenofucopyranoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Roman; Hauck, Dirk; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne; Künzler, Markus; Titz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Selenoglycosides are used as reactive glycosyl donors in the syntheses of oligosaccharides. In addition, such heavy atom analogs of natural glycosides are useful tools for structure determination of their lectin receptors using X-ray crystallography. Some lectins, e.g., members of the tectonin family, only bind to carbohydrate epitopes with O-alkylated ring hydroxy groups. In this context, we report the first synthesis of an O -methylated selenoglycoside, specifically methyl 2- O -methyl-L-selenofucopyranoside, a ligand of the lectin tectonin-2 from the mushroom Laccaria bicolor . The synthetic route required a strategic revision and further optimization due to the intrinsic lability of alkyl selenoglycosides, in particular for the labile fucose. Here, we describe a successful synthetic access to methyl 2- O -methyl-L-selenofucopyranoside in 9 linear steps and 26% overall yield starting from allyl L-fucopyranoside.

  1. Determination of lead associated with airborne particulate matter by flame atomic absorption and wave-length dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talebi, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    The lead content of airborne particulate matter was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) following digestion with a mixture of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide and also by wave-length dispersive x-ray fluorescence (WDXRF). The extraction procedure was checked by analyzing a standard reference material of airborne particulate matter (NIST, SRM -1648). It was concluded that lead can quantitatively (98%) be extracted from airborne particulate matter by the leaching process. A five-stage sequential extraction was performed to assess the potential mobility of lead associated with airborne particulate matter. Comparison of the airborne particulate lead measured by WDXRF to that measured by FAAS showed good agreement. The WDXRF method requires no time-consuming sample preparation or use of environmentally unfriendly solvents. The technique is suggested for direct determination of lead in airborne particulate matter in air pollution studies. (author)

  2. Room temperature atomic layer deposited Al2O3 on CH3NH3PbI3 characterized by synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kot, Małgorzata; Das, Chittaranjan; Henkel, Karsten; Wojciechowski, Konrad; Snaith, Henry J.; Schmeisser, Dieter

    2017-11-01

    An ultrathin Al2O3 film deposited on methylammonium lead triiodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskite has the capability to suppress the carrier recombination process and improve the perovskite solar cells efficiency and stability. However, annealing at temperatures higher than 85 °C degrades the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite film. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study performed in this work indicates that it is possible to grow Al2O3 by atomic layer deposition on the perovskite at room temperature, however, besides pure Al2O3 some OH groups are found and the creation of lead and iodine oxides at the Al2O3/CH3NH3PbI3 interface takes place.

  3. Study of apical oxygen atoms in a spin-ladder cuprate compound by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near the Cu K edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatterer, C.J.; Eustache, B.; Collin, L.; Beuran, C.F.; Partiot, C.; Germain, P.; Xu, X.Z.; Lagues, M. [CNRS, Paris (France). Surfaces et Supraconducteurs; Michalowicz, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Desordonnes, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 avenue du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France)]|[LURE, Universite Paris Sud, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Moscovici, J. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Desordonnes, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 avenue du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France); Deville Cavellin, C. [CNRS, Paris (France). Surfaces et Supraconducteurs]|[Laboratoire d`Electronique, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 av. du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France); Traverse, A. [LURE, Universite Paris Sud, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France)

    1997-04-01

    The structure of high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate compounds is based on CuO{sub 2} planes alternating with blocks that behave as charge reservoirs. The apical oxygen atoms which belong to these reservoirs are suspected to play a role in the mechanism of superconductivity. It thus seems necessary to measure the amount of apical oxygen atoms in various compounds, as a function of the superconducting properties. Polarisation dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements were performed near the Cu K-edge on three types of phases. We collected information about the neighbourhood of the copper atom in the cuprate planes and in the direction perpendicular to these planes. Two of these phases have well known structures: Bi2212 in which copper atoms are on a pyramidal site and infinite layer phase, a square planar cuprate without apical oxygen. We used the obtained results as reference data to study a new copper-rich phase related to the spin-ladder series. (orig.)

  4. X- rays and matter- the basic interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    In this introductory article we attempt to provide the theoretical basis for developing the interaction between X-rays and matter, so that one can unravel properties of matter by interpretation of X-ray experiments on samples. We emphasize that we are dealing with the basics, which means that we...... shall limit ourselves to a discussion of the interaction of an X-ray photon with an isolated atom, or rather with a single electron in a Hartree-Fock atom. Subsequent articles in this issue deal with more complicated - and interesting - forms of matter encompassing many atoms or molecules. To cite...

  5. Band alignment of atomic layer deposited MgO/Zn0.8Al0.2O heterointerface determined by charge corrected X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Baojun; Liu, Shulin; Yang, Yuzhen; Heng, Yuekun

    2016-05-01

    Pure magnesium (MgO) and zinc oxide doped with aluminum oxide (Zn0.8Al0.2O) were prepared via atomic layer deposition. We have studied the structure and band gap of bulk Zn0.8Al0.2O material by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Tauc method, and the band offsets and alignment of atomic layer deposited MgO/Zn0.8Al0.2O heterointerface were investigated systematically using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in this study. Different methodologies, such as neutralizing electron gun, the use of C 1s peak recalibration and zero charging method, were applied to recover the actual position of the core levels in insulator materials which were easily influenced by differential charging phenomena. Schematic band alignment diagram, valence band offset (ΔEV) and conduction band offset (ΔEC) for the interface of the MgO/Zn0.8Al0.2O heterostructure have been constructed. An accurate value of ΔEV = 0.72 ± 0.11 eV was obtained from various combinations of core levels of heterojunction with varied MgO thickness. Given the experimental band gaps of 7.83 eV for MgO and 5.29 eV for Zn0.8Al0.2O, a type-II heterojunction with a ΔEC of 3.26 ± 0.11 eV was found. Band offsets and alignment studies of these heterojunctions are important for gaining deep consideration to the design of various optoelectronic devices based on such heterointerface.

  6. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90° Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ~ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 Å) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been demonstrated as a

  7. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, A.H.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1998-01-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90 o Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ∼ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 (angstrom)) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been

  8. Determination of dopant atomic positions with kinematical X-ray standing waves; Untersuchung von Fremdatomen in kristallinen Materialien mit kinematischen stehenden Roentgenwellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, Bente

    2011-11-15

    Recent advances in the kinematic X-ray standing wave technique (KXSW) for the determination of the atomic coordinates and displacement parameters in nonperfect crystalline materials are described in this thesis. The methodology has been improved by considering three significant aspects: - the inclusion of weak multiple beam contributions - the excitation of secondary fluorescence in multiple-element samples - the influence of the crystal mosaicity on the fluorescence yield. The improvements allowed to successfully apply the method to investigate complex oxide materials of current interest for potential device applications. The thermally-induced interdiffusion of cobalt and manganese thin films on zinc oxide single crystals has been studied to determine which lattice sites are occupied preferentially. The data analysis revealed that after thermal diffusion the adsorbed atoms occupied zinc sites in the host lattice. The mean deviation of the cobalt atomic position from the zinc lattice site was comparable to the thermal displacement parameter of the zinc atoms. In the case of manganese a secondary phase was found on the surface. Measurements performed on LaSrMnO{sub 4} provided new insight concerning the rotation of the oxygen octahedron around the manganese atoms and the concomitant displacements of the strontium and lanthanum atoms. It was found that the oxygen octahedra are rotated around the [100]-direction by 4,5 . The measurements in transmission geometry performed on titanium dioxide (rutile) demonstrated that KXSW measurements in the Laue geometry is a viable technique. By performing KXSW under grazing-incidence conditions it is possible to achieve depth resolution. The results clearly show that the extended KXSW technique is a versatile method for characterizing complex material systems. (orig.)

  9. Providing x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallozzi, P.J.; Epstein, H.M.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides an apparatus for providing x-rays to an object that may be in an ordinary environment such as air at approximately atmospheric pressure. The apparatus comprises: means (typically a laser beam) for directing energy onto a target to produce x-rays of a selected spectrum and intensity at the target; a fluid-tight enclosure around the target; means for maintaining the pressure in the first enclosure substantially below atmospheric pressure; a fluid-tight second enclosure adjoining the first enclosure, the common wall portion having an opening large enough to permit x-rays to pass through but small enough to allow the pressure reducing means to evacuate gas from the first enclosure at least as fast as it enters through the opening; the second enclosure filled with a gas that is highly transparent to x-rays; the wall of the second enclosure to which the x-rays travel having a portion that is highly transparent to x-rays (usually a beryllium or plastic foil), so that the object to which the x-rays are to be provided may be located outside the second enclosure and adjacent thereto and thus receive the x-rays substantially unimpeded by air or other intervening matter. The apparatus is particularly suited to obtaining EXAFS (extended x-ray fine structure spectroscopy) data on a material

  10. Quantum electrodynamics tests and X-rays standards using pionic atoms and highly charged ions; Tests d'electrodynamique quantique et etalons de rayons-X a l'aide des atomes pioniques et des ions multicharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, Trassinelli

    2005-12-15

    The object of this thesis is to present a new measurement of the pion mass using pionic nitrogen X-ray spectroscopy and results on helium-like argon and sulphur spectroscopy. The new pion mass has been measured with an accuracy of 1.7 ppm, 30% better that the present world average value, and it is obtained from Bragg spectroscopy of 5 ->4 pionic nitrogen transitions using the theoretical predictions provided by quantum electrodynamics. We have got: m({pi}{sup -}) = (139.571042 {+-} 0.000210 {+-} 0.000110) where the first error is due to the statistics and the second is the systematic error. I present the calculation of the hyperfine structure and recoil corrections for pionic atoms using a new perturbation method for the Klein-Gordon equation. The spectrometer used for this measurement has been characterized with the relativistic M1 transitions from helium-like ions produced with a new device, the Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Ion Trap. High statistics spectra from these ions have enabled us to measure transition energies with an accuracy of some ppm which has allowed us to compare theoretical predictions with experiment data. X-ray emission from pionic atoms and multicharged ions can be used to define new types of X-ray standards for energies of a few keV.

  11. Determination of net atomic charges in anthraquinone by means of 5-h X-ray diffraction experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlouf, Miroslav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 611, 1-3 (2002), s. 139-146 ISSN 0022-2860 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/99/M037 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : net charges * net atomic charges * charge density analysis Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.122, year: 2002

  12. X-ray interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, A.

    1980-01-01

    An improved type of amplitude-division x-ray interferometer is described. The wavelength at which the interferometer can operate is variable, allowing the instrument to be used to measure x-ray wavelength, and the angle of inclination is variable for sample investigation. (U.K.)

  13. Extremity x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003461.htm Extremity x-ray To use the sharing features on this page, ... in the body Risks There is low-level radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the ...

  14. X-rays utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebigan, F.

    1979-03-01

    The modality of X-ray utilization in different activities and economy is given. One presents firstly quantities and units used in radiation dosimetry and other fields. One gives the generation of X-rays, their properties as well as the elements of radiation protection. The utilization characteristics of these radiations in different fields are finally given. (author)

  15. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x- ...

  16. Energy dependence of the anisotropy of noncharacteristic x-rays emitted in fast ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoe, R.S.; Sellin, I.A.; Brown, M.D.; Forester, J.P.; Griffin, P.M.; Pegg, D.J.; Peterson, R.S.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of beam velocity and K-shell binding energy on the angular distributions of the noncharacteristic x-radiation emitted for various collision pairs. The results are in general agreement with the calculations of Mueller and Greiner, in that the anisotropy increases rapidly with energy, provided that the ions are still moving slowly, compared to the velocity of the K-shell electrons of the separated atoms. The anisotropy in some cases exceeds the maximum permitted by the Mueller--Greiner model for the zero alignment case, implying that strong alignment phenomena also occur

  17. X-ray laser implementation by means of a strong source of high-spin metastable atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helman, J.S.; Rau, C.; Bunge, C.F.

    1983-01-01

    High-spin metastable atomic beams of high density and extremely small divergence can be produced by electron capture during grazing-angle scattering of ion beams at ferromagnetic surfaces. This can be used to generate a long-lived reservoir of Li 1s2s2p 4 P/sub 5/2//sup ts0/ with enough density of metastables so that after laser-induced transfer to Li 1s2p/sup ts2/P strong lasing at 207 A should occur. This novel technique can also be used to produce a variety of other metastables known as potential candidates for lasing at shorter wavelengths

  18. CHIANTI—AN ATOMIC DATABASE FOR EMISSION LINES. XIII. SOFT X-RAY IMPROVEMENTS AND OTHER CHANGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2013-01-01

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of two parts: an atomic database and a suite of computer programs in Python and IDL. Together, they allow the calculation of the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and provide spectroscopic plasma diagnostics for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7.1 has been released, which includes improved data for several ions, recombination rates, and element abundances. In particular, it provides a large expansion of the CHIANTI models for key Fe ions from Fe VIII to Fe XIV to improve the predicted emission in the 50-170 Å wavelength range. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org and in SolarSoft, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  19. A comparative study on total reflection X-ray fluorescence determination of low atomic number elements in air, helium and vacuum atmospheres using different excitation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, N. L.; Kanrar, Buddhadev; Aggarwal, S. K.; Wobrauschek, Peter; Rauwolf, M.; Streli, Christina

    2014-09-01

    A comparison of trace element determinations of low atomic number (Z) elements Na, Mg, Al, P, K and Ca in air, helium and vacuum atmospheres using W Lβ1, Mo Kα and Cr Kα excitations has been made. For Mo Kα and W Lβ1 excitations a Si (Li) detector with beryllium window was used and measurements were performed in air and helium atmospheres. For Cr Kα excitation, a Si (Li) detector with an ultra thin polymer window (UTW) was used and measurements were made in vacuum and air atmospheres. The sensitivities of the elemental X-ray lines were determined using TXRF spectra of standard solutions and processing them by IAEA QXAS program. The elemental concentrations of the elements in other solutions were determined using their TXRF spectra and pre-determined sensitivity values. The study suggests that, using the above experimental set up, Mo Kα excitation is not suited for trace determination of low atomic number element. Excitation by WLβ1 and helium atmosphere, the spectrometer can be used for the determination of elements with Z = 15 (P) and above with fairly good detection limits whereas Cr Kα excitation with ultra thin polymer window and vacuum atmosphere is good for the elements having Z = 11 (Na) and above. The detection limits using this set up vary from 7048 pg for Na to 83 pg for Ti.

  20. Analysis of x-ray spectra emitted from highly ionized atoms in the vacuum spark and laser-produced high power plasma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandelbaum, P.

    1987-05-01

    The interest in atomic spectroscopy has greatly been reinforced in the last ten years. This gain of interest is directly related to the developments in different fields of research where hot plasmas are created. These fields include in particular controlled thermonuclear fusion research by means of inertial or magnetic confinement approaches and also the most recent efforts to achieve lasers in the XUV region. The present work is based on the specific contribution of the atomic spectroscopy group at the Hebrew University. The recent development of both theoretical and experimental tools allowed us to progress in the understanding of the highly ionized states of heavy elements. In this work the low-inductance vacuum-spark developed at the Hebrew University was used as the hot plasma source. The spectra were recorded in the 7-300 A range by means of a high-resolution extreme-grazing-incidence spectrometer developed at the Racah Institute by Profs. J.L. Schwob and B.S. Fraenkel. To the extend the spectroscopic studies to higher-Z atoms, the laser-produced plasma facility at Soreq Nuclear Center was used. In this work the spectra of the sixth row elements were recorded in the x-rays by means of a crystal spectrometer. All these experimental systems are briefly described in chapter one. Chapter two deals with the theoretical methods used in the present work for the atomic calculations. Chapter three deals with the spectra of elements of the fifth row emitted from the vacuum-spark in the 30-150 A range. These spectra as experimental data were used in order to test ab-initio computations along the NiI sequence 3d-nl transitions. The results of this work are presented in chapter four. Chapter five is devoted to the measurement and analysis of spectra emitted from the vacuum-spark by rare-earth elements. (author)

  1. Investigation of the structure of nanocrystalline refractory oxides by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulyanova, T. M.; Titova, L. V.; Medichenko, S. V.; Zonov, Yu. G.; Konstantinova, T. E.; Glazunova, V. A.; Doroshkevich, A. S.; Kuznetsova, T. A.

    2006-01-01

    The structures of nanocrystalline fibrous powders of refractory oxides have been investigated by different methods: determination of coherent-scattering regions, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic-force microscopy (AFM). The sizes of nanograins of different crystalline phases of refractory metal oxides have been determined during the formation of these nanograins and the dynamics of their growth during heat treatment in the temperature range 600-1600 deg. C has been studied. The data on the structure of nanocrystalline refractory oxide powders, obtained by different methods, are in good agreement. According to the data on coherent-scattering regions, the sizes of the ZrO 2 (Y 2 O 3 ) and Al 2 O 3 grains formed are in the range 4-6 nm, and the particle sizes determined according to the TEM and AFM data are in the ranges 5-7 and 2-10 nm, respectively. SEM analysis made it possible to investigate the dynamics of nanoparticle growth at temperatures above 1000 deg. C and establish the limiting temperatures of their consolidation in fibers

  2. X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  3. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, S.; Stagg, L.; Lambert, T.W.; Griswa, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    A patient support system for X-ray equipment in arteriographic studies of the heart is described in detail. The support system has been designed to overcome many of the practical problems encountered in using previous types of arteriographic X-ray equipment. The support system is capable of horizontal movement and, by a series of shafts attached to the main support system, the X-ray source and image intensifier or detector may be rotated through the same angle. The system is highly flexible and details are given of several possible operational modes. (U.K.)

  4. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grady, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray apparatus is described which has a shutter between the X-ray source and the patient. The shutter controls the level of radiation to which the patient is exposed instead of merely discontinuing the electric power supplied to the source. When the shutter is opened a radiation sensor senses the level of X-radiation. When a preset quantity of X-radiation has been measured an exposure control closes the shutter. Instead of using the radiation sensor, the integrated power supplied to the anode of the X-ray source may be measured. (author)

  5. Soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy of the Ba atomic layer deposition on the ceramic multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemanskaya, G.V., E-mail: galina.benemanskaya@mail.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya str. 26, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Dementev, P.A.; Lapushkin, M.N. [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya str. 26, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Timoshnev, S.N. [St Petersburg Academic University, Khlopina str.8/3, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Senkovskiy, B. [Helmholts-Zentrum Berlin, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Ba/BiFeO{sub 3} interface was studied by X-ray synchrotron- photoemission spectroscopy. • Ba adsorption is found to modify the Bi 4f, O 1s and Fe 2p core level spectra. • Ba induced charge transfer causes increasing in Bi-valency and O-ionicity. • Ba adsorption results in increasing the amount of Fe{sup 2+} ions in the surface region. - Abstract: Electronic structure of the ceramic multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} and the Ba/BiFeO{sub 3} nanointerface is investigated in situ in an ultrahigh vacuum by synchrotron-based photoemission spectroscopy with the excited photon energy from 120 eV to 900 eV. The Bi 4f, O 1s, Fe 2p, and Ba 5p core-levels spectra are studied. The Ba atomic layer deposition is found to induce a significant change in spectra that is originated from the charge transfer between Ba adatoms and Bi, O surface atoms with increasing the Bi-valency and O-ionicity. The Fe 2p{sub 3/2} core level spectrum for the clean BiFeO{sub 3} is shown to contain both the Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ion components with the atomic ratio of Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} ∼1. The Ba adsorption is found to increase the ratio up to ∼1.5. This new effect is clearly caused by recharge between Fe{sup 3+} ↔ Fe{sup 2+} ions with increasing the amount of Fe{sup 2+} ions.

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose ... limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  8. X-ray examination apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to an X-ray apparatus which includes an adjustable X-ray filter. In order to adjust an intensity profile of the X-ray beam, an X-ray absorbing liquid is transported to filter elements of the X-ray filter. Such transport is susceptible to gravitational forces which lead to an

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  12. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very small ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  13. Direct imaging by atomic force microscopy of surface-localized self-assembled monolayers on a cuprate superconductor and surface X-ray scattering analysis of analogous monolayers on the surface of water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schougaard, Steen B.; Reitzel, Niels; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    A self-assembled monolayer of CF3(CF2)(3)(CH2)(11)NH2 atop the (001) surface of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x was imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM images provide direct 2D-structural evidence for the epitaxial 5.5 angstrom square root 2 x root 2R45 degrees unit...... was studied by grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction and specular X-ray reflectivity. Structural differences and similarities between the water-supported and superconductor-localized monolayers are discussed....

  14. Repeated pulsed x-ray emission equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terauchi, Hikaru; Iida, Satoshi

    1982-01-01

    X-ray diffraction technique has been applied to determine the spatial positions of atoms which compose a material, and it is needless to say that the technique is a fundamental means regardless of the fields of research. However, the application of X-ray diffraction to the research on physical properties has been so far limited to know the spatial positions of atoms or molecules under thermal equilibrium condition. The addition of time element to the conventional technique, that is, the analysis of material structure including the time-varying processes under non-equilibrium conditions, is considered to approach the elucidation of the essence of materials. The authors call this dynamic structural analysis. The authors have planned to analyze X-ray diffraction intensity which has the resolution of about 10 -8 s in the real time which is conjugate with energy. However, present pulsed X-ray sources are not suitable for diffraction experiment because the pulse width is too long or X-ray wavelength is too short. Accordingly, the authors have made for trial a pulsed X-ray source for diffraction experiment. Its specifications are: diode voltage (X-ray tube voltage) from 200 to 300 kV, diode current from 2 to 5 kA, pulse width of about 30ns, maximum repetition frequency 10 pps, and X-ray focus size of 2 mm diameter. One of the features of this source is the repeated generation of pulsed X-ray. This is the first trial in the world, and is indispensable to the dynamic structural analysis described above. The quality of the emitted X-ray is also written. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  15. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  16. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also be useful to help diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  17. X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    A form of x-ray tube is described which provides satisfactory focussing of the electron beam when the beam extends for several feet from gun to target. Such a tube can be used for computerised tomographic scanning. (UK)

  18. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  19. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray ... posted: How to Obtain and Share Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI ...

  20. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  1. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Pancreatic Cancer The Limitations of Online Dose Calculators Video: The ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  2. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs ...

  3. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  4. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... June is Men's Health Month Recently posted: Pancreatic Cancer The Limitations of Online Dose Calculators Video: The ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  5. Passivity of 316L stainless steel in borate buffer solution studied by Mott-Schottky analysis, atomic absorption spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhicao; Cheng Xuequn; Dong Chaofang; Xu Lin; Li Xiaogang

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The polarization curve of 316L SS possesses five turning potentials in passive region. → Films formed at turning potentials perform different electrochemical and semiconductor properties. → Dissolutions and regenerations of passive film at turning potentials are obtained by AAS and XPS. → Turning potentials appearing in passive region are ascribed to the changes of the compositions of the passive films. - Abstract: The passivity of 316L stainless steel in borate buffer solution has been investigated by Mott-Schottky, atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that the polarization curve in the passive region possesses several turning potentials (0 V SCE , 0.2 V SCE , 0.4 V SCE , 0.6 V SCE and 0.85 V SCE ). The passive films formed at turning potentials perform different electrochemical and semiconductor properties. Further, the compositions of the passive films formed at turning potentials are investigated. The results reasonably explain why these potentials appear in the passive region and why specimens perform different properties at turning potentials.

  6. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of NO2 reactions on CaCO3 (1014) surfaces in humid environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Grassian, Vicki H

    2012-09-13

    In this study, alternating current (AC) mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with phase imaging and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to investigate the effect of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) adsorption on calcium carbonate (CaCO3) (101̅4) surfaces at 296 K in the presence of relative humidity (RH). At 70% RH, CaCO3 (101̅4) surfaces undergo rapid formation of a metastable amorphous calcium carbonate layer, which in turn serves as a substrate for recrystallization of a nonhydrated calcite phase, presumably vaterite. The adsorption of nitrogen dioxide changes the surface properties of CaCO3 (101̅4) and the mechanism for formation of new phases. In particular, the first calcite nucleation layer serves as a source of material for further island growth; when it is depleted, there is no change in total volume of nitrocalcite, Ca(NO3)2, particles formed whereas the total number of particles decreases. This indicates that these particles are mobile and coalesce. Phase imaging combined with force curve measurements reveals areas of inhomogeneous energy dissipation during the process of water adsorption in relative humidity experiments, as well as during nitrocalcite particle formation. Potential origins of the different energy dissipation modes within the sample are discussed. Finally, XPS analysis confirms that NO2 adsorbs on CaCO3 (101̅4) in the form of nitrate (NO3(-)) regardless of environmental conditions or the pretreatment of the calcite surface at different relative humidity.

  7. Distribution of heavy metals in Lumbricus terrestris, Aporrectodea longa and A. rosea measured by atomic absorption and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, C.; Laursen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Distribution of Ca, Pb, Cd, Zn, Fe and Mn has been investigated in the earthworm species Lumbricus terrestris, Aporectodea longa and A. rosea by atomic absorption and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry measurements. The material of L. terrestris originated from the garden of the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University in central Copenhagen. Material of the other two species was sampled in sewage sludge treated plots. It was found that lead and cadmium are accumulated in the gut wall and from here transferred to waste nodules (brown bodies). In L. terrestris more lead was transferred to waste nodules than cadmium. Also large amounts of zinc were accumulated in the gut wall. Analyses of L. terrestris calciferous glands showed that these take part in regulation and excretion of a number of heavy metals. Lead and cadmium content was low in the ventral nerve chord and seminal vesicles. A. longa with poorly developed calciferous glands seems to rely more on waste nodule formation in the ultimate immobilization of lead. (author)

  8. Observation and resonant x-ray optical interpretation of multi-atom resonant photoemission effects in O 1s emission from NiO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannella, N.; Yang, S.-H.; Mun, B.S.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Kay, A.W.; Sell, B.C.; Watanabe, M.; Ohldag, H.; Arenholz, E.; Young, A.T.; Hussain, Z.; Van Hove, M.A.; Fadley, C.S.

    2006-01-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results for the variation of the O 1s intensity from a NiO(001) surface as the excitation energy is varied through the Ni 2p1/2,3/2 absorption resonances, and as the incidence angle of the radiation is varied from grazing to larger values. For grazing incidence, a strong multi-atom resonant photoemission(MARPE) effect is seen on the O 1s intensity as the Ni 2p resonances are crossed, but its magnitude decreases rapidly as the incidence angle is increased. Resonant x-ray optical (RXRO) calculations are found to predict these effects very well, although the experimental effects are found to decrease at higher incidence angles faster than those in theory. The potential influence of photoelectron diffraction effects on such measurements are also considered, including experimental data with azimuthal-angle variation and corresponding multiple-scattering-diffraction calculations, but we conclude that they do not vary beyond what is expected on the basis of the change in photoelectron kinetic energy. Varying from linear polarization to circular polarization is found to enhance these effects in NiO considerably, although the reasons are not clear. We also discuss the relationship of these measurements to other related interatomic resonance experiments and theoretical developments, and make some suggestions for future studies in this area

  9. Classification of X-ray spectra from laser produced plasmas of atoms from Tm to Pt in the range 6-9A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandelbaum, P.; Klapisch, M.; Bar-Shalom, A.; Schwob, J.L.; Zigler, A.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray spectra of highly ionized tungsten and neighbouring atoms (Tm, Yb, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Pt) has been observed from laser produced plasmas in the lambda = 6-9A range. Beside the prominent lines of the Ni I-like ions, lines belonging to Co I (3d 9 -3d 8 4p), Cu I (3d 10 4s-3d 9 4s4p, 3d 10 4p-3d 9 4p 2 ) and Zn I-like ions (3d 10 4s 2 -3d 9 4s 2 4p, 3d 10 4s4p-3d 9 4s4p 2 ) have been identified. Classification was based on isoelectronic sequence analysis and on comparison with ab-initio relativistic calculations. A collisional-radiative model of the Cu I-like ions in the plasma is used to show that the contribution of the 3d 10 4d-3d 9 4p4d and 3d 10 4f-3d 9 4f4p transition arrays to the 3d-4p spectrum is small. The importance of configuration interaction is pointed out. Computations agree with measurements within experimental uncertainty. (Auth.)

  10. Comparative and complementary characterization of precipitate microstructures in Al-Mg-Si(-Li) alloys by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshino, Yuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Kozuka, Masaya [Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel, Ltd., 1-5-5 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271 (Japan); Hirosawa, Shoichi, E-mail: hirosawa@ynu.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Aruga, Yasuhiro [Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel, Ltd., 1-5-5 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Microalloying addition of Li enhances the age-hardening response of Al-Mg-Si alloys. • Size and number density of nanoclusters or precipitates are increased by Li addition. • Mg and Si contents within the aggregates are inversely decreased by Li addition. • Microalloying Li accelerates heterogeneous nucleation of such Mg-Si aggregates. - Abstract: In this study, comparative and complementary characterization of precipitate microstructures by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atom probe tomography (APT) has been performed for Al-0.55 wt%Mg-0.89 wt%Si(-0.043 wt%Li) alloys aged at 433 K for 1.2 ks (under aging) and 36 ks (peak aging). Quantitative estimation of nanometer-scale clusters (nanoclusters) and β″ precipitates by TEM and APT revealed that microalloying addition of Li increases the size and number density of these Mg-Si aggregates, resulting in the enhanced age-hardening response. Positive evidence by APT for the segregation of Li suggests that heterogeneous nucleation of such Mg-Si aggregates with the aid of Li is attributed to the modified precipitate microstructures and thus improved mechanical strength of this alloy system.

  11. A study of the local atomic structure in Hg0.80Cd0.20Te using x-ray diffuse scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, J.P.; Cohen, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    The local atomic arrangements in a commercial n-type wafer of Hg 0.8 Cd 0.2 Te were investigated by measuring the diffuse x-ray scattering in two volumes in reciprocal space. A change in contrast between the two measurements was achieved by making one volume measurement at 12037 eV and a second volume measurement at 12270 eV, i.e., near the Hg L III edge. The difference between these two measurements yielded intensity only due to Hg--Hg, Hg--Te, and Hg--Cd pair interactions. In all three patterns, peak-like features were apparent at the forbidden Bragg peak positions on thermal diffuse scattering ridges that joined major Bragg reflections; these are primarily attributed to second order displacement effects on the mixed cation sublattice. The first two Warren-Cowley short-range order parameters were determined to be α 1/2 1/2 0 =-0.050(26) and α 110 =0.118(35). Simulations of the structure revealed small ordered regions with a preference for 3:1 Hg--Cd near neighbor configurations. The near-neighbor Hg--Te bonds contract from that calculated from the average crystal's lattice parameter, and this Hg--Te distance is less than the distance in HgTe

  12. Plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxial growth of aluminum nitride studied with real time grazing angle small angle x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Virginia R.; Nepal, Neeraj; Johnson, Scooter D.; Robinson, Zachary R.; Nath, Anindya; Kozen, Alexander C.; Qadri, Syed B.; DeMasi, Alexander; Hite, Jennifer K.; Ludwig, Karl F.; Eddy, Charles R.

    2017-05-01

    Wide bandgap semiconducting nitrides have found wide-spread application as light emitting and laser diodes and are under investigation for further application in optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and efficient power switching technologies. Alloys of the binary semiconductors allow adjustments of the band gap, an important semiconductor material characteristic, which is 6.2 eV for aluminum nitride (AlN), 3.4 eV for gallium nitride, and 0.7 eV for (InN). Currently, the highest quality III-nitride films are deposited by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. Temperatures of 900 °C and higher are required to deposit high quality AlN. Research into depositing III-nitrides with atomic layer epitaxy (ALEp) is ongoing because it is a fabrication friendly technique allowing lower growth temperatures. Because it is a relatively new technique, there is insufficient understanding of the ALEp growth mechanism which will be essential to development of the process. Here, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering is employed to observe the evolving behavior of the surface morphology during growth of AlN by ALEp at temperatures from 360 to 480 °C. Increased temperatures of AlN resulted in lower impurities and relatively fewer features with short range correlations.

  13. Analysis of heavy metals and minerals elements in the turmeric using Total-Reflection X-ray Fluorescence analysis technique and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriamisetra, V.M.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, many studies demonstrate anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory benefits of turmeric. The aims of this work is to perform analysis of metals such as calcium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, arsenic, bromine, rubidium, strontium, cadmium and lead in the turmeric collected from various places in Madagascar. The analysis by total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique is used to determine the concentrations of heavy metals, while the atomic absorption spectrometry is used for the determination of trace elements. Analysis results show that the concentration of calcium in the turmeric is very high, its average concentration is 1025.8 mg.kg -1 . The average concentrations of manganese, of copper and of iron are respectively 44.7 mg.kg -1 ; 19.7 mg.kg -1 and 53.6 mg.kg -1 . The average concentrations of zinc, of rubidium and of strontium are respectively 17.3 mg.kg -1 ; 35.2 mg.kg -1 and 21.7 mg.kg -1 [fr

  14. Corrosive effects of fluoride on titanium: investigation by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and human epithelial cell culturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stájer, Anette; Ungvári, Krisztina; Pelsoczi, István K; Polyánka, Hilda; Oszkó, Albert; Mihalik, Erzsébet; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Radnai, Márta; Kemény, Lajos; Fazekas, András; Turzó, Kinga

    2008-11-01

    High fluoride (F(-)) concentrations and acidic pH impair the corrosion resistance of titanium (Ti). Effects of F(-)-containing caries-preventive prophylactic rinses, and gels on Ti were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Human epithelial cell attachment and proliferation were investigated by dimethylthiazol-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and protein content assays. Aqueous 1% NaF solution (3800 ppm F(-), pH 4.5) or high (12,500 ppm) F(-) content gel (pH 4.8) strongly corroded the surface and modified its composition. XPS revealed formation of a strongly bound F(-)-containing complex (Na(2)TiF(6)). AFM indicated an increase in roughness (R(a)) of the surfaces: 10-fold for the NaF solution and smaller for the gel or a mouthwash (250 ppm F(-), pH 4.4). MTT revealed that cell attachment was significantly increased by the gel, but was not disturbed by either the mouthwash or the NaF. Cell proliferation determined by MTT decreased significantly only for the NaF-treated samples; protein content assay experiments showed no such effect. This study indicates that epithelial cell culturing results can depend on the method used, and the adverse effects of a high F(-) concentration and low pH should be considered when prophylactic gels are applied by patients with Ti implants or other dental devices.

  15. X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masswig, I.

    1986-01-01

    The tkb market survey comparatively evaluates the X-ray sources and replacement tubes for stationary equipment currently available on the German market. It lists the equipment parameters of 235 commercially available X-ray sources and their replacement tubes and gives the criteria for purchase decisions. The survey has been completed with December 1985, and offers good information concerning medical and technical aspects as well as those of safety and maintenance. (orig.) [de

  16. X-ray Fluorescence Holography: Principles, Apparatus, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Korecki, Pawel

    2018-06-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is an atomic structure determination technique that combines the capabilities of X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. It provides a unique means of gaining fully three-dimensional information about the local atomic structure and lattice site positions of selected elements inside compound samples. In this work, we discuss experimental and theoretical aspects that are essential for the efficient recording and analysis of X-ray fluorescence holograms and review the most recent advances in XFH. We describe experiments performed with brilliant synchrotron radiation as well as with tabletop setups that employ conventional X-ray tubes.

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is a compact apparatus that can be taken ... of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... ray examination. X-rays usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. ... x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is taken during x-ray examinations to ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray ( ... leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  3. New theoretical investigation resolving discrepancies of atomic form factors and attenuation coefficients in the near-edge soft x-ray regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantler, C.T.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Reliable knowledge of the complex X-ray form factor and the photoelectric attenuation coefficient is required for crystallography, medical diagnosis, refractive index studies and XAFS. Discrepancies between currently used theoretical approaches of 200% exist for numerous elements from 1 keV to 3 keV X-ray energies. This work derives new theoretical results in near-edge soft X-ray regions and improves upon the theoretical uncertainty in these regions by a factor of 10. This work was also reported in J.Phys.Chem.Ref.Data (2000)

  4. Atomic structure determination of InSb(100)c(4x4) and c(8x2)phases by X-ray photoelectron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, V.E. de; Soares, E.A.; Magalhaes, M.R.P.; Paniago, R.; Siervo, A. de; Landers, R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The (100) surfaces of III-V compound semiconductors exhibit a variety of surface reconstructions that have attracted a lot of attention because of their importance in both homo epitaxial and heteroepitaxial growth. In the special case of the narrow bandgap InSb compound semiconductor its potential application in high-speed electronic and optoelectronic devices has encourage many studies of its (100) surface atomic structure. Among the reconstructions presented by the InSb(100) surface two of them have received more attention, that is, the observed well-ordered In-rich c(8x2) and Sb terminated c(4x4) surfaces. The c(8x2) structure can be obtained by exposing the surface to low energy ion bombardment and annealing, whereas the c(4x4) structure involves the chemisorption of Sb onto an already Sb-terminated surface. These two structures have been studied mainly by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and surface X-ray diffraction (SXRD) techniques and all the proposed models are based on the occurrence of group III (and/or V) blocks of dimmers occupying sites on the top or at subsurface layer. However, there are still difficulties in determining either the exact number of atoms in each dimmer or the number of dimmers in each block. With the goal of getting a better structure determination of the InSb(100) surface phases a photoelectron diffraction experiment (XPD) was carried out at LNLS where synchrotron and Al-K α radiations have been used. In the present work, the experimental and preliminary results of structure determination for both In Sn(100)c(8x2) and InSb(100)c(4x4) phases will be presented and discussed. (author)

  5. X-ray therapy with enhanced effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberbauer, F.

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of iodine atoms into a malignant tumor by intravenous injection of a contrast medium that is excreted by way of the kidneys selectively increases the tumor's capacity for the absorption of X-ray photons. This effect is exploited in CCT, but in high-voltage X-ray therapy it leads to an elevated focal dose while the incident dose remains the same. (orig.) [de

  6. X-Ray Absorption with Transmission X-Ray Microscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, F.M.F.

    2016-01-01

    In this section we focus on the use of transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) to measure the XAS spectra. In the last decade a range of soft X-ray and hard X-ray TXM microscopes have been developed, allowing the measurement of XAS spectra with 10–100 nm resolution. In the hard X-ray range the TXM

  7. Modern X-ray spectroscopy 3. X-ray fluorescence holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kouichi

    2008-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) provides three dimensional atomic images around specified elements. The XFH uses atoms as a wave source or monitor of interference field within a crystal sample, and therefore it can record both intensity and phase of scattered X-rays. Its current performance makes it possible to apply to ultra thin film, impurity and quasicrystal. In this article, I show the theory including solutions for twin image problem, advanced measuring system, data processing for reconstruction of the atomic images and for obtaining accurate atomic positions, applications using resonant X-ray scattering and X-ray excited optical luminescence, and an example of XFH result on the local structure around copper in silicon steal. (author)

  8. X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webley, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    The object of the invention described is to provide an X-ray tube providing a scanned X-ray output which does not require a scanned electron beam. This is obtained by an X-ray tube including an anode which is rotatable about an axis, and a source of a beam of energy, for example an electron beam, arranged to impinge on a surface of the anode to generate X-radiation substantially at the region of incidence on the anode surface. The anode is rotatable about the axis to move the region of incidence over the surface. The anode is so shaped that the rotation causes the region of incidence to move in a predetermined manner relative to fixed parts of the tube so that the generated X-radiation is scanned in a predetermined manner relative to the tube. (UK)

  9. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacconi, R.; Setti, G.

    1980-01-01

    This book contains the lectures, and the most important seminars held at the NATO meeting on X-Ray astronomy in Erice, July 1979. The meeting was an opportune forum to discuss the results of the first 8-months of operation of the X-ray satellite, HEAO-2 (Einstein Observatory) which was launched at the end of 1978. Besides surveying these results, the meeting covered extragalactic astronomy, including the relevant observations obtained in other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum (ultra-violet, optical, infrared and radio). The discussion on galactic X-ray sources essentially covered classical binaries, globular clusters and bursters and its significance to extragalactic sources and to high energy astrophysics was borne in mind. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of a portable micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the ancient ceramics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulou, D.N.; Zachariadis, G.A.; Anthemidis, A.N.; Tsirliganis, N.C.; Stratis, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Two multielement instrumental methods of analysis, micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were applied for the analysis of 7th and 5th century B.C. ancient ceramic sherds in order to evaluate the above two methods and to assess the potential to use the current compact and portable micro-XRF instrument for the in situ analysis of ancient ceramics. The distinguishing factor of interest is that micro-XRF spectrometry offers the possibility of a nondestructive analysis, an aspect of primary importance in the compositional analysis of cultural objects. Micro-XRF measurements were performed firstly directly on the ceramic sherds with no special pretreatment apart from surface cleaning (micro-XRF on sherds) and secondly on pressed pellet disks which were prepared for each ceramic sherd (micro-XRF on pellet). For the ICP-AES determination of elements, test solutions were prepared by the application of a microwave-assisted decomposition procedure in closed high-pressure PFA vessels. Also, the standard reference material SARM 69 was used for the efficiency calibration of the micro-XRF instrument and was analysed by both methods. In order to verify the calibration, the standard reference materials NCS DC 73332 and SRM620 as well as the reference materials AWI-1 and PRI-1 were analysed by micro-XRF. Elemental concentrations determined by the three analytical procedures (ICP-AES, micro-XRF on sherds and micro-XRF on pellets) were statistically treated by correlation analysis and Student's t-test (at the 95% confidence level)

  11. Comparison of a portable micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the ancient ceramics analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou, D.N. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Zachariadis, G.A. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Anthemidis, A.N. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Tsirliganis, N.C. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, Tsimiski 58, GR-67100, Xanthi (Greece); Stratis, J.A. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece)]. E-mail: jstratis@chem.auth.gr

    2004-12-01

    Two multielement instrumental methods of analysis, micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were applied for the analysis of 7th and 5th century B.C. ancient ceramic sherds in order to evaluate the above two methods and to assess the potential to use the current compact and portable micro-XRF instrument for the in situ analysis of ancient ceramics. The distinguishing factor of interest is that micro-XRF spectrometry offers the possibility of a nondestructive analysis, an aspect of primary importance in the compositional analysis of cultural objects. Micro-XRF measurements were performed firstly directly on the ceramic sherds with no special pretreatment apart from surface cleaning (micro-XRF on sherds) and secondly on pressed pellet disks which were prepared for each ceramic sherd (micro-XRF on pellet). For the ICP-AES determination of elements, test solutions were prepared by the application of a microwave-assisted decomposition procedure in closed high-pressure PFA vessels. Also, the standard reference material SARM 69 was used for the efficiency calibration of the micro-XRF instrument and was analysed by both methods. In order to verify the calibration, the standard reference materials NCS DC 73332 and SRM620 as well as the reference materials AWI-1 and PRI-1 were analysed by micro-XRF. Elemental concentrations determined by the three analytical procedures (ICP-AES, micro-XRF on sherds and micro-XRF on pellets) were statistically treated by correlation analysis and Student's t-test (at the 95% confidence level)

  12. Flash x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Q.; Pellinen, D.

    1976-01-01

    The complementary techniques of flash x-ray radiography (FXR) and flash x-ray diffraction (FXD) provide access to a unique domain in nondestructive materials testing. FXR is useful in studies of macroscopic properties during extremely short time intervals, and FXD, the newer technique, is used in studies of microscopic properties. Although these techniques are similar in many respects, there are some substantial differences. FXD generally requires low-voltage, line-radiation sources and extremely accurate timing; FXR is usually less demanding. Phenomena which can be profitably studied by FXR often can also be studied by FXD to permit a complete materials characterization

  13. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, M.S.

    1976-01-01

    The deployment of detectors outside the deleterious effects of the atmosphere by sending them in space vehicles, has been explained. This has thrown open the entire spectrum of the electromagnetic and particle radiation to direct observations, thus enlarging the vistas of the field of astronomy and astrophysics. The discovery of strong emitters of X-rays such as SCO X-1, NorX-2, transient sources such as Cen X-2, Cen X-4, Cen X-1, Supernova remnants Tan X-1, etc., are reported. The background of the X-ray spectrum as measured during two rocket flights over Thumba, India is presented. (K.B.)

  14. X-ray masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, J.C.; Satchell, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    In semiconductor manufacture, where X-ray irradiation is used, a thin silicon membrane can be used as an X-ray mask. This membrane has areas on which are patterns to define the regions to be irradiated. These regions are of antireflection material. With the thin, in the order of 3 microns, membranes used, fragility is a problem. Hence a number of ribs of silicon are formed integral with the membrane, and which are relatively thick, 5 to 10 microns. The ribs may be formed by localised deeper boron deposition followed by a selective etch. (author)

  15. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small dose of ... x-ray , is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth ...

  16. Subluminous X-ray binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armas Padilla, M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of the first X-ray binary, Scorpius X-1, by Giacconi et al. (1962), marked the birth of X-ray astronomy. Following that discovery, many additional X-ray sources where found with the first generation of X-ray rockets and observatories (e.g., UHURU and Einstein). The short-timescale

  17. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Ray Exam: Hip Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  18. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  19. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  20. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  1. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  2. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  3. CRL X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolchevsky, N.N.; Petrov, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    A novel types of X-ray tubes with refractive lenses are proposed. CRL-R X-ray tube consists of Compound Refractive Lens- CRL and Reflection X-ray tube. CRL acts as X-ray window. CRL-T X-ray consists of CRL and Transmission X-ray tube. CRL acts as target for electron beam. CRL refractive lens acts as filter, collimator, waveguide and focusing lens. Properties and construction of the CRL X-ray tube are discussed. (authors)

  4. X rays and condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daillant, J.

    1997-01-01

    After a historical review of the discovery and study of X rays, the various interaction processes between X rays and matter are described: Thomson scattering, Compton scattering, X-photon absorption through photoelectric effect, and magnetic scattering. X ray sources such as the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are described. The various X-ray applications are presented: imagery such as X tomography, X microscopy, phase contrast; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy; X-ray scattering and diffraction techniques

  5. Correlated charge changing interactions and K x-ray emission in ion-atom collisions. Progress report, August 15, 1983-March 15, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, E.M.; Tanis, J.A.

    1984-03-01

    Correlations between K x-ray emission and charge-changing interactions have been investigated for highly charged vanadium and sulfur ions incident on gas targets under single collision conditions. From measurements of K x-rays coincident with single electron capture, significant new evidence was obtained for the existence of resonant-transfer-and-excitation (RTE) in 180 to 460 MeV V 19+ 20+ 21+ + He collisions and 70 to 160 MeV S 13+ + He collisions. The RTE process, which proceeds via an inverse Auger transition, is qualitatively analogous to dielectronic recombination. For both vanadium and sulfur, the cross section for coincidences between K x rays and capture showed strong resonant behavior. Of particular significance is the observation that for V + He all three charge states exhibited two maxima in the coincidence cross section. Calculations show that these maxima are correlated to intermediate states in the RTE process for which the excited and captured electrons have principal quantum numbers n = 2,2 and n = 2, greater than or equal to 3, respectively. In these same experiments, coincidences between K x-rays and ions which lose an electron were also measured, as well as cross sections for total K x-ray production and total electron capture and loss

  6. Material Discriminated X-Ray CT System by Using New X-Ray Imager with Energy Discriminate Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Aoki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Material discriminated X-ray CT system has been constructed by using conventional X-ray tube (white X-ray source and photon-counting X-ray imager as an application with energy band detection. We have already reported material identify X-ray CT using K-shell edge method elsewhere. In this report the principle of material discrimination was adapted the separation of electron-density and atomic number from attenuation coefficient mapping in X-ray CT reconstructed image in two wavelength X-ray CT method using white X-ray source and energy discriminated X-ray imager by using two monochrome X-ray source method. The measurement phantom was prepared as four kinds material rods (Carbon(C, Iron(Fe, Copper(Cu, Titanium(Ti rods of 3mm-diameter inside an aluminum(Al rod of 20mm-diameter. We could observed material discriminated X-ray CT reconstructed image, however, the discrimination properties were not good than two monochrome X-ray CT method. This results was could be explained because X-ray scattering, beam-hardening and so on based on white X-ray source, which could not observe in two monochrome X-ray CT method. However, since our developed CdTe imager can be detect five energy-bands at the same time, we can use multi-band analysis to decrease the least square error margin. We will be able to obtain more high separation in atomic number mapping in X-ray CT reconstructed image by using this system.

  7. Structural evidence for the sorption of Ni(II) atoms on the edges of montmorillonite clay minerals: a polarized X-ray absorption fine structure study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dähn, Rainer; Scheidegger, André M.; Manceau, Alain; Schlegel, Michel L.; Baeyens, Bart; Bradbury, Michael H.; Chateigner, Daniel

    The nature of surface complexes formed on Ni uptake onto montmorillonite (a dioctahedral smectite) has been investigated over an extended time period by polarized extended X-ray absorption fine structure (P-EXAFS) spectroscopy. Self-supporting films of Ni-sorbed montmorillonite were prepared by contacting Ni and montmorillonite at pH 7.2, high ionic strength (0.3 M NaClO 4), and low Ni concentration ([Ni] initial = 19.9 μM) for 14- and 360-d reaction time. The resulting Ni concentration on the clay varied from 4 to 7 μmol/g. Quantitative texture analysis indicates that the montmorillonite particles were well orientated with respect to the plane of the film. The full width at half maximum of the orientation distribution of the c* axes of individual clay platelets about the normal to the film plane was 44.3° (14-d reaction time) and 47.1° (360-d reaction time). These values were used to correct the coordination numbers determined by P-EXAFS for texture effects. Ni K-edge P-EXAFS spectra were recorded at angles between the incident beam and the film normal equal to 10, 35, 55, and 80°. Spectral analysis led to the identification of three nearest cationic subshells containing 2.0 ± 0.5 Al at 3.0 Å and 2.0 ± 0.5 Si at 3.12 Å and 4.0 ± 0.5 Si at 3.26 Å. These distances are characteristic of edge-sharing linkages between Al and Ni octahedra and of corner-sharing linkages between Ni octahedra and Si tetrahedra, as in clay structures. The angular dependence of the Ni-Al and Ni-Si contributions indicates that Ni-Al pairs are oriented parallel to the film plane, whereas Ni-Si pairs are not. The study reveals the formation of Ni inner-sphere mononuclear surface complexes located at the edges of montmorillonite platelets and thus that heavy metals binding to edge sites is a possible sorption mechanism for dioctahedral smectites. Data analysis further suggests that either the number of neighboring Al atoms slightly increases from 1.6 to 2 or that the structural order

  8. X-ray beam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, T.J.; Randmer, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method of minimizing the preferential angular absorption of the divergent beam from an X-ray generator is described. The generator consists of an X-ray shielded housing with an X-ray transmissive window symmetrically placed in radial alignment with a focal spot area on a sloped target surface of an X-ray tube in the housing. The X-ray tube may be of the stationary anode type or of the rotating anode type. (U.K.)

  9. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient and determination of the imaginary component of the atomic form factor of molybdenum over the 13.5-41.5-keV energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonge, Martin D. de; Tran, Chanh Q.; Chantler, Christopher T.; Barnea, Zwi; Dhal, Bipin B.; Cookson, David J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Mashayekhi, Ali

    2005-01-01

    We use the x-ray extended-range technique (XERT) [Chantler et al., Phys. Rev. A 64, 062506 (2001)] to measure the mass attenuation coefficients of molybdenum in the x-ray energy range of 13.5-41.5 keV to 0.02-0.15 % accuracy. Measurements made over an extended range of the measurement parameter space are critically examined to identify, quantify, and correct where necessary a number of experimental systematic errors. These results represent the most extensive experimental data set for molybdenum and include absolute mass attenuation coefficients in the regions of the x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The imaginary component of the atomic form-factor f 2 is derived from the photoelectric absorption after subtracting calculated Rayleigh and Compton scattering cross sections from the total attenuation. Comparison of the result with tabulations of calculated photoelectric absorption coefficients indicates that differences of 1-15 % persist between the calculated and observed values

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to ...

  11. X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, U.

    1979-11-01

    The author describes several possibilities for the production of X-radiation. Especially he discusses the use of bremsstrahlung at electron impact on solid targets and the synchrotron radiation. He presents some equations for the calculation of X-ray intensities. Especially the X-radiation from the DORIS storage ring is discussed. (HSI)

  12. Medical x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Gui Ah Auu; Husaini Salleh; Idris Besar; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Shaharuddin Mohd; Siti Najila Mohd Janib; Mohamed Ali Abdul Khader; Mahalatchimi Dave; Mohd Fazly Abdul Rahim; Ng Chee Moon; Ram Piari; Teoh Hoon Heng; Lee Peter

    2004-01-01

    This book describes the fundamental subject about medical radiography. It is a multidisciplinary field that requires cross professional input from scientists, engineers and medical doctors. However, it is presented in simple language to suit different levels of readers from x-ray operators and radiographers to physists, general practitioners and radiology specialists.The book is written in accordance to the requirements of the standard syllabus approved by the Ministry of Health Malaysia for the training of medical x-ray operator and general practitioners. In general, the content is not only designed to provide relevant and essential subject for related professionals in medical radiological services such as x-ray operator, radiographer and radiologists, but also to address those in associated radiological services including nurses, medical technologists and physicists.The book is organized and arranged sequentially into 3 parts for easy reference: Radiation safety; X-ray equipment and associated facilities; Radiography practices. With proper grasping of all these parts, the radiological services could be provided with confident and the highest professional standard. Thus, medical imaging with highest quality that can provide useful diagnostic information at minimum doses and at cost effective could be assured

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... change into a gown. You may have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to ... You Sponsored by About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  14. X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography of metalloenzymes at XFELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Junko

    2016-01-01

    The ultra-bright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of biological and inorganic systems beyond what is possible at synchrotron sources. Although the structure and chemistry at the catalytic sites have been studied intensively in both biological and inorganic systems, a full understanding of the atomic-scale chemistry requires new approaches beyond the steady state X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures. Following the dynamic changes in the geometric and electronic structure at ambient conditions, while overcoming X-ray damage to the redox active catalytic center, is key for deriving reaction mechanisms. Such studies become possible by using the intense and ultra-short femtosecond X-ray pulses from an XFEL, where sample is probed before it is damaged. We have developed methodology for simultaneously collecting crystallography data and X-ray emission spectra, using an energy dispersive spectrometer at ambient conditions. In addition, we have developed a way to collect metal L-edge data of dilute samples using soft X-rays at XFELs. The advantages and challenges of these methods will be described in this review. (author)

  15. Structural refinement and extraction of hydrogen atomic positions in polyoxymethylene crystal based on the first successful measurements of 2-dimensional high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction and wide-angle neutron diffraction patterns of hydrogenated and deuterated species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Kohji; Hanesaka, Makoto; Ohhara, Takashi; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tamada, Taro; Kuroki, Ryota; Fujiwara, Satoru; Ozeki, Tomoji; Kitano, Toshiaki; Nishu, Takashi; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2007-01-01

    2-Dimensional X-ray and neutron diffraction patterns have been successfully measured for deuterated and hydrogenated polyoxymethylene (POM) samples obtained by γ-ray induced solid-state polymerization reaction. More than 700 reflections were collected from the X-ray diffraction data at -150degC by utilizing a high-energy synchrotron X-ray beam at SPring-8, Japan, from which the crystal structure of POM has been refined thoroughly including the extraction of hydrogen atomic positions at clearly seen in the difference Fourier synthesis map. As the first trial the nonuniform (9/5) helical model was analyzed with the reliability factor (R factor) 6.9%. The structural analysis was made also using the X-ray reflections of about 400 observed at room temperature (R 8.8%), and the thermal parameters of constituent atoms were compared between the low and high temperatures to discuss the librational thermal motion of the chains. The 2-dimensional neutron diffraction data, collected for the deuterated and hydrogenated POM samples using an imaging plate system specifically built-up for neutron scattering experiment, have allowed us to pick up the D and H atomic positions clearly in the Fourier synthesis maps. Another possible model, (29/16) helix, which was proposed by several researches, has been also investigated on the basis of the X-ray diffraction data at -150degC. The direct method succeeded in extracting this (29/16) model straightforwardly. The R factor was 8.6%, essentially the same as that of (9/5) helical model. This means that the comparison of the diffraction intensity between the data collected from the full-rotation X-ray diffraction pattern and the intensity calculated for both the (9/5) and (29/16) models cannot be used for the unique determination of the superiority of the model, (9/5) or (29/16) helix. However, we have found the existence of 001 and 002 reflections which give the longer repeating period 55.7 A. Besides there observed a series of meridional

  16. The determination of major and some minor constituents in lead zirconate-titanate compositions by x-ray fluorescence and atomic absorption spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Willigen, J.H.H.G.; Kruidhof, H.; Dahmen, E.A.M.F.

    1972-01-01

    An accurate X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method is described for the determination of lead, zirconium and titanium in lead zirconate-titanate ceramics. Careful matching of samples and standards by a borax fusion method resulted in a relative standard deviation of about 0.2% for the major

  17. X-ray filter for x-ray powder diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, John Jay; Conley, Raymond P.; Bouet, Nathalie C. D.; Dooryhee, Eric; Ghose, Sanjit

    2018-01-23

    Technologies are described for apparatus, methods and systems effective for filtering. The filters may comprise a first plate. The first plate may include an x-ray absorbing material and walls defining first slits. The first slits may include arc shaped openings through the first plate. The walls of the first plate may be configured to absorb at least some of first x-rays when the first x-rays are incident on the x-ray absorbing material, and to output second x-rays. The filters may comprise a second plate spaced from the first plate. The second plate may include the x-ray absorbing material and walls defining second slits. The second slits may include arc shaped openings through the second plate. The walls of the second plate may be configured to absorb at least some of second x-rays and to output third x-rays.

  18. A portable x-ray source and method for radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovanivsky, K.S.

    1996-01-01

    A portable x-ray source that produces a sufficient x-ray flux to produce high quality x-ray images on x-ray films. The source includes a vacuum chamber filled with a heavy atomic weight gas at low pressure and an x-ray emitter. The chamber is in a magnetic field and an oscillating electric field and generates electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma having a ring of energetic electrons inside the chamber. The electrons bombard the x-ray emitter which in turn produces x-ray. A pair of magnetic members generate an axisymmetric magnetic mirror trap inside the chamber. The chamber may be nested within a microwave resonant cavity and between the magnets or the chamber and the microwave cavity may be a single composite structure. (author)

  19. X-ray refractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tur'yanskij, A.G.; Pirshin, I.V.

    2001-01-01

    Paper introduces a new circuit of X-ray refractometer to study angular and spectral features of refracted radiation within hard X-ray range. Refractometer incorporates two goniometers, two crystal-analyzers and three radiation detectors. The maximum distance between radiation source focal point and a receiving slit of the second goniometer is equal to 1.4 m. For the first time one obtained refraction patterns of fine-film specimens including C/Si stressed structure. Paper describes a new technique of refractometry via specimen oscillation at fixed position of a detecting device. Paper presents the measurement results of oscillation refraction patterns for specimens of melted quartz and ZnSe single crystal [ru

  20. X-ray radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: The most common form of radio therapy is X-ray therapy, where a beam of photons or their parent electrons break down hydrogen bonds within the body's cells and remove certain DNA information necessary for cell multiplication. This process can eradicate malignant cells leading to complete recovery, to the remission of some cancers, or at least to a degree of pain relief. The radiotherapy instrument is usually an electron linac, and the electrons are used either directly in 'electrotherapy' for some 10% of patients, or the electrons bombard a conversion target creating a broad beam of high energy photons or 'penetration X-rays'. The simplest machine consists of several accelerating sections at around 3 GHz, accelerating electrons to 6 MeV; a cooled tungsten target is used to produce a 4 Gray/min X-ray field which can be collimated into a rectangular shape at the patient position. This tiny linac is mounted inside a rotating isocentric gantry above the patient who must remain perfectly still. Several convergent beams can also be used to increase the delivered dose. More sophisticated accelerators operate at up to 18 MeV to increase penetration depths and decrease skin exposure. Alternatively, electrotherapy can be used with different energies for lower and variable penetration depths - approximately 0.5 cm per MeV. In this way surface tissue may be treated without affecting deeper and more critical anatomical regions. This type of linac, 1 to 2 metres long, is mounted parallel to the patient with a bending magnet to direct the beam to the radiotherapy system, which includes the target, thick movable collimator jaws, a beam field equalizer, dose rate and optical field simulation and energy controls. There are over 2000 acceleratorbased X-ray treatment units worldwide. Western countries have up to two units per million population, whereas in developing countries such as Bangladesh, the density is only one per 100 million. Several

  1. X-ray generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucarias, A; Shepherd, J W

    1982-09-08

    An X-ray tube has a tubular envelope with a cathode for directing an electron beam onto a focal spot area of a spaced anode target to generate X-rays. The target is mounted for axial rotation on one end of a rotor disposed in an end portion of the envelope and encircled by a stator of an alternating current induction motor. An annular shield of high permeability magnetic material extends transversely between the electron beam and the stator of the induction motor for shunting stray or fringe electromagnetic fields established by the stator away from the electron beam to avoid consequent lateral deflections of the electron and corresponding lateral movements of the focal spot area.

  2. X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsmuir, J.H.; Ferguson, S.R.; D'Amico, K.L.; Stokes, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the application of a new high-resolution X-ray tomographic microscope to the study of porous media. The microscope was designed to exploit the properties of a synchrotron X-ray source to perform three dimensional tomography on millimeter sized objects with micron resolution and has been used in materials science studies with both synchrotron and conventional and synchrotron sources will be compared. In this work the authors have applied the microscope to measure the three dimensional structure of fused bead packs and berea sandstones with micron resolution and have performed preliminary studies of flow in these media with the microscope operated in a digital subtraction radiography mode. Computer graphics techniques have been applied to the data to visually display the structure of the pore body system. Tomographic imaging after flow experiments should detect the structure of the oil-water interface in the pore network and this work is ongoing

  3. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Chuji.

    1980-01-01

    A principal object of the present invention is to provide an X-ray apparatus which is such that the distance between the surface of the patient's table and the floor on which the apparatus is installed is sufficiently small in the horizontal position of the patient's table of the roentgenographical pedestal and that the rotation of the pedestal from the horizontal position to a tilted position and further to the vertical position of the table can be carried out smoothly. (auth)

  4. X-ray Ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, R.; Zerlett, G.

    1983-01-01

    This commentary, presented as volume 2 of the Deutsches Strahlenschutzrecht (German legislation on radiation protection) deals with the legal provisions of the ordinance on the protection against harmful effects of X-radiation (X-ray Ordinance - RoeV), of March 1, 1973 (announced in BGBl.I, page 173), as amended by the ordinance on the protection against harmful effects of ionizing radiation, of October 13, 1976 (announced in BGBl. I, page 2905). Thus volume 2 completes the task started with volume 1, namely to present a comprehensive view and account of the body of laws governing radiation protection, a task which was thought useful as developments in the FRG led to regulations being split up into the X-ray Ordinance, and the Radiation Protection Ordinance. In order to present a well-balanced commentary on the X-ray Ordinance, it was necessary to discuss the provisions both from the legal and the medical point of view. This edition takes into account the Fourth Public Notice of the BMA (Fed. Min. of Labour and Social Affairs) concerning the implementation of the X-ray Ordinance of January 4, 1982, as well as court decisions and literature published in this field, until September 1982. In addition, the judgment of the Federal Constitutional Court, dated October 19, 1982, concerning the voidness of the law on government liability, and two decisions by the Federal High Court, dated November 23, 1982, concerning the right to have insight into medical reports - of great significance in practice - have been considered. This commentary therefore is up to date with current developments. (orig.) [de

  5. Producing x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallozzi, P.J.; Epstein, H.M.; Jung, R.G.; Applebaum, D.C.; Fairand, B.P.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    A method of producing x-rays by directing radiant energy from a laser onto a target is described. Conversion efficiency of at least about 3 percent is obtained by providing the radiant energy in a low-power precursor pulse of approximately uniform effective intensity focused onto the surface of the target for about 1 to 30 nanoseconds so as to generate an expanding unconfined coronal plasma having less than normal solid density throughout and comprising a low-density (underdense) region wherein the plasma frequency is less than the laser radiation frequency and a higher-density (overdense) region wherein the plasma frequency is greater than the laser radiation frequency and, about 1 to 30 nanoseconds after the precursor pulse strikes the target, a higher-power main pulse focused onto the plasma for about 10 -3 to 30 nanoseconds and having such power density and total energy that the radiant energy is absorbed in the underdense region and conducted into the overdense region to heat it and thus to produce x-rays therefrom with the plasma remaining substantially below normal solid density and thus facilitating the substantial emission of x-rays in the form of spectral lines arising from nonequilibrium ionization states

  6. Mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) and measurement of x-ray energy spectra using based calcium phosphate biomaterials: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes Z, M. A.; Da Silva, T. A.; Nogueira, M. S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Goncalves Z, E., E-mail: madelon@cdtn.br [Pontifice Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Av. Dom Jose Gaspar 500, Belo Horizonte 30535-901, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    In dentistry, alveolar bone regeneration procedures using based calcium phosphate biomaterials have been shown effective. However,there are not reports in the literature of studies the interaction of low energy radiation in these biomaterials used as attenuator and not being then allowed a comparison between the theoretical values and experimental.The objective of this study was to determine the interaction of radiation parameters of four dental biomaterials - BioOss, Cerasorb M Dental, Straumann Boneceramic and Osteogen for diagnostic radiology qualities. As a material and methods, the composition of the biomaterials was determined by the analytical techniques. The samples with 0.181 cm to 0,297 cm thickness were experimentally used as attenuators for the measurement of the transmitted X-rays spectra in X-ray equipment with 50 to 90 kV range by spectrometric system comprising the Cd Te detector. After this procedure, the mass attenuation coefficient, the effective atomic number were determined and compared between all the specimens analyzed, using the program WinXCOM in the range of 10 to 200 keV. In all strains examined observed that the energy spectrum of x-rays transmitted through the BioOss has the mean energy slightly smaller than the others biomaterials for close thickness. The μ/ρ and Z{sub eff} of the biomaterials showed its dependence on photon energy and atomic number of the elements of the material analyzed. It is concluded according to the methodology employed in this study that the measurements of x-ray spectrum, μ/ρ and Z{sub eff} using biomaterials as attenuators confirmed that the thickness, density, composition of the samples, the incident photon energy are factors that determine the characteristics of radiation in a tissue or equivalent material. (Author)

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone ... bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special preparation. You ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can be taken to the patient in a hospital bed or the emergency room. The x-ray ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  11. X-ray detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The object of the invention (an ionization chamber X-ray detector array for use with high speed computerised tomographic imaging apparatus) is to reduce the time required to produce a tomographic image. The detector array described determines the distribution of X-ray intensities in one or more flat, coplanar X-ray beams. It comprises three flat anode sheets parallel to the X-ray beam, a plurality of rod-like cathodes between the anodes, a detector gas between the electrodes and a means for applying a potential between the electrodes. Each of the X-ray sources is collimated to give a narrow, planar section of X-ray photons. Sets of X-ray sources in the array are pulsed simultaneously to obtain X-ray transmission data for tomographic image reconstruction. (U.K.)

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... changes seen in metabolic conditions. assist in the detection and diagnosis of bone cancer . locate foreign objects ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were maintained on ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page ... the patient standing upright, as in cases of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ... body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray ...

  19. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Hip What's in this article? What It Is Why ... You Have Questions Print What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... X-rays are a form of radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for bone x-rays consists of ... and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The x-ray tube is connected to a flexible arm that is extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath the patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ...

  3. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Ankle What's in this article? What It Is Why ... You Have Questions Print What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  4. Multiscale structural study using scanning X-ray microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsumi, Hiroyuki; Arima, Taka-hisa

    2016-01-01

    Correspondence between structures at the atomic- and meso-scales can be given by scanning X-ray microscopy integrated with polarized X-ray diffractometry. Symmetry is the common structural feature available across multiple hierarchies. This article introduces a symmetry evaluation technique based on polarized X-ray diffractometry and describes two embodiments: chirality domain observation and antiferromagnetic domain observation. Multiscale structural studies would play an important role in uncovering universality of hierarchical structure. (author)

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craievich, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental technics of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) is presented and several uses of it in atomic, molecular and bio physics are shown. The recent progresses of this technics, both theoretical and experimental, are discussed and the future perspectives on this subject are commented. (L.C.) [pt

  6. SMM x ray polychromator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  7. Obstetric X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mwachi, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    Radiography of the pelvis should never be taken to diagnose early pregnancy, because of potential hazards of radiation damage to the growing foetus. the only indication occurs in the last week of pregnancy (37 weeks). Obstetric X-ray will help you answer like confirmation of malposition,multiple pregnancies; fetal abnormalities e.g. hydrocephalus, foetal disposition. The choice of radiographic projection will help give foetal presentation, disposition as well as foetal maturity. The search pattern helps you determine maternal and spine deformity, foetal spine and head , foetal presentation and any other anomalies

  8. X-ray film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, U.W.; Gilmore, D.J.; Wonacott, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of film as an X-ray detector is discussed and its behaviour is compared with that of a perfect Poissonian detector. The efficiency of microdensitometry as a method of extracting the information recorded on the film is discussed. More emphasis is placed in the precision of microdensitometric measurements than on the more obvious characteristic of film speed. The effects of chemical fog and background on the precision of the measurements is considered and it is concluded that the final limit to precision is set by the chemical fog. (B.D.)

  9. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of literature on X-ray diffraction begins with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips' organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. This is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is divided according to the equipment (cameras, diffractometers, monochromators) and its applications. The applications are subdivided into sections for high/low temperature and pressure, effects due to the equipment, small angle scattering and a part for stress, texture and phase analyses of metals and quantitative analysis of minerals

  10. Clustering of germanium atoms in silica glass responsible for the 3.1 eV emission band studied by optical absorption and X-ray absorption fine structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomoko; Muto, Shunsuke; Yuliati, Leny; Yoshida, Hisao; Inada, Yasuhiro

    2009-01-01

    Correlation between the 3.1 eV emission band and local atomic configuration was systematically examined for Ge + implanted silica glass by UV-vis optical absorption spectroscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis. The 2.7 eV emission band, commonly observed in defective silica, was replaced by the sharp and intense 3.1 eV emission band for the Ge + fluence > 2 x 10 16 cm -2 , in which UV-vis absorption spectra suggested clustering of Ge atoms with the size ∼1 nm. XAFS spectroscopy indicated that the Ge atoms were under coordinated with oxygen atoms nearly at a neutral valence state on average. The present results are consistent with the previous ESR study but imply that the small Ge clusters rather than the O=Ge: complexes (point defects) are responsible for the 3.1 eV emission band.

  11. Commercial Applications of X Ray Spectrometric Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegrzynek, D.

    2013-01-01

    In the 21st century, the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique is widely used in process control, industrial applications and for routine elemental analysis. The technique has a multielement capability capable of detecting elements with Z ≥ 10, with a few instruments capable of detecting also elements with Z ≥ 5. It is characterized by a non-destructive analysis process and relatively good detection limits, typically one part per million, for a wide range of elements. The first commercial XRF instruments were introduced to the market about 50 years ago. They were the wavelength dispersive X ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometers utilizing Bragg’s law and reflection on crystal lattices for sequential elemental analysis of sample composition. The advances made in radiation detector technology, especially the introduction of semiconductor detectors, improvements in signal processing electronics, availability and exponential growth of personal computer market led to invention of energy dispersive X ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. The EDXRF is more cost effective as compared to WDXRF. It also allows for designing compact instruments. Such instruments can be easily tailored to the needs of different customers, integrated with industrial installations, and also miniaturized for the purpose of in-situ applications. The versatility of the technique has been confirmed in a spectacular way by using the XRF and X-ray spectrometric techniques, among few others, during the NASA and ESA missions in search for the evidence of life and presence of water on the surface of Mars. The XRF technique has achieved its strong position within the atomic spectroscopy group of analytical techniques not only due to its versatility but also due to relatively low running costs, as compared to the commonly used methods, e.g., atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) or inductively coupled plasma atomic emission/mass spectrometry (ICP-AES/MS). Presently, the XRF technique together with X ray

  12. Electron-ion-x-ray spectrometer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, S.H.; Deslattes, R.D.; MacDonald, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a spectrometer system developed for electron, ion, and x-ray spectroscopy of gas-phase atoms and molecules following inner-shell excitation by tunable synchrotron radiation. The spectrometer has been used on beamline X-24A at the National Synchrotron Light Source for excitation-dependent studies of Ar L-shell and K-shell photoexcitation and vacancy decay processes. The instrumentation and experimental methods are discussed, and examples are given of electron spectra and coincidence spectra between electrons and fluorescent x-rays

  13. Commercial Applications of X Ray Spectrometric Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegrzynek, D., E-mail: D.Wedgrznek@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency, The IAEA Laboratories, Seibersdorf, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-15

    In the 21st century, the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique is widely used in process control, industrial applications and for routine elemental analysis. The technique has a multielement capability capable of detecting elements with Z {>=} 10, with a few instruments capable of detecting also elements with Z {>=} 5. It is characterized by a non-destructive analysis process and relatively good detection limits, typically one part per million, for a wide range of elements. The first commercial XRF instruments were introduced to the market about 50 years ago. They were the wavelength dispersive X ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometers utilizing Bragg's law and reflection on crystal lattices for sequential elemental analysis of sample composition. The advances made in radiation detector technology, especially the introduction of semiconductor detectors, improvements in signal processing electronics, availability and exponential growth of personal computer market led to invention of energy dispersive X ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. The EDXRF is more cost effective as compared to WDXRF. It also allows for designing compact instruments. Such instruments can be easily tailored to the needs of different customers, integrated with industrial installations, and also miniaturized for the purpose of in-situ applications. The versatility of the technique has been confirmed in a spectacular way by using the XRF and X-ray spectrometric techniques, among few others, during the NASA and ESA missions in search for the evidence of life and presence of water on the surface of Mars. The XRF technique has achieved its strong position within the atomic spectroscopy group of analytical techniques not only due to its versatility but also due to relatively low running costs, as compared to the commonly used methods, e.g., atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) or inductively coupled plasma atomic emission/mass spectrometry (ICP-AES/MS). Presently, the XRF technique together with X ray

  14. Anomalous x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendin, G.

    1979-01-01

    The availability of tunable synchrotron radiation has made it possible systematically to perform x-ray diffraction studies in regions of anomalous scattering near absorption edges, e.g. in order to derive phase information for crystal structure determination. An overview is given of recent experimental and theoretical work and discuss the properties of the anomalous atomic scattering factor, with emphasis on threshold resonances and damping effects. The results are applied to a discussion of the very strong anomalous dispersion recently observed near the L 3 edge in a cesium complex. Also given is an overview of elements and levels where similar behavior can be expected. Finally, the influence of solid state and chemical effects on the absorption edge structure is discussed. 64 references

  15. Soft x-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs

  16. X-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowicz, A.A.; Van Grieken, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    In the period under review, i.e, through 1984 and 1985, some 600 articles on XRS (X-ray spectrometry) were published; most of these have been scanned and the most fundamental ones are discussed. All references will refer to English-language articles, unless states otherwise. Also general books have appeared on quantitative EPXMA (electron-probe X-ray microanalysis) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) as well as an extensive review on the application of XRS to trace analysis of environmental samples. In the period under review no radically new developments have been seen in XRS. However, significant improvements have been made. Gain in intensities has been achieved by more efficient excitation, higher reflectivity of dispersing media, and better geometry. Better understanding of the physical process of photon- and electron-specimen interactions led to complex but more accurate equations for correction of various interelement effects. Extensive use of micro- and minicomputers now enables fully automatic operation, including qualitative analysis. However, sample preparation and presentation still put a limit to further progress. Although some authors find XRS in the phase of stabilization or even stagnation, further gradual developments are expected, particularly toward more dedicated equipment, advanced automation, and image analysis systems. Ways are outlined in which XRS has been improved in the 2 last years by excitation, detection, instrumental, methodological, and theoretical advances. 340 references

  17. X-ray scattering measurements from thin-foil x-ray mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; BYRNAK, BP; Hornstrup, Allan

    1992-01-01

    Thin foil X-ray mirrors are to be used as the reflecting elements in the telescopes of the X-ray satellites Spectrum-X-Gamma (SRG) and ASTRO-D. High resolution X-ray scattering measurements from the Au coated and dip-lacquered Al foils are presented. These were obtained from SRG mirrors positioned...... in a test quadrant of the telescope structure and from ASTRO-D foils held in a simple fixture. The X-ray data is compared with laser data and other surface structure data such as STM, atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM, and electron micrography. The data obtained at Cu K-alpha(1), (8.05 keV) from all...

  18. Frontiers in X-Ray Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The year 2010 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the optical laser and the first anniversary of the world's first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. This exciting, new accelerator-based source of x-rays provides peak brilliances roughly a billion times greater than currently available from synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, and thus explores a qualitatively different parameter space. This talk will describe the first experiments at the LCLS aimed at understanding the nature of high intensity x-ray interactions, related applications in ultrafast imaging on the atomic scale and sketch nascent plans for the extension of both linac and storage-ring based photon sources.

  19. X-ray spectroscopy with EBIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Cauble, R.; Chen, M.; DelGrande, N.; Knapp, D.; Marrs, R.; Osterheld, A.; Reed, K.; Schneider, M.; Scofield, J.; Wong, K.; Vogel, D.; Zasadzinski, R.; Chantrenne, S.; Wargelin, B.

    1992-04-01

    X-ray spectroscopy with the Livermore electron beam ion traps provides data on a wide range of atomic physics issues including ionization, recombination, and excitation cross sections, identification of forbidden transitions, and contributions from relatively and quantum electrodynamics to the transition energies. Here we briefly discuss the source characteristics and x-ray instrumentation, and report measurements of the excitation cross sections of the Kα transitions in heliumlike Ti 20+ as a function of beam energy. The measurements allow detailed comparisons with theoretical predictions of the direct electron-impact excitation cross sections, resonance-excitation contributions, and the electron temperature dependence of the ratio of triplet and singlet lines. The results demonstrate the importance of such measurements for increasing the reliability of x-ray diagnostics of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

  20. Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios for some elements in the atomic number range 28≤Z≤39 at 16.896 keV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Yılmaz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The K shell intensity ratios (Kβ/Kα have been experimentally determined for some elements in the atomic number range 28 ≤ Z ≤ 39 by using secondary excitation method. K X-rays emitted by samples have been counted by a Si (Li detector with 160 eV resolutions at 5.9 keV. The measured values were compared with the theoretical and experimental values. In general, the values obtained are in good agreement with the calculated values.

  1. Comparison of the trace analysis of heavy metal aerosols by means of atom absorption spectroscopy and proton-induced X-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottrodt, K.H.; Georgii, H.W.; Groeneveld, K.O.; Frankfurt Univ.

    1977-01-01

    The comparative analyses of AAS and PIXE (Proton-Induced X-ray Emission) show very good agreement in the absolute values of the concentrations of all metals analyzed. The practical detection limits are about 10 -10 g for the investigated element in both measuring processes, so that the analysis of pure air samples is possible with both methods. PIXE is particularly suitable for the analysis of aerosol samples as it is not necessary to process the filter, the samples are not destroyed, and many elements can be simultaneously analyzed within a short time (5-10 min.). Furthermore, the possibility of automatization enables an efficient treatment of meteorological problems. (orig.) [de

  2. 100 years of discovery of X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tao

    2012-01-01

    X-ray diffraction was discovered by Max von Laue a hundred years ago. Later, through the work of William H. Bragg and William L. Bragg, an experimental analysis method was developed to solve the structure of molecules at the atomic level. Over the past hundred years, science and technology has been dramatically changed by X-ray diffraction analysis, which has also undergone considerable development. The recent emergence of hard X-ray free electron lasers has provided a new dimension for X-ray diffraction analysis, promising even greater progress in the fields of physics, chemistry and biology. (author)

  3. X-ray Crystallography of Biological Macromolecules -RE ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    trons of the atoms scatter X-rays and if identical molecules are arranged in a ... Institute of Science,. Bangalore. ... The first X-ray diffraction pictures were taken and the theory .... various processes involved in biological systems in detail. We.

  4. Theory of X-ray absorption and emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukoyama, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical studies on X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy are discussed. Simple expressions for X-ray emission rate and X-ray absorption cross section are presented in the dipole approximation. Various atomic models to obtain realistic wave functions and theoretical calculations for X-ray absorption cross sections and X-ray emission rates are described. In the case of molecules and solids, molecular orbital methods for electronic structures and molecular wave functions are discussed. The emphasis is on the procedures to obtain the excited-state and continuum wave functions for molecules and to calculate the multi-center dipole matrix elements. The examples of the calculated X-ray absorption and emission spectra are shown and compared with the experimental results

  5. X-ray table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, J.R.; Otto, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    An X-ray radiographic or fluoroscopic table is described which includes a film holder with a frame attached to a cable running over end pulleys for positioning the holder longitudinally as desired under the table top. The holder has a front opening to receive a cassette-supporting tray which can be slid out on tracks to change the cassette. A reed switch on the frame is opened by a permanent magnet on the tray only when the tray is half-way out. When the switch is closed, an electromagnet locks the pulley and the holder in place. The holder is thus automatically locked in place not only during exposure (tray in) but when the tray is out for changing the cassette. To re-position the holder, the operator pulls the tray half-out and, using the tray itself, pushes the holder along the table, the holder being counterbalanced by a weight. (author)

  6. X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmayne, I.G.B.

    1988-01-01

    The patent concerns a warning and protection system for mobile x-ray equipment used for 'on site' radiography, so that workers in the vicinity of such a working unit can be alerted to its presence. The invention is a local repeater warning system which gives a preliminary warning that energisation of the tubehead is imminent, as well as a switch near the tubehead to abort or inhibit energisation. The latter switch allows personnel caught in the vicinity of the tubehead to prevent energisation. The preliminary warning may be flashing lamps or by a klaxon. The control unit for the equipment may include a monitoring circuit to detect failure of the warning light or klaxon. (U.K.)

  7. X-ray equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmayne, I.G.B.

    1988-01-06

    The patent concerns a warning and protection system for mobile x-ray equipment used for 'on site' radiography, so that workers in the vicinity of such a working unit can be alerted to its presence. The invention is a local repeater warning system which gives a preliminary warning that energisation of the tubehead is imminent, as well as a switch near the tubehead to abort or inhibit energisation. The latter switch allows personnel caught in the vicinity of the tubehead to prevent energisation. The preliminary warning may be flashing lamps or by a klaxon. The control unit for the equipment may include a monitoring circuit to detect failure of the warning light or klaxon. (U.K.).

  8. Increased kilo-electron-volt x-ray yields from Z-pinch plasmas by mixing elements of similar atomic numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeney, C.; LePell, P.D.; Failor, B.H.; Wong, S.L.; Apruzese, J.P.; Whitney, K.G.; Thornhill, J.W.; Davis, J.; Yadlowsky, E.; Hazelton, R.C.; Moschella, J.J.; Nash, T.; Loter, N.

    1995-01-01

    Magnesium-coated aluminum wire array Z pinch plasmas have been tested on a 4-MA, 6-TW pulsed electrical generator. A mixture of 80% aluminum and 20% magnesium is observed to maximize the radiated kilovolt x-ray yield at ≥50 kJ, which is 50% higher than that obtained with pure aluminum. Spectroscopic analysis and collisional radiative equilbrium models with radiation transport are employed to show that the aluminum-magnesium mixture reduces the opacity of the strongest emission lines, thus increasing the yield by increasing the probability of photon escape. Furthermore, the spectroscopic data also point to the presence of a strong temperature gradient in the pinched plasma that results in the outer magnesium coating of the wires having a higher electron temperature in the pinch. This temperature difference also plays a role in enhancing the kilovolt x-ray yield. The observation of a higher magnesium electron temperature offers evidence that the magnesium reaches the axis first, forming a core that is compressed and heated by the imploding mass of aluminum. Since the emissions from the core are not absorbed by the outer aluminum, the yields are increased. By comparison, aluminum-magnesium alloys imploded on a different but similar generator do not show a temperature difference

  9. X-Ray Lasers 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, Sergei; Daido, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2018-01-01

    These proceedings comprise a selection of invited and contributed papers presented at the 15th International Conference on X-Ray Lasers (ICXRL 2016), held at the Nara Kasugano International Forum, Japan, from May 22 to 27, 2016. This conference was part of an ongoing series dedicated to recent developments in the science and technology of x-ray lasers and other coherent x-ray sources with additional focus on supporting technologies, instrumentation and applications.   The book showcases recent advances in the generation of intense, coherent x-rays, the development of practical devices and their applications across a wide variety of fields. It also discusses emerging topics such as plasma-based x-ray lasers, 4th generation accelerator-based sources and higher harmonic generations, as well as other x-ray generation schemes.

  10. X-ray instrumentation in astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuhlane, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of a conference devoted to x-ray instrumentation in astronomy. Special sections are: AXAF X-Ray Optical Systems; Specialized X-Ray Systems; X-Ray Optical Systems I; X-Ray Optical Systems II; Gas Filled X-Ray Detectors II; The NASA Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility; X-Ray and EUV Spectrometers; Microchannel Plates; and Solid State Detectors

  11. X-ray absorption anisotropy for polychromatic illumination-Crystal views from inside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Novikov, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    We review an atomic resolution imaging method based on the analysis of the fine structure in X-ray absorption anisotropy, which results from incident beam diffraction. For a polychromatic X-ray beam, due to the suppression of higher order diffraction fringes, X-ray absorption anisotropy patterns can be interpreted as distorted real-space projections of the atomic structure around absorbing atoms. A qualitative method for analysis of X-ray absorption anisotropy patterns is presented, based on modeling of X-ray patterns with ray-traced images calculated for clusters around absorbing atoms.

  12. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  13. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  14. X-ray filtration apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to an X-ray shielding support device. In spite of considerable development in X-ray taking techniques, a need still exists for effective shielding, inter alia, to compensate for variations in the thickness, density and the absorption properties of the object being studied. By appropriate shielding, the X-ray image produced is of sufficient detail, contrast and intensity over its entire area to constitute a useful diagnostic aid. It is also desirable to subject the patient to the smallest possible X-ray dosage. 4 figs

  15. X-ray emission spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despujols, J.

    1992-01-01

    Principles of X-ray emission spectrometry are first recalled, then wave-length dispersive and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer are described. They are essentially designed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of elements (Z>10). Sample preparation, calibration, corrections, interferences, accuracy are reviewed. Examples of use in different industries are given. (71 refs.)

  16. Spectroscopic ellipsometric modeling of a Bi–Te–Se write layer of an optical data storage device as guided by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Madaan, Nitesh; Bagley, Jacob; Diwan, Anubhav [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Liu, Yiqun [Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Davis, Robert C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Lunt, Barry M. [Department of Information Technology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Smith, Stacey J., E-mail: ssmith@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Linford, Matthew R., E-mail: mrlinford@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-10-31

    Conventional magnetic tape is the most widely used medium for archival data storage. However, data stored on it need to be migrated every ca. 5 years. Recently, optical discs that store information for hundreds, or even more than 1000 years, have been introduced to the market. We recently proposed that technology in these optical discs be used to make an optical tape that would show greater permanence than its magnetic counterpart. Here we provide a detailed optical characterization of a sputtered thin film of bismuth, tellurium, and selenium (BTS) that is a proposed data storage layer for these devices. The methodology described herein should be useful in the future development of related materials. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) data are obtained using interference enhancement, and the modeling of this data is guided by results from atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray reflectivity (XRR). By AFM, ca. 40 nm BTS films show ca. 10 nm roughness. SEM images also suggest considerable roughness in the films and indicate that they are composed of 13.1 ± 5.9 nm grains. XRD confirms that the films are crystalline and predicts a grain size of 17 ± 2 nm. XRD results are consistent with the composition of the films — a mildly oxidized BTS material. Three models of increasing complexity are investigated to explain the SE data. The first model consists of a smooth, homogeneous BTS film. The second model adds a roughness layer to the previous model. The third model also has two layers. The bottom layer is modeled as a mixture of BTS and void using a Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The upper layer is similarly modeled, but with a gradient. The first model was unable to adequately model the SE data. The second model was an improvement — lower MSE (4.4) and good agreement with step height measurements. The third model was even better — very low MSE (2.6) and good agreement with AFM results. The

  17. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attekum, P.M.T.M. van.

    1979-01-01

    The methods and results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the study of plasmons, alloys and gold compounds are discussed. After a comprehensive introduction, seven papers by the author, previously published elsewhere, are reprinted and these cover a wide range of the uses of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. (W.D.L.)

  18. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic radiography is described in detail. It comprises a tubular target carrier supporting at its distal end a target with an inclined forward face. Image definition is improved by positioning in the path of the X-rays a window of X-ray transmitting ceramic material, e.g. 90% oxide of Be, or Al, 7% Si0 2 . The target carrier forms a probe which can be positioned in the patient's mouth. X-rays are directed forwardly and laterally of the target to an X-ray film positioned externally. The probe is provided with a detachable sleeve having V-form arms of X-ray opaque material which serve to depress the tongue out of the radiation path and also shield the roof of the mouth and other regions of the head from the X-ray pattern. A cylindrical lead shield defines the X-ray beam angle. (author)

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and easiest ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top of page What are the limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? ...

  1. Traditional x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Methods of imaging x-rays, with particular reference to medicine, are reviewed. The history and nature of x-rays, their production and spectra, contrast, shapes and fine structure, image transducers, including fluorescent screens, radiography, fluoroscopy, and image intensifiers, image detection, perception and enhancement and clinical applications are considered. (U.K.)

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety How to Read Your Radiology Report ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are a form of radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different parts of the body absorb the x-rays in ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... lowest radiation dose possible while producing the best images for ... organizations continually review and update the technique standards used ...

  7. Ten years of x-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faigel, G.; Bortel, G.; Tegze, M.; Fadley, C.S.; Simionovici, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    With the appearance of nano-science the role of local methods has become more and more important. Hard x-ray holography based on the inside reference point concept is a local probe of the atomic order in solids. It gives the 3D real space image of atoms without the phase ambiguity inherent to diffraction methods. In this paper a brief description of the basics of hard x-ray holography is given. The last ten years' experimental and evaluation-related developments are reviewed. We also introduce different variants of the method, such as Bremsstrahlung and gamma ray holography (GRH). The power of the method is illustrated by examples. We outline new directions and future possibilities. (authors)

  8. X-ray imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A novel, high-speed apparatus for use in X-ray computerised tomography is described in detail. It consists of a semi-circular array of X-ray sources, collimators and an ion chamber array for detection of the X-rays. The X-ray sources may be pulsed in salvos such that the corresponding detectors in the array are only illuminated by one source. The use of computer controlled salvos speeds up the image processing by at least a factor of two. The ion chamber array is designed to have a constant detection efficiency for varying angles of X-ray incidence. A detailed description of the detector construction and suggested gaseous fillings are given. It is claimed that the present tomographic system allows fast and accurate imaging of internal body organs and is insensitive to the blurring effects which motion of these organs tends to produce. (UK)

  9. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the crystalline quality through full-width at half-maximum values. .... angular divergence of ∆α = 12 arc sec. X-rays generated from the monochromator were diffracted from (0 0 6) LiNbO3 atomic planes with the (+, −, −, +, +) geometry. [8].

  10. X-ray microscopy of human malaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magowan, C.; Brown, J.T.; Mohandas, N.; Meyer-Ilse, W. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Associations between intracellular organisms and host cells are complex and particularly difficult to examine. X-ray microscopy provides transmission images of subcellular structures in intact cells at resolutions superior to available methodologies. The spatial resolution is 50-60nm with a 1 micron depth of focus, superior to anything achievable with light microscopy. Image contrast is generated by differences in photoelectric absorption by the atoms in different areas (i.e. subcellular structures) throughout the full thickness of the sample. Absorption due to carbon dominates among all the elements in the sample at 2.4 nm x-ray wavelength. Thus images show features or structures, in a way not usually seen by other types of microscopy. The authors used soft x-ray microscopy to investigate structural development of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in normal and genetically abnormal erythrocytes, and in infected erythrocytes treated with compounds that have anti-malarial effects. X-ray microscopy showed newly elaborated structures in the cytosol of unstained, intact erythrocytes, redistribution of mass (carbon) in infected erythrocytes, and aberrant parasite morphology. Better understanding of the process of intracellular parasite maturation and the interactions between the parasite and its host erythrocyte can help define new approaches to the control of this deadly disease.

  11. X-ray microscopy of human malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magowan, C.; Brown, J.T.; Mohandas, N.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-01-01

    Associations between intracellular organisms and host cells are complex and particularly difficult to examine. X-ray microscopy provides transmission images of subcellular structures in intact cells at resolutions superior to available methodologies. The spatial resolution is 50-60nm with a 1 micron depth of focus, superior to anything achievable with light microscopy. Image contrast is generated by differences in photoelectric absorption by the atoms in different areas (i.e. subcellular structures) throughout the full thickness of the sample. Absorption due to carbon dominates among all the elements in the sample at 2.4 nm x-ray wavelength. Thus images show features or structures, in a way not usually seen by other types of microscopy. The authors used soft x-ray microscopy to investigate structural development of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in normal and genetically abnormal erythrocytes, and in infected erythrocytes treated with compounds that have anti-malarial effects. X-ray microscopy showed newly elaborated structures in the cytosol of unstained, intact erythrocytes, redistribution of mass (carbon) in infected erythrocytes, and aberrant parasite morphology. Better understanding of the process of intracellular parasite maturation and the interactions between the parasite and its host erythrocyte can help define new approaches to the control of this deadly disease

  12. Strong interaction effects in hadronic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    The WKB method is applied to the calculation of strong interaction-induced level widths and shifts of hadronic atoms. The calculation, while elementary enough for undergraduate quantum mechanics students, gives a good account of kaonic and antiprotonic atom data

  13. X-ray diagnostics for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Goeler, S.; Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.

    1982-12-01

    A short description of the x-ray diagnostic preparation for the TFTR tokamak is given. The x-ray equipment consists of the limiter x-ray monitoring system, the soft x-ray pulse-height-analysis-system, the soft x-ray imaging system and the x-ray crystal spectrometer. Particular attention is given to the radiation protection of the x-ray systems from the neutron environment

  14. X-ray filter for chest X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferlic, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    A description is given of an X-ray filter comprised of a sheet of radiation absorbing material with an opening corresponding to the spine and central portion of the heart. The upper portion of the filter exhibits a relatively narrow opening which becomes gradually wider toward the lower portion of the filter. This filter will permit an acceptable density level of x-ray exposure for the lungs while allowing a higher level of x-ray exposure for the mediastinum areas of the body. (author)

  15. X-ray filter for chest x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferlic, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    Filter for use in medical x-ray apparatus to permit higher intensity x-ray exposure in the heart and mediastinum area while maintaining a normal level of x-ray exposure in other areas of the body, particlarly in the lung area. The filter comprises a sheet of radiation absorbing material having an opening therein, said opening corresponding to the spine and central portion of the heart. Accordingly, the upper portion of the filter exhibits a relatively narrow opening which becomes gradually wider toward the lower portion of the filter

  16. Nature of isomerism of solid isothiourea salts, inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases, as studied by 1H-14N nuclear quadrupole double resonance, X-ray, and density functional theory/quantum theory of atoms in molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latosińska, J N; Latosińska, M; Seliger, J; Žagar, V; Maurin, J K; Kazimierczuk, Z

    2012-02-09

    Isothioureas, inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases, have been studied experimentally in solid state by nuclear quadrupole double resonance (NQDR) and X-ray methods and theoretically by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules/density functional theory. Resonance frequencies on (14)N have been detected and assigned to particular nitrogen sites in each molecule. The crystal packings of (S)-3,4-dichlorobenzyl-N-methylisothiouronium chloride with the disordered chlorine positions in benzene ring and (S)-butyloisothiouronium bromide have been resolved in X-ray diffraction studies. (14)N NQDR spectra have been found good indicators of isomer type and strength of intra- or intermolecular N-H···X (X = Cl, Br) interactions. From among all salts studied, only for (S)-2,3,4,5,6-pentabromobenzylisothiouronium chloride are both nitrogen sites equivalent, which has been explained by the slow exchange. This unique structural feature can be a key factor in the high biological activity of (S)-2,3,4,5,6-pentabromobenzylisothiouronium salts.

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies to near-atomic resolution of dihydrodipicolinate synthase from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, Benjamin R.; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Dogovski, Con; Jameson, Geoffrey B.; Parker, Michael W.; Perugini, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS), an enzyme of the lysine-biosynthetic pathway, is a promising target for antibiotic development against pathogenic bacteria. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis to 1.45 Å resolution of DHDPS from methicillin-resistant S. aureus is reported. In recent years, dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS; EC 4.2.1.52) has received considerable attention from both mechanistic and structural viewpoints. DHDPS is part of the diaminopimelate pathway leading to lysine, coupling (S)-aspartate-β-semialdehyde with pyruvate via a Schiff base to a conserved active-site lysine. In this paper, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of DHDPS from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, an important bacterial pathogen, are reported. The enzyme was crystallized in a number of forms, predominantly from PEG precipitants, with the best crystal diffracting to beyond 1.45 Å resolution. The space group was P1 and the unit-cell parameters were a = 65.4, b = 67.6, c = 78.0 Å, α = 90.1, β = 68.9, γ = 72.3°. The crystal volume per protein weight (V M ) was 2.34 Å 3 Da −1 , with an estimated solvent content of 47% for four monomers per asymmetric unit. The structure of the enzyme will help to guide the design of novel therapeutics against the methicillin-resistant S. aureus pathogen

  18. Advances in X-ray spectroscopy contributions in honour of professor Y. Cauchois

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnelle, C

    1982-01-01

    Advances in X-Ray Spectroscopy covers topics relevant to the advancement of X-ray spectroscopy technology. The book is a collection of papers written by specialists in X-ray spectroscopy and pays tribute to the scientific work of Prof. Yvette Cauchois. The text is organized into four parts. Part I covers the analysis of X-ray transitions between atomic levels and relativistic theories of X-ray emission satellites and electron BremsStrahlung. Part II reviews the means provided by X-ray spectroscopy for the determination of the electronic structure of solids, while Part III discusses methods of

  19. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons

  20. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons.

  1. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  2. Scattering of x rays from low-Z materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaines, J.L.; Kissel, L.D.; Catron, H.C.; Hansen, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    X rays incident on thin beryllium, boron, carbon, and other low-Z materials undergo both elastic and inelastic scattering as well as diffraction from the crystalline or crystalline-like structure of the material. Unpolarized monoenergetic x rays in the 1.5 to 8.0-keV energy range were used to determine the absolute scattering efficiency of thin beryllium, carbon, and boron foils. These measurements are compared to calculated scattering efficiencies predicted by single-atom theories. In addition, the relative scattering efficiency versus x-ray energy was measured for other low-Z foils using unpolarized bremsstrahlung x rays. In all the low-Z foils examined, we observed Bragg-like x-ray diffraction due to the ordered structure of the materials

  3. X-ray scatter data for diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, C.E.; Soares, C.G.; Motz, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The ratio of the scattered to the total X-ray fluence (scatter fraction) at the centre of the image plane for X-rays transmitted through polystyrene phantoms has been measured for X-ray energies of 32 and 69 keV, X-ray beam diameters from 4 to 40 cm, phantom thicknesses from 5 to 30 cm and phantom-to-image-plane separations from 0.3 to 40 cm. The experimental values for this ratio have less than a 10% variation for these two X-ray energies and the experimental data show good agreement with Monte Carlo calculations and available experimental results for low atomic number materials. Based on these results, simple curves are generated which give estimates (+ - 10%) of the scatter fraction for all combinations of the geometric parameters encountered in diagnostic radiology. (author)

  4. X-ray film calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, G.F.; Dittmore, C.H.; Henke, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of silver halide x-ray films for imaging and spectroscopy which is limited by the range of intensities that can be recorded and densitometered. Using the manufacturers processing techniques can result in 10 2-3 range in intensity recorded over 0-5 density range. By modifying the chemistry and processing times, ranges of 10 5-6 can be recorded in the same density range. The authors report on x-ray film calibration work and dynamic range improvements. Changes to the processing chemistry and the resulting changes in dynamic range and x-ray sensitivity are discussed

  5. Women and x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkley, P A; Stewart, J H

    1976-01-01

    When a woman comes to an X-Ray Department it is usually necessary to know the present stage of her menstrual cycle. X-Rays may have an adverse effect on the embryo, especially in early pregnancy. However, exposure to X-Rays at any stage may be associated with a slightly increased incidence of malignant disease in childhood. The International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends that in women of child-bearing age (in some cases as young as 11 years), non-urgent diagnostic radiography be confined to the preovulatory phase of the menstrual cycle: that is, 14 days following the first day of the last menstrual period.

  6. Inference on carbon atom arrangement in the turbostatic graphene layers in Tikak coal (India) by X-ray pair distribution function analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikia, Binoy K. [Indian Oil Corporation Ltd., West Bengal (India)

    2010-07-01

    This paper communicates the distribution of carbon atoms in a single poly-cyclic aromatic (PCA) layer (graphene) in Tikak coal from Assam, India. The pair distribution function (PDF) analysis performed indicates no evidence of any graphite like structure in this coal. The aromatic fraction is observed to be 74%; with the aliphatic fraction correspondingly estimated to be 26% in this coal. The average carbon atom has 2.5 nearest carbon atom neighbours at an average bond distance of 1.50{angstrom}. The average stacking height of the parallel aromatic layers (Lc) and the average diameter of the aromatic layers (La) are estimated to be 9.86 {angstrom} and 4.80 {angstrom} respectively. For this coal, the average number of stacking layers and the average number of atoms per layer are estimated to be four and eight respectively. In addition, the gamma band is observed at a d-value of 4.34{angstrom}. The comparison of the atom-pair correlation function to simulated one-dimensional structure function calculated for a model compound benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) also indicates that C{sub 6} unit is the major components in this coal. The average carbon atom has at least one and one nearest aryl and alkyl C-C atom pairs separated by 1.39 and 1.54{angstrom} respectively.

  7. Synchrotron x-ray sources and new opportunities in the soil and environmental sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, D.; Anderson, S.; Mattigod, S.

    1990-07-01

    This report contains the following papers: characteristics of the advanced photon source and comparison with existing synchrotron facilities; x-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES -- A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials; applications of x-ray spectroscopy and anomalous scattering experiments in the soil and environmental sciences; X-ray fluorescence microprobe and microtomography

  8. L X-ray energy shifts and intensity ratios in tantalum with C and N ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    charged particles. Study of atomic ... authors [1–10] have observed that the X-ray energy shifts in heavy ion collision process are relative to the ... and observed the L X-ray energy shifts of different L X-ray components in some high Z elements.

  9. Upsurge of X-ray astronomy 230-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudec, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    Instruments are described used for X-ray astronomy, namely X-ray detectors and X-ray telescopes. Unlike telescopes, the detectors do not comprise X-ray optics. A survey is given of the results obtained in solar and stellar X-ray astronomy and hypotheses are submitted on the origin of X radiation in the interstellar space. (J.B.)

  10. Atomic substitution effects on the structural and vibrational properties of Ni{sub x}Pb{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3}: X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, R. C. da [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Física, São Carlos-SP, 13565-905 (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Pombal-PB, 58840-000 (Brazil); Toledo, T. A. de; Pizani, P. S., E-mail: pizani@df.ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Física, São Carlos-SP, 13565-905 (Brazil); Espinosa, J. W. M. [Universidade Federal de Goiás, Engenharia de Produção, Catalão-GO, 75704-020 (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    The effects of the atomic substitution of Pb by Ni in the PbTiO{sub 3} ferroelectric perovskite on the vibrational and structural properties was studied using x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering. It was observed that for Ni concentrations between 0.0 and 0.4, there is the formation of a solid solution with reduction of the Raman wavenumber of the E(TO1) soft mode and the tetragonallity factor, which influence directly the temperature of the tetragonal ferroelectric to cubic paraelectric phase transition, the Curie temperature. For concentrations greater than 0.4, it is observed the formation of a PbTiO{sub 3} and NiTiO{sub 3} composite, denounced by the recovering of the both, tetragonallity factor and the E(TO1) soft mode wavenumber. The values of the Curie temperatures were estimated by the Raman scattering measurements for temperatures ranging from 300 to 950 K.

  11. Radiometric dating and quantitative analysis of elements in depth profiles of sediments by means of nuclear physical as well as X-ray fluorescence and atomic emission spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenburg, M.

    1987-01-01

    The measurement of heavy metal concentration in sediments is of great importance for the assessment of water quality. If dating of the different layers of sediment cores is possible, informations about the history of pollution can be inferred. This paper describes the development and practical test of a procedure suitable for the investigation of sediment cores. Both the element analysis and the dating are based on physical methods. For element concentration determination inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP), total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) are used. The techniques are described and compared. For dating radiometric measurements of 210 Pb and 137 Cs are carried out with a coaxial well-type germanium γ-ray detector in a special low-level arrangement. Results of the systematic investigations are presented and a few individual depth profiles are discussed. (orig.) With 34 figs., 20 tabs [de

  12. X-ray absorption edges and E.X.A.F.S.: application to the study of electronic and atomic structures of titanium and vanadium carbides TiC(1-x) and VC(1-x)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moisy-Maurice, Virginie.

    1980-09-01

    This text presents a systematic study of the X-ray absorption fine structures evolution, at the K edge of titanium, with vacancy concentration in TiC(1-x). The absorption edges are situated in the 50 eV following the coefficient discontinuity: from the evaluation of their general aspect, it is deduced that the positive charge of titanium atoms decreases when vacancy concentration increases in TiC(1-x). This allowed us to determine the best band structure calculation model. The interpretation of EXAFS spectra (modulation of the absorption coefficient until 1500 eV above the edge) gives indications about the local atomic structure. Here, the contraction of the average titanium-carbon interatomic distances compared to the distances between crystallographic sites is of the order of the experimental resolution 0.02 A for Ti C(0.8). The study of the damping of the spectra in terms of Debye-Waller factors gave an evaluation of the relative static atomic mean square displacements between first neighbours. Last, it has been established that the disordering of vacancies in the order-disorder transition of V 8 C 7 is an atomic scale phenomenon [fr

  13. Distribution of solute atoms in β- and spinel Si6-zAlzOzN8-z by Al K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Yoshioka, Satoru; Tanaka, Isao; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Suga, Takeo; Sekine, Toshimori

    2005-01-01

    Local environments of solutes in β- and spinel Si 6-z Al z O z N 8-z are investigated by means of Al K x-ray absorption near-edge structure. The experimental spectra are found to be the same throughout the wide solubility range. This suggests that the local environments of Al are independent of the solute concentration. First-principles band-structure calculations are systematically made to interpret the experimental spectra. Effect of a core hole was included into the calculation. Theoretical spectra were obtained using variety of different model structures constructed by a set of plane-wave pseudopotentials calculations in our previous study [K. Tatsumi, I. Tanaka, H. Adachi, and M. Yoshiya, Phys. Rev. B 66, 165210 (2002)]. The numbers of models were 51 and 45 for both β and spinel, respectively. They are classified and averaged according to the local atomic structure of Al solutes. The combination of experimental spectra and theoretical results can unambiguously lead to the conclusion that Al atoms are preferentially coordinated by O atoms in both β and spinel phases. This is consistent with the conclusion obtained by the first-principles total-energy calculations. In the spinel phase, Al atoms are found to be located preferentially at the octahedral cationic site. This agrees with the conclusion in a recent report on the nuclear magnetic resonance experiment

  14. Photoelectric atomic absorption cross sections for elements Z = 6 to 54 in the medium energy X-ray range (5 to 25 keV). Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, G.; Stephenson, J.D.; Wagenfeld, H.

    1975-01-01

    Photoelectric atomic absorption cross sections have been calculated by means of hydrogen-like eigenfunctions for the atomic K, L, M and N sub-shells of the elements Z = 6 to 54, using revised screening constants and an extension of the theory. The absorption cross sections have been further separated into dipole and quadrupole components so that the numerical data can also be applied to the Borrmann effect. (orig.) [de

  15. Quantum effets in nonresonant X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowik, Jan Malte

    2015-11-15

    Due to their versatile properties, X rays are a unique tool to investigate the structure and dynamics of matter. X-ray scattering is the fundamental principle of many imaging techniques. Examples are X-ray crystallography, which recently celebrated one hundred years and is currently the leading method in structure determination of proteins, as well as X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI), which is an imaging technique with countless applications in biology, medicine, etc. The technological development of X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) has brought X-ray imaging at the edge of a new scientific revolution. XFELs offer ultrashort X-ray pulses with unprecedented high X-ray fluence and excellent spatial coherence properties. These properties make them an outstanding radiation source for X-ray scattering experiments, providing ultrafast temporal resolution as well as atomic spatial resolution. However, the radiation-matter interaction in XFEL experiments also advances into a novel regime. This demands a sound theoretical fundament to describe and explore the new experimental possibilities. This dissertation is dedicated to the theoretical study of nonresonant X-ray scattering. As the first topic, I consider the near-field imaging by propagation based X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI). I devise a novel theory of PCI, in which radiation and matter are quantized. Remarkably, the crucial interference term automatically excludes contributions from inelastic scattering. This explains the success of the classical description thus far. The second topic of the thesis is the X-ray imaging of coherent electronic motion, where quantum effects become particularly apparent. The electron density of coherent electronic wave packets - important in charge transfer and bond breaking - varies in time, typically on femto- or attosecond time scales. In the near future, XFELs are envisaged to provide attosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility for time-resolved ultrafast X-ray scattering

  16. Quantum effets in nonresonant X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slowik, Jan Malte

    2015-11-01

    Due to their versatile properties, X rays are a unique tool to investigate the structure and dynamics of matter. X-ray scattering is the fundamental principle of many imaging techniques. Examples are X-ray crystallography, which recently celebrated one hundred years and is currently the leading method in structure determination of proteins, as well as X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI), which is an imaging technique with countless applications in biology, medicine, etc. The technological development of X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) has brought X-ray imaging at the edge of a new scientific revolution. XFELs offer ultrashort X-ray pulses with unprecedented high X-ray fluence and excellent spatial coherence properties. These properties make them an outstanding radiation source for X-ray scattering experiments, providing ultrafast temporal resolution as well as atomic spatial resolution. However, the radiation-matter interaction in XFEL experiments also advances into a novel regime. This demands a sound theoretical fundament to describe and explore the new experimental possibilities. This dissertation is dedicated to the theoretical study of nonresonant X-ray scattering. As the first topic, I consider the near-field imaging by propagation based X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI). I devise a novel theory of PCI, in which radiation and matter are quantized. Remarkably, the crucial interference term automatically excludes contributions from inelastic scattering. This explains the success of the classical description thus far. The second topic of the thesis is the X-ray imaging of coherent electronic motion, where quantum effects become particularly apparent. The electron density of coherent electronic wave packets - important in charge transfer and bond breaking - varies in time, typically on femto- or attosecond time scales. In the near future, XFELs are envisaged to provide attosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility for time-resolved ultrafast X-ray scattering

  17. Band alignment of atomic layer deposited MgO/Zn{sub 0.8}Al{sub 0.2}O heterointerface determined by charge corrected X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Baojun, E-mail: yanbj@ihep.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Institute of High Energy Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing P. O. Box 100049 (China); Liu, Shulin [State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Institute of High Energy Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing P. O. Box 100049 (China); Yang, Yuzhen [State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Institute of High Energy Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing P. O. Box 100049 (China); Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing P. O. Box 210093 (China); Heng, Yuekun [State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics, Institute of High Energy Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing P. O. Box 100049 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Band alignment of MgO/Zn{sub 0.8}Al{sub 0.2}O heterojunction were investigated systematically using charge corrected X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. • Differential charging phenomenon is observed in determination VBOs of insulator/semiconductor heterojunction. • Valence and conduction band offsets have been determined to be 0.72 ± 0.11 eV and 3.26 ± 0.11 eV, respectively, with a type-II band line-up. - Abstract: Pure magnesium (MgO) and zinc oxide doped with aluminum oxide (Zn{sub 0.8}Al{sub 0.2}O) were prepared via atomic layer deposition. We have studied the structure and band gap of bulk Zn{sub 0.8}Al{sub 0.2}O material by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Tauc method, and the band offsets and alignment of atomic layer deposited MgO/Zn{sub 0.8}Al{sub 0.2}O heterointerface were investigated systematically using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in this study. Different methodologies, such as neutralizing electron gun, the use of C 1s peak recalibration and zero charging method, were applied to recover the actual position of the core levels in insulator materials which were easily influenced by differential charging phenomena. Schematic band alignment diagram, valence band offset (ΔE{sub V}) and conduction band offset (ΔE{sub C}) for the interface of the MgO/Zn{sub 0.8}Al{sub 0.2}O heterostructure have been constructed. An accurate value of ΔE{sub V} = 0.72 ± 0.11 eV was obtained from various combinations of core levels of heterojunction with varied MgO thickness. Given the experimental band gaps of 7.83 eV for MgO and 5.29 eV for Zn{sub 0.8}Al{sub 0.2}O, a type-II heterojunction with a ΔE{sub C} of 3.26 ± 0.11 eV was found. Band offsets and alignment studies of these heterojunctions are important for gaining deep consideration to the design of various optoelectronic devices based on such heterointerface.

  18. Band Offset Measurements in Atomic-Layer-Deposited Al2O3/Zn0.8Al0.2O Heterojunction Studied by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Baojun; Liu, Shulin; Heng, Yuekun; Yang, Yuzhen; Yu, Yang; Wen, Kaile

    2017-12-01

    Pure aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) and zinc aluminum oxide (Zn x Al 1-x O) thin films were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The microstructure and optical band gaps (E g ) of the Zn x Al 1-x O (0.2 ≤ x ≤ 1) films were studied by X-ray diffractometer and Tauc method. The band offsets and alignment of atomic-layer-deposited Al 2 O 3 /Zn 0.8 Al 0.2 O heterojunction were investigated in detail using charge-corrected X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In this work, different methodologies were adopted to recover the actual position of the core levels in insulator materials which were easily affected by differential charging phenomena. Valence band offset (ΔE V ) and conduction band offset (ΔE C ) for the interface of the Al 2 O 3 /Zn 0.8 Al 0.2 O heterojunction have been constructed. An accurate value of ΔE V  = 0.82 ± 0.12 eV was obtained from various combinations of core levels of heterojunction with varied Al 2 O 3 thickness. Given the experimental E g of 6.8 eV for Al 2 O 3 and 5.29 eV for Zn 0.8 Al 0.2 O, a type-I heterojunction with a ΔE C of 0.69 ± 0.12 eV was found. The precise determination of the band alignment of Al 2 O 3 /Zn 0.8 Al 0.2 O heterojunction is of particular importance for gaining insight to the design of various electronic devices based on such heterointerface.

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is taken ... and/or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... is repeated. Two or three images (from different angles) will typically be taken. An x-ray may ... RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical questions or for ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... no special preparation. Tell your doctor and the technologist if there is any possibility you are pregnant. ... should always inform their physician and x-ray technologist if there is any possibility that they are ...

  2. X-ray guided biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova, R.; Lezana, A.H.; Pedrosa, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is now a routine procedure in many X-ray Departments. This paper presents the authors' experience with this technique in chest, abdominal and skeletal lesions. (Auth.)

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of ... exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, infection, arthritis , abnormal bone growths and bony changes seen in ... injuries, including fractures, and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely ...

  5. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic dental radiography is described in detail. It comprises an electron gun having an elongated tubular target carrier extending into the patient's mouth. The carrier supports an inclined target for direction of an X-ray pattern towards a film positioned externally of the patient's mouth. Image definition is improved by a focusing anode which focuses the electron beam into a sharp spot (0.05 to 0.10 mm diameter) on the target. The potential on the focusing anode is adjustable to vary the size of the spot. An X-ray transmitting ceramic (oxides of Be, Al and Si) window is positioned adjacent to the front face of the target. The electron beam can be magnetically deflected to change the X-ray beam direction. (author)

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... procedure varies. See the Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their ...

  7. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... technologist, an individual specially trained to perform radiology examinations, positions the patient on the x-ray table ... bone is forming), for comparison purposes. When the examination is complete, you may be asked to wait ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more of the x-rays ... taken of the unaffected limb, or of a child's growth plate (where new bone is forming), for ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more of the x-rays ... information you were looking for? Yes No Please type your comment or suggestion into the following text ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... a large photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ... and places the x-ray film holder or digital recording plate under the table in the area ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... in metabolic conditions. assist in the detection and diagnosis of bone cancer . locate foreign objects in soft ... frequently compared to current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... of any bone in the body, including the hand, wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg ( ... Image Gallery Radiological technologist preparing to take an arm x-ray on a ... Images related ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... care is taken during x-ray examinations to use the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that ... radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different parts of the body absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. Dense ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray machine is a compact apparatus that can be taken to the patient in a hospital ... so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? A bone x-ray examination itself ... available in emergency rooms, physician offices, ambulatory care centers, nursing homes and other locations, making it convenient ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician , who ... Medicine Radiation Safety How to Read Your Radiology Report Images related to X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Sponsored ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... to produce pictures of any bone in the body. It is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones ... x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... to X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... the baby. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page ... procedure varies. See the Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... and fracture reductions. look for injury, infection, arthritis , abnormal bone growths and bony changes seen in metabolic ... to current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... imaged. When necessary, sandbags, pillows or other positioning devices will be used to help you maintain the ... here Images × Image Gallery Radiological technologist preparing to take an arm x-ray on a patient. View ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... foot. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A bone x-ray is ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ... taken of the unaffected limb, or of a child's growth plate (where new bone is forming), for ...

  10. Flash x-ray cinematography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, W.E.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments intended to provide an overview of the potential capabilities and limitations of flash x-ray cinematography as a diagnostic technique for a Fast Reactor Safety Test Facility are described. The results provide estimates of the x-ray pulse intensity required to obtain adequate radiographs of an array of fuel pins in a typical reactor configuration. An estimate of the upper limit on the pulse duration imposed by the reactor background radiation was also determined. X-ray cinematography has been demonstrated at a repetition rate limited only by the recording equipment on hand at the time of these measurements. These preliminary results indicate that flash x-ray cinematography of the motion of fuel in a Fast Reactor Test Facility is technically feasible

  11. X-ray screening materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardley, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to x-ray screening materials and especially to materials in sheet form for use in the production of, for example, protective clothing such as aprons and lower back shields, curtains, mobile screens and suspended shields. The invention is based on the observation that x-ray screening materials in sheet form having greater flexiblity than the hitherto known x-ray screening materials of the same x-ray absorber content can be produced if, instead of using a single sheet of filled sheet material of increased thickness, one uses a plurality of sheets of lesser thickness together forming a laminar material of the desired thickness and one bonds the individual sheets together at their edges and, optionally, at other spaced apart points away from the edges thereby allowing one sheet to move relative to another. (U.K.)

  12. X-ray luminescent glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Yamada, O.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray luminescent glasses comprising a divalent cation such as an alkaline earth metal or other divalent cations such as pb, cd, or zn, and certain rare earth metaphosphates are suitable as vitreous, x-ray phosphors or x-ray luminescent glass fibers in an x-ray intensifying screen. The glasses have the composition n(Mo X p2o5)((1-y)tb2o3 X yce2o3 X 3p2o5) wherein N is greater than zero but less than or equal to 16, M is an alkaline earth metal or other divalent cation such as pb, cd, or zn, and Y is greater than or equal to zero but less than one

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray uses a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of any bone in the ... of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over ...

  15. Miniature x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  16. Duodenal X-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheppach, W.

    1982-01-01

    The publication provides an overview of duodenal X-ray diagnostics with the aid of barium meals in 1362 patients. The introducing paragraphs deal with the topographic anatomy of the region and the methodics of X-ray investigation. The chapter entitled ''processes at the duodenum itself'' describes mainly ulcers, diverticula, congenital anomalies, tumors and inflammations. The neighbourhood processes comprise in the first place diseases having their origin at the pancreas and bile ducts. As a conclusion, endoscopic rectograde cholangio-pancreaticography and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography are pointed out as advanced X-ray investigation methods. In the annex of X-ray images some of the described phenomena are shown in exemplary manner. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, ... CT Exams Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety How to Read Your Radiology ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone x-ray makes images of any ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small ... the table in the area of the body being imaged. When necessary, sandbags, pillows or other positioning ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

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    Full Text Available ... ray examination. X-rays usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. ... minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. ... appliances, eye glasses and any metal objects or clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. ...

  4. Magnetic x-ray microdiffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Paul G [Computer-Aided Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Isaacs, Eric D [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2006-08-07

    Magnetic x-ray microdiffraction uses the structural specificity of x-ray diffraction to probe complex magnetic structures at the length scales relevant to physical phenomena including domain dynamics and phase transitions. Conventional magnetic crystallography techniques such as neutron or x-ray diffraction lack this spatial resolution. The combination of both reciprocal space and real space resolution with a rich magnetic cross section allows new microscopy techniques to be developed and applied to magnetism at the scale of single domains. Potential applications include a wide range of magnetic problems in nanomagnetism, the interaction of strain, polarization and magnetization in complex oxides and spatially resolved studies of magnetic phase transitions. We present the physical basis for x-ray microdiffraction and magnetic scattering processes, review microdiffraction domain imaging techniques in antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic materials and discuss potential directions for studies. (topical review)

  5. High Brightness, Laser-Driven X-ray Source for Nanoscale Metrology and Femtosecond Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siders, C W; Crane, J K; Semenov, V; Betts, S; Kozioziemski, B; Wharton, K; Wilks, S; Barbee, T; Stuart, B; Kim, D E; An, J; Barty, C

    2007-02-26

    This project developed and demonstrated a new, bright, ultrafast x-ray source based upon laser-driven K-alpha generation, which can produce an x-ray flux 10 to 100 times greater than current microfocus x-ray tubes. The short-pulse (sub-picosecond) duration of this x-ray source also makes it ideal for observing time-resolved dynamics of atomic motion in solids and thin films.

  6. X-ray Compton line scan tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupsch, Andreas; Lange, Axel; Jaenisch, Gerd-Ruediger [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany). Fachgruppe 8.5 - Mikro-ZfP; Hentschel, Manfred P. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany); Kardjilov, Nikolay; Markoetter, Henning; Hilger, Andre; Manke, Ingo [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) (Germany); Toetzke, Christian [Potsdam Univ. (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The potentials of incoherent X-ray scattering (Compton) computed tomography (CT) are investigated. The imaging of materials of very different atomic number or density at once is generally a perpetual challenge for X-ray tomography or radiography. In a basic laboratory set-up for simultaneous perpendicular Compton scattering and direct beam attenuation tomography are conducted by single channel photon counting line scans. This results in asymmetric distortions of the projection profiles of the scattering CT data set. In a first approach, corrections of Compton scattering data by taking advantage of rotational symmetry yield tomograms without major geometric artefacts. A cylindrical sample composed of PE, PA, PVC, glass and wood demonstrates similar Compton contrast for all the substances, while the conventional absorption tomogram only reveals the two high order materials. Comparison to neutron tomography reveals astonishing similarities except for the glass component (without hydrogen). Therefore, Compton CT offers the potential to replace neutron tomography, which requires much more efforts.

  7. Electromechanical x-ray generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Scott A; Platts, David; Sorensen, Eric B

    2016-05-03

    An electro-mechanical x-ray generator configured to obtain high-energy operation with favorable energy-weight scaling. The electro-mechanical x-ray generator may include a pair of capacitor plates. The capacitor plates may be charged to a predefined voltage and may be separated to generate higher voltages on the order of hundreds of kV in the AK gap. The high voltage may be generated in a vacuum tube.

  8. Accelerator x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This first book to cover in-depth the generation of x-rays in particle accelerators focuses on electron beams produced by means of the novel Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) technology. The resulting highly brilliant x-rays are at the centre of this monograph, which continues where other books on the market stop. Written primarily for general, high energy and radiation physicists, the systematic treatment adopted by the work makes it equally suitable as an advanced textbook for young researchers.

  9. X-ray tube target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    A target with an improved heat emissive surface for use in a rotating anode type x-ray tube is described. The target consists of a body having a first surface portion made of x-ray emissive material and a second surface portion made of a heat emissive material comprising at least one of hafnium boride, hafnium oxide, hafnium nitride, hafnium silicide, and hafnium aluminide. (U.K.)

  10. X-ray data processing

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Harold R.

    2017-01-01

    The method of molecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography is a little over a century old. The history is described briefly, along with developments in X-ray sources and detectors. The fundamental processes involved in measuring diffraction patterns on area detectors, i.e. autoindexing, refining crystal and detector parameters, integrating the reflections themselves and putting the resultant measurements on to a common scale are discussed, with particular reference to the most c...

  11. Polarized X-ray excitation for scatter reduction in X-ray fluorescence computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernekohl, Don; Tzoumas, Stratis; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Lei

    2018-05-25

    X-ray fluorescence computer tomography (XFCT) is a new molecular imaging modality which uses X-ray excitation to stimulate the emission of fluorescent photons in high atomic number contrast agents. Scatter contamination is one of the main challenges in XFCT imaging which limits the molecular sensitivity. When polarized X-rays are used, it is possible to reduce the scatter contamination significantly by placing detectors perpendicular to the polarization direction. This study quantifies scatter contamination for polarized and unpolarized X-ray excitation and determines the advantages of scatter reduction. The amount of scatter in preclinical XFCT is quantified in Monte Carlo simulations. The fluorescent X-rays are emitted isotropically, while scattered X-rays propagate in polarization direction. The magnitude of scatter contamination is studied in XFCT simulations of a mouse phantom. In this study, the contrast agent gold is examined as an example but a scatter reduction from polarized excitation is also expected for other elements. The scatter reduction capability is examined for different polarization intensities with a monoenergetic X-ray excitation energy of 82 keV. The study evaluates two different geometrical shapes of CZT detectors which are modeled with an energy resolution of 1 keV FWHM at an X-ray energy of 80 keV. Benefits of a detector placement perpendicular to the polarization direction are shown in iterative and analytic image reconstruction including scatter correction. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and the normalized mean square error (NMSE) are analyzed and compared for the reconstructed images. A substantial scatter reduction for common detector sizes was achieved for 100% and 80% linear polarization while lower polarization intensities provide a decreased scatter reduction. By placing the detector perpendicular to the polarization direction, a scatter reduction by factor up to 5.5 can be achieved for common detector sizes. The image

  12. Low energy (soft) x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Masaharu; Antoku, Shigetoshi; Russell, W.J.; Miller, R.C.; Nakamura, Nori; Mizuno, Masayoshi; Nishio, Shoji.

    1987-05-01

    Dosimetry of low-energy (soft) X rays produced by the SOFTEX Model CMBW-2 was performed using Nuclear Associates Type 30 - 330 PTW, Exradin Type A2, and Shonka-Wyckoff ionization chambers with a Keithley Model 602 electrometer. Thermoluminescent (BeO chip) dosimeters were used with a Harshaw Detector 2000-A and Picoammeter-B readout system. Beam quality measurements were made using aluminum absorbers; exposure rates were assessed by the current of the X-ray tube and by exposure times. Dose distributions were established, and the average factors for non-uniformity were calculated. The means of obtaining accurate absorbed and exposed doses using these methods are discussed. Survival of V79 cells was assessed by irradiating them with soft X rays, 200 kVp X rays, and 60 Co gamma rays. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for soft X rays with 0, 0.2, 0.7 mm added thicknesses of aluminum were 1.6, which were compared to 60 Co. The RBE of 200 kVp X rays relative to 60 Co was 1.3. Results of this study are available for reference in future RERF studies of cell survival. (author)

  13. X-ray electron charge density distribution in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, U.

    1986-01-01

    During the last two years new highly accurate X-ray structure amplitudes for silicon have been published. Also the scattering phases of some 'forbidden' reflections have been determined using the X-ray three-beam case. This allows the construction of most precise valence and difference electron density plots and the comparison with those calculated on the basis of the Aldret-Hart X-ray pendelloesung data or theoretically. The density plots are discussed in details of both, the bond and the atomic site. The contributions of various Fourier components and the influence of different temperature factors on the difference density are studied. (author)

  14. Liquid ammonia: Molecular correlation functions from x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narten, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    For nearly spherical molecules the x-ray scattering from liquids yields structure and correlation functions for molecular centers. The distribution of electron density in an ammonia molecular is very nearly spherical, and orientational correlation between molecules in the liquid is not ''seen'' by x rays. Structure and correlation functions for molecular centers (nitrogen atoms) are derived from x-ray data on liquid NH 3 at 4 degreeC and tabulated. They provide a sensitive test for future work on a molecular theory of liquid ammonia

  15. Soft X-ray spectrographs for solar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in soft X-ray spectrometery are reviewed, with emphasis on techniques for studying the windowless region from roughly 1-100 A. Recent technological developments considered include multilayer mirrors, large-format CCD detectors which are sensitive to X-rays, position-sensitive photon counting detectors, new kinds of X-ray films, and optical systems based on gratings with nonuniform ruling spacings. Improvements in the extent and accuracy of the atomic physics data sets on which the analysis of spectroscopic observatons depend are also discussed.

  16. X-ray spectrometry with synchrotron radiation; Roentgenspektrometrie mit Synchrotronstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Matthias [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Berlin (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Roentgen- und IR-Spektrometrie' ; Gerlach, Martin; Holfelder, Ina; Hoenicke, Philipp; Lubeck, Janin; Nutsch, Andreas; Pollakowski, Beatrix; Streeck, Cornelia; Unterumsberger, Rainer; Weser, Jan; Beckhoff, Burkhard

    2014-12-15

    The X-ray spectrometry of the PTB at the BESSY II storage ring with radiation in the range from 78 eV to 10.5 keV is described. After a description of the instrumentation development reference-sample free X-ray fluorescence analysis, the determination of fundamental atomic parameters, X-ray fluorescence analysis under glance-angle incidence, highly-resolving absorption spectrometry, and emission spectrometry are considered. Finally liquid cells and in-situ measurement techniques are described. (HSI)

  17. Astrophysical extended X-ray absorption fine-structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, J.W.; Forrey, R.C.; Cho, K.; Department of Physics and Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University)

    1997-01-01

    We present an astrophysical extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) analysis (AEA) tool. The AEA tool is designed to generate a numerical model of the modification to the X-ray absorption coefficient due to the EXAFS phenomenon. We have constructed a complete database (elements up to the atomic number 92) of EXAFS parameters: central atom phase shift (2δ 1 ), backscattering phase shift (φ b ), and backscattering amplitude (F). Using the EXAFS parameter data base, the AEA tool can generate a numerical model of any compound when the atomic numbers of neighboring atoms and their distances to the central X-ray-absorbing atom are given. copyright 1997 The American Astronomical Society

  18. Prepulse dependence in hard x-ray generation from microdroplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, M.; Kahaly, S.; Kumar, G. Ravindra; Sandhu, A. S.; Gibbon, P.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2006-01-01

    We report on experiments which show that liquid microdroplets are very efficient in hard x-ray generation. We make a comparative study of hard x-ray emission from 15 μm methanol microdroplets and a plain slab target of similar atomic composition at similar laser intensities. The hard X-ray yield from droplet plasmas is about 35 times more than that obtained from solid plasmas. A prepulse that is about 10ns and at least 2% in intensity of the main pulse is essential for hard x-ray generation from the droplets at about 1015 W cm-2. A hot electron temperature of 36 keV is measured from the droplets at 8 x 1014 W cm-2; three times higher intensity is needed to obtain similar hot electron temperature from solid plasmas that have similar atomic composition. We use 1D-PIC simulation to obtain qualitative correlation to the experimental observations

  19. X-Ray-Scattering Measurements Of Strain In PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebe, Peggy; Lowry, Lynn E.; Chung, Shirley Y.; Yavrouian, Andre H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Internal stress relieved by heating above glass-transition temperature. Report describes wide-angle x-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry of specimens of poly(etheretherketone) having undergone various thermal treatments. Wide-angle x-ray scattering particularly useful in determining distances between atoms, crystallinity, and related microstructurally generated phenomena, as thermal expansion and strain. Calorimetric measurements aid interpretation of scattering measurements by enabling correlation with thermal effects.

  20. X-ray scattering studies of surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, M.K.

    1998-01-01

    Here we shall briefly review the basics and some applications of x-ray specular reflectivity and diffuse scattering techniques. These x-ray scattering techniques are uniquely suited to study of the structure of surfaces and interfaces at atomic resolutions as they are nondestructive and can probe even interfaces which are buried. The study of structure of surfaces and interfaces is not only required in understanding physics in reduced dimensions but is also essential in developing technologically important materials