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Sample records for kaon emission source

  1. Neutrino emissivity under neutral kaon condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, S

    2006-01-01

    Neutrino emissivity from neutron star matter with neutral kaon condensate is considered. It is shown that a new cooling channel is opened, and what is more, all previously known channels acquire the greater emissivity reaching the level of the direct URCA cycle in normal matter.

  2. Neutrino emissivity under neutral kaon condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Kubis, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    Neutrino emissivity from neutron star matter with neutral kaon condensate is considered. It is shown that a new cooling channel is opened, and what is more, all previously known channels acquire the greater emissivity reaching the level of the direct URCA cycle in normal matter.

  3. Kaon interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, Ulrich W; Wiedemann, Urs Achim; Wu Yuang Fang

    1996-01-01

    Two-kaon and two-pion correlation functions for an expanding thermalized source are compared. In the Yano-Koonin-Podgoretskii parametrization of the correlation function, the HBT radius parameters are shown to obey M_\\bot- scaling in the absence of collective transverse flow. This scaling is broken by transverse flow. An accurate comparison of pion and kaon correlations can thus resolve issue whether the observed M_\\bot-dependence of the transverse radius parameter is due to transverse collective flow or other transverse gradients. Effects from resonance decays are shortly discussed.

  4. 2011 NATA - Emissions Sources

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes all emissions sources that were modeled in the 2011 National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA), inlcluding point, nonpoint, and mobile sources, and...

  5. Field emission electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  6. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hora P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the acoustic emission (AE source modeling by means of FEM system COMSOL Multiphysics. The following types of sources are used: the spatially concentrated force and the double forces (dipole. The pulse excitation is studied in both cases. As a material is used steel. The computed displacements are compared with the exact analytical solution of point sources under consideration.

  7. The transverse momentum dependence of charged kaon Bose–Einstein correlations in the SELEX experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Nigmatkulov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the measurement of the one-dimensional charged kaon correlation functions using 600GeV/c Σ−, π− and 540GeV/c p beams from the SELEX (E781 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. K±K± correlation functions are studied for three transverse pair momentum, kT, ranges and parameterized by a Gaussian form. The emission source radii, R, and the correlation strength, λ, are extracted. The analysis shows a decrease of the source radii with increasing kaon transverse pair momentum for all beam types.

  8. The transverse momentum dependence of charged kaon Bose-Einstein correlations in the SELEX experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigmatkulov, G. A.; Ponosov, A. K.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Asratyan, A.; Atamantchouk, A. G.; Ayan, A. S.; Balatz, M. Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N. F.; Cooper, P. S.; Dauwe, L. J.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dersch, U.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Dzyubenko, G. B.; Edelstein, R.; Emediato, L.; Endler, A. M. F.; Engelfried, J.; Eschrich, I.; Escobar, C. O.; Estrada, N.; Evdokimov, A. V.; Filimonov, I. S.; Flores-Castillo, A.; Garcia, F. G.; Giller, I.; Golovtsov, V. L.; Gouffon, P.; Gülmez, E.; Iori, M.; Jun, S. Y.; Kaya, M.; Kilmer, J.; Kim, V. T.; Kochenda, L. M.; Konorov, I.; Kozhevnikov, A. P.; Krivshich, A. G.; Krüger, H.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Kubarovsky, V. P.; Kulyavtsev, A. I.; Kuropatkin, N. P.; Kurshetsov, V. F.; Kushnirenko, A.; Lach, J.; Landsberg, L. G.; Larin, I.; Leikin, E. M.; López-Hinojosa, G.; Lungov, T.; Maleev, V. P.; Mao, D.; Mathew, P.; Mattson, M.; Matveev, V.; McCliment, E.; Moinester, M. A.; Molchanov, V. V.; Morelos, A.; Nemitkin, A. V.; Neoustroev, P. V.; Newsom, C.; Nilov, A. P.; Nurushev, S. B.; Ocherashvili, A.; Onel, Y.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Penzo, A.; Petrenko, S. V.; Procario, M.; Prutskoi, V. A.; Razmyslovich, B. V.; Romanov, D. A.; Rud, V. I.; Russ, J.; Sánchez-López, J. L.; Savchenko, A. A.; Simon, J.; Sinev, G. V.; Sitnikov, A. I.; Smith, V. J.; Srivastava, M.; Steiner, V.; Stepanov, V.; Stutte, L.; Svoiski, M.; Tarasov, V. V.; Terentyev, N. K.; Torres, I.; Uvarov, L. N.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vavilov, D. V.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.; Verebryusov, V. S.; Victorov, V. A.; Vishnyakov, V. E.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vorwalter, K.; You, J.; Zukanovich-Funchal, R.

    2016-02-01

    We report the measurement of the one-dimensional charged kaon correlation functions using 600GeV / cΣ-, π- and 540GeV / cp beams from the SELEX (E781) experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. K±K± correlation functions are studied for three transverse pair momentum, kT, ranges and parameterized by a Gaussian form. The emission source radii, R, and the correlation strength, λ, are extracted. The analysis shows a decrease of the source radii with increasing kaon transverse pair momentum for all beam types.

  9. The transverse momentum dependencies of charged kaon Bose-Einstein correlations in the SELEX experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Nigmatkulov, G A; Akgun, U; Alkhazov, G; Amaro-Reyes, J; Asratyan, A; Atamantchouk, A G; Ayan, A S; Balatz, M Y; Blanco-Covarrubias, A; Bondar, N F; Cooper, P S; Dauwe, L J; Davidenko, G V; Dersch, U; Dolgolenko, A G; Dzyubenko, G B; Edelstein, R; Emediato, L; Endler, A M F; Engelfried, J; Eschrich, I; Escobar, C O; Estrada, N; Evdokimov, A V; Filimonov, I S; Flores-Castillo, A; Garcia, F G; Golovtsov, V L; Gouffon, P; Gülmez, E; Iori, M; Jun, S Y; Kaya, M; Kilmer, J; Kim, V T; Kochenda, L M; Konorov, I; Kozhevnikov, A P; Krivshich, A G; Krüger, H; Kubantsev, M A; Kubarovsky, V P; Kulyavtsev, A I; Kuropatrkin, N P; Kurshetsov, V F; Kushnirenko, A; Lach, J; Landsberg, L G; Larin, I; Leikin, E M; López-Hinojosa, G; Lungov, T; Maleev, V P; Mao, D; Mathew, P; Mattson, M; Matveev, V; McCliment, E; Moinester, M A; Molchanov, V V; Morelos, A; Nemitkin, A V; Neoustroev, P V; Newsom, C; Nilov, A P; Nurushev, S B; Ocherashvili, A; Onel, Y; Ozkorucuklu, S; Penzo, A; Petrenko, S V; Procario, M; Prutskoi, V A; Razmyslovich, B V; Romanov, D A; Rud, V I; Russ, J; Sánchez-López, J L; Savchenko, A A; Simon, J; Sinev, G V; Sitnikov, A I; Smith, V J; Srivastava, M; Steiner, V; Stepanov, V; Stutte, L; Svoiski, M; Tarasov, V V; Terentyev, N K; Torres, I; Uvarov, L N; Vasiliev, A N; Vavilov, D V; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E; Verebryusov, V S; Victorov, V A; Vishnyakov, V E; Vorobyov, A A; Vorwalter, K; You, J; Zukanovich-Funchal, R

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the charged kaon correlation functions $k_T$ dependencies using 600 GeV/$c$ $\\Sigma^-$, $\\pi^-$ and 540 GeV/$c$ $p$ beams from the SELEX (E781) experiment at Tevatron. One-dimentional $K^{ch}K^{ch}$ correlation functions are constructed in three transverse momentum ranges. The emission source parameters $\\lambda$ and $R$ are extracted. The analysis shows a decrease of the source radii with the kaon pair transverse momentum for all beam types

  10. Two-kaon correlations in central Pb + Pb collisions at 158 A GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Sugitate, T; Bøggild, H; Boissevain, J; Christiansen, P H L; Conin, L; Dodd, J; Erazmus, B; Esumi, S; Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Ferenc, D; Franz, A; Gaardhøje, J J; Hansen, A G; Hansen, O; Hardtke, D; van Hecke, H; Holzer, E B; Humanic, T J; Hummel, P; Jacak, B V; Kaimi, K; Kaneta, M; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Leltchouk, M; Ljubicic, A; Lörstad, B; Maeda, N; Martin, L; Medvedev, A; Murray, M; Ohnishi, H; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Piuz, François; Pluta, J; Polychronakos, V; Potekhin, M; Poulard, G; Reichhold, D; Sakaguchi, A; Schmidt-Sørensen, J; Simon-Gillo, J; Sondheim, W; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Willis, W J; Wolf, K; Xu, N; Zachary, D S

    2001-01-01

    Two-particle interferometry of positive kaons is studied in Pb + Pb collisions at mean transverse momenta $\\approx 0.25$ and 0.91 GeV/c. A three-dimensional analysis was applied to the lower $p_T$ data, while a two-dimensional analysis was used for the higher $p_T$ data. We find that the source size parameters are consistent with the $m_T$ scaling curve observed in pion correlation measurements in the same collisions, and that the duration time of kaon emission is consistent with zero within the experimental sensitivity.

  11. Kaons in nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiselberg, H. [NORDITA, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1998-06-01

    The kaon energy in a nuclear medium and its dependence on kaon-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon correlations is discussed. The transition from the Lenz potential at low densities to the Hartree potential at high densities can be calculated analytically by making a Wigner-Seitz cell approximation and employing a square well potential. As the Hartree potential is less attractive than the Lenz one, kaon condensation inside cores of neutron stars appears to be less likely than previously estimated. (orig.)

  12. Exploiting dual otoacoustic emission sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Carolina; Kalluri, Radha

    2015-12-01

    Two distinct processes generate otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Reflection-source emissions, here recorded as stimulus frequency OAEs, are optimally informative at low sound levels and are more sensitive to slight hearing loss; they have been linked to cochlear amplifier gain and tuning. Distortion-source emissions are strongest at moderate-high sound levels and persist despite mild hearing loss; they likely originate in the nonlinear process of hair cell transduction. In this preliminary study, we exploit the unique features of each by generating a combined reflection-distortion OAE profile in normal hearing and hearing-impaired ears. Distortion-product (DP) and stimulus-frequency (SF) OAEs were recorded over a broad range of stimulus levels and frequencies. Individual I/O and transfer functions were generated for both emission types in each ear, and OAE peak strength, compression threshold, and rate of compression were calculated. These combined SFOAE and DPOAE features in normal and hearing-impaired ears may provide a potentially informative and novel index of hearing loss. This is an initial step toward utilizing OAE source in characterizing cochlear function and dysfunction.

  13. Exploiting Dual Otoacoustic Emission Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Carolina; Kalluri, Radha

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct processes generate otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Reflection-source emissions, here recorded as stimulus frequency OAEs, are optimally informative at low sound levels and are more sensitive to slight hearing loss; they have been linked to cochlear amplifier gain and tuning. Distortion-source emissions are strongest at moderate-high sound levels and persist despite mild hearing loss; they likely originate in the nonlinear process of hair cell transduction. In this preliminary study, we exploit the unique features of each by generating a combined reflection-distortion OAE profile in normal hearing and hearing-impaired ears. Distortion-product (DP) and stimulus-frequency (SF) OAEs were recorded over a broad range of stimulus levels and frequencies. Individual I/O and transfer functions were generated for both emission types in each ear, and OAE peak strength, compression threshold, and rate of compression were calculated. These combined SFOAE and DPOAE features in normal and hearing-impaired ears may provide a potentially informative and novel index of hearing loss. This is an initial step toward utilizing OAE source in characterizing cochlear function and dysfunction. PMID:27695142

  14. The Search For The Cp-violating Emission Of An E1 Photon From The Kaon Long Decays To Positive Pion Negative Pion Gamma

    CERN Document Server

    Shields, J M

    2005-01-01

    A search for the CP-violating electric dipole (E1) direct emission contribution to the KL → π+π −γ decay is performed using data from the 1997 KTeV/E832 experiment. Because the KL → π +π−γ decay mode is massively dominated by the CP-violating inner bremsstrahlung (IB) and the CP-conserving magnetic dipole (M1) direct emission processes, previous analyses have neglected the E1 contribution. Therefore, this measurement is the first attempt to directly quantify the size of the E1 decay process. This E1 transition is one of the very few CP-violating processes that is accessible to experiment and, in principle, will produce new insights into the structure of the neutral kaon. The result of this analysis is that the E1 contribution is below the threshold of sensitivity, and therefore an upper bound of |g E1| < 0.14 (90% CL) is reported. In the process of obtaining this upper limit, high resolution measurements of fit parame...

  15. RARE KAON DECAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITTENBERG, L.

    2005-07-19

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments have probed sensitivities corresponding to mass scales of well over 100 TeV, making life difficult for models predicting accessible LFV in kaon decay and discouraging new dedicated experiments of this type.

  16. Anisotropic emission of charged mesons and structure characteristic of emission source in heavy ion collisions at 1-2A GeV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Fu-Hu

    2008-01-01

    Angular distributions of pions and kaons produced in heavy ion collisions at the low-energy end of high energies (1-2 A GeV) have been investigated by using a multisource ideal gas model.The model covers the expansions and movements of the emission sources, and it is related to the collective flows. By using the analytic expression and the Monte Carlo method, the azimuthal and polar angle distributions of mesons are calculated by the model and compared with the experimental data of the KaoS Collaboration.

  17. Kaon Physics Review

    CERN Document Server

    Lellouch, L

    2009-01-01

    I critically review recent lattice QCD results relevant for kaon phenomenology, as well as the methods that are used to obtain them. The focus is on calculations with N_f=2 and N_f=2+1 flavors of sea quarks. Concerning methodology, the subjects covered include a discussion of how best to extrapolate and/or interpolate results to the physical quark-mass point, a scheme for assessing the extent to which a lattice QCD calculation includes the various effects required to compute a given quantity reliably and a procedure for averaging lattice results. The phenomenological topics that I review comprise leptonic and semileptonic kaon decays, as well as neutral kaon mixing and CP violation in K->\\pi\\pi decays.

  18. Attributing Atmospheric Methane to Anthropogenic Emission Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David

    2016-07-19

    Methane is a greenhouse gas, and increases in atmospheric methane concentration over the past 250 years have driven increased radiative forcing of the atmosphere. Increases in atmospheric methane concentration since 1750 account for approximately 17% of increases in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, and that percentage increases by approximately a factor of 2 if the effects of the greenhouse gases produced by the atmospheric reactions of methane are included in the assessment. Because of the role of methane emissions in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, the identification and quantification of sources of methane emissions is receiving increased scientific attention. Methane emission sources include biogenic, geogenic, and anthropogenic sources; the largest anthropogenic sources are natural gas and petroleum systems, enteric fermentation (livestock), landfills, coal mining, and manure management. While these source categories are well-known, there is significant uncertainty in the relative magnitudes of methane emissions from the various source categories. Further, the overall magnitude of methane emissions from all anthropogenic sources is actively debated, with estimates based on source sampling extrapolated to regional or national scale ("bottom-up analyses") differing from estimates that infer emissions based on ambient data ("top-down analyses") by 50% or more. To address the important problem of attribution of methane to specific sources, a variety of new analytical methods are being employed, including high time resolution and highly sensitive measurements of methane, methane isotopes, and other chemical species frequently associated with methane emissions, such as ethane. This Account describes the use of some of these emerging measurements, in both top-down and bottom-up methane emission studies. In addition, this Account describes how data from these new analytical methods can be used in conjunction with chemical mass balance (CMB) methods for source

  19. Kaon Physics at KLOE

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Antonelli, M; Bacci, C; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Bowring, D; Branchini, P; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Cera, F; Chi, S; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Falco, S; Di Micco, B; Doria, A; Dreucci, M; Fe, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Fiore, S; Forti, C; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gorini, E; Graziani, E; Incagli, M; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Mei, W; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Perfetto, F; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; San, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Spadaro, T; Testa, M; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Xu, G; Palutan, Matteo

    2006-01-01

    The most precise determination of Vus comes from semileptonic kaon decays. We have measured with the KLOE detector at DAFNE, the Frascati phi-factory, all the experimental inputs to Vus for both neutral and charged kaons. Using our results we extract the value of Vus with about 0.9% fractional error, which is entirely dominated by the theoretical error on the knowledge of the normalization of the decay form factors, f0. A new determination of the ratio Vus/Vud is also presented, based on our precise measurement of the absolute branching ratio for the decay K+ -> mu+nu, combined with recent lattice results for the ratio f_K/f_pi. New results on CPT symmetry have also been achieved, which are based on the first measurement of the charge asymmetry for Ks -> pi e nu decay.

  20. Kaon Production and Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Wolke, B M; Budzanowski, A; Czyzykiewicz, R; Grzonka, D; Jarczyk, L; Kamys, B; Khoukaz, A; Kilian, K; Kowina, P; Lister, T A; Moskal, P; Oelert, Walter; Rozek, T; Santo, R; Schepers, G; Sefzick, T; Siemaszko, M; Smyrski, J; Steltenkamp, S; Strzalkowski, A; Winter, P; Wüstner, P; Zipper, W; Wolke, By M.

    2003-01-01

    Exclusive data on both the elementary kaon and antikaon production channels have been taken at the cooler synchrotron COSY in proton-proton scattering. In the kaon--hyperon production an enhancement by one order of magnitude of the Lambda/Sigma0 ratio has been observed at excess energies below Q=13 MeV compared to data at higher excess energies (Q>300 MeV). New results obtained at the COSY-11 facility explore the transition region between the regime of this low-energy Sigma0 suppression and excess energies of 60 MeV. A comparison of the energy dependence of the Lambda and Sigma0 total cross sections exhibits distinct qualitative differences between both hyperon production channels. Studies of kaon-antikaon production have been motivated especially by the ongoing discussion about the nature of the scalar resonances f0(980) and a0(980) coupling to the K anti-K channel. For the reaction pp->ppK+K- a first total cross section value is reported at an excess energy of Q=17 MeV, i.e. below the phi threshold. Calcula...

  1. Mobile Source Emissions Regulatory Compliance Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Mobile Source Emissions Regulatory Compliance Data Inventory data asset contains measured summary compliance information on light-duty, heavy-duty, and non-road...

  2. Mobile source emissions inventory development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, K.Y.; De Paul, F.T.; Heavisides, T.; Wagner, D.

    1991-03-01

    The study was undertaken to develop a methodology for preparing a 5km by 5km areal gridded mobile source emissions inventory for areas of Illinois which are in nonattainment status with regard to National Ambient Air Quality Standards. A pilot emissions inventory was developed by linking the USEPA mobile source emissions program (MOBILE4) with existing traffic data from the Illinois Department of Transportation's (IDOT) Highway Record Data Bank (HRDB), the Chicago Area Transportation Study (CATS) and Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources' (ENR) Geographic Information System (GIS). The methodology developed here was applied to one pollutant in one test case county in Illinois. Hydrocarbon emissions from mobile sources in Kane county are the focus of the study. Vehicle type, vehicle age, and Vehicle Miles of Travel (VMT) distributions were obtained from information provided in the 1982 Illinois State Implementation Plan (SIP). Among the products of the project is a preliminary 25-sq km gridded mobile source hydrocarbon emissions inventory for Kane county. Numerical results as well as a color correlated overview map of the county-wide gridded emissions inventory are provided in the report. Recommendations for improving the methodology and further developing gridded mobile source emission inventories for other Illinois counties are also provided.

  3. Kaon fluctuations from lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn; Gunther, Jana; Parotto, Paolo; Pasztor, Attila; Vazquez, Israel Portillo; Ratti, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    We show that it is possible to isolate a set of kaon fluctuations in lattice QCD. By means of the Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) model, we calculate the actual kaon second-to-first fluctuation ratio, which receives contribution from primordial kaons and resonance decays, and show that it is very close to the one obtained for primordial kaons in the Boltzmann approximation. The latter only involves the strangeness and electric charge chemical potentials, which are functions of $T$ and $\\mu_B$ due to the experimental constraint on strangeness and electric charge, and can therefore be calculated on the lattice. This provides an unambiguous method to extract the kaon freeze-out temperature, by comparing the lattice results to the experimental values for the corresponding fluctuations.

  4. Source mechanism of Saturn narrowband emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Menietti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Narrowband emission (NB is observed at Saturn centered near 5 kHz and 20 kHz and harmonics. This emission appears similar in many ways to Jovian kilometric narrowband emission observed at higher frequencies, and therefore may have a similar source mechanism. Source regions of NB near 20 kHz are believed to be located near density gradients in the inner magnetosphere and the emission appears to be correlated with the occurrence of large neutral plasma clouds observed in the Saturn magnetotail. In this work we present the results of a growth rate analysis of NB emission (~20 kHz near or within a probable source region. This is made possible by the sampling of in-situ wave and particle data. The results indicate waves are likely to be generated by the mode-conversion of directly generated Z-mode emission to O-mode near a density gradient. When the local hybrid frequency is close n fce (n is an integer and fce is the electron cyclotron frequency with n=4, 5 or 6 in our case, electromagnetic Z-mode and weak ordinary (O-mode emission can be directly generated by the cyclotron maser instability.

  5. Evaluation of Mobile Source Emissions and Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmann, Timothy Ryan

    Mobile sources contribute significantly to air pollution problems. Relevant pollutants include numerous gaseous and particle-phase species that can affect human health, ecosystems, and climate. Accurate inventories of emissions from these sources are needed to help understand possible adverse impacts, and to develop effective air quality management strategies. Unfortunately large uncertainties persist in the understanding of mobile source emissions, and how these emissions are changing over time. This dissertation aims to evaluate long-term trends in mobile source emissions in the United States, and to make detailed measurements of emissions from present-day fleets of on-road vehicles operating in California. Long-term trends in mobile source emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the United States were investigated through development of a fuel-based emission inventory. Annual emissions from on- and off-road gasoline and diesel engines were quantified for the years 1996-2006. Diesel engines were found to be the dominant mobile source of NOx and PM2.5, and on-road diesel vehicles were identified as the single largest anthropogenic source of NOx emissions in the United States as of 2005. The importance of diesel engines as a source of exhaust particulate matter emissions has led to the recent introduction of advanced emission control technologies in the United States, such as diesel particle filters (DPF), which have been required since 2007 for all new on-road heavy-duty (HD) diesel engines. In addition to national requirements for the use of such control devices on new engines, California has mandated accelerated clean-up of statewide emissions from older in-use diesel engines. The plume capture method was further applied to measure emissions from a more diverse population of trucks observed at the Caldecott tunnel in summer 2010. Emissions from hundreds of individual trucks were measured, and emission factor distributions were

  6. Bose-Einstein Correlations of Charged and Neutral Kaons in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Nicholass, D; Repond, J; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Jechow, M; Pavel, N; Yagues-Molina, A G; Antonelli, S; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Bindi, M; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Iacobucci, G; Margotti, A; Nania, R; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Zichichi, A; Bartsch, D; Brock, I; Goers, S; Hartmann, H; Hilger, E; Jakob, H P; Jüngst, M; Kind, O M; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Paul, E; Renner, R; Samson, U; Schonberg, V; Shehzadi, R; Wlasenko, M; Brook, N H; Heath, G P; Morris, J D; Namsoo, T; Capua, M; Fazio, S; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Kim, J Y; Ma, K J; Ibrahim, Z A; Kamaluddin, B; Wan-Abdullah, W A T; Ning, Y; Ren, Z; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, A; Figiel, J; Galas, A; Gil, M; Olkiewicz, K; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bold, T; Grabowska-Bold, I; Kisielewska, D; Lukasik, J; Przybycien, M; Suszycki, L; Kotanski, A; Slominski, W; Adler, V; Behrens, U; Bloch, I; Blohm, C; Bonato, A; Borras, K; Ciesielski, R; Coppola, N; Dossanov, A; Drugakov, V; Fourletova, J; Geiser, A; Gladkov, D; Göttlicher, P; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Haas, T; Hain, W; Horn, C; Huttmann, A; Kahle, B; Katkov, I I; Klein, U; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Lobodzinska, E; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Miglioranzi, S; Montanari, A; Notz, D; Rinaldi, L; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Santamarta, R; Schneekloth, U; Spiridonov, A; Stadie, H; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Theedt, T; Wolf, G; Wrona, K; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Lohmann, W; Schlenstedt, S; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Pelfer, P G; Bamberger, A; Dobur, D; Karstens, F; Vlasov, N N; Bussey, P J; Doyle, A T; Dunne, W; Ferrando, J; Forrest, M; Saxon, D H; Skillicorn, I O; Gialas, I; Papageorgiu, K; Gosau, T; Holm, U; Klanner, R; Lohrmann, E; Salehi, H; Schleper, P; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sztuk, J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Foudas, C; Fry, C; Long, K R; Tapper, A D; Kataoka, M; Matsumoto, T; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Barakbaev, A N; Boos, E G; Pokrovskiy, N S; Zhautykov, B O; Aushev, V; Son, D; De Favereau, J; Piotrzkowski, K; Barreiro, F; Glasman, C; Jiménez, M; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Ron, E; Soares, M; Terron, J; Zambrana, M; Corriveau, F; Liu, C; Walsh, R; Zhou, C; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Dolgoshein, B A; Sosnovtsev, V; Stifutkin, A; Suchkov, S; Dementiev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Khein, L A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Levchenko, B B; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shcheglova, L M; Zotkin, D S; Zotkin, S A; Abt, I; Büttner, C; Caldwell, A; Kollar, D; Schmidke, W B; Sutiak, J; Grigorescu, G; Keramidas, A; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Pellegrino, A; Tiecke, H; Vázquez, M; Wiggers, L; Brümmer, N; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Lee, A; Ling, T Y; Allfrey, P D; Bell, M A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cottrell, A; Devenish, R C E; Foster, B; Korcsak-Gorzo, K; Patel, S; Roberfroid, V; Robertson, A; Straub, P B; Uribe-Estrada, C; Walczak, R; Bellan, P; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dusini, S; Garfagnini, A; Limentani, S; Longhin, A; Stanco, L; Turcato, M; Oh, B Y; Raval, A; Ukleja, J; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, G; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cole, J E; Hart, J C; Abramowicz, H; Gabareen, A; Ingbir, R; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Kuze, M; Maeda, J; Hori, R; Kagawa, S; Okazaki, N; Shimizu, S; Tawara, T; Hamatsu, R; Kaji, H; Kitamura, S; Ota, O; Ri, Y D; Ferrero, M I; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Arneodo, M; Ruspa, M; Fourletov, S; Martin, J F; Boutle, S K; Butterworth, J M; Gwenlan, C; Jones, T W; Loizides, J H; Sutton, M R; Wing, M; Brzozowska, B; Ciborowski, J; Grzelak, G; Kulinski, P; Luzniak, P; Malka, J; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Plucinsky, P P; Eisenberg, Y; Giller, I; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Rosin, M; Brownson, E; Danielson, T; Everett, A; Kcira, D; Reeder, D D; Ryan, P; Savin, A A; Smith, W H; Wolfe, H; Bhadra, S; Catterall, C D; Cui, Y; Hartner, G; Menary, S; Noor, U; Standage, J; Whyte, J

    2007-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations of charged and neutral kaons have been measured in e+-p deep inelastic scattering with an integrated luminosity of 121 pb-1 using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The two-particle correlation function was studied as a function of the four-momentum difference of the kaon pairs, Q_12=sqrt{-(p_1-p_2)^2}, assuming a Gaussian shape for the particle source. The values of the radius of the production volume, r, and of the correlation strength, lambda, were obtained for both neutral and charged kaons. The radii for charged and neutral kaons are similar and are consistent with those obtained at LEP.

  7. Weak Kaon Production off the Nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, M Rafi; Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2010-01-01

    The weak kaon production off the nucleon induced by neutrinos is studied at the low and intermediate energies of interest for some ongoing and future neutrino oscillation experiments. This process is also potentially important for the analysis of proton decay experiments. We develop a microscopical model based on the SU(3) chiral Lagrangians. The basic parameters of the model are fpi, the pion decay constant, Cabibbo's angle, the proton and neutron magnetic moments and the axial vector coupling constants for the baryons octet, D and F, that are obtained from the analysis of the semileptonic decays of neutron and hyperons. The studied mechanisms are the main source of kaon production for neutrino energies up to 1.2 to 1.5 GeV for the various channels and the cross sections are large enough to be amenable to be measured by experiments such as Minerva and T2K.

  8. Detecting small low emission radiating sources

    CERN Document Server

    Allmaras, Moritz; Hristova, Yulia; Kanschat, Guido; Kuchment, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The article addresses the possibility of robust detection of geometrically small, low emission sources on a significantly stronger background. This problem is important for homeland security. A technique of detecting such sources using Compton type cameras is developed, which is shown on numerical examples to have high sensitivity and specificity and also allows to assign confidence probabilities of the detection. 2D case is considered in detail.

  9. Calendar Year 2016 Stationary Source Emissions Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evelo, Stacie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The City of Albuquerque (COA) Environmental Health Department Air Quality Program has issued stationary source permits and registrations the Department of Energy/Sandia Field Office for operations at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. This emission inventory report meets the annual reporting compliance requirements for calendar year (CY) 2016 as required by the COA.

  10. Overview of kaon decay physics

    CERN Document Server

    Peccei, Roberto D

    1995-01-01

    After a brief history of the insights gained from Kaon physics, the potential of Kaon decays for probing lepton number violation is discussed. Present tests of CTP and of Quantum Mechanics in the neutral Kaon sector are then reviewed and the potential of the Frascati \\Phi factory for doing incisive tests in this area is emphasized. The rest of this overview focuses on CP violating effects in the Kaon system. Although present observations of CP violation are perfectly consistent with the CKM model, we emphasize the theoretical and experimental difficulties which must be faced to establish this conclusively. In so doing, theoretical predictions and experimental prospects for detecting \\Delta S=1 CP violation through measurements of \\epsilon^\\prime/\\epsilon and of rare K decays are reviewed. The importance of looking for evidence for non-CKM CP-violating phases, through a search for a non-vanishing transverse muon polarization in K_{\\mu 3} decays, is also stressed.

  11. International Conference on Kaon Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Conference follows former editions with similar emphasis on kaon physics. aiming at a comprehensive discussion on the latest experimental and theoretical achievements and development of new projects. TOPICS: CP and T violation CKM matrix and Flavor Mixing Rare decays Precise SM tests CPT and Quantum Mechanics Lepton universality and flavor violation Lattice gauge theory Chiral perturbation theory Physics beyond the Standard Model Future opportunities in Kaon Physics

  12. Krakow conference on low emissions sources: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, B.L.; Butcher, T.A. [eds.

    1995-12-31

    The Krakow Conference on Low Emission Sources presented the information produced and analytical tools developed in the first phase of the Krakow Clean Fossil Fuels and Energy Efficiency Program. This phase included: field testing to provide quantitative data on missions and efficiencies as well as on opportunities for building energy conservation; engineering analysis to determine the costs of implementing pollution control; and incentives analysis to identify actions required to create a market for equipment, fuels, and services needed to reduce pollution. Collectively, these Proceedings contain reports that summarize the above phase one information, present the status of energy system management in Krakow, provide information on financing pollution control projects in Krakow and elsewhere, and highlight the capabilities and technologies of Polish and American companies that are working to reduce pollution from low emission sources. It is intended that the US reader will find in these Proceedings useful results and plans for control of pollution from low emission sources that are representative of heating systems in central and Eastern Europe. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Kaon photoproduction off proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoupil, Dalibor; Bydžovský, Petr

    2016-11-01

    We have recently constructed our version of the Regge-plus-resonance (RPR) model and two variants of an isobar model for photoproduction of kaons on the proton, utilizing new experimental data from CLAS, LEPS, and GRAAL collaborations for adjusting free parameters of the models. Higher-spin nucleon (3/2 and 5/2) and hyperon (3/2) resonances were included using the consistent formalism by Pascalutsa and found to play an important role in data description. The set of chosen nucleon resonances in our new isobar models agrees well with the set of the most probable contributing states determined in the Bayesian analysis with the RPR model whilst only 6 out of 10 N*'s selected in the RPR fit of ours overlap with the nucleon resonant states in the Bayesian analysis. Results of two versions of the isobar model are compared to the new version of the RPR model and experimental data in the third-resonance region and their properties are discussed. We place an emphasis on the choice of resonances, the predictions in the forward- and backward-angle region as well as the choice of the hadron form factor.

  14. Kaon photoproduction off proton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skoupil Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently constructed our version of the Regge-plus-resonance (RPR model and two variants of an isobar model for photoproduction of kaons on the proton, utilizing new experimental data from CLAS, LEPS, and GRAAL collaborations for adjusting free parameters of the models. Higher-spin nucleon (3/2 and 5/2 and hyperon (3/2 resonances were included using the consistent formalism by Pascalutsa and found to play an important role in data description. The set of chosen nucleon resonances in our new isobar models agrees well with the set of the most probable contributing states determined in the Bayesian analysis with the RPR model whilst only 6 out of 10 N*’s selected in the RPR fit of ours overlap with the nucleon resonant states in the Bayesian analysis. Results of two versions of the isobar model are compared to the new version of the RPR model and experimental data in the third-resonance region and their properties are discussed. We place an emphasis on the choice of resonances, the predictions in the forward- and backward-angle region as well as the choice of the hadron form factor.

  15. Kaon Flavour Physics Strikes Back

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J

    2016-01-01

    In this short presentation I emphasize the increased importance of kaon flavour physics in the search for new physics (NP) that we should witness in the rest of this decade and in the next decade. The main actors will be the branching ratios for the rare decays $K^+\\rightarrow\\pi^+\

  16. CP violation in kaon decays

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, G

    1996-01-01

    We review the Standard Model predictions of CP violation in kaon decays. We present an elementary introduction to Chiral Perturbation Theory, four--quark effective hamiltonians and the relation among them. Particular attention is devoted to $K\\to 3\\pi$, $K\\to 2\\pi \\gamma$ and $K\\to \\pi \\bar{f} f$ decays.

  17. Diffuse emission of high-energy neutrinos from gammary burst fireballs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamborra, I.; Ando, S.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been suggested as possible sources of the high-energy neutrino flux recently detected by the IceCube telescope. We revisit the fireball emission model and elaborate an analytical prescription to estimate the high-energy neutrino prompt emission from pion and kaon decays,

  18. Diffuse emission of high-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray burst fireballs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamborra, I.; Ando, S.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been suggested as possible sources of the high-energy neutrino flux recently detected by the IceCube telescope. We revisit the fireball emission model and elaborate an analytical prescription to estimate the high-energy neutrino prompt emission from pion and kaon decays,

  19. Danish emission inventories for road transport and other mobile sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Morten

    have increased by 36 %, and CH4 emissions have decreased by 51 %. A N2O emission increase of 29 % is related to the relatively high emissions from older gasoline catalyst cars. The 1985-2006 emission decreases for PM (exhaust only), CO, NOX and NMVOC are 30, 69, 28 and 71 % respectively, due......This report explains the parts of the Danish inventories related to road transport and other mobile sources. Emission results are shown for CO2, CH4, N2O, SO2, NOX, NMVOC, CO, particulate matter (PM), heavy metals, dioxins and PAH. From 1990-2006 the fuel use and CO2 emissions for road transport...... to the introduction of vehicles complying with gradually stricter emission standards. For SO2 the emission drop is 99% (due to reduced sulphur content in the diesel fuel), whereas the NH3 emissions increase by 3065% (due to the introduction of catalyst cars). For other mobile sources the calculated emission changes...

  20. Constraining Emission Models of Luminous Blazar Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, Marek; /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr.; Stawarz, Lukasz; /Kipac, Menlo Park /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ. /SLAC; Moderski, Rafal; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr.; Madejski, Greg; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Many luminous blazars which are associated with quasar-type active galactic nuclei display broad-band spectra characterized by a large luminosity ratio of their high-energy ({gamma}-ray) and low-energy (synchrotron) spectral components. This large ratio, reaching values up to 100, challenges the standard synchrotron self-Compton models by means of substantial departures from the minimum power condition. Luminous blazars have also typically very hard X-ray spectra, and those in turn seem to challenge hadronic scenarios for the high energy blazar emission. As shown in this paper, no such problems are faced by the models which involve Comptonization of radiation provided by a broad-line-region, or dusty molecular torus. The lack or weakness of bulk Compton and Klein-Nishina features indicated by the presently available data favors production of {gamma}-rays via up-scattering of infrared photons from hot dust. This implies that the blazar emission zone is located at parsec-scale distances from the nucleus, and as such is possibly associated with the extended, quasi-stationary reconfinement shocks formed in relativistic outflows. This scenario predicts characteristic timescales for flux changes in luminous blazars to be days/weeks, consistent with the variability patterns observed in such systems at infrared, optical and {gamma}-ray frequencies. We also propose that the parsec-scale blazar activity can be occasionally accompanied by dissipative events taking place at sub-parsec distances and powered by internal shocks and/or reconnection of magnetic fields. These could account for the multiwavelength intra-day flares occasionally observed in powerful blazars sources.

  1. Air Emissions Sources, Charts and Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Air Emissions provides (1) interactive charts supporting national, state, or county charts, (2) county maps of criteria air pollutant emissions for a state, and (3)...

  2. Emissivity Tuned Emitter for RTPV Power Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl M. Stoots; Robert C. O' Brien; Troy M. Howe

    2012-03-01

    Every mission launched by NASA to the outer planets has produced unexpected results. The Voyager I and II, Galileo, and Cassini missions produced images and collected scientific data that totally revolutionized our understanding of the solar system and the formation of the planetary systems. These missions were enabled by the use of nuclear power. Because of the distances from the Sun, electrical power was produced using the radioactive decay of a plutonium isotope. Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in the past and currently used Multi-Mission RTGs (MMRTGs) provide power for space missions. Unfortunately, RTGs rely on thermocouples to convert heat to electricity and are inherently inefficient ({approx} 3-7% thermal to electric efficiency). A Radioisotope Thermal Photovoltaic (RTPV) power source has the potential to reduce the specific mass of the onboard power supply by increasing the efficiency of thermal to electric conversion. In an RTPV, a radioisotope heats an emitter, which emits light to a photovoltaic (PV) cell, which converts the light into electricity. Developing an emitter tuned to the desired wavelength of the photovoltaic is a key part in increasing overall performance. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have built a Thermal Photovoltaic (TPV) system, that utilizes a simulated General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) from a MMRTG to heat a tantalum emitter. The GPHS is a block of graphite roughly 10 cm by 10 cm by 5 cm. A fully loaded GPHS produces 250 w of thermal power and weighs 1.6 kgs. The GRC system relies on the GPHS unit radiating at 1200 K to a tantalum emitter that, in turn, radiates light to a GaInAs photo-voltaic cell. The GRC claims system efficiency of conversion of 15%. The specific mass is around 167 kg/kWe. A RTPV power source that utilized a ceramic or ceramic-metal (cermet) matrix would allow for the combination of the heat source, canister, and emitter into one compact unit, and allow variation in size

  3. Quasifree kaon photoproduction on nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Lee; T. MART; Cornelius Bennhold; Lester Wright

    2001-12-01

    Investigations of the quasifree reaction A({gamma}, K Y)B are presented in the distorted wave impulse approximation (DWIA). For this purpose, we present a revised tree-level model of elementary kaon photoproduction that incorporates hadronic form factors consistent with gauge invariance, uses SU(3) values for the Born couplings and uses resonances consistent with multi-channel analyses. The potential of exclusive quasifree kaon photoproduction on nuclei to reveal details of the hyperon-nucleus interaction is examined. Detailed predictions for the coincidence cross section, the photon asymmetry, and the hyperon polarization and their sensitivities to the ingredients of the model are obtained for all six production channels. Under selected kinematics these observables are found to be sensitive to the hyperon-nucleus final state interaction. Some polarization observables are found to be insensitive to distortion effects, making them ideal tools to search for possible medium modifications of the elementary amplitude.

  4. Bayesian analysis for kaon photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsainy, T., E-mail: tmart@fisika.ui.ac.id; Mart, T., E-mail: tmart@fisika.ui.ac.id [Department Fisika, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    We have investigated contribution of the nucleon resonances in the kaon photoproduction process by using an established statistical decision making method, i.e. the Bayesian method. This method does not only evaluate the model over its entire parameter space, but also takes the prior information and experimental data into account. The result indicates that certain resonances have larger probabilities to contribute to the process.

  5. Renormalisation Group Flow and Kaon Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Krippa, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Functional renormalisation group approach is applied to a system of kaons with finite chemical potential. A set of approximate flow equations for the effective couplings is derived and solved. At high scale the system is found to be at the normal phase whereas at some critical value of the running scale it undergoes the phase transition (PT) to the phase with a spontaneously broken symmetry with the kaon condensate as an order parameter. The value of the condensate turns out to be quite sensitive to the kaon-kaon scattering length.

  6. RESEARCH ON EMISSIONS AND MITIGATION OF POP'S FROM COMBUSTION SOURCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapter summarizes EPA's research on emissions and control of persistent organic pollutants (POPS) from combustion sources, with emphasis on source characterization and measurement, formation and destruction mechanisms, formation prevention, and flue gas cleaning. Laboratory exp...

  7. RESEARCH ON EMISSIONS AND MITIGATION OF POP'S FROM COMBUSTION SOURCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapter summarizes EPA's research on emissions and control of persistent organic pollutants (POPS) from combustion sources, with emphasis on source characterization and measurement, formation and destruction mechanisms, formation prevention, and flue gas cleaning. Laboratory exp...

  8. Danish emission inventories for road transport and other mobile sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Morten

    for road transport increased by 30 %, and CH4 emissions have decreased by 74 %. A N2O emission increase of 29 % is related to the relatively high emissions from older gasoline catalyst cars. The 1985-2010 emission decrease for NOX, NMVOC, CO and particulates (exhaust only: Size is below PM2.5) -52, -84......This report explains the parts of the Danish emission inventories related to road transport and other mobile sources. Emission results are shown for CO2, CH4, N2O, SO2, NOX, NMVOC, CO, particulate matter (PM), heavy metals, dioxins and PAH. From 1990-2010 the fuel consumption and CO2 emissions......, -81, and -65 %, respectively, due to the introduction of vehicles complying with gradually stricter emission standards. For SO2 the emission drop 99 % (due to reduced sulphur content in the diesel fuel), whereas the NH3 emissions increased by 2232 % (due to the introduction of catalyst cars...

  9. Bose-Einstein correlations of charged and neutral kaons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2007-05-15

    Bose-Einstein correlations of charged and neutral kaons have been measured in e{sup {+-}}p deep inelastic scattering with an integrated luminosity of 121 pb{sup -1} using the ZEUS detector at HERA. The two-particle correlation function was studied as a function of the four-momentum difference of the kaon pairs, Q{sub 12}={radical}(-(p{sub 1}-p{sub 2}){sup 2}), assuming a Gaussian shape for the particle source. The values of the radius of the production volume, r, and of the correlation strength, {lambda}, were obtained for both neutral and charged kaons. The radii for charged and neutral kaons are similar and are consistent with those obtained at LEP. (orig.)

  10. Russia's black carbon emissions: focus on diesel sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholod, Nazar; Evans, Meredydd; Kuklinski, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a significant climate forcer with a particularly pronounced forcing effect in polar regions such as the Russian Arctic. Diesel combustion is a major global source of BC emissions, accounting for 25-30 % of all BC emissions. While the demand for diesel is growing in Russia, the country's diesel emissions are poorly understood. This paper presents a detailed inventory of Russian BC emissions from diesel sources. Drawing on a complete Russian vehicle registry with detailed information about vehicle types and emission standards, this paper analyzes BC emissions from diesel on-road vehicles. We use the COPERT emission model (COmputer Programme to calculate Emissions from Road Transport) with Russia-specific emission factors for all types of on-road vehicles. On-road diesel vehicles emitted 21 Gg of BC in 2014: heavy-duty trucks account for 60 % of the on-road BC emissions, while cars represent only 5 % (light commercial vehicles and buses account for the remainder). Using Russian activity data and fuel-based emission factors, the paper also presents BC emissions from diesel locomotives and ships, off-road engines in industry, construction and agriculture, and generators. The study also factors in the role of superemitters in BC emissions from diesel on-road vehicles and off-road sources. The total emissions from diesel sources in Russia are estimated to be 49 Gg of BC and 17 Gg of organic carbon (OC) in 2014. Off-road diesel sources emitted 58 % of all diesel BC in Russia.

  11. Mobile Source Emissions Regulatory Compliance Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Engine and Vehicle Compliance Certification and Fuel Economy Inventory contains measured emissions and fuel economy compliance information for all types of...

  12. Pion-Kaon correlations in central Au+Au collisions at square root [sNN] = 130 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gutierrez, T D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-12-31

    Pion-kaon correlation functions are constructed from central Au+Au STAR data taken at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV by the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The results suggest that pions and kaons are not emitted at the same average space-time point. Space-momentum correlations, i.e., transverse flow, lead to a space-time emission asymmetry of pions and kaons that is consistent with the data. This result provides new independent evidence that the system created at RHIC undergoes a collective transverse expansion.

  13. Danish emission inventories for road transport and other mobile sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, M.

    gasoline catalyst cars. For other mobile sources the fuel use, CO2 and NOX emissions have decreased with 15% from 1985 to 2002, and the PM emission decline is in the order of 13%. For SO2 the emission drop is 74% from 1985 to 2002, due to gradually lower fuel sulphur contents. In the same period...... the emissions of NMVOC and CO has increased with 32 and 6%, mainly due to the increased use of small gasoline boats. Uncertainties for the emissions and trends have been estimated......This report explains the parts of the Danish inventories related to road transport and other mobile sources. Emission results for CO2, CH4, N2O, SO2, NOX, NMVOC, CO, particulate matter (PM), heavy metals, dioxins and PAH are shown from 1985 to 2002. In this period the fuel use and CO2 emissions...

  14. Black carbon emissions from diesel sources in Russia. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kholod, Nazar [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Evans, Meredydd [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    This report presents a detailed inventory of Russian BC emissions from diesel sources. Drawing on a complete Russian vehicle registry with detailed information about vehicle types and emission standards, this report analyzes BC emissions from diesel on-road vehicles. On-road diesel vehicles emitted 21 Gg of BC in 2014: heavy-duty trucks account for 60% of the on-road BC emissions, while cars represent only 5% (light commercial vehicles and buses account for the remainder). Using Russian activity data and fuel-based emission factors, the report also presents BC emissions from diesel locomotives and ships, off-road engines in industry, construction and agriculture, and generators. The total emissions from diesel sources in Russia are estimated to be 49 Gg of BC in 2014.

  15. Danish emission inventories for road transport and other mobile sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, M.

    gasoline catalyst cars. For other mobile sources the fuel use, CO2 and NOX emissions have decreased with 15% from 1985 to 2002, and the PM emission decline is in the order of 13%. For SO2 the emission drop is 74% from 1985 to 2002, due to gradually lower fuel sulphur contents. In the same period...... the emissions of NMVOC and CO has increased with 32 and 6%, mainly due to the increased use of small gasoline boats. Uncertainties for the emissions and trends have been estimated...

  16. Computer simulation of the emission process of some field emission alloy ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgieva, S.; Vichev, R.; Drandarov, N. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1996-10-01

    The ion emission process from InGa, AuBe and AuSi field emission alloy ion sources (LAIS) is simulated. Field strength is calculated using the SOC model. Paraxial source size, beam spot size, energy and angular distributions are estimated. The effects on the emission characteristics of Coulomb interaction between ions are investigated, and the strong influences of ion mass and charge are also shown. (Author).

  17. Satellite-derived emissions inventories and detection of missing sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinden, C. A.; Fioletov, V.; Shephard, M.; Krotkov, N. A.; Li, C.; Joiner, J.

    2016-12-01

    Our understanding of the impacts of air pollution on health and the environment, and our ability to predict future levels, is limited by our knowledge of its sources. Here, a global inventory of SO2 emissions, derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite and independent of conventional emissions databases, is presented. Our OMI-based inventory is found to be generally consistent with these conventional inventories. However, since we are also able to detect emission sources (in addition to quantifying their emissions), many SO2 sources were identified that are evidently missing from bottom-up inventories, including nearly 40 large anthropogenic sources pointing to significant discrepancies in some regions such as the Middle-East. The methodology, inventory highlights, and applications to other pollutants (NO2 from OMI and NH3 from the Cross-track Infrared Sounder) will be discussed.

  18. Danish emission inventories for road transport and other mobile sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Morten

    This report explains the parts of the Danish inventories related to road transport and other mobile sources. Emission results are shown for CO2, CH4, N2O, SO2, NOX, NMVOC, CO, particulate matter (PM), heavy metals, dioxins and PAH. From 1990-2006 the fuel use and CO2 emissions for road transport ...

  19. Ammonia emissions from non-agricultural sources in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, M. A.; Dragosits, U.; Tang, Y. S.; Fowler, D.

    A detailed literature review has been undertaken of the magnitude of non-agricultural sources of ammonia (NH 3) in the United Kingdom. Key elements of the work included estimation of nitrogen (N) excreted by different sources (birds, animals, babies, human sweat), review of miscellaneous combustion sources, as well as identification of industrial sources and use of NH 3 as a solvent. Overall the total non-agricultural emission of NH 3 from the UK in 1996 is estimated here as 54 (27-106) kt NH 3-N yr -1, although this includes 11 (6-23) kt yr -1 from agriculture related sources (sewage sludge spreading, biomass burning and agro-industry). Compared with previous estimates for 1990, component source magnitudes have changed both because of revised average emissions per source unit (emission factors) and changes in the source activity between 1990 and 1996. Sources with larger average emission factors than before include horses, wild animals and sea bird colonies, industry, sugar beet processing, household products and non-agricultural fertilizer use, with the last three sources being included for the first time. Sources with smaller emission factors than before include: land spreading of sewage sludge, direct human emissions (sweat, breath, smoking, infants), pets (cats and dogs) and fertilizer manufacture. Between 1990 and 1996 source activities increased for sewage spreading (due to reduced dumping at sea) and transport (due to increased use of catalytic converters), but decreased for coal combustion. Combined with the current UK estimates of agricultural NH 3 emissions of 229 kt N yr -1 (1996), total UK NH 3 emissions are estimated at 283 kt N yr -1. Allowing for an import of reduced nitrogen (NH x) of 30 kt N yr -1 and deposition of 230 kt N yr -1, these figures imply an export of 83 kt NH 3-N yr -1. Although export is larger than previously estimated, due to the larger contribution of non-agricultural NH 3 emissions, it is still insufficient to balance the UK

  20. Emittance of a Field Emission Electron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    approximately correct. The gate and switching time A thermionic source is run space-charge limited for which the current varies as a power 3 /2 of the grid...and millimeter-wave power amplifiers that use thermionic cathodes, requiring the sources to produce a current density characteristic of that in the...Rb radius, magnetic field strength B, accelerating voltage Vb, frequency f inversely related to Rb, harmonic number n, and emit- tance via 1− J

  1. CPT Tests: Kaon vs neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-07-09

    CPT violation has an impressive limit in the neutral kaon system |m(K{sup 0})-m({bar K}{sup 0})| < 10{sup -18} m{sub K} = 0.50 x 10{sup -18} GeV. However, if viewed as a constraint on the mass-squared, the bound appears weak, |m{sup 2}(K{sup 0})-m{sup 2}({bar K}{sup 0})| < 0.25 eV{sup 2}. the authors point out that neutrino oscillation offers better limits on CPT violation in this case. The comparison of solar and rector neutrino results puts the best limit on CPT violation by far, |{Delta}m{sub {nu}}{sup 2}-{Delta}m{sub {rho}}{sup 2}| < 1.3 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} (90% CL).

  2. Nucleon Resonances in Kaon Photoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Bennhold, C; Waluyo, A; Haberzettl, H; Penner, G; Feuster, T; Mosel, U

    1999-01-01

    Nucleon resonances are investigated through the electromagnetic production of K-mesons. We study the kaon photoproduction process at tree-level and compare to a recently developed unitary K-matrix approach. Employing hadronic form factors along with the proper gauge prescription yields suppression of the Born terms and leads a resonance dominated process for both K-Lambda and K-Sigma photoproduction. Using new SAPHIR data we find the K+-Lambda photoproduction to be dominated by the S11(1650) at threshold, with additional contributions from the P11(1710) and P13(1720) states. The K-Sigma channel couples to a cluster of Delta resonances around W = 1900 MeV. We briefly discuss some tantalizing evidence for a missing D13 resonance around 1900 MeV with a strong branching ratio into KLambda channel.

  3. Effect of low emission sources on air quality in Cracow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedoma, J. [EKOPOL Environmental Engineering Studies and Design Office, Co. Ltd., Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents calculation of power engineering low emission and results of stimulation of the effect of this emission on air quality in Cracow, Poland. It has been stated that the segment of low emission in central areas of the town makes up ca. 40% of the observed concentration of sulfur dioxide. Furthermore it has been stated that the capital investment must be concentrated in the central part of the town in order to reach noticeable improvement of air quality in Cracow. Neither the output of a separate power source nor the emission level and its individual harmful effect, but the location of the source and especially packing density of the sources must decide the priority of upgrading actions.

  4. Methane Emissions from Point and Area Sources in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Frost, G. J.; Holloway, J. S.; McKeen, S. A.; Neuman, J.; Nowak, J. B.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.

    2010-12-01

    Airborne measurements of methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide, ammonia, and nitric oxides were made aboard the NOAA WP-3D during May and June 2010, during the CalNex (Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) field campaign based out of Ontario, California. Emission ratios of CH4 to these other trace gas species are calculated from observations downwind of point sources and compared to national emissions inventories. Further, background urban ratios of CH4 to CO are established, and enhancements from known area CH4 sources, such as rice paddies and cattle ranches, are analyzed. Finally, significant methane emissions from point sources not in emissions inventories are examined.

  5. One-prong $\\tau$ decays with kaons

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Park, I.C.; Riu, I.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Boix, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Halley, A.W.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Tournefier, E.; Wright, A.E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.C.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E.B.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Robertson, N.A.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Etienne, F.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Lutz, A.M.; Schune, M.H.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foa, L.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Johnson, R.P.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Prange, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1999-01-01

    One-prong $\\tau$ decays into final states involving kaons are studied with about 161k $\\tau^+\\tau^-$ events collected by the ALEPH detector from 1991 to 1995. Charged kaons are identified by dE/dx measurement, while $K^0_L$'s are detected through their interaction in calorimeters. Branching ratios are measured for the inclusive mode, $B(\\tau^-\\rightarrow K^-X\

  6. Neptune's non-thermal radio emissions - Phenomenology and source locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabl, Gerald K. F.; Ladreiter, H.-P.; Rucker, Helmut O.; Kaiser, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    During the inbound and the outbound leg of Voyager 2's encounter with Neptune, the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) experiment aboard the spacecraft detected short radio bursts at frequencies within the range of about 500-1300 kHz, and broad-banded smoothly varying emission patterns within the frequency range from about 40-800 kHz. Both emissions can be described in terms of a period of 16.1 hours determining Neptune's rotation period. Furthermore, just near closest approach, a narrow-banded smoothly varying radio component was observed occurring between 600 and 800 kHz. After giving a brief overview about some general characteristics of Neptune's nonthermal radio emission, the source locations of Neptune's emission components are determined, using an offset tilted dipole model for Neptune's magnetic field. Assuming that the emission originates near the electron gyrofrequency a geometrical beaming model is developed in order to fit the observed emission episodes.

  7. X-Ray Emission from Compact Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cominsky, L

    2004-03-23

    This paper presents a review of the physical parameters of neutron stars and black holes that have been derived from X-ray observations. I then explain how these physical parameters can be used to learn about the extreme conditions occurring in regions of strong gravity, and present some recent evidence for relativistic effects seen in these systems. A glossary of commonly used terms and a short tutorial on the names of X-ray sources are also included.

  8. Kaons in nuclear matter; Kaonen in Kernmaterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolomeitsev, E.E.

    1997-02-01

    The subject of the doctoral thesis is examination of the properties of kaons in nuclear matter. A specific method is explained that has been developed for the scientific objectives of the thesis and permits description of the kaon-nucleon interactions and kaon-nucleon scattering in a vacuum. The main challenge involved was to find approaches that would enable application of the derived relations out of the kaon mass shell, connected with the second objective, namely to possibly find methods which are independent of models. The way chosen to achieve this goal relied on application of reduction formulas as well as current algebra relations and the PCAC hypothesis. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Arbeit befasst sich mit der Untersuchung der Eigenschaften von Kao nen in Kernmaterie. Zu diesem Zweck wurde ein Verfahren entwickelt, di e Kaon- Nukleon- Wechselwirkung und Kaon- Nukleon- Streuung im Vakuumzu beschreiben. Die Hauptherausforderung bestand darin, dass die abgel eiteten Relationen ausserhalb der Kaonen- Massenschale anwendbar werde n. Eine Nebenforderung war, dass die vorgeschlagenen Verfahren moeglic hst modell- unabhaengig sind. Um dieses Ziel zu erreichen, wurden Redu ktionsformeln, Stromalgebra- Relationen und die PCAC- Hypothese angewe ndet.

  9. Miniature field emission light sources for bio-chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, Bartlomiej; Gorecka-Drzazga, Anna; Dziuban, Jan A [Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland)], E-mail: bartlomiej.cichy@pwr.wroc.pl

    2009-01-01

    A concept based on preparation of miniature field emission light sources (FELS) for integration with bio-chips is presented. Glass and silicon-glass micro-fluidic systems (biochips) with spectrofluorometric detection are designated for this solution. Planar, miniature silicon-glass field emission light sources were designed and fabricated for this conception. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been used as a low-voltage electron emissive layer. Nanocrystalline yttria matrices doped with rare earth (Re) ions (Re: Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) have been synthesized and utilized as phosphor layers. Light emission spectral characteristics of fabricated sources allow to couple them with typical fluorescent markers as e.g. Alexa, Fluorescein or TO-PRO, used on the wide scale in biochemical researches. Fabricated FELSs are characterized by the intensive and homogenous light emission with well defined sharp emission lines. The efficient and stable field emission from carbon nanotubes has also been noticed. Fabricated FELS are technologically compatible with highly developing micromachined fluidic systems and are able to direct on-chip integration with these microsystems.

  10. Methane emissions from grazing cattle using point-source dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinn, S M; Turner, D; Tomkins, N; Charmley, E; Bishop-Hurley, G; Chen, D

    2011-01-01

    The ability to accurately measure greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is essential to gauge our ability to reduce these emissions. Enteric methane from ruminants is an important but often difficult source to quantify since it depends on the amount and type of feed intake. Unfortunately, many of the available measurement techniques for estimating enteric methane emissions can impose a change in feed intake. Our study evaluates a nonintrusive technique that uses a novel approach (point-source dispersion with multiple open-path concentrations) to calculate enteric methane emissions from grazing cattle, reported as the major source of GHG in many countries, particularly Australia. A scanner with a mounted open-path laser was used to measure methane concentration across five paths above a paddock containing 18 grazing cattle over 16 d. These data were used along with wind statistics in a dispersion model (WindTrax) to estimate an average herd methane emission rate over 10-mm intervals. Enteric methane emissions from the herd grazing a combination of Rhodes grass (Chlotis gayana Kunth) and Leucaena [Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.)] averaged (+/- SD) 141 (+/- 147) g animal(-1) d(-1). In a release-recovery experiment, the technique accounted for 77% of the released methane at a single point. Our study shows the technique generates more reliable methane emissions during daytime (unstable stratification).

  11. Estimation of Methane Emissions from Municipal Solid Waste Landfills in China Based on Point Emission Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Bo-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Citation: Cai, B.-F., Liu, J.-G., Gao, Q.-X., et al., 2014. Estimation of methane emissions from municipal solid waste landfills in China based on point emission sources. Adv. Clim. Change Res. 5(2, doi: 10.3724/SP.J.1248.2014.081.

  12. Discrimination of particulate matter emission sources using stochastic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Andrzej; Maciejewska, Monika; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Sikora, Grzegorz; Balcerek, Michał; Teuerle, Marek

    2016-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is one of the criteria pollutants which has been determined as harmful to public health and the environment. For this reason the ability to recognize its emission sources is very important. There are a number of measurement methods which allow to characterize PM in terms of concentration, particles size distribution, and chemical composition. All these information are useful to establish a link between the dust found in the air, its emission sources and influence on human as well as the environment. However, the methods are typically quite sophisticated and not applicable outside laboratories. In this work, we considered PM emission source discrimination method which is based on continuous measurements of PM concentration with a relatively cheap instrument and stochastic analysis of the obtained data. The stochastic analysis is focused on the temporal variation of PM concentration and it involves two steps: (1) recognition of the category of distribution for the data i.e. stable or the domain of attraction of stable distribution and (2) finding best matching distribution out of Gaussian, stable and normal-inverse Gaussian (NIG). We examined six PM emission sources. They were associated with material processing in industrial environment, namely machining and welding aluminum, forged carbon steel and plastic with various tools. As shown by the obtained results, PM emission sources may be distinguished based on statistical distribution of PM concentration variations. Major factor responsible for the differences detectable with our method was the type of material processing and the tool applied. In case different materials were processed by the same tool the distinction of emission sources was difficult. For successful discrimination it was crucial to consider size-segregated mass fraction concentrations. In our opinion the presented approach is very promising. It deserves further study and development.

  13. Estimation of Methane Emissions from Municipal Solid Waste Landfills in China Based on Point Emission Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Bo-Feng; LIU Jian-Guo; GAO Qing-Xian; NIE Xiao-Qin; CAO Dong; LIU Lan-Cui; ZHOU Ying; ZHANG Zhan-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The methane (CH4) emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills in China in 2007 were estimated based on database of the three-dimensional emission factors matrix and point sources, by an IPCC recommended FOD (first-order decay) model. The location, capacity and age of landfills constitute the three dimensions of the emission factors matrix, which were obtained by laboratory analysis and in situ investigation. Key parameters such as waste composition, degradable organic carbon ratio, CH4 correction factor, oxidation factor and recovery rate, were carefully analyzed in terms of these three dimensions. The point sources database consists of 2,107 MSW landfills in cities and towns of China in 2007. The results show that the CH4 emissions from MSW landfills were 1.186 Mt in 2007. Compared with the CH4 emissions of 2.20 Mt in 2005, the significant discrepancy mainly comes from statistical data of landfills, e.g., number of landfills and amount of waste disposed in landfills. CH4 emissions were lower than 700 t for most of the landfills, whereas there were 279 landfills with emissions larger than 1,000 t, and only 10 landfills with emissions larger than 10,000 t. Jiangsu province ranks the largest emitter with 98,700 t while Tibet is the smallest emitter with 2,100 t. In general, the emissions from eastern provinces, such as Jiangsu, Guangdong and Zhejiang, were larger than those from western provinces, such as Ningxia, Tibet and Qinghai.

  14. Emission characteristics of AuSiBe field ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drandarov, N.; Georgieva, St.; Nikolov, B.; Donchev, T. (Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. po Elektronika)

    A ribbon type AuSiBe alloy field ion source, which combines the advantages of both hairpin type sources and reservoir type sources, has been constructed. The current-voltage characteristics of this source have been investigated. Hysteresis and four differentiated emission regions have been observed for them. By means of scanning electronic microscopy, it has been established that this complicated behaviour of the I-V curves and the angular distribution of the extracted ions are associated with the shape of the emitting surface. The mass spectrum of the emitted ions has been determined by means of an E x B mass filter. Considerable emission of Au[sup +], AuBe[sub 3][sup 2+], Si[sup 2+], Be[sup 2+], AuBe[sub 3][sup +], Be[sup +], Si[sup +], and Au[sup 2+] has been observed. (author).

  15. X International Conference on Kaon Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The International Conference on Kaon Physics 2016 took place at the University of Birmingham (United Kingdom) on 14-17 September 2016. This conference continued the KAON series, offering an opportunity for theorists and experimentalists from the high-energy physics community to discuss all aspects of kaon physics. The 2016 edition saw a strong participation from theory and phenomenology and the first kaon results from the LHCb experiment at CERN, as well as updates from several experiments around the world including NA62 and KOTO. All papers published in this volume of KAON2016 have been peer reviewed through processes administered by the proceedings Editors. Reviews were conducted by expert referees to the professional and scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing. The organizers and the participants wish to thank the University of Birmingham, the European Research Council, CERN, the UK Science and Technology Facility Council and the UK Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology for their support in the organization of this successful edition. Figure for summary

  16. Exploring Hadron Structure Through Exclusive Kaon Electroproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmignotto, Marco A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The kaon electroproduction cross section was extracted from data from the E93-018 and the E01-004 (FPI-2) experiments taken at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in the p(e,e'K+)Λ channel. The cross section was fully separated into longitudinal, transverse, and two interference components at four-momentum transfers Q2 of 1.0 (GeV/c)2 (with center of mass energy W=1.81 GeV), 1.36 and 2.07 (GeV/c)2 (W=2.31 GeV). The kaon form factor (FK) was extracted from the longitudinal cross section in these kinematics using the Regge model by Vanderhaeghen, Guidal, and Laget. Results show FK to be systematically lower than the empirical monopole form, although still compatible with this form within the estimated uncertainties. The resulting kaon form factor values were combined with the world pion and kaon form factor data to extract the transverse change densities of the pion and kaon. These were compared to that of the proton, showing a possible experimental glimpse of the transition between the proton core and the meson cloud in terms of transverse densities.

  17. Revisiting RG Flow for Kaon Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Paeng, Won-Gi

    2014-01-01

    Kaon condensation in compact-star matter can be considered as a quantum critical phenomenon with the kaon mass tuned to zero by the baryon density plus the electron chemical potential that increases at the increase of the density. We approach this problem with a renormalization group flow at one loop of the system of anti-kaons considered as pseudo-Goldstone bosons coupled to nucleonic matter described as a Fermi liquid near its fixed point. While the Weinberg-Tomozawa term in chiral Lagrangians is of leading order in describing kaon-nucleon interactions in chiral perturbation theory, hence widely employed in the literature, it is irrelevant in the RG sense, therefore plays, if any, a less important role in the condensation process. The consequence is that the $\\Lambda (1405)$ resonance which is driven by the Weinberg-Tomozawa term is irrelevant for triggering kaon condensation. On the contrary, the $KN$ sigma term $\\Sigma_{KN}$, subleading in chiral counting, can play a more crucial role in renormalization g...

  18. Transverse Flow of Kaons in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑玉明; 储自力; FUCHS Christian; FAESSLER Amand; 肖武; 华大平; 阎玉鹏

    2002-01-01

    The transverse flow of positively charged kaons from heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energy is investigatedwithin the framework of the quantum molecular dynamics model. The calculated results show that the experi-mental data are only consistent with those including the kaon mean-field potential from the chiral Lagrangian.This indicates that the transverse flow pattern of kaons is a useful probe of the kaon potential in a nuclearmedium.

  19. Source Attribution of Methane Emissions in Northeastern Colorado Using Ammonia to Methane Emission Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilerman, S. J.; Neuman, J. A.; Peischl, J.; Aikin, K. C.; Ryerson, T. B.; Perring, A. E.; Robinson, E. S.; Holloway, M.; Trainer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Due to recent advances in extraction technology, oil and natural gas extraction and processing in the Denver-Julesburg basin has increased substantially in the past decade. Northeastern Colorado is also home to over 250 concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), capable of hosting over 2 million head of ruminant livestock (cattle and sheep). Because of methane's high Global Warming Potential, quantification and attribution of methane emissions from oil and gas development and agricultural activity are important for guiding greenhouse gas emission policy. However, due to the co-location of these different sources, top-down measurements of methane are often unable to attribute emissions to a specific source or sector. In this work, we evaluate the ammonia:methane emission ratio directly downwind of CAFOs using a mobile laboratory. Several CAFOs were chosen for periodic study over a 12-month period to identify diurnal and seasonal variation in the emission ratio as well as differences due to livestock type. Using this knowledge of the agricultural ammonia:methane emission ratio, aircraft measurements of ammonia and methane over oil and gas basins in the western US during the Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) field campaign in March and April 2015 can be used for source attribution of methane emissions.

  20. Lidar method to estimate emission rates from extended sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, point measurements, often combined with models, are the primary means by which atmospheric emission rates are estimated from extended sources. However, these methods often fall short in their spatial and temporal resolution and accuracy. In recent years, lidar has emerged as a suitable to...

  1. Data structure for estimating emissions from non-road sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorenson, S. C.; Kalivoda, M.; Vacarro, R.; Trozzi, C.; Samaras, Z.; Lewis, C.A.

    1997-03-01

    The work described in the following is a portion of the MEET project (Methodologies for Estimation Air Pollutant Emissions from Transport). The overall goal of the MEET project is to consolidate and present methodologies which can be used to estimate air pollutant emissions from various types of traffic sources. One of the goals of MEET is to provide methodologies to be used in the COMMUTE project also funded by DG VII. COMMUTE is developing computer software which can be used to provide emissions inventories on the European scale. Although COMMUTE is viewed as a prime user of the information generated in MEET, the MEET results are intended to be used in a broader area, and on both smaller and larger spatial scales. The methodologies and data presented will be useful for planners on a more local scale than a national or continental basis. While most attention in previous years has been concentrated on emissions from road transport, it has become increasingly apparent in later years that the so-called off road transportation contributes significantly to the emission of air pollutants. The three most common off-road traffic modes are Air Traffic, Rail Traffic, and Ship or Marine traffic. In the following, the basic structure of the methods for estimating the emissions from these sectors will be given and of the input and output data associated with these calculations. The structures will of necessity be different for the different types of traffic. The data structures in the following reflect these variations and uncertainties. In some instances alternative approaches to emissions estimation will be suggested. The user must evaluate the amount and reliability of available data for the application at hand, and select the method which would be expected to give the highest accuracy. In any event, a large amount of uncertainty is inherent in the estimation of emissions from the non-road traffic sources, particularly those involving rail and maritime transport. (EG)

  2. Data structure for estimating emissions from non-road sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorenson, S. C.; Kalivoda, M.; Vacarro, R.; Trozzi, C.; Samaras, Z.; Lewis, C.A.

    1997-03-01

    The work described in the following is a portion of the MEET project (Methodologies for Estimation Air Pollutant Emissions from Transport). The overall goal of the MEET project is to consolidate and present methodologies which can be used to estimate air pollutant emissions from various types of traffic sources. One of the goals of MEET is to provide methodologies to be used in the COMMUTE project also funded by DG VII. COMMUTE is developing computer software which can be used to provide emissions inventories on the European scale. Although COMMUTE is viewed as a prime user of the information generated in MEET, the MEET results are intended to be used in a broader area, and on both smaller and larger spatial scales. The methodologies and data presented will be useful for planners on a more local scale than a national or continental basis. While most attention in previous years has been concentrated on emissions from road transport, it has become increasingly apparent in later years that the so-called off road transportation contributes significantly to the emission of air pollutants. The three most common off-road traffic modes are Air Traffic, Rail Traffic, and Ship or Marine traffic. In the following, the basic structure of the methods for estimating the emissions from these sectors will be given and of the input and output data associated with these calculations. The structures will of necessity be different for the different types of traffic. The data structures in the following reflect these variations and uncertainties. In some instances alternative approaches to emissions estimation will be suggested. The user must evaluate the amount and reliability of available data for the application at hand, and select the method which would be expected to give the highest accuracy. In any event, a large amount of uncertainty is inherent in the estimation of emissions from the non-road traffic sources, particularly those involving rail and maritime transport. (EG)

  3. CP Violation in Kaon Decays (II)

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanaka, Taku

    2014-01-01

    Major progress has been made in kaon physics in the past 50 years. The number of KL->pi+pi- events has increased by 6 orders of magnitude, and the observed CP violation was experimentally proven to be caused by a complex phase in the CKM matrix. Recent kaon experiments are now searching for new physics beyond the standard model with the K->pi nu nu-bar decays. The branching ratio of K->pi nu nu-bar decays are 7-8 orders of magnitude smaller than the branching ratio of KL->pi+ pi-. This paper reviews the progress of kaon experiments in the US and Japan, and how the 6-7 orders of magnitude improvements were possible in the past 50 years.

  4. Mapping methane emission sources over California based on airborne measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, T.; Guha, A.; Peischl, J.; Misztal, P. K.; Jonsson, H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Ryerson, T. B.

    2011-12-01

    The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32) has created a need to accurately characterize the emission sources of various greenhouse gases (GHGs) and verify the existing state GHG inventory. Methane (CH4) is a major GHG with a global warming potential of 20 times that of CO2 and currently constitutes about 6% of the total statewide GHG emissions on a CO2 equivalent basis. Some of the major methane sources in the state are area sources where methane is biologically produced (e.g. dairies, landfills and waste treatment plants) making bottom-up estimation of emissions a complex process. Other potential sources include fugitive emissions from oil extraction processes and natural gas distribution network, emissions from which are not well-quantified. The lack of adequate field measurement data to verify the inventory and provide independently generated estimates further contributes to the overall uncertainty in the CH4 inventory. In order to gain a better perspective of spatial distribution of major CH4 sources in California, a real-time measurement instrument based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) was installed in a Twin Otter aircraft for the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emissions Research in Natural Ecosystems Transects) campaign, where the driving research goal was to understand the spatial distribution of biogenic VOC emissions. The campaign took place in June 2011 and encompassed over forty hours of airborne CH4 and CO2 measurements during eight unique flights which covered much of the Central Valley and its eastern edge, the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and the coastal range. The coincident VOC measurements, obtained through a high frequency proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTRMS), aid in CH4 source identification. High mixing ratios of CH4 (> 2000 ppb) are observed consistently in all the flight transects above the Central Valley. These high levels of CH4 are accompanied by high levels of methanol which is an important

  5. ALMA Band 8 Continuum Emission from Orion Source I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Tomoya; Machida, Masahiro N.; Matsushita, Yuko; Motogi, Kazuhito; Matsumoto, Naoko; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Burns, Ross A.; Honma, Mareki

    2016-12-01

    We have measured continuum flux densities of a high-mass protostar candidate, a radio source I in the Orion KL region (Orion Source I) using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) at band 8 with an angular resolution of 0.″1. The continuum emission at 430, 460, and 490 GHz associated with Source I shows an elongated structure along the northwest-southeast direction perpendicular to the so-called low-velocity bipolar outflow. The deconvolved size of the continuum source, 90 au × 20 au, is consistent with those reported previously at other millimeter/submillimeter wavelengths. The flux density can be well fitted to the optically thick blackbody spectral energy distribution, and the brightness temperature is evaluated to be 700-800 K. It is much lower than that in the case of proton-electron or H- free-free radiations. Our data are consistent with the latest ALMA results by Plambeck & Wright, in which the continuum emission was proposed to arise from the edge-on circumstellar disk via thermal dust emission, unless the continuum source consists of an unresolved structure with a smaller beam filling factor.

  6. Kaons in flavour tagged B decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Bittner, M.; Eckstein, P.; Paulini, M. G.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Seeger, M.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Cronström, H. I.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Chechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1994-09-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e + e - storage ring DORIS II, flavour-dependent kaon production in B meson decays has been studied. Using the leptons as flavour tags, it has been possible to separately measure the multiplicities of K +, K - and K {/s 0} in inclusive B decays and in semileptonic B decays. The kaon production in semileptonic B decays was further used to estimate the ratio of charmed decays over all decays, and thus also the fraction of charmless B decays.

  7. Rare kaon, muon, and pion decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L.

    1998-12-01

    The author discusses the status of and prospects for the study of rare decays of kaons, muons, and pions. Studies of rare kaon decays are entering an interesting new phase wherein they can deliver important short-distance information. It should be possible to construct an alternative unitarity triangle to that determined in the B sector, and thus perform a critical check of the Standard Model by comparing the two. Rare muon decays are beginning to constrain supersymmetric models in a significant way, and future experiments should reach sensitivities which this kind of model must show effects, or become far less appealing.

  8. Quark model for kaon nucleon scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmed Osman

    2011-12-01

    Kaon nucleon elastic scattering is studied using chiral (3) quark model including antiquarks. Parameters of the present model are essentially based on nucleon–nucleon and nucleon–hyperon interactions. The mass of the scalar meson is taken as 635 MeV. Using this model, the phase shifts of the and partial waves of the kaon nucleon elastic scattering are investigated for isospins 0 and 1. The results of the numerical calculations of different partial waves are in good agreement with experimental data.

  9. Direct CP violation in neutral kaon decays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wojciech Wiślicki

    2004-03-01

    The final result of the NA48 experiment is presented and performed at the CERN SPS neutral kaon beams, on the direct CP violation parameter Re$('/)$, as measured from the decay rates of neutral kaons into two pions. The data collected in the years 1997-2001 yield the evidence for the direct CP violation with Re$('/)=(14.7± 2.2)× 10^{-4}$. Description of experimental method and systematics, comparison with the corresponding FNAL result and discussion of some implications for the theory are given.

  10. Bose-Einstein correlations of charged kaons in central Pb + Pb collisions at $E_{beam}$ = 158 GeV per nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, S V; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, Jerzy; Barton, R A; Behler, M; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blume, C; Blyth, C O; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Brun, R; Buncic, P; Cerny, V; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Filip, P; Fodor, Z; Foka, P Y; Freund, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gazdzicki, M; Georgopoulos, G; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Igo, G; Jones, P G; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kolesnikov, V I; Kollegger, T; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; Van Leeuwen, M; Lednicky, R; Lévai, Peter; Malakhov, A I; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Meurer, C; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Nelson, J M; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Perl, K; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pinsky, L; Pühlhofer, F; Reid, J G; Renfordt, R E; Retyk, W; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybicki, A; Sammer, T; Sandoval, A; Sann, H; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Squier, G T A; Stock, R; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Trainor, T A; Varga, D; Vassiliou, Maria; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Yoo, I K; Zaranek, J; Zimányi, J; 10.1016/S0370-2693(03)00102-3

    2003-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations of charged kaons were measured near mid- rapidity in central Pb + Pb collisions at 158 A GeV by the NA49 experiment at the CERN SPS. Source radii were extracted using the Yano-Koonin-Podgoretsky and Bertsch-Pratt parameterizations. The results are compared to published pion and kaon data. The measured m /sub perpendicular to / dependence for kaons and pions is consistent with collective transverse expansion of the source and a freeze-out time of about 9.5 fm. (31 refs).

  11. Emission sources of atmospheric phosphine and simulation of phosphine formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary results on the emission sources of atmospheric phosphine and the types of its precursors in the environment are described. Sunlight plays a more important role than oxygen in its degradation. The vertical profile of phosphine levels in ambient air has been measured. Laboratory simulation of phosphine formation under anaerobic conditions shows that addition of chicken manure, bone powder, or lecithin leads to an increment in phosphine emission. Phosphine can also be adsorbed to soil matrix and thus can survive in soil and sediment. Adsorption and light degradation explain the low ambient levels of phosphine.

  12. Controlling the Emission of Electromagnetic Sources by Coordinate transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Yu; Ran, Lixin; Chen, Hongsheng; Kong, Jin Au

    2007-01-01

    The coordinate transformation on the space that contains electromagnetic sources is studied. We find that, not only the permittivity and permeability tensors of the media, but also the sources inside the media will take another form in order to behave equivalently as the original case. It is demonstrated that, a source of arbitrary shape and position in the free space can be replaced by an appropriately designed metamaterial coating with current distributed on the inner surface and would not be detected by outer observers, because the emission of the source can be controlled at will in this way. As examples, we show how to design conformal antennas by covering the sources with transformation media. The method proposed in this letter provides a completely new approach to develop novel active EM devices.

  13. Fission-neutrons source with fast neutron-emission timing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusev, G., E-mail: rusev@lanl.gov; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.M.; Jandel, M.

    2016-05-01

    A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. The time is provided by registering the fission fragments in a layer of a thin scintillation film with a signal rise time of 1 ns. The scintillation light output is measured by two silicon photomultipliers with rise time of 0.5 ns. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements using it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  14. Modeling study of natural emissions, source apportionment, and emission control of atmospheric mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Suraj K.

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic pollutant and is important to understand its cycling in the environment. In this dissertation, a number of modeling investigations were conducted to better understand the emission from natural surfaces, the source-receptor relationship of the emissions, and emission reduction of atmospheric mercury. The first part of this work estimates mercury emissions from vegetation, soil and water surfaces using a number of natural emission processors and detailed (LAI) Leaf Area Index data from GIS (Geographic Information System) satellite products. East Asian domain was chosen as it contributes nearly 50% of the global anthropogenic mercury emissions into the atmosphere. The estimated annual natural mercury emissions (gaseous elemental mercury) in the domain are 834 Mg yr-1 with 462 Mg yr-1 contributing from China. Compared to anthropogenic sources, natural sources show greater seasonal variability (highest in simmer). The emissions are significant, sometimes dominant, contributors to total mercury emission in the regions. The estimates provide possible explanation for the gaps between the anthropogenic emission estimates based on activity data and the emission inferred from field observations in the regions. To understand the contribution of domestic emissions to mercury deposition in the United States, the second part of the work applies the mercury model of Community Multi-scale Air Quality Modeling system (CMAQ-Hg v4.6) to apportion the various emission sources attributing to the mercury wet and dry deposition in the 6 United States receptor regions. Contributions to mercury deposition from electric generating units (EGU), iron and steel industry (IRST), industrial point sources excluding EGU and IRST (OIPM), the remaining anthropogenic sources (RA), natural processes (NAT), and out-of-boundary transport (BC) in domain was estimated. The model results for 2005 compared reasonably well to field observations made by MDN (Mercury Deposition Network

  15. Quantifying methane emissions and sources in the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S.; Townsend-Small, A.; Schroeder, J.; Blake, N. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and is relatively constant throughout the atmosphere, at 1.8 ppmv. This value, however, is increasing primarily due to anthropogenic sources, including agriculture and natural gas extraction. Here we present atmospheric methane fluxes measured during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) in July - August 2014 in the Colorado Front Range on the NCAR C-130. During this campaign 775 advanced whole air samples (AWAS) were collected onboard the aircraft and 248 samples were collected on the ground in order to quantify and evaluate air pollution sources. Methane concentrations were measured continuously aboard the aircraft using cavity ringdown spectroscopy. Major sources of methane in this region are oil and natural gas extraction and distribution, landfills, and cattle feed lots. In order to assess the impact of methane emissions on this area, methane flux was evaluated by comparing upwind and downwind concentrations where significant enhancements were observed downwind. We also present information from other hydrocarbons measured in canisters to attribute methane emissions to urban, agricultural, and oil and gas sources. The state of Colorado recently enacted legislation to reduce emissions of hydrocarbons from oil and gas facilities and our measurements will provide a preliminary estimate of whether these regulations are effective.

  16. Landfill is an important atmospheric mercury emission source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xinbin; TANG Shunlin; LI Zhonggen; WANG Shaofeng; LIANG Lian

    2004-01-01

    Since municipal wastes contain refuses with high mercury contents, incineration of municipal wastes becomes the major anthropogenic atmospheric mercury emission source. In China, landfills are however the main way to dispose of municipal wastes. Total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations in landfill gas of Gaoyan sanitary landfill located in suburb of Guiyang City were monitored using a high temporal resolved automated mercury analyzer, and mono-methylmercury (MMHg) and dimethylmercury (DMHg) concentrations in landfill gas were also measured using GC coupled with the cold vapor atomic fluorescence (CVAFS) method. Meanwhile, the TGM exchange fluxes between exposed waste and air and the soil surface of the landfill and air, were measured using low Hg blank quartz flux chamber coupled with high temporal resolved automated mercury analyzer technique. TGM concentrations in landfill gas from half year filling area averaged out at 665.52±291.25 ng/m3, which is comparable with TGM concentrations from flue gas of a small coal combustion boiler in Guiyang. The average MMHg and DMHg concentrations averaged out at 2.06±1.82 ng/m3 and 9.50±5.18 ng/m3, respectively. It is proven that mercury emission is the predominant process at the surfaces of both exposed wastes and soil of landfill. Landfills are not only TGM emission source, but also methylmercury emission source to the ambient air. There are two ways to emit mercury to the air from landfills, one is with the landfill gas through landfill gas duct, and the other through soil/air exchange. The Hg emission processes from landfills are controlled by meteorological parameters.

  17. Intensity noise and spontaneous emission coupling in superluminescent light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, H.F. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (US))

    1990-01-01

    A simple expression for the noise in the photocurrent generated by the detection of light from an ideal superluminescent source is derived using a quantum amplifier model. The excess noise factor {ital X} is found to be related to the photocurrent {ital I{sub d}}, electronic charge, {ital e}, spontaneous emission coupling factor {ital K}, and full width at half maximum power of the emission spectrum {Delta}{ital v}{sub 1/2} by the expression {ital X} = 0.664 {ital I{sub d}/eK}{Delta}{ital v}{sub 1/2}. Implications of this result for the performance of fiberoptic gyroscopes using superluminescent diode (SLD) light sources and for the design of low-noise SLD's are discussed.

  18. Isospin violation in pion-kaon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, B; Kubis, Bastian; Mei{\\ss}ner, Ulf-G.

    2002-01-01

    We consider strong and electromagnetic isospin violation in near-threshold pion-kaon scattering. At tree level, such effects are small for all physical channels. We work out the complete one-loop corrections to the process pi^- K^+ -> pi^0 K^0. They come out rather small. We also show that the corresponding radiative cross section is highly suppressed at threshold.

  19. International Meeting on Physics at KAON

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, David; Speth, Josef

    1990-01-01

    "Physics at KAON", an international meeting jointly organized by the KFA Jillich and TRI­ UMF, was held in the Physikzentrum Bad Honnef from June 7 through June 9, 1989. This was one of a series of meetings - the first one in Europe - in which plans for the medium energy physics laboratory KAON were presented and some aspects of the physics at this new facility were discussed. The meeting focussed mainly on the topics of hadron spectroscopy, J{ -meson scattering, strangeness in nuclei, and rare decays. Also presented were some of the research programs at SATURNE and COSY which may well lead to KAON physics in the future. These proceed­ ings include articles which summarize our current experimental and theoretical knowledge in the various areas, as well as papers which describe lines of research feasible with KAON. The large number of participants - limited, in fact, by the capacity of the Physikzentrum - clearly demonstrates the great interest of the European physics community in the research avenue...

  20. Nonlinear Effect on Effective Mass of Kaon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiXiguo; GuoYanrui; GaoYuan; JinGenming

    2003-01-01

    The study of hardron properties in dense medium crekted in relativistic heavy ion collision is a subject of considerable current interest. Of particular importance is the modification of kaon properties in-medium. The knowledge is useful for our understanding of both chiral symmetry restoration in dense matter and the properties of the dense nuclear matter existing in neutron stars.

  1. The Revival of Kaon Flavour Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J

    2016-01-01

    After years of silence we should witness in the rest of this decade and in the next decade the revival of kaon flavour physics. This is not only because of the crucial measurements of the branching ratios for the rare decays $K^+\\to\\pi^+\

  2. Mitigation strategies for methane emissions from agricultural sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duxbury, J.M. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Anthropogenic emissions of CH{sub 4} account for 70% of total global emissions of this greenhouse gas. Current anthropogenic emissions of CH{sub 4} in the US are estimated to be between 24-30 Tg CH{sub 4} or 7-9% of the global anthropogenic total. By comparison the US is responsible for 27% of anthropogenic emissions of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel use. Table 1 shows that the major anthropogenic sources of CH{sub 4} in the US are landfills (37%), domestic livestock and livestock waste (31%) and the coal mining/natural gas/petroleum industries (28%). On a global basis it is estimated that US landfills contribute 30% to the global landfill total, whereas livestock (including waste) and the coal mining/natural gas/petroleum industries each contribute about 8% to their respective global totals. The US is an insignificant contributor (< 1%) to global emissions of CH{sub 4} from rice paddies.

  3. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au + Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Danley, D.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novak, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xie, W.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    We present a systematic study of charged-pion and kaon interferometry in Au +Au collisions at √{s NN}=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-mass dependence of the oscillations.

  4. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Asano, H; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, D; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanishchev, D; Jacak, B V; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, G W; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Montuenga, P; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Nouicer, R; Novak, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Koop, J D Orjuela; Osborn, J D; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, J S; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramson, B J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Rinn, T; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J G; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sexton, A; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Snowball, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-mass dependence of the oscillations.

  5. ALMA band 8 continuum emission from Orion Source I

    CERN Document Server

    Hirota, Tomoya; Matsushita, Yuko; Motogi, Kazuhito; Matsumoto, Naoko; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Burns, Ross A; Honma, Mareki

    2016-01-01

    We have measured continuum flux densities of a high-mass protostar candidate, a radio source I in the Orion KL region (Orion Source I) using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) at band 8 with an angular resolution of 0.1". The continuum emission at 430, 460, and 490 GHz associated with Source I shows an elongated structure along the northwest-southeast direction perpendicular to the so-called low-velocity bipolar outflow. The deconvolved size of the continuum source, 90 au times 20 au, is consistent with those reported previously at other millimeter/submillimeter wavelength. The flux density can be well fitted to the optically thick black-body spectral energy distribution (SED), and the brightness temperature is evaluated to be 700-800 K. It is much lower than that in the case of proton-electron or H- free-free radiations. Our data are consistent with the latest ALMA results by Plambeck & Wright (2016), in which the continuum emission have been proposed to arise from the edge-on circum...

  6. Mapping methane sources and emissions over California from direct airborne flux and VOC source tracer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, A.; Misztal, P. K.; Peischl, J.; Karl, T.; Jonsson, H. H.; Woods, R. K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying the contributions of methane (CH4) emissions from anthropogenic sources in the Central Valley of California is important for validation of the statewide greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory and subsequent AB32 law implementation. The state GHG inventory is largely based on activity data and emission factor based estimates. The 'bottom-up' emission factors for CH4 have large uncertainties and there is a lack of adequate 'top-down' measurements to characterize emission rates. Emissions from non-CO2 GHG sources display spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability, and are thus, often, poorly characterized. The Central Valley of California is an agricultural and industry intensive region with large concentration of dairies and livestock operations, active oil and gas fields and refining operations, as well as rice cultivation all of which are known CH4 sources. In order to gain a better perspective of the spatial distribution of major CH4 sources in California, airborne measurements were conducted aboard a Twin Otter aircraft for the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emissions Research in Natural Ecosystems Transects) campaign, where the driving research goal was to understand the spatial distribution of biogenic VOC emissions. The campaign took place in June 2011 and encompassed over forty hours of low-altitude and mixed layer airborne CH4 and CO2 measurements alongside coincident VOC measurements. Transects during eight unique flights covered much of the Central Valley and its eastern edge, the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and the coastal range. We report direct quantification of CH4 fluxes using real-time airborne Eddy Covariance measurements. CH4 and CO2 were measured at 1-Hz data rate using an instrument based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) along with specific VOCs (like isoprene, methanol, acetone etc.) measured at 10-Hz using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer - Eddy Covariance (PTRMS-EC) flux system. Spatially resolved eddy covariance

  7. On Emissivity of Reference Source of IR Radiometer for Remote Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    高木, 亨; 松井, 松長; 宮武, 将浩; タカギ, トオル; マツイ, マツナガ; ミヤタケ, マサヒロ; Tohru, TAKAGI; Matsunaga, MATSUI; Masahiro, MIYATAKE

    1980-01-01

    The reference source of the radiometer for remote sensing should be small and light the emissivity high and the field of view of the optical system wide. In this paper, the theoretical and experimental consideration on emissivity of the cavity type reference source of radiometer for remote sensing is performed. The results are as follows: 1) The simplified equation for calculation of emissivity of cavity type source is introduced. 2) The equation for emissivity of cavity type source at variou...

  8. Mapping Fugitive Gas Emission Sources and Severity Across Southeastern Saskatchewan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, J.; Risk, D. A.; Lavoie, M.; Williams, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Southeastern Saskatchewan, Canada contains a 10,000 km2 region heavily developed by oil and gas activity that has been struggling with air quality issues, arising from hundreds or thousands of oil and gas leak points. The region is also very diverse in terms of oilfield operators, who use extraction techniques including conventional, enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and fracking. As regulators and operators need more knowledge about emission patterns locally, we undertook comprehensive mapping and characterization of leak sources at the regional scale using vehicle-based data collection, together with computational techniques. We measured the presence and source of fugitive emissions from infrastructure and oilfield activities in eight 100 km2 survey domains. These included two controls with no oil and gas activity, and otherwise the domains were selected to capture the diversity of development; targeting primarily conventional and EOR activities in the Weyburn-Midale beds, and unconventional activities in the Bakken play. A total of 25 unique operators fell within the survey domains. Each domain was surveyed multiple times for CO2, CH4, and H2S, allowing us to identify persistent leaks and to screen out one-time events. The multiple gas targets also provided opportunities for discriminating one type of fugitive emission from another (i.e. flares from storage tanks) using ratios of excess (above ambient) concentrations, after correcting for natural background variability with a signal-processing routine. Fugitive emissions were commonly observed in all study domains. Most emissions were associated with oil and gas infrastructure, as opposed to drilling and other short-term activities. There were obvious emissions at many well pads, storage tanks, and flares. We also observed high geochemical variability around flares, with some being very effective in combusting toxic gases, and others less so. Almost all observed concentrations fell below regulatory limits, but have a

  9. Technologies and policies for "hard to scrub" emissions sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, J.

    2016-12-01

    The science of climate change yields harsh math regarding atmospheric accumulations of GHGs. The world is far from target trajectories for 2C or 1.5C, and the global carbon budget is severe. To achieve those targets requires two things. First, we must field technologies that reduce emissions from the "hard to scrub" parts of the US and global economies, such as heavy industry (cement and steel), aviation, ocean shipping, and household cooking and heating. Second, we will likely need negative emissions pathways for those sources that prove extremely difficult to remove or reduce - the climate equivalent of adding revenue to one's budget. Such pathways may well need to convert GHG emissions (especially CO2 and methane) into useful products with minimal infrastructure builds. Dramatic advances in advanced manufacturing, 3D printing, simulation, modeling, and data analytics have made possible solutions which were previously unthinkable or impossible. This include "bespoke reactors", which can simultaneously perform separations and conversions; low-cost modular chemical systems of any scale; biologically inspired or biologically mediated energy services; direct air carbon-capture systems; and electrochemical pathways for emissions reduction and conversion. However, these approaches are unlikely to be fielded without policy actions or reforms that support such systems in competitive global energy markets. Such policy measures do NOT require a carbon price. Rather, they could include individual or combined measures such as emission or performance standards, financial incentives (like tax credits or low-cost access to capital), border adjustable tariffs, creation of CO2 utilities, ands public good surcharges. Innovation in both technical and policy arenas are needed to achieve the goals of the Paris agreement signatories, and these innovations can be simultaneously configured to deliver substantive greenhouse gas mitigation.

  10. Kaon Condensates, Nuclear Symmetry Energy and Cooling of Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, S

    2003-01-01

    The cooling of neutron stars by URCA processes in the kaon-condensed neutron star matter for various forms of nuclear symmetry energy is investigated. The kaon-nucleon interactions are described by a chiral lagrangian. Nuclear matter energy is parametrized in terms of the isoscalar contribution and the nuclear symmetry energy in the isovector sector. High density behaviour of nuclear symmetry energy plays an essential role in determining the composition of the kaon-condensed neutron star matter which in turn affects the cooling properties. We find that the symmetry energy which decreases at higher densities makes the kaon-condensed neutron star matter fully protonized. This effect inhibits strongly direct URCA processes resulting in slower cooling of neutron stars as only kaon-induced URCA cycles are present. In contrast, for increasing symmetry energy direct URCA processes are allowed in the almost whole density range where the kaon condensation exists.

  11. Nonequilibrium Weak Processes in Kaon Condensation; 2, Kinetics of condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Muto, T; Iwamoto, N; Muto, Takumi; Tatsumi, Toshitaka; Iwamoto, Naoki

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of negatively charged kaon condensation in the early stages of a newly born neutron star is considered. The thermal kaon process, in which kaons are thermally produced by nucleon-nucleon collisions, is found to be dominant throughout the equilibration process. Temporal changes of the order parameter of the condensate and the number densities of the chemical species are obtained from the rate equations, which include the thermal kaon reactions as well as the kaon-induced Urca and the modified Urca reactions. It is shown that the dynamical evolution of the condensate is characterized by three stages: the first, prior to establishment of a condensate, the second, during the growth and subsequent saturation of the condensate, and the third, near chemical equilibrium. The connection between the existence of a soft kaon mode and the instability of the noncondensed state is discussed. Implications of the nonequilibrium process on the possible delayed collapse of a protoneutron star are also mentioned.

  12. Milagro Observations of TeV Emission from Galactic Sources in the Fermi Bright Source List

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Aune, T; Berley, D; Chen, C; Christopher, G E; DeYoung, T; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Huentemeyer, P H; Kolterman, B E; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Morgan, T; Mincer, A I; Némethy, P; Pretz, J; Ryan, J M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Yodh, G B

    2009-01-01

    We present the result of a search of Milagro sky map for spatial correlations with sources from a subset of the recent Fermi Bright Source List (BSL). The BSL consists of the 205 most significant sources detected above 100 MeV by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We select sources based on their categorization in the BSL, taking all confirmed or possible Galactic sources in the field of view of Milagro. Of the 34 Fermi sources selected, 14 are observed by Milagro at a significance of 3 standard deviations or more. We conduct this search with a new analysis which employs newly-optimized gamma-hadron separation and utilizes the full 8-year Milagro dataset. Milagro is sensitive to gamma rays above 1 TeV and these results extend the observation of these sources far above the Fermi energy band. With the new analysis and additional data, TeV emission is definitively observed associated with the Fermi pulsar J2229.0+6114, in the the Boomerang Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN). Furthermore, an extended region of TeV emission is...

  13. Loop corrections to pion and kaon neutrinoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Siddikov, Marat

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the next-to-leading order corrections to deeply virtual pion and kaon production in neutrino experiments. We estimate these corrections in the kinematics of the Minerva experiment at FERMILAB, and find that they are sizable and increase the leading order cross-section by up to a factor of two. We provide a code, which can be used for the evaluation of the cross-sections, taking into account these corrections and employing various GPD models.

  14. CALCULATION OF KAON ELECTROMAGNETIC FORM FACTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ZHI-GANG; WAN SHAO-LONG; WANG KE-LIN

    2001-01-01

    The kaon meson electromagnetic form factor is calculated in the framework of coupled Schwinger-Dyson and Bethe-Salpeter formulation in simplified impulse approximation (dressed vertex) with modified fiat-bottom potential,which is a combination of the flat-bottom potential taking into consideration the infrared and ultraviolet asymptotic behaviours of the effective quark-gluon coupling. All the numerical results give a good fit to experimental values.

  15. Non-perturbative renormalization in kaon decays

    CERN Document Server

    Donini, Andrea; Martinelli, G; Rossi, G C; Talevi, M; Testa, M; Vladikas, A

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the application of the MPSTV non-perturbative method \\cite{NPM} to the operators relevant to kaon decays. This enables us to reappraise the long-standing question of the $\\Delta I=1/2$ rule, which involves power-divergent subtractions that cannot be evaluated in perturbation theory. We also study the mixing with dimension-six operators and discuss its implications to the chiral behaviour of the $B_K$ parameter.

  16. Sterile neutrinos facing kaon physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abada, A.; Bečirević, D.; Sumensari, O.; Weiland, C.; Funchal, R. Zukanovich

    2017-04-01

    We discuss weak kaon decays in a scenario in which the Standard Model is extended by massive sterile fermions. After revisiting the analytical expressions for leptonic and semileptonic decays we derive the expressions for decay rates with two neutrinos in the final state. By using a simple effective model with only one sterile neutrino, compatible with all current experimental bounds and general theoretical constraints, we conduct a thorough numerical analysis which reveals that the impact of the presence of massive sterile neutrinos on kaon weak decays is very small, less than 1% on decay rates. The only exception is B (KL→ν ν ) , which can go up to O (10-10), thus possibly within the reach of the KOTO, NA62 and SHIP experiments. Plans have also been proposed to search for this decay at the NA64 experiment. In other words, if all the future measurements of weak kaon decays turn out to be compatible with the Standard Model predictions, this will not rule out the existence of massive light sterile neutrinos with non-negligible active-sterile mixing. Instead, for a sterile neutrino of mass below mK, one might obtain a huge enhancement of B (KL→ν ν ), otherwise negligibly small in the Standard Model.

  17. Neutron-emission measurements at a white neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Data on the spectrum of neutrons emittcd from neutron-induced reactions are important in basic nuclear physics and in applications. Our program studies neutron emission from inelastic scattering as well as fission neutron spectra. A ''white'' neutron source (continuous in energy) allows measurements over a wide range of neutron energies all in one experiment. We use the tast neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for incident neutron energies from 0.5 MeV to 200 MeV These experiments are based on double time-of-flight techniques to determine the energies of the incident and emitted neutrons. For the fission neutron measurements, parallel-plate ionization or avalanche detectors identify fission in actinide samples and give the required fast timing pulse. For inelastic scattering, gamma-ray detectors provide the timing and energy spectroscopy. A large neutron-detector array detects the emitted neutrons. Time-of-flight techniques are used to measure the energies of both the incident and emitted neutrons. Design considerations for the array include neutron-gamma discrimination, neutron energy resolution, angular coverage, segmentation, detector efficiency calibration and data acquisition. We have made preliminary measurements of the fission neutron spectra from {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. Neutron emission spectra from inelastic scattering on iron and nickel have also been investigated. The results obtained will be compared with evaluated data.

  18. Modal acoustic emission source determination in silicon carbide matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, G. N.

    2000-05-01

    Modal acoustic emission has been used to monitor damage accumulation in woven silicon carbide (SiC) fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites during tensile testing. There are several potential sources of damage in these systems including transverse matrix cracking, fiber/matrix interphase debonding and sliding, longitudinal cracks in between plies, and fiber breakage. In the past, it has been shown that modal AE is excellent at detecting when damage occurs and subsides, where the damage occurs along the length of the sample, and the loss in material stiffness as a consequence of damage accumulation. The next step is to determine the extent that modal AE can be used to identify specific physical sources. This study will discuss the status of this aim for this composite system. Individual events were analyzed and correlated to specific sources based on the characteristics of the received waveforms, e.g., frequency spectrum and energy, and when the event occurred during the stress-history of the tensile test. Post-test microstructural examination of the test specimens enabled some correlation between specific types of AE events and damage sources.

  19. One-dimensional pion, kaon, and proton femtoscopy in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm {NN}}}$ =2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Zhang, Chunhui; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdemir, Irem; Erhardt, Filip; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hansen, Alexander; Harris, John William; Hartmann, Helvi; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hilden, Timo Eero; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Ionita, Costin; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Kamal; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobayashi, Taiyo; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Legrand, Iosif; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera Renee; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Masui, Hiroshi; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Pant, Divyash; Papcun, Peter; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Seeder, Karin Soraya; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew Donald; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Symons, Timothy; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Takahashi, Jun; Tanaka, Naoto; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2015-11-19

    The size of the particle emission region in high-energy collisions can be deduced using the femtoscopic correlations of particle pairs at low relative momentum. Such correlations arise due to quantum statistics and Coulomb and strong final state interactions. In this paper, results are presented from femtoscopic analyses of $\\pi^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\pm}$, ${\\rm K}^{\\pm}{\\rm K}^{\\pm}$, ${\\rm K}^{0}_S{\\rm K}^{0}_S$, ${\\rm pp}$, and ${\\rm \\overline{p}}{\\rm \\overline{p}}$ correlations from Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm {NN}}}=2.76$ TeV by the ALICE experiment at the LHC. One-dimensional radii of the system are extracted from correlation functions in terms of the invariant momentum difference of the pair. The comparison of the measured radii with the predictions from a hydrokinetic model is discussed. The pion and kaon source radii display a monotonic decrease with increasing average pair transverse mass $m_{\\rm T}$ which is consistent with hydrodynamic model predictions for central collisions. The kaon and proton s...

  20. Identifying and characterizing major emission point sources as a basis for geospatial distribution of mercury emissions inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenhuisen, Frits; Wilson, Simon J.

    2015-07-01

    Mercury is a global pollutant that poses threats to ecosystem and human health. Due to its global transport, mercury contamination is found in regions of the Earth that are remote from major emissions areas, including the Polar regions. Global anthropogenic emission inventories identify important sectors and industries responsible for emissions at a national level; however, to be useful for air transport modelling, more precise information on the locations of emission is required. This paper describes the methodology applied, and the results of work that was conducted to assign anthropogenic mercury emissions to point sources as part of geospatial mapping of the 2010 global anthropogenic mercury emissions inventory prepared by AMAP/UNEP. Major point-source emission sectors addressed in this work account for about 850 tonnes of the emissions included in the 2010 inventory. This work allocated more than 90% of these emissions to some 4600 identified point source locations, including significantly more point source locations in Africa, Asia, Australia and South America than had been identified during previous work to geospatially-distribute the 2005 global inventory. The results demonstrate the utility and the limitations of using existing, mainly public domain resources to accomplish this work. Assumptions necessary to make use of selected online resources are discussed, as are artefacts that can arise when these assumptions are applied to assign (national-sector) emissions estimates to point sources in various countries and regions. Notwithstanding the limitations of the available information, the value of this procedure over alternative methods commonly used to geo-spatially distribute emissions, such as use of 'proxy' datasets to represent emissions patterns, is illustrated. Improvements in information that would facilitate greater use of these methods in future work to assign emissions to point-sources are discussed. These include improvements to both national

  1. The diffusive instability of kaon condensate in neutron star matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, S

    2004-01-01

    The beta equilibrated dense matter with kaon condensate is analyzed with respect to extended stability conditions including charge fluctuations. This kind of the diffusive instability, appeared to be common property in the kaon condensation case. Results for three different nuclear models are presented.

  2. 76 FR 4155 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Categories: Gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... promulgated National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Categories: Gasoline.... Total gasoline consumption is the total used nationwide, so the emission inventory includes emissions... January 24, 2011 Part II Environmental Protection Agency 40 CFR Parts 9 and 63 National Emission Standards...

  3. Danish emission inventories for road transport and other mobile sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Morten

    for road transport increased by 30 %, and CH4 emissions have decreased by 74 %. A N2O emission increase of 29 % is related to the relatively high emissions from older gasoline catalyst cars. The 1985-2010 emission decrease for NOX, NMVOC, CO and particulates (exhaust only: Size is below PM2.5) -52, -84...

  4. Effective Mass of Kaon in Asymmetrici Nuclear Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiXiguo; GaoYuan; LiuZiyu; ZuoWei

    2003-01-01

    The properties of kaon at very high baryon density has been a fascinating subject since 1986. Of particular importance is the modification of effective mass of antikaon in-medium. This is expected to not only help us to understander the chiral symmetry restoration but also effect the composition and structure of neutron star.. The modification of kaon and antikaon mass in medium might be a new mechanism of production at energies below the threshold. Based on the mean-field approximation to the effective SU(3)L×SU(3)n chiral Lagrangian, the kaon and anti kaon mass in medium, defined as the energy of a kaon (or antikaon) with zero three momentum,are then given by[1

  5. Halocarbon emissions and sources in the equatorial Atlantic Cold Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hepach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Halocarbons from oceanic sources contribute to halogens in the troposphere, and can be transported into the stratosphere where they take part in ozone depletion. This paper presents distribution and sources in the equatorial Atlantic from June and July 2011 of the four compounds bromoform (CHBr3, dibromomethane (CH2Br2, methyl iodide (CH3I and diiodomethane (CH2I2. Enhanced biological production during the Atlantic Cold Tongue (ACT season, indicated by phytoplankton pigment concentrations, led to elevated concentrations of CHBr3 of up to 44.7 pmol L−1 and up to 9.2 pmol L−1 for CH2Br2 in surface water, which is comparable to other tropical upwelling systems. While both compounds correlated very well with each other in the surface water,CH2Br2 was often more elevated in greater depth than CHBr3, which showed maxima in the vicinity of the deep chlorophyll maximum. The deeper maximum of CH2Br2 indicates an additional source in comparison to CHBr3 or a slower degradation of CH2Br2. Concentrations of CH3I of up to 12.8 pmol L−1 in the surface water were measured. In contrary to expectations of a predominantly photochemical source in the tropical ocean, its distribution was mostly in agreement with biological parameters, indicating a~biological source. CH2I2 was very low in the near surface water with maximum concentrations of only 3.7 pmol L−1, and the observed anticorrelation with global radiation was likely due to its strong photolysis. CH2I2 showed distinct maxima in deeper waters similar to CH2Br2. For the first time, diapycnal fluxes of the four halocarbons from the upper thermocline into and out of the mixed layer were determined. These fluxes were low in comparison to the halocarbon sea-to-air fluxes. This indicates that despite the observed maximum concentrations at depth, production in the surface mixed layer is the main oceanic source for all four compounds and has an influence on emissions into the atmosphere. The calculated

  6. Source location of chorus emissions observed by Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parrot

    Full Text Available One of the objectives of the Cluster mission is to study sources of various electromagnetic waves using the four satellites. This paper describes the methods we have applied to data recorded from the STAFF spectrum analyser. This instrument provides the cross spectral matrix of three magnetic and two electric field components. This spectral matrix is analysed to determine, for each satellite, the direction of the wave normal relative to the Earth’s magnetic field as a function of frequency and of time. Due to the Cluster orbit, chorus emissions are often observed close to perigee, and the data analysis determines the direction of these waves. Three events observed during different levels of magnetic activity are reported. It is shown that the component of the Poynting vector parallel to the magnetic field changes its sense when the satellites cross the magnetic equator, which indicates that the chorus waves propagate away from the equator. Detailed analysis indicates that the source is located in close vicinity of the plane of the geomagnetic equator.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms; Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities

  7. The Kaon Bag Parameter at Physical Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Frison, Julien; Christ, Norman H; Garron, Nicolas; Mawhinney, Robert; Sachrajda, Chris T; Yin, Hantao

    2013-01-01

    We present preliminary results for the calculation of the Kaon Bag parameter $B_K$ in $N_f=2+1$ lattice QCD, using M\\"obius Domain Wall Fermion ensembles generated by the RBC-UKQCD collaboration. This computation is done directly at physical meson masses, so that we do not have to rely on chiral perturbation theory or any other mass extrapolation. In parallel, the four-quark operator is renormalised through the Rome-Southampton technique. Finally, we compare our value with previous results and draw some conclusions about the remaining dominant contributions in our error budget.

  8. Targets for a Neutral Kaon Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, Christopher [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    A secondary beam of neutral Kaons is under consideration for Hall D at Jefferson Lab to perform spectroscopic studies of hyperons produced by K 0 L particles scattering from proton and deuteron targets. The proposed physics program would utilize the GlueX detector package currently installed in Hall D. This contribution looks at potential targets for use in the new facility, paying close attention to the existing infrastructure of GlueX and Hall D. Unpolarized cryotargets of liquid hydrogen and deuerium, as well as polarized solid targets of protons and deuterons are examined.

  9. Kaon condensation and multi-strange matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazda, D.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2010-04-01

    We report on dynamical calculations of multi- K¯ hypernuclei, which were performed by adding K¯ mesons to particle-stable configurations of nucleons, Λ and Ξ hyperons. The K¯ separation energy as well as the baryonic densities saturate with the number of antikaons. We demonstrate that the saturation is a robust feature of multi- K¯ hypernuclei. Because the K¯ separation energy B does not exceed 200 MeV, we conclude that kaon condensation is unlikely to occur in finite strong-interaction self-bound {N,Λ,Ξ} strange hadronic systems.

  10. Emissions from Combustion of Open Area Sources: Prescribed Forest and Agricultural Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions from wildfires and prescribed forest and agricultural burns generate a variety of emissions that can cause adverse health effects for humans, contribute to climate change, and decrease visibility. Only limited pollutant data are available for these sources, particularly...

  11. 78 FR 7487 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Area Sources: Industrial, Commercial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ..., beryllium, cadmium, lead, chromium, manganese, nickel, ethylene dioxide, and PCBs. In addition, the final..., arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, lead, chromium, manganese, nickel, POM, ethylene dioxide, and PCBs. In... emissions of harmful toxic air emissions from these combustion sources, improving air quality,...

  12. EMISSION FACTORS FOR IRON AND STEEL SOURCES: CRITERIA AND TOXIC POLLUTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report provides a comprehensive set of emission factors for sources of both criteria and toxic air pollutants in integrated iron and steel plants and specialty electric arc shops (minimills). Emission factors are identified for process sources, and process and open source fug...

  13. Polychlorinated Biphenyl Sources, Emissions, and Environmental Levels in school Buildings (PCB Workshop presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measure PCB emission rates from primary sources in laboratory chambersMeasure transport and sorption by materials and dust in laboratory chambersCharacterize PCBs in school building materialsEstimate PCB emission rates from sources in schoolsExamine congener patterns in sources a...

  14. Correlating emissions with time and temperature to predict worst-case emissions from open liquid area sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Archana; Sattler, Melanie L

    2005-08-01

    The two primary factors influencing ambient air pollutant concentrations are emission rate and dispersion rate. Gaussian dispersion modeling studies for odors, and often other air pollutants, vary dispersion rates using hourly meteorological data. However, emission rates are typically held constant, based on one measured value. Using constant emission rates can be especially inaccurate for open liquid area sources, like wastewater treatment plant units, which have greater emissions during warmer weather, when volatilization and biological activity increase. If emission rates for a wastewater odor study are measured on a cooler day and input directly into a dispersion model as constant values, odor impact will likely be underestimated. Unfortunately, because of project schedules, not all emissions sampling from open liquid area sources can be conducted under worst-case summertime conditions. To address this problem, this paper presents a method of varying emission rates based on temperature and time of the day to predict worst-case emissions. Emissions are varied as a linear function of temperature, according to Henry's law, and a tenth order polynomial function of time. Equation coefficients are developed for a specific area source using concentration and temperature measurements, captured over a multiday period using a data-logging monitor. As a test case, time/temperature concentration correlation coefficients were estimated from field measurements of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at the Rowlett Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant in Garland, TX. The correlations were then used to scale a flux chamber emission rate measurement according to hourly readings of time and temperature, to create an hourly emission rate file for input to the dispersion model ISCST3. ISCST3 was then used to predict hourly atmospheric concentrations of H2S. With emission rates varying hourly, ISCST3 predicted 384 acres of odor impact, compared with 103 acres for constant emissions. Because field

  15. A global catalogue of large SO2 sources and emissions derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioletov, Vitali E.; McLinden, Chris A.; Krotkov, Nickolay; Li, Can; Joiner, Joanna; Theys, Nicolas; Carn, Simon; Moran, Mike D.

    2016-09-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite sensor processed with the new principal component analysis (PCA) algorithm were used to detect large point emission sources or clusters of sources. The total of 491 continuously emitting point sources releasing from about 30 kt yr-1 to more than 4000 kt yr-1 of SO2 per year have been identified and grouped by country and by primary source origin: volcanoes (76 sources); power plants (297); smelters (53); and sources related to the oil and gas industry (65). The sources were identified using different methods, including through OMI measurements themselves applied to a new emission detection algorithm, and their evolution during the 2005-2014 period was traced by estimating annual emissions from each source. For volcanic sources, the study focused on continuous degassing, and emissions from explosive eruptions were excluded. Emissions from degassing volcanic sources were measured, many for the first time, and collectively they account for about 30 % of total SO2 emissions estimated from OMI measurements, but that fraction has increased in recent years given that cumulative global emissions from power plants and smelters are declining while emissions from oil and gas industry remained nearly constant. Anthropogenic emissions from the USA declined by 80 % over the 2005-2014 period as did emissions from western and central Europe, whereas emissions from India nearly doubled, and emissions from other large SO2-emitting regions (South Africa, Russia, Mexico, and the Middle East) remained fairly constant. In total, OMI-based estimates account for about a half of total reported anthropogenic SO2 emissions; the remaining half is likely related to sources emitting less than 30 kt yr-1 and not detected by OMI.

  16. Impact of routine episodic emissions on the expected frequency distribution of emissions from oil and gas production sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, N.; Blewitt, D.; Hebert, L. B.

    2015-12-01

    In coordination with oil and gas operators, we developed a high resolution (oil and gas emissions over a year. We include routine emissions from condensate tanks, dehydrators, pneumatic devices, fugitive leaks and liquids unloading. We explore the variability in natural gas emissions from these individual well-pad sources, and find that routine short-term episodic emissions such as tank flashing and liquids unloading result in the appearance of a skewed, or 'fat-tail' distribution of emissions, from an individual well-pad over time. Additionally, we explore the expected variability in emissions from multiple wells with different raw gas composition, gas/liquids production volumes and control equipment. Differences in well-level composition, production volume and control equipment translate into differences in well-level emissions leading to a fat-tail distribution of emissions in the absence of operational upsets. Our results have several implications for recent studies focusing on emissions from oil and gas sources. Time scale of emission estimates are important and have important policy implications. Fat tail distributions may not be entirely driven by avoidable mechanical failures, and are expected to occur under routine operational conditions from short-duration emissions (e.g., tank flashing, liquid unloading). An understanding of the expected distribution of emissions for a particular population of wells is necessary to evaluate whether the observed distribution is more skewed than expected. Temporal variability in well-pad emissions make comparisons to annual average emissions inventories difficult and may complicate the interpretation of long-term ambient fenceline monitoring data. Sophisticated change detection algorithms will be necessary to identify when true operational upsets occur versus routine short-term emissions.

  17. Charged kaon femtoscopic correlations in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, B; Adamova, D; Adare, A M; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agnello, M; Agocs, A G; Agostinelli, A; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, N; Ahmad Masoodi, A; Ahn, S U; Ahn, S A; Ajaz, M; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Almaraz Avina, E; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anielski, J; Anson, C; Anticic, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshauser, H; Arbor, N; Arcelli, S; Arend, A; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Arslandok, M; Asryan, A; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Aysto, J; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badala, A; Baek, Y W; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Ban, J; Baral, R C; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnafoldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Basu, S; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Behera, N K; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Bencedi, G; Beole, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdnikov, Y; Berenyi, D; Bergognon, A A E; Berzano, D; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhom, J; Bianchi, L; Bianchi, N; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bilandzic, A; Bjelogrlic, S; Blanco, F; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Boccioli, M; Bottger, S; Bogdanov, A; Boggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Boldizsar, L; Bombara, M; Book, J; Borel, H; Borissov, A; Bossu, F; Botje, M; Botta, E; Braidot, E; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Browning, T A; Broz, M; Brun, R; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bufalino, S; Buncic, P; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caballero Orduna, D.; Caffarri, D; Cai, X; Caines, H; Calvo Villar, E; Camerini, P; Canoa Roman, V; Cara Romeo, G; Carena, F; Carena, W; Carlin Filho, N; Carminati, F; Casanova Diaz, A; Castillo Castellanos, J; Castillo Hernandez, J F; Casula, E A R; Catanescu, V; Cavicchioli, C; Ceballos Sanchez, C; Cepila, J; Cerello, P; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Chawla, I; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Chibante Barroso, V; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; Chojnacki, M; Choudhury, S; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, S U; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cleymans, J; Coccetti, F; Colamaria, F; Colella, D; Collu, A; Conesa Balbastre, G; Conesa del Valle, Z; Connors, M E; Contin, G; Contreras, J G; Cormier, T M; Corrales Morales, Y; Cortese, P; Cortes Maldonado, I; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Cotallo, M E; Crescio, E; Crochet, P; Cruz Alaniz, E; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; Dalsgaard, H H; Danu, A; Das, S; Das, I; Das, D; Das, K; Dash, A; Dash, S; De, S; de Barros, G O V; De Caro, A; De Cataldo, G; de Cuveland, J; De Falco, A; De Gruttola, D; Delagrange, H; Deloff, A; De Marco, N; Denes, E; De Pasquale, S; Deppman, A; D'Erasmo, G; de Rooij, R; Diaz Corchero, M A; Di Bari, D; Dietel, T; Di Giglio, C; Di Liberto, S; Di Mauro, A; Di Nezza, P; Divia, R; Djuvsland, O; Dobrin, A; Dobrowolski, T; Donigus, B; Dordic, O; Driga, O; Dubey, A K; Dubla, A; Ducroux, L; Dupieux, P; Dutta Majumdar, A K; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Elia, D; Emschermann, D; Engel, H; Erazmus, B; Erdal, H A; Espagnon, B; Estienne, M; Esumi, S; Evans, D; Eyyubova, G; Fabris, D; Faivre, J; Falchieri, D; Fantoni, A; Fasel, M; Fearick, R; Fehlker, D; Feldkamp, L; Felea, D; Feliciello, A; Fenton-Olsen, B; Feofilov, G; Fernandez Tellez, A; Ferretti, A; Festanti, A; Figiel, J; Figueredo, M A S; Filchagin, S; Finogeev, D; Fionda, F M; Fiore, E M; Floratos, E; Floris, M; Foertsch, S; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Fragiacomo, E; Francescon, A; Frankenfeld, U; Fuchs, U; Furget, C; Fusco Girard, M; Gaardhoje, J J; Gagliardi, M; Gago, A; Gallio, M; Gangadharan, D R; Ganoti, P; Garabatos, C; Garcia-Solis, E; Garishvili, I; Gerhard, J; Germain, M; Geuna, C; Gheata, M; Gheata, A; Ghosh, P; Gianotti, P; Girard, M R; Giubellino, P; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Glassel, P; Gomez, R; Ferreiro, E G; Gonzalez-Trueba, L H; Gonzalez-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Goswami, A; Gotovac, S; Graczykowski, L K; Grajcarek, R; Grelli, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoras, A; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, S; Grigoryan, A; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Gros, P; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J Y; Grosso, R; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerzoni, B; Guilbaud, M; Gulbrandsen, K; Gulkanyan, H; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; Haaland, O; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Han, B H; Hanratty, L D; Hansen, A; Harmanova-Tothova, Z; Harris, J W; Hartig, M; Harton, A; Hasegan, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, S; Hayrapetyan, A; Heckel, S T; Heide, M; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Herrera Corral, G; Herrmann, N; Hess, B A; Hetland, K F; Hicks, B; Hippolyte, B; Hori, Y; Hristov, P; Hrivnacova, I; Huang, M; Humanic, T J; Hwang, D S; Ichou, R; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Inaba, M; Incani, E; Innocenti, G M

    2013-01-01

    Correlations of two charged identical kaons (K$^{ch}$ K$^{ch}$) are measured in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV by the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). One-dimensional K$^{ch}$ K$^{ch}$ correlation functions are constructed in three multiplicity and four transverse momentum ranges. The K$^{ch}$ K$^{ch}$ femtoscopic source parameters R and lambda are extracted. The K$^{ch}$ K$^{ch}$ correlations show a slight increase of femtoscopic radii with increasing multiplicity and a slight decrease of radii with increasing transverse momentum. These trends are similar to the ones observed for $\\pi\\pi$ and $K_s^0 K_s^0$ correlations in pp and heavy-ion collisions. However, the observed one dimensional correlation radii for charged kaons are larger at high multiplicities than those for pions in contrast to what was observed in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC.

  18. New Physics Signatures in Kaon Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Blanke, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Kaon physics provides a unique opportunity to identify new flavour and CP violating interactions beyond the Standard Model (SM). In the SM, implied by the hierarchical structure of the CKM matrix and the GIM mechanism, flavour changing neutral current processes are most strongly suppressed in the kaon sector while the suppression is much less effective in the B meson systems. Thus their theoretical cleanness makes rare K decays, in particular the K -> pi nu anti-nu system, extremely well suited to look for deviations from their tiny SM values. Despite the increasingly stringent constraints on new physics from direct search experiments as well as indirect searches in B meson decays, large enhancements of both K^+ -> pi^+ nu anti-nu and K_L -> pi^0 nu anti-nu are still possible, and deviations from the SM could be observed even for a multi-TeV new physics scale. In addition the correlation betweeen the charged and neutral K -> pi nu anti-nu modes provides insight on the new physics operator structure in K^0 - a...

  19. Consideration of the Change of Material Emission Signatures due to Longterm Emissions for Enhancing VOC Source Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, K. H.; Zhang, J. S.; Knudsen, Henrik Nellemose

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the changes of VOC material emission profiles over time and develop a method to account for such changes in order to enhance a source identification technique that is based on the measurements of mixed air samples and the emission signatures of in...

  20. Consideration Of The Change Of Material Emission Signatures Due To Long-term Emissions For Enhancing Voc Source Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, K. H.; Zhang, J. S.; Knudsen, H. N.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the changes of VOC material emission profiles over time and develop a method to account for such changes in order to enhance a source identification technique that is based on the measurements of mixed air samples and the emission signatures of in...

  1. Extracting the Kaon Collins function from $e^+e^-$ hadron pair production data

    CERN Document Server

    Anselmino, M; D'Alesio, U; Hernandez, J O Gonzalez; Melis, S; Murgia, F; Prokudin, A

    2015-01-01

    The latest data released by the BaBar Collaboration on azimuthal correlations measured for pion-kaon and kaon-kaon pairs produced in $e^+e^-$ annihilations allow, for the first time, a direct extraction of the kaon Collins functions. These functions are then used to compute the kaon Collins asymmetries in Semi Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering processes, which result in good agreement with the measurements performed by the HERMES and COMPASS Collaborations.

  2. VUV Emission of Microwave Driven Argon Plasma Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Julio; Espinho, Susana; Felizardo, Edgar; Tatarova, Elena; Dias, Francisco; Ferreira, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    An experimental and kinetic modeling investigation of a low-pressure (0.1-1.2 mbar), surface wave (2.45 GHz) induced Ar plasma as a source vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light is presented, using visible and VUV optical spectroscopy. The electron density and the relative VUV emission intensities of excited Ar atoms (at 104.8 nm and 106.6 nm) and ions (at 92.0 nm and 93.2 nm) were determined as a function of the microwave power and pressure. The experimental results were analyzed using a 2D self-consistent theoretical model based on a set of coupled equations including the electron Boltzmann equation, the rate balance equations for the most important electronic excited species and for charged particles, the gas thermal balance equation, and the wave electrodynamics. The principal collisional and radiative processes for neutral Ar(3p54s) and Ar(3p54p) and ionized Ar(3s3p6 2S1/2) levels are accounted for. Model predictions are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. This study was funded by the Foundation for Science and Technology, Portuguese Ministry of Education and Science, under the research contract PTDC/FIS/108411/2008.

  3. Measurement of the charged kaon lifetime with the KLOE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Antonelli, M; Archilli, F; Bacci, C; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, S; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocchetta, S; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Chi, S; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Micco, B; Doria, A; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Fiore, S; Forti, C; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gorini, E; Graziani, E; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Mei, W; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Perfetto, F; Primavera, M; Santangelo, P; Saracino, G; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Sibidanov, A; Spadaro, T; Testa, M; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Venanzoni, G; Versaci, R; Xu, G

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the charged kaon lifetime using a sample of 15 \\times 10^6 tagged kaon decays. Charged kaons were produced in pairs at the DA\\PhiNE \\phi-factory, e^+e^- \\to \\phi \\to K^+ K^-. The decay of a K^+ was tagged by the production of a K^- and viceversa. The lifetime was obtained, for both charges, from independent measurements of the decay time and decay lenght distributions. From fits to the four distributions we find \\tau = (12.347\\pm0.030) ns.

  4. Global mercury emissions to the atmosphere from anthropogenic and natural sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Pirrone

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an up-to-date assessment of global mercury emissions from anthropogenic and natural sources. On an annual basis, natural sources account for 5207 Mg of mercury released to the global atmosphere, including the contribution from re-emission processes, which are emissions of previously deposited mercury originating from anthropogenic and natural sources, and primary emissions from natural reservoirs. Anthropogenic sources, which include a large number of industrial point sources, are estimated to account for 2320 Mg of mercury emitted annually. The major contributions are from fossil-fuel fired power plants (810 Mg yr−1, artisanal small scale gold mining (400 Mg yr−1, non-ferrous metals manufacturing (310 Mg yr−1, cement production (236 Mg yr−1, waste disposal (187 Mg yr−1 and caustic soda production (163 Mg yr−1. Therefore, our current estimate of global mercury emissions suggests that the overall contribution from natural sources (primary emissions+re-emissions and anthropogenic sources is nearly 7527 Mg per year, the uncertainty associated with these estimates are related to the typology of emission sources and source regions.

  5. Global mercury emissions to the atmosphere from anthropogenic and natural sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Pirrone

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an up-to-date assessment of global mercury emissions from anthropogenic and natural sources. On an annual basis, natural sources account for 5207 Mg of mercury released to the global atmosphere, including the contribution from re-emission processes, which are emissions of previously deposited mercury originating from anthropogenic and natural sources, and primary emissions from natural reservoirs. Anthropogenic sources, which include a large number of industrial point sources, are estimated to account for 2320 Mg of mercury emitted annually. The major contributions are from fossil-fuel fired power plants (810 Mg yr−1, artisanal small scale gold mining (400 Mg yr−1, non-ferrous metals manufacturing (310 Mg yr−1, cement production (236 Mg yr−1, waste disposal (187 Mg yr−1 and caustic soda production (163 Mg yr−1. Therefore, our current estimate of global mercury emissions suggests that the overall contribution from natural sources (primary emissions + re-emissions and anthropogenic sources is nearly 7527 Mg per year, the uncertainty associated with these estimates are related to the typology of emission sources and source regions.

  6. Global mercury emissions to the atmosphere from anthropogenic and natural sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrone, N.; Cinnirella, S.; Feng, X.; Finkelman, R. B.; Friedli, H. R.; Leaner, J.; Mason, R.; Mukherjee, A. B.; Stracher, G. B.; Streets, D. G.; Telmer, K.

    2010-07-01

    This paper provides an up-to-date assessment of global mercury emissions from anthropogenic and natural sources. On an annual basis, natural sources account for 5207 Mg of mercury released to the global atmosphere, including the contribution from re-emission processes, which are emissions of previously deposited mercury originating from anthropogenic and natural sources, and primary emissions from natural reservoirs. Anthropogenic sources, which include a large number of industrial point sources, are estimated to account for 2320 Mg of mercury emitted annually. The major contributions are from fossil-fuel fired power plants (810 Mg yr-1), artisanal small scale gold mining (400 Mg yr-1), non-ferrous metals manufacturing (310 Mg yr-1), cement production (236 Mg yr-1), waste disposal (187 Mg yr-1) and caustic soda production (163 Mg yr-1). Therefore, our current estimate of global mercury emissions suggests that the overall contribution from natural sources (primary emissions + re-emissions) and anthropogenic sources is nearly 7527 Mg per year, the uncertainty associated with these estimates are related to the typology of emission sources and source regions.

  7. Kaon femtoscopy in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=2.76$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Shreyasi; The ALICE collaboration; Adamova, Dagmar; Adolfsson, Jonatan; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Bazo Alba, Jose Luis; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altenkamper, Lucas; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andreou, Dimitra; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barioglio, Luca; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boca, Gianluigi; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonomi, Germano; Bonora, Matthias; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Bratrud, Lars; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Capon, Aaron Allan; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chandra, Sinjini; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Chowdhury, Tasnuva; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Concas, Matteo; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Costanza, Susanna; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Franz Degenhardt, Hermann; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Van Doremalen, Lennart Vincent; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Duggal, Ashpreet Kaur; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Esumi, Shinichi; Eulisse, Giulio; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabbietti, Laura; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Francisco, Audrey; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gajdosova, Katarina; Gallio, Mauro; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-solis, Edmundo Javier; Garg, Kunal; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; De Leone Gay, Maria Beatriz; Germain, Marie; Ghosh, Jhuma; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Sanchez Gonzalez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Greiner, Leo Clifford; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grion, Nevio; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosa, Fabrizio; Grosse-oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Gruber, Lukas; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Bautista Guzman, Irais; Haake, Rudiger; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Haque, Md Rihan; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hassan, Hadi; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hills, Christopher; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Hohlweger, Bernhard; Horak, David; Hornung, Sebastian; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hughes, Charles; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Islam, Md Samsul; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacak, Barbara; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jaelani, Syaefudin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jercic, Marko; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karczmarczyk, Przemyslaw; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khabanova, Zhanna; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Khuntia, Arvind; Kielbowicz, Miroslaw Marek; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Byungchul; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Lokesh; Kumar, Shyam; Kundu, Sourav; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lai, Yue Shi; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lapidus, Kirill; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lavicka, Roman; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lehner, Sebastian; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lim, Bong-hwi; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lindsay, Scott William; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Litichevskyi, Vladyslav; Llope, William; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Loncar, Petra; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Luhder, Jens Robert; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Lucio Martinez, Jose Antonio; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Masson, Erwann; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Mathis, Andreas Michael; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mihaylov, Dimitar Lubomirov; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Myers, Corey James; Myrcha, Julian Wojciech; Nag, Dipanjan; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Narayan, Amrendra; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Negrao De Oliveira, Renato Aparecido; Nellen, Lukas; Nesbo, Simon Voigt; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pacik, Vojtech; Pagano, Davide; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Palni, Prabhakar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Panebianco, Stefano; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Pathak, Surya Prakash; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira, Luis Gustavo; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Peretti Pezzi, Rafael; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pliquett, Fabian; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Pozdniakov, Valeriy; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Rana, Dhan Bahadur; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-lucian; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Rokita, Przemyslaw Stefan; Ronchetti, Federico; Dominguez Rosas, Edgar; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Rotondi, Alberto; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Vazquez Rueda, Omar; Rui, Rinaldo; Rumyantsev, Boris; Rustamov, Anar; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Saarinen, Sampo; Sadhu, Samrangy; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Saha, Sumit Kumar; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Baidyanath; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandoval, Andres; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarkar, Nachiketa; Sarma, Pranjal; Sas, Mike Henry Petrus; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Scheid, Horst Sebastian; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Marten Ole; Schmidt, Martin; Schmidt, Nicolas Vincent; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sett, Priyanka; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shaikh, Wadut; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Anjali; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Sheikh, Ashik Ikbal; Shigaki, Kenta; Shou, Qiye; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singhal, Vikas; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Sozzi, Federica; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Stocco, Diego; Storetvedt, Maksim Melnik; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Suzuki, Ken; Swain, Sagarika; Szabo, Alexander; Szarka, Imrich; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thakur, Dhananjaya; Thakur, Sanchari; Thomas, Deepa; Thoresen, Freja; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Tikhonov, Anatoly; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Rojas Torres, Solangel; Tripathy, Sushanta; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Tropp, Lukas; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Trzeciak, Barbara Antonina; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vazquez Doce, Oton; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Vertesi, Robert; Vickovic, Linda; Vigolo, Sonia; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Voscek, Dominik; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Wagner, Boris; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wenzel, Sandro Christian; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Willsher, Emily; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Witt, William Edward; Yalcin, Serpil; Yamakawa, Kosei; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correa Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann; Zou, Shuguang

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of three-dimensional femtoscopic analyses for charged and neutral kaonsrecorded by ALICE in Pb–Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=2.76$ Femtoscopy is used to measure the space-time characteristics of particle production from the effects of quantum statistics and final-state interactions in two-particle correlations. Kaon femtoscopy is an important supplement to that of pions because it allows one to distinguish between different model scenarios working equally well for pions. In particular, we compare the measured 3D kaon radii with a purely hydrodynamical calculation and a model where the hydrodynamic phase is followed by a hadronic rescattering stage. The former predicts an approximate transverse mass ($m_{\\rm T}$) scaling of source radii obtained from pion and kaon correlations. This $m_{\\rm T}$ scaling appears to be broken in our data, which indicates the importance of the hadronic rescattering phase at LHC energies. A $k_{\\rm T}$ scaling of pion and kaon source r...

  8. Analysis of point source emissions in the Texas-Mexico border region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, A.; Deshpande, B. [Texas A& amp; M University, Kingsville, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Pollutant emissions in the Texas-Mexico border were investigated using an emission database that covers 25 Texas counties and the states of Coahuila, Chihuahua, Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas in Mexico. Major emissions are from energy generation, mainly from two coal-fired facilities in Coahuila, which also generate most of carbon dioxide. Texas exhibits a larger concentration of sources; around Laredo and the Lower Rio Grande Valley and a sugarcane mill is a significant contributor to particles emissions. In Mexico the minerals and metals industries are the second major contributors to emissions, especially particles. Fossil fuel production is the main source of VOCs.

  9. Dioxin emissions from biomass fired energy plants and other sources in Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleicher, O.; Jensen, A.A.; Blinksbjerg, P.; Thomsen, E.; Schilling, B.

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents results from a new Danish investigation of emissions of dioxins (PCDD) and furans (PCDF) from various sources carried out for the Danish EPA. The purpose was to investigate smaller sources (in size or emission), for which the knowledge of the PCDD/F emissions was low or missing. The sources were: Five biomass plants (> 1 MW) using straw, wood and chip board residue, a farm size boiler (> 1 MW) using straw, a wood stove during wood pellets, and three district heating plants (> 1 MW) using waste oil. In addition, measurements were made of emissions from barbecuing, and cremation of corpses in two crematories. (Author) 5 refs.

  10. Test Method for High β Particle Emission Rate of 63Ni Source Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Li-feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the problem of measurement difficulties of β particle emission rate of Ni-63 source plate used for Ni-63 betavoltaic battery, a relative test method of scintillation current method was erected according to the measurement principle of scintillation detector.β particle emission rate of homemade Ni-63 source plate was tested by the method, and the test results were analysed and evaluated, it was initially thought that scintillation current method was a feasible way of testing β particle emission rate of Ni-63 source plate with high β particle emission rate.

  11. Cosmology tests in rare kaon decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duk Viacheslav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Standard Model (SM of particle physics is an extremely successful theory that effectively describes strong and electroweak interactions up to the energies presently accessible. Still, the SM does not explain the observed parameters of neutrino oscillations, baryon asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter (DM, and contains a fine-tuning of 16 orders of magnitude (the gauge hierarchy problem. Various New Physics (NP models beyond the SM have been developed in order to address the above limitations. This paper concentrates on several models related to cosmology and their tests in rare kaon decays. In particular, recent NA48/2 results on the search for heavy neutrinos, light in-flatons and dark photons are presented. Prospects for the ongoing NA62 experiment are discussed.

  12. Pion and Kaon Electromagnetic Form Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Bijnens, J; Bijnens, Johan; Talavera, Pere

    2002-01-01

    We study the electromagnetic form factor of the pion and kaons at low-energies with the use of Chiral Perturbation Theory. The analysis is performed within the three flavour framework and at next-to-next-to-leading order. We explain carefully all the relevant consistency checks on the expressions, present full analytical results for the pion form factor and describe all the assumptions in the analysis. From the phenomenological point of view we make use of our expression and the available data to obtain the charge radius of the pion obtaining $_V^\\pi=(0.452+-0.013) fm^2$, as well as the low-energy constant $L_9^r(m_\\rho)= (5.93+-0.43)10^{-3}$. We also obtain experimental values for 3 combinations of order $p^6$ constants.

  13. Strange Baryonic Matter and Kaon Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazda, D.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    In this contribution we address the question whether kaon condensation could occur in strongly interacting self-bound strange hadronic matter. In our comprehensive dynamical relativistic mean-field (RMF) calculations of nuclear and hypernuclear systems containing several antikaons we found saturation of bar K separation energy as well as the associated nuclear and bar K density distributions upon increasing the number of bar K mesons. The saturation pattern was found to be a universal feature of these multi-strangeness configurations. Since in all cases the bar K separation energy does not exceed 200 MeV, we conclude that bar K mesons do not provide the physical "strangeness" degrees of freedom for self-bound strange hadronic matter.

  14. Multi-kaonic Hypernuclei and Kaon Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazda, D.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2011-09-01

    This contribution reports on dynamical, self-consistent calculations of multi-bar K hypernuclei, which were performed by adding antikaons to particle-stable nuclear configurations of nucleons, Λ and Ξ hyperons. Our results show a robust pattern of saturation of the bar K separation energy Bbar K as a function of the number of bar K mesons, with Bbar K bounded from above by 200 MeV. The associated baryon densities saturate at values 2-3 times nuclear-matter density. The main reason for saturation is the repulsion induced by the vector meson fields between bar K mesons, similarly to what was found for multi-bar K nuclei. The calculations confirm that strangeness in finite strong-interaction self-bound systems is realized through hyperons, with no room for kaon condensation.

  15. Searches for very rare decays of kaons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, K. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The physics motivation for searches for very rare kaon decays, either forbidden or suppressed within the Standard Model, is briefly discussed. Simple arguments conclude that such searches probe possible new forces at a 200 TeV mass scale or constitute a precision test of the electroweak model. The examples of such process are decays of K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu} {sup {+-}}e{sup -+}, K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {mu}{sup +} e{sup -}, K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -}, and K{sup +} {yields} {pi} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}. We present the current experimental status and describe the new efforts to reach sensitivities down to one part in 10{sup 12}. The discussion is focused on the experimental program at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where intense beams make such studies possible.

  16. National mapping of GHG and non-GHG emissions sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    The report documents the work done in work package 1 of the project “National mapping of GHG and non-GHG emissions sources”. The work consisted of a literature review on current state of the art for spatial and temporal distribution of emissions and development of the specifications for both...

  17. Current Issues in Kaon Photoelectro-Production off the Nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The electromagnetic kaon production amplitudes associated to Lambda/Sigma hyperons can be described by phenomenological models, most notably by isobar approaches. Experimental data on kaon production have been collected at ELSA, SPring8, GRAAL, LNS Tohoku, and Jefferson Lab in the past, the measurements at Jefferson Lab providing the largest kinematic coverage and statistical significance. However, ambiguities inherent in the models, some data inconsistency in the cross-sections taken at different laboratories, and the problem of missing acceptance in forward direction of the experimental set-ups hinders a reliable extraction of resonance parameters. Predictions for the hypernuclear photo-production cross-section rely on a consistent and comprehensive description of the elementary process at forward kaon angles, where the current strong variation of the models is very unsatisfactory. A number of new experiments are now addressing these issues, among them the charged kaon electro-production programme with the ...

  18. Study Pinpoints Sources of Polluting Vehicle Emissions (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-03-01

    Unburned lubricant produces 60%-90% of organic carbon emissions. While diesel fuel is often viewed as the most polluting of conventional petroleum-based fuels, emissions from gasoline engines can more significantly degrade air quality. Gasoline exhaust is at least as toxic on a per-unit-mass basis as diesel exhaust, and contributes up to 10 times more particulate matter (PM) to the emission inventory. Because emissions from both fuels can gravely impact health and the environment, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) launched a study to understand how these pollutants relate to fuels, lubricants, and engine operating conditions. NREL's Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) project tested a variety of vehicles over different drive cycles at moderate (72 F) and cold (20 F) temperatures. Testing included: (1) Normal and high-emitting light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicles; (2) Gasoline, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG)-powered vehicles; (3) New and aged lubricants representative of those currently on the market; and (4) Gasoline containing no ethanol, E10, Texas-mandated low-emission diesel fuel, biodiesel, and CNG. The study confirmed that normally functioning emission control systems for gasoline light-duty vehicles are very effective at controlling organic carbon (OC) emissions. Diesel vehicles without aftertreatment emission control systems exhibited OC emissions approximately one order of magnitude higher than gasoline vehicles. High-emitter gasoline vehicles produced OC emissions similar to diesel vehicles without exhaust aftertreatment emission control. Exhaust catalysts combusted or converted more than 75% of lubricating oil components in the exhaust gases. Unburned crankcase lubricant made up 60%-90% of OC emissions. This OC represented 20%-50% of emitted PM in all but two of the vehicles. Three-way catalysts proved effective at reducing most of the OC. With high PM emitters or vehicles with

  19. What Is the Source of Quiet Sun Transition Region Emission?

    CERN Document Server

    Schmit, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Dating back to the first observations of the on-disk corona, there has been a qualitative link between the photosphere's magnetic network and enhanced transition-temperature plasma emission. These observations led to the development of a general model that describes emission structures through the partitioning of the atmospheric volume with different magnetic loop geometries that exhibit different energetic equilibria. Does the internetwork produce transition-temperature emission? What fraction of network flux connects to the corona? How does quiet sun emission compare with low-activity Sun-like stars? In this work, we revisit the canonical model of the quiet sun, with high-resolution observations from IRIS and HMI in hand, to address those questions. We use over 900 deep exposures of Si IV 1393A from IRIS along with nearly simultaneous HMI magnetograms to quantify the correlation between transition-temperature emission structures and magnetic field concentrations through a number of novel statistics. Our obs...

  20. Determination of the pion and kaon structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitkenhead, W.; Barton, D.S.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Busza, W.; Dobrowolski, T.; Friedman, J.I.; Kendall, H.W.; Lyons, T.; Nelson, B.; Rosenson, L.; Toy, W.; Verdier, R.; Votta, L.; Chiaradia, M.T.; DeMarzo, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Germinario, G.; Guerriero, L.; LaVopa, P.; Maggi, G.; Posa, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Spinelli, P.; Waldner, F.; Brenner, A.E.; Carey, D.C.; Elias, J.E.; Garbincius, P.H.; Mikenberg, G.; Polychronakos, V.A.; Meunier, R.; Cutts, D.; Dulude, R.S.; Lanou, R.E. Jr.; Massimo, J.T.

    1980-07-21

    Quark structure functions have been extracted from low-p/sub T/ inclusive hadron production data for the pion and kaon with use of the recombination model. n/sup ..pi../=1.0 +- 0.1 and n/sup K/=2.5 +- 0.6 is obtained, where n is the leading (1-x) power of the nonstrange--valence-quark distribution. Both the pion and kaon nonstrange--sea-quark functions have napprox. =3.5.

  1. Rare and forbidden kaon decays at the AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettell, S.

    1997-12-09

    An overview of the Rare Kaon Decay program at the AGS is presented, with particular emphasis on the three major experiments currently running and analyzing data. A brief overview of earlier kaon decay experiments and of the AGs performance improvements is also provided. This review concludes with a discussion of proposed and developing experiments planned to run in the year 2000 and beyond (AGS-2000).

  2. The Electromagnetic Mass Differences of Pions and Kaons

    CERN Document Server

    Donoghue, J F; Donoghue, John F.; Perez, Antonio F.

    1997-01-01

    We use the Cottingham method to calculate the pion and kaon electromagnetic mass differences with as few model dependent inputs as possible. The constraints of chiral symmetry at low energy, QCD at high energy and experimental data in between are used in the dispersion relation. We find excellent agreement with experiment for the pion mass difference. The kaon mass difference exhibits a strong violation of the lowest order prediction of Dashen's theorem, in qualitative agreement with several other recent calculations.

  3. Collective Flow of A Hyperons within Covariant Kaon Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Yong-Zhong; ZHU Yu-Lan; WANG Yan-Yan; ZHENG Yu-Ming

    2011-01-01

    @@ The collective flow of ∧ hyperons produced in association with positively charged kaon mesons in nuclear reactions at SIS energies is studied using the quantum molecular dynamics(QMD)model within covariant kaon dynamics Our calculation indicates that both the directed and differential directed flows of ∧s are almost in agreement with the experimental data.This suggest that the covariant kaon dynamics based on the chiral mean field approximation can not only explain the collective flow of kaon mesons,but also give reasonable results for the collective flow of ∧ hyperons at SIS energies.The final-state interaction of ∧ hyperons with dense nuclear matter enhances their directed flow and improves the agreement of their differential directed flow with the experimental data.The influence of the interaction on the ∧ collective flow is more appreciable at large rapidity or transverse momentum region.%The collective How of A hyperons produced in association with positively charged kaon mesons in nuclear reactions at SIS energies is studied using the quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) model within covariant kaon dynamics. Our calculation indicates that both the directed and differential directed Sows of As are almost in agreement with the experimental data. This suggest that the covariant kaon dynamics based on the chiral mean Geld approximation can not only explain the collective flow of kaon mesons, but also give reasonable results for the collective How of A hyperons at SIS energies. The Hnal-state interaction of A hyperons with dense nuclear matter enhances their directed How and improves the agreement of their differential directed How with the experimental data. The influence of the interaction on the A collective How is more appreciable at iarge rapidity or transverse momentum region.

  4. Kaon-nucleon scattering lengths from kaonic deuterium experiments revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Döring, M

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the impact of the recent measurement of kaonic hydrogen X rays by the SIDDHARTA collaboration on the allowed ranges for the kaon-deuteron scattering length in the framework of non-relativistic effective field theory. Based on data from KN scattering only, we predict the kaon-deuteron scattering length A_Kd= (-1.46 + i 1.08) fm, with an estimated uncertainty of about 25% in both the real and the imaginary part.

  5. What Is the Source of Quiet Sun Transition Region Emission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, D. J.; De Pontieu, Bart

    2016-11-01

    Dating back to the first observations of the on-disk corona, there has been a qualitative link between the photosphere’s magnetic network and enhanced transition-temperature plasma emission. These observations led to the development of a general model that describes emission structures through the partitioning of the atmospheric volume with different magnetic loop geometries that exhibit different energetic equilibria. Does the internetwork produce transition-temperature emission? What fraction of network flux connects to the corona? How does quiet Sun emission compare with low-activity Sun-like stars? In this work, we revisit the canonical model of the quiet Sun, with high-resolution observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and HMI in hand, to address those questions. We use over 900 deep exposures of Si iv 1393 Å from IRIS along with nearly simultaneous HMI magnetograms to quantify the correlation between transition-temperature emission structures and magnetic field concentrations through a number of novel statistics. Our observational results are coupled with analysis of the Bifrost MHD model and a large-scale potential field model. Our results paint a complex portrait of the quiet Sun. We measure an emission signature in the distant internetwork that cannot be attributed to network contribution. We find that the dimmest regions of emission are not linked to the local vertical magnetic field. Using the MHD simulation, we categorize the emission contribution from cool mid-altitude loops and high-altitude coronal loops and discuss the potential emission contribution of spicules. Our results provide new constraints on the coupled solar atmosphere so that we can build on our understanding of how dynamic thermal and magnetic structures generate the observed phenomena in the transition region.

  6. Kaon Thresholds and Two-Flavor Chiral Expansions for Hyperons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu-Jiun Jiang, Brian C. Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2011-01-01

    Two-flavor chiral expansions provide a useful perturbative framework to study hadron properties. Such expansions should exhibit marked improvement over the conventional three-flavor chiral expansion. Although one can theoretically formulate two-flavor theories for the various hyperon multiplets, the nearness of kaon thresholds can seriously undermine the effectiveness of the perturbative expansion in practice. We investigate the importance of virtual kaon thresholds on hyperon properties, specifically their masses and isovector axial charges. Using a three-flavor expansion that includes SU(3) breaking effects, we uncover the underlying expansion parameter governing the description of virtual kaon thresholds. For spin-half hyperons, this expansion parameter is quite small. Consequently virtual kaon contributions are well described in the two-flavor theory by terms analytic in the pion mass-squared. For spin three-half hyperons, however, one is closer to the kaon production threshold, and the expansion parameter is not as small. Breakdown of SU(2) chiral perturbation theory is shown to arise from a pole in the expansion parameter associated with the kaon threshold. Estimating higher-order corrections to the expansion parameter is necessary to ascertain whether the two-flavor theory of spin three-half hyperons remains perturbative. We find that, despite higher-order corrections, there is a useful perturbative expansion for the masses and isovector axial charges of both spin-half and spin three-half hyperons.

  7. Beam and target dependencies of two-kaon femtoscopic correlations in SELEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigmatkulov, Grigory

    2017-03-01

    The space and time extents of the particle emitting source created in collisions of particles with nuclei can be measured using a correlation femtoscopy method. In this paper we show the preliminary measurements of K± K± correlation functions in 600 GeV/c Σ-, π- and 540 GeV/c p interactions with carbon and copper nuclei. The one-dimensional correlation functions are parameterized by a Gaussian form. The dependencies of the charged kaon emitting source radii on the different h+A collisions are presented.

  8. Black carbon emissions from Russian diesel sources: case study of Murmansk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Evans

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC is a potent pollutant because of its effects on climate change, ecosystems and human health. Black carbon has a particularly pronounced impact as a climate forcer in the Arctic because of its effect on snow albedo and cloud formation. We have estimated BC emissions from diesel sources in Murmansk Region and Murmansk City, the largest city in the world above the Arctic Circle. In this study we developed a detailed inventory of diesel sources including on-road vehicles, off-road transport (mining, locomotives, construction and agriculture, fishing and diesel generators. For on-road transport, we conducted several surveys to understand the vehicle fleet and driving patterns, and, for all sources, we also relied on publicly available local data sets and analysis. We calculated that BC emission in Murmansk Region were 0.40 Gg in 2012. The mining industry is the largest source of BC emissions in the region, emitting 70% of all BC emissions because of its large diesel consumption and absence of emissions controls. On-road vehicles are the second largest source emitting about 12% of emissions. Old heavy duty trucks are the major source of emissions. Emission controls on new vehicles limit total emissions from on-road transportation. Vehicle traffic and fleet surveys show that many of the older cars on the registry are lightly or never used. We also estimated that total BC emissions from diesel sources in Russia were 56.7 Gg in 2010, and on-road transport contributed 55% of diesel BC emissions. Agricultural machinery is also a significant source Russia-wide, in part because of the lack of controls on off-road vehicles.

  9. Megacity and country emissions from combustion sources-Buenos Aires-Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowski, L.; Gomez, D.; Matranga, M.; D'Angiola, A.; Oreggioni, G.

    2010-12-01

    Historic time series (1970-2006) emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants arising from stationary and mobile combustion sources were estimated at national level for Argentina and at regional level for the metropolitan area of Buenos Aires (MABA). All emissions were estimated using a bottom-up approach following the IPCC good practice guidance. For mobile sources, national emissions include all transport categories. Regional emissions account thus far only for on-road. For national emissions, methodologies and guidance by the IPCC were employed, applying the highest possible tier and using: i)country-specific emission factors for carbon and sulphur and technology-based information for other species, ii)activity data from energy balance series (1970-2007), and iii)complementary information concerning the non-energy use of fuels. Regional emissions in 2006 were estimated in-depth using a technology-based approach for the city of Buenos Aires (CBA) and the 24 neighboring districts composing the MABA. A regional emissions factors database was developed to better characterize Latin American fleets and driving conditions employing COPERT III-IV algorithms and emission factors measured in dynamometers and circulating vehicles in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Colombia. Past emissions were back estimated from 2005 to 1970 using the best available information, which differs greatly among categories, spatial disaggregation and time periods. The time series of stationary and mobile combustion sources at the national and regional level allowed the identification of distinct patterns. National greenhouse gas emissions in 2006 amounted to ~ 150 million ton CO2-equivalent, 70% of which were contributed by stationary sources. On-road transport was the major contributor within mobile sources (28.1 %). The increasing emissions trends are dominated by on-road transport, agriculture and residential categories while the variability is largely associated with energy industries

  10. Freeze-out Dynamics via Charged Kaon Femtoscopy in sqrt(sNN)=200 GeV Central Au+Au Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Barnovska, Z; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai,; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bruna, E; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, P; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks,; Ding, F; Dion, A; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Fersch, R G; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Gliske, S; Grebenyuk, O G; Grosnick, D; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hajkova, O; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jena, C; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lima, L M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Mioduszewski, S; Mitrovski, M K; Mohammed, Y; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mustafa, M K; Naglis, M; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nogach, L V; Novak, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Oliveira, R A N; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Powell, C B; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, B; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T R; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; deSouza, U G; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan,; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of three-dimensional correlation functions of like-sign low transverse momentum kaon pairs from sqrt(sNN)=200 GeV Au+Au collisions. A Cartesian surface-spherical harmonic decomposition technique was used to extract the kaon source function. The latter was found to have a three-dimensional Gaussian shape and can be adequately reproduced by Therminator event generator simulations with resonance contributions taken into account. Compared to the pion one, the kaon source function is generally narrower and does not have the long tail along the pair transverse momentum direction. The kaon Gaussian radii display a monotonic decrease with increasing transverse mass m_T over the interval of 0.55<=m_T<=1.15 GeV/c^2. While the kaon radii are adequately described by the m_T-scaling in the outward and sideward directions, in the longitudinal direction the lowest m_T value exceeds the expectations from a pure hydrodynamical model prediction.

  11. Tropical deforestation as a source of greenhouse gas emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghton, R.A. [The Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Tropical deforestation, including both the permanent conversion of forests to croplands and pastures and the temporary or partial removal of forests for shifting cultivation and selective logging, is estimated to have released on the order of 1-2 PgC/yr (15-35% of annual fossil fuel emissions) during the 1990s. The magnitude of emissions depends on the rates of deforestation, the biomass of the forests deforested, and other reductions in biomass that result from forest use. If, in addition to carbon dioxide, one considers the emissions of methane, nitrous oxide, and other chemically reactive gases that result from deforestation and subsequent uses of the land, annual emissions during the 1990s accounted for about 25% of the total anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Trends in the rates of tropical deforestation are difficult to predict, but at today's rates, another 85 to 130 PgC will be released over the next 100 years, the emissions declining only as tropical forests are eliminated.

  12. Effects of source temperature and characteristics on the optical emission from a gallium liquid metal ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornsey, R.I.; Marriott, P.

    1989-05-14

    The light emitted from the region close to the tip of an emitting liquid metal ion source has been observed. It is shown that at high currents the light intensity rises almost as the cube of the current, but that the optical emission also depends on the source characteristics. A model based on the break-up of charged droplets is proposed to account for these results, thermal evaporation being found to be insignificant. Measurements of the effects of source temperature on light emission are also presented. From these measurements it is demonstrated that field ionisation cannot be responsible for the distortion of the total ion energy distribution seen at elevated temperatures. (author).

  13. EFFECTIVE SOURCE SIZES OF LOW RAPIDITY SOFT PARTICLE-EMISSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PEITZMANN, T; ALBRECHT, R; AWES, TC; BECKMANN, P; BERGER, F; BLOOMER, M; BLUME, C; BOCK, D; BOCK, R; CLAESSON, G; CLEWING, G; DRAGON, L; EKLUND, A; FERGUSON, RL; FRANZ, A; GARPMAN, S; GLASOW, R; GUSTAFSSON, HA; GUTBROD, HH; HOLKER, G; IDH, J; JACOBS, P; KAMPERT, KH; KOLB, BW; LOHNER, H; LUND, [No Value; OBENSHAIN, FE; OSKARSSON, A; OTTERLUND, [No Value; PLASIL, F; POSKANZER, AM; PURSCHKE, M; ROTERS, B; SAINI, S; SANTO, R; SCHMIDT, HR; SORENSEN, SP; STEFFENS, K; STEINHAEUSER, P; STENLUND, E; STUKEN, D; YOUNG, GR

    1994-01-01

    Correlations of positive pions and protons measured with the Plastic Ball detector in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied. Source parameters are extracted for various projectile-target combinations. While the proton source can be explained by geometry, the pion source shows more

  14. High resolution European emission grids for anthropogenic sources for the years 2003-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Visschedijk, Antoon; Kuenen, Jeroen; van der Brugh, Hans; Dröge, Rianne; Schaap, Martijn

    2010-05-01

    To develop atmospheric services such as forecasting atmospheric composition a combination of meteorological models, atmospheric chemical transport models, satellite observational data and emission grids are needed. The latter are input for the predictive models and need to be as accurate as possible both in time and space. To support the new EU FP7 MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) we developed high resolution (1/8 degree x 1/16 degree lon-lat or ~ 7 x7 km) emission grids for UNECE-Europe for the years 2003-2007. These years are the focus of a reanalysis exercise within MACC. Reanalysis datasets are produced with data assimilation and modelling systems applied to the best available observational datasets. Such reanalysed fields of climate and atmospheric composition can be used in other studies (e.g. IPCC) to make more accurate assessments. For the MACC reanalysis years we use a combination of official reported emission data as available from EMEP, the IIASA GAINS model and expert estimates resulting in a consistent emission data set by country by source category for these years. From 2003-2007 emissions of air pollutants decreased by about 5%, although the reduction of NH3 emission was less (2.3%) and SO2 reduction was more (13%). However, more remarkable than the overall changes are the regional differences as well as source sector differences. For example, NOx emissions changed by -12% in the EU15+NOR+CHE, -8% in the EU12 and + 6 % in the non-EU countries. The emissions are distributed using our newly developed year 2005 emission database which is partly developed in EU FP7 MEGAPOLI. This database distinguishes itself from previous emission databases by a much improved spatial allocation of emissions. To this end we checked and updated our point source database by adding new point sources and removing obsolete entries for power plants, refineries and industrial installations. For diffuse sources like transport, residential combustion and

  15. Premature deaths attributed to source-specific BC emissions in six urban US regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Matthew D.; Henze, Daven K.; Capps, Shannon L.; Hakami, Amir; Zhao, Shunliu; Resler, Jaroslav; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Stanier, Charles O.; Baek, Jaemeen; Sandu, Adrian; Russell, Armistead G.; Nenes, Athanasios; Pinder, Rob W.; Napelenok, Sergey L.; Bash, Jesse O.; Percell, Peter B.; Chai, Tianfeng

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that exposure to particulate black carbon (BC) has significant adverse health effects and may be more detrimental to human health than exposure to PM2.5 as a whole. Mobile source BC emission controls, mostly on diesel-burning vehicles, have successfully decreased mobile source BC emissions to less than half of what they were 30 years ago. Quantification of the benefits of previous emissions controls conveys the value of these regulatory actions and provides a method by which future control alternatives could be evaluated. In this study we use the adjoint of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to estimate highly-resolved spatial distributions of benefits related to emission reductions for six urban regions within the continental US. Emissions from outside each of the six chosen regions account for between 7% and 27% of the premature deaths attributed to exposure to BC within the region. While we estimate that nonroad mobile and onroad diesel emissions account for the largest number of premature deaths attributable to exposure to BC, onroad gasoline is shown to have more than double the benefit per unit emission relative to that of nonroad mobile and onroad diesel. Within the region encompassing New York City and Philadelphia, reductions in emissions from large industrial combustion sources that are not classified as EGUs (i.e., non-EGU) are estimated to have up to triple the benefits per unit emission relative to reductions to onroad diesel sectors, and provide similar benefits per unit emission to that of onroad gasoline emissions in the region. While onroad mobile emissions have been decreasing in the past 30 years and a majority of vehicle emission controls that regulate PM focus on diesel emissions, our analysis shows the most efficient target for stricter controls is actually onroad gasoline emissions.

  16. A global catalogue of large SO2 sources and emissions derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Fioletov, Vitali E.; McLinden, Chris A; Krotkov, Nickolay; Li, Can; Joiner, Joanna; Theys, Nicolas; Carn, Simon; Moran, Mike D.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite sensor processed with the new principal component analysis (PCA) algorithm were used to detect large point emission sources or clusters of sources. The total of 491 continuously emitting point sources releasing from about 30 kt yr−1 to more than 4000 kt yr−1 of SO2 per year have been identified and grouped by country and by primary source origin: volcanoes (76 sources); power plants (297);...

  17. A global catalogue of large SO2 sources and emissions derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Fioletov, Vitali E.; McLinden, Chris A; Krotkov, Nickolay; Li, Can; Joiner, Joanna; Theys, Nicolas; Carn, Simon; Moran, Mike D.

    2016-01-01

    Sulphur dioxide (SO2) measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite sensor processed with the new Principal Component Analysis (PCA) algorithm were used to detect large point emission sources or clusters of sources. The total of 491 continuously emitting point sources releasing from about 30 kt yr−1 to more than 4000 kt yr−1 of SO2 per year have been identified and grouped by country and by primary source origin: volcanoes (76 sources); power plants (297); smel...

  18. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochems, P; Kirk, A T; Bunert, E; Runge, M; Goncalves, P; Zimmermann, S

    2015-06-01

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  19. The EUV Emission in the Coma Cluster of Galaxies and the Underlying Source of this Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bowyer, S; Lampton, M; Jones, T W

    2004-01-01

    Observations with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) have shown the Coma Cluster to be a source of EUV emission in excess of that produced by X-ray gas in the cluster. We have re-examined the EUVE data on this cluster in an attempt to obtain clues as to the origin of this emission. We find two important new results. First, the ratio between the azimuthally averaged EUV excess emission and the ROSAT hard X-ray flux is constant as a function of distance from the cluster center outward. Second, a correlation analysis between the EUV excess emission and the X-ray emission shows that on a detailed level the EUV excess is spatially closely related to the X-ray emission. These findings contradict previous suggestions as to the underlying source of the diffuse EUV emission in Coma and provide important information in regards to the true source of this emission. We propose a new explanation for the source of this emission: inverse Compton scattering of microwave background photons by secondary electrons and posit...

  20. Manipulating carbon nanotubes Towards the application as novel field emission sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeres, Erwin Cornelis

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is about the research performed on novel field emission sources. Having a better electron source can reduce the time needed to obtain an electron microscope image and enable studying processes at a higher resolution. We chose to fabricate electron sources by means of mounting

  1. Modeling Ozone in the Eastern United States Using a Fuel-Based Mobile Source Emissions Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, B. C.; Ahmadov, R.; McKeen, S. A.; Kim, S. W.; Frost, G. J.; Trainer, M.

    2015-12-01

    A fuel-based mobile source emissions inventory of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) is developed for the continental US. Emissions are mapped for the year 2013, including emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles, and off-road engines. We find that mobile source emissions of NOx in the National Emissions Inventory 2011 (NEI11) are 50-60% higher than results from this study; mobile sources contribute around half of total US anthropogenic NOx emissions. We model chemistry and transport of emissions from the NEI11 and our fuel-based inventory during the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) Study period in the summer of 2013, using the Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model. In the Eastern US, there is a consistent over-prediction of tropospheric ozone (O3) levels when simulating emissions from the NEI11, with the largest biases located in the Southeastern US. Using our fuel-based inventory, we test O3 sensitivity to lower NOx emissions. We highlight results in the Southeast, a region with significant interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions of ozone precursors. Model results of NOy, CO, and O3 are compared with aircraft measurements made during SENEX.

  2. Compilation of a source profile database for hydrocarbon and OVOC emissions in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Ziwei; Shao, Min; Lu, Sihua

    2016-10-01

    Source profiles are essential for quantifying the role of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in air pollution. This study compiled a database of VOC source profiles in China, with 75 species drawn from five major categories: transportation, solvent use, biomass burning, fossil fuel burning, and industrial processes. Source profiles were updated for diesel vehicles, biomass burning, and residential coal burning by measuring both hydrocarbons and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), while other source profiles were derived from the available literature. The OVOCs contributed 53.8% of total VOCs in the profiles of heavy - duty diesel vehicle exhaust and 12.4%-46.3% in biomass and residential coal burning, which indicated the importance of primary OVOCs emissions from combustion-related sources. Taking the national emission inventory from 2008 as an example, we established an approach for assigning source profiles to develop a speciation-specific VOC and OVOC emission inventory. The results showed that aromatics contributed 30% of the total 26 Tg VOCs, followed by alkanes (24%), alkenes (19%) and OVOCs (12%). Aromatics (7.9 Tg) were much higher than in previous results (1.1 Tg and 3.4 Tg), while OVOCs (3.1 Tg) were comparable with the 3.3 Tg and 4.3 Tg reported in studies using profiles from the US. The current emission inventories were built based on emission factors from non-methane hydrocarbon measurements, and therefore the proportions from OVOC emissions was neglected, leading to up to 30% underestimation of total VOC emissions. As a result, there is a need to deploy appropriate emission factors and source profiles that include OVOC measurements to reduce the uncertainty of estimated emissions and chemical reactivity potential.

  3. Solar Source Regions of Energetic 3He Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, G. M.; Nitta, N. V.; Cohen, C. M.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    One of the surprising observations from the ACE mission has been the detection of energetic 3He emission occurring over multi-day periods. Previously observations of solar energetic 3He had detected short-lived "impulsive" energetic particle events which were associated with type III bursts and energetic electrons. The ACE observations were able to detect 3He at very low levels (<1% of 4He compared to ~10% in most earlier work) and this showed that the impulsive events often occurred during seemingly continuous multi-day periods of 3He emission. During solar active periods, 3He was present at 1 AU the majority of the time, giving evidence for either semi-continuous processes or else unresolved multiple small injections. The obvious injections during such periods were strongly associated with jet activity By adding STEREO and SDO observations we are seeking to extend the observational picture for these events. First, by following single 3He emitting regions from STEREO-B to ACE to STEREO-A we seek to examine for how long the 3He emission can continue, since any single spacecraft can be magnetically connected to a single region for only a few days and ACE often sees emission periods of that length. Second, by using SDO-AIA we seek to probe further the properties of the emitting regions to see if the previously reported association with jets is seen in events which we can now observe with greater resolution, sensitivity, and cadence than previously possible.

  4. Characterization of Acoustic Emission Source to Identify Fracture in Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Hardy, "An Approach to Acoustic Emission Signal Analysis," Materials Evaluation, 35, 1977 , pp. 100-106. [5] Hsu, N.N. and F.R. Breckenridge...Measurements," Journal of Applied Mechanics, 53, 1986, pp. 61-68. [17] Mindess , S., "The Fracture Process Zone in Concrete," Toughening Mechanisms in

  5. Road dust emission sources and assessment of street washing effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karanasiou, A.; Amato, F.; Moreno, T.; Lumbreras, J.; Borge, R.; Linares, C.; Boldo, E.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.

    2014-01-01

    Although previous studies report on the effect of street washing on ambient particulate matter levels, there is a lack of studies investigating the results of street washing on the emission strength of road dust. A sampling campaign was conducted in Madrid urban area during July 2009 where road dust

  6. Biofluorescence and the Extended Red Emission in Astrophysical Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, F.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    A broad emission band over the wavelength range ~6000-7500 Å in submicron dust in the galaxy and in M82 can be explained by fluorescence phenomena in low-temperature chloroplasts and bacterial pigments. Alternative explanations do not appear to be promising.

  7. 40 CFR 63.843 - Emission limits for existing sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for minimum exhaust rates as published by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists in Chapters 3 and 5 of “Industrial Ventilation: A Handbook of Recommended Practice” (incorporated... lb/ton) of green anode; and (2) POM limit. Emissions of POM shall not exceed 0.09 kg/Mg (0.18...

  8. Danish emission inventories for road transport and other mobile sources. Inventories until year 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winther, M. [DMU, Dept. of Policy Analysis (Denmark)

    2007-01-15

    This report explains the parts of the Danish inventories related to road transport and other mobile sources. Emission results for CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X}, NMVOC, CO, particulate matter (PM), heavy metals, dioxins and PAH are shown from 1985 to 2004. In this period the fuel use and CO{sub 2} emissions for road transport have increased by 48%. The emission decreases for PM (exhaust only), CO, NO{sub X} and NMVOC are 35, 58, 34 and 66% respectively, due to the introduction of vehicles complying with gradually stricter emission standards. A N{sub 2}O emission increase of 301% is related to the high emissions from gasoline catalyst cars. For other mobile sources the fuel use and CO{sub 2} emissions have decreased by 15% from 1985 to 2004. The PM, NO{sub x} and NMVOC emission declines are 46, 14 and 10%, respectively. For SO{sub 2} the emission drop is 74% from 1985 to 2004, due to gradually lower fuel sulphur contents. For CO the 1985 and 2004 emissions are the same. Uncertainties for the emissions and trends have been estimated. (au)

  9. Understanding X-ray reflection emissivity profiles in AGN: Locating the X-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkins, D R

    2012-01-01

    The illumination pattern (or emissivity profile) of the accretion disc due to the reflection of X-rays in AGN can be understood in terms of relativistic effects on the rays propagating from a source in a corona surrounding the central black hole, both on their trajectories and on the accretion disc itself. Theoretical emissivity profiles due to isotropic point sources as well as simple extended geometries are computed in general relativistic ray tracing simulations performed on graphics processing units (GPUs). Such simulations assuming only general relativity naturally explain the accretion disc emissivity profiles determined from relativistically broadened emission lines which fall off steeply (with power law indices of between 6 and 8) over the inner regions of the disc, then flattening off to almost a constant before tending to a constant power law of index 3 over the outer disc. Simulations for a variety of source locations, extents and geometries show how the emissivity profiles depend on these properti...

  10. CO2 emission factors for waste incineration: Influence from source separation of recyclable materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Warberg; Astrup, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    CO2-loads from combustible waste are important inputs for national CO2 inventories and life-cycle assessments (LCA). CO2 emissions from waste incinerators are often expressed by emission factors in kg fossil CO2 emitted per GJ energy content of the waste. Various studies have shown considerable...... variations between emission factors for different incinerators, but the background for these variations has not been thoroughly examined. One important reason may be variations in collection of recyclable materials as source separation alters the composition of the residual waste incinerated. The objective...... of this study was to quantify the importance of source separation for determination of emission factors for incineration of residual household waste. This was done by mimicking various source separation scenarios and based on waste composition data calculating resulting emission factors for residual waste...

  11. Multi-K¯ nuclei and kaon condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazda, D.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2008-04-01

    We extend previous relativistic mean-field (RMF) calculations of multi-K¯ nuclei, using vector boson fields with SU(3) PPV coupling constants and scalar boson fields constrained phenomenologically. For a given core nucleus, the resulting K¯ separation energy BK¯, as well as the associated nuclear and K¯-meson densities, saturate with the number κ of K¯ mesons for κ>κsat~10. Saturation appears robust against a wide range of variations, including the RMF nuclear model used and the type of boson fields mediating the strong interactions. Because BK¯ generally does not exceed 200 MeV, it is argued that multi-K¯ nuclei do not compete with multihyperonic nuclei in providing the ground state of strange hadronic configurations and that kaon condensation is unlikely to occur in strong-interaction self-bound strange hadronic matter. Last, we explore possibly self-bound strange systems made of neutrons and K¯0 mesons, or protons and K- mesons, and study their properties.

  12. Experimental Development of Low-emittance Field-emission Electron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueangaranwong, A. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator & Detector Development; Buzzard, C. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Divan, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Korampally, V. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Piot, P. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator & Detector Development; Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Field emission electron sources are capable of extreme brightness when excited by static or time-dependent electro- magnetic fields. We are currently developing a cathode test stand operating in DC mode with possibility to trigger the emission using ultra-short (~ 100-fs) laser pulses. This contribution describes the status of an experiment to investigate field-emission using cathodes under development at NIU in collaboration with the Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials.

  13. Quantifying natural source mercury emissions from the Ivanhoe Mining District, north-central Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Mark A.; Gustin, Mae Sexauer; Zhang, Hong

    In order to assess the importance of mercury emissions from naturally enriched sources relative to anthropogenic point sources, data must be collected that characterizes mercury emissions from representative areas and quantifies the influence of various environmental parameters that control emissions. With this information, we will be able to scale up natural source emissions to regional areas. In this study in situ mercury emission measurements were used, along with data from laboratory studies and statistical analysis, to scale up mercury emissions for the naturally enriched Ivanhoe Mining District, Nevada. Results from stepwise multi-variate regression analysis indicated that lithology, soil mercury concentration, and distance from the nearest fault were the most important factors controlling mercury flux. Field and lab experiments demonstrated that light and precipitation enhanced mercury emissions from alluvium with background mercury concentrations. Diel mercury emissions followed a Gaussian distribution. The Gaussian distribution was used to calculate an average daily emission for each lithologic unit, which were then used to calculate an average flux for the entire area of 17.1 ng Hg m -2 h -1. An annual emission of ˜8.7×10 4 g of mercury to the atmosphere was calculated for the 586 km 2 area. The bulk of the Hg released into the atmosphere from the district (˜89%) is from naturally enriched non-point sources and ˜11% is emitted from areas of anthropogenic disturbance where mercury was mined. Mercury emissions from this area exceed the natural emission factor applied to mercury rich belts of the world (1.5 ng m -2 h -1) by an order of magnitude.

  14. Spatial and temporal dynamics of methane emissions from agricultural sources in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, P.H.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.

    2001-01-01

    Agricultural activities contribute significantly to the global methane budget. Agricultural sources of methane are influenced by land-use change, including changes in agricultural area, livestock keeping and agricultural management practices. A spatially explicit inventory of methane emissions from

  15. 40 CFR 63.3300 - Which of my emission sources are affected by this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... this part (National Emission Standards for the Printing and Publishing Industry) which the owner or... standards for the printing and publishing industry) which is included in the affected source under...

  16. 78 FR 7137 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... harmful toxic air emissions from these combustion sources. This will improve air quality and protect..., cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, nickel and selenium) as an alternative to the proposed PM...

  17. Review of NO/sub x/ emission factors for stationary fossil fuel combustion sources. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligan, R.J.; Sailor, W.C.; Wasilewski, J.; Kuby, W.C.

    1979-09-01

    A review of recent NOx test data was performed, and summaries of emission factors presented for various types of stationary source combustion and for various fossil fuels. The effects of combustion modifications on NOx emissions are quantified. Background data are given to help the user determine the reliability of each factor in particular applications.

  18. Emission of volatile organic compounds from silage: compounds, sources, and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silage, fermented cattle feed, has recently been identified as a significant source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted to the atmosphere. A small number of studies have measured VOC emission from silage, but not enough is known about the processes involved to accurately quantify emission r...

  19. Danish emission inventories for road transport and other mobile sources. Inventories until the year 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winther, M.

    2012-08-15

    This report explains the parts of the Danish emission inventories related to road transport and other mobile sources. Emission results are shown for CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X}, NMVOC, CO, particulate matter (PM), heavy metals, dioxins and PAH. From 1990-2010 the fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions for road transport increased by 30 %, and CH{sub 4} emissions have decreased by 74 %. A N{sub 2}O emission increase of 29 % is related to the relatively high emissions from older gasoline catalyst cars. The 1985-2010 emission decrease for NO{sub X}, NMVOC, CO and particulates (exhaust only: Size is below PM{sub 2.5}) -52, -84, -81, and -65 %, respectively, due to the introduction of vehicles complying with gradually stricter emission standards. For SO{sub 2} the emission drop 99 % (due to reduced sulphur content in the diesel fuel), whereas the NH{sub 3} emissions increased by 2232 % (due to the introduction of catalyst cars). For other mobile sources the calculated emission changes for CO{sub 2} (and fuel use), CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O were -2, 5 and -1 %, from 1990 to 2010. The emissions of SO{sub 2}, particulates (all size fractions), NO{sub X}, NMVOC and CO decreased by 88, 65, 17, 28 and 2 % from 1985 to 2010. For NH{sub 3} the emissions increased by 17 % in the same time period. Uncertainties for the emissions and trends were estimated. (Author)

  20. Sources of nitrogen and phosphorus emissions to Irish rivers: estimates from the Source Load Apportionment Model (SLAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockler, Eva; Deakin, Jenny; Archbold, Marie; Daly, Donal; Bruen, Michael

    2017-04-01

    More than half of the river and lake water bodies in Europe are at less than good ecological status or potential, and diffuse pollution from agriculture remains a major, but not the only, cause of this poor performance. In Ireland, it is evident that agri-environmental policy and land management practices have, in many areas, reduced nutrient emissions to water, mitigating the potential impact on water quality. However, additional measures may be required in order to further decouple the relationship between agricultural productivity and emissions to water, which is of vital importance given the on-going agricultural intensification in Ireland. Catchment management can be greatly supported by modelling, which can reduce the resources required to analyse large amounts of information and can enable investigations and measures to be targeted. The Source Load Apportionment Model (SLAM) framework was developed to support catchment management in Ireland by characterising the contributions from various sources of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) emissions to water. The SLAM integrates multiple national spatial datasets relating to nutrient emissions to surface water, including land use and physical characteristics of the sub-catchments to predict emissions from point (wastewater, industry discharges and septic tank systems) and diffuse sources (agriculture, forestry, peatlands, etc.). The annual nutrient emissions predicted by the SLAM were assessed against nutrient monitoring data for 16 major river catchments covering 50% of the area of Ireland. At national scale, results indicate that the total average annual emissions to surface water in Ireland are over 2,700 t yr-1 of P and 80,000 t yr-1 of N. The SLAM results include the proportional contributions from individual sources at a range of scales from sub-catchment to national, and show that the main sources of P are from wastewater and agriculture, with wide variations across the country related to local anthropogenic

  1. Charged kaon mass measurement using the Cherenkov effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, N., E-mail: ngraf@umail.iu.ed [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47403 (United States); Lebedev, A. [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Abrams, R.J. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Akgun, U.; Aydin, G. [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Baker, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Barnes, P.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bergfeld, T. [University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29201 (United States); Beverly, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Bujak, A. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Carey, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Dukes, C. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Duru, F. [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Feldman, G.J. [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Godley, A. [University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29201 (United States); Guelmez, E.; Guenaydin, Y.O. [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Gustafson, H.R. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Gutay, L. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Hartouni, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2010-03-21

    The two most recent and precise measurements of the charged kaon mass use X-rays from kaonic atoms and report uncertainties of 14 and 22 ppm yet differ from each other by 122 ppm. We describe the possibility of an independent mass measurement using the measurement of Cherenkov light from a narrow-band beam of kaons, pions, and protons. This technique was demonstrated using data taken opportunistically by the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory which recorded beams of protons, kaons, and pions ranging in momentum from +37 to +63GeV/c. The measured value is 491.3+-1.7MeV/c{sup 2}, which is within 1.4sigma of the world average. An improvement of two orders of magnitude in precision would make this technique useful for resolving the ambiguity in the X-ray data and may be achievable in a dedicated experiment.

  2. Charged Kaon Mass Measurement using the Cherenkov Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Graf, N; Abrams, R J; Akgun, U; Aydin, G; Baker, W; Barnes, P D; Bergfeld, T; Beverly, L; Bujak, A; Carey, D; Dukes, C; Duru, F; Feldman, G J; Godley, A; Gülmez, E; Günaydın, Y O; Gustafson, H R; Gutay, L; Hartouni, E; Hanlet, P; Hansen, S; Heffner, M; Johnstone, C; Kaplan, D; Kamaev, O; Kilmer, J; Klay, J; Kostin, M; Lange, D; Ling, J; Longo, M J; Lu, L C; Materniak, C; Messier, M D; Meyer, H; Miller, D E; Mishra, S R; Nelson, K; Nigmanov, T; Norman, A; Onel, Y; Paley, J M; Park, H K; Penzo, A; Peterson, R J; Raja, R; Rajaram, D; Ratnikov, D; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H; Seun, S; Solomey, N; Soltz, R; Swallow, E; Schmitt, R; Subbarao, P; Torun, Y; Tope, T E; Wilson, K; Wright, D; Wu, K

    2009-01-01

    The two most recent and precise measurements of the charged kaon mass use X-rays from kaonic atoms and report uncertainties of 14 ppm and 22 ppm yet differ from each other by 122 ppm. We describe the possibility of an independent mass measurement using the measurement of Cherenkov light from a narrow-band beam of kaons, pions, and protons. This technique was demonstrated using data taken opportunistically by the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory which recorded beams of protons, kaons, and pions ranging in momentum from +37 GeV/c to +63 GeV/c. The measured value is 491.3 +/- 1.7 MeV/c^2, which is within 1.4 sigma of the world average. An improvement of two orders of magnitude in precision would make this technique useful for resolving the ambiguity in the X-ray data and may be achievable in a dedicated experiment.

  3. Kaon electroproduction at large four-momentum transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pete Markowitz

    2003-06-16

    Exclusive H(e,e'K)Y data were taken in January, March and April of 2001 at the Jefferson Lab Hall A. The electrons and kaons were detected in coincidence in the hall's two High Resolution Spectrometers (HRS). The kaon arm of the pair had been specifically outfitted with two aerogel Cerenkov threshold detectors, designed to separately provide pion and proton particle identification thus allowing kaon identification. Preliminary data show the cross section's dependence on the invariant mass, W, along with results of systematic studies. Ultimately the data will be used to perform a Rosenbluth Separation as well, separating the longitudinal from the transverse response functions.

  4. Exposing strangeness: Projections for kaon electromagnetic form factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Chang, Lei; Liu, Yu-Xin; Roberts, Craig D.; Tandy, Peter C.

    2017-08-01

    A continuum approach to the kaon and pion bound-state problems is used to reveal their electromagnetic structure. For both systems, when used with parton distribution amplitudes appropriate to the scale of the experiment, Standard Model hard-scattering formulas are accurate to within 25% at momentum transfers Q2≈8 GeV2. There are measurable differences between the distribution of strange and normal matter within the kaons, e.g. the ratio of their separate contributions reaches a peak value of 1.5 at Q2≈6 GeV2. Its subsequent Q2 evolution is accurately described by the hard scattering formulas. Projections for the ratio of kaon and pion form factors at timelike momenta beyond the resonance region are also presented. These results and projections should prove useful in planning next-generation experiments.

  5. Baryon masses at nonzero isospin/kaon density

    CERN Document Server

    Detmold, William

    2013-01-01

    We present a lattice QCD calculation of the ground-state energy shifts of various baryons in a medium of pions or kaons at a single value of the quark mass corresponding to a pion mass of m_\\pi~390 MeV and a kaon mass of m_K~540 MeV, and in a spatial volume V (4fm)^3. All systems are created using a canonical formalism in which quark propagators are contracted into correlation functions of fixed isospin/kaon density. We study four different systems, \\Sigma^+(\\pi^+)^n, \\Xi^0(\\pi^+)^n, p(K^+)^n, and n(K^+)^n, for up to n=11 mesons. From the ground-state energy shifts we extract two- and three-body scattering parameters, as well as linear combinations of low-energy constants appearing in tree-level chiral perturbation theory.

  6. Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.

    2007-06-01

    This document supports the other measurement procedures and all building energy-monitoring projects by providing methods to calculate the source energy and emissions from the energy measured at the building. Energy and emission factors typically account for the conversion inefficiencies at the power plant and the transmission and distribution losses from the power plant to the building. The energy and emission factors provided here also include the precombustion effects, which are the energy and emissions associated with extracting, processing, and delivering the primary fuels to the point of conversion in the electrical power plants or directly in the buildings.

  7. New directions: Beyond sulphur, vanadium and nickel - About source apportionment of ship emissions in emission control areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Hendryk; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Streibel, Thorsten; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2017-08-01

    During the oil crises of the 70s and the associated increase of the oil price, the usage of marine fuels shifted from middle distillates of the crude oil refinery, such as marine diesel oil (MDO) or marine gas oil (MGO), towards cheaper heavy fuel oils (HFO), or also called residual fuel oil. The latter refers to the vacuum residue of the crude oil refinery blended by lighter refinery products, such as kerosene, to meet a certain maximum viscosity. Those HFOs are rich in sulphur and heavy metals which end up as significant constituents in emitted fine particulate matter (PM2.5) after the combustion. Especially for harbour cities or highly frequented ship traffic routes, HFO-derived PM2.5 has been identified as a globally important perpetrator of increased mortality by cardiopulmonary diseases and lung cancer (e.g. Corbett et al., 2007). However, the emitted hazardous species provide reliable markers to assess the contribution of this emission source to air pollution in source apportionment studies. Such studies are often performed utilising positive matrix factorisation, whose score matrix can be interpreted as temporal contribution of k identified emission sources and factors represent the k corresponding emission profiles. If one of the k factors contains moderate to high amounts of sulphate, vanadium and nickel with a high ratio of the two latter ones, the ship identification was unambiguous (e.g. Viana et al., 2009). Even more sensitive towards emission profiles are receptor models such as chemical mass balance, which require detailed prior knowledge about the assumed emission sources (Jeong et al., 2017).

  8. Estimating dispersed and point source emissions of methane in East Anglia: results and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Neil; Connors, Sarah; Hancock, Ben; Jones, Pip; Murphy, Jonathan; Riddick, Stuart; Robinson, Andrew; Skelton, Robert; Manning, Alistair; Forster, Grant; Oram, David; O'Doherty, Simon; Young, Dickon; Stavert, Ann; Fisher, Rebecca; Lowry, David; Nisbet, Euan; Zazzeri, Guilia; Allen, Grant; Pitt, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    We have been investigating ways to estimate dispersed and point source emissions of methane. To do so we have used continuous measurements from a small network of instruments at 4 sites across East Anglia since 2012. These long-term series have been supplemented by measurements taken in focussed studies at landfills, which are important point sources of methane, and by measurements of the 13C:12C ratio in methane to provide additional information about its sources. These measurements have been analysed using the NAME InTEM inversion model to provide county-level emissions (~30 km x ~30 km) in East Anglia. A case study near a landfill just north of Cambridge was also analysed using a Gaussian plume model and the Windtrax dispersion model. The resulting emission estimates from the three techniques are consistent within the uncertainties, despite the different spatial scales being considered. A seasonal cycle in emissions from the landfill (identified by the isotopic measurements) is observed with higher emissions in winter than summer. This would be expected from consideration of the likely activity of methanogenic bacteria in the landfill, but is not currently represented in emission inventories such as the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory. The possibility of assessing North Sea gas field emissions using ground-based measurements will also be discussed.

  9. Control of mercury emissions from stationary coal combustion sources in China: Current status and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2016-11-01

    Coal burning in power plants and industrial boilers is the largest combustion source of mercury emissions in China. Together, power plants and industrial boilers emit around 250 tonnes of mercury each year, or around half of atmospheric mercury emissions from anthropogenic sources in the country. Power plants in China are generally equipped with multi-pollutant control technologies, which offer the co-benefit of mercury removal, while mercury-specific control technologies have been installed in some facilities. In contrast, most industrial boilers have only basic or no flue gas cleaning. A combination of measures, including energy conservation, coal switching and blending, reducing the mercury contents of coals through washing, combustion controls, and flue gas cleaning, can be used to reduce mercury emissions from these stationary combustion sources. More stringent emission standards for the major air pollutants from coal-fired power plants and industrial boiler, along with standards for the previously unregulated mercury, were implemented recently, which is expected to bring significant reduction in their mercury emissions through the necessary upgrades of multi-pollutant and mercury-specific control technologies. Meanwhile, strong monitoring capacity and strict enforcement are necessary to ensure that the combustion sources operate in compliance with the new emission standards and achieve significant reduction in the emissions of mercury and other air pollutants.

  10. Danish emission inventories for road transport and other mobile sources. Inventories until year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winther, M.

    2008-09-15

    This report explains the parts of the Danish inventories related to road transport and other mobile sources. Emission results are shown for CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X}, NMVOC, CO, particulate matter (PM), heavy metals, dioxins and PAH. From 1990-2006 the fuel use and CO{sub 2} emissions for road transport have increased by 36 %, and CH{sub 4} emissions have decreased by 51 %. A N{sub 2}O emission increase of 29 % is related to the relatively high emissions from older gasoline catalyst cars. The 1985-2006 emission decreases for PM (exhaust only), CO, NO{sub X} and NMVOC are 30, 69, 28 and 71 % respectively, due to the introduction of vehicles complying with gradually stricter emission standards. For SO{sub 2} the emission drop is 99% (due to reduced sulphur content in the diesel fuel), whereas the NH{sub 3} emissions increase by 3065% (due to the introduction of catalyst cars). For other mobile sources the calculated emission changes for CO{sub 2} (and fuel use), CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O are -10, 5 and -11%, from 1990 to 2006. The emissions of SO{sub 2}, particulates (all size fractions), NO{sub X}, NMVOC and CO have decreased by 88, 56, 14, 12 and 9% from 1985 to 2006. For NH{sub 3} the emissions have increased by 8% in the same time period. Uncertainties for the emissions and trends have been estimated. (au)

  11. Estimating methane emissions from biological and fossil-fuel sources in the San Francisco Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seongeun; Cui, Xinguang; Blake, Donald R.; Miller, Ben; Montzka, Stephen A.; Andrews, Arlyn; Guha, Abhinav; Martien, Philip; Bambha, Ray P.; LaFranchi, Brian; Michelsen, Hope A.; Clements, Craig B.; Glaize, Pierre; Fischer, Marc L.

    2017-01-01

    We present the first sector-specific analysis of methane (CH4) emissions from the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) using CH4 and volatile organic compound (VOC) measurements from six sites during September - December 2015. We apply a hierarchical Bayesian inversion to separate the biological from fossil-fuel (natural gas and petroleum) sources using the measurements of CH4 and selected VOCs, a source-specific 1 km CH4 emission model, and an atmospheric transport model. We estimate that SFBA CH4 emissions are 166-289 Gg CH4/yr (at 95% confidence), 1.3-2.3 times higher than a recent inventory with much of the underestimation from landfill. Including the VOCs, 82 ± 27% of total posterior median CH4 emissions are biological and 17 ± 3% fossil fuel, where landfill and natural gas dominate the biological and fossil-fuel CH4 of prior emissions, respectively.

  12. Emission sources contributing to tropospheric ozone over Equatorial Africa during the summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouarar, I.; Law, K. S.; Pham, M.; Liousse, C.; Schlager, H.; Hamburger, T.; Reeves, C. E.; Cammas, J.-P.; Nédéléc, P.; Szopa, S.; Ravegnani, F.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Ulanovsky, A.; Richter, A.

    2011-12-01

    A global chemistry-climate model LMDz_INCA is used to investigate the contribution of African and Asian emissions to tropospheric ozone over Central and West Africa during the summer monsoon. The model results show that ozone in this region is most sensitive to lightning NOx and to Central African biomass burning emissions. However, other emission categories also contribute significantly to regional ozone. The maximum ozone changes due to lightning NOx occur in the upper troposphere between 400 hPa and 200 hPa over West Africa and downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Biomass burning emissions mainly influence ozone in the lower and middle troposphere over Central Africa, and downwind due to westward transport. Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds, which can be uplifted from the lower troposphere to higher altitudes by the deep convection that occurs over West Africa during the monsoon season, lead to maximum ozone changes in the lower stratosphere region. Soil NOx emissions over the Sahel region make a significant contribution to ozone in the lower troposphere. In addition, convective uplift of these emissions and subsequent ozone production are also an important source of ozone in the upper troposphere over West Africa. Concerning African anthropogenic emissions, they only make a small contribution to ozone compared to the other emission categories. The model results indicate that most ozone changes due to African emissions occur downwind, especially over the Atlantic Ocean, far from the emission regions. The import of Asian emissions also makes a considerable contribution to ozone concentrations above 150 hPa and has to be taken into account in studies of the ozone budget over Africa. Using IPCC AR5 (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; Fifth Assessment Report) estimates of anthropogenic emissions for 2030 over Africa and Asia, model calculations show larger changes in ozone over Africa due to growth in Asian emissions compared to African emissions

  13. Valence-quark distribution functions in the kaon and pion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Chang, Lei; Roberts, Craig D.; Wan, Shaolong; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-04-01

    We describe expressions for pion and kaon dressed-quark distribution functions that incorporate contributions from gluons which bind quarks into these mesons and hence overcome a flaw of the commonly used handbag approximation. The distributions therewith obtained are purely valence in character, ensuring that dressed quarks carry all the meson's momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale and vanish as (1 -x )2 when Bjorken-x →1 . Comparing such distributions within the pion and kaon, it is apparent that the size of S U (3 ) -flavor symmetry breaking in meson parton distribution functions is modulated by the flavor dependence of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. Corrections to these leading-order formulas may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea quarks. Working with available empirical information, we build an algebraic framework that is capable of expressing the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables a realistic comparison with experiment which allows us to identify and highlight basic features of measurable pion and kaon valence-quark distributions. We find that whereas roughly two thirds of the pion's light-front momentum is carried by valence dressed quarks at a characteristic hadronic scale; this fraction rises to 95% in the kaon; evolving distributions with these features to a scale typical of available Drell-Yan data produces a kaon-to-pion ratio of u -quark distributions that is in agreement with the single existing data set, and predicts a u -quark distribution within the pion that agrees with a modern reappraisal of π N Drell-Yan data. Precise new data are essential in order to validate this reappraisal and because a single modest-quality measurement of the kaon-to-pion ratio cannot be considered definitive.

  14. Valence-quark distribution functions in the kaon and pion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chen; Chang, Lei; Roberts, Craig D.; Wan, Shaolong; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-04-18

    We describe expressions for pion and kaon dressed-quark distribution functions that incorporate contributions from gluons which bind quarks into these mesons and hence overcome a flaw of the commonly used handbag approximation. The distributions therewith obtained are purely valence in character, ensuring that dressed quarks carry all the meson’s momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale and vanish as ( 1 - x ) 2 when Bjorken- x → 1 . Comparing such distributions within the pion and kaon, it is apparent that the size of S U ( 3 ) -flavor symmetry breaking in meson parton distribution functions is modulated by the flavor dependence of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. Corrections to these leading-order formulas may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea quarks. Working with available empirical information, we build an algebraic framework that is capable of expressing the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables a realistic comparison with experiment which allows us to identify and highlight basic features of measurable pion and kaon valence-quark distributions. We find that whereas roughly two thirds of the pion’s light-front momentum is carried by valence dressed quarks at a characteristic hadronic scale; this fraction rises to 95% in the kaon; evolving distributions with these features to a scale typical of available Drell-Yan data produces a kaon-to-pion ratio of u -quark distributions that is in agreement with the single existing data set, and predicts a u -quark distribution within the pion that agrees with a modern reappraisal of π N Drell-Yan data. Precise new data are essential in order to validate this reappraisal and because a single modest-quality measurement of the kaon-to-pion ratio cannot be considered definitive.

  15. Potential Dust Emissions from Sources in the Southern Hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattachan, A.; D'Odorico, P.; Okin, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Hemisphere currently exhibits low levels of atmospheric dust concentrations relative to the Northern Hemisphere. Recent research suggests that dust concentrations could, however, increase as a result of loss of vegetation cover in the Southern Kalahari and the Mallee. Disturbances resulting from grazing and agriculture are identified as such drivers of land use change in these regions. While studies on the importance of atmospheric dust in global-scale processes are abundant, little has been done to locate the potential dust sources in the Southern Hemisphere because potential new sources are by definition inactive and are undetected in satellite images. To this end, using a combination of laboratory experiments and field observations, we assess that the sediments collected from the dunefields in the Southern Kalahari and Mallee can emit substantial amount of dust, are rich in soluble iron and dust from these sources would reach the Southern Ocean. It is suggested that the supply of soluble iron through atmospheric dust deposition limits the productivity of the Southern Ocean. Thus intensification of land use can potentially make these regions an important source of iron given their proximity to the Southern Ocean. This iron-rich dust could stimulate ocean productivity in future as more areas are reactivated as a result of land-use and droughts.

  16. Aircraft-Based Measurements of Point Source Methane Emissions in the Barnett Shale Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Tegan N; Shepson, Paul B; Cambaliza, Maria O L; Stirm, Brian H; Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Yacovitch, Tara I; Herndon, Scott C; Lan, Xin; Lyon, David

    2015-07-07

    We report measurements of methane (CH4) emission rates observed at eight different high-emitting point sources in the Barnett Shale, Texas, using aircraft-based methods performed as part of the Barnett Coordinated Campaign. We quantified CH4 emission rates from four gas processing plants, one compressor station, and three landfills during five flights conducted in October 2013. Results are compared to other aircraft- and surface-based measurements of the same facilities, and to estimates based on a national study of gathering and processing facilities emissions and 2013 annual average emissions reported to the U.S. EPA Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (GHGRP). For the eight sources, CH4 emission measurements from the aircraft-based mass balance approach were a factor of 3.2-5.8 greater than the GHGRP-based estimates. Summed emissions totaled 7022 ± 2000 kg hr(-1), roughly 9% of the entire basin-wide CH4 emissions estimated from regional mass balance flights during the campaign. Emission measurements from five natural gas management facilities were 1.2-4.6 times larger than emissions based on the national study. Results from this study were used to represent "super-emitters" in a newly formulated Barnett Shale Inventory, demonstrating the importance of targeted sampling of "super-emitters" that may be missed by random sampling of a subset of the total.

  17. Modeling regional mobile source emissions in a geographic information system framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, W. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Center for Geographic Information Systems; Sarasua, W. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Hallmark, S. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). School of Civil and Construction Engineering; Guensler, R. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School fo Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2000-07-01

    Suburban sprawl, population growth, and automobile dependency contribute directly to air pollution problems in US metropolitan areas. As metropolitan regions attempt to mitigate these problems, they are faced with the difficult task of balancing the mobility needs of a growing population and economy, while simultaneously lowering or maintaining levels of ambient pollutants. Although ambient air quality can he directly monitored, predicting the amount and fraction of the mobile source components presents special challenges. A modeling framework that can correlate spatial and temporal emission-specific vehicle activities is required for the complex photochemical models used to predict pollutant concentrations . This paper discusses the GIS-based modeling approach called the Mobile Emission Assessment System for Urban and Regional Evaluation (MEASURE). MEASURE provides researchers and planners with a means of assessing motor vehicle emission reduction strategies. Estimates of spatially resolved fleet composition and activity are combined with activity-specific emission rates to predict engine start and running exhaust emissions. Engine start emissions are estimated using aggregate zonal information. Running exhaust emissions are predicted using road segment specific information and aggregate zonal information. The paper discusses the benefits and challenges related to mobile source emissions modeling in a GIS framework and identifies future GIS mobile emissions modeling research needs. (Author)

  18. Catalytic action of β source on x-ray emission from plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Sadiq, Mehboob; Hussain, S.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.; Waheed, A.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of preionization around the insulator sleeve by a mesh-type β source (Ni6328) for the x-ray emission from a (2.3-3.9 kJ) plasma focus device is investigated. Quantrad Si p-i-n diodes along with suitable filters are employed as time-resolved x-ray detectors and a multipinhole camera with absorption filters is used for time-integrated analysis. X-ray emission in 4π geometry is measured as a function of argon and hydrogen gas filling pressures with and without β source at different charging voltages. It is found that the pressure range for the x-ray emission is broadened, x-ray emission is enhanced, and shot to shot reproducibility is improved with the β source. With argon, the CuKα emission is estimated to be 27.14 J with an efficiency of 0.7% for β source and 21.5 J with an efficiency of 0.55% without β source. The maximum x-ray yield in 4π geometry is found to be about 68.90 J with an efficiency of 1.8% for β source and 54.58 J with an efficiency of 1.4% without β source. With hydrogen, CuKα emission is 11.82 J with an efficiency of 0.32% for β source and 10.07 J with an efficiency of 0.27% without β source. The maximum x-ray yield in 4π geometry is found to be 30.20 J with an efficiency of 0.77% for β source and 25.58 J with an efficiency of 0.6% without β source. The x-ray emission with Pb insert at the anode tip without β source is also investigated and found to be reproducible and significantly high. The maximum x-ray yield is estimated to be 46.6 J in 4π geometry with an efficiency of 1.4% at 23 kV charging voltage. However, degradation of x-ray yield is observed when charging voltage exceeds 23 kV for Pb insert. From pinhole images it is observed that the x-ray emission due to the bombardment of electrons at the anode tip is dominant in both with and without β source.

  19. Kaon Eletromagnetic Form Factor in the Light-Front Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, F P; Frederico, T; Tomio, L; Pereira, Fabiano P.; Tomio, Lauro

    2005-01-01

    Numerical calculations are performed and compared to the experimental data for the electromagnetic form factor of the kaon, which is extracted from both components of the electromagnetic current, $J^{+}$ and $J^{-}$, with a pseudo-scalar coupling of the quarks to the kaon. In the case of $J^{+}$ there is no pair term contribution in the Drell-Yan frame ($q^{+}=0$). However, for $J^{-}$, the pair term contribution is different from zero and necessary in order to preserve the rotational symmetry of the current. The free parameters are the quark masses and the regulator mass.

  20. Patch antenna microcavity terahertz sources with enhanced emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madéo, J.; Todorov, Y.; Gilman, A.; Frucci, G.; Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.; Sirtori, C.; Dani, K. M.

    2016-10-01

    We study the emission properties of an electroluminescent THz frequency quantum cascade structure embedded in an array of patch antenna double-metal microcavities. We show that high photon extraction efficiencies can be obtained by adjusting the active region thickness and array periodicity as well as high Purcell factors (up to 65), leading to an enhanced overall emitted power. Up to a 44-fold increase in power is experimentally observed in comparison with a reference device processed in conventional mesa geometry. Estimation of the Purcell factors using electromagnetic simulations and the theoretical extraction efficiency are in agreement with the observed power enhancement and show that, in these microcavities, the overall enhancement solely depends on the square of the total quality factor.

  1. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Electron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radauscher, Erich J.; Keil, Adam D.; Wells, Mitch; Amsden, Jason J.; Piascik, Jeffrey R.; Parker, Charles B.; Stoner, Brian R.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2015-11-01

    A novel chemical ionization (CI) source has been developed based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission electron source. The CNT-based electron source was evaluated and compared with a standard filament thermionic electron source in a commercial explosives trace detection desktop mass spectrometer. This work demonstrates the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. Both positive and negative modes were investigated. Spectra were collected for a standard mass spectrometer calibration compound, perfluorotributylamine (PFTBA), as well as trace explosives including trinitrotoluene (TNT), Research Department explosive (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The electrical characteristics, lifetime at operating pressure, and power requirements of the CNT-based electron source are reported. The CNT field emission electron sources demonstrated an average lifetime of 320 h when operated in constant emission mode under elevated CI pressures. The ability of the CNT field emission source to cycle on and off can provide enhanced lifetime and reduced power consumption without sacrificing performance and detection capabilities.

  2. 40 CFR 63.1316 - PET and polystyrene affected sources-emissions control provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true PET and polystyrene affected sources... and Resins § 63.1316 PET and polystyrene affected sources—emissions control provisions. (a) The owner... paragraph (b) of this section. The owner or operator of an affected source producing polystyrene using...

  3. Mobile source emission control cost-effectiveness: Issues, uncertainties, and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M.Q. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research

    1994-12-01

    Emissions from mobile sources undoubtedly contribute to US urban air pollution problems. Consequently, mobile source control measures, ranging from vehicle emission standards to reducing vehicle travel, have been adopted or proposed to help attain air quality standards. To rank various mobile source control measures, various government agencies and private organizations calculate cost-effectiveness in dollars per ton of emissions reduced. Arguments for or against certain control measures are often made on the basis of the calculated cost-effectiveness. Yet, different studies may yield significantly different cost-effectiveness results, because of the various methodologies used and assumptions regarding the values of costs and emission reductions. Because of the methodological differences, the cost-effectiveness results may not be comparable between studies. Use of incomparable cost-effectiveness results may result in adoption of ineffective control measures. This paper first discusses some important methodological issues involved in cost-effectiveness calculation for mobile sources and proposes appropriate, systematic methods for dealing with these issues. Various studies have been completed recently to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of mobile source emission control measures. These studies resulted in wide variations in the cost-effectiveness for same control measures. Methodological assumptions used in each study are presented and, based on the proposed methods for cost-effectiveness calculation, adjustments are applied to the original estimates in each study to correct inappropriate methodological assumptions and to make the studies comparable. Finally, mobile source control measures are ranked on the basis of the adjusted cost-effectiveness estimates.

  4. Quantification of carbon sources for isoprene emission in poplar leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzwieseer, J.; Graus, M.; Schnitzler, J. P.; Heizmann, U.; Rennenberg, H.; Hansel, A.

    2003-12-01

    Isoprene is the most abundant volatile organic compound emitted by plants and in particular by trees. Current interest in understanding its biosynthesis in chloroplasts is forced by the important role isoprene plays in atmospheric chemistry. Leaf isoprene formation is closely linked to photosynthesis by a dynamic use of recently fixed photosynthetic precursors in the chloroplast. Under steady state conditions in [13C]CO2 atmosphere approximately 75 % of isoprene became labeled within minutes. The source of unlabeled C is suggested to be of extra-chloroplastidic and/or from starch degradation. In order to test whether these alternative carbon sources - leaf internal C-pools and xylem-transported carbohydrates, contribute to leaf isoprene formation in poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba) on-line proton-transfer-reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to follow 13C-labeling kinetics.

  5. Electron dynamics in RF sources with a laser controlled emission

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V; Metrochenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    Photoemission radiofrequency (RF) electron sources are sources of electron beams with extremely high brightness. Beam bunching processes in such devices are well studied in case when laser pulse duration is much lower of rf oscillation period.At the same time photoemission RF guns have some merits when operating in 'long-pulse' mode. In this case the laser pulse duration is much higher of rf oscillation period but much lower of rise time of oscillations in a gun cavity. Beam parameters at the gun output are compared for photoemission and thermoemission cathode applications. The paper presents results of a beam dynamics simulation in such guns with different resonance structures. Questions connected with defining of the current pulse peak value that can be obtained in such guns are discussed.

  6. Attributing Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Anthropogenic and Natural Sources Using AVIRIS-NG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A. K.; Frankenberg, C.; Thompson, D. R.; Duren, R. M.; Aubrey, A. D.; Bue, B. D.; Green, R. O.; Gerilowski, K.; Krings, T.; Borchardt, J.; Kort, E. A.; Sweeney, C.; Conley, S. A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dennison, P. E.; Ayasse, A.

    2016-12-01

    Imaging spectrometers like the next generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG) can map large regions with the high spatial resolution necessary to resolve methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. This capability is aided by real time detection and geolocation of gas plumes, permitting unambiguous identification of individual emission source locations and communication to ground teams for rapid follow up. We present results from AVIRIS-NG flight campaigns in the Four Corners region (Colorado and New Mexico) and the San Joaquin Valley (California). Over three hundred plumes were observed, reflecting emissions from anthropogenic and natural sources. Examples of plumes will be shown for a number of sources, including CH4 from well completions, gas processing plants, tanks, pipeline leaks, natural seeps, and CO2 from power plants. Despite these promising results, an imaging spectrometer built exclusively for quantitative mapping of gas plumes would have improved sensitivity compared to AVIRIS-NG. For example, an instrument providing a 1 nm spectral sampling (2,000-2,400 micron) would permit mapping CH4, CO2, H2O, CO, and N2O from more diffuse sources using both airborne and orbital platforms. The ability to identify emission sources offers the potential to constrain regional greenhouse gas budgets and improve partitioning between anthropogenic and natural emission sources. Because the CH4 lifetime is only about 9 years and CH4 has a Global Warming Potential 86 times that of CO2 for a 20 year time interval, mitigating these emissions is a particularly cost-effective approach to reduce overall atmospheric radiative forcing. Fig. 1. True color image subset with superimposed gas plumes showing concentrations in ppmm. Left: AVIRIS-NG observed CH4 plumes from natural gas processing plant extending over 500 m downwind of multiple emissions sources. Right: Multiple CO2 plumes observed from coal-fired power plant.

  7. Size-Resolved Source Emission Rates of Indoor Ultrafine Particles Considering Coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Donghyun; Choi, Jung-Il; Wallace, Lance A

    2016-09-20

    Indoor ultrafine particles (UFP, log-normally distributed for three common indoor UFP sources: an electric stove, a natural gas burner, and a paraffin wax candle. Experimental investigations were performed in a full-scale test building. Size- and time-resolved concentrations of UFP ranging from 2 to 100 nm were monitored using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Based on the temporal evolution of the particle size distribution during the source emission period, the size-dependent source emission rate was determined using a material-balance modeling approach. The results indicate that, for a given UFP source, the source strength varies with particle size and source type. The analytical model assuming a log-normally distributed source emission rate could predict the temporal evolution of the particle size distribution with reasonable accuracy for the gas stove and the candle. Including the effect of coagulation was found to increase the estimates of source strengths by up to a factor of 8. This result implies that previous studies on indoor UFP source strengths considering only deposition and ventilation might have largely underestimated the true values of UFP source strengths, especially for combustion due to the natural gas stove and the candle.

  8. Kaon condensation in neutron stars and high density behaviour of nuclear symmetry energy

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, S

    1999-01-01

    We study the influence of a high density behaviour of the nuclear symmetry energy on a kaon condensation in neutron stars. We find that the symmetry energy typical for several realistic nuclear potentials, which decreases at high densities, inhibits kaon condensation for weaker kaon-nucleon couplings. There exists a threshold coupling above which the kaon condensate forms at densities exceeding some critical value. This is in contrast to the case of rising symmetry energy, as e.g. for relativistic mean field models, when the kaon condensate can form for any coupling at a sufficiently high density. Properties of the condensate are also different in both cases.

  9. Kaon photoproduction from the deuteron in a Regge-plus-resonance approach

    CERN Document Server

    Vancraeyveld, Pieter; Ryckebusch, Jan; Vrancx, Tom

    2012-01-01

    We present a Regge-inspired effective-Lagrangian framework for kaon photoproduction from the deuteron. Quasi-free kaon production is investigated using the Regge-plus-resonance (RPR) elementary operator within the relativistic plane-wave impulse approximation. The RPR model was developed to describe photoinduced and electroinduced charged-kaon production off protons. We show how this elementary operator can be transformed in order to account for the production of neutral kaons from both protons and neutrons. The model results for kaon photoproduction from the deuteron compare favourably to the 2H(g,K)YN data published to date.

  10. Kaon photoproduction from the deuteron in a Regge-plus-resonance approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vancraeyveld, P., E-mail: pieter.vancraeyveld@ugent.be [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); De Cruz, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Ryckebusch, J., E-mail: jan.ryckebusch@ugent.be [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Vrancx, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2013-01-02

    We present a Regge-inspired effective-Lagrangian framework for kaon photoproduction from the deuteron. Quasi-free kaon production is investigated using the Regge-plus-resonance (RPR) elementary operator within the relativistic plane-wave impulse approximation. The RPR model was developed to describe photoinduced and electroinduced charged-kaon production off protons. We show how this elementary operator can be transformed in order to account for the production of neutral kaons from both protons and neutrons. The model results for kaon photoproduction from the deuteron compare favourably to the {sup 2}H({gamma},K)YN data published to date.

  11. Source-receptor relationships between East Asian sulfur dioxide emissions and Northern Hemisphere sulfate concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2008-07-01

    We analyze the effect of varying East Asian (EA) sulfur emissions on sulfate concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere, using a global coupled oxidant-aerosol model (MOZART-2). We conduct a base and five sensitivity simulations, in which sulfur emissions from each continent are tagged, to establish the source-receptor (S-R) relationship between EA sulfur emissions and sulfate concentrations over source and downwind regions. We find that from west to east across the North Pacific, EA sulfate contributes approximately 80% 20% of sulfate at the surface, but at least 50% at 500 hPa. Surface sulfate concentrations are dominated by local anthropogenic sources. Of the sulfate produced from sources other than local anthropogenic emissions (defined here as "background" sulfate), EA sources account for approximately 30% 50% (over the Western US) and 10% 20% (over the Eastern US). The surface concentrations of sulfate from EA sources over the Western US are highest in MAM (up to 0.15 μg/m3), and lowest in DJF (less than 0.06 μg/m3). Reducing EA SO2 emissions will significantly decrease the spatial extent of the EA sulfate influence (represented by the areas where at least 0.1 μg m-3 of sulfate originates from EA) over the North Pacific both at the surface and at 500 hPa in all seasons, but the extent of influence is insensitive to emission increases, particularly in DJF and JJA. We find that EA sulfate concentrations over most downwind regions respond nearly linearly to changes in EA SO2 emissions, but sulfate concentrations over the EA source region increase more slowly than SO2 emissions, particularly at the surface and in winter, due to limited availability of oxidants (in particular of H2O2, which oxidizes SO2 to sulfate in the aqueous phase). We find that similar estimates of the S-R relationship for trans-Pacific transport of EA sulfate would be obtained using either sensitivity (i.e., varying emissions from a region to examine the effects on downwind concentrations

  12. Source-receptor relationships between East Asian sulfur dioxide emissions and Northern Hemisphere sulfate concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the effect of varying East Asian (EA sulfur emissions on sulfate concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere, using a global coupled oxidant-aerosol model (MOZART-2. We conduct a base and five sensitivity simulations, in which sulfur emissions from each continent are tagged, to establish the source-receptor (S-R relationship between EA sulfur emissions and sulfate concentrations over source and downwind regions. We find that from west to east across the North Pacific, EA sulfate contributes approximately 80%–20% of sulfate at the surface, but at least 50% at 500 hPa. Surface sulfate concentrations are dominated by local anthropogenic sources. Of the sulfate produced from sources other than local anthropogenic emissions (defined here as "background" sulfate, EA sources account for approximately 30%–50% (over the Western US and 10%–20% (over the Eastern US. The surface concentrations of sulfate from EA sources over the Western US are highest in MAM (up to 0.15 μg/m3, and lowest in DJF (less than 0.06 μg/m3. Reducing EA SO2 emissions will significantly decrease the spatial extent of the EA sulfate influence (represented by the areas where at least 0.1 μg m−3 of sulfate originates from EA over the North Pacific both at the surface and at 500 hPa in all seasons, but the extent of influence is insensitive to emission increases, particularly in DJF and JJA. We find that EA sulfate concentrations over most downwind regions respond nearly linearly to changes in EA SO2 emissions, but sulfate concentrations over the EA source region increase more slowly than SO2 emissions, particularly at the surface and in winter, due to limited availability of oxidants (in particular of H2O2, which oxidizes SO2 to sulfate in the aqueous phase. We find that similar estimates of the S-R relationship for trans-Pacific transport of EA sulfate would be

  13. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zavala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on the photochemistry in the region using observational and modeling approaches. The observed historical trends of ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO and nitrogen oxides (NOx suggest that ozone production in the MCMA has changed from a low to a high VOC-sensitive regime over a period of 20 years. Comparison of the historical emission trends of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons derived from mobile-source emission studies in the MCMA from 1991 to 2006 with the trends of the concentrations of CO, NOx, and the CO/NOx ratio during peak traffic hours also indicates that fuel-based fleet average emission factors have significantly decreased for CO and VOCs during this period whereas NOx emission factors do not show any strong trend, effectively reducing the ambient VOC/NOx ratio.

    This study presents the results of model analyses on the sensitivity of the observed ozone levels to the estimated historical changes in its precursors. The model sensitivity analyses used a well-validated base case simulation of a high pollution episode in the MCMA with the mathematical Decoupled Direct Method (DDM and the standard Brute Force Method (BFM in the 3-D CAMx chemical transport model. The model reproduces adequately the observed historical trends and current photochemical levels. Comparison of the BFM and the DDM sensitivity techniques indicates that the model yields ozone values that increase linearly with

  14. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zavala

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on the photochemistry in the region using observational and modeling approaches. The observed historical trends of ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO and nitrogen oxides (NOx suggest that ozone production in the MCMA has changed from a low to a high VOC-sensitive regime over a period of 20 years. Comparison of the historical emission trends of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons derived from mobile-source emission studies in the MCMA from 1991 to 2006 with the trends of the concentrations of CO, NOx, and the CO/NOx ratio during peak traffic hours also indicates that fuel-based fleet average emission factors have significantly decreased for CO and VOCs during this period whereas NOx emission factors do not show any strong trend, effectively reducing the ambient VOC/NOx ratio.

    This study presents the results of model analyses on the sensitivity of the observed ozone levels to the estimated historical changes in its precursors. The model sensitivity analyses used a well-validated base case simulation of a high pollution episode in the MCMA with the mathematical Decoupled Direct Method (DDM and the standard Brute Force Method (BFM in the 3-D CAMx chemical transport model. The model reproduces adequately the observed historical trends and current photochemical levels. Comparison of the BFM and the DDM sensitivity techniques indicates that the model yields ozone values that increase linearly with

  15. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, M.; Lei, W.; Molina, M. J.; Molina, L. T.

    2009-01-01

    The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on the photochemistry in the region using observational and modeling approaches. The observed historical trends of ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) suggest that ozone production in the MCMA has changed from a low to a high VOC-sensitive regime over a period of 20 years. Comparison of the historical emission trends of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons derived from mobile-source emission studies in the MCMA from 1991 to 2006 with the trends of the concentrations of CO, NOx, and the CO/NOx ratio during peak traffic hours also indicates that fuel-based fleet average emission factors have significantly decreased for CO and VOCs during this period whereas NOx emission factors do not show any strong trend, effectively reducing the ambient VOC/NOx ratio. This study presents the results of model analyses on the sensitivity of the observed ozone levels to the estimated historical changes in its precursors. The model sensitivity analyses used a well-validated base case simulation of a high pollution episode in the MCMA with the mathematical Decoupled Direct Method (DDM) and the standard Brute Force Method (BFM) in the 3-D CAMx chemical transport model. The model reproduces adequately the observed historical trends and current photochemical levels. Comparison of the BFM and the DDM sensitivity techniques indicates that the model yields ozone values that increase linearly with NOx emission reductions and decrease linearly with VOC emission reductions only up to 30% from the

  16. BLACK Carbon Emissions from Diesel Sources in the Largest Arctic City: Case Study of Murmansk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M.; Kholod, N.; Malyshev, V.; Tretyakova, S.; Gusev, E.; Yu, S.; Barinov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Russia has very little data on its black carbon (BC) emissions. Because Russia makes up such a large share of the Arctic, understanding Russian emissions will improve our understanding of overall BC levels, BC in the Arctic and the link between BC and climate change. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up inventory of BC emissions from diesel sources in Murmansk, Russia, along with uncertainty estimates associated with these emissions. The research team developed a detailed data collection methodology. The methodology involves assessing the vehicle fleet and activity in Murmansk using traffic, parking lot and driver surveys combined with an existing database from a vehicle inspection station and statistical data. The team also assessed the most appropriate emission factors, drawing from both Russian and international inventory methodologies. The researchers also compared fuel consumption using statistical data and bottom-up fuel calculations. They then calculated emissions for on-road transportation, off-road transportation (including mines), diesel generators, fishing and other sources. The article also provides a preliminary assessment of Russia-wide emissions of black carbon from diesel sources.

  17. Compact sources as the origin of the soft gamma-ray emission of the Milky Way

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebrun, F.; Terrier, R.; Bazzano, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Milky Way is known to be an abundant source of gamma-ray photons(1), now determined to be mainly diffuse in nature and resulting from interstellar processes(2). In the soft gamma-ray domain, point sources are expected to dominate, but the lack of sensitive high-resolution observations did...... show that these sources account for the entirety of the Milky Way's emission in soft gamma-rays, leaving at most a minor role for diffuse processes....

  18. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng, Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5×10)...

  19. Atmospheric mercury emissions in Australia from anthropogenic, natural and recycled sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter F.; Morrison, Anthony L.; Malfroy, Hugh J.; Cope, Martin; Lee, Sunhee; Hibberd, Mark L.; Meyer, C. P. (Mick); McGregor, John

    2012-12-01

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has begun a process of developing a legally binding instrument to manage emissions of mercury from anthropogenic sources. The UNEP Governing Council has concluded that there is sufficient evidence of significant global adverse impacts from mercury to warrant further international action; and that national, regional and global actions should be initiated as soon as possible to identify populations at risk and to reduce human generated releases. This paper describes the development of, and presents results from, a comprehensive, spatially and temporally resolved inventory of atmospheric mercury emissions from the Australian landmass. Results indicate that the best estimate of total anthropogenic emissions of mercury to the atmosphere in 2006 was 15 ± 5 tonnes. Three industrial sectors contribute substantially to Australian anthropogenic emissions: gold smelting (˜50%, essentially from a single site/operation), coal combustion in power plants (˜15%) and alumina production from bauxite (˜12%). A diverse range of other sectors contribute smaller proportions of the emitted mercury, but industrial emissions account for around 90% of total anthropogenic mercury emissions. The other sectors include other industrial sources (mining, smelting, and cement production) and the use of products containing mercury. It is difficult to determine historical trends in mercury emissions given the large uncertainties in the data. Estimates for natural and re-emitted emissions from soil, water, vegetation and fires are made using meteorological models, satellite observations of land cover and soil and vegetation type, fuel loading, fire scars and emission factors which account for the effects of temperature, insolation and other environmental variables. These natural and re-emitted sources comfortably exceed the anthropogenic emissions, and comprise 4-12 tonnes per year from vegetation, 70-210 tonnes per year from soils, and 21-63 tonnes

  20. Independent evaluation of point source fossil fuel CO2 emissions to better than 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Jocelyn Christine; Keller, Elizabeth D; Norris, Margaret W; Wiltshire, Rachael M

    2016-09-13

    Independent estimates of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions are key to ensuring that emission reductions and regulations are effective and provide needed transparency and trust. Point source emissions are a key target because a small number of power plants represent a large portion of total global emissions. Currently, emission rates are known only from self-reported data. Atmospheric observations have the potential to meet the need for independent evaluation, but useful results from this method have been elusive, due to challenges in distinguishing CO2ff emissions from the large and varying CO2 background and in relating atmospheric observations to emission flux rates with high accuracy. Here we use time-integrated observations of the radiocarbon content of CO2 ((14)CO2) to quantify the recently added CO2ff mole fraction at surface sites surrounding a point source. We demonstrate that both fast-growing plant material (grass) and CO2 collected by absorption into sodium hydroxide solution provide excellent time-integrated records of atmospheric (14)CO2 These time-integrated samples allow us to evaluate emissions over a period of days to weeks with only a modest number of measurements. Applying the same time integration in an atmospheric transport model eliminates the need to resolve highly variable short-term turbulence. Together these techniques allow us to independently evaluate point source CO2ff emission rates from atmospheric observations with uncertainties of better than 10%. This uncertainty represents an improvement by a factor of 2 over current bottom-up inventory estimates and previous atmospheric observation estimates and allows reliable independent evaluation of emissions.

  1. Consideration of Fugitive Emissions in Major Source Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  2. Global organic carbon emissions from primary sources from 1960 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ye; Shen, Huizhong; Chen, Yilin; Zhong, Qirui; Chen, Han; Wang, Rong; Shen, Guofeng; Liu, Junfeng; Li, Bengang; Tao, Shu

    2015-12-01

    In an attempt to reduce uncertainty, global organic carbon (OC) emissions from a total of 70 sources were compiled at 0.1° × 0.1° resolution for 2007 (PKU-OC-2007) and country scale from 1960 to 2009. The compilation took advantage of a new fuel-consumption data product (PKU-Fuel-2007) and a series of newly published emission factors (EFOC) in developing countries. The estimated OC emissions were 32.9 Tg (24.1-50.6 Tg as interquartile range), of which less than one third was anthropogenic in origin. Uncertainty resulted primarily from variations in EFOC. Asia, Africa, and South America had high emissions mainly because of residential biomass fuel burning or wildfires. Per-person OC emission in rural areas was three times that of urban areas because of the relatively high EFOC of residential solid fuels. Temporal trend of anthropogenic OC emissions depended on rural population, and was influenced primarily by residential crop residue and agricultural waste burning. Both the OC/PM2.5 ratio and emission intensity, defined as quantity of OC emissions per unit of fuel consumption for all sources, of anthropogenic OC followed a decreasing trend, indicating continuous improvement in combustion efficiency and control measures.

  3. Extraction of Emission Source Images in d+Au and

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Paul

    2004-10-01

    Relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC, produce a fireball of nuclear matter with extremely high energy density. The dynamical evolution of this fireball is driven by such fundamental properties as the nuclear Equation of State (EOS) and possibly by a phase transition, e.g., to a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Two-particle correlation studies, for various particle species,provide an important probe of the space-time extent of this fireball. In recent measurements the PHENIX collaboration has used a model-independent imaging technique proposed by Brown and Danielewicz(D.Brown and P.Danieliwicz, Phys.Rev.C 64, 014902 (2001))to extract two-particle source functions directly from Au+Au and d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. Source images obtained from these two systems for various particle species for several centality and kt selections will be presented and compared/contrasted. The implications of these results for the decay dynamics of the fireball created at RHIC will also be dicussed.

  4. COS-B gamma ray sources beyond the predicted diffuse emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Simpson, G.

    1990-01-01

    COS-B data were reanalyzed using for background subtraction the modeled galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission based on HI- and CO-line surveys and the gamma-ray data itself. A methodology was developed for this purpose with the following three features: automatic generation of source catalogs using correlation analysis, simulation of trials to derive significance thresholds for source detection, and bootstrap sampling to drive error boxes and confidence intervals for source parameters. The analysis shows that about half of the 2CG sources are explained by concentrations in the distribution of molecular hydrogen. Indication for a few weak new sources is also obtained.

  5. Legal and financial methods for reducing low emission sources: Options for incentives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samitowski, W. [Office of Economic and Legal Advisors POLINVEST Ltd., Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    There are two types of the so-called low emission sources in Cracow: over 1,000 local boiler houses and several thousand solid fuel-fired stoves. The accomplishment of each of 5 sub-projects offered under the American-Polish program entails solving the technical, financial, legal and public relations-related problems. The elimination of the low emission source requires, therefore, a joint effort of the following pairs: (a) local authorities, (b) investors, (c) owners and users of low emission sources, and (d) inhabitants involved in particular projects. The results of the studies developed by POLINVEST indicate that the accomplishment of the projects for the elimination of low emission sources will require financial incentives. Bearing in mind the today`s resources available from the community budget, this process may last as long as a dozen or so years. The task of the authorities of Cracow City is making a long-range operational strategy enabling reduction of low emission sources in Cracow.

  6. Identification the Emission Sources of Dioxins and Furans and Estimating their Contribution on Emission Rate in Iran in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momeniha Fatemeh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Background and Objective: Dioxins and Furans are dangerous and highly toxic compounds entering to the environment from natural and manmade sources. Having high stability and half-life, these compounds remain for a long period in the medium and bring about severe effects on human beings and the environment. The aim of this study was to identify dioxins and furans emission sources in Iran and to estimate their contribution in emission rate. ‌Materials and Methods: First, we identified the emission sources of dioxins and furans and then necessary data was gathered by referring to the authorized organizations and filling the prepared UNEP questionnaires. We used Excel software to analyze the data collected.Results: According to the results obtained, total dioxins and furan emission in Iran in 2010, was 1957 g TEQ/yr; out of this amount, 705.8 g TEQ is emitted to the atmosphere and 643.2 g TEQ is residual ash. Therefore, dioxins and furans emission rate was 26.4 µg TEQ/capita in Iran. The most rates of emissions were associated with uncontrolled open burning (732.8 g TEQ/yr and ferrous and nonferrous metal production (635.7 g TEQ/yr such as cupper, iron, and steel.‌Conclusion: Our findings showed that the emission rate of Dioxins and Furans is much higher in Iran compared with other countries and appropriate management strategies are required to control these dangerous pollutants. st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso

  7. Semiconductor light source with electrically tunable emission wavelength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belenky, Gregory (Port Jefferson, NY); Bruno, John D. (Bowie, MD); Kisin, Mikhail V. (Centereach, NY); Luryi, Serge (Setauket, NY); Shterengas, Leon (Centereach, NY); Suchalkin, Sergey (Centereach, NY); Tober, Richard L. (Elkridge, MD)

    2011-01-25

    A semiconductor light source comprises a substrate, lower and upper claddings, a waveguide region with imbedded active area, and electrical contacts to provide voltage necessary for the wavelength tuning. The active region includes single or several heterojunction periods sandwiched between charge accumulation layers. Each of the active region periods comprises higher and lower affinity semiconductor layers with type-II band alignment. The charge carrier accumulation in the charge accumulation layers results in electric field build-up and leads to the formation of generally triangular electron and hole potential wells in the higher and lower affinity layers. Nonequillibrium carriers can be created in the active region by means of electrical injection or optical pumping. The ground state energy in the triangular wells and the radiation wavelength can be tuned by changing the voltage drop across the active region.

  8. Contribution of Point Sources to the Soft Gamma-Ray Galactic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, R.; Lebrun, F.; Bélanger, G.; Goldwurm, A.; Strong, A. W.; Schoenfelder, V.; Bouchet, L.; Roques, J. P.; Parmar, A.

    2004-10-01

    The nature of the soft gamma-ray (20-200 keV) Galactic emission has been a matter of debate for a long time. Previous experiments have tried to sep- arate the point source contribution from the real in- terstellar emission, but with a rather poor spatial res- olution, they concluded that the interstellar emission could be a large fraction of the total Galactic emis- sion. INTEGRAL, having both high resolution and high sensitivity, is well suited to reassess more pre- cisely this problem. Using the INTEGRAL core pro- gram Galactic Center Deep Exposure (GCDE), we estimate the contribution of detected point sources to the total Galactic flux. Key words: Interstellar emission; INTEGRAL; IBIS/ISGRI.

  9. Violation of Bell’s inequality in neutral kaons system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj K Samal; Dipankar Home

    2002-08-01

    We show by general considerations that it is not possible to test violation of the existing versions of Bell’s inequality in entangled neutral kaons system using experimentally accessible thin regenerators. We point out the loophole in the recent argument (A Bramon and M Nowakowski, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1 (1999)) that claimed such a test to be possible.

  10. Limits on Lorentz violation in neutral-Kaon decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, K.K.; Wilschut, H. W.; Timmermans, R. G. E.

    2013-01-01

    The KLOE collaboration recently reported bounds on the directional dependence of the lifetime of the short-lived neutral kaon K_S with respect to the cosmic microwave background dipole anisotropy. We interpret their results in a general framework developed to probe Lorentz violation in the weak

  11. Exploration of Lorentz violation in neutral-kaon decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, K.K.; Noordmans, J.P.; Wilschut, H. W.; Timmermans, R.G.E.

    2014-01-01

    The KLOE Collaboration recently reported bounds on the directional dependence of the lifetime of the short-lived neutral kaon K-S(0) with respect to the dipole anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background. We interpret their results in an effective field theory framework developed to probe the

  12. Bell inequality and CP violation in the neutral kaon system

    CERN Document Server

    Bertlmann, Reinhold A; Hiesmayr, B C

    2001-01-01

    For the entangled neutral kaon system we formulate a Bell inequality sensitive to CP violation in mixing. Via this Bell inequality we obtain a bound on the leptonic CP asymmetry which is violated by experimental data. Furthermore, we connect the Bell inequality with a decoherence approach and find a lower bound on the decoherence parameter which practically corresponds to Furry's hypothesis.

  13. Optimization of Experiment Detecting Kaon and Pion Internal Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacht, Jacob

    2016-09-01

    Pions and kaons are the lightest two-quark systems in Nature. Scientists believe that the rules governing the strong interaction are chirally, symmetric. If this were true, the pion would have no mass. The chiral symmetry is broken dynamically by quark-gluon interactions, giving the pion mass. The pion is thus seen as the key to confirm the mechanism that dynamically generates nearly all of the mass of hadrons and central to the effort to understand hadron structure. The most prominent observables are the meson form factors. Experiments are planned at the 12 GeV Jefferson Lab. An experiment aimed at shedding light on the kaon's internal structure is scheduled to run in 2017. The experimental setup has been optimized for detecting kaons, but it may allow for detecting pions between values of Q2 of 0.4 and 5.5 GeV2. Measurements of the separated pion cross section and exploratory extraction of the pion form factor from electroproduction at low Q2 could be compared to earlier e-pi scattering data, and thus help validating the method. At high Q2, these measurements provide the first L/T separated cross sections and could help guide planned dedicated pion experiments. I will present possible parasitic studies with the upcoming kaon experiment. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-1306227.

  14. Determination of Transverse Charge Density from Kaon Form Factor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Ott, Johann; Horn, Tanja; Pegg, Ian; Mecholski, Nicholas; Carmignotto, Marco; Ali, Salina

    2016-09-01

    At the level of nucleons making up atomic nuclei, among subatomic particles made up of quarks, K-mesons or kaons represent the most simple hadronic system including the heavier strange quark, having a relatively elementary bound state of a quark and an anti-quark as its valence structure. Its electromagnetic structure is then parametrized by a single, dimensionless quantity known as the form factor, the two-dimensional Fourier transform of which yields the quantity of transverse charge density. Transverse charge density, in turn, provides a needed framework for the interpretation of form factors in terms of physical charge and magnetization, both with respect to the propagation of a fast-moving nucleon. To this is added the value of strange quarks in ultimately presenting a universal, process-independent description of nucleons, further augmenting the importance of studying the kaon's internal structure. The pressing character of such research questions directs the present paper, describing the first extraction of transverse charge density from electromagnetic kaon form factor data. The extraction is notably extended to form factor data at recently acquired higher energy levels, whose evaluation could permit more complete phenomenological models for kaon behavior to be proposed. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-1306227.

  15. Proton and kaon timelike form factors from BABAR

    CERN Document Server

    Serednyakov, S I

    2015-01-01

    The latest BABAR results on the proton and kaon timelike form factors (FF) are presented. The special emphasize is made on comparison of the spacelike and timelike FFs and the rise of the proton FF near threshold. The behavior of the cross section of e+e- annihilation into hadrons near the nucleon-antinucleon threshold is discussed.

  16. NA48 results on neutral kaon and hyperon rare decays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nicolò Cartiglia

    2004-03-01

    The NA48 Collaboration has performed an extensive program of kaon and hyperon rare decays using the data collected during the period 1997-2001. This program includes new tests of chiral perturbation theory, new measurements of the mass and $K_{S}$ lifetime and the possibility to measure the Cabibbo angle using $\\Xi$ beta decays.

  17. Red Sprites as the source of ELF emission from lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, J.

    2013-12-01

    Jagdish Rai Invertis University, NH-24, Bareilly, India and Manoj K. Paras Department of Applied Sciences, DIT University, Dehradun, India. ABSTRACT Rai (1974) discussed the possibility of upper atmospheric lightning discharges. These discharges were observed experimentally by sertman et al (1995), Lyons (1996), Stenback- Nielsen and Mc Harg (2008) and many others. Cummer et al (1998) and Cummer (2003) observed that the radiation from red sprites lie in the ELF range. From the knowledge of velocity and current expressions obtained by Paras and Rai (2011) for red sprites, authors obtained the frequency spectrum of emitted radiation. The radiation lies mainly in ELF range and peaks around 40Hz. A comparative study of radio emissions from red sprite and return stroke- lateral corona current system shows that the power radiated from the former is higher than the later. When subjected to the propagation in earth -ionosphere waveguide, authors find that the Schumann resonances are caused by red sprites and not by return strokes. References:- 1. Cummer, S.A., U.S. Inan, T.F. Bell and C.P. Barrington-Leigh, 1998, ELF radiation produced by electrical currents in sprites, Geophys. Res. Letters 25, 8. 2. Cummer, S.A. 2003, Current moment in sprite producing lightning , J. Atmos. Solar Terr. Phys., 65, 499-908. 3. Lyons W.A., 1996 Sprite observations above the U.S. high plains in relation to their parent thunderstorm systems, J. Geophys. Res. D101, 29641. 4. Paros M.K. and J. Rai, 2011 Electric and magnetic fields from return stroke- lateral corona system and red sprites J. Electromagnetic Analysis and Applications, 3. 5. Rai J., 1974 some studies on lighting, Ph.D. Thesis Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. 6. Sentman D.D., E.M. Wescott, D.L. Osborne, D.L. Hampton and M.J. Heazener, 1995, Preliminary results from the sprites 94 Campaign, Red Sprites, Geophy. Res. Letters, 22, 1205. 7. Stenback- Nielson H.C. and Mc Harg M.G., 2008, High time resolution sprite imaging

  18. EFFECT OF THE TYPE OF HEAT SOURCES ON CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Rabczak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A lot of attention is nowadays devoted to the problem of generally defined ecology. It is absolutely essential in case of systems and sources generating heat due to their direct influence on the environment through emitting post-process products to the atmosphere which are, most frequently a result of combustion. Therefore, constant searchers are made to optimize the operation of heat sources and to acquire energy from sources for which the general balance of carbon dioxide emission is zero or close to zero. This work compares the emissions of equivalent CO2 from selected systems with the following heat sources: coal, gas furnace, heat pump, and refers results of the analysis to aspects connected with regulations concerning environmental protection. The systems generating thermal energy in the gas furnaces, coal, biomass, as well as the compression heat pumps with the lower heat source as ambient air or ground were taken under consideration, as well as centralized systems for the production of heat based on the combustion of coal, gas, oil, and biomass. the Emission of carbon dioxide for the installation of cogeneration and absorption heat pump were also calculated. Similarly obtained amount of extra emission necessary for the proper operation maintenance of heating devices via the supplied electricity from external source, the mostly fuel-fired power plants for fuels as previously mentioned. The results of the calculations were presented in tables and graphs.

  19. Source characterization of major emission sources in the Imperial and Mexicali Valleys along the US/Mexico border

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.G.; Chow, J.C. [Desert Research Institute, 2215 Raggio Pkwy., 89512 Reno, NV (United States)

    2001-08-10

    Chemical profiles for particle emissions are needed for source apportionment studies using the chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model. Source measurements of geological sources, motor vehicle exhaust, vegetative burning (e.g. asparagus, field burning, charbroil cooking), and industrial sources (e.g. oil-fueled glass plant, manure-fueled power plants) were acquired as part of the Imperial/Mexicali Valley Cross Border PM{sub 10} Transport Study in 1992. Six different source sampling techniques (i.e. hot- and diluted-exhaust sampling, ground-based source sampling, particle sweeping/grab sampling, vacuum sampling, and laboratory resuspension sampling) were applied to acquire filter samples of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters <2.5 and 10 {mu}m, respectively). Filter samples were analyzed for mass by gravimetry, elements (Na to U) by X-ray fluorescence, anions (Cl{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup =}) by ion chromatography, ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) by automated colorimetry, soluble sodium (Na{sup +}) and potassium (K{sup +}) by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and organic and elemental carbon (OC, EC) by thermal/optical reflectance. Concentration data were acquired for a total of 50 chemical species. Elevated abundances of crustal components (Al, Si, K, Ca, Fe) from geological material, carbon (OC, EC) and trace elements (Br, Pb) from vehicle exhausts, carbon (OC, EC) and ions (K{sup +}, Cl{sup -}) from vegetative burning, ions (SO{sub 4}{sup =}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Cl{sup -}) and elements (Cl, Se) from a manure-fueled power plants, and sulfur and trace elements (Na{sup +}, Pb, Se, Ni, V) from an oil-fueled glass plant were found in the resulting source profiles. Abundances of crustal species (e.g. Al, Si, Ca) in the Imperial/Mexicali Valley geological profiles are more than twice those found in central and southern California. Abundances of lead in motor vehicle exhausts indicate different

  20. Constraints on the TeV source population and its contribution to the galactic diffuse TeV emission

    CERN Document Server

    Casanova, Sabrina

    2007-01-01

    The detection by the HESS atmospheric Cerenkov telescope of fourteen new sources from the Galactic plane makes it possible to estimate the contribution of unresolved sources like those detected by HESS to the diffuse Galactic emission measured by the Milagro Collaboration. The number-intensity relation and the luminosity function for the HESS source population are investigated. By evaluating the contribution of such a source population to the diffuse emission we conclude that a significant fraction of the TeV energy emission measured by the Milagro experiment could be due to unresolved sources like HESS sources. Predictions concerning the number of sources which Veritas, Milagro, and HAWC should detect are also given.

  1. Assessment of possible strategies to reduce mobile sources emissions in Costa Rica, 2010-2015 projection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Herrera-Murillo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of the possible strategies to reduce the emissions from mobile sources in Costa Rica were evaluated for the 2010-2015 period. The total emissions were estimated using emission factors obtained from Mobile 6 model and activity data like fuel and vehicle type distribution. This study found that 50% substitution of public transport vehicles was the most effective measure to lower the anual rate increase for NOx and Total Organic Gases (TOG. Both around 14,3% and 11,7% anually, respectively.

  2. Inference of emission rates from multiple sources using Bayesian probability theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Eugene; Flesch, Thomas K

    2010-03-01

    The determination of atmospheric emission rates from multiple sources using inversion (regularized least-squares or best-fit technique) is known to be very susceptible to measurement and model errors in the problem, rendering the solution unusable. In this paper, a new perspective is offered for this problem: namely, it is argued that the problem should be addressed as one of inference rather than inversion. Towards this objective, Bayesian probability theory is used to estimate the emission rates from multiple sources. The posterior probability distribution for the emission rates is derived, accounting fully for the measurement errors in the concentration data and the model errors in the dispersion model used to interpret the data. The Bayesian inferential methodology for emission rate recovery is validated against real dispersion data, obtained from a field experiment involving various source-sensor geometries (scenarios) consisting of four synthetic area sources and eight concentration sensors. The recovery of discrete emission rates from three different scenarios obtained using Bayesian inference and singular value decomposition inversion are compared and contrasted.

  3. 76 FR 15703 - Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources and Emission Guidelines for Existing Sources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    .... EPA has also finalized revised CAA section 112 NESHAP from the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry... Air Act Cd Cadmium CDX Central Data Exchange CEMS Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems CFR Code of...; manufacturers of plastics and rubber products. 327 Manufacturers of cement; nonmetallic mineral...

  4. Modeling of Regionalized Emissions (MoRE) into Water Bodies: An Open-Source River Basin Management System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stephan Fuchs; Maria Kaiser; Lisa Kiemle; Steffen Kittlaus; Shari Rothvoß; Snezhina Toshovski; Adrian Wagner; Ramona Wander; Tatyana Weber; Sara Ziegler

    2017-01-01

    .... The river basin management system MoRE (Modeling of Regionalized Emissions) was developed as a flexible open-source instrument which is able to model pathway-specific emissions and river loads on a catchment scale...

  5. Optical sensors of gas on the basis of semiconductor sources of infrared emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabatsiy V. N.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Various constructions of optic sensors of gas and gas analyzers on their basis with the use of low-powered semiconductor sources of infrared emission for wave-length of 2,5–5,0 mm made on basis of InGaAs/InAs and InAsSbP/InAs heterostructures are worked out. The experimental results demonstrating the ability of application of semiconductor sources of infrared emission in optic sensors for measuring of metan concentration (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2 are given. The availability of use of such sensors in the gas analysis equipment of new generation is shown.

  6. ɛK^{} in the Standard Model and the kaon phase conventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala F.

    2017-07-01

    The parameter ɛ_K , that quantifies CP violation in kaon mixing, is the observable setting the strongest constraints on new physics with a generic flavour and CP structure. While its experimental uncertainty is at the half percent level, the theoretical one is at the level of 15%. One of the largest sources of the latter uncertainty is the poor perturbative behaviour of the short-distance contribution of the box diagram with two charm quarks. In this proceeding, based on Ligeti and Sala arXiv:1602.08494 [hep-ph], I summarise how that contribution can be removed, from the imaginary part of the mixing amplitude, by a rephasing of the kaon fields. A first outcome is a mild reduction of the total theoretical uncertainty of ɛ_K : while this might look counterintuitive at first sight, if different "pieces" ( i.e. short- and long-distance) of an observable are computed with different techniques, then it is possible to choose a phase convention where the total uncertainty of that observable is optimised. Moreover, it is worthy to discuss if and how this freedom of rephasing, which has been somehow overlooked in the past, can help in making progress in lattice QCD computations of immediate relevance for ɛ_K.

  7. Epsilon_K in the Standard Model and the kaon phase conventions

    CERN Document Server

    Sala, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The parameter epsilon_K, that quantifies CP violation in kaon mixing, is the observable setting the strongest constraints on new physics with a generic flavour and CP structure. While its experimental uncertainty is at the half percent level, the theoretical one is at the level of 15%. One of the largest sources of the latter uncertainty is the poor perturbative behaviour of the short-distance contribution of the box diagram with two charm quarks. In this proceeding, based on arXiv:1602.08494, I summarise how that contribution can be removed, from the imaginary part of the mixing amplitude, by a rephasing of the kaon fields. A first outcome is a mild reduction of the total theoretical uncertainty of epsilon_K: while this might look counterintuitive at first sight, if different "pieces" (i.e. short- and long-distance) of an observable are computed with different techniques, then it is possible to choose a phase convention where the total uncertainty of that observable is optimised. Moreover, it is worthy to di...

  8. Pair angular correlations for pions, kaons and protons in proton-proton collisions in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Zaborowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents the correlation functions in $\\Delta\\eta\\, \\Delta\\phi$ space for pairs of pions, kaons and protons. The studies were carried out on the set of proton-proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV, obtained in ALICE, A Large Ion Collider Experiment at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The analysis was performed for two charge combinations (like-sign pairs and unlike-sign pairs) as well as for three multiplicity ranges. Angular correlations are a rich source of information about the elementary particles behaviour. They result in from the interplay of numerous effects, including resonances’ decays, Coulomb interactions and energy and momentum conservation. In case of identical particles quantum statistics needs to be taken into account. Moreover, particles differ in terms of quark content. Kaons, carrying the strange quark obey the strangeness conservation law. In the production of protons baryon number must be conserved. These features are reflected...

  9. Soil organic carbon dust emission: an omitted global source of atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Webb, Nicholas P; Butler, Harry J; Strong, Craig L; McTainsh, Grant H; Leys, John F; Viscarra Rossel, Raphael A

    2013-10-01

    Soil erosion redistributes soil organic carbon (SOC) within terrestrial ecosystems, to the atmosphere and oceans. Dust export is an essential component of the carbon (C) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) budget because wind erosion contributes to the C cycle by removing selectively SOC from vast areas and transporting C dust quickly offshore; augmenting the net loss of C from terrestrial systems. However, the contribution of wind erosion to rates of C release and sequestration is poorly understood. Here, we describe how SOC dust emission is omitted from national C accounting, is an underestimated source of CO(2) and may accelerate SOC decomposition. Similarly, long dust residence times in the unshielded atmospheric environment may considerably increase CO(2) emission. We developed a first approximation to SOC enrichment for a well-established dust emission model and quantified SOC dust emission for Australia (5.83 Tg CO(2)-e yr(-1)) and Australian agricultural soils (0.4 Tg CO(2)-e yr(-1)). These amount to underestimates for CO(2) emissions of ≈10% from combined C pools in Australia (year = 2000), ≈5% from Australian Rangelands and ≈3% of Australian Agricultural Soils by Kyoto Accounting. Northern hemisphere countries with greater dust emission than Australia are also likely to have much larger SOC dust emission. Therefore, omission of SOC dust emission likely represents a considerable underestimate from those nations' C accounts. We suggest that the omission of SOC dust emission from C cycling and C accounting is a significant global source of uncertainty. Tracing the fate of wind-eroded SOC in the dust cycle is therefore essential to quantify the release of CO(2) from SOC dust to the atmosphere and the contribution of SOC deposition to downwind C sinks.

  10. Odor sampling: techniques and strategies for the estimation of odor emission rates from different source types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; Del Rosso, Renato

    2013-01-15

    Sampling is one of the main issues pertaining to odor characterization and measurement. The aim of sampling is to obtain representative information on the typical characteristics of an odor source by means of the collection of a suitable volume fraction of the effluent. The most important information about an emission source for odor impact assessment is the so-called Odor Emission Rate (OER), which represents the quantity of odor emitted per unit of time, and is expressed in odor units per second (ou∙s-1). This paper reviews the different odor sampling strategies adopted depending on source type. The review includes an overview of odor sampling regulations and a detailed discussion of the equipment to be used as well as the mathematical considerations to be applied to obtain the OER in relation to the sampled source typology.

  11. An inexpensive method to estimate CO and NO{sub x} emissions from mobile sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olcese, L.E.; Palancar, G.G.; Toselli, B.M. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina). Departamento de Fisico Quimica

    2001-07-01

    CO and NO{sub x} measurements from mobile sources at two urban locations in Cordoba City, Argentina, were used to develop a very simple method to estimate emission from these sources. This development was possible because primary urban air pollution in Cordoba comes mostly from mobile sources and because a field measurement campaign was conducted by the city government during 1995-1996 that has allowed us to have a complete and valuable data bank. Air concentrations of CO, NO{sub x} as well as physical, and meteorological variables were measured at two urban sites with two monitoring stations. We compared the measured CO and NO{sub x} air concentration data with the predictions of a method that uses regression analysis to estimate the emission factor from the mobile sources. The agreement is good, considering the simplicity of the approach. (author)

  12. Investigating Sources and Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds in California's San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentner, D. R.; Harley, R. A.; Weber, R.; Karlik, J. F.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2011-12-01

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are regulated both as primary air pollutants and as precursors to the formation of secondary organic aerosol and tropospheric ozone. The San Joaquin Valley, a non-attainment area for ozone and PM2.5, contains a variety of point, area, and mobile VOC sources that contribute to both primary and secondary pollution. Using ambient measurements of over 100 different VOCs and Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOCs) made at multiple field sites, we assess the magnitude and importance of various VOC sources in the San Joaquin Valley. Hourly measurements were made during the spring and summer of 2010 via in-situ gas chromatography in Bakersfield, CA as part of the CalNex experiment and also at a rural site located 100 km north of Bakersfield. Additionally, in-situ measurements of fresh motor vehicle exhaust were made in Oakland's Caldecott tunnel during the summer of 2010. Measurements include a broad array of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs ranging in size from 1 to 17 carbon atoms, including many compounds with functional groups or substituents (e.g. aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, halogens, sulfur, & nitrogen). Using statistical methods of source apportionment, covariance, source receptor modeling, and air parcel back trajectories, we assess the impact of various sources on observed VOC concentrations at our field sites in the San Joaquin Valley. Prevalent sources include gasoline and diesel-vehicle exhaust, petroleum extraction/refining, biogenic emissions from agricultural crops and natural vegetation, and emissions from dairy operations and animal husbandry. We use measurements of fresh motor vehicle emissions from the Caldecott tunnel to constrain apportionment of gasoline and diesel-related VOCs and IVOCs in the San Joaquin Valley. Initial results from Bakersfield show substantial influence from local anthropogenic VOC sources, but there is evidence for transport of emissions from both anthropogenic and biogenic

  13. Emission characteristics of laser ablation-hollow cathode glow discharge spectral source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatodorov Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of a scheme combining laser ablation as sample introduction source and hollow cathode discharge as excitation source are presented. The spatial separation of the sample material introduction by laser ablation and hollow cathode excitation is achieved by optimizing the gas pressure and the sample-cathode gap length. At these conditions the discharge current is maximized to enhance the analytical lines intensity.

  14. Emission sources contributing to tropospheric ozone over Equatorial Africa during the summer monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bouarar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A global chemistry-climate model LMDz_INCA is used to investigate the contribution of African and Asian emissions to tropospheric ozone over Central and West Africa during the summer monsoon. The model results show that ozone in this region is most sensitive to lightning NOx and to Central African biomass burning emissions. However, other emission categories also contribute significantly to regional ozone. The maximum ozone changes due to lightning NOx occur in the upper troposphere between 400 hPa and 200 hPa over West Africa and downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Biomass burning emissions mainly influence ozone in the lower and middle troposphere over Central Africa, and downwind due to westward transport. Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds, which can be uplifted from the lower troposphere to higher altitudes by the deep convection that occurs over West Africa during the monsoon season, lead to maximum ozone changes in the lower stratosphere region. Soil NOx emissions over the Sahel region make a significant contribution to ozone in the lower troposphere. In addition, convective uplift of these emissions and subsequent ozone production are also an important source of ozone in the upper troposphere over West Africa. Concerning African anthropogenic emissions, they only make a small contribution to ozone compared to the other emission categories. The model results indicate that most ozone changes due to African emissions occur downwind, especially over the Atlantic Ocean, far from the emission regions. The import of Asian emissions also makes a considerable contribution to ozone concentrations above 150 hPa and has to be taken into account in studies of the ozone budget over Africa. Using IPCC AR5 (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; Fifth Assessment Report estimates of anthropogenic emissions for 2030 over Africa and Asia, model calculations show larger changes in ozone over Africa due to

  15. Novel thin film field emission electron source laboratory directed research and development final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walko, R.J.; Fleming, J.G.; Hubbs, J.W.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate proof of concept of a thin film field emission electron source based on electron tunneling between discrete metal islands on an insulating substrate. An electron source of this type should be more easily fabricated permitting the use of a wider range of materials, and be less prone to damage and erratic behavior than the patterned field emitter arrays currently under development for flat panel displays and other vacuum microelectronic applications. This report describes the results of the studies of electron and light emission from such structures, and the subsequent discovery of a source of light emission from conductive paths across thin insulating gaps of the semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor (SIS) and metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures. The substrates consisted of silicon nitride and silicon dioxide on silicon wafers, Kapton{reg_sign}, quartz, and cut slabs of silica aerogels. The conductive film samples were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and sputtering, while the MIS and SIS samples were prepared by CVD followed by cleaving, grinding, mechanical indentation, erosion by a sputter Auger beam, electrical arcing and chemical etching. Electron emission measurements were conducted in high and ultra high vacuum systems at SNL, NM as well as at SNL, CA. Optical emission measurements were made in air under an optical microscope as well as in the above vacuum environments. Sample morphology was investigated using both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  16. Emission factors and source apportionment for abrasion particles produced by road traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowiecki, N.; Lienemann, P.; Figi, R.; Hill, M.; Richard, A.; Furger, M.; Rickers, K.; Cliff, S. S.; Baltensperger, U.; Gehrig, R.

    2009-04-01

    Particle emissions of road traffic are generally associated with fresh exhaust emissions only. However, recent studies identified a clear contribution of non-exhaust emissions to the PM10 load of the ambient air. These emissions consist of particles produced by abrasion from brakes, road wear, tire wear, as well as resuspension of deposited road dust. For many urban environments, quantitative information about the contributions of the individual abrasion processes is still scarce. For effective PM10 reduction scenarios it is of particular interest to know whether road wear, resuspension or fresh abrasion from vehicles is dominating the non-exhaust PM10 contribution. In Switzerland, the emissions of road traffic abrasion particles into the ambient air were characterized in the project APART (Abrasion Particles produced by Road Traffic). The project aimed at finding the contribution of the non-exhaust sources to total traffic-related PM10 and PM2.5 for different traffic conditions, by determining specific elemental fingerprint signatures for the various sources. This was achieved by hourly elemental mass concentration measurements in three size classes (2.5-10, 1-2.5 and 0.1-1 micrometers) with a rotating drum impactor (RDI) and subsequent synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-XRF). The elemental fingerprint measurements were embedded into a large set of aerosol, gas phase, meteorological and traffic count measurements. To identify traffic related emissions, measurements were performed upwind and downwind of selected roads. For a better investigation of road wear, a road wear simulator was applied in additional experiments. This allows for the identification and quantification of the different source contributions by means of source-receptor modeling, and for the calculation of real-world emission factors for the individual abrasion sources. The preliminary analysis of hourly resolved trace element measurements in a street canyon in Zürich showed

  17. Summary of Requirements for Sewage Sludge Incinerators (SSI): New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Emission Guidelines (EG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This November 2011 document summarizes the various requirements of the sewage sludge incinerators (SSI) new source performance standards (NSPS) and emission guidelines (EG), broken down into compliance categories.

  18. Young radio sources: the duty-cycle of the radio emission and prospects for gamma-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Orienti, M; Giovannini, G; Giroletti, M; D'Ammando, F

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary stage of a powerful radio source originated by an AGN is related to its linear size. In this context, compact symmetric objects (CSOs), which are powerful and intrinsically small objects, should represent the young stage in the individual radio source life. However, the fraction of young radio sources in flux density-limited samples is much higher than what expected from the number counts of large radio sources.This indicates that a significant fraction of young radio sources does not develop to the classical Fanaroff-Riley radio galaxies,suggesting an intermittent jet activity. As the radio jets are expanding within the dense and inhomogeneous interstellar medium,the ambient may play a role in the jet growth, for example slowing down or even disrupting its expansion when a jet-cloud interaction takes place. Moreover, this environment may provide the thermal seed photons that scattered by the lobes' electrons may be responsible for high energy emission, detectable by Fermi-LAT.

  19. Spatially resolved optical-emission spectroscopy of a radio-frequency driven iodine plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedrick, James; Doyle, Scott; Grondein, Pascaline; Aanesland, Ane

    2016-09-01

    Iodine is of interest for potential use as a propellant for spacecraft propulsion, and has become attractive as a replacement to xenon due to its similar mass and ionisation potential. Optical emission spectroscopy has been undertaken to characterise the emission from a low-pressure, radio-frequency driven inductively coupled plasma source operating in iodine with respect to axial distance across its transverse magnetic filter. The results are compared with axial profiles of the electron temperature and density for identical source conditions, and the spatial distribution of the emission intensity is observed to be closely correlated with the electron temperature. This work has been done within the LABEX Plas@Par project, and received financial state aid managed by the ``Agence Nationale de la Recherche'', as part of the ``Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir'' under the reference ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02.

  20. An effect of stimulated radiation processes on radio emission from extended sources

    CERN Document Server

    Prigara, F V

    2003-01-01

    Both the standard theory of thermal radio emission and the synchrotron theory encounter some difficulties. The most crucial for the former one is nonpossibility to explain the radio spectrum of Venus in the decimeter range (Ksanfomality 1985). The radio spectra of planetary nebulae at high frequencies also are not comfortably consistent with the standard theory (Siodmiak & Tylenda 2001). Here we show that the account for an induced character of radiation processes sufficiently improves the predictions of the standard theory. Moreover, the developed here theory of radio emission from non-uniform gas gives the radio spectra of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and radio galaxies, which are normally attributed to the synchrotron emission. It is important, in this aspect, that the synchrotron self-absorption produces a change in the polarization position angle across the spectral peak. No such a change was detected in gigahertz-peaked spectrum sources (Mutoh et al. 2002). Besides, the flat or sligh...

  1. Theory of light emission from a dipole source embedded in a chiral sculptured thin film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Tom G; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2007-10-29

    Developing a theory based on a spectral Green function for light emission from a point-dipole source embedded in a chiral sculptured thin film (CSTF), we found that the intensity and polarization of the emitted light are strongly influenced by the structural handedness of the CSTF as well as the placement and orientation of the source dipole. The emission patterns across both pupils of the dipole-containing CSTF can be explained in terms of the circular Bragg phenomenon exhibited by CSTFs when illuminated by normally as well as obliquely incident plane waves. The emission characteristics augur well for the future of CSTFs as optical biosensors as well as light emitters with controlled circular polarization and bandwidth.

  2. 77 FR 22391 - Standards of Performance for Greenhouse Gas Emissions for New Stationary Sources: Electric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... report, ``Each additional ton of greenhouse gases emitted commits us to further change and greater risks... Greenhouse Gas Concentrations; Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, Division of Earth and Life Sciences... Greenhouse Gas Emissions for New Stationary Sources; Electric Utility Generating Units; Proposed Rule...

  3. An emission source inversion model based on satellite data and its application in air quality forecasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims at constructing an emission source inversion model using a variational processing method and adaptive nudging scheme for the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) based on satellite data to investigate the applicability of high resolution OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) column concentration data for air quality forecasts over the North China. The results show a reasonable consistency and good correlation between the spatial distributions of NO2 from surface and OMI satellite measurements in both winter and summer. Such OMI products may be used to implement integrated variational analysis based on observation data on the ground. With linear and variational corrections made, the spatial distribution of OMI NO2 clearly revealed more localized distributing characteristics of NO2 concentration. With such information, emission sources in the southwest and southeast of North China are found to have greater impacts on air quality in Beijing. When the retrieved emission source inventory based on high-resolution OMI NO2 data was used, the coupled Weather Research Forecasting CMAQ model (WRF-CMAQ) performed significantly better in forecasting NO2 concentration level and its tendency as reflected by the more consistencies between the NO2 concentrations from surface observation and model result. In conclusion, satellite data are particularly important for simulating NO2 concentrations on urban and street-block scale. High-resolution OMI NO2 data are applicable for inversing NOx emission source inventory, assessing the regional pollution status and pollution control strategy, and improving the model forecasting results on urban scale.

  4. Development and evaluation of a lightweight sensor system for emission sampling from open area sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new sensor system for mobile and aerial emission sampling was developed for open area sources, such as open burning. The sensor system, termed “Kolibri”, consists of multiple low-cost air quality sensors measuring CO2, CO, and black carbon, samplers for particulate matter with ...

  5. Development and evaluation of a lightweight sensor system for aerial emission sampling from open area sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new sensor system for mobile and aerial emission sampling was developed for open area pollutant sources, such as prescribed forest burns. The sensor system, termed “Kolibri”, consists of multiple low-cost air quality sensors measuring CO2, CO, samplers for particulate matter wi...

  6. Standardization of flux chambers and wind tunnels for area source emission measurements at animal feeding operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers and practitioners have used many varied designs of wind tunnels and flux chambers to measure the flux of volatile organic compounds, odor, and ammonia from area sources at animal feeding operations. The measured fluxes are used to estimate emission factors or compare treatments. We sho...

  7. Source Classification Framework for an optimized European wide Emission Control Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten; Donner, Erica; Ledin, Anna

    2011-01-01

    of the PS environmental emission. The SCF also provides a well structured approach for European pollutant source and release classification and management. With further European wide implementation, the SCF has the potential or an optimized ECS in order to obtain good chemical status of European water...

  8. An analytical solution for VOCs emission from multiple sources/sinks in buildings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG BaoQing; YU Bo; Chang Nyung KIM

    2008-01-01

    An analytical solution is presented to describe the emission/sorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from/on multiple single-layer materials coexisting in buildings. The diffusion of VOCs within each material is described by a transient diffusion equation. All diffusion equations are coupled with each other through the equation of mass conservation in the air. The analytical solution is validated by the experimental data in literature, Compared to the one-material case, the coexistence of multiple materials may decrease the emission rate of VOCs from each material. The smaller the diffusion coef-ficient is, the more the emission rate decreases. Whether a material is a source or a sink in the case of multiple materials coexisting is not affected by the diffusion coefficient. For the case of multiple mate-rials with different partition coefficients, a material with a high partition coefficient may become a sink. This may promote the emission of VOCs from other materials.

  9. Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in California's San Joaquin Valley: Characterizing Large Point Source Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, F. M.; Duren, R. M.; Miller, C. E.; Aubrey, A. D.; Falk, M.; Holland, L.; Hook, S. J.; Hulley, G. C.; Johnson, W. R.; Kuai, L.; Kuwayama, T.; Lin, J. C.; Thorpe, A. K.; Worden, J. R.; Lauvaux, T.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is an important atmospheric pollutant that contributes to global warming and tropospheric ozone production. Methane mitigation could reduce near term climate change and improve air quality, but is hindered by a lack of knowledge of anthropogenic methane sources. Recent work has shown that methane emissions are not evenly distributed in space, or across emission sources, suggesting that a large fraction of anthropogenic methane comes from a few "super-emitters." We studied the distribution of super-emitters in California's southern San Joaquin Valley, where elevated levels of atmospheric CH4 have also been observed from space. Here, we define super-emitters as methane plumes that could be reliably detected (i.e., plume observed more than once in the same location) under varying wind conditions by airborne thermal infrared remote sensing. The detection limit for this technique was determined to be 4.5 kg CH4 h-1 by a controlled release experiment, corresponding to column methane enhancement at the point of emissions greater than 20% above local background levels. We surveyed a major oil production field, and an area with a high concentration of large dairies using a variety of airborne and ground-based measurements. Repeated airborne surveys (n=4) with the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer revealed 28 persistent methane plumes emanating from oil field infrastructure, including tanks, wells, and processing facilities. The likelihood that a given source type was a super-emitter varied from roughly 1/3 for processing facilities to 1/3000 for oil wells. 11 persistent plumes were detected in the dairy area, and all were associated with wet manure management. The majority (11/14) of manure lagoons in the study area were super-emitters. Comparing to a California methane emissions inventory for the surveyed areas, we estimate that super-emitters comprise a minimum of 9% of inventoried dairy emissions, and 13% of inventoried oil emissions in this region.

  10. Source-Receptor Relationships for East Asian Sulfur Dioxide Emissions and Northern Hemisphere Sulfate Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2007-12-01

    We analyze the effect of varying East Asian (EA) sulfur emissions on sulfate concentrations in the northern hemisphere based on a global coupled oxidant-aerosol model (MOZART-2) driven with NCEP reanalysis meteorology for 1991. We conduct a base and several sensitivity simulations, in which sulfur emissions from each continent are tagged, to establish the source-receptor (S-R) relationship between EA sulfur emissions and sulfate concentrations over the source and downwind regions. We find that reducing EA SO2 emissions will significantly decrease the spatial extent of the EA sulfate influence over the North Pacific, but raising EA SO2 emissions will not significantly increase the spatial extent of influence. We define a linearity index and find the S-R relationship between EA SO2 emissions and EA sulfate concentrations to be nearly linear over most downwind regions, but to be non-linear over the EA source region, particularly at the surface and in winter. In addition, we find that besides the direct transport of EA sulfate to North America (NA) and Europe (EU), the indirect response of locally-produced NA or EU sulfate to changes in EA SO2 emissions is negative (i.e., offsetting the direct effect) in winter, spring and fall, but becomes positive in summer. In summer the indirect response is as important as direct transport of EA sulfate over the southeastern U.S. and southern EU. This summertime positive indirect effect largely results from induced changes in H2O2 oxidant concentrations over these regions.

  11. Are biogenic emissions a significant source of summertime atmospheric toluene in rural Northeastern United States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. White

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Summertime atmospheric toluene enhancements at Thompson Farm in the rural northeastern United States were unexpected and resulted in a toluene/benzene seasonal pattern that was distinctly different from that of other anthropogenic volatile organic compounds. Consequentially, three hydrocarbon sources were investigated for potential contributions to the enhancements during 2004–2006. These included: 1 increased warm season fuel evaporation coupled with changes in reformulated gasoline (RFG content to meet U.S. EPA summertime volatility standards, 2 local industrial emissions and 3 local vegetative emissions. The contribution of fuel evaporation emission to summer toluene mixing ratios was estimated to range from 16 to 30 pptv d−1, and did not fully account for the observed enhancements (20–50 pptv in 2004–2006. Static chamber measurements of alfalfa, a crop at Thompson Farm, and dynamic branch enclosure measurements of loblolly pine trees in North Carolina suggested vegetative emissions of 5 and 12 pptv d−1 for crops and coniferous trees, respectively. Toluene emission rates from alfalfa are potentially much larger as these plants were only sampled at the end of the growing season. Measured biogenic fluxes were on the same order of magnitude as the influence from gasoline evaporation and industrial sources (regional industrial emissions estimated at 7 pptv d−1 and indicated that local vegetative emissions make a significant contribution to summertime toluene enhancements. Additional studies are needed to characterize the variability and factors controlling toluene emissions from alfalfa and other vegetation types throughout the growing season.

  12. Estimation of PFOS emission from domestic sources in the eastern coastal region of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuangwei; Lu, Yonglong; Wang, Tieyu; Liu, Shijie; Jones, Kevin; Sweetman, Andy

    2013-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and related chemicals (collectively "PFOS equivalents") have been released to the environment through widespread consumer use and disposal of PFOS-containing products like carpet, leather, textiles, paper, food containers, household cleansers, etc. Accordingly, in addition to PFOS-related industries, domestic activities may also considerably contribute to the PFOS emissions in the eastern coastal region of China, which has been characterized by high industrial input. In the present study, domestic emissions of PFOS equivalents derived from municipal wastewater treatment plants were estimated at the county level, using a regression model of domestic emission density with population density and per capita disposable income as independent variables. The total emission load of PFOS equivalents from domestic sources in the eastern coastal region of China was 381kg in 2010, and large cities were prominent as the emission centers. The domestic emission density averaged 0.37g/km(2)·a for the entire study area. Generally, the Beijing-Tianjin area, Pearl River Delta and Yangtze River Delta, as the most populous and economically developed areas in China, showed significantly higher emission density. Geographical variations within individual provinces were noteworthy. The average per capita discharge load of PFOS equivalents arising from domestic activities was 1.91μg/day per capita in the eastern coastal region of China, which is consistent with previous estimates in Korea, but lower than those calculated for developed countries. In comparison, the spatial distributions of provincial PFOS emissions from domestic and industrial sources were similar to each other; however, the latter was much larger for all the provinces.

  13. Source identification of benzene emissions in Texas City using an adjoint neighborhood scale transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, B.; Olaguer, E. P.; Herndon, S. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Cuclis, A.

    2012-12-01

    During the "Formaldehyde and Olefins from Large Industrial Sources" (FLAIR) study in 2009, the Aerodyne Research Inc. (ARI) mobile laboratory performed real-time in situ measurements of VOCs, NOx and HCHO in Texas City, TX on May 7, 2009 from 11 am to 3 pm. This high resolution dataset collected in a predominantly industrial area provides an ideal test bed for advanced source attribution. Our goal was to identify and quantify emission sources within the largest facility in Texas City most likely responsible for measured benzene concentrations. For this purpose, fine horizontal resolution (200 m x 200 m) 4D variational (4Dvar) inverse modeling was performed by running the HARC air quality transport model in adjoint mode based on ambient concentrations measured by the mobile laboratory. The simulations were conducted with a horizontal domain size of 4 km x 4 km for a four-hour period (11 am to 3 pm). Potential emission unit locations within the facility were specified using a high spatial resolution digital model of the largest industrial complex in the area. The HARC model was used to infer benzene emission rates from all potential source locations that would account for the benzene concentrations measured by the Aerodyne mobile laboratory in the vicinity of the facility. A Positive Matrix Factorization receptor model was also applied to the concentrations of other compounds measured by the mobile lab to support the source attribution by the inverse model. Although previous studies attributed measured benzene concentrations during the same time period to a cooling tower unit at the industrial complex, this study found that some of the flare units in the facility were also associated with the elevated benzene concentrations. The emissions of some of these flare units were found to be greater than reported in emission inventories, by up to two orders of magnitude.

  14. Source-receptor relationships between East Asian sulfur dioxide emissions and Northern Hemisphere sulfate concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the effect of varying East Asian (EA sulfur emissions on sulfate concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere, using a global coupled oxidant-aerosol model (MOZART-2. We conduct a base and five sensitivity simulations, in which sulfur emissions from each continent are tagged, to establish the source-receptor (S-R relationship between EA sulfur emissions and sulfate concentrations over source and downwind regions. We find that from west to east across the North Pacific, EA sulfate contributes approximately 80%–20% of sulfate at the surface, but at least 50% at 500 hPa. In addition, EA SO2 emissions account for approximately 30%–50% and 10%–20% of North American background sulfate over the western and eastern US, respectively. The contribution of EA sulfate to the western US at the surface is highest in MAM and JJA, but is lowest in DJF. Reducing EA SO2 emissions will significantly decrease the spatial extent of the EA sulfate influence over the North Pacific both at the surface and at 500 mb in all seasons, but the extent of influence is insensitive to emission increases, particularly in DJF and JJA. We find that EA sulfate concentrations over most downwind regions respond nearly linearly to changes in EA SO2 emissions, but sulfate concentrations over the EA source region increase more slowly than SO2 emissions, particularly at the surface and in winter, due to limited availability of oxidants (mostly H2O2. We find that similar estimates of the S-R relationship for trans-Pacific transport of EA sulfate would be obtained using either sensitivity or tagging techniques. Our findings suggest that future changes in EA sulfur emissions may cause little change in the sulfate induced health impact over downwind continents but SO2 emission reductions may significantly reduce the sulfate related climate cooling over the North Pacific and the United States.

  15. Submillimetre continuum emission from Class 0 sources: Theory, Observations, and Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Rengel, M; Fröbrich, D; Wolf, S; Eislöffel, J; Rengel, Miriam; Hodapp, Klaus; Froebrich, Dirk; Wolf, Sebastian; Eisloeffel, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    We report on a study of the thermal dust emission of the circumstellar envelopes of a sample of Class 0 sources. The physical structure (geometry, radial intensity profile, spatial temperature and spectral energy distribution) and properties (mass, size, bolometric luminosity (L_bol) and temperature (T_ bol), and age) of Class 0 sources are derived here in an evolutionary context. This is done by combining SCUBA imaging at 450 and 850 microm of the thermal dust emission of envelopes of Class 0 sources in the Perseus and Orion molecular cloud complexes with a model of the envelope, with the implementation of techniques like the blackbody fitting and radiative transfer calculations of dusty envelopes, and with the Smith evolutionary model for protostars. The modelling results obtained here confirm the validity of a simple spherical symmetric model envelope, and the assumptions about density and dust distributions following the standard envelope model. The spherically model reproduces reasonably well the observe...

  16. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng, Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-05-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5×10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy/min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result.

  17. Studies of extreme ultraviolet emission from laser produced plasmas, as sources for next generation lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Thomas

    The work presented in this thesis is primarily concerned with the optimisation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photoemission around 13.5 nm, from laser produced tin (Sn) plasmas. EUV lithography has been identified as the leading next generation technology to take over from the current optical lithography systems, due to its potential of printing smaller feature sizes on integrated circuits. Many of the problems hindering the implementation of EUV lithography for high volume manufacturing have been overcome during the past 20 years of development. However, the lack of source power is a major concern for realising EUV lithography and remains a major roadblock that must be overcome. Therefore in order to optimise and improve the EUV emission from Sn laser plasma sources, many parameters contributing to the make-up of an EUV source are investigated. Chapter 3 presents the results of varying several different experimental parameters on the EUV emission from Sn laser plasmas. Several of the laser parameters including the energy, gas mixture, focusing lens position and angle of incidence are changed, while their effect on the EUV emission is studied. Double laser pulse experiments are also carried out by creating plasma targets for the main laser pulse to interact with. The resulting emission is compared to that of a single laser pulse on solid Sn. Chapter 4 investigates tailoring the CO2 laser pulse duration to improve the efficiency of an EUV source set-up. In doing so a new technique for shortening the time duration of the pulse is described. The direct effects of shortening the CO2 laser pulse duration on the EUV emission from Sn are then studied and shown to improve the efficiency of the source. In Chapter 5 a new plasma target type is studied and compared to the previous dual laser experiments. Laser produced colliding plasma jet targets form a new plasma layer, with densities that can be optimised for re-heating with the main CO2 laser pulse. Chapter 6 will present

  18. Studies of the Strange Sea-Quarks Spin with Kaons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Voloshin, Andrew; Goodwill, Justin; Lendacky, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that quarks and gluons give the substructure to the nucleons. and understanding of the spin structure of the nucleon in terms of quarks and gluons has been the goal of intense investigations during the last decades. The determination of strangeness is challenging and the only way of determining the strange distribution accurately from data is to improve the semi-inclusive information. This talk is focused on the determination of the strange sea contribution to the nucleon spin through the pseudo-scalar method using semi-inclusive Kaon detection technique with CLAS12 at Jefferson Lab. A Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector is under construction and will be used for pion-kaon-proton separation. National Science Foundation #1615067.

  19. Valence-quark distribution functions in the kaon and pion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chen; Roberts, Craig D; Wan, Shaolong; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-01-01

    We describe expressions for pion and kaon dressed-quark distribution functions that incorporate contributions from gluons which bind quarks into these mesons and hence overcome a flaw of the commonly used handbag approximation. The distributions therewith obtained are purely valence in character, ensuring that dressed-quarks carry all a meson's momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale and vanishing as $(1-x)^2$ when Bjorken-$x\\to 1$. Comparing such distributions within the pion and kaon, it is apparent that the size of SU(3)-flavour symmetry breaking in meson parton distribution functions is modulated by the flavour dependence of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. Corrections to these leading-order formulae may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea-quarks. Working with available empirical information, we build an algebraic framework that is capable of expressing the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables a realistic comparison...

  20. KTAG: The Kaon Identification Detector for CERN experiment NA62

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, J. R.

    2016-07-01

    In the study of ultra-rare kaon decays, CERN experiment NA62 exploits an unseparated monochromatic (75 GeV/c) beam of charged particles of flux 800 MHz, of which 50 MHz are K+. Kaons are identified with more than 95% efficiency, a time resolution of better than 100 ps, and misidentification of less than 10-4 using KTAG, a differential, ring-focussed, Cherenkov detector. KTAG utilises 8 sets of 48 Hamamatsu PMTs, of which 32 are of type 9880 and 16 of type 7400, with signals fed directly to the differential inputs of NINO front-end boards and then to TDC cards within the TEL62 system. Leading and trailing edges of the PMT signal are digitised, enabling slewing corrections to be made, and a mean hit rate of 5 MHz per PMT is supported. The electronics is housed within a cooled and insulated Faraday cage with environmental monitoring capabilities.

  1. Contaminant dispersion prediction and source estimation with integrated Gaussian-machine learning network model for point source emission in atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Denglong [Fuli School of Food Equipment Engineering and Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No.28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); Zhang, Zaoxiao, E-mail: zhangzx@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No.28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No.28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2016-07-05

    Highlights: • The intelligent network models were built to predict contaminant gas concentrations. • The improved network models coupled with Gaussian dispersion model were presented. • New model has high efficiency and accuracy for concentration prediction. • New model were applied to indentify the leakage source with satisfied results. - Abstract: Gas dispersion model is important for predicting the gas concentrations when contaminant gas leakage occurs. Intelligent network models such as radial basis function (RBF), back propagation (BP) neural network and support vector machine (SVM) model can be used for gas dispersion prediction. However, the prediction results from these network models with too many inputs based on original monitoring parameters are not in good agreement with the experimental data. Then, a new series of machine learning algorithms (MLA) models combined classic Gaussian model with MLA algorithm has been presented. The prediction results from new models are improved greatly. Among these models, Gaussian-SVM model performs best and its computation time is close to that of classic Gaussian dispersion model. Finally, Gaussian-MLA models were applied to identifying the emission source parameters with the particle swarm optimization (PSO) method. The estimation performance of PSO with Gaussian-MLA is better than that with Gaussian, Lagrangian stochastic (LS) dispersion model and network models based on original monitoring parameters. Hence, the new prediction model based on Gaussian-MLA is potentially a good method to predict contaminant gas dispersion as well as a good forward model in emission source parameters identification problem.

  2. Electron optics simulation for designing carbon nanotube based field emission x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shabana

    In this dissertation, electron optics simulation for designing carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source for medical imaging applications will be presented. However, for design optimization of x-ray tubes accurate electron beam optics simulation is essential. To facilitate design of CNT x-ray sources a commercial 3D finite element software has been chosen for extensive simulation. The results show that a simplified model of uniform electron field emission from the cathode surface is not sufficient when compared to experimental measurements. This necessitated the development of a refined model to describe a macroscopic field emission CNT cathode for electron beam optics simulations. The model emulates the random distribution of CNTs and the associated variation of local field enhancement factor. The main parameter of the model has been derived empirically from the experimentally measured I-V characteristics of the CNT cathode. Simulation results based on this model agree well with experiments which include measurements of the transmission rate and focus spot size. The model provides a consistent simulation platform for optimization of electron beam optics in CNT x-ray source design. A systematic study of electron beam optics in CNT x-ray tubes led to the development of a new generation of compact x-ray source with multiple pixels. A micro focus field emission x-ray source with a variable focal spot size has been fully characterized and evaluated. It has been built and successfully integrated into micro-CT scanners which are capable of dynamic cardiac imaging of free-breathing small animals with high spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition a spatially distributed high power multi-beam x-ray source has also been designed and integrated into a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) configuration. This system has the potential to reduce the total scan time to 4 seconds and yield superior image quality in breast imaging.

  3. Development of a stationary carbon emission inventory for Shanghai using pollution source census data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianzhe; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Weichun

    2016-12-01

    This study utilizes 521,631 activity data points from the 2007 Shanghai Pollution Source Census to compile a stationary carbon emission inventory for Shanghai. The inventory generated from our dataset shows that a large portion of Shanghai's total energy use consists of coal-oriented energy consumption. The electricity and heat production industries, iron and steel mills, and the petroleum refining industry are the main carbon emitters. In addition, most of these industries are located in Baoshan District, which is Shanghai's largest contributor of carbon emissions. Policy makers can use the enterpriselevel carbon emission inventory and the method designed in this study to construct sound carbon emission reduction policies. The carbon trading scheme to be established in Shanghai based on the developed carbon inventory is also introduced in this paper with the aim of promoting the monitoring, reporting and verification of carbon trading. Moreover, we believe that it might be useful to consider the participation of industries, such as those for food processing, beverage, and tobacco, in Shanghai's carbon trading scheme. Based on the results contained herein, we recommend establishing a comprehensive carbon emission inventory by inputting data from the pollution source census used in this study.

  4. Indoor emissions as a primary source of airborne allergenic fungal particles in classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naomichi; Hospodsky, Denina; Dannemiller, Karen C; Nazaroff, William W; Peccia, Jordan

    2015-04-21

    This study quantifies the influence of ventilation and indoor emissions on concentrations and particle sizes of airborne indoor allergenic fungal taxa and further examines geographical variability, each of which may affect personal exposures to allergenic fungi. Quantitative PCR and multiplexed DNA sequencing were employed to count and identify allergenic fungal aerosol particles indoors and outdoors in seven school classrooms in four different countries. Quantitative diversity analysis was combined with building characterization and mass balance modeling to apportion source contributions of indoor allergenic airborne fungal particles. Mass balance calculations indicate that 70% of indoor fungal aerosol particles and 80% of airborne allergenic fungal taxa were associated with indoor emissions; on average, 81% of allergenic fungi from indoor sources originated from occupant-generated emissions. Principal coordinate analysis revealed geographical variations in fungal communities among sites in China, Europe, and North America (p < 0.05, analysis of similarity), demonstrating that geography may also affect personal exposures to allergenic fungi. Indoor emissions including those released with occupancy contribute more substantially to allergenic fungal exposures in classrooms sampled than do outdoor contributions from ventilation. The results suggest that design and maintenance of buildings to control indoor emissions may enable reduced indoor inhalation exposures to fungal allergens.

  5. Classical Illustrations of CP Violation in Kaon Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Rosner, Jonathan L; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Slezak, Scott A.

    2001-01-01

    It is easy to construct classical 2-state systems illustrating the behavior of the short-lived and long-lived neutral $K$ mesons in the limit of CP conservation. The emulation of CP violation is more tricky, but is provided by the two-dimensional motion of a Foucault pendulum. Analogies are drawn between the pendulum and observables in neutral kaon decays. An emulation of CP- and CPT-violation using electric circuits is also discussed.

  6. Kaon Photoproduction Near Threshold in Six Isospin Channels Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mart, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this talk I review the progress achieved in the investigation of kaon photoproduction on the nucleon near the production threshold. This investigation has been performed by using the so-called isobar model, which makes use of Feynman diagrams for the background terms and the Breit-Wigner multipoles for the resonance terms. The future prospect as well as application of this model in the hadronic sector are also briefly discussed.

  7. Three-prong $\\tau$ decays with charged kaons

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bazarko, A O; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    Final states with charged kaons in three-prong $\\tau$ decays are studied by exploiting the particle identification from the dE/dx measurement. The results are based on a sample of about $1.6\\times 10^{5}$ detected $\\tau$ pairs collected with the ALEPH detector between 1991 and 1995 around the Z peak. The following branching ratios have been measured: $B(\\tau^{-}~\\rightarrow~K^{-}K^{+}\\pi^{-}\

  8. Light-front model of the kaon electromagnetic current

    CERN Document Server

    Pacheco-Bicudo-Cabral de Melo, J; Frederico, T; Tomio, Lauro

    2003-01-01

    The electromagnetic form factor is extracted from both components of the electromagnetic current: J(plus) and J(minus) with a pseudo-scalar coupling of the quarks to the kaon. In the case of J(plus) there is no pair term contribution in the Drell-Yan frame. However, J(minus) component of the electromagnetic current the pair term contribution is different from zero and is necessary include it to preserve the rotational symmetry of the current.

  9. Surface Tension between Kaon Condensate and Normal Nuclear Matter Phase

    OpenAIRE

    Christiansen, Michael B.; Glendenning, Norman K.; Schaffner-Bielich, Jurgen

    2000-01-01

    We calculate for the first time the surface tension and curvature coefficient of a first order phase transition between two possible phases of cold nuclear matter, a normal nuclear matter phase in equilibrium with a kaon condensed phase, at densities a few times the saturation density. We find the surface tension is proportional to the difference in energy density between the two phases squared. Furthermore, we show the consequences for the geometrical structures of the mixed phase region in ...

  10. Kaon decay studies at CERN SPS in the last decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccucci, A.; Goudzovski, E.; Kekelidze, V.; Madigozhin, D.; Potrebenikov, I.

    2016-07-01

    This review summarizes the kaon experimental results obtained in the last 15 years on the basis of data collected on the SPS in CERN with a participance of JINR physicists. These results contribute essentially into the Standard Model checks and search for its extension, fundamental symmetry violations and low energy strong interactions theory development. A progress in the experimental technique and prospects for the future results are also discussed.

  11. Detecting Methane Emission Sources in California: a Case-Study of Scientist/Decision-Maker Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, F. M.; Duren, R. M.; Miller, C. E.; Aubrey, A. D.; Falk, M.; Kuwayama, T.; Hinojosa, L.

    2015-12-01

    Reducing anthropogenic methane emissions is a high priority for the state of California as a strategy to meet near-term greenhouse gas emissions targets. However, implementation of an effective, cost-efficient methane mitigation plan requires local-to-regional scale information on methane sources, and cooperation of diverse stakeholders. We hypothesize that methane "super-emitters," large point sources thought to contribute disproportionately to anthropogenic methane emissions, are logical mitigation targets. We outline a tiered observing strategy involving satellite, aircraft, and surface observations to identify these super-emitters and their contribution to regional methane emissions. We demonstrate this approach with field studies of agricultural and oil and gas sources in California's San Joaquin Valley with cooperation a multi-stakeholder team. This partnership between researchers, regulators, and methane emitting industry took advantage of data sharing, site access, and complementary measurement approaches to identify appropriate methane mitigation targets. This experience suggests that collaborative partnerships that leverage multiple observational methods will be required for identifying methane mitigation targets and crafting regionally appropriate methane mitigation policy.

  12. A Collaborative Study of Source Apportionment and Total City Emissions of CH4 from Indianapolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajny, K. D.; Davis, K. J.; Franklin, J. E.; Harvey, R. M.; Lavoie, T. N.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Salmon, O. E.; Sarmiento, D. P.; Shepson, P. B.; Stirm, B. H.; Wofsy, S.

    2016-12-01

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important greenhouse gas emitted in the United States, accounting for about 11% of all US greenhouse gas emissions in 2014. Over 60% of CH4 emissions globally are due to human activity and two of the largest anthropogenic sources of CH4 are waste decomposition in landfills and losses from the energy sector. Indianapolis has been a testbed site for development of methods for quantitative urban-scale greenhouse gas emissions measurements, through the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) since 2010. Multiple airborne mass balance experiments with Purdue University's Airborne Laboratory for Atmospheric Research (ALAR) have been performed in the area to quantify greenhouse gas emissions, since 2008. Previous research has shown that the large landfill in Indianapolis is the only significant point source, emitting 45 ± 14 mols CH4/s or roughly 1/3 of all CH4 emissions. Propane/methane ratios have indicated that all other CH4 emissions were due to leaks in the natural gas distribution system in the city, but not all the sources have been identified. A recent collaborative effort aimed to investigate this further using tower based inversions from INFLUX data, ground based Lagrangian transport modeling using Fourier Transform Spectrometers, and airborne based mass balance experiments using ALAR. Within the 2-week long project there were 4 days with atmospheric conditions that allowed for simultaneous airborne and ground based measurements. Here we will discuss selected outcomes from this effort, including city-wide mass balance measurements from ALAR, our results in light of the FTS observations, and how the results compare to the historical data base for Indianapolis.

  13. Measurement of the charged kaon mass with the MIPP RICH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, Nicholas J. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The currently accepted value of the charged kaon mass is 493.677 ± 0.013 MeV (26 ppm). It is a weighted average of six measurements, most of which use kaonic atom X-ray energy techniques. The two most recent and precise results dominate the average but differ by 122 ppm. Inconsistency in the data set needs to be resolved, preferably using independent techniques. One possibility uses the Cherenkov effect. A measurement of the charged kaon mass using this technique is presented. The data was taken with the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory using a tagged beam of protons, kaons, and pions ranging in momentum from 37 GeV/c to 63 GeV/c. The measured value is 491.3 ± 1.7 MeV. This is within 1.4σ of the current value. An improvement in precision by a factor of 35 would make this technique competitive for resolving the ambiguity in the X-ray data.

  14. CP violation and Kaon weak matrix elements from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Garron, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    In this short review, I present the recent lattice computations of kaon weak matrix elements relevant to $K \\to \\pi\\pi$ decays and neutral kaon mixing. These matrix elements are key to the theoretical determination of the CP violation parameters $\\epsilon$ and $\\epsilon'$ . Impressive progress have been achieved recently, in particular the first realistic computation of $\\epsilon'/\\epsilon$ with physical kinematics has been reported in [1]. The novelty is the $\\Delta I = 1/2$ channel, whereas the $\\Delta I = 3/2$ contribution is now computed at several values of the lattice spacing and extrapolated to the continuum limit. I will also present the status of $B_K$ and discuss its error budget, with a particular emphasis on the perturbative error. Finally I will review the matrix elements of neutral kaon mixing beyond the standard model and will argue that the discrepancy observed by different collaborations could be explained by the renormalisation procedure of the relevant four-quark operators.

  15. Charged Kaon Mass Measurement using the Cherenkov Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, N.; /Indiana U.; Lebedev, A.; /Harvard U., Phys. Dept.; Abrams, R.J.; /Michigan U.; Akgun, U.; Aydin, G.; /Iowa U.; Baker, W.; /Fermilab; Barnes, P.D., Jr.; /LLNL, Livermore; Bergfeld, T.; /South Carolina U.; Beverly, L.; /Fermilab; Bujak, A.; /Purdue U.; Carey, D.; /Fermilab /Virginia U. /Iowa U.

    2009-09-01

    The two most recent and precise measurements of the charged kaon mass use X-rays from kaonic atoms and report uncertainties of 14 ppm and 22 ppm yet differ from each other by 122 ppm. We describe the possibility of an independent mass measurement using the measurement of Cherenkov light from a narrow-band beam of kaons, pions, and protons. This technique was demonstrated using data taken opportunistically by the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory which recorded beams of protons, kaons, and pions ranging in momentum from +37 GeV/c to +63 GeV/c. The measured value is 491.3 {+-} 1.7 MeV/c{sup 2}, which is within 1.4{sigma} of the world average. An improvement of two orders of magnitude in precision would make this technique useful for resolving the ambiguity in the X-ray data and may be achievable in a dedicated experiment.

  16. Consistent Probabilistic Description of the Neutral Kaon System

    CERN Document Server

    Bernabeu, J; Villanueva-Perez, P

    2013-01-01

    The neutral Kaon system has both CP violation in the mass matrix and a non-vanishing lifetime difference in the width matrix. This leads to an effective Hamiltonian which is not a normal operator, with incompatible (non-commuting) masses and widths. In the Weisskopf-Wigner Approach (WWA), by diagonalizing the entire Hamiltonian, the unphysical non-orthogonal "stationary" states $K_{L,S}$ are obtained. These states have complex eigenvalues whose real (imaginary) part does not coincide with the eigenvalues of the mass (width) matrix. In this work we describe the system as an open Lindblad-type quantum mechanical system due to Kaon decays. This approach, in terms of density matrices for initial and final states, provides a consistent probabilistic description, avoiding the standard problems because the width matrix becomes a composite operator not included in the Hamiltonian. We consider the dominant-decay channel to two pions, so that one of the Kaon states with definite lifetime becomes stable. This new approa...

  17. Induced polarization of Λ(1116) in kaon electroproduction with CLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielyan, Marianna; Raue, Brian; Carman, Daniel S.; Park, Kijun

    2013-10-01

    The CLAS Collaboration is using the p(e,e'K+p)π- reaction to perform a measurement of the induced polarization of the electroproduced Λ(1116). The parity-violating weak decay of the Λ into p&pgr- (64%) allows extraction of the recoil polarization of the Λ. This study uses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) to detect the scattered electron, the kaon, and the decay proton. CLAS allows for a large kinematic acceptance with 0.8 ≤ Q2 ≤ 3.5 GeV2, 1.6 ≤ W ≤ 3.0 GeV, as well as the kaon scattering angle. In this experiment a 5.5 GeV electron beam was incident upon an unpolarized liquid-hydrogen target. The goal is to map out the kinematic dependencies for this polarization observable to provide new constraints for theoretical models of the electromagnetic production of kaon-hyperon final states. Along with previously published photo- and electro-production cross sections and polarization observables from CLAS, SAPHIR, and GRAAL, these data are needed in a coupled-channel analysis to identify previously unobserved s-channel resonances.

  18. Volatile organic compound emissions from unconventional natural gas production: Source signatures and air quality impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarthout, Robert F.

    Advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing over the past two decades have allowed access to previously unrecoverable reservoirs of natural gas and led to an increase in natural gas production. Intensive unconventional natural gas extraction has led to concerns about impacts on air quality. Unconventional natural gas production has the potential to emit vast quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. Many VOCs can be toxic, can produce ground-level ozone or secondary organic aerosols, and can impact climate. This dissertation presents the results of experiments designed to validate VOC measurement techniques, to quantify VOC emission rates from natural gas sources, to identify source signatures specific to natural gas emissions, and to quantify the impacts of these emissions on potential ozone formation and human health. Measurement campaigns were conducted in two natural gas production regions: the Denver-Julesburg Basin in northeast Colorado and the Marcellus Shale region surrounding Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. An informal measurement intercomparison validated the canister sampling methodology used throughout this dissertation for the measurement of oxygenated VOCs. Mixing ratios of many VOCs measured during both campaigns were similar to or higher than those observed in polluted cities. Fluxes of natural gas-associated VOCs in Colorado ranged from 1.5-3 times industry estimates. Similar emission ratios relative to propane were observed for C2-C6 alkanes in both regions, and an isopentane:n-pentane ratio ≈1 was identified as a unique tracer for natural gas emissions. Source apportionment estimates indicated that natural gas emissions were responsible for the majority of C2-C8 alkanes observed in each region, but accounted for a small proportion of alkenes and aromatic compounds. Natural gas emissions in both regions accounted for approximately 20% of hydroxyl radical reactivity, which could hinder federal ozone standard

  19. Mutagenicity and Pollutant Emission Factors of Solid-Fuel Cookstoves: Comparison with Other Combustion Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Esra; Warren, Sarah H.; Ebersviller, Seth M.; Kooter, Ingeborg M.; Schmid, Judith E.; Dye, Janice A.; Linak, William P.; Gilmour, M. Ian; Jetter, James J.; Higuchi, Mark; DeMarini, David M.

    2016-01-01

    JJ, Higuchi M, DeMarini DM. 2016. Mutagenicity and pollutant emission factors of solid-fuel cookstoves: comparison with other combustion sources. Environ Health Perspect 124:974–982; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1509852 PMID:26895221

  20. Deciphering acoustic emission signals in drought stressed branches: the missing link between source and sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidewei L Vergeynst

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available When drought occurs in plants, acoustic emission signals can be detected, but the actual causes of these signals are still unknown. By analyzing the waveforms of the measured signals, it should however be possible to trace the characteristics of the acoustic emission source and get information about the underlying physiological processes. A problem encountered during this analysis is that the waveform changes significantly from source to sensor and lack of knowledge on wave propagation impedes research progress made in this field. We used finite element modeling and the well-known pencil lead break source to investigate wave propagation in a branch. A cylindrical rod of polyvinyl chloride was first used to identify the theoretical propagation modes. Two wave propagation modes could be distinguished and we used the finite element model to interpret their behavior in terms of source position for both the PVC rod and a wooden rod. Both wave propagation modes were also identified in drying-induced signals from woody branches, and we used the obtained insights to provide recommendations for further acoustic emission research in plant science.

  1. Assessing the Emission Sources of Atmospheric Mercury in Wet Deposition Across Illinois, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gratz L. E.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available From August 2007 to August 2009, we collected event-based precipitation samples for mercury (Hg and trace element analysis at four sites in Illinois, USA. The objectives of these measurements were to quantify the levels of Hg wet deposition across the state, and to assess the contributions to Hg in precipitation from major local and regional emission sources. The measurement sites were located in Chicago, Peoria, Nilwood, and Carbondale, IL. We were not able to identify a clear spatial gradient in Hg wet deposition among the sites. At all four locations we frequently observed Hg concentrations in precipitation > 25 ng/L, while each site received > 10 μg/m2 of Hg wet deposition annually, suggesting a substantial impact from local and regional anthropogenic emission sources. We applied the multivariate statistical receptor model Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF to the measured Hg and trace element wet deposition amounts at the four sites. The results suggested that 60-83% of total Hg deposition at each site could be attributed to coal combustion emissions. Although we identified other source signatures in the precipitation composition, including cement manufacturing, metal smelting / waste incineration, and iron-steel production, these sources contributed substantially less to the measured amounts of Hg wet deposition. We also applied the hybrid receptor model Quantitative Transport Bias Analysis (QTBA to the Hg wet deposition data from each site to identify the major source regions associated with the measured values. Results suggested that sources in the Chicago/Gary, St. Louis, and Ohio River Valley urban/industrial areas had a substantial impact on Hg wet deposition, strongly supporting the conclusion that local and regional coal combustion was the largest source of Hg wet deposition in Illinois.

  2. Emission of volatile organic compounds from silage: Compounds, sources, and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Howard, Cody; Muck, Richard E.; Franco, Roberta B.; Montes, Felipe; Green, Peter G.; Mitloehner, Frank; Trabue, Steven L.; Rotz, C. Alan

    2013-10-01

    Silage, fermented cattle feed, has recently been identified as a significant source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. A small number of studies have measured VOC emission from silage, but not enough is known about the processes involved to accurately quantify emission rates and identify practices that could reduce emissions. Through a literature review, we have focused on identifying the most important compounds emitted from corn silage (the most common type of silage in the US) and the sources of these compounds by quantifying their production and emission potential in silage and describing production pathways. We reviewed measurements of VOC emission from silage and assessed the importance of individual silage VOCs through a quantitative analysis of VOC concentrations within silage. Measurements of VOC emission from silage and VOCs present within silage indicated that alcohols generally make the largest contribution to emission from corn silage, in terms of mass emitted and potential ozone formation. Ethanol is the dominant alcohol in corn silage; excluding acids, it makes up more than half of the mean mass of VOCs present. Acids, primarily acetic acid, may be important when emission is high and all VOCs are nearly depleted by emission. Aldehydes and esters, which are more volatile than acids and alcohols, are important when exposure is short, limiting emission of more abundant but less volatile compounds. Variability in silage VOC concentrations is very high; for most alcohols and acids, tolerance intervals indicate that 25% of silages have concentrations a factor of two away from median values, and possibly much further. This observation suggests that management practices can significantly influence VOC concentrations. Variability also makes prediction of emissions difficult. The most important acids, alcohols, and aldehydes present in silage are probably produced by bacteria (and, in the case of ethanol, yeasts) during fermentation and

  3. Air pollutant emissions from Chinese households: A major and underappreciated ambient pollution source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Mauzerall, Denise L; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Qiang; Song, Yu; Peng, Wei; Klimont, Zbigniew; Qiu, Xinghua; Zhang, Shiqiu; Hu, Min; Lin, Weili; Smith, Kirk R; Zhu, Tong

    2016-07-12

    As part of the 12th Five-Year Plan, the Chinese government has developed air pollution prevention and control plans for key regions with a focus on the power, transport, and industrial sectors. Here, we investigate the contribution of residential emissions to regional air pollution in highly polluted eastern China during the heating season, and find that dramatic improvements in air quality would also result from reduction in residential emissions. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry to evaluate potential residential emission controls in Beijing and in the Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei (BTH) region. In January and February 2010, relative to the base case, eliminating residential emissions in Beijing reduced daily average surface PM2.5 (particulate mater with aerodynamic diameter equal or smaller than 2.5 micrometer) concentrations by 14 ± 7 μg⋅m(-3) (22 ± 6% of a baseline concentration of 67 ± 41 μg⋅m(-3); mean ± SD). Eliminating residential emissions in the BTH region reduced concentrations by 28 ± 19 μg⋅m(-3) (40 ± 9% of 67 ± 41 μg⋅m(-3)), 44 ± 27 μg⋅m(-3) (43 ± 10% of 99 ± 54 μg⋅m(-3)), and 25 ± 14 μg⋅m(-3) (35 ± 8% of 70 ± 35 μg⋅m(-3)) in Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei provinces, respectively. Annually, elimination of residential sources in the BTH region reduced emissions of primary PM2.5 by 32%, compared with 5%, 6%, and 58% achieved by eliminating emissions from the transportation, power, and industry sectors, respectively. We also find air quality in Beijing would benefit substantially from reductions in residential emissions from regional controls in Tianjin and Hebei, indicating the value of policies at the regional level.

  4. A comparison of PCA and PMF models for source identification of fugitive methane emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assan, Sabina; Baudic, Alexia; Bsaibes, Sandy; Gros, Valerie; Ciais, Philippe; Staufer, Johannes; Robinson, Rod; Vogel, Felix

    2017-04-01

    Methane (CH_4) is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 28-32 times that of carbon dioxide (CO_2) on a 100 year period, and even greater on shorter timescales [Etminan, et al., 2016, Allen, 2014]. Thus, despite its relatively short life time and smaller emission quantities compared to CO_2, CH4 emissions contribute to approximately 20{%} of today's anthropogenic greenhouse gas warming [Kirschke et al., 2013]. Major anthropogenic sources include livestock (enteric fermentation), oil and gas production and distribution, landfills, and wastewater emissions [EPA, 2011]. Especially in densely populated areas multiple CH4 sources can be found in close vicinity. Thus, when measuring CH4 emissions at local scales it is necessary to distinguish between different CH4 source categories to effectively quantify the contribution of each sector and aid the implementation of greenhouse gas reduction strategies. To this end, source apportionment models can be used to aid the interpretation of spatial and temporal patterns in order to identify and characterise emission sources. The focus of this study is to evaluate two common linear receptor models, namely Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and Positive Matrix Factorisation (PMF) for CH4 source apportionment. The statistical models I will present combine continuous in-situ CH4 , C_2H_6, δ^1^3CH4 measured using a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument [Assan et al. 2016] with volatile organic compound (VOC) observations performed using Gas Chromatography (GC) in order to explain the underlying variance of the data. The strengths and weaknesses of both models are identified for data collected in multi-source environments in the vicinity of four different types of sites; an agricultural farm with cattle, a natural gas compressor station, a wastewater treatment plant, and a pari-urban location in the Ile de France region impacted by various sources. To conclude, receptor model results to separate statistically the

  5. Open Source Tools for Numerical Simulation of Urban Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottrott, A.; Tan, S. M.; He, Y.

    2016-12-01

    There is a global movement toward urbanization. Approximately 7% of the global population lives in just 28 megacities, occupying less than 0.1% of the total land area used by human activity worldwide. These cities contribute a significant fraction of the global budget of anthropogenic primary pollutants and greenhouse gasses. The 27 largest cities consume 9.9%, 9.3%, 6.7% and 3.0% of global gasoline, electricity, energy and water use, respectively. This impact motivates novel approaches to quantify and mitigate the growing contribution of megacity emissions to global climate change. Cities are characterized by complex topography, inhomogeneous turbulence, and variable pollutant source distributions. These features create a scale separation between local sources and urban scale emissions estimates known as the Grey-Zone. Modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques provide a quasi-deterministic, physically based toolset to bridge the scale separation gap between source level dynamics, local measurements, and urban scale emissions inventories. CFD has the capability to represent complex building topography and capture detailed 3D turbulence fields in the urban boundary layer. This presentation discusses the application of OpenFOAM to urban CFD simulations of natural gas leaks in cities. OpenFOAM is an open source software for advanced numerical simulation of engineering and environmental fluid flows. When combined with free or low cost computer aided drawing and GIS, OpenFOAM generates a detailed, 3D representation of urban wind fields. OpenFOAM was applied to model methane (CH4) emissions from various components of the natural gas distribution system, to investigate the impact of urban meteorology on mobile CH4 measurements. The numerical experiments demonstrate that CH4 concentration profiles are highly sensitive to the relative location of emission sources and buildings. Sources separated by distances of 5-10 meters showed significant differences in

  6. Toroidally Asymmetric Distributions of Hydrocarbon (CD) Emission and Chemical Sputtering Sources in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, M; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Lasnier, C J; McLean, A G; Watkins, J G

    2006-05-16

    Measurements in DIII-D show that the carbon chemical sputtering sources along the inner divertor and center post are toroidally periodic and highest at the upstream tile edge. Imaging with a tangentially viewing camera and visible spectroscopy were used to monitor the emission from molecular hydrocarbons (CH/CD) at 430.8 nm and deuterium neutrals in attached and partially detached divertors of low-confinement mode plasmas. In contrast to the toroidally periodic CD distribution, emission from deuterium neutrals was observed to be toroidally symmetric along the inner strike zone. The toroidal distribution of the measured tile surface temperature in the inner divertor correlates with that of the CD emission, suggesting larger parallel particle and heat fluxes to the upstream tile edge, either due to toroidal tile gaps or height steps between adjacent tiles.

  7. A multi-component Langmuir-mode source for the observed pulsar coherent emission

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, P B

    2015-01-01

    Several classes of neutron star are sources of coherent emission at frequencies of 10^2 - 10^3 MHz: others are radio-quiet. The primary emission spectra are broadly universal in form over many orders of magnitude in rotation period and polar-cap magnetic flux density. The existence of nulls and mode-changes in some radio-loud pulsars can be understood only as a manifestation of magnetospherical bistability. An ion-proton plasma with a possible background of electron-positron pairs is formed at the polar caps of stars with positive corotational charge density and is shown here to be a physical basis for the presence or absence of coherent emission and a likely reason why bistability may be present in the later stages of a pulsar lifetime.

  8. Nine years of global hydrocarbon emissions based on source inversion of OMI formaldehyde observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauwens, Maite; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Müller, Jean-François; De Smedt, Isabelle; Van Roozendael, Michel; van der Werf, Guido R.; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Sindelarova, Katerina; Guenther, Alex

    2016-08-01

    As formaldehyde (HCHO) is a high-yield product in the oxidation of most volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by fires, vegetation, and anthropogenic activities, satellite observations of HCHO are well-suited to inform us on the spatial and temporal variability of the underlying VOC sources. The long record of space-based HCHO column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is used to infer emission flux estimates from pyrogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on the global scale over 2005-2013. This is realized through the method of source inverse modeling, which consists in the optimization of emissions in a chemistry-transport model (CTM) in order to minimize the discrepancy between the observed and modeled HCHO columns. The top-down fluxes are derived in the global CTM IMAGESv2 by an iterative minimization algorithm based on the full adjoint of IMAGESv2, starting from a priori emission estimates provided by the newly released GFED4s (Global Fire Emission Database, version 4s) inventory for fires, and by the MEGAN-MOHYCAN inventory for isoprene emissions. The top-down fluxes are compared to two independent inventories for fire (GFAS and FINNv1.5) and isoprene emissions (MEGAN-MACC and GUESS-ES). The inversion indicates a moderate decrease (ca. 20 %) in the average annual global fire and isoprene emissions, from 2028 Tg C in the a priori to 1653 Tg C for burned biomass, and from 343 to 272 Tg for isoprene fluxes. Those estimates are acknowledged to depend on the accuracy of formaldehyde data, as well as on the assumed fire emission factors and the oxidation mechanisms leading to HCHO production. Strongly decreased top-down fire fluxes (30-50 %) are inferred in the peak fire season in Africa and during years with strong a priori fluxes associated with forest fires in Amazonia (in 2005, 2007, and 2010), bushfires in Australia (in 2006 and 2011), and peat burning in Indonesia (in 2006 and 2009), whereas generally increased fluxes

  9. Contaminant dispersion prediction and source estimation with integrated Gaussian-machine learning network model for point source emission in atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Denglong; Zhang, Zaoxiao

    2016-07-05

    Gas dispersion model is important for predicting the gas concentrations when contaminant gas leakage occurs. Intelligent network models such as radial basis function (RBF), back propagation (BP) neural network and support vector machine (SVM) model can be used for gas dispersion prediction. However, the prediction results from these network models with too many inputs based on original monitoring parameters are not in good agreement with the experimental data. Then, a new series of machine learning algorithms (MLA) models combined classic Gaussian model with MLA algorithm has been presented. The prediction results from new models are improved greatly. Among these models, Gaussian-SVM model performs best and its computation time is close to that of classic Gaussian dispersion model. Finally, Gaussian-MLA models were applied to identifying the emission source parameters with the particle swarm optimization (PSO) method. The estimation performance of PSO with Gaussian-MLA is better than that with Gaussian, Lagrangian stochastic (LS) dispersion model and network models based on original monitoring parameters. Hence, the new prediction model based on Gaussian-MLA is potentially a good method to predict contaminant gas dispersion as well as a good forward model in emission source parameters identification problem.

  10. Annual emissions of mercury to the atmosphere from natural sources in Nevada and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolbaugh, M.F.; Gustin, M.S.; Rytuba, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The impact of natural source emissions on atmospheric mercury concentrations and the biogeochemical cycle of mercury is not known. To begin to assess this impact, mercury emissions to the atmosphere were scaled up for three areas naturally enriched in mercury: the Steamboat Springs geothermal area, Nevada, the New Idria mercury mining district, California, and the Medicine Lake volcano, California. Data used to scale up area emissions included mercury fluxes, measured in-situ using field flux chambers, from undisturbed and disturbed geologic substrates, and relationships between mercury emissions and geologic rock types, soil mercury concentrations, and surface heat flux. At select locations mercury fluxes were measured for 24 h and the data were used to adjust fluxes measured at different times of the day to give an average daily flux. This adjustment minimized daily temporal variability, which is observed for mercury flux because of light and temperature effects. Area emissions were scaled spatially and temporally with GIS software. Measured fluxes ranged from 0.3 to approximately 50 ng m-2 h-1 at undisturbed sites devoid of mercury mineralization, and to greater than 10,000 ng m-2 h-1 from substrates that were in areas of mercury mining. Area-averaged fluxes calculated for bare soil at Steamboat Springs, New Idria, and Medicine Lake of 181, 9.2, and 2 ng m-2 h-1, respectively, are greater than fluxes previously ascribed to natural non-point sources, indicating that these sources may be more significant contributors of mercury to the atmosphere than previously realized.

  11. Magnetic characteristics of industrial dust from different sources of emission: A case study of Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuszkiewicz, Marcin; Magiera, Tadeusz; Kapička, Aleš; Petrovský, Eduard; Grison, Hanna; Gołuchowska, Beata

    2015-05-01

    Dust emission and deposition in topsoil have negative effect on individual components of the ecosystem. In addition to routine geochemical analyses, magnetic measurements may provide useful complementary information related to the type, concentration and grain-size distribution of the technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) and thus the degree of contamination of the environment. The aim of this contribution is to use magnetic parameters in distinguishing dust from a wide range of sources of air pollution (power industry, cement, coke, ceramic industries and biomass combustion). We measured magnetic susceptibility, hysteresis parameters and thermomagnetic curves. Our results suggest that predominant component in tested samples is magnetite, only dust from coking plant and the combustion of lignite contained also maghemite and/or hematite. Mixture of sizes, ranging from fine single-domain to coarse multi-domain grains, was detected. Our results indicate that industrial dusts from various sources of emissions have different specific magnetic properties and magnetic measurements may provide very helpful information.

  12. X-ray emission as a diagnostic from pseudospark-sourced electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowes, D., E-mail: david.bowes@strath.ac.uk [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Yin, H.; He, W.; Zhang, L.; Cross, A.W.; Ronald, K.; Phelps, A.D.R. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Chen, D.; Zhang, P. [Computed Tomography Lab, School of Mathematical Sciences, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Chen, X.; Li, D. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    X-ray emission has been achieved using an electron beam generated by a pseudospark low-pressure discharge and utilised as a diagnostic for beam detection. A 300 A, 34 kV PS-sourced electron beam pulse of 3 mm diameter impacting on a 0.1 mm-thick molybdenum target generated X-rays which were detected via the use of a small, portable X-ray detector. Clear X-ray images of a micro-sized object were captured using an X-ray photodetector. This demonstrates the inducement of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) not only as an indicator of beam presence but also as a future X-ray source for small-spot X-ray imaging of materials.

  13. Source Classification Framework for an optimized European wide Emission Control Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten; Donner, Erica; Ledin, Anna

    2011-01-01

    , and thereby establish an appropriate inventory containing such information. Suited for this purpose a Source Classification Framework (SCF) was developed. It consists of harmonized European classification codes for economic activities and emission processes combined with the CAS# for the PS as well...... as an urban structure descriptor. It also includes a release profile descriptor and when ever possible the release factor describing the extent of PS release from a given pollution source, i.e. commodity or activity. It has been possible to establish PS emission inventories for a given catchment of an urban...... environmental quality standards for the considered PSs. The developed SCF emphasized the need for further knowledge and research within the area of quantification of PS releases from given commodities and activities. These release factors are required for a more thorough, solid and valid quantification...

  14. Investigation of source-emission PM-10 particulate matter field studies of candidate methods. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farthing, W.E.; Williamson, A.D.; Dawes, S.S.; Martin, R.S.; Ragland, J.W.

    1986-12-01

    The report outlines the results of four field tests of two candidate methods for source PM10 measurement. The first method involves a new sampling-train design which incorporates emission gas recycle (EGR) to avoid the anisokinetic sampling bias inherent in size-specific emissions measurement. The second technique, the simulated Method 5 (SIM-5) approach, uses existing sampling hardware with an altered traversing protocol to minimize this bias. The results of the test series suggest that both techniques are sufficiently advanced that they should be documented in more detail for potential use as sampling methods. Further, more extensive testing should be performed in order to define precision, reproducibility, and comparability of each technique as well as identify potential sources of interference or bias.

  15. VUV emission spectroscopy diagnostics of a 14 GHz ECR negative hydrogen ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, R.; Ichikawa, T.; Kasuya, T.; Nishiura, M.; Shimozuma, T.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-01

    Vacuum Ultra Violet(VUV) emission from a 4 cm diameter 2 cm long compact ion source excited by 14 GHz microwave has been investigated. Intensity ratio of band spectrum emission near Ly-α to Ly-α line spectrum is determined from the measured spectrum. which shows preferential excitation of molecules near the entrance of microwave input power. The ratio does not depend strongly upon pressure nor the input microwave power when the intensity is integrated over the volume of the plasma. The spatial distribution of the spectrum intensity ratio exhibits concentrations near microwave inlet and the opposite side where the microwave matching structure is located. The ratio at these peripheral regions is about two times as high as that of the central region. The ratio increased in proportion to the ion source pressure up to about 3.0 Pa, indicating efficient production of high energy electrons by ECR up to this pressure.

  16. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  17. Source apportionment of gaseous and particulate PAHs from traffic emission using tunnel measurements in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Wang, Siyao; Lohmann, Rainer; Yu, Na; Zhang, Chenkai; Gao, Yi; Zhao, Jianfu; Ma, Limin

    2015-04-01

    Understanding sources and contributions of gaseous and particulate PAHs from traffic-related pollution can provide valuable information for alleviating air contamination from traffic in urban areas. On-road sampling campaigns were comprehensively conducted during 2011-2012 in an urban tunnel of Shanghai, China. 2-3 rings PAHs were abundant in the tunnel's gas and particle phases. Diagnostic ratios of PAHs were statistically described; several were significantly different between the gas and particle phases. Principal component analysis (PCA), positive matrix factorization (PMF), bivariate correlation analysis and multiple linear regression analysis (MLRA) were applied to apportion sources of gaseous and particulate PAHs in the tunnel. Main sources of the gaseous PAHs included evaporative emission of fuel, high-temperature and low-temperature combustion of fuel, accounting for 50-51%, 30-36% and 13-20%, respectively. Unburned fuel particles (56.4-78.3%), high-temperature combustion of fuel (9.5-26.1%) and gas-to-particle condensation (12.2-17.5%) were major contributors to the particulate PAHs. The result reflected, to a large extent, PAH emissions from the urban traffic of Shanghai. Improving fuel efficiency of local vehicles will greatly reduce contribution of traffic emission to atmospheric PAHs in urban areas. Source apportionment of PM10 mass was also performed based on the organic component data. The results showed that high-temperature combustion of fuel and gas-to-particle condensation contributed to 15-18% and 7-8% of PM10 mass, respectively, but 55-57% of the particle mass was left unexplained. Although the results from the PCA and PMF models were comparable, the PMF method is recommended for source apportionment of PAHs in real traffic conditions. In addition, the combination of multivariate statistical method and bivariate correlation analysis is a useful tool to comprehensively assess sources of PAHs.

  18. Source Apportionment of Stack Emissions from Research and Development Facilities Using Positive Matrix Factorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Larson, Timothy V. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-08-19

    Emissions from research and development (R&D) facilities are difficult to characterize due to the wide variety of processes used, changing nature of research, and large number of chemicals. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) concentrations measured in the main exhaust stacks of four different R&D buildings to identify the number and composition of major contributing sources. PMF identified from 9-11 source-related factors contributing to the stack emissions depending on the building. The factors that were similar between buildings were major contributors to trichloroethylene (TCE), acetone, and ethanol emissions. Several other factors had similar profiles for two or more buildings but not for all four. One factor for each building was a combination of p/m-xylene, o-xylene and ethylbenzene. At least one factor for each building was identified that contained a broad mix of many species and constraints were used in PMF to modify the factors to resemble more closely the off-shift concentration profiles. PMF accepted the constraints with little decrease in model fit. Although the PMF model predicted the profiles of the off-shift samples, the percent of total emissions was under-predicted by the model versus the measured data.

  19. Quantum Rod Emission Coupled to Plasmonic Lattice Resonances: A Collective Directional Source of Polarized Light

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, S R K; Verschuuren, M A; Gomes, R; Lambert, K; De Geyter, B; Hassinen, A; Van Thourhout, D; Hens, Z; Rivas, J Gomez

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that an array of optical antennas may render a thin layer of randomly oriented semiconductor nanocrystals into an enhanced and highly directional source of polarized light. The array sustains collective plasmonic lattice resonances which are in spectral overlap with the emission of the nanocrystals over narrow angular regions. Consequently, di?fferent photon energies of visible light are enhanced and beamed into def?nite directions.

  20. An efficient closed-form solution for acoustic emission source location in three-dimensional structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibing Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient closed-form solution (ECS for acoustic emission(AE source location in three-dimensional structures using time difference of arrival (TDOA measurements from N receivers, N ≥ 6. The nonlinear location equations of TDOA are simplified to linear equations. The unique analytical solution of AE sources for unknown velocity system is obtained by solving the linear equations. The proposed ECS method successfully solved the problems of location errors resulting from measured deviations of velocity as well as the existence and multiplicity of solutions induced by calculations of square roots in existed close-form methods.

  1. VUV emission spectroscopy combined with H− density measurements in the ion source Prometheus I

    OpenAIRE

    Aleiferis, S.; Laulainen, Janne; Svarnas, P.; Tarvainen, Olli; Bacal, M.; Béchu, S.

    2017-01-01

    “Prometheus I” is a volume H− negative ion source, driven by a network of dipolar electron cyclotron resonance (ECR; 2.45 GHz) modules. The vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) emission spectrum of low-temperature hydrogen plasmas may be related to molecular and atomic processes involved directly or indirectly in the production of negative ions. In this work, VUV spectroscopy has been performed in the above source, Prometheus I, both in the ECR zones and the bulk (far from ECR zones and surfaces) plasma....

  2. Controlling light emission from single-photon sources using photonic nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Chen, Yuntian; Mørk, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    The photonic nanowire has recently emerged as an promising alternative to microcavity-based single-photon source designs. In this simple structure, a geometrical effect ensures a strong coupling between an embedded emitter and the optical mode of interest and a combination of tapers and mirrors...... are used to tailor the far-field emission pattern. This non-resonant approach relaxes the demands to fabrication perfection, allowing for record-high measured efficiency of fabricated nanowire single-photon sources. We review recent progress in photonic nanowire technology and present next generation...

  3. On the problems of stability and durability of field-emission current sources for electrovacuum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakunin, Alexander N.; Aban'shin, Nikolay P.; Akchurin, Garif G.; Akchurin, Georgy G.; Avetisyan, Yuri A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of the practical implementation of the concept of field-emission current source with high average current density of 0.1-0.3 A-cm-2 are shown. The durability of cathode samples at a level of 6000 hours is achieved under conditions of technical vacuum. A phenomenological model is suggested that describes the tunneling of both equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrons in a vacuum from the zone of concentration of electrostatic field. Conditions are discussed as the resulting increase in the emission current due to the connection mechanism of the photoelectric effect is thermodynamically favorable, that is not accompanied by an undesirable increase in the temperature of the local emission zone. It is shown that to ensure stability and durability of the cathode is also important to limit the concentration of equilibrium carriers using composite structures «DLC film on Mo substrate." This helps to reduce the criticality of the CVC. A possible alternative is to use a restrictive resistance in the cathode. However, this increases the heat losses and thus decreases assembly efficiency. The results of experimental studies of the structure showing the saturation of photoemission current component with an increase in operating voltage. This fact suggests the existence of an effective mechanism for control of emission at constant operating voltage. This is fundamentally important for the stabilization of field emission cathode, providing a reliability and durability. The single-photon processes and the small thickness DLC films (15-20 nm) provide high-speed process of control.

  4. The potentional of renewable energy sources for greenhouse gases emissions reduction in Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedinec Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As European Union (EU candidate country, Macedonia is in the process of adoption of the EU strategic energy policies, harmonization of the national legislation with the EU legislation and defining the respective national goals. In this regard, the government has recently adopted a National Strategy for Utilization of Renewable Energy Sources (RES, prepared by ICEIM-MANU. The main goal of this paper is to assess the potential for greenhouse gases (GHG emissions reduction by implementation of 21%-RES-scenarios from the Strategy. The corresponding emissions reduction is calculated against the baseline (reference scenario developed within the Second National Communication on Climate Change. Furthermore, all potential RES technologies are analyzed from economic aspect and combined in a form of emissions reduction cost curve, displaying the total marginal cost of the GHG emissions reduction by RES. Finally, on the bases of the environmental and economic effectiveness of the considered RES technologies, as well as taking into account the country specific barriers, the priority actions for GHG emissions reduction are identified.

  5. Impacts of natural emission sources on particle pollution levels in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liora, Natalia; Poupkou, Anastasia; Giannaros, Theodore M.; Kakosimos, Konstantinos E.; Stein, Olaf; Melas, Dimitrios

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this work is the study of the impact of windblown dust, sea-salt aerosol and biogenic emissions on particle pollution levels in Europe. The Natural Emissions MOdel (NEMO) and the modelling system consisted of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) and the Comprehensive Air Quality model with extensions (CAMx) were applied in a 30 km horizontal resolution grid, which covered Europe and the adjacent areas for the year 2009. Air quality simulations were performed for different emission scenarios in order to study the contribution of each natural emission source individually and together to air quality levels in Europe. The simulations reveal that the exclusion of windblown dust emissions decreases the mean seasonal PM10 levels by more than 3.3 μg/m3 (∼20%) in the Eastern Mediterranean during winter while an impact of 3 μg/m3 was also found during summer. The results suggest that sea-salt aerosol has a significant effect on PM levels and composition. Eliminating sea-salt emissions reduces PM10 seasonal concentrations by around 10 μg/m3 in Mediterranean Sea during summer while a decrease of up to 6 μg/m3 is found in Atlantic Ocean during autumn. Sea-salt particles also interact with the anthropogenic component and therefore their absence in the atmosphere decreases significantly the nitrates in aerosols where shipping activities are present. The exclusion of biogenic emissions in the model runs leads to a significant reduction of secondary organic aerosols of more than 90% while an increase in PM2.5 levels in central Europe and Eastern Mediterranean is found due to their interaction with anthropogenic component.

  6. Concentrations and diversity of microbes from four local bioaerosol emission sources in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarakainen, Pasi; Rintala, Helena; Meklin, Teija; Kärkkäinen, Päivi; Hyvärinen, Anne; Nevalainen, Aino

    2011-12-01

    Microbial particles can readily be released into the air from different types of man-made sources such as waste operations. Microbiological emissions from different biological sources and their dispersion may be an issue of concern for area planning and for nearby residents. This study was designed to determine the concentrations and diversity of microbiological emissions from four different man-made source environments: waste center with composting windrows, sewage treatment plant, farming environment, and cattle manure spreading. Samples of airborne particles were collected onto polyvinyl chloride filters at three distances along the prevailing downwind direction, from each source environment during a period of approximately 1 week. These samples were analyzed for 13 species or assay groups of fungi, bacterial genus Streptomyces, and Gram-positive and -negative bacteria using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Samples for determining the concentrations of viable fungi and bacteria were collected from all environments using a six-stage impactor. The results show that there were variations in the microbial diversity between the source environments. Specifically, composting was a major source for the fungal genera Aspergillus and Penicillium, particularly for Aspergillus fumigatus, and for the bacterial genus Streptomyces. Although the microbial concentrations in the sewage treatment plant area were significantly higher than those at 50 or 200 m distance from the plant area, in the farming environment or cattle manure spreading area, no significant difference was observed between different distances from the source. In summary, elevated concentrations of microbes that differ from background can only be detected within a few hundred meters from the source. This finding, reported earlier for culturable bacteria and fungi, could thus be confirmed using molecular methods that cover both culturable and nonculturable microbial material.

  7. Low-luminosity X-ray sources and the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Warwick, R S

    2014-01-01

    Using the XMM-Newton Slew Survey, we construct a hard-band selected sample of low-luminosity Galactic X-ray sources. Two source populations are represented, namely coronally-active stars and binaries (ASBs) and cataclysmic variables (CVs), with X-ray luminosities collectively spanning the range 10^(28-34) erg/s (2-10 keV). We derive the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and volume emissivity of each population. Scaled to the local stellar mass density, the latter is found to be 1.08 +/- 0.16 x 10^28 erg/s/M and 2.5 +/- 0.6 x 10^27 erg/s/M, for the ASBs and CVs respectively, which in total is a factor 2 higher than previous estimates. We employ the new XLFs to predict the X-ray source counts on the Galactic plane at l = 28.5 deg and show that the result is consistent with current observational constraints. The X-ray emission of faint, unresolved ASBs and CVs can account for a substantial fraction of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We discuss a model in which roughly 80 per cent of the 6-10 keV...

  8. A process-based emission model of volatile organic compounds from silage sources on farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, H. F.; Rotz, C. A.; Hafner, S. D.; Montes, F.; Cohen, M.; Mitloehner, F. M.

    2017-03-01

    Silage on dairy farms can emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a precursor in the formation of tropospheric ozone. Because of the challenges associated with direct measurements, process-based modeling is another approach for estimating emissions of air pollutants from sources such as those from dairy farms. A process-based model for predicting VOC emissions from silage was developed and incorporated into the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM, v. 4.3), a whole-farm simulation of crop, dairy, and beef production systems. The performance of the IFSM silage VOC emission model was evaluated using ethanol and methanol emissions measured from conventional silage piles (CSP), silage bags (SB), total mixed rations (TMR), and loose corn silage (LCS) at a commercial dairy farm in central California. With transport coefficients for ethanol refined using experimental data from our previous studies, the model performed well in simulating ethanol emission from CSP, TMR, and LCS; its lower performance for SB could be attributed to possible changes in face conditions of SB after silage removal that are not represented in the current model. For methanol emission, lack of experimental data for refinement likely caused the underprediction for CSP and SB whereas the overprediction observed for TMR can be explained as uncertainty in measurements. Despite these limitations, the model is a valuable tool for comparing silage management options and evaluating their relative effects on the overall performance, economics, and environmental impacts of farm production. As a component of IFSM, the silage VOC emission model was used to simulate a representative dairy farm in central California. The simulation showed most silage VOC emissions were from feed lying in feed lanes and not from the exposed face of silage storages. This suggests that mitigation efforts, particularly in areas prone to ozone non-attainment status, should focus on reducing emissions during feeding. For

  9. Natural emissions of methane from geothermal and volcanic sources in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etiope, G.; Fridriksson, T.; Italiano, F.; Winiwarter, W.; Theloke, J.

    2007-08-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that methane emission from lithosphere degassing is an important component of the natural greenhouse-gas atmospheric budget. Globally, the geological sources are mainly due to seepage from hydrocarbon-prone sedimentary basins, and subordinately from geothermal/volcanic fluxes. This work provides a first estimate of methane emission from the geothermal/volcanic component at European level. In Europe, 28 countries have geothermal systems and at least 10 countries host surface geothermal manifestations (hot springs, mofettes, gas vents). Even if direct methane flux measurements are available only for a few small areas in Italy, a fair number of data on CO 2, CH 4 and steam composition and flux from geothermal manifestations are today available for 6 countries (Czech Republic, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Spain). Following the emission factor and area-based approach, the available data have been analyzed and have led to an early and conservative estimate of methane emission into the atmosphere around 10,000 ton/yr (4000-16,000 ton/yr), basically from an area smaller than 4000 km 2, with a speculative upper limit in the order of 10 5 ton/yr. Only 4-18% of the conservative estimate (about 720 ton/yr) is due to 12 European volcanoes, where methane concentration in volcanic gases is generally in the order of a few tens of ppmv. Volcanoes are thus not a significant methane source. While the largest emission is due to geothermal areas, which may be situated next to volcanoes or independent. Here inorganic synthesis, thermometamorphism and thermal breakdown of organic matter are substantial. Methane flux can reach hundreds of ton/yr from small individual vents. Geothermal methane is mainly released in three countries located in the main high heat flow regions: Italy, Greece, and Iceland. Turkey is likely a fourth important contributor but the absolute lack of data prevents any emission estimate. Therefore, the actual European geothermal

  10. Volcanoes as emission sources of atmospheric mercury in the Mediterranean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara; Mazzolai; Lanzillotta; Nucaro; Pirrone

    2000-10-01

    Emissions from volcanoes, fumaroles and solfataras as well as contributions from widespread geological anomalies could represent an important source of mercury released to the atmosphere in the Mediterranean basin. Volcanoes located in this area (Etna, Stromboli and Vulcano) are the most active in Europe; therefore, it is extremely important to know their mercury contributions to the regional atmospheric budget. Two main methods are used for the evaluation of volcanic mercury flux: a direct determination of the flux (by measuring in the plume) and an indirect one derived from the determination of the Hg/SO2 (or Hg/S) ratio value, as SO2 emissions are constantly monitored by volcanologists. An attempt to estimate mercury flux from the Vulcano volcano and to establish the Hg/S ratio value has been made along three field campaigns carried out in October 1998, in February and May 1999 sampling several fumaroles. Traditional sampling methods were used to collect both total Hg and S. The average Hg/S ratio value resulted to be 1.2 x 10(-7). From the Hg/S value we derived the Hg/SO2 value, and by assuming that all the volcanoes located in this area have the same Hg/SO2 ratio, mercury emissions from Vulcano and Stromboli were estimated to be in the range 1.3-5.5 kg/year and 7.3-76.6 kg/year respectively, while for Etna mercury flux ranged from 61.8 to 536.5 kg/year. Data reported in literature appear to be overestimated (Fitzgerald WF. Mercury emission from volcanos. In: 4th International conference on mercury as a global pollutant, August 4-8 1996, Hamburg, Germany), volcanic mercury emission does not constitute the main natural source of the metal.

  11. Geogenic Sources Strongly Contribute to the Mackenzie River Delta's Methane Emissions Derived From Airborne Flux Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnert, K.; Serafimovich, A.; Metzger, S.; Hartmann, J.; Sachs, T.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic permafrost-associated wetlands and thawing permafrost emit the greenhouse gas methane (CH4), either as a product of recent microbial activity in the active layer or taliks, or from deeper geogenic sources where pathways through the permafrost exist. Current emission estimates vary strongly between different models and there is still disagreement between bottom-up estimates from local field studies and top-down estimates from atmospheric measurements. We use airborne flux data from two campaigns in the Mackenzie River Delta, Canada, in July 2012 and 2013 to directly quantify permafrost CH4 emissions on the regional scale, to analyse the regional pattern of CH4 fluxes and to estimate the contribution of geogenic emissions to the overall CH4 budget of the delta. CH4 fluxes were calculated with a time-frequency resolved version of the eddy covariance technique, resulting in a gridded 100 m x 100 m resolution flux map within the footprints of the flight tracks. We distinguish geogenic gas seeps from biogenic sources by their strength and show that they contribute strongly to the annual CH4 budget of the delta. Our study provides the first estimate of annual CH4 release from the Mackenzie River Delta and the adjacent coastal plain. We show that one percent of the covered area contains the strongest geogenic seeps which contribute disproportionately to the annual emission estimate. Our results show that geogenic CH4 emissions might need more attention, especially in areas where permafrost is vulnerable to thawing sufficiently to create pathways for geogenic gas migration. The presented map can be used as a baseline for future CH4 flux studies in the Mackenzie River Delta.

  12. Development of a composite line source emission model for traffic interrupted microenvironments and its application in particle number emissions at a bus station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Jayaratne, Rohan; Heuff, Darlene; Morawska, Lidia

    A composite line source emission (CLSE) model was developed to specifically quantify exposure levels and describe the spatial variability of vehicle emissions in traffic interrupted microenvironments. This model took into account the complexity of vehicle movements in the queue, as well as different emission rates relevant to various driving conditions (cruise, decelerate, idle and accelerate), and it utilised multi-representative segments to capture the accurate emission distribution for real vehicle flow. Hence, this model was able to quickly quantify the time spent in each segment within the considered zone, as well as the composition and position of the requisite segments based on the vehicle fleet information, which not only helped to quantify the enhanced emissions at critical locations, but it also helped to define the emission source distribution of the disrupted steady flow for further dispersion modelling. The model then was applied to estimate particle number emissions at a bi-directional bus station used by diesel and compressed natural gas fuelled buses. It was found that the acceleration distance was of critical importance when estimating particle number emission, since the highest emissions occurred in sections where most of the buses were accelerating and no significant increases were observed at locations where they idled. It was also shown that emissions at the front end of the platform were 43 times greater than at the rear of the platform. Although the CLSE model is intended to be applied in traffic management and transport analysis systems for the evaluation of exposure, as well as the simulation of vehicle emissions in traffic interrupted microenvironments, the bus station model can also be used for the input of initial source definitions in future dispersion models.

  13. The challenges of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution through energy sources: evidence from a panel of developed countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmat, Ghulam; Zaman, Khalid; Shukui, Tan; Sajjad, Faiza; Khan, Muhammad Azhar; Khan, Muhammad Zahir

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the long-run relationship between climatic factors (i.e., greenhouse gas emissions, agricultural methane emissions, and industrial nitrous oxide emission), air pollution (i.e., carbon dioxide emissions), and energy sources (i.e., nuclear energy; oil, gas, and coal energy; and fossil fuel energy) in the panel of 35 developed countries (including EU-15, new EU member states, G-7, and other countries) over a period of 1975-2012. In order to achieve this objective, the present study uses sophisticated panel econometric techniques including panel cointegration, panel fully modified OLS (FMOLS), and dynamic OLS (DOLS). The results show that there is a long-run relationship between the variables. Nuclear energy reduces greenhouse gases and carbon emissions; however, the other emissions, i.e., agricultural methane emissions and industrial nitrous oxide, are still to increase during the study period. Electricity production from oil, gas, and coal sources increases the greenhouse gases and carbon emissions; however, the intensity to increase emissions is far less than the intensity to increase emissions through fossil fuel. Policies that reduce emissions of greenhouse gases can simultaneously alter emissions of conventional pollutants that have deleterious effects on human health and the environment.

  14. On the Evolution of and High-Energy Emission from GHz-Peaked-Spectrum Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, L.; Ostorero, L.; Begelman, M.C.; Moderski, R.; Kataoka, J.; Wagner, S.

    2007-12-18

    Here we discuss evolution and broad-band emission of compact (< kpc) lobes in young radio sources. We propose a simple dynamical description for these objects, consisting of a relativistic jet propagating into a uniform gaseous medium in the central parts of an elliptical host. In the framework of the proposed model, we follow the evolution of ultrarelativistic electrons injected from a terminal hotspot of a jet to expanding lobes, taking into account their adiabatic energy losses as well as radiative cooling. This allows us to discuss the broad-band lobe emission of young radio sources. In particular, we argue that the observed spectral turnover in the radio synchrotron spectra of these objects cannot originate from the synchrotron self-absorption process but is most likely due to free-free absorption effects connected with neutral clouds of interstellar medium engulfed by the expanding lobes and photoionized by active centers. We also find a relatively strong and complex high-energy emission component produced by inverse-Compton up-scattering of various surrounding photon fields by the lobes electrons. We argue that such high energy radiation is strong enough to account for several observed properties of GHz-peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies at UV and X-ray frequencies. In addition, this emission is expected to extend up to GeV (or possibly even TeV) photon energies and can thus be probed by several modern {gamma}-ray instruments. In particular, we suggest that GPS radio galaxies should constitute a relatively numerous class of extragalactic sources detected by GLAST.

  15. Historic emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in Mato Grosso, Brazil: 1 source data uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morton Douglas C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Historic carbon emissions are an important foundation for proposed efforts to Reduce Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation and enhance forest carbon stocks through conservation and sustainable forest management (REDD+. The level of uncertainty in historic carbon emissions estimates is also critical for REDD+, since high uncertainties could limit climate benefits from credited mitigation actions. Here, we analyzed source data uncertainties based on the range of available deforestation, forest degradation, and forest carbon stock estimates for the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso during 1990-2008. Results Deforestation estimates showed good agreement for multi-year periods of increasing and decreasing deforestation during the study period. However, annual deforestation rates differed by > 20% in more than half of the years between 1997-2008, even for products based on similar input data. Tier 2 estimates of average forest carbon stocks varied between 99-192 Mg C ha-1, with greatest differences in northwest Mato Grosso. Carbon stocks in deforested areas increased over the study period, yet this increasing trend in deforested biomass was smaller than the difference among carbon stock datasets for these areas. Conclusions Estimates of source data uncertainties are essential for REDD+. Patterns of spatial and temporal disagreement among available data products provide a roadmap for future efforts to reduce source data uncertainties for estimates of historic forest carbon emissions. Specifically, regions with large discrepancies in available estimates of both deforestation and forest carbon stocks are priority areas for evaluating and improving existing estimates. Full carbon accounting for REDD+ will also require filling data gaps, including forest degradation and secondary forest, with annual data on all forest transitions.

  16. Heat Source Neutron Emission Rate Reduction Studies - Water Induced HF Liberation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matonic, John; Brown, John; Foltyn, Liz; Garcia, Lawrence; Hart, Ron; Herman, David; Huling, Jeff; Pansoy-Hjelvik, M. E. Lisa; Sandoval, Fritz; Spengler, Diane

    2004-02-01

    Plutonium-238 oxide (238PuO2) is used in the fabrication of general purpose heat sources (GPHS) or light-weight radioisotope heater units (LWRHUs). The heat sources supply the thermal energy used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators to power spacecraft for deep space missions and to heat critical components in the cold environs of space. Los Alamos National Laboratory has manufactured heat sources for approximately two decades. The aqueous purification of 238PuO2 is required, due to rigorous total Pu-content, actinide and non-actinide metal impurity, and neutron emission rate specifications. The 238PuO2 aqueous purification process is a new capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory as previously, aqueous purified 238PuO2 occurred at other DOE complexes. The Pu-content and actinide and non-actinide metal impurity specifications are met well within specification in the Los Alamos process, though reduction in neutron emission rates have been challenging. High neutron emission rates are typically attributed to fluoride content in the oxide. The alpha decay from 238Pu results in α,n reactions with light elements such as 17O, 18O, and 19F resulting in high neutron emission rates in the purified 238PuO2. Simple 16O-exchange takes care of the high NER due to 17O, and 18O. A new method to reduce the NER due to 19F in the purified 238PuO2 is presented in this paper. The method involves addition of water to purified 238PuO2, followed by heating to remove the water and liberating fluoride as HF.

  17. Traffic induced particle resuspension in Paris: Emission factors and source contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, F.; Favez, O.; Pandolfi, M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Moukhtar, S.; Bruge, B.; Verlhac, S.; Orza, J. A. G.; Bonnaire, N.; Le Priol, T.; Petit, J.-F.; Sciare, J.

    2016-03-01

    Gaining knowledge on the process of particle resuspension from urban paved roads is of particular importance considering the increasing relevance of this source in urban air quality management and the lack of basic information on emission factors and source contributions. In this study we performed extensive field measurements for the quantification of the emission factors from different types of road in the city of Paris, and investigated the causes of their variability and the contributions to the ambient air PM10 observed across one year at one traffic monitoring site in the ring road of Paris. Results show agreement between lower road dust loadings (RD10: 0.7-2.2 mg m-2) and emission factors (5.4-9.0 mg vehicle-1 km-1) at inner-roads of Paris, compared to the ring road (2.4 mg m-2 and 17 mg vehicle-1 km-1, respectively), where the two parameters are estimated independently. The higher values in the ring road were likely caused by the poor state of pavement and higher share of heavy duty vehicles. Road wear, brake wear and a carbonaceous source, were almost equally responsible for 96% of RD10. At the traffic monitoring site located at the ring road (220,000 vehicle/day), the contributions of road dust emissions were estimated by receptor modeling to be 13% of PM10 on an annual mean (6.3 μg m-3), while the sum of vehicle exhaust and wear accounted for 47% resulting in a total traffic contribution of 60% of PM10. Road salting resulted to be a minor contributor (1% of annual mean) also in winter time (2%).

  18. Contribution of electric energy to the process of elimination of low emission sources in Cracow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lach, J.; Mejer, T.; Wybranski, A. [Power Distribution Plant, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    At present energy supply belongs to the most important global problems. A significant part of energy is consumed for residential heating purposes. Depending on climatic conditions, fuel distribution and the level of technological development, the contribution of these purposes ranges between ca. 50% (Poland) and ca. 12% (Spain). The power engineering structure in Poland is based almost exclusively upon solid fuels, i.e. hard and brown coal. Chemical compounds (carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) produced in combustion process influence negatively the natural environment. The contribution of residential heating in this negative effect is rather significant. Because of the fact, that the resources of fossil fuels (the most important source of energy at present) are limited and their influence on natural environment is negative, efforts are made to find out more effective ways of energy consumption and to reduce the pollutant emission from heating sources. This problem is a topical issue in Cracow, especially during the heating season because the coal-fired stoves situated in the central part of the town remain the most important source of pollutant emission. These sources cause serious menace to the health of inhabitants; furthermore the pollutants destroy Cracow monuments entered in the UNESCO world list of human heritage.

  19. Kaon-condensed hypernuclei as highly dense self-bound objects

    CERN Document Server

    Muto, Takumi

    2008-01-01

    The structure of $K^-$-condensed hypernuclei, which may be produced in the laboratory in strangeness-conserving processes, is investigated using an effective chiral Lagrangian for the kaon-baryon interaction, combined with a nonrelativistic baryon-baryon interaction model. It is shown that a large number of negative strangeness is needed for the formation of highly dense and deeply bound state with kaon condensates and that part of the strangeness should be carried by hyperons mixed in the nucleus. The properties of kaon-condensed hypernuclei such as the ground state energy and particle composition are discussed. Such a self-bound object has a long lifetime and may decay only through weak interaction processes. Comparison with other possible nuclear states is also made, such as kaon-condensed nuclei without mixing of hyperons and noncondensed multistrange hypernuclei. Implications of kaon-condensed hypernuclei for experiments are mentioned.

  20. Assumptions about footprint layer heights influence the quantification of emission sources: a case study for Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüser, Imke; Harder, Hartwig; Heil, Angelika; Kaiser, Johannes W.

    2017-09-01

    Lagrangian particle dispersion models (LPDMs) in backward mode are widely used to quantify the impact of transboundary pollution on downwind sites. Most LPDM applications count particles with a technique that introduces a so-called footprint layer (FL) with constant height, in which passing air tracer particles are assumed to be affected by surface emissions. The mixing layer dynamics are represented by the underlying meteorological model. This particle counting technique implicitly assumes that the atmosphere is well mixed in the FL. We have performed backward trajectory simulations with the FLEXPART model starting at Cyprus to calculate the sensitivity to emissions of upwind pollution sources. The emission sensitivity is used to quantify source contributions at the receptor and support the interpretation of ground measurements carried out during the CYPHEX campaign in July 2014. Here we analyse the effects of different constant and dynamic FL height assumptions. The results show that calculations with FL heights of 100 and 300 m yield similar but still discernible results. Comparison of calculations with FL heights constant at 300 m and dynamically following the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height exhibits systematic differences, with daytime and night-time sensitivity differences compensating for each other. The differences at daytime when a well-mixed PBL can be assumed indicate that residual inaccuracies in the representation of the mixing layer dynamics in the trajectories may introduce errors in the impact assessment on downwind sites. Emissions from vegetation fires are mixed up by pyrogenic convection which is not represented in FLEXPART. Neglecting this convection may lead to severe over- or underestimations of the downwind smoke concentrations. Introducing an extreme fire source from a different year in our study period and using fire-observation-based plume heights as reference, we find an overestimation of more than 60  % by the constant FL height

  1. Tomographic reconstruction of the beam emissivity profile in the negative ion source NIO1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonnesu, N.; Agostini, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.

    2016-12-01

    A versatile negative hydrogen ion source named NIO1 of a moderate size (130 mA total extracted H- current, 9 apertures, 60 kV total acceleration) has been developed and installed at Consorzio RFX. It will allow great experimental flexibility, very beneficial for studying several important issues related to beam extraction, optics and performance optimization, in view of SPIDER and MITICA, the two full-scale experiments for the ITER neutral beam injector under construction at RFX. The main target of emission tomography applied to an ion beam is the reconstruction of the emissivity profile, from which the ion density distribution can be obtained. The measurement of the beam density profile and of its uniformity throughout the pulse duration with a non-invasive diagnostic, such as tomography, would represent an effective method for monitoring the ion source operation and for malfunction detection. The application of this diagnostic to the NIO1 beam will represent the experimental verification of the possibility to reconstruct a multi-beamlet profile, in the interest of the next tomography systems for SPIDER and MITICA. In this paper, a feasibility study of the tomographic diagnostic for NIO1 is presented. A tomography code based on algebraic reconstruction techniques has been developed for this purpose and the transport of the nine H- beamlets is simulated with a Monte Carlo particle tracking code from the ion source to the tomography plane, where the beam emissivity profile to be reconstructed is calculated. The reference emissivity profile is reconstructed by the tomography code considering different possible layouts of the detection system, in order to find the best compromise between the quality of reconstructions and the complexity of the diagnostic. Results show that a tomography system based on six linear CCD cameras should be capable of reconstructing the NIO1 emissivity profile with an rms error lower than 10%. How instrumental noise in the integrated

  2. Suppression of Fiber Modal Noise Induced Radial Velocity Errors for Bright Emission-Line Calibration Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal to noise and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity (RV) spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high signal to noise. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial mass planets. These high precision calibration sources often use single mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to...

  3. A search for TeV emission from unidentified EGRET sources in the galactic plane

    CERN Document Server

    Buckley, J H; Bradbury, S M; Burdett, A M; Gordo, J B; Carter-Lewis, D A; Catanese, M; Cawley, M F; Fegan, D J; Finley, J P; Gaidos, J A; Hillas, A M; Krennrich, F; Lamb, R C; Lessard, R W; Masterson, C; McEnery, J E; Mohanty, G B; Quinn, J; Rodgers, A J; Rose, H J; Rovero, A C; Samuelson, F W; Sembroski, G H; Srinivasan, R; Weekes, T C; Zweerink, J A

    1997-01-01

    The ~70 unidentified sources of the EGRET sky survey may be one of its most important legacies. The identification of these sources at other wavelengths is critical to understanding their nature. Many have flat spectra out to 10 GeV which, if extrapolated to TeV energies, would be easily detectable relative to the steeply falling diffuse background. The Whipple Observatory gamma-ray telescope has been used to observe a number of these which were selected based on their position, intensity and spectrum and in some cases based on a possible association with a supernova remnant or pulsar. No significant emission has been detected from these sources, and upper limits are given.

  4. Real-Time Source Classification with an Waveform Parameter Filtering of Acoustic Emission Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seung Hyun; Park, Jae Ha; Ahn, Bong Young [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    The acoustic emission(AE) technique is a well established method to carry out structural health monitoring(SHM) of large structures. However, the real-time monitoring of the crack growth in the roller coaster support structures is not easy since the vehicle operation produces very large noise as well as crack growth. In this investigation, we present the waveform parameter filtering method to classify acoustic sources in real-time. This method filtrates only the AE hits by the target acoustic source as passing hits in a specific parameter band. According to various acoustic sources, the waveform parameters were measured and analyzed to verify the present filtering method. Also, the AE system employing the waveform parameter filter was manufactured and applied to the roller coaster support structure in an actual amusement park

  5. Review of methods for remote sensing of atmospheric emissions from stationary sources. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeger, M.L.; Sokol, C.K.; Coffey, S.J.; Wright, R.S.; Farthing, W.E.

    1988-03-01

    This report reviews the commercially available and developing technologies for the application of remote sensing to the measurement of source emissions. The term remote sensing technology, as applied in the report, means the detection or concentration measurement of trace atmospheric species by sensing the interaction of propagating electromagnetic energy and the specific constituent along the path of propagation. Many remote-monitoring techniques are applicable to source measurements. The source of the energy can be natural or designed as part of the system. In general, passive techniques are easier to use and less expensive to purchase and operate than are the active systems. Active systems are, in general, more specific and more sensitive than the passive systems. Some active techniques provide the added advantage of range resolution, which is preferred for some types of measurement applications.

  6. Flavour symmetry breaking in the kaon parton distribution amplitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Shi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We compute the kaon's valence-quark (twist-two parton distribution amplitude (PDA by projecting its Poincaré-covariant Bethe–Salpeter wave-function onto the light-front. At a scale ζ=2 GeV, the PDA is a broad, concave and asymmetric function, whose peak is shifted 12–16% away from its position in QCD's conformal limit. These features are a clear expression of SU(3-flavour-symmetry breaking. They show that the heavier quark in the kaon carries more of the bound-state's momentum than the lighter quark and also that emergent phenomena in QCD modulate the magnitude of flavour-symmetry breaking: it is markedly smaller than one might expect based on the difference between light-quark current masses. Our results add to a body of evidence which indicates that at any energy scale accessible with existing or foreseeable facilities, a reliable guide to the interpretation of experiment requires the use of such nonperturbatively broadened PDAs in leading-order, leading-twist formulae for hard exclusive processes instead of the asymptotic PDA associated with QCD's conformal limit. We illustrate this via the ratio of kaon and pion electromagnetic form factors: using our nonperturbative PDAs in the appropriate formulae, FK/Fπ=1.23 at spacelike-Q2=17 GeV2, which compares satisfactorily with the value of 0.92(5 inferred in e+e− annihilation at s=17 GeV2.

  7. Charged kaon and proton production in B-hadron decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegenfeldt, Fredrik Per

    The production of charged kaons and protons in B-hadron decays has been measured in e+e- annihilations at centre-of-mass energies corresponding to the Z0 mass. In total 1.6 million hadronic Z0 decays were analysed, corresponding to about 690000 B-hadron decays. They were collected using the DELPHI detector at the LEP collider at CERN during 1994 and 1995. Events containing B-hadron decays were identified using special characteristics of the B-hadron decay topology. In particular, the long lifetime of the B-hadron leads to decay vertices significantly displaced relative the interaction point. These so called secondary vertices were reconstructed using a powerful micro vertex detector. In order to discriminate B-hadron decay products from fragmentation tracks, a method was used where the impact parameter measured by the vertex detector was employed as a discriminating variable. The tracks were thus divided into two classes, one compatible with the interaction point and the other compatible with a secondary vertex. An unfolding method was used to extract the true B-hadron decay tracks from the two classes. Charged kaons and protons were identified using the Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector and corrected for misidentification using an efficiency matrix. The analysis resulted in charged kaon and proton spectra from B-hadron decays, including previously unmeasured momentum regions. Integrating the spectra yielded the following multiplicities n(B- hadron-->K+/- X)=0.683+/-0.021(stat) +/-0.017(syst) n(B- hadron-->p/p X)=0.127+/-0.013(stat) +/-0.019(syst) where the proton multiplicity does not include Λ baryon decay products.

  8. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Ground Level Area Sources in Dairy and Cattle Feedyard Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin B. Parnell

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A protocol that consisted of an isolation flux chamber and a portable gas chromatograph was used to directly quantify greenhouse gas (GHG emissions at a dairy and a feedyard operation in the Texas Panhandle. Field sampling campaigns were performed 5 consecutive days only during daylight hours from 9:00 am to 7:00 pm each day. The objective of this research was to quantify and compare GHG emission rates (ERs from ground level area sources (GLAS at dairy and cattle feedyard operations during the summer. A total of 74 air samples using flux chamber were collected from the barn (manure lane and bedding area, loafing pen, open lot, settling basin, lagoons, and compost pile within the dairy operation. For the cattle feedyard, a total of 87 air samples were collected from four corner pens of a large feedlot, runoff holding pond, and compost pile. Three primary GHGs (methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide were measured and quantified from both operations. The aggregate estimated ERs for CH4, CO2, and N2O were 836, 5573, 3.4 g hd−1 d−1 (collectively 27.5 kg carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e hd−1 d−1, respectively, at the dairy operation. The aggregate ERs for CH4, CO2, and N2O were 3.8, 1399, 0.68 g hd−1 d−1 (1.7 kg CO2e hd−1 d−1, respectively, from the feedyard. The estimated USEPA GHG ERs were about 13.2 and 1.16 kg CO2e hd−1 d−1, respectively, for dairy and feedyard operations. Aggregate CH4, CO2 and N2O ERs at the dairy facility were about 219, 4 and 5 times higher, respectively, than those at the feedyard. At the dairy, average CH4 ERs estimated from the settling basin, primary and secondary lagoons were significantly higher than those from the other GLAS, contributing about 98% of the aggregate CH4 emission. The runoff holding pond and pen surface of the feedyard contributed about 99% of the aggregate CH4 emission. Average CO2 and N2O ERs estimated from the pen surface area were significantly higher than those estimated from

  9. Quaternary deposits and weathered bedrock material as a source of dangerous radon emissions in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersell Valter

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The risk of dangerous radon emissions in Estonia is high, being among the highest in Europe. In almost 33 per cent of Estonian land area, the content of radon in soil-contained air exceeds the safe limit for unrestricted construction (50 kBq/m3. In such high radon-risk areas the concentration of radon in soil-contained air ranges from 50 to 400 kBq/m3, in a few cases reaching up to 2,100 kBq/m3 exceeding the permitted level for residential areas. The situation is particularly serious in the northernmost part of the country, where uranium-rich graptolite argillite (Dictyonema shale and the Obolus phosphorite are close to ground surface and their particles are constituent parts of Quaternary deposits. Radon emissions from bedrock have been investigated in detail, but to date Quaternary strata as a source of radon emissions are poorly studied. According to our measurements the highest concentrations of radon are related to tills containing clasts and fines of graptolite argillite and phosphorite. Glacial deposits include also granitoidal material, containing U, Th and K, which have been transported by glaciers from the outcrop areas of crystalline basement rocks in Finland and the Gulf of Finland. Due to weathering, outwash and repeated redeposition other genetic types are poorer in radioactive elements and they are weaker sources of radon.

  10. The Nuclear Region of Low Luminosity Flat Radio Spectrum Sources. II. Emission-Line Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Gonçalves, A C

    2004-01-01

    We report on the spectroscopic study of 19 low luminosity Flat Radio Spectrum (LL FRS) sources selected from Marcha's et al. (1996) 200 mJy sample. In the optical, these objects are mainly dominated by the host galaxy starlight. After correcting the data for this effect, we obtain a new set of spectra clearly displaying weak emission lines; such features carry valuable information concerning the excitation mechanisms at work in the nuclear regions of LL FRS sources. We have used a special routine to model the spectra and assess the intensities and velocities of the emission lines; we have analyzed the results in terms of diagnostic diagrams. Our analysis shows that 79% of the studied objects harbour a Low Ionization Nuclear Emission-line Region (or LINER) whose contribution was swamped by the host galaxy starlight. The remaining objects display a higher ionization spectrum, more typical of Seyferts; due to the poor quality of the spectra, it was not possible to identify any possible large Balmer components. T...

  11. Probing the environment of gravitational wave transient sources with TeV afterglow emission

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Qin-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (aLIGO) detected gravitational wave (GW) transients from mergers of binary black holes (BHs). The system may also produce a wide-angle, relativistic outflow if the claimed short GRB detected by GBM is in real association with GW 150914. It was suggested that mergers of double neutron stars (or neutron star-black hole binaries), another promising source of GW transients, also produce fast, wide-angle outflows. In this paper, we calculate the high-energy gamma-ray emission arising from the blast waves driven by these wide-angle outflows. We find that TeV emission arising from the inverse-Compton process in the relativistic outflow resulted from mergers of binary BHs similar to those in GW 150914 could be detectable by ground-based IACT telescopes such as Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) if the sources occur in { a dense medium with density $n > 0.3 cm^{-3}$}. For neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) and NS-BH mergers, TeV emission from the wide-...

  12. Soil carbon dioxide emissions from the Mojave desert: Isotopic evidence for a carbonate source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soper, Fiona M.; McCalley, Carmody K.; Sparks, Kimberlee; Sparks, Jed P.

    2017-01-01

    Arid soils represent a substantial carbonate pool and may participate in surface-atmosphere CO2 exchange via a diel cycle of carbonate dissolution and exsolution. We used a Keeling plot approach to determine the substrate δ13C of CO2 emitted from carbonate-dominated soils in the Mojave desert and found evidence for a nonrespiratory source that increased with surface temperature. In dry soils at 25-30°C, the CO2 substrate had δ13C values of -19.4 ± 4.2‰, indicative of respiration of organic material (soil organic matter = -23.1 ± 0.8‰). CO2 flux increased with temperature; maximum fluxes occurred above 60°C, where δ13CO2 substrate (-7.2‰ ± 2.8‰) approached soil carbonate values (0.2 ± 0.2‰). In wet soils, CO2 emissions were not temperature dependent, and δ13CO2 substrate was lower in vegetated soils with higher flux rates, higher organic C content, and potential root respiration. These data provide the first direct evidence of CO2 emissions from alkaline desert soils derived from an abiotic source and that diurnal emission patterns are strongly driven by surface temperature.

  13. Household Solar Photovoltaics: Supplier of Marginal Abatement, or Primary Source of Low-Emission Power?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Palmer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available With declining system costs and assuming a short energy payback period, photovoltaics (PV should, at face value, be able to make a meaningful contribution to reducing the emission intensity of Australia’s electricity system. However, solar is an intermittent power source and households remain completely dependent on a “less than green” electricity grid for reliable electricity. Further, much of the energy impact of PV occurs outside of the conventional boundaries of PV life-cycle analyses (LCA. This paper examines these competing observations and explores the broader impacts of a high penetration of household PV using Melbourne, Victoria as a reference. It concludes that in a grid dominated by unsequestered coal and gas, PV provides a legitimate source of emission abatement at high, but declining costs, with the potential for network and peak demand support. It may be technically possible to integrate a high penetration of PV, but the economic and energy cost of accommodating high-penetration PV erodes much of the benefits. Future developments in PV, storage, and integration technologies may allow PV to take on a greater long term role, but in the time horizon usually discussed in climate policy, a large-scale expansion of household PV may hinder rather than assist deep cuts to the emission intensity of Australia’s electricity system.

  14. Influence of straw types and nitrogen sources on mushroom composting emissions and compost productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, R; Hobbs, P J; Mead, A; Dobrovin-Pennington, A

    2002-09-01

    The effects of different straw types and organic and inorganic nitrogen (N) sources on the chemical composition and odor concentration (OC) of mushroom composting emissions, compost parameters, and mushroom yield were examined using bench-scale and large-scale (windrows and aerated tunnels) composting systems. There were close correlations between the butanol or combined H(2)S+dimethyl sulfide (DMS) concentration and OC of air samples taken from different composting ingredients (r=0.83 and 0.76-0.87, Pcocoa shells, ammonium sulfate) produced lower mushroom yields than materials in which the N was more readily available (poultry manure, urea, brewers' grains, hop and molasses wastes, cocoa meal). Replacement of poultry manure with the other N sources at 50-100% or wheat straw with rape, bean, or linseed straw in aerated tunnel or windrow composts reduced the OC and emissions of odorous sulfur-containing compounds, but also reduced yield. Urea and cocoa meal may be suitable for "low odor" prewetting of straw, with addition of poultry manure immediately before aerated tunnel composting. Rape straw in compost reduces the formation of anaerobic zones and resulting odorous emissions, since it maintains its structure and porosity better than wheat straw.

  15. Assessing the emission sources of atmospheric mercury in wet deposition across Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, Lynne E; Keeler, Gerald J; Morishita, Masako; Barres, James A; Dvonch, J Timothy

    2013-03-15

    From August 4, 2007 to August 31, 2009, we collected event-based precipitation samples for mercury (Hg) and trace element analyses at four sites in Illinois (IL), USA. The objectives of these measurements were to quantify Hg wet deposition across the state, and to assess the contributions to Hg in precipitation from major local and regional emission sources. Monitoring sites were located, from north to south, in Chicago, Peoria, Nilwood, and Carbondale, IL. Measurements from these four sites demonstrated that a clear spatial gradient in Hg wet deposition was not evident across the state. Each site received>10μgm(-2) of Hg wet deposition annually, and these observed values were comparable to annual Hg wet deposition measurements from other event-based precipitation monitoring sites in source-impacted areas of the Midwestern U.S. We applied the multivariate statistical receptor model, Positive Matrix Factorization (EPA PMF v3.0), to the measured Hg and trace element wet deposition amounts at the four sites. Results suggested that 50% to 74% of total Hg wet deposition at each site could be attributed to coal combustion emissions. The other source signatures identified in the precipitation compositions included cement manufacturing, mixed metal smelting/waste incineration, iron-steel production, and a phosphorus source. We also applied a hybrid receptor model, Quantitative Transport Bias Analysis (QTBA), to the Hg wet deposition datasets to identify the major source regions associated with the measured values. The calculated QTBA probability fields suggested that transport from urban/industrial areas, such as Chicago/Gary, St. Louis, and the Ohio River Valley, resulted in some of the highest estimated event-based Hg wet deposition amounts at the four sites (potential mass transfer of up to 0.32μgm(-2)). The combined application of PMF and QTBA supported the hypothesis that local and regional coal combustion was the largest source of Hg wet deposition in Illinois.

  16. CEBAF at higher energies and the kaon electromagnetic form factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, O.K.

    1994-04-01

    The electromagnetic production of strangeness, the physics of exciting systems having strangeness degrees of freedom (production of hadrons with one or more strange constituent quarks) using electromagnetic probes (real or virtual photons), is one of the frontier areas of research which will be investigated at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) when it becomes operational. CEBAF is expected to have an important impact upon this field of research using its specialized set of detection instruments and high quality electron beam. This paper focusses upon one aspect of the associated production of strangeness - the determination of the kaon electromagnetic form factor at high squared momentum transfers.

  17. Non-leptonic kaon decays at large $N_c$

    CERN Document Server

    Donini, A; Pena, C; Romero-López, F

    2016-01-01

    We study the scaling with the number of colours, $N_c$, of the weak amplitudes mediating kaon mixing and decay. We evaluate the amplitudes of the two relevant current-current operators on the lattice for $N_c=3-7$. We conclude that the subleading $1/N_c$ corrections in $\\hat{B}_K$ are small, but those in the $K \\rightarrow \\pi\\pi$ amplitudes are large and fully anti-correlated in the $I=0, 2$ isospin channels. We briefly comment on the implications for the $\\Delta I=1/2$ rule.

  18. Steep-spectrum sources and the duty cycle of the radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Orienti, M

    2010-01-01

    It is currently accepted that intrinsically compact and bright radio sources characterized by a convex spectrum peaking at frequencies ranging from 100 MHz to a few GHz are young objects. Following the evolutionary models, these objects would evolve into the population of classical radio galaxies. However, the fraction of young radio sources in flux density-limited samples is much larger than what expected from the number counts of large radio sources. This may suggest that for some reason a significant fraction of young objects would never become large radio galaxies with sizes up to a few Mpc. The discovery of the young radio source PKS 1518+047 characterized by an uncommonly steep spectrum confirms that the radio emission may switch off shortly after its onset. Then the source spectrum steepens and evolves due to energy losses. If the interruption is not temporary, the fate of the fading sources is to disappear at frequencies lower than those explored by current radio telescopes. Fossils of past activities...

  19. Acoustic emission source location in complex structures using full automatic delta T mapping technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jumaili, Safaa Kh.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Holford, Karen M.; Eaton, Mark J.; Pullin, Rhys

    2016-05-01

    An easy to use, fast to apply, cost-effective, and very accurate non-destructive testing (NDT) technique for damage localisation in complex structures is key for the uptake of structural health monitoring systems (SHM). Acoustic emission (AE) is a viable technique that can be used for SHM and one of the most attractive features is the ability to locate AE sources. The time of arrival (TOA) technique is traditionally used to locate AE sources, and relies on the assumption of constant wave speed within the material and uninterrupted propagation path between the source and the sensor. In complex structural geometries and complex materials such as composites, this assumption is no longer valid. Delta T mapping was developed in Cardiff in order to overcome these limitations; this technique uses artificial sources on an area of interest to create training maps. These are used to locate subsequent AE sources. However operator expertise is required to select the best data from the training maps and to choose the correct parameter to locate the sources, which can be a time consuming process. This paper presents a new and improved fully automatic delta T mapping technique where a clustering algorithm is used to automatically identify and select the highly correlated events at each grid point whilst the "Minimum Difference" approach is used to determine the source location. This removes the requirement for operator expertise, saving time and preventing human errors. A thorough assessment is conducted to evaluate the performance and the robustness of the new technique. In the initial test, the results showed excellent reduction in running time as well as improved accuracy of locating AE sources, as a result of the automatic selection of the training data. Furthermore, because the process is performed automatically, this is now a very simple and reliable technique due to the prevention of the potential source of error related to manual manipulation.

  20. Mercury emissions to the atmosphere from anthropogenic sources in Europe in 2000 and their scenarios until 2020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacyna, Elisabeth G; Pacyna, Jozef M; Fudala, Janina; Strzelecka-Jastrzab, Ewa; Hlawiczka, Stanislaw; Panasiuk, Damian

    2006-10-15

    The paper reviews the current state of knowledge regarding European emissions of mercury and presents estimates of European emissions of mercury to the atmosphere from anthropogenic sources for the year 2000. This information was then used as a basis for Hg emission scenario development until the year 2020. Combustion of coal in power plants and residential heat furnaces generates about half of the European emissions being 239 tonnes. The coal combustion is followed by the production of caustic soda with the use of the Hg cell process (17%). Major points of mercury emission generation in the mercury cell process include: by-product hydrogen stream, end box ventilation air, and cell room ventilation air. This technology is now being changed to other caustic soda production technologies and further reduction of Hg emissions is expected in this connection. The third category on the list of the largest Hg emitters in Europe is cement production (about 13%). The largest emissions were estimated for Russia (the European part of the country), contributing with about 27% to the European emissions, followed by Poland, Germany, Spain, Ukraine, France, Italy and the United Kingdom. Most of these countries use coal as a major source of energy in order to meet the electricity and heat demands. In general, countries in the Central and Eastern Europe generated the main part of the European emissions in 2000. Emission reductions between 20% and 80% of the 2000 emission amounts can be obtained by the year 2020, as estimated by various scenarios.

  1. A Fuel-Based Assessment of On-Road and Off-Road Mobile Source Emission Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmann, T. R.; Harley, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    Mobile sources contribute significantly to emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the United States. These emissions lead to a variety of environmental concerns including adverse human health effects and climate change. In the electric power sector, sulfur dioxide (SO2) and NOx emissions from power plants are measured directly using continuous emission monitoring systems. In contrast for mobile sources, statistical models are used to estimate average emissions from a very large and diverse population of engines. Despite much effort aimed at improving them, mobile source emission inventories continue to have large associated uncertainties. Alternate methods are needed to help evaluate estimates of mobile source emissions and quantify and reduce the associated uncertainties. In this study, a fuel-based approach is used to estimate emissions from mobile sources, including on-road and off-road gasoline and diesel engines. In this approach, engine activity is measured by fuel consumed (in contrast EPA mobile source emission models are based on vehicle km of travel and total amount of engine work output for on-road and off-road engines, respectively). Fuel consumption is defined in this study based on highway fuel tax reports for on-road engines, and from surveys of fuel wholesalers who sell tax-exempt diesel fuel for use in various off-road sectors such as agriculture, construction, and mining. Over the decade-long time period (1996-2006) that is the focus of the present study, national sales of taxable gasoline and diesel fuel intended for on-road use increased by 15 and 43%, respectively. Diesel fuel use by off-road equipment increased by about 20% over the same time period. Growth in fuel consumption offset some of the reductions in pollutant emission factors that occurred during this period. This study relies on in-use measurements of mobile source emission factors, for example from roadside and tunnel studies, remote sensing, and

  2. Discovery of an extended source of gamma-ray emission in the Southern hemisphere

    CERN Document Server

    Araya, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of a $\\sim$ 3.$^{\\circ}$4-wide region of high-energy emission in data from the Fermi LAT satellite is reported. The region is located in the Southern hemisphere and relatively far from the plane of the Galaxy, around the Galactic coordinates l=350.6, b=-4.7. It shows a hard spectrum that is compatible with a power-law, $\\frac{dN}{dE}\\propto E^{-\\Gamma}$, with a spectral index $\\Gamma = 1.68 \\pm 0.04_{stat}$ above 200 MeV and a total integrated flux above 1 GeV of $(3.76 \\pm 0.33_{stat}) \\times 10^{-9}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. Two hypotheses about the nature of the source are discussed, namely that the emission comes from the shell of an unknown supernova remnant or from a pulsar wind nebula.

  3. Historic Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Mato Grosso, Brazil: 1. Source Data Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Douglas C.; Sales, Marcio H.; Souza, Carlos M., Jr.; Griscom, Bronson

    2011-01-01

    Historic carbon emissions are an important foundation for proposed efforts to Reduce Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation and enhance forest carbon stocks through conservation and sustainable forest management (REDD+). The level of uncertainty in historic carbon emissions estimates is also critical for REDD+, since high uncertainties could limit climate benefits from mitigation actions. Here, we analyzed source data uncertainties based on the range of available deforestation, forest degradation, and forest carbon stock estimates for the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso during 1990-2008. Results: Deforestation estimates showed good agreement for multi-year trends of increasing and decreasing deforestation during the study period. However, annual deforestation rates differed by >20% in more than half of the years between 1997-2008, even for products based on similar input data. Tier 2 estimates of average forest carbon stocks varied between 99-192 Mg C/ha, with greatest differences in northwest Mato Grosso. Carbon stocks in deforested areas increased over the study period, yet this increasing trend in deforested biomass was smaller than the difference among carbon stock datasets for these areas. Conclusions: Patterns of spatial and temporal disagreement among available data products provide a roadmap for future efforts to reduce source data uncertainties for estimates of historic forest carbon emissions. Specifically, regions with large discrepancies in available estimates of both deforestation and forest carbon stocks are priority areas for evaluating and improving existing estimates. Full carbon accounting for REDD+ will also require filling data gaps, including forest degradation and secondary forest, with annual data on all forest transitions.

  4. Penning plasma based simultaneous light emission source of visible and VUV lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, G. L.; Prakash, R.; Pal, U. N.; Manchanda, R.; Halder, N.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a laboratory-based penning plasma discharge source is reported which has been developed in two anode configurations and is able to produce visible and VUV lights simultaneously. The developed source has simultaneous diagnostics facility using Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The two anode configurations, namely, double ring and rectangular configurations, have been studied and compared for optimum use of the geometry for efficient light emissions and recording. The plasma is produced using helium gas and admixture of three noble gases including helium, neon, and argon. The source is capable to produce eight spectral lines for pure helium in the VUV range from 20 to 60 nm and total 24 spectral lines covering the wavelength range 20-106 nm for the admixture of gases. The large range of VUV lines is generated from gaseous admixture rather from the sputtered materials. The recorded spectrum shows that the plasma light radiations in both visible and VUV range are larger in double ring configuration than that of the rectangular configurations at the same discharge operating conditions. To clearly understand the difference, the imaging of the discharge using ICCD camera and particle-in-cell simulation using VORPAL have also been carried out. The effect of ion diffusion, metastable collision with the anode wall and the nonlinear effects are correlated to explain the results.

  5. Penning plasma based simultaneous light emission source of visible and VUV lights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, G. L., E-mail: glvyas27@gmail.com [Manipal University Jaipur (India); Prakash, R.; Pal, U. N. [CSIR-Central Electronics and Engineering Research Institute, Microwave Tubes Division (India); Manchanda, R. [Institute for Plasma Research (India); Halder, N. [Manipal University Jaipur (India)

    2016-06-15

    In this paper, a laboratory-based penning plasma discharge source is reported which has been developed in two anode configurations and is able to produce visible and VUV lights simultaneously. The developed source has simultaneous diagnostics facility using Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The two anode configurations, namely, double ring and rectangular configurations, have been studied and compared for optimum use of the geometry for efficient light emissions and recording. The plasma is produced using helium gas and admixture of three noble gases including helium, neon, and argon. The source is capable to produce eight spectral lines for pure helium in the VUV range from 20 to 60 nm and total 24 spectral lines covering the wavelength range 20–106 nm for the admixture of gases. The large range of VUV lines is generated from gaseous admixture rather from the sputtered materials. The recorded spectrum shows that the plasma light radiations in both visible and VUV range are larger in double ring configuration than that of the rectangular configurations at the same discharge operating conditions. To clearly understand the difference, the imaging of the discharge using ICCD camera and particle-in-cell simulation using VORPAL have also been carried out. The effect of ion diffusion, metastable collision with the anode wall and the nonlinear effects are correlated to explain the results.

  6. Crowd-Sourcing Management Activity Data to Drive GHG Emission Inventories in the Land Use Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paustian, K.; Herrick, J.

    2015-12-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the land use sector constitute the largest source category for many countries in Africa. Enhancing C sequestration and reducing GHG emissions on managed lands in Africa has to potential to attract C financing to support adoption of more sustainable land management practices that, in addition to GHG mitigation, can provide co-benefits of more productive and climate-resilient agroecosystems. However, robust systems to measure and monitor C sequestration/GHG reductions are currently a significant barrier to attracting more C financing to land use-related mitigation efforts.Anthropogenic GHG emissions are driven by a variety of environmental factors, including climate and soil attributes, as well as human-activities in the form of land use and management practices. GHG emission inventories typically use empirical or process-based models of emission rates that are driven by environmental and management variables. While a lack of field-based flux and C stock measurements are a limiting factor for GHG estimation, we argue that an even greater limitation may be availabiity of data on the management activities that influence flux rates, particularly in developing countries in Africa. In most developed countries there is a well-developed infrastructure of agricultural statistics and practice surveys that can be used to drive model-based GHG emission estimations. However, this infrastructure is largely lacking in developing countries in Africa. While some activity data (e.g. land cover change) can be derived from remote sensing, many key data (e.g., N fertilizer practices, residue management, manuring) require input from the farmers themselves. The explosive growth in cellular technology, even in many of the poorest parts of Africa, suggests the potential for a new crowd-sourcing approach and direct engagement with farmers to 'leap-frog' the land resource information model of developed countries. Among the many benefits of this approach

  7. Global Scale Attribution of Anthropogenic and Natural Dust Sources and their Emission Rates Based on MODIS Deep Blue Aerosol Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginoux, Paul; Prospero, Joseph M.; Gill, Thomas E.; Hsu, N. Christina; Zhao, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the global dust cycle is limited by a dearth of information about dust sources, especially small-scale features which could account for a large fraction of global emissions. Here we present a global-scale high-resolution (0.1 deg) mapping of sources based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep Blue estimates of dust optical depth in conjunction with other data sets including land use. We ascribe dust sources to natural and anthropogenic (primarily agricultural) origins, calculate their respective contributions to emissions, and extensively compare these products against literature. Natural dust sources globally account for 75% of emissions; anthropogenic sources account for 25%. North Africa accounts for 55% of global dust emissions with only 8% being anthropogenic, mostly from the Sahel. Elsewhere, anthropogenic dust emissions can be much higher (75% in Australia). Hydrologic dust sources (e.g., ephemeral water bodies) account for 31% worldwide; 15% of them are natural while 85% are anthropogenic. Globally, 20% of emissions are from vegetated surfaces, primarily desert shrublands and agricultural lands. Since anthropogenic dust sources are associated with land use and ephemeral water bodies, both in turn linked to the hydrological cycle, their emissions are affected by climate variability. Such changes in dust emissions can impact climate, air quality, and human health. Improved dust emission estimates will require a better mapping of threshold wind velocities, vegetation dynamics, and surface conditions (soil moisture and land use) especially in the sensitive regions identified here, as well as improved ability to address small-scale convective processes producing dust via cold pool (haboob) events frequent in monsoon regimes.

  8. Spectral emission properties of a LPP light source in the sub-200nm range for wafer inspection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambino, Nadia; Rollinger, Bob; Hudgins, Duane; Abhari, Reza; Abreau, F.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the spectral emission proprieties of a droplet-based laser-produced plasma are investigated in the VUV range. These studies are performed with a spectrograph operating from 30 nm to 180 nm at a spectral resolution of 0.1 nm. The emission spectra are recorded for different droplet-based metal fuels such as tin, indium and gallium in the presence of different background gas pressure levels. The experimental results are relevant for alternative light sources that would be needed for future wafer inspection tools. In addition, the experimental results help to determine the Out- Of-Band (OOB) radiation emission of the EUV source. By tuning the type of fuel, the laser energies and the background gas, the LPP light source shows good capabilities to be operated as a tunable light source that covers a spectral emission range from the EUV to the sub-200 nm range.

  9. Kaon-kaon scattering at maximal isospin from $N_f=2+1+1$ twisted mass lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Helmes, Christopher; Knippschild, Bastian; Kostrzewa, Bartosz; Liu, Liuming; Urbach, Carsten; Werner, Markus

    2016-01-01

    We present results for the interaction of two kaons at maximal isospin. The calculation is based on 2+1+1 flavour gauge configurations generated by the ETM Collaboration (ETMC) featuring pion masses ranging from about 230 MeV to 450 MeV at three values of the lattice spacing. The elastic scattering length $a_0^{I=1}$ is calculated at several values of the bare strange quark and light quark masses. We find $M_K a_0 =-0.397(11)(_{-8}^{+0})$ as the result of a chiral and continuum extrapolation to the physical point. This number is compared to other lattice results.

  10. A probabilistic framework for single-sensor acoustic emission source localization in thin metallic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimkhanlou, Arvin; Salamone, Salvatore

    2017-09-01

    Tracking edge-reflected acoustic emission (AE) waves can allow the localization of their sources. Specifically, in bounded isotropic plate structures, only one sensor may be used to perform these source localizations. The primary goal of this paper is to develop a three-step probabilistic framework to quantify the uncertainties associated with such single-sensor localizations. According to this framework, a probabilistic approach is first used to estimate the direct distances between AE sources and the sensor. Then, an analytical model is used to reconstruct the envelope of edge-reflected AE signals based on the source-to-sensor distance estimations and their first arrivals. Finally, the correlation between the probabilistically reconstructed envelopes and recorded AE signals are used to estimate confidence contours for the location of AE sources. To validate the proposed framework, Hsu-Nielsen pencil lead break (PLB) tests were performed on the surface as well as the edges of an aluminum plate. The localization results show that the estimated confidence contours surround the actual source locations. In addition, the performance of the framework was tested in a noisy environment simulated by two dummy transducers and an arbitrary wave generator. The results show that in low-noise environments, the shape and size of the confidence contours depend on the sources and their locations. However, at highly noisy environments, the size of the confidence contours monotonically increases with the noise floor. Such probabilistic results suggest that the proposed probabilistic framework could thus provide more comprehensive information regarding the location of AE sources.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of emission control of primary and secondary organic aerosol sources during Beijing 2008 Olympics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S.; Hu, M.; Guo, Q.; Zhang, X.; Schauer, J. J.; Zhang, R.

    2012-12-01

    To explore the primary and secondary sources of fine organic particles after the aggressive implementation of air pollution controls during 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, 12-h PM2.5 concentrations were measured at one urban and one upwind rural site during the CAREBeijing-2008 (Campaigns of Air quality REsearch in Beijing and surrounding region) summer field campaign. The PM2.5 concentrations were 72.5±43.6μg m3 and 64.3±36.2μg m-3 at the urban site and rural site, respectively, which were the lowest in recent years due to the implementation of drastic control measures and favorable weather conditions. Five primary and four secondary fine organic particle sources were quantified using a CMB (chemical mass balance) model and tracer-yield method. Compared with previous studies in Beijing, the contribution of vehicle emission increased, with diesel engines contributing 16.2±5.9% and 14.5±4.1% to the total organic carbon (OC) concentrations and gasoline vehicles accounting for 10.3±8.7% and 7.9±6.2% of the OC concentrations at two sites. Due to the implementation of emission control measures, the OC concentrations from important primary sources have been reduced, and secondary formation has become an important contributor to fine organic aerosols. Compared with the non-controlled period, primary vehicle contributions were reduced by 30% and 24% in the urban and regional area, and reductions in the contribution from coal combustion were 57% and 7%, respectively. These results demonstrate the emission control measures significantly alleviated the primary organic particle pollution in and around Beijing. However, the control effectiveness of secondary organic particles was not significant.

  12. Patterns of mercury dispersion from local and regional emission sources, rural Central Wisconsin, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kolker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous real-time changes in mercury (Hg speciation – reactive gaseous Hg (RGM, elemental Hg (Hg°, and fine particulate Hg (Hg-PM2.5, were determined from June to November 2007, in ambient air at three locations in rural Central Wisconsin. Known Hg emission sources within the airshed of the monitoring sites include: 1 a 1114 megawatt (MW coal-fired electric utility generating station; 2 a Hg-bed chlor-alkali plant; and 3 a smaller (465 MW coal-burning electric utility. Monitoring sites, showing sporadic elevation of RGM, Hg° and Hg-PM2.5, were positioned at distances of 25, 50 and 100 km northward of the larger electric utility. A series of RGM events were recorded at each site. The largest, on 23 September, occurred under prevailing southerly winds, with a maximum RGM value (56.8 pg m−3 measured at the 100 km site, and corresponding elevated SO2 (10.41 ppbv; measured at 50 km site. The finding that RGM, Hg°, and Hg-PM2.5 are not always highest at the 25 km site, closest to the large generating station, contradicts the idea that RGM decreases with distance from a large point source. This may be explained if: 1 the 100 km site was influenced by emissions from the chlor-alkali facility or by RGM from regional urban sources; 2 the emission stack height of the larger power plant promoted plume transport at an elevation where the Hg is carried over the closest site; or 3 RGM was being generated in the plume through oxidation of Hg°. Operational changes at each emitter since 2007 should reduce their Hg output, potentially allowing quantification of the environmental benefit in future studies.

  13. Unifying intensity noise and second-order coherence properties of amplified spontaneous emission sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazek, Martin; Hartmann, Sébastien; Molitor, Andreas; Elsaesser, Wolfgang

    2011-09-01

    We present joint investigations of relative intensity noise (RIN) and second-order coherence properties of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) generated by a superluminescent diode. We introduce a generalized intensity noise description for ASE sources that contains the shot noise contribution but also accounts for first- and second-order coherence properties reflecting the process of light generation. We find excellent agreement between pump-current-dependent RIN values and this new description, with the perspective of particular interesting consequences for the realization of low-noise broadband emitters.

  14. Study of argon additive in a beam injection type negative ion source using VUV emission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Nakada, Naoki; Fukumasa, Osamu

    2006-01-01

    Effects of Ar addition are studied by using a beam injection type negative ion source. With adding Ar, I_ increases at low base H_2 pressure. At high base H_2 pressure, however, I_ decreases. VUV emission intensities also decrease at high base pressure. In other words, Ar addition is adverse effect for production of H_2 (v''). Therefore, decrease in I_ is caused by decrease in H_2 (v''). In D_2 plasmas, variation patterns of plasma parameters and VUV intensities by Ar addition are nearly the ...

  15. Suppression of Fiber Modal Noise Induced Radial Velocity Errors for Bright Emission-line Calibration Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high S/N. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission-line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets. These high-precision calibration sources often use single-mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single-mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to spectrograph calibration systems. Our solution uses an integrating sphere in conjunction with a diffuser that is moved rapidly using electrostrictive polymers, and is generally superior to most tested forms of mechanical fiber agitation. We demonstrate a high level of modal noise reduction with a narrow bandwidth 1550 nm laser. Our relatively inexpensive solution immediately enables spectrographs to take advantage of the innate precision of bright state-of-the art calibration sources by removing a major source of systematic noise.

  16. Toward a probabilistic acoustic emission source location algorithm: A Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Thomas; Straub, Daniel; Higgins, Christopher

    2012-09-01

    Acoustic emissions (AE) are stress waves initiated by sudden strain releases within a solid body. These can be caused by internal mechanisms such as crack opening or propagation, crushing, or rubbing of crack surfaces. One application for the AE technique in the field of Structural Engineering is Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). With piezo-electric sensors mounted to the surface of the structure, stress waves can be detected, recorded, and stored for later analysis. An important step in quantitative AE analysis is the estimation of the stress wave source locations. Commonly, source location results are presented in a rather deterministic manner as spatial and temporal points, excluding information about uncertainties and errors. Due to variability in the material properties and uncertainty in the mathematical model, measures of uncertainty are needed beyond best-fit point solutions for source locations. This paper introduces a novel holistic framework for the development of a probabilistic source location algorithm. Bayesian analysis methods with Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation are employed where all source location parameters are described with posterior probability density functions (PDFs). The proposed methodology is applied to an example employing data collected from a realistic section of a reinforced concrete bridge column. The selected approach is general and has the advantage that it can be extended and refined efficiently. Results are discussed and future steps to improve the algorithm are suggested.

  17. Nonlinear Kalman Filtering for acoustic emission source localization in anisotropic panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan Niri, E; Farhidzadeh, A; Salamone, S

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear Kalman Filtering is an established field in applied probability and control systems, which plays an important role in many practical applications from target tracking to weather and climate prediction. However, its application for acoustic emission (AE) source localization has been very limited. In this paper, two well-known nonlinear Kalman Filtering algorithms are presented to estimate the location of AE sources in anisotropic panels: the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF). These algorithms are applied to two cases: velocity profile known (CASE I) and velocity profile unknown (CASE II). The algorithms are compared with a more traditional nonlinear least squares method. Experimental tests are carried out on a carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel instrumented with a sparse array of piezoelectric transducers to validate the proposed approaches. AE sources are simulated using an instrumented miniature impulse hammer. In order to evaluate the performance of the algorithms, two metrics are used: (1) accuracy of the AE source localization and (2) computational cost. Furthermore, it is shown that both EKF and UKF can provide a confidence interval of the estimated AE source location and can account for uncertainty in time of flight measurements.

  18. Hydrocarbon emissions and characterization of methane sources in the Barnett Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, J. E.; Townsend-Small, A.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    As energy demand and costs continue to rise worldwide, so does the development of energy from natural gas. The United States in particular has expanded its natural gas industry, becoming one of the world's top gas producing countries. The Barnett Shale of northern Texas is one of the most developed and productive natural gas shale plays in the United States. However, emissions from the many oil and gas system components in the region have not been fully characterized. An extensive list of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was measured from 120 whole air canisters collected throughout the Barnett shale in October 2013. Known methane sources were targeted and included oil and natural gas well pads, compressor stations, distribution pipelines and city gates, cattle feedlots and landfills. C1-C5 alkanes were elevated throughout the region and were similar to or greater than concentrations in major U.S. cities. The VOC source signature for oil and gas operations was distinguished from biogenic sources. Average ethane content relative to methane was calculated for each of the source types, and ranged from 0.7 to 12.8%. For the whole region, the ethane content was 7.2±6.1%, illustrating the high variability and effect of the various hydrocarbon sources on the local air.

  19. Development of an ultrafast electron source based on a cold-field emission gun for ultrafast coherent TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Giuseppe Mario; Houdellier, Florent; Abeilhou, Pierre; Arbouet, Arnaud

    2017-07-01

    We report on the design of a femtosecond laser-driven electron source for ultrafast coherent transmission electron microscopy. The proposed architecture allows introducing an ultrafast laser beam inside the cold field emission source of a commercial TEM, aligning and focusing the laser spot on the apex of the nanoemitter. The modifications of the gun assembly do not deteriorate the performances of the electron source in conventional DC mode and allow easy switching between the conventional and ultrafast laser-driven emission modes. We describe here this ultrafast electron source and discuss its properties.

  20. A transition radiation detector for kaon/pion separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baake, M.; Diekmann, B.; Gebert, F.; Heinloth, K.; Holzkamp, S.; Koersgen, G.; Voigtlaender-Tetzner, A. (Bonn Univ. (Germany, F.R.)); Bagdassarian, L.; Kazarian, C.; Oganessian, A. (Erevanskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1989-09-01

    The experiment WA69 at the CERN Omega spectrometer facility has studied fixed target photon and hadron production of inclusive hadronic final states with tagged photon beams of 65-175 GeV in comparison to charged hadron beams ({pi} and K) of 80 and 140 GeV fixed energies. For the identification of final state pions and kaons above 100 GeV/c a transition radiation detector (TRAD) has been developed. This detector was constructed of 12 modules, each consisting of a polypropylene fibre radiator and a proportional chamber with a xenon/methane gas mixture to detect the transition radiation produced by fast moving charged particles. We give a description of the detector setup and working conditions. As a first result obtained with the TRAD the ratio of photoproduced kaons and pions in the extreme forward regime (x{sub F}>0.7 and -t<1 GeV{sup 2}) is measured to be 10.2(+-1.7)% which is in agreement with VDM predictions. (orig.).

  1. Search for a bound state of kaon and pion

    CERN Document Server

    Kishimoto, T; Hayakawa, T; Ajimura, S; Itabashi, T; Matsuoka, K; Minami, S; Mitoma, Y; Sakaguchi, A; Shimizu, Y; Terai, K; Sato, T; Noumi, H; Sekimoto, M; Takahashi, H; Fukuda, T; Imoto, W; Mizoi, Y

    2012-01-01

    We have searched for a bound state of kaon and pion denoted by $X$. The $X$ was conjectured to explain the so-called $\\Theta^+$ resonance as a bound state of kaon, pion and nucleon. This model explains almost all properties of the $\\Theta^+$, however, the model works only if the $K \\pi$ interaction is strongly attractive. It is so strong that it could make a bound state $X$. Here we report a result of the search for the $X$ by using the $K^+ + N \\rightarrow X^+ + N$ reaction at P$_K\\sim$ 1.2 GeV/c. The $X^+ \\rightarrow K^+ \\gamma \\gamma$ decay produces $K^+$ in momentum region where other processes cannot fill. We observed signature of the $X^+$ with statistical significance of 2 $\\sigma$. Production cross section of $X$ with respect to that of $\\pi^0$ is 1$\\pm$0.5% if we take it as an evidence and 1.5% if we set an upper limit.

  2. Probing CPT in transitions with entangled neutral kaons

    CERN Document Server

    Bernabeu, J; Villanueva-Perez, P

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel CPT symmetry test in the neutral kaon system based, for the first time, on the direct comparison of the probabilities of a transition and its CPT reverse. The required interchange of "in" $\\leftrightarrow$ "out" states for a given process is obtained exploiting the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations of neutral kaon pairs produced at a $\\phi$-factory. The observable quantities have been constructed by selecting the two semileptonic decays for flavour tag, the $\\pi\\pi$ and $3\\pi^0$ decays for CP tag and the time orderings of the decay pairs. The interpretation in terms of the standard Weisskopf-Wigner approach to this system, directly connects CPT violation in these observables to the violating $\\Re\\delta$ parameter in the mass matrix of $K^0$-$\\bar{K^0}$, a genuine CPT violating effect independent of $\\Delta \\Gamma$ and not requiring the decay as an essential ingredient. Possible spurious effects induced by CP violation in the decay and/or a violation of the $\\Delta S= \\Delta...

  3. Induced polarization of {\\Lambda}(1116) in kaon electroproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielyan, M; Carman, D S; Park, K; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Amaryan, M J; Pereira, S Anefalos; Avakian, H; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Baturin, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Bono, J; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Cao, T; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Cortes, O; Crede, V; DAngelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; Fassi, L El; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Fleming, J A; Forest, T A; Garillon, B; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Ho, D; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Jenkins, D; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Lenisa, P; Levine, W I; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J D; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mestayer, M D; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moody, C I; Moutarde, H; Movsisyan, A; Munevar, E; Camacho, C Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Osipenko, M; Pappalardo, L L; Paremuzyan, R; Pasyuk, E; Peng, P; Phelps, W; Phillips, J J; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Protopopescu, D; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Sabatie, F; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Simonyan, A; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Tang, W; Ungaro, M; Vlassov, A V; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhang, J

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the induced polarization of the ${\\Lambda}(1116)$ in the reaction $ep\\rightarrow e'K^+{\\Lambda}$, detecting the scattered $e'$ and $K^+$ in the final state along with the proton from the decay $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^-$.The present study used the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), which allowed for a large kinematic acceptance in invariant energy $W$ ($1.6\\leq W \\leq 2.7$ GeV) and covered the full range of the kaon production angle at an average momentum transfer $Q^2=1.90$ GeV$^2$.In this experiment a 5.50 GeV electron beam was incident upon an unpolarized liquid-hydrogen target. We have mapped out the $W$ and kaon production angle dependencies of the induced polarization and found striking differences from photoproduction data over most of the kinematic range studied. However, we also found that the induced polarization is essentially $Q^2$ independent in our kinematic domain, suggesting that somewhere below the $Q^2$ covered here there must be a strong $Q^2$ dependence. Along wit...

  4. Hotspots of gross emissions from the land use sector: patterns, uncertainties, and leading emission sources for the period 2000-2005 in the tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Cuesta, Rosa Maria; Rufino, Mariana C.; Herold, Martin; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Rosenstock, Todd S.; Herrero, Mario; Ogle, Stephen; Li, Changsheng; Poulter, Benjamin; Verchot, Louis; Martius, Christopher; Stuiver, John; de Bruin, Sytze

    2016-07-01

    According to the latest report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), emissions must be cut by 41-72 % below 2010 levels by 2050 for a likely chance of containing the global mean temperature increase to 2 °C. The AFOLU sector (Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use) contributes roughly a quarter ( ˜ 10-12 Pg CO2e yr-1) of the net anthropogenic GHG emissions mainly from deforestation, fire, wood harvesting, and agricultural emissions including croplands, paddy rice, and livestock. In spite of the importance of this sector, it is unclear where the regions with hotspots of AFOLU emissions are and how uncertain these emissions are. Here we present a novel, spatially comparable dataset containing annual mean estimates of gross AFOLU emissions (CO2, CH4, N2O), associated uncertainties, and leading emission sources, in a spatially disaggregated manner (0.5°) for the tropics for the period 2000-2005. Our data highlight the following: (i) the existence of AFOLU emissions hotspots on all continents, with particular importance of evergreen rainforest deforestation in Central and South America, fire in dry forests in Africa, and both peatland emissions and agriculture in Asia; (ii) a predominant contribution of forests and CO2 to the total AFOLU emissions (69 %) and to their uncertainties (98 %); (iii) higher gross fluxes from forests, which coincide with higher uncertainties, making agricultural hotspots appealing for effective mitigation action; and (iv) a lower contribution of non-CO2 agricultural emissions to the total gross emissions (ca. 25 %), with livestock (15.5 %) and rice (7 %) leading the emissions. Gross AFOLU tropical emissions of 8.0 (5.5-12.2) were in the range of other databases (8.4 and 8.0 Pg CO2e yr-1 in FAOSTAT and the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) respectively), but we offer a spatially detailed benchmark for monitoring progress in reducing emissions from the land sector in the tropics. The location of

  5. Sodium D-line emission in Comet West (1975n) and the sodium source in Comets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, M.

    1980-09-15

    A spectrum of the sodium D-line emission from Comet West (1975n) taken at heliocentric distance 1.4 AU is analyzed by comparing the D-line brightness to that in the underlying continuum. Using the observations of this comet by Ney and Merrill, we find that the dust grains which dominate the visible and infrared continua are too cool to to provide the observed sodium atoms through evaporation of sodium metal or a sodium compound from grain surfaces. Though sodium metal may evaporate from a small-grain component, we suggest that molecules embedded in the volatile nuclear matrix are a more plausible source of sodium. The relationship between this source and the interstellar sodium abundance is discussed.

  6. Bright and durable field emission source derived from refractory taylor cones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Gregory

    2016-12-20

    A method of producing field emitters having improved brightness and durability relying on the creation of a liquid Taylor cone from electrically conductive materials having high melting points. The method calls for melting the end of a wire substrate with a focused laser beam, while imposing a high positive potential on the material. The resulting molten Taylor cone is subsequently rapidly quenched by cessation of the laser power. Rapid quenching is facilitated in large part by radiative cooling, resulting in structures having characteristics closely matching that of the original liquid Taylor cone. Frozen Taylor cones thus obtained yield desirable tip end forms for field emission sources in electron beam applications. Regeneration of the frozen Taylor cones in-situ is readily accomplished by repeating the initial formation procedures. The high temperature liquid Taylor cones can also be employed as bright ion sources with chemical elements previously considered impractical to implement.

  7. Atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyls in Indian cities: levels, emission sources and toxicity equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Paromita; Zhang, Gan; Eckhardt, Sabine; Li, Jun; Breivik, Knut; Lam, Paul K S; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Jones, Kevin C

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric concentration of Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured on diurnal basis by active air sampling during Dec 2006 to Feb 2007 in seven major cities from the northern (New Delhi and Agra), eastern (Kolkata), western (Mumbai and Goa) and southern (Chennai and Bangalore) parts of India. Average concentration of Σ25PCBs in the Indian atmosphere was 4460 (± 2200) pg/m(-3) with a dominance of congeners with 4-7 chlorine atoms. Model results (HYSPLIT, FLEXPART) indicate that the source areas are likely confined to local or regional proximity. Results from the FLEXPART model show that existing emission inventories cannot explain the high concentrations observed for PCB-28. Electronic waste, ship breaking activities and dumped solid waste are attributed as the possible sources of PCBs in India. Σ25PCB concentrations for each city showed significant linear correlation with Toxicity equivalence (TEQ) and Neurotoxic equivalence (NEQ) values.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of emission controls on primary and secondary organic aerosol sources during Beijing 2008 Olympics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To assess the primary and secondary sources of fine organic aerosols after the aggressive implementation of air pollution controls during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, 12 h PM2.5 values were measured at an urban site at Peking University (PKU and an upwind rural site at Yufa during the CAREBEIJING-2008 (Campaigns of Air quality REsearch in BEIJING and surrounding region summer field campaign. The average PM2.5 concentrations were 72.5 ± 43.6 μg m−3 and 64.3 ± 36.2 μg m−3 (average ± standard deviation, below as the same at PKU and Yufa, respectively, showing the lowest concentrations in recent years. Combining the results from a CMB (chemical mass balance model and secondary organic aerosol (SOA tracer-yield model, five primary and four secondary fine organic aerosol sources were compared with the results from previous studies in Beijing. The relative contribution of mobile sources to PM2.5 concentrations was increased in 2008, with diesel engines contributing 16.2 ± 5.9% and 14.5 ± 4.1% and gasoline vehicles contributing 10.3 ± 8.7% and 7.9 ± 6.2% to organic carbon (OC at PKU and Yufa, respectively. Due to the implementation of emission controls, the absolute OC concentrations from primary sources were reduced during the Olympics, and the contributions from secondary formation of OC represented a larger relative source of fine organic aerosols. Compared with the non-controlled period prior to the Olympics, primary vehicle contributions were reduced by 30% at the urban site and 24% at the rural site. The reductions in coal combustion contributions were 57% at PKU and 7% at Yufa. Our results demonstrate that the emission control measures implemented in 2008 significantly alleviated the primary organic particle pollution in and around Beijing. However, additional studies are needed to provide a more comprehensive assessment of the emission control effectiveness on SOA formation.

  9. Quantitative evaluation of emission controls on primary and secondary organic aerosol sources during Beijing 2008 Olympics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S.; Hu, M.; Guo, Q.; Zhang, X.; Schauer, J. J.; Zhang, R.

    2013-08-01

    To assess the primary and secondary sources of fine organic aerosols after the aggressive implementation of air pollution controls during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, 12 h PM2.5 values were measured at an urban site at Peking University (PKU) and an upwind rural site at Yufa during the CAREBEIJING-2008 (Campaigns of Air quality REsearch in BEIJING and surrounding region) summer field campaign. The average PM2.5 concentrations were 72.5 ± 43.6 μg m-3 and 64.3 ± 36.2 μg m-3 (average ± standard deviation, below as the same) at PKU and Yufa, respectively, showing the lowest concentrations in recent years. Combining the results from a CMB (chemical mass balance) model and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracer-yield model, five primary and four secondary fine organic aerosol sources were compared with the results from previous studies in Beijing. The relative contribution of mobile sources to PM2.5 concentrations was increased in 2008, with diesel engines contributing 16.2 ± 5.9% and 14.5 ± 4.1% and gasoline vehicles contributing 10.3 ± 8.7% and 7.9 ± 6.2% to organic carbon (OC) at PKU and Yufa, respectively. Due to the implementation of emission controls, the absolute OC concentrations from primary sources were reduced during the Olympics, and the contributions from secondary formation of OC represented a larger relative source of fine organic aerosols. Compared with the non-controlled period prior to the Olympics, primary vehicle contributions were reduced by 30% at the urban site and 24% at the rural site. The reductions in coal combustion contributions were 57% at PKU and 7% at Yufa. Our results demonstrate that the emission control measures implemented in 2008 significantly alleviated the primary organic particle pollution in and around Beijing. However, additional studies are needed to provide a more comprehensive assessment of the emission control effectiveness on SOA formation.

  10. Reconstructing Emission from Pre-Reionization Sources with Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuation Measurements by the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Helgason, K.; Arendt, R. G.; Bromm, V.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    We present new methodology to use cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to probe sources at 10 less than or approx. equal to z less than or approx. equal to 30 from a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) NIRCam configuration that will isolate known galaxies to 28 AB mag at 0.55 m. At present significant mutually consistent source-subtracted CIB fluctuations have been identified in the Spitzer and AKARI data at 25 m, but we demonstrate internal inconsistencies at shorter wavelengths in the recent CIBER data. We evaluate CIB contributions from remaining galaxies and show that the bulk of the high-z sources will be in the confusion noise of the NIRCam beam, requiring CIB studies. The accurate measurement of the angular spectrum of the fluctuations and probing the dependence of its clustering component on the remaining shot noise power would discriminate between the various currently proposed models for their origin and probe the flux distribution of its sources. We show that the contribution to CIB fluctuations from remaining galaxies is large at visible wavelengths for the current instruments precluding probing the putative Lyman-break of the CIB fluctuations. We demonstrate that with the proposed JWST configuration such measurements will enable probing the Lyman-break. We develop a Lyman-break tomography method to use the NIRCam wavelength coverage to identify or constrain, via the adjacent two-band subtraction, the history of emissions over 10 less than or approx. equal to z less than or approx. equal to 30 as the universe comes out of the Dark Ages. We apply the proposed tomography to the current SpitzerIRAC measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 m, to find that it already leads to interestingly low upper limit on emissions at z greater than or approx. equal to 30.

  11. Reconstructing Emission from Pre-reionization Sources with Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuation Measurements by the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Helgason, K.; Arendt, R. G.; Bromm, V.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-05-01

    We present new methodology to use cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to probe sources at 10≲ z≲ 30 from a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)/NIRCam configuration that will isolate known galaxies to 28 AB mag at 0.5-5 μm. At present significant mutually consistent source-subtracted CIB fluctuations have been identified in the Spitzer and AKARI data at ˜2-5 μm, but we demonstrate internal inconsistencies at shorter wavelengths in the recent CIBER data. We evaluate CIB contributions from remaining galaxies and show that the bulk of the high-z sources will be in the confusion noise of the NIRCam beam, requiring CIB studies. The accurate measurement of the angular spectrum of the fluctuations and probing the dependence of its clustering component on the remaining shot noise power would discriminate between the various currently proposed models for their origin and probe the flux distribution of its sources. We show that the contribution to CIB fluctuations from remaining galaxies is large at visible wavelengths for the current instruments precluding probing the putative Lyman-break of the CIB fluctuations. We demonstrate that with the proposed JWST configuration such measurements will enable probing the Lyman-break. We develop a Lyman-break tomography method to use the NIRCam wavelength coverage to identify or constrain, via the adjacent two-band subtraction, the history of emissions over 10≲ z≲ 30 as the universe comes out of the “Dark Ages.” We apply the proposed tomography to the current Spitzer/IRAC measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, to find that it already leads to interestingly low upper limit on emissions at z≳ 30.

  12. Insights into PM10 sources in Houston, Texas: Role of petroleum refineries in enriching lanthanoid metals during episodic emission events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozlaker, Ayşe; Buzcu-Güven, Birnur; Fraser, Matthew P.; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2013-04-01

    Petroleum refineries may emit large quantities of pollutants during non-routine operations that include start-ups and shutdowns, planned maintenance, and unplanned equipment failures. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) tracks such events by requiring industries to self-report estimates of these emissions because they often have a detrimental impact on local air quality and potentially, public health. An inventory of non-routine episodic emission events is available via TCEQ's website. However, there is on-going concern that such episodic emissions are sometimes under-reported or even not cataloged. Herein, we present concentrations of 42 main group, transition, and lanthanoid elements in 114 time-resolved (3 or 6 h) samples collected over a 1-month period. We also develop strategies to identify aerosol sources using elemental tracers and compare source apportionment (performed by positive matrix factorization) based on ambient measurements to inventoried non-routine emission events. Through interpretation of key marker elements, five sources impacting concentrations of metals in PM10 were identified and calculated to contribute 73% of the measured PM10 mass. On average, primary emissions from fluidized-bed catalytic cracking (FCC) units negligibly contributed to apportioned PM10 mass. However, 35 samples were identified as impacted by transient PM10 emissions from FCC units because of elevated levels of lanthanoid metals and their ratios. Only 31 of these 35 samples coincided with self-reported non-routine emission events. Further, roughly half of the emission event self-reports detailed only emissions of gaseous pollutants. Based on this, we posit that not all PM10 emission events are reported and even self-reported emission events are incomplete - those that only catalog gaseous pollutants may also include unreported PM emissions.

  13. Methyl chloride and methyl bromide emissions from baking: an unrecognized anthropogenic source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Brett F; Horst, Axel; Carrizo, Daniel; Holmstrand, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Methyl chloride and methyl bromide (CH3Cl and CH3Br) are the largest natural sources of chlorine and bromine, respectively, to the stratosphere, where they contribute to ozone depletion. We report the anthropogenic production of CH3Cl and CH3Br during breadbaking, and suggest this production is an abiotic process involving the methyl ester functional groups in pectin and lignin structural polymers of plant cells. Wide variations in baking styles allow only rough estimates of this flux of methyl halides on a global basis. A simple model suggests that CH3Br emissions from breadbaking likely peaked circa 1990 at approximately 200tonnes per year (about 0.3% of industrial production), prior to restrictions on the dough conditioner potassium bromate. In contrast, CH3Cl emissions from breadbaking may be of similar magnitude as acknowledged present-day CH3Cl industrial emissions. Because the mechanisms involve functional groups and compounds widely found in plant materials, this type of methyl halide production may occur in other cooking techniques as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Biological sources and sinks of nitrous oxide and strategies to mitigate emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Andrew J; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Pretty, Jules; Baggs, Elizabeth M; Richardson, David J

    2012-05-05

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is a powerful atmospheric greenhouse gas and cause of ozone layer depletion. Global emissions continue to rise. More than two-thirds of these emissions arise from bacterial and fungal denitrification and nitrification processes in soils, largely as a result of the application of nitrogenous fertilizers. This article summarizes the outcomes of an interdisciplinary meeting, 'Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) the forgotten greenhouse gas', held at the Kavli Royal Society International Centre, from 23 to 24 May 2011. It provides an introduction and background to the nature of the problem, and summarizes the conclusions reached regarding the biological sources and sinks of N(2)O in oceans, soils and wastewaters, and discusses the genetic regulation and molecular details of the enzymes responsible. Techniques for providing global and local N(2)O budgets are discussed. The findings of the meeting are drawn together in a review of strategies for mitigating N(2)O emissions, under three headings, namely: (i) managing soil chemistry and microbiology, (ii) engineering crop plants to fix nitrogen, and (iii) sustainable agricultural intensification.

  15. A New Diagnostic Diagram of Ionization Source for High Redshift Emission Line Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new diagram, the Kinematic-Excitation diagram (KEx diagram), which uses the [OIII]/H\\beta\\ line ratio and the [OIII]5007 emission line width (\\sigma_{[OIII]}) to diagnose the ionization source and physical properties of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) and the star-forming galaxies (SFGs). The KEx diagram is a suitable tool to classify emission-line galaxies (ELGs) at intermediate redshift because it uses only the [OIII]5007 and H\\beta\\ emission lines. We use the SDSS DR7 main galaxy sample and the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich (BPT) diagnostic to calibrate the diagram at low redshift. We find that the diagram can be divided into 3 regions: one occupied mainly by the pure AGNs (KEx-AGN region), one dominated by composite galaxies (KEx-composite region), and one contains mostly SFGs (KEx-SFG region). AGNs are separated from SFGs in this diagram mainly because they preferentially reside in luminous and massive galaxies and have high [OIII]/H\\beta. The separation of AGN from star-forming galaxies is e...

  16. Sources of and processes controlling CO2 emissions change with the size of streams and rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkiss, E. R.; Hall, R. O., Jr.; Sponseller, R. A.; Butman, D.; Klaminder, J.; Laudon, H.; Rosvall, M.; Karlsson, J.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) evasion from streams and rivers to the atmosphere represents a substantial flux in the global carbon cycle. The proportions of CO2 emitted from streams and rivers that come from terrestrially derived CO2 or from CO2 produced within freshwater ecosystems through aquatic metabolism are not well quantified. Here we estimated CO2 emissions from running waters in the contiguous United States, based on freshwater chemical and physical characteristics and modelled gas transfer velocities at 1463 United States Geological Survey monitoring sites. We then assessed CO2 production from aquatic metabolism, compiled from previously published measurements of net ecosystem production from 187 streams and rivers across the contiguous United States. We find that CO2 produced by aquatic metabolism contributes about 28% of CO2 evasion from streams and rivers with flows between 0.0001 and 19,000 m3 s-1. We mathematically modelled CO2 flux from groundwater into running waters along a stream-river continuum to evaluate the relationship between stream size and CO2 source. Terrestrially derived CO2 dominates emissions from small streams, and the percentage of CO2 emissions from aquatic metabolism increases with stream size. We suggest that the relative role of rivers as conduits for terrestrial CO2 efflux and as reactors mineralizing terrestrial organic carbon is a function of their size and connectivity with landscapes.

  17. Sources of High-Energy Emission in the Green Pea Galaxies: New Constraints from Magellan Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Derek Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The recently discovered Green Pea galaxies display extreme starburst activity and may be some of the only possible Lyman continuum emitting galaxies at low redshift. Green Peas are characterized by their unusually high [O III]/[O II] ratios, similar to the ratios observed in high-redshift galaxies. In addition, the presence of the high-energy He II 4686 line shows that the Green Peas are highly ionized. However, the origin of the He II emission in the Green Peas, and many other starburst galaxies, is still an open question. We analyze IMACS and MagE spectra from the Magellan telescopes in order to evaluate the most probable cause of this He II emission. We also analyze other properties like dust content, temperature and density, and kinematic components. Our IMACS spectra show no Wolf-Rayet (WR) features. We set upper limits on the WR populations in our sample and conclude that Wolf-Rayet stars are not a likely candidate for the He II emission. With deeper MagE spectra we investigate energetic shocks as a possible source of the He II, and move one step closer to uncovering the origin of high-energy photons in these unique starbursts.

  18. A study of diffuse radio sources and X-ray emission in six massive clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Parekh, Viral; Kale, Ruta; Intema, Huib

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to extend our current knowledge of the diffuse radio source (halo and relic) populations to $z$ $>$ 0.3. Here we report GMRT and EVLA radio observations of six galaxy clusters taken from the MAssive Cluster Survey (MACS) catalogue to detect diffuse radio emission. We used archival GMRT (150, 235 and 610 MHz) and EVLA (L band) data and made images at multiple radio frequencies of the following six clusters - MACSJ0417.5-1154, MACSJ1131.8-1955, MACSJ0308.9+2645, MACSJ2243.3-0935, MACSJ2228.5+2036 and MACSJ0358.8-2955. We detect diffuse radio emission (halo or relic or both) in the first four clusters. In the last two clusters we do not detect any diffuse radio emission but we put stringent upper-limits on their radio powers. We also use archival {\\it Chandra} X-ray data to carry out morphology and substructure analysis of these clusters. We find that based on X-ray data, these MACS clusters are non-relaxed and show substructures in their temperature distribution. The radio power...

  19. The importance of vehicle emissions as a source of atmospheric ammonia in the megacity of Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yunhua; Zou, Zhong; Deng, Congrui; Huang, Kan; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Lin, Jing; Zhuang, Guoshun

    2016-03-01

    Agricultural activities are a major source contributing to NH3 emissions in Shanghai and most other regions of China; however, there is a long-standing and ongoing controversy regarding the contributions of vehicle-emitted NH3 to the urban atmosphere. From April 2014 to April 2015, we conducted measurements of a wide range of gases (including NH3) and the chemical properties of PM2.5 at hourly resolution at a Shanghai urban supersite. This large data set shows NH3 pollution events, lasting several hours with concentrations 4 times the annual average of 5.3 µg m-3, caused by the burning of crop residues in spring. There are also generally higher NH3 concentrations (mean ± 1 σ) in summer (7.3 ± 4.9 µg m-3; n = 2181) because of intensive emissions from temperature-dependent agricultural sources. However, the NH3 concentration in summer was only an average of 2.4 µg m-3 or 41 % higher than the average NH3 concentration of other seasons. Furthermore, the NH3 concentration in winter (5.0 ± 3.7 µg m-3; n = 2113) was similar to that in spring (5.1 ± 3.8 µg m-3; n = 2198) but slightly higher, on average, than that in autumn (4.5 ± 2.3 µg m-3; n = 1949). Moreover, other meteorological parameters like planetary boundary layer height and relative humidity were not major factors affecting seasonal NH3 concentrations. These findings suggest that there may be some climate-independent NH3 sources present in the Shanghai urban area. Independent of season, the concentrations of both NH3 and CO present a marked bimodal diurnal profile, with maxima in the morning and the evening. A spatial analysis suggests that elevated concentrations of NH3 are often associated with transport from regions west-northwest and east-southeast of the city, areas with dense road systems. The spatial origin of NH3 and the diurnal concentration profile together suggest the importance of vehicle-derived NH3 associated with daily commuting in the urban environment. To further examine vehicular NH3

  20. Photoelectron Emission from Metal Surfaces Induced by Radiation Emitted by a 14 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source

    CERN Document Server

    Laulainen, Janne; Koivisto, Hannu; Komppula, Jani; Kronholm, Risto; Tarvainen, Olli

    2015-01-01

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a room-temperature 14 GHz ECR ion source. It is shown that the photoelectron emission from Al, Cu, and stainless steel (SAE 304) surfaces, which are common plasma chamber materials, is predominantly caused by radiation emitted from plasma with energies between 8 eV and 1 keV. Characteristic X-ray emission and bremsstrahlung from plasma have a negligible contribution to the photoelectron emission. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum conceivable photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 10 % of the estimated total electron losses from the plasma.

  1. Photoelectron emission from metal surfaces induced by radiation emitted by a 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulainen, Janne; Kalvas, Taneli; Koivisto, Hannu; Komppula, Jani; Kronholm, Risto; Tarvainen, Olli

    2016-02-01

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a room-temperature 14 GHz ECR ion source. It is shown that the photoelectron emission from Al, Cu, and stainless steel (SAE 304) surfaces, which are common plasma chamber materials, is predominantly caused by radiation emitted from plasma with energies between 8 eV and 1 keV. Characteristic X-ray emission and bremsstrahlung from plasma have a negligible contribution to the photoelectron emission. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum conceivable photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 10% of the estimated total electron losses from the plasma.

  2. Photoelectron emission from metal surfaces induced by radiation emitted by a 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laulainen, Janne, E-mail: janne.p.laulainen@student.jyu.fi; Kalvas, Taneli; Koivisto, Hannu; Komppula, Jani; Kronholm, Risto; Tarvainen, Olli [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaskyla (Finland)

    2016-02-15

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a room-temperature 14 GHz ECR ion source. It is shown that the photoelectron emission from Al, Cu, and stainless steel (SAE 304) surfaces, which are common plasma chamber materials, is predominantly caused by radiation emitted from plasma with energies between 8 eV and 1 keV. Characteristic X-ray emission and bremsstrahlung from plasma have a negligible contribution to the photoelectron emission. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum conceivable photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 10% of the estimated total electron losses from the plasma.

  3. Point-source and diffuse high-energy neutrino emission from Type IIn supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, M.; Coenders, S.; Vasilopoulos, G.; Kamble, A.; Sironi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Type IIn supernovae (SNe), a rare subclass of core collapse SNe, explode in dense circumstellar media that have been modified by the SNe progenitors at their last evolutionary stages. The interaction of the freely expanding SN ejecta with the circumstellar medium gives rise to a shock wave propagating in the dense SN environment, which may accelerate protons to multi-PeV energies. Inelastic proton-proton collisions between the shock-accelerated protons and those of the circumstellar medium lead to multimessenger signatures. Here, we evaluate the possible neutrino signal of Type IIn SNe and compare with IceCube observations. We employ a Monte Carlo method for the calculation of the diffuse neutrino emission from the SN IIn class to account for the spread in their properties. The cumulative neutrino emission is found to be ∼10 per cent of the observed IceCube neutrino flux above 60 TeV. Type IIn SNe would be the dominant component of the diffuse astrophysical flux, only if 4 per cent of all core collapse SNe were of this type and 20-30 per cent of the shock energy was channeled to accelerated protons. Lower values of the acceleration efficiency are accessible by the observation of a single Type IIn SN as a neutrino point source with IceCube using up-going muon neutrinos. Such an identification is possible in the first year following the SN shock breakout for sources within 20 Mpc.

  4. Nature of air pollution, emission sources, and management in the Indian cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttikunda, Sarath K.; Goel, Rahul; Pant, Pallavi

    2014-10-01

    The global burden of disease study estimated 695,000 premature deaths in 2010 due to continued exposure to outdoor particulate matter and ozone pollution for India. By 2030, the expected growth in many of the sectors (industries, residential, transportation, power generation, and construction) will result in an increase in pollution related health impacts for most cities. The available information on urban air pollution, their sources, and the potential of various interventions to control pollution, should help us propose a cleaner path to 2030. In this paper, we present an overview of the emission sources and control options for better air quality in Indian cities, with a particular focus on interventions like urban public transportation facilities; travel demand management; emission regulations for power plants; clean technology for brick kilns; management of road dust; and waste management to control open waste burning. Also included is a broader discussion on key institutional measures, like public awareness and scientific studies, necessary for building an effective air quality management plan in Indian cities.

  5. Time-distance domain transformation for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin metallic plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Gawronski, Mateusz; Baran, Ireneusz; Spychalski, Wojciech; Staszewski, Wieslaw J; Uhl, Tadeusz; Kundu, Tribikram; Packo, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Emission used in Non-Destructive Testing is focused on analysis of elastic waves propagating in mechanical structures. Then any information carried by generated acoustic waves, further recorded by a set of transducers, allow to determine integrity of these structures. It is clear that material properties and geometry strongly impacts the result. In this paper a method for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin plates is presented. The approach is based on the Time-Distance Domain Transform, that is a wavenumber-frequency mapping technique for precise event localization. The major advantage of the technique is dispersion compensation through a phase-shifting of investigated waveforms in order to acquire the most accurate output, allowing for source-sensor distance estimation using a single transducer. The accuracy and robustness of the above process are also investigated. This includes the study of Young's modulus value and numerical parameters influence on damage detection. By merging the Time-Distance Domain Transform with an optimal distance selection technique, an identification-localization algorithm is achieved. The method is investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. The latter involves both laboratory and large scale industrial tests.

  6. Simultaneous reconstruction of emission activity and attenuation coefficient distribution from TOF data, acquired with external transmission source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panin, V Y; Aykac, M; Casey, M E

    2013-06-07

    The simultaneous PET data reconstruction of emission activity and attenuation coefficient distribution is presented, where the attenuation image is constrained by exploiting an external transmission source. Data are acquired in time-of-flight (TOF) mode, allowing in principle for separation of emission and transmission data. Nevertheless, here all data are reconstructed at once, eliminating the need to trace the position of the transmission source in sinogram space. Contamination of emission data by the transmission source and vice versa is naturally modeled. Attenuated emission activity data also provide additional information about object attenuation coefficient values. The algorithm alternates between attenuation and emission activity image updates. We also proposed a method of estimation of spatial scatter distribution from the transmission source by incorporating knowledge about the expected range of attenuation map values. The reconstruction of experimental data from the Siemens mCT scanner suggests that simultaneous reconstruction improves attenuation map image quality, as compared to when data are separated. In the presented example, the attenuation map image noise was reduced and non-uniformity artifacts that occurred due to scatter estimation were suppressed. On the other hand, the use of transmission data stabilizes attenuation coefficient distribution reconstruction from TOF emission data alone. The example of improving emission images by refining a CT-based patient attenuation map is presented, revealing potential benefits of simultaneous CT and PET data reconstruction.

  7. Diverse origins of Arctic and Subarctic methane point source emissions identified with multiply-substituted isotopologues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P. M. J.; Stolper, D. A.; Smith, D. A.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Paull, C. K.; Dallimore, S.; Wik, M.; Crill, P. M.; Winterdahl, M.; Eiler, J. M.; Sessions, A. L.

    2016-09-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and there are concerns that its natural emissions from the Arctic could act as a substantial positive feedback to anthropogenic global warming. Determining the sources of methane emissions and the biogeochemical processes controlling them is important for understanding present and future Arctic contributions to atmospheric methane budgets. Here we apply measurements of multiply-substituted isotopologues, or clumped isotopes, of methane as a new tool to identify the origins of ebullitive fluxes in Alaska, Sweden and the Arctic Ocean. When methane forms in isotopic equilibrium, clumped isotope measurements indicate the formation temperature. In some microbial methane, however, non-equilibrium isotope effects, probably related to the kinetics of methanogenesis, lead to low clumped isotope values. We identify four categories of emissions in the studied samples: thermogenic methane, deep subsurface or marine microbial methane formed in isotopic equilibrium, freshwater microbial methane with non-equilibrium clumped isotope values, and mixtures of deep and shallow methane (i.e., combinations of the first three end members). Mixing between deep and shallow methane sources produces a non-linear variation in clumped isotope values with mixing proportion that provides new constraints for the formation environment of the mixing end-members. Analyses of microbial methane emitted from lakes, as well as a methanol-consuming methanogen pure culture, support the hypothesis that non-equilibrium clumped isotope values are controlled, in part, by kinetic isotope effects induced during enzymatic reactions involved in methanogenesis. Our results indicate that these kinetic isotope effects vary widely in microbial methane produced in Arctic lake sediments, with non-equilibrium Δ18 values spanning a range of more than 5‰.

  8. Applying geochemical signatures of atmospheric dust to distinguish current mine emissions from legacy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chenyin; Taylor, Mark Patrick

    2017-07-01

    Resolving the source of environmental contamination is the critical first step in remediation and exposure prevention. Australia's oldest silver-zinc-lead mine at Broken Hill (>130 years old) has generated a legacy of contamination and is associated with persistent elevated childhood blood lead (Pb) levels. However, the source of environmental Pb remains in dispute: current mine emissions; remobilized mine-legacy lead in soils and dusts; and natural lead from geological weathering of the gossan ore body. Multiple lines of evidence used to resolve this conundrum at Broken Hill include spatial and temporal variations in dust Pb concentrations and bioaccessibility, Pb isotopic compositions, particle morphology and mineralogy. Total dust Pb loading (mean 255 μg/m2/day) and its bioaccessibility (mean 75% of total Pb) is greatest adjacent to the active mining operations. Unweathered galena (PbS) found in contemporary dust deposits contrast markedly to Pb-bearing particles from mine-tailings and weathered gossan samples. Contemporary dust particles were more angular, had higher sulfur content and had little or no iron and manganese. Dust adjacent to the mine has Pb isotopic compositions (208Pb/207Pb: 2.3197; 206Pb/207Pb: 1.0406) that are a close match (99%) to the ore body with values slightly lower (94%) at the edge of the city. The weight of evidence supports the conclusion that contemporary dust Pb contamination in Broken Hill is sourced primarily from current mining activities and not from weathering or legacy sources.

  9. A Bayesian Approach for Localization of Acoustic Emission Source in Plate-Like Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Bayesian approach for localizing acoustic emission (AE source in plate-like structures with consideration of uncertainties from modeling error and measurement noise. A PZT sensor network is deployed to monitor and acquire AE wave signals released by possible damage. By using continuous wavelet transform (CWT, the time-of-flight (TOF information of the AE wave signals is extracted and measured. With a theoretical TOF model, a Bayesian parameter identification procedure is developed to obtain the AE source location and the wave velocity at a specific frequency simultaneously and meanwhile quantify their uncertainties. It is based on Bayes’ theorem that the posterior distributions of the parameters about the AE source location and the wave velocity are obtained by relating their priors and the likelihood of the measured time difference data. A Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm is employed to draw samples to approximate the posteriors. Also, a data fusion scheme is performed to fuse results identified at multiple frequencies to increase accuracy and reduce uncertainty of the final localization results. Experimental studies on a stiffened aluminum panel with simulated AE events by pensile lead breaks (PLBs are conducted to validate the proposed Bayesian AE source localization approach.

  10. Dimethylsulphide (DMS emissions from the western Pacific Ocean: a potential marine source for stratospheric sulphur?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Marandino

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sea surface and atmospheric measurements of dimethylsulphide (DMS were performed during the TransBrom cruise in the western Pacific Ocean between Japan and Australia in October 2009. Air–sea DMS fluxes were computed between 0 and 30 μmol m−2 d−1, which are in agreement with those computed by the current climatology, and peak emissions of marine DMS into the atmosphere were found during the occurrence of tropical storm systems. Atmospheric variability in DMS, however, did not follow that of the computed fluxes and was more related to atmospheric transport processes. The computed emissions were used as input fields for the Lagrangian dispersion model FLEXPART, which was set up with actual meteorological fields from ERA-Interim data and different chemical lifetimes of DMS. A comparison with aircraft in situ data from the adjacent HIPPO2 campaign revealed an overall good agreement between modelled versus observed DMS profiles over the tropical western Pacific Ocean. Based on observed DMS emissions and meteorological fields along the cruise track, the model projected that up to 30 g S per month in the form of DMS, emitted from an area of 6 × 104 m2, can be transported above 17 km. This surprisingly large DMS entrainment into the stratosphere is disproportionate to the regional extent of the area of emissions and mainly due to the high convective activity in this region as simulated by the transport model. Thus, if DMS can cross the tropical tropopause layer (TTL, we suggest that the considerably larger area of the tropical western Pacific Ocean can be a source of sulphur to the stratosphere, which has not been considered as yet.

  11. Field determination of multipollutant, open area combustion source emission factors with a hexacopter unmanned aerial vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurell, J.; Mitchell, W.; Chirayath, V.; Jonsson, J.; Tabor, D.; Gullett, B.

    2017-10-01

    An emission sensor/sampler system was coupled to a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) hexacopter unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to characterize gases and particles in the plumes emitted from open burning of military ordnance. The UAV/sampler was tested at two field sites with test and sampling flights spanning over 16 h of flight time. The battery-operated UAV was remotely maneuvered into the plumes at distances from the pilot of over 600 m and at altitudes of up to 122 m above ground level. While the flight duration could be affected by sampler payload (3.2-4.6 kg) and meteorological conditions, the 57 sampling flights, ranging from 4 to 12 min, were typically terminated when the plume concentrations of CO2 were diluted to near ambient levels. Two sensor/sampler systems, termed ;Kolibri,; were variously configured to measure particulate matter, metals, chloride, perchlorate, volatile organic compounds, chlorinated dioxins/furans, and nitrogen-based organics for determination of emission factors. Gas sensors were selected based on their applicable concentration range, light weight, freedom from interferents, and response/recovery times. Samplers were designed, constructed, and operated based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methods and quality control criteria. Results show agreement with published emission factors and good reproducibility (e.g., 26% relative standard deviation for PM2.5). The UAV/Kolibri represents a significant advance in multipollutant emission characterization capabilities for open area sources, safely and effectively making measurements heretofore deemed too hazardous for personnel or beyond the reach of land-based samplers.

  12. Periodic shock-emission from acoustically driven cavitation clouds: a source of the subharmonic signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Keith; Tapia-Siles, Cecilia; Gerold, Bjoern; Postema, Michiel; Cochran, Sandy; Cuschieri, Alfred; Prentice, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Single clouds of cavitation bubbles, driven by 254kHz focused ultrasound at pressure amplitudes in the range of 0.48-1.22MPa, have been observed via high-speed shadowgraphic imaging at 1×10(6) frames per second. Clouds underwent repetitive growth, oscillation and collapse (GOC) cycles, with shock-waves emitted periodically at the instant of collapse during each cycle. The frequency of cloud collapse, and coincident shock-emission, was primarily dependent on the intensity of the focused ultrasound driving the activity. The lowest peak-to-peak pressure amplitude of 0.48MPa generated shock-waves with an average period of 7.9±0.5μs, corresponding to a frequency of f0/2, half-harmonic to the fundamental driving. Increasing the intensity gave rise to GOC cycles and shock-emission periods of 11.8±0.3, 15.8±0.3, 19.8±0.2μs, at pressure amplitudes of 0.64, 0.92 and 1.22MPa, corresponding to the higher-order subharmonics of f0/3, f0/4 and f0/5, respectively. Parallel passive acoustic detection, filtered for the fundamental driving, revealed features that correlated temporally to the shock-emissions observed via high-speed imaging, p(two-tailed) subharmonic spectral peaks, in the frequency domain. The larger cavitation clouds (>200μm diameter, at maximum inflation), that developed under insonations of peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes >1.0MPa, emitted shock-waves with two or more fronts suggesting non-uniform collapse of the cloud. The observations indicate that periodic shock-emissions from acoustically driven cavitation clouds provide a source for the cavitation subharmonic signal, and that shock structure may be used to study intra-cloud dynamics at sub-microsecond timescales.

  13. Collins and Sivers asymmetries in muonproduction of pions and kaons off transversely polarised protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Adolph

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the Collins and Sivers asymmetries for charged pions and charged and neutral kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of high energy muons off transversely polarised protons are presented. The results were obtained using all the available COMPASS proton data, which were taken in the years 2007 and 2010. The Collins asymmetries exhibit in the valence region a non-zero signal for pions and there are hints of non-zero signal also for kaons. The Sivers asymmetries are found to be positive for positive pions and kaons and compatible with zero otherwise.

  14. Collins and Sivers asymmetries in muonproduction of pions and kaons off transversely polarised proton

    CERN Document Server

    Adolph, C; Alexeev, M G; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Andrieux, V; Anosov, V; Austregesilo, A; Badełek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Baum, G; Beck, R; Bedfer, Y; Berlin, A; Bernhard, J; Bicker, K; Bieling, J; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bodlak, M; Boer, M; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Braun, C; Bressan, A; Büchele, M; Burtin, E; Capozza, L; Chiosso, M; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Crespo, M L; Curiel, Q; Dalla Torre, S; Dasgupta, S S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O Yu; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Duic, V; Dünnweber, W; Dziewiecki, M; Efremov, A; Elia, C; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Filin, A; Finger, M; Finger jr , M; Fischer, H; Franco, C; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S; Geyer, R; Gnesi, I; Gobbo, B; Goertz, S; Gorzellik, M; Grabmüller, S; Grasso, A; Grube, B; Grussenmeyer, T; Guskov, A; Guthörl, T; Haas, F; von Harrach, D; Hahne, D; Hashimoto, R; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Hinterberger, F; Höppner, Ch; Horikawa, N; d’Hose, N; Huber, S; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, A; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jary, V; Jasinski, P; Jörg, P; Joosten, R; Kabuß, E; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Königsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Krämer, M; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuchinski, N; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Kurjata, R P; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levillain, M; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Marchand, C; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matousek, J; Matsuda, H; Matsuda, T; Meshcheryakov, G; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu V; Miyachi, Y; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nerling, F; Neubert, S; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Novy, J; Nowak, W -D; Nunes, A S; Olshevsky, A G; Orlov, I; Ostrick, M; Panknin, R; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Peshekhonov, D V; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Quaresma, M; Quintans, C; Ramos, S; Regali, C; Reicherz, G; Rocco, E; Rossiyskaya, N S; Ryabchikov, D I; Rychter, A; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schill, C; Schlüter, T; Schmidt, K; Schmieden, H; Schönning, K; Schopferer, S; Schott, M; Shevchenko, O Yu; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sirtl, S; Slunecka, M; Sosio, S; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Steiger, L; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Sulej, R; Suzuki, H; Szabelski, A; Szameitat, T; Sznajder, P; Takekawa, S; ter Wolbeek, J; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Thibaud, F; Uhl, S; Uman, I; Virius, M; Wang, L; Weisrock, T; Wilfert, M; Windmolders, R; Wollny, H; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zink, A

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the Collins and Sivers asymmetries for charged pions and charged and neutral kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of high energy muons off transversely polarised protons are presented. The results were obtained using all the available COMPASS proton data, which were taken in the years 2007 and 2010. The Collins asymmetries exhibit in the valence region a non-zero signal for pions and there are hints of non-zero signal also for kaons. The Sivers asymmetries are found to be positive for positive pions and kaons and compatible with zero otherwise.

  15. Inclusive neutral kaon production in 70 GeV/c K/sup +/p interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, Monique; Beaufays, J; Berejnov, V V; Caso, C; Chliapnikov, P V; Contri, R; De Clercq, C; De Wolf, E A; Drevermann, H; Dumont, J J; Dziembowski, Z; Fenyuk, A; Fontanelli, F; Gatignon, L; Gerdyukov, L N; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Yves; Grard, F; Gritsaenko, I; Gumenyuk, S A; Hanton, J; Harigel, G G; Johnson, D P; Kittel, E W; Kubic, V; Lemonne, J; Lugovsky, S B; Metzger, W J; Milstene, C; Monge, R; Nikitin, S; Nikolaenko, V; Peeters, P; Petrovikh, Y; Porte, J P; Ronjin, V; Ross, R T; Schotanus, D J; Squarcia, S; Stergiou, Athanase; Theocharopoulos, P; Trevisan, U; Utochkin, B; Van de Walle, R T; Van der Poel, P A; Vassiliadis, G; Yarba, V A

    1981-01-01

    The inclusive production of neutral kaons in 70 GeV/c K/sup +/p interactions is studied with the CERN BEBC bubble chamber. The (semi-) inclusive cross sections are interpreted in terms of the various strangeness channels leading to neutral kaon production. The invariant inclusive cross section for kaon production is studied as a function of p/sub t//sup 2/ and the Feynman variable x. The latter distributions are considered both 'raw' and corrected for the presence of K/sup 0/'s resulting from K* decay. They are compared with the prediction expected from the Regge-Mueller formalism, the recombination model and fragmentation models. (24 refs).

  16. Quantifying Spatial and Temporal Variability of Methane Emissions from a Complex Area Source: Case Study of a Central Indiana Landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Bogner, J. E.; Green, R. B.; Shepson, P. B.; Thoma, E. D.; Foster-wittig, T. A.; Spokas, K.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric methane is a powerful greenhouse gas that is responsible for about 17% of the total direct radiative forcing from long-lived greenhouse gases (IPCC 2013). While the global emission of methane is relatively well quantified, the temporal and spatial variability of methane emissions from individual area or point sources are still poorly understood. Using 4 field methods (aircraft-based mass balance, tracer correlation, vertical radial plume mapping, and static chambers) and a new field-validated process-based model (California Landfill Methane Inventory Model, CALMIM 5.4), we investigated both the total emissions from a central Indiana landfill as well as the partitioned emissions inclusive of methanotrophic oxidation for the various cover soils. This landfill is an upwind source for the city of Indianapolis, so the resolution of m2 to km2 scale emissions, as well as understanding the temporal variability for this complex area source, contributes to improved regional inventory calculations. Emissions for the site as a whole were measured using both an aircraft-based mass balance approach as well as a ground-based tracer correlation method, permitting direct comparison of the strengths, limitations, and uncertainties of these two approaches. Because US landfills are highly-engineered and composed of daily, intermediate, and final cover areas with differing thicknesses, composition, and implementation of gas recovery, we also expected different emission signatures and strengths from the various cover areas. Thus we also deployed static chambers and vertical radial plume mapping to quantify the spatial variability of emissions from the thinner daily and intermediate cover areas. Understanding the daily, seasonal and annual emission rates from a landfill is not trivial, and usually requires a combination of measurement and modeling approaches. Thus, our unique data set provides an opportunity to gain an improved understanding of the emissions from a complex

  17. On-site passive flux sampler measurement of emission rates of carbonyls and VOCs from multiple indoor sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, Naohide [Research Institute of Science for Safety and Sustainability (RISS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Kai, Yuya; Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Kumagai, Kazukiyo; Okuizumi, Yumiko; Jona, Miki; Yanagisawa, Yukio [Department of Environment Systems, Institute of Environmental Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8563 (Japan); Fujii, Minoru [Research Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan)

    2009-05-15

    In indoor environments with high levels of air pollution, it is desirable to remove major sources of emissions to improve air quality. In order to identify the emission sources that contribute most to the concentrations of indoor air pollutants, we used passive flux samplers (PFSs) to measure emission rates of carbonyl compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from many of the building materials and furnishings present in a room in a reinforced concrete building in Tokyo, Japan. The emission flux of formaldehyde from a desk was high (125 {mu}g/m{sup 2}/h), whereas fluxes from a door and flooring were low (21.5 and 16.5 {mu}g/m{sup 2}/h, respectively). The emission fluxes of toluene from the ceiling and the carpet were high (80.0 and 72.3 {mu}g/m{sup 2}/h, respectively), whereas that from the flooring was low (9.09 {mu}g/m{sup 2}/h). The indoor and outdoor concentrations of formaldehyde were 61.5 and 8.64 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, respectively, and those of toluene were 43.2 and 17.5 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, respectively. The air exchange rate of the room as measured by the perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) method was 1.84/h. Taking into consideration the area of the emission sources, the carpet, ceiling, and walls were identified as the principal emission sources, contributing 24%, 20%, and 22% of the formaldehyde, respectively, and 22%, 27%, and 14% of the toluene, respectively, assuming that the emission rate from every major emission sources could be measured. In contrast, the door, the flooring, and the desk contributed little to the indoor levels of formaldehyde (1.0%, 0.54%, and 4.1%, respectively) and toluene (2.2%, 0.31%, and 0.85%, respectively). (author)

  18. Identifying and characterizing major emission point sources as a basis for geospatial distribution of mercury emissions inventories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuisen, Frits

    2015-01-01

    Mercury is a global pollutant that poses threats to ecosystem and human health. Due to its global transport, mercury contamination is found in regions of the Earth that are remote from major emissions areas, including the Polar regions. Global anthropogenic emission inventories identify important se

  19. Global Partitioning of NOx Sources Using Satellite Observations: Relative Roles of Fossil Fuel Combustion, Biomass Burning and Soil Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaegle, Lyatt; Steinberger, Linda; Martin, Randall V.; Chance, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    This document contains the following abstract for the paper "Global partitioning of NOx sources using satellite observations: Relative roles of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning and soil emissions." Satellite observations have been used to provide important new information about emissions of nitrogen oxides. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are significant in atmospheric chemistry, having a role in ozone air pollution, acid deposition and climate change. We know that human activities have led to a three- to six-fold increase in NOx emissions since pre-industrial times, and that there are three main surface sources of NOx: fuel combustion, large-scale fires, and microbial soil processes. How each of these sources contributes to the total NOx emissions is subject to some doubt, however. The problem is that current NOx emission inventories rely on bottom-up approaches, compiling large quantities of statistical information from diverse sources such as fuel and land use, agricultural data, and estimates of burned areas. This results in inherently large uncertainties. To overcome this, Lyatt Jaegle and colleagues from the University of Washington, USA, used new satellite observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) instrument. As the spatial and seasonal distribution of each of the sources of NOx can be clearly mapped from space, the team could provide independent topdown constraints on the individual strengths of NOx sources, and thus help resolve discrepancies in existing inventories. Jaegle's analysis of the satellite observations, presented at the recent Faraday Discussion on "Atmospheric Chemistry", shows that fuel combustion dominates emissions at northern mid-latitudes, while fires are a significant source in the Tropics. Additionally, she discovered a larger than expected role for soil emissions, especially over agricultural regions with heavy fertilizer use. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  20. Global Partitioning of NOx Sources Using Satellite Observations: Relative Roles of Fossil Fuel Combustion, Biomass Burning and Soil Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaegle, Lyatt; Steinberger, Linda; Martin, Randall V.; Chance, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    This document contains the following abstract for the paper "Global partitioning of NOx sources using satellite observations: Relative roles of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning and soil emissions." Satellite observations have been used to provide important new information about emissions of nitrogen oxides. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are significant in atmospheric chemistry, having a role in ozone air pollution, acid deposition and climate change. We know that human activities have led to a three- to six-fold increase in NOx emissions since pre-industrial times, and that there are three main surface sources of NOx: fuel combustion, large-scale fires, and microbial soil processes. How each of these sources contributes to the total NOx emissions is subject to some doubt, however. The problem is that current NOx emission inventories rely on bottom-up approaches, compiling large quantities of statistical information from diverse sources such as fuel and land use, agricultural data, and estimates of burned areas. This results in inherently large uncertainties. To overcome this, Lyatt Jaegle and colleagues from the University of Washington, USA, used new satellite observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) instrument. As the spatial and seasonal distribution of each of the sources of NOx can be clearly mapped from space, the team could provide independent topdown constraints on the individual strengths of NOx sources, and thus help resolve discrepancies in existing inventories. Jaegle's analysis of the satellite observations, presented at the recent Faraday Discussion on "Atmospheric Chemistry", shows that fuel combustion dominates emissions at northern mid-latitudes, while fires are a significant source in the Tropics. Additionally, she discovered a larger than expected role for soil emissions, especially over agricultural regions with heavy fertilizer use. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  1. Using an Explicit Emission Tagging Method in Global Modeling of Source-Receptor Relationships for Black Carbon in the Arctic: Variations, Sources and Transport Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Singh, Balwinder; Zhang, Rudong; Ma, Po-Lun; Qian, Yun; Ghan, Steven J.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2014-11-27

    We introduce an explicit emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model to quantify source-region-resolved characteristics of black carbon (BC), focusing on the Arctic. Explicit tagging of BC source regions without perturbing the emissions makes it straightforward to establish source-receptor relationships and transport pathways, providing a physically consistent and computationally efficient approach to produce a detailed characterization of the destiny of regional BC emissions and the potential for mitigation actions. Our analysis shows that the contributions of major source regions to the global BC burden are not proportional to the respective emissions due to strong region-dependent removal rates and lifetimes, while the contributions to BC direct radiative forcing show a near-linear dependence on their respective contributions to the burden. Distant sources contribute to BC in remote regions mostly in the mid- and upper troposphere, having much less impact on lower-level concentrations (and deposition) than on burden. Arctic BC concentrations, deposition and source contributions all have strong seasonal variations. Eastern Asia contributes the most to the wintertime Arctic burden. Northern Europe emissions are more important to both surface concentration and deposition in winter than in summer. The largest contribution to Arctic BC in the summer is from Northern Asia. Although local emissions contribute less than 10% to the annual mean BC burden and deposition within the Arctic, the per-emission efficiency is much higher than for major non-Arctic sources. The interannual variability (1996-2005) due to meteorology is small in annual mean BC burden and radiative forcing but is significant in yearly seasonal means over the Arctic. When a slow aging treatment of BC is introduced, the increase of BC lifetime and burden is source-dependent. Global BC forcing-per-burden efficiency also increases primarily due to changes in BC vertical distributions. The

  2. Two source emission behaviour of alpha fragments of projectile having energy around 1 GeV per nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, V; Pathak, Ramji

    2010-01-01

    The emission of projectile fragments alpha has been studied in ^{84}Kr interactions with nuclei of the nuclear emulsion detector composition at relativistic energy below 2 GeV per nucleon. The angular distribution of projectile fragments alpha in terms of transverse momentum could not be explained by a straight and clean-cut collision geometry hypothesis of Participant - Spectator (PS) Model. Therefore, it is assumed that projectile fragments alpha were produced from two separate sources that belong to the projectile spectator region differing drastically in their temperatures. It has been clearly observed that the emission of projectile fragments alpha are from two different sources. The contribution of projectile fragments alpha from contact layer or hot source is a few percent of the total emission of projectile fragments alphas. Most of the projectile fragments alphas are emitted from the cold source. It has been noticed that the temperature of hot and cold regions are dependent on the projectile mass num...

  3. First exploratory calculation of the long-distance contributions to the rare kaon decays $K\\to\\pi\\ell^+\\ell^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Christ, Norman H; Juttner, Andreas; Lawson, Andrew; Portelli, Antonin; Sachrajda, Christopher T

    2016-01-01

    The rare decays of a kaon into a pion and a charged lepton/antilepton pair proceed via a flavour changing neutral current and therefore may only be induced beyond tree level in the Standard Model. This natural suppression makes these decays sensitive to the effects of potential New Physics. The CP conserving $K\\to\\pi \\ell^+\\ell^-$ decay channels however are dominated by a single photon exchange; this involves a sizeable long-distance hadronic contribution which represents the current major source of theoretical uncertainty. Here we outline our methodology for the computation of the long-distance contributions to these rare decay amplitudes using lattice QCD and present the numerical results of the first exploratory studies of these decays in which all but the disconnected diagrams are evaluated. The domain wall fermion ensembles of the RBC and UKQCD collaborations are used, with a pion mass of $M_{\\pi}\\sim 430\\,\\mathrm{MeV}$ and a kaon mass of $M_{K}\\sim 625\\,\\mathrm{MeV}$. In particular we determine the form...

  4. Novel techniques for characterization of hydrocarbon emission sources in the Barnett Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Brian Joseph

    Changes in ambient atmospheric hydrocarbon concentrations can have both short-term and long-term effects on the atmosphere and on human health. Thus, accurate characterization of emissions sources is critically important. The recent boom in shale gas production has led to an increase in hydrocarbon emissions from associated processes, though the exact extent is uncertain. As an original quantification technique, a model airplane equipped with a specially-designed, open-path methane sensor was flown multiple times over a natural gas compressor station in the Barnett Shale in October 2013. A linear optimization was introduced to a standard Gaussian plume model in an effort to determine the most probable emission rate coming from the station. This is shown to be a suitable approach given an ideal source with a single, central plume. Separately, an analysis was performed to characterize the nonmethane hydrocarbons in the Barnett during the same period. Starting with ambient hourly concentration measurements of forty-six hydrocarbon species, Lagrangian air parcel trajectories were implemented in a meteorological model to extend the resolution of these measurements and achieve domain-fillings of the region for the period of interest. A self-organizing map (a type of unsupervised classification) was then utilized to reduce the dimensionality of the total multivariate set of grids into characteristic one-dimensional signatures. By also introducing a self-organizing map classification of the contemporary wind measurements, the spatial hydrocarbon characterizations are analyzed for periods with similar wind conditions. The accuracy of the classification is verified through assessment of observed spatial mixing ratio enhancements of key species, through site-comparisons with a related long-term study, and through a random forest analysis (an ensemble learning method of supervised classification) to determine the most important species for defining key classes. The hydrocarbon

  5. Patterns of mercury dispersion from local and regional emission sources, rural Central Wisconsin, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kolker

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous real-time changes in mercury (Hg speciation- reactive gaseous Hg (RGM, elemental Hg (Hg°, and fine particulate Hg (Hg-PM2.5, were determined from June to November, 2007, in ambient air at three locations in rural Central Wisconsin. Known Hg emission sources within the airshed of the monitoring sites include: 1 a 1114 megawatt (MW coal-fired electric utility generating station; 2 a Hg-bed chlor-alkali plant; and 3 a smaller (465 MW coal-burning electric utility. Monitoring sites, showing sporadic elevation of Hg°, Hg-PM2.5, and RGM were positioned at distances of 25, 50 and 100 km northward of the larger electric utility. Median concentrations of Hg°, Hg-PM2.5, and RGM were 1.3–1.4 ng m−3, 2.6–5.0 pg m−3, and 0.6–0.8 pg m−3, respectively. A series of RGM events were recorded at each site. The largest, on 23 September, occurred under prevailing southerly winds, with a maximum RGM value (56.8 pg m-3 measured at the 100 km site, and corresponding elevated SO2 (10.4 ppbv; measured at 50 km site. The finding that RGM, Hg°, and Hg-PM2.5 are not always highest at the 25 km site, closest to the large generating station, contradicts the idea that RGM decreases with distance from a large point source. This may be explained if: 1 the 100 km site was influenced by emissions from the chlor-alkali facility or by RGM from regional urban sources; 2 the emission stack height of the larger power plant promoted plume transport at an elevation where the Hg is carried over the closest site; or 3 RGM was being generated in the plume through oxidation of Hg°. Operational changes at each emitter since 2007 should reduce their Hg output, potentially allowing quantification of the environmental benefit in future studies.

  6. Measuring gas emissions from livestock buildings: A review on uncertainty analysis and error sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calvet, S.; Gates, R.S.; Zhang, G.; Estelles, F.; Ogink, N.W.M.; Pedersen, S.; Berckmans, D.

    2013-01-01

    Measuring gaseous and particulate emissions from livestock houses has been the subject of intensive research over the past two decades. Currently, there is general agreement regarding appropriate methods to measure emissions from mechanically ventilated buildings. However, measuring emissions from

  7. Tracking chiral polychlorinated biphenyl sources near a hazardous waste incinerator: fresh emissions or weathered revolatilization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Brian J; Ross, Matthew S; Wong, Charles S

    2012-07-01

    The Swan Hills Treatment Centre (SHTC), located in central Alberta, is the primary facility in Canada for incinerating polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Past studies have shown significant contamination by PCBs and other pollutants of the immediate surrounding region. However, it is unclear whether the major source of contamination to the region's atmosphere is historical release incidents or long-term emissions. To answer this question, concentrations of PCBs and enantiomer fractions of several PCB congeners were determined in soil and air, via polyurethane foam passive samplers, over several seasons between 2005 and 2008. Concentrations in both media were highest for samples collected closest to the SHTC, demonstrating a concentration profile typical of a point source. Enantiomer analysis revealed racemic profiles in air for all congeners, while soil was significantly nonracemic for PCB 95, indicating significant microbial degradation of this congener. However, the primary source of this congener, and likely others, in the surrounding atmosphere is recent and continual releases from the SHTC, rather than the release of weathered PCBs previously deposited to local soils. In addition, enantiomer compositions for PCBs 95 and 149 yielded minimum biotransformation half-lives of 25 and 97 years, respectively, suggesting an expected gradual decline in the region's PCB load once fresh inputs cease.

  8. New chemical tracers for diesel source emission apportionment in ambient fine particulate matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charland, J.P.; Caravaggio, G.; MacDonald, P.; MacPhee, T. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Graham, L.A. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Hopanes and steranes are petroleum biomarkers that are commonly used in chemical mass balance (CMB)studies to determine the source of organic carbon from motor vehicle exhaust. Hopanes and steranes are found in engine lubricating oil and trace amounts are released during engine combustion. Since lubricating oils are used in both gasoline and diesel engines, the distribution and abundance of these biomarkers relative to organic carbon (OC) in exhaust particulate matter (PM) cannot be used to distinguish between these sources. The purpose of this study was to find molecular markers specific to diesel fuel that can be used to assess the contribution of diesel vehicles exhaust to ambient PM. PM filter samples were collected from gasoline and diesel vehicles. At the same time, samples of fresh and used engine specific lubricating oils were also collected along with gasoline and diesel fuel for organic speciation. Thermal desorption (TD)-gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to analyze all samples. Ambient air PM samples were also collected and analyzed for the presence of these newly proposed tracers. It was concluded that the detection of bicycloparaffins in PM can provide new insight into diesel emissions and help determine pollution sources.

  9. Synchrotron soft X-ray and field-emission electron sources: a comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, J C H; Howells, M R

    2002-12-01

    The soft X-ray spectral region and the useful range of electron energy-loss spectroscopy are very similar, both including the energy range 100-1000 eV. Moreover, well-developed monochromators and parallel detection devices with comparable resolution exist for both. Despite the differing interactions of electrons and photons, many complementary experiments in imaging, spectroscopy and diffraction have been performed using both techniques. We therefore compare the brightness, degeneracy, monochromaticity, beam size, source size, spatial and temporal coherence of field-emission electron beams and soft X-ray synchrotron radiation from typical undulators. Recent brightness values for nanotip field emitters and undulators, both measured and calculated, are provided with examples from the Advanced Light Source synchrotron-radiation facility at Berkeley USA. The quantum mechanical upper limit on source brightness, as well as relationships among beam brightness, coherence parameters, and degeneracy, are discussed. Factors which limit these parameters and methods of measurement are reviewed, and the implications for diffraction, imaging and spectroscopic experiments as well as radiation damage are briefly commented on.

  10. VUV emission spectroscopy combined with H- density measurements in the ion source Prometheus I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleiferis, S.; Laulainen, J.; Svarnas, P.; Tarvainen, O.; Bacal, M.; Béchu, S.

    2017-08-01

    "Prometheus I" is a volume H- negative ion source, driven by a network of dipolar electron cyclotron resonance (ECR; 2.45 GHz) modules. The vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) emission spectrum of low-temperature hydrogen plasmas may be related to molecular and atomic processes involved directly or indirectly in the production of negative ions. In this work, VUV spectroscopy has been performed in the above source, Prometheus I, both in the ECR zones and the bulk (far from ECR zones and surfaces) plasma. The acquired VUV spectra are correlated with the negative ion densities, as measured by means of laser photodetachment, and the possible mechanisms of negative ion production are considered. The well-established H- formation process of dissociative attachment to vibrationally excited molecules is evaluated, while an additional production path (i.e. neutral resonant ionization) is tested due to the recently attracted interest. The obtained results indicate that for the source Prometheus I, the dominant formation process is dissociative attachment.

  11. One-prong τ decays with neutral kaons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciarri, M.; Adam, A.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahlen, S.; Alpat, B.; Alcaraz, J.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelescu, T.; Antreasyan, D.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Baba, P. V. K. S.; Bagnaia, P.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Banicz, K.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Bartalini, P.; Baschirotto, A.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bencze, Gy. L.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Bilei, G. M.; Bizzarri, R.; Blaising, J. J.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Boucham, A.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Boutigny, D.; Bouwens, B.; Brambilla, E.; Branson, J. G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brock, I. C.; Bujak, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Burgos, C.; Busenitz, J.; Buytenhuijs, A.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Romeo, G. Cara; Caria, M.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A. M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Castello, R.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chan, A.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Choi, M. T.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coan, T. E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Commichau, V.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de La Cruz, B.; Cui, X. T.; Cui, X. Y.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; de Boeck, H.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Dénes, E.; Denes, P.; Denotaristefani, F.; Dibitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dorne, I.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; Dutta, S.; Easo, S.; Efremenko, Yu.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Extermann, P.; Fabbretti, R.; Fabre, M.; Faccini, R.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, D.; Fernandez, G.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Gailloud, M.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gau, S. S.; Gentile, S.; Gerald, J.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldstein, J.; Gong, Z. F.; Gonzalez, E.; Gougas, A.; Goujon, D.; Gratta, G.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Gu, C.; Guanziroli, M.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gustafson, H. R.; Gutay, L. J.; Hartmann, B.; Hasan, A.; He, J. T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hervé, A.; Hilgers, K.; van Hoek, W. C.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S. R.; Hu, G.; Ilyas, M. M.; Innocente, V.; Janssen, H.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Kapinos, P.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Khokhar, S.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, A.; Kirkby, D.; Kirkby, J.; Kirsch, S.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Koffeman, E.; Kornadt, O.; Koutsenko, V.; Koulbardis, A.; Kraemer, R. W.; Kramer, T.; Krenz, W.; Kuijten, H.; Kunin, A.; de Guevara, P. Ladron; Landi, G.; Lapoint, C.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Laurikainen, P.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, J.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, K. Y.; Leggett, C.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Lieb, E.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lindemann, B.; Lista, L.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z. A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, W.; Lu, Y. S.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Ludovici, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; Macchiolo, A.; Maity, M.; Malgeri, L.; Malik, R.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mangla, S.; Maolinbay, M.; Marchesini, P.; Marin, A.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Mazumdar, K.; McNally, D.; Mele, S.; Merk, M.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mi, Y.; Mihul, A.; van Mil, A. J. W.; Mir, Y.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Möller, M.; Monaco, V.; Monteleoni, B.; Moore, R.; Morand, R.; Morganti, S.; Moulai, N. E.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Nagy, E.; Nahn, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niaz, M. A.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, H.; Organtini, G.; Ostonen, R.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Pevsner, A.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Pinto, J. C.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Produit, N.; Qureshi, K. N.; Raghavan, R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rattaggi, M.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Redaelli, M.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Ricker, A.; Riemann, S.; Riemers, B. C.; Riles, K.; Rind, O.; Rizvi, H. A.; Ro, S.; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Roe, B. P.; Röhner, M.; Röhner, S.; Romero, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosselet, Ph.; van Rossum, W.; Roth, S.; Rubio, J. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Salicio, J.; Salicio, J. M.; Sanchez, E.; Santocchia, A.; Sarakinos, M. E.; Sarkar, S.; Sartorelli, G.; Sassowsky, M.; Sauvage, G.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Schoeneich, B.; Scholz, N.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, K.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sehgal, R.; Seiler, P. G.; Sens, J. C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shukla, J.; Shumilov, E.; Son, D.; Sopczak, A.; Soulimov, V.; Smith, B.; Spickermann, T.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Sticozzi, F.; Stone, H.; Stoyanov, B.; Strauch, K.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Susinno, G. F.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Syed, A. A.; Tang, X. W.; Taylor, L.; Timellini, R.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Toker, O.; Tonutti, M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tully, C.; Tuchscherer, H.; Ulbricht, J.; Urbán, L.; Uwer, U.; Valente, E.; van de Walle, R. T.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vikas, P.; Vikas, U.; Vivargent, M.; Voelkert, R.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vorobyov, An. A.; Vuilleumier, L.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, A.; Weill, R.; Willmott, C.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wu, S. X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xu, J.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, G.; Yao, X. Y.; Ye, C. H.; Ye, J. B.; Ye, Q.; Yeh, S. C.; You, J. M.; Yunus, N.; Yzerman, M.; Zaccardelli, C.; Zalite, An.; Zemp, P.; Zeng, J. Y.; Zeng, M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, G. J.; Zhou, J. F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, G. Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zichichi, A.; van der Zwaan, B. C. C.

    1995-02-01

    We have analyzed one-prong τ decays with neutral kaons using the information from a fine-grained hadron calorimeter. The data sample consists of 43 500 Z → τ+τ-( γ) events collected by the L3 detector at LEP in 1991, 1992 and 1993. The following branching fractions are measured: B(τ - → ν τπ -overlineK0) = 0.0095 ± 0.0015 (stat) ± 0.0006(syst); B(τ - → ν τπ - π 0overlineK0) = 0.0041 ± 0.0012(stat) ± 0.0003(syst) and B(τ - → ν τπ -K 0overlineK0) = 0.0031 ± 0.0012(stat) ± 0.0004(syst) .

  12. Eta Production from Hydrogen using Pion and Kaon Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippens, W. Bradford

    1999-10-01

    Eta meson production data from pions and kaons near threshold are scarce and of poor quality. These data are important for determining the η n and ηΛ scattering lengths and for determining the role of resonances in the η production process. Both processes interestingly have dominant production resonances with masses very near the reaction threshold, which complicates the determination of the resonance parameters. Precision η production data from pions are needed to help resolve ambiguities in the determination of the resonance parameters of the N S_11 resonance and in the determination of the helicity amplitudes for η photoproduction. We report differential cross sections for η production near threshold from the reactions π^- p→ η n and K^- p→ ηΛ based upon data recently taken by the Crystal Ball Collaboration. Excitation functions and angular distributions will be presented. Angular distributions from both reactions show significant deviation from S-wave production.

  13. Ratio of Pion Kaon Production in Proton Carbon Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, Andrey V. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The ratio of pion-kaon production by 120 GeV/c protons incident on carbon target is presented. The data was recorded with the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Production ratios of K++, K--, K-/K+, and π-+ are measured in 24 bins in longitudinal momentum from 20 to 90 GeV/c and transverse momentum up to 2 GeV/c. The measurement is compared to existing data sets, particle production Monte Carlo results from FLUKA-06, parametrization of proton-beryllium data at 400/450 GeV/c, and ratios measured by the MINOS experiment on the NuMI target.

  14. ENUBET: Enhanced NeUtrino BEams from kaon Tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meregaglia, A.

    2016-12-01

    A reduction of the neutrino flux uncertainty by one order of magnitude in conventional neutrino beams can be achieved monitoring the positron production in the decay tunnel originating from the Ke3 decays of charged kaons. This novel approach will be developed in the framework of the ERC ENUBET Project. In this talk we present the aims of the project and the ongoing R&D for the instrumentation of the decay tunnel. In particular, we describe a specialized shashlik calorimeter (iron-scintillator) with a compact readout based on small-area silicon photo multipliers that allows for a very effective longitudinal segmentation of the detector to enhance electron/hadron separation. The expected performance of the detector estimated from a full GEANT4 simulation of the neutrino decay tunnel are presented. We also discuss preliminary results on a prototype composed by 12 ultra compact modules exposed to pions and electrons at CERN-PS.

  15. Kaon semileptonic decay form factors with HISQ valence quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Gamiz, E; Bazavov, A; Bernard, C; Bouchard, C; DeTar, C; Du, D; El-Khadra, A X; Foley, J; Freeland, E D; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Kim, J; Kronfeld, A S; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Mackenzie, P B; Neil, E T; Oktay, M B; Qiu, Si-Wei; Simone, J N; Sugar, R; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2012-01-01

    We report on the status of our kaon semileptonic form factor calculations using the highly-improved staggered quark (HISQ) formulation to simulate the valence fermions. We present results for the form factor f_+^{K \\pi}(0) on the asqtad N_f=2+1 MILC configurations, discuss the chiral-continuum extrapolation, and give a preliminary estimate of the total error. We also present a more preliminary set of results for the same form factor but with the sea quarks also simulated with the HISQ action; these results include data at the physical light quark masses. The improvements that we expect to achieve with the use of the HISQ configurations and simulations at the physical quark masses are briefly discussed.

  16. Higher Moments of Net-Kaon Multiplicity Distributions at STAR

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuations of conserved quantities such as baryon number (B), electric charge number (Q), and strangeness number (S), are sensitive to the correlation length and can be used to probe non-gaussian fluctuations near the critical point. Experimentally, higher moments of the multiplicity distributions have been used to search for the QCD critical point in heavy-ion collisions. In this paper, we report the efficiency-corrected cumulants and their ratios of mid- rapidity (|y| < 0.5) net-kaon multiplicity distributions in Au+Au collisions at 7.7, 11.5, 14.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV collected in 2010, 2011, and 2014 with STAR at RHIC. The centrality and energy dependence of the cumulants and their ratios, are presented. Furthermore, the comparisons with baseline calculations (Poisson) and non-critical-point models (UrQMD) are also discussed.

  17. Kaon-nucleon couplings for weak decays of hypernuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Savage, M J

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the weak kaon-nucleon (NNK) S-wave and P-wave interactions using heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. The leading 1-loop SU(3) breaking contributions to the ppK, pnK, and nnK couplings are computed. We find that they suppress all NNK amplitudes by 30\\% to 50\\%. The ratio of neutron-induced to proton-induced hypernuclear decay widths is sensitive to such reductions. It has been argued that the discrepancy between the predicted and observed P-wave amplitudes in \\Delta s=1 hyperon decay results from an accidental cancellation between tree-level amplitudes, and is not a fundamental problem for chiral perturbation theory. Agreement between experimentally determined NNK P-wave amplitudes and our estimates would support this explanation.

  18. Calculation of BSM Kaon B-parameters using Staggered Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, Yong-Chull; Kim, Jangho; Kim, Seonghee; Lee, Weonjong; Leem, Jaehoon; Pak, Jeonghwan; Park, Sungwoo; Jung, Chulwoo; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Sharpe, Stephen R; Yoon, Boram

    2014-01-01

    We present updated results for kaon B-parameters for operators arising in models of new physics. We use HYP-smeared staggered quarks on the $N_f = 2+1$ MILC asqtad lattices. During the last year we have added new ensembles, which has necessitated chiral-continuum fitting with more elaborate fitting functions. We have also corrected an error in a two-loop anomalous dimension used to evolve results between different scales. Our results for the beyond-the-Standard-Model B-parameters have total errors of $5-10$\\%. We find that the discrepancy observed last year between our results and those of the RBC/UKQCD and ETM collaborations for some of the B-parameters has been reduced from $4\\!-\\!5\\,\\sigma$ to $2\\!-\\!3\\,\\sigma$.

  19. MULTI-bar K (hyper)nuclei and Kaon Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazda, D.; Mareš, J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2010-10-01

    We report on recent relativistic mean-field calculations of multi-bar K nuclei1,2 which were performed fully and self-consistently across the periodic table. The bar K separation energy B{bar K} as well as the nuclear and bar K-meson densities were found to saturate with the number of antikaons in the nuclear medium. Saturation appears robust against a wide range of variations, including the nuclear model used and the type of boson fields mediating the strong interactions. In addition, we have explored properties of kaonic hypernuclei - strange systems made of nucleons, hyperons and K- mesons. We observed saturation also in these objects. Since the bar K separation energy B{bar K} does not exceed 200 MeV, multi-bar K nuclei lie energetically well above multi-hyperonic nuclei and it is unlikely that kaon condensation could occur in strong-interaction self-bound hadronic matter.

  20. Comparison of emissions from on-road sources using a mobile laboratory under various driving and operational sampling modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zavala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile sources produce a significant fraction of the total anthropogenic emissions burden in large cities and have harmful effects on air quality at multiple spatial scales. Mobile emissions are intrinsically difficult to estimate due to the large number of parameters affecting the emissions variability within and across vehicles types. The MCMA-2003 Campaign in Mexico City has showed the utility of using a mobile laboratory to sample and characterize specific classes of motor vehicles to better quantify their emissions characteristics as a function of their driving cycles. The technique clearly identifies "high emitter" vehicles via individual exhaust plumes, and also provides fleet average emission rates. We have applied this technique to Mexicali during the Border Ozone Reduction and Air Quality Improvement Program (BORAQIP for the Mexicali-Imperial Valley in 2005. We analyze the variability of measured emission ratios for emitted NOx, CO, specific VOCs, NH3, and some primary fine particle components and properties by deploying a mobile laboratory in roadside stationary sampling, chase and fleet average operational sampling modes. The measurements reflect various driving modes characteristic of the urban fleets. The observed variability for all measured gases and particle emission ratios is greater for the chase and roadside stationary sampling than for fleet average measurements. The fleet average sampling mode captured the effects of traffic conditions on the measured on-road emission ratios, allowing the use of fuel-based emission ratios to assess the validity of traditional "bottom-up" emissions inventories. Using the measured on-road emission ratios, we estimate CO and NOx mobile emissions of 175±62 and 10.4±1.3 metric tons/day, respectively, for the gasoline vehicle fleet in Mexicali. Comparisons with similar on-road emissions data from Mexico City indicated that fleet average NO emission ratios were

  1. Comparison of emission ratios from on-road sources using a mobile laboratory under various driving and operational sampling modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zavala

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile sources produce a significant fraction of the total anthropogenic emissions burden in large cities and have harmful effects on air quality at multiple spatial scales. Mobile emissions are intrinsically difficult to estimate due to the large number of parameters affecting the emissions variability within and across vehicles types. The MCMA-2003 Campaign in Mexico City has showed the utility of using a mobile laboratory to sample and characterize specific classes of motor vehicles to better quantify their emissions characteristics as a function of their driving cycles. The technique clearly identifies "high emitter" vehicles via individual exhaust plumes, and also provides fleet average emission rates. We have applied this technique to Mexicali during the Border Ozone Reduction and Air Quality Improvement Program for the Mexicali-Imperial Valley in 2005. In this paper we analyze the variability of measured emission ratios for emitted NOx, CO, specific VOCs, NH3, and some primary fine particle components and properties obtained during the Border Ozone Reduction and Air Quality Improvement Program for the Mexicali-Imperial Valley in 2005 by deploying a mobile laboratory in roadside stationary sampling, chase and fleet average operational sampling modes. The measurements reflect various driving modes characteristic of the urban fleets. The observed variability for all measured gases and particle emission ratios is greater for the chase and roadside stationary sampling than for fleet average measurements. The fleet average sampling mode captured the effects of traffic conditions on the measured on-road emission ratios, allowing the use of fuel-based emission ratios to assess the validity of traditional "bottom-up" emissions inventories. Using the measured on-road emission ratios, we estimate CO and NOx mobile emissions of 175±62 and 10.4±1.3 metric tons/day, respectively, for the gasoline vehicle fleet in

  2. Analysis of the pion-kaon sigma-term and related topics

    CERN Document Server

    Frink, M; Meißner, Ulf G; Frink, Matthias; Kubis, Bastian; Mei{\\ss}ner, Ulf-G.

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the one-loop contributions to the difference \\Delta_{\\pi K} between the isoscalar on-shell pion-kaon scattering amplitude at the Cheng-Dashen point and the scalar form factor \\Gamma_K (2M_\\pi^2) in the framework of three flavor chiral perturbation theory. These corrections turn out to be small. This is further sharpened by treating the kaons as heavy fields (two flavor chiral perturbation theory). We also analyze the two-loop corrections to the kaon scalar form factor based on a dispersive technique. We find that these corrections are smaller than in the comparable case of the scalar form factor of the pion. This is related to the weaker final state interactions in the pion-kaon channel.

  3. Influence of Chiral Mean Field on Kaon In-plane Flow in Heavy Ion Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yu-Ming; FUCHS Christian; FAESSLER Amand; SHEKHTER Kirril; SRISAWAD Pornrad; KOBDAJ Chinorat; YAN Yu-Peng

    2004-01-01

    The influence of the chiral mean field on the K+ in-plane flow in heavy ion collisions at SIS energy is investigated within covariant kaon dynamics. For the kaon mesons inside the nuclear medium a quasi-particle picture including scalar and vector fields is adopted and compared to the standard treatment with a static potential. It is confirmed that a Lorentz force from spatial component of the vector field provides an important contribution to the inmedium kaon dynamics and strongly counterbalances the influence of the vector potential on the K+ in-plane flow. The calculated results show that the new FOPI data can be reasonably described using the Brown & Rho parametrization,which partly takes into account the correction of higher order contributions in the chiral expansion. This indicates that one can abstract the information on the kaon potential in a nuclear medium from the analysis of the K+ in-plane flow.

  4. 1 to 2 GeV/c beam line for hypernuclear and kaon research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1985-02-15

    A kaon beam line operating in the range from 1.0 to 2.0 GeV/c is proposed. The line is meant for kaon and pion research in a region hitherto inaccessible to experimenters. Topics in hypernuclear and kaon physics of high current interest include the investigation of doubly strange nuclear systems with the K/sup -/,K/sup +/ reaction, searching for dibaryon resonances, hyperon-nucleon interactions, hypernuclear ..gamma.. rays, and associated production of excited hypernuclei. The beam line would provide separated beams of momentum analyzed kaons at intensities greater than 10/sup 6/ particles per spill with a momentum determined to one part in a thousand. This intensity is an order of magnitude greater than that currently available. 63 references.

  5. Characterization and inventory of PCDD/F emissions from coal-fired power plants and other sources in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Long-Full; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Li, Hsing-Wang; Wang, Mao-Sung; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping

    2007-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were to quantify (1) the emission factors of a variety of dioxin emission sources; (2) the overall dioxin emission inventory in Taiwan as well as in a major metropolitan (KC area); and (3) the contribution of power plants to the overall PCDD/F emission. To achieve these goals, a total of 95 flue gas samples were collected and analyzed for 17 PCDD/Fs from 20 sources to develop emission factors. The emission factor of PCDD/Fs from coal-fired power plants (0.62 microgI-TEQton(-1)) obtained in this study is considerably higher than the values reported from different countries including UK, USA, and Spain by a factor of 2-265. It means that the air pollution control devices in certain power plants need to be more efficient. The emission data showed that there is a total annual release to air of 6.1 and 95gI-TEQ from major sources in the KC area and Taiwan, respectively. The dominant sources of PCDD/Fs in the KC area are the coal-fired power plants, secondary aluminum smelting, electric arc furnaces, and open burning of rice straw, which contributed for 56%, 17%, 13%, and 3.3% to the total, respectively. However, in Taiwan, the dominant sources of PCDD/Fs are the iron ore sintering, coal-fired power plants, electric arc furnaces, and open burning of rice straw, which contributed for 32%, 28%, 23%, and 8.1% to the total, respectively. The results of this study showed that coal-fired power plants are very significant sources of PCDD/Fs and also provide an important database to assist the decision makers for formulating policies to alleviate dioxin concerns.

  6. A study of diffuse radio sources and X-ray emission in six massive clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, V.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Kale, R.; Intema, H.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study is to extend our current knowledge of the diffuse radio source (halo and relic) populations to z > 0.3. Here, we report GMRT and EVLA radio observations of six galaxy clusters taken from the MAssive Cluster Survey (MACS) catalogue to detect diffuse radio emission. We used archival GMRT (150, 235, and 610 MHz) and EVLA (L band) data and made images at multiple radio frequencies of the following six clusters - MACSJ0417.5-1154, MACSJ1131.8-1955, MACSJ0308.9+2645, MACSJ2243.3-0935, MACSJ2228.5+2036, and MACSJ0358.8-2955. We detect diffuse radio emission (halo or relic, or both) in the first four clusters. In the last two clusters, we do not detect any diffuse radio emission but we put stringent upper limits on their radio powers. We also use archival Chandra X-ray data to carry out morphology and substructure analysis of these clusters. We find that based on X-ray data, these MACS clusters are non-relaxed and show substructures in their temperature distribution. The radio powers of the first four MACS clusters are consistent with their expected values in the LX-P1.4 GHz plot. However, we found ultrasteep spectrum radio halo in the MACSJ0417.5-1154 cluster whose rest-frame cut-off frequency is at ˜900 MHz. The remaining two clusters whose radio powers are ˜11 times below the expected values are most likely to be in the `off-state' as has been postulated in some of the models of radio halo formation.

  7. Diffuse Gas in Retired Galaxies: Nebular Emission Templates and Constraints on the Sources of Ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Jonas; Gilfanov, Marat; Sarzi, Marc; Chen, Yan-Mei; Oh, Kyuseok

    2016-01-01

    We present emission line templates for passively evolving ("retired") galaxies, useful for investigation of the evolution of the ISM in these galaxies, and characterization of their high-temperature source populations. The templates are based on high signal-to-noise ($>800$) co-added spectra ($3700-6800$\\AA) of $\\sim11500$ gas-rich Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies devoid of star-formation and active galactic nuclei. Stacked spectra are provided for the entire sample and sub-samples binned by mean stellar age. In Johansson~et al (2014), these spectra provided the first measurements of the He II 4686\\AA\\ line in passively-evolving galaxies, and the observed He II/H$\\beta$ ratio constrained the contribution of accreting white dwarfs (the "single-degenerate" scenario) to the type Ia supernova rate. In this paper, the full range of unambiguously detected emission lines are presented. Comparison of the observed [O I] 6300\\AA/H$\\alpha$ ratio with photoionization models further constrains any high-temperature single...

  8. The Extended Jet In AP Librae As The Source Of The VHE $\\gamma$-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Zacharias, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Most modeling attempts of blazars use a small emission zone located close to the central black hole in order to explain the broad-band spectral energy distribution. Here we present a case where additionally to the small region a $>$kpc-scale jet is required to successfully reproduce the spectrum and especially the TeV emission, namely the low-frequeny peaked BL Lac object AP Librae detected in the TeV domain by the H.E.S.S. experiment. Given that other parts of the spectral energy distribution follow the characteristics implied by the source classification, the inverse Compton component spans 10 orders of magnitude, which cannot be reproduced by the one-zone model. Additionally, observational constraints in both the synchrotron and inverse Compton compoenent strongly constrain the parameters of a self-consistent model ruling out the possibility of TeV photon production in the vicinity of the galactic center. We discuss the possibility that the TeV radiation is emitted by highly energetic particles in the exte...

  9. Collins fragmentation function for pions and kaons in a spectator model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchetta, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gamberg, L.P. [Penn State Univ., Berks, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Goldstein, G.R. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Mukherjee, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India). Physics Dept.

    2007-07-15

    We calculate the C