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Sample records for kansas state department

  1. DOE KSU EV Site Operator Program. [United States Department of Energy (DOE) Kansas State University (KSU) Electric Vehicle (EV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

    1992-01-01

    Kansas State University, with funding from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the DOE Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric of hybrid vehicle technology. This will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four(4) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort station wagons. This quarter's report describes ongoing public relations activities and meetings as well as presenting performance data for the electric vehicles. (GHH)

  2. Kansas Non-State Road System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset is a single centerline road network representation of 120,000 miles of the Kansas non-state highway system with limited attribution. It includes rural...

  3. KANSAS WIND POWERING AMERICAN STATE OUTREACH: KANSAS WIND WORKING GROUP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAMMARLUND, RAY

    2010-10-27

    The Kansas Wind Working Group (WWG) is a 33-member group announced by former Governor Kathleen Sebelius on Jan. 7, 2008. Formed through Executive Order 08-01, the WWG will educate stakeholder groups with the current information on wind energy markets, technologies, economics, policies, prospects and issues. Governor Mark Parkinson serves as chair of the Kansas Wind Working Group. The group has been instrumental in focusing on the elements of government and coordinating government and private sector efforts in wind energy development. Those efforts have moved Kansas from 364 MW of wind three years ago to over 1000 MW today. Further, the Wind Working Group was instrumental in fleshing out issues such as a state RES and net metering, fundamental parts of HB 2369 that was passed and is now law in Kansas. This represents the first mandatory RES and net metering in Kansas history.

  4. Teaching Kansas History: The State of the State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isern, Thomas D.

    1990-01-01

    Provides a history of debate concerning issue of teaching Kansas state history in public schools as mandated by law. Studies show the failure to comply was a result of nonavailability of textbooks and lack of teacher preparation. Contends that State Department of Education did not support the law because state history is not taught in many Kansas…

  5. "Consumer Satisfaction" Response from Kansas State Alumni

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrew P. Barkley

    1993-01-01

    The determinants of the degree of alumni satisfaction with their investment in college education were identified using survey data from recent graduates of the College of Agriculture at Kansas State University...

  6. 2015 State Geodatabase for Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The 2015 TIGER Geodatabases are extracts of selected nation based and state based geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  7. State of Kansas: K-12 Enrollment Projection Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ted

    2015-01-01

    This document contains headcount enrollment projections for the State of Kansas for the 2015-16 school year through the 2019-20 school year. These projections are based on resident live births in Kansas and the headcount enrollment data for previous school years. Based on the available data related to resident live births by county and previous…

  8. 76 FR 40624 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas AGENCY... Plan (SIP) submittal from the State of Kansas addressing the requirements of Clean Air Act (CAA or Act... Division, 901 North 5th Street, Kansas City, Kansas 66101. EPA requests that, if at all possible, you...

  9. Risk assessment Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (DOE/KCP) PCB discharge to Blue River Sewage Treatment Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidambariah, Venkatesh; Garrett, J.K.; King, K.H.; Yambert, M.W.; Travis, C.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-09-29

    The Environmental Protection Department of the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (DOE/KCP) requested that a risk assessment be performed on the potential health effects of discharges of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the DOE/KCP to the Blue River Sewage Treatment Plant, Kansas City's largest publicly owned treatment works facility (Kansas City POTW). The major objectives of this risk assessment are (1) to determine the potential health impacts of DOE/KCP's current discharges of PCBs to the Kansas City POTW via all reasonable exposure pathways and (2) to determine a health-based, safe'' discharge level for PCBs to the Kansas City POTW. The present risk assessment considers both occupational and public impacts of PCB discharges from the DOE/KCP. Two occupational exposure scenarios assessed are (1) risk to Kansas City POTW sewer line maintenance workers and (2) risk to Kansas City POTW workers during routine operations of the facility. Both types of workers may be dermally exposed to PCBs in sewage. Public risks considered include risk to populations living within 50 km of the Kansas City POTW via inhalation of PCBs from sludge incinerated at the facility. Additionally, risk to the general public associated with PCB releases from the Kansas City POTW to the Missouri River is assessed. These pathways include ingestion of PCBs in drinking water supplied by the Missouri River, dermal adsorption and accidental ingestion of PCBs while swimming in the Missouri River, and ingestion of PCBs through consumption of fish taken from the Missouri River. Risk to breastfed infants from ingestion of PCBs through mothers' milk is also assessed. 108 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, State of Kansas (300m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period. The map is designed to be explicitly...

  11. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, State of Kansas (300m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  12. Public-health education at Kansas State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Jennifer; Payne, Patricia; Ann Holcomb, Carol; Rush, Bonnie; Renter, David; Moro, Manuel H; Freeman, Lisa C

    2008-01-01

    What are veterinary medical and public-health professionals doing to remedy the immediate and impending shortages of veterinarians in population health and public practice? This question was addressed at the joint symposium of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges and the Association of Schools of Public Health, held in April 2007. Thinking locally, faculty and students at Kansas State University (KSU) asked similar questions after attending the symposium: What are we doing within the College of Veterinary Medicine to tackle this problem? What can we do better with new collaborators? Both the professional veterinary curriculum and the Master of Public Health (MPH) at KSU provide exceptional opportunities to address these questions. Students are exposed to public health as a possible career choice early in veterinary school, and this exposure is repeated several times in different venues throughout their professional education. Students also have opportunities to pursue interests in population medicine and public health through certificate programs, summer research programs, study abroad, and collaborations with contributing organizations unique to KSU, such as its Food Science Institute, National Agricultural Biosecurity Center, and Biosecurity Research Institute. Moreover, students may take advantage of the interdisciplinary nature of public-health education at KSU, where collaborations with several different colleges and departments within the university have been established. We are pleased to be able to offer these opportunities to our students and hope that our experience may be instructive for the development of similar programs at other institutions, to the eventual benefit of the profession at large.

  13. 2011 State Teacher Policy Yearbook. Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2011

    2011-01-01

    For five years running, the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) has tracked states' teacher policies, preparing a detailed and thorough compendium of teacher policy in the United States on topics related to teacher preparation, licensure, evaluation, career advancement, tenure, compensation, pensions and dismissal. The 2011 State Teacher…

  14. Science programs in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P.; Kramer, Ariele R.

    2017-05-08

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is a non-regulatory Earth science agency within the Department of the Interior that provides impartial scientific information to describe and understand the health of our ecosystems and environment; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life. The USGS cooperates with Federal, State, tribal, and local agencies in Kansas to deliver long-term data in real-time and interpretive reports describing what those data mean to the public and resource management agencies. USGS science programs in Kansas provide real-time groundwater monitoring at more than 30 locations; streamflow monitoring at more than 232 locations; water-quality and trends in the Little Arkansas and Kansas Rivers; inflows and outflows of sediment to/from reservoirs and in streams; harmful algal bloom research in the Kansas River, Milford Lake, and Cheney Reservoir; water-quantity and water-quality effects of artificial groundwater recharge for the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery project near Wichita, Kansas; compilation of Kansas municipal and irrigation water-use data statewide; the occurrence, effects, and movement of environmental pesticides, antibiotics, algal toxins, and taste-and-odor compounds; and funding to the Kansas Water Resources Research Institute to further research and education through Kansas universities.

  15. Kansas Electric Transmission Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital representation of the EletcircTransmission lines for the State of Kansas as maintained by the Kansas Corporation Commission. Data is...

  16. Characteristics of Child Abuse Homicides in the State of Kansas from 1994 to 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajese, Tanyaradzwa M.; Nguyen, Linh T.; Pham, Giao Q.; Pham, Van K.; Melhorn, Katherine; Kallail, K. James

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study described the epidemiology of child abuse homicides in the state of Kansas from 1994 to 2007. It focused on obtaining significant details on all recorded child abuse homicides in Kansas during this time frame to provide critical information that can be used for future preventive measures. Methods: A retrospective case review…

  17. Federal-State Cooperative Program in Kansas, seminar proceedings, July 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntzinger, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    During the past few years, water-resource management in Kansas has undergone reorientation with the creation of the Kansas Water Authority and the Kansas Water office. New thrusts toward long-term goals based on the Kansas State Water plan demand strong communication and coordination between all water-related agencies within the State. The seminar discussed in this report was an initial step by the Kansas Water Office to assure the continued presence of a technical-coordination process and to provide an opportunity for the U.S. Geological Survey to summarize their technical-informational activities in Kansas for the benefit of State and Federal water agencies with the State. The seminar was held on July 8 and 9, 1985, in Lawrence, Kansas. The agenda included a summary of the data-collection activities and short synopses of projects completed within the past year and those currently underway. The data program discussions described the information obtained at the surface water, groundwater, water quality, and sediment sites in Kansas. Interpretive projects summarized included studies in groundwater modeling, areal hydrologic analysis, regional analysis of floods , low-flow, high-flow, and flow-volume characteristics, water quality of groundwater and lakes, and traveltime and transit-loss analysis. (USGS)

  18. Characteristics of Child Abuse Homicides in the State of Kansas from 1994 to 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajese, Tanyaradzwa M.; Nguyen, Linh T.; Pham, Giao Q.; Pham, Van K.; Melhorn, Katherine; Kallail, K. James

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study described the epidemiology of child abuse homicides in the state of Kansas from 1994 to 2007. It focused on obtaining significant details on all recorded child abuse homicides in Kansas during this time frame to provide critical information that can be used for future preventive measures. Methods: A retrospective case review…

  19. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, State of Kansas (300m buffer) and Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period. The map is designed to be explicitly...

  20. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, State of Kansas (300m buffer) and Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  1. Kansas LPC CRI Protocol

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Inventory and Monitoring: 2015-2019 Kansas Lesser Prairie-Chicken Cooperative Recovery Initiative. The Kansas Lesser prairie-chicken (LPC) Cooperative Recovery...

  2. Kansas TV facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This layer shows the location of all Kansas Title V sources (Clean Air Act major sources). Source information came from Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

  3. Advancing Postsecondary Opportunity, Completion, and Productivity: Essential Performance Indicators for Kansas and Selected Peer States. 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midwestern Higher Education Compact, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This report portrays various performance indicators that are intended to facilitate an assessment of the postsecondary education system in Kansas. Descriptive statistics are presented for Kansas and five other comparison states as well as the nation. Comparison states were selected according to the degree of similarity of population…

  4. Migrant Programs in the Southwestern States -- Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Migrant Information Clearinghouse, Austin, TX. Juarez-Lincoln Center.

    Part of the "Comprehensive National Survey of Migrant Programs" series, this directory was prepared for use by agencies working with migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the Southwestern states of Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. The directory lists programs, services, and resources available to migrants in these states.…

  5. Climate and weather atlas of Kansas : An introduction

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Because Kansas lies in the center of the continental United States, it is subject to varying weather patterns as air masses move across the state. Much of the severe...

  6. History and Future of Professional Development Schools in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Debbie; Myers, Scott

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a history of the Professional Development School (PDS) movement in Kansas, as well as the major influences and challenges ahead as partnerships continue to grow and adapt. Mercer and Myers highlight the Kansas State Department of Education's (KSDE's) engagement in dialogue about the professional learning continuum of licensed…

  7. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenbacher, Don [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  8. Hydrology of Prairie Dog Creek Valley, Norton Dam to state line, north-central Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stullken, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    Development of water resources has been a major factor in the economy of Prairie Dog Creek Valley in north-central Kansas. Releases from Norton Reservoir to the Almena Irrigation District averaged 6,900 acre-feet per year during 1967-76. The number of irrigation wells increased from 4 to 147 during 1947-78. Ground water in the valley is derived mostly from the alluvial aquifer. The effects of irrigation on the aquifer are indicated by water-level changes. The water in storage increased from 130,000 to 136,000 acre-feet during 1947-78 due to recharge from surface-water irrigation. A steady-state model of the aquifer prior to irrigation (1947) indicated that most recharge was from precipitation (88 percent) and most discharge was to streams (54 percent) and reparian transpiration (26 percent). Although aquifer storage increased in this area, storage generally decreased in other areas of western Kansas. (USGS)

  9. Kansas State University DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program. Year 3, Third quarter report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hague, J.R.

    1994-05-01

    Formed on July 15, 1981, the goal of this program is to undertake applied research and development projects that may enhance reliability and minimize the cost of electric service in Kansas. The Kansas Electric Utilities Research Program (KEURP) is a contractual joint venture between six major electric utilities that serve the residents of the State of Kansas. The establishment of KEURP was made possible by the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC). The KCC allowed Kansas electric utilities to include research and development (R & D) costs in their operating expenses, including dues to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Kansas universities play a unique role in KEURP with representation on the executive, technical and advisory committees of the program. The universities receive significant direct and indirect support from KEURP through direct funded projects as well as KEURP/EPRI co-funded projects. KEURP is working with EPRI researchers on projects to develop or expand Kansans knowledge and expertise in the fields of high technology and economic development. KEURP is a major source of funding in the electric/hybrid vehicle demonstration program.

  10. Integrating Multicultural Subject Matters into Teaching Strategies of Elementary School Teachers (The U.S. State of Kansas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanka Lunder Verlič

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The following academic article is based on a PhD thesis that is currently being completed, titled Education and Qualifications of Elementary School Teachers in the U.S. State of Kansas and Slovenia for teaching in classes with immigrant children. The research study titled Integrating Multicultural Subject Matters into Teaching Strategies of Elementary School Teachers (The U.S. State of Kansas, conducted in 2007 based on a sample of 89 elementary school teachers in the U.S. State of Kansas, represents one aspect of assessing the adequacy of undergraduate education regarding multicultural subject matters for elementary school teachers in Slovenia and the U.S. (State of Kansas as well as the qualifications of elementary school teachers of both countries for working with immigrant children. Despite the long-standing tradition of multicultural education in western countries, the research results for Kansas elementary school teachers showed a presence of significant discrepancies between the actual and optimal integration of multicultural subject matters. These results indicate that future undergraduate study programs will have to invest more time in developing multicultural skills and providing practical experiences for working in a diverse environment.

  11. Kansas State University: DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program. Year 4, fourth quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    Kansas State University, in support of a DOE and Kansas Electric Utilities Research Program subject contract, continues to test, evaluate, demonstrate, and develop electric vehicle and infrastructure technology. K-State is operating two Soleq EVcort vehicles. During this reporting period both vehicles were brought back to full operational status after warranty service was completed by Soleq. Vehicle failures occurred due to three unrelated battery cable failures in addition to the replacement of one battery. Both vehicles are being operated on a routine basis. K-State, along with York Technical College, has established a relationship with Troy Design and Manufacturing (TDM) Redford, Michigan. K-State has ordered no less than four Ford Ranger electric trucks from TDM. K-State is involved in the steering committee that is monitoring and refining information to direct the design and testing of these new technology vehicles. TDM should become the first automotive manufacturer certified by one of the Big Three under their Quality Vehicle Manufacturer program. Kansas State University and the Kansas Electric Utility Research Program look forward to working with TDM on their new EV program.

  12. Kansas State University DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program. Year 5 second quarter report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hague, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Kansas State University is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. Data collection and a historical perspective are maintained on vehicle requirements. Two vehicles are electric conversion vehicles from Soleq Corporation of Chicago, Illinois, and four Ford Ranger EVs were procured from Troy Design and manufacturing of Redford, Michigan.

  13. United States Department of State Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    targets for worldwide reduction or elimination of the cultiva- tion, production, and commercial-scale import of cocaine, opium, heroin, mari- juana ...international sanctions against state sponsors of terrorism and urges their strict enforcement. State presses state spon- sors to abandon their support for

  14. Ground Water Atlas of the United States: Segment 3, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James A.; Appel, Cynthia L.

    1997-01-01

    The three States-Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska-that comprise Segment 3 of this Atlas are in the central part of the United States. The major rivers that drain these States are the Niobrara, the Platte, the Kansas, the Arkansas, and the Missouri; the Mississippi River is the eastern boundary of the area. These rivers supply water for many uses but ground water is the source of slightly more than one-half of the total water withdrawn for all uses within the three-State area. The aquifers that contain the water consist of consolidated sedimentary rocks and unconsolidated deposits that range in age from Cambrian through Quaternary. This chapter describes the geology and hydrology of each of the principal aquifers throughout the three-State area. Some water enters Segment 3 as inflow from rivers and aquifers that cross the segment boundaries, but precipitation, as rain and snow, is the primary source of water within the area. Average annual precipitation (1951-80) increases from west to east and ranges from about 16 to 48 inches (fig. 1). The climate of the western one-third of Kansas and Nebraska, where the average annual precipitation generally is less than 20 inches per year, is considered to be semiarid. This area receives little precipitation chiefly because it is distant from the Gulf of Mexico, which is the principal source of moisture-laden air for the entire segment, but partly because it is located in the rain shadow of the Rocky Mountains. Average annual precipitation is greatest in southeastern Missouri. Much of the precipitation is returned to the atmosphere by evapotranspiration, which is the combination of evaporation from the land surface and surface-water bodies, and transpiration from plants. Some of the precipitation either flows directly into streams as overland runoff or percolates into the soil and then moves downward into aquifers where it is stored for a time and subsequently released as base flow to streams. Average annual runoff, which is the

  15. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Kansas. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  16. 78 FR 22827 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas; Infrastructure SIP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... implement the Kansas Air Quality Act and to employ the professional, technical and other staff to effectuate... potentially resulted in apartment complexes, strip malls, small farms, restaurants, etc. triggering GHG PSD...

  17. 1990 Kansas Land Cover Patterns Update

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — In 2008, an update of the 1990 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) database was undertaken. The 1990 KLCP database depicts 10 general land cover classes for the State...

  18. Service design projects sponsored by the Kansas State University Student Chapter of the IEEE EMBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Connor; Gruber, Lucinda; Young, Ethan; Humphrey, Jason; Warren, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Service projects offer volunteer student organizations a means to generate interest and focus activity outside of the context of the classroom. This paper addresses efforts by the Kansas State University (KSU) Student Chapter of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) to initiate and guide service projects in two primary areas: (1) research to aid persons with disabilities (RAPD) and (2) hands-on efforts to interest young women in the quantitative fields of science and engineering. Three RAPD projects are presented: a computer mouse design that helps to alleviate productivity problems associated with Parkinson's tremors, a battery removal tool for arthritic individuals with limited dexterity, and a wireless door control and communication system to assist mobility-limited individuals. Service projects to garner science and engineering interest in young women are co-sponsored by the KSU Women in Engineering and Science Program (WESP). The most recent activity, entitled 'Vital Signs Shirts,' is presented in this paper, along with a summary of pending interactive laboratories designed to interest participants in engineering as applied to the human body. These service projects encourage IEEE EMBS student chapter members to explore their biomedical engineering interests and make a positive impact in the community.

  19. Potential for Microbial Degradation of cis-Dichloroethene and Vinyl Chloride in Streambed Sediment at the U.S. Department of Energy, Kansas City Plant, Missouri, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of carbon-14 (14C) radiotracer-based microcosm experiments was conducted to assess the mechanisms and products of degradation of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) in streambed sediments at the U.S. Department of Energy, Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri. The focus of the investigation was the potential for biotic and abiotic cis-DCE and VC degradation in surficial and underlying hyporheic sediment from the Blue River and its tributaries, Indian Creek and Boone Creek. Substantial degradation of [1,2-14C] cis-DCE and [1,2-14C] VC to 14C-carbon dioxide (14CO2) was observed in all viable surficial sediment microcosms prepared under oxic conditions. No significant accumulation of reductive dechlorination products was observed under these oxic incubation conditions. The results indicate that microbial mineralization processes involving direct oxidation or co-metabolic oxidation are the primary mechanisms of cis-DCE and VC biodegradation in oxic stream sediment at the Kansas City Plant. Substantial mineralization of [1,2-14C] VC also was observed in all viable surficial sediment microcosms incubated in the absence of detectable oxygen (dissolved oxygen concentrations less than 25 micrograms per liter). In general, the accumulation of mineralization products (14CO2 and 14C-methane [14CH4]) predominated with only trace-level detection of the reductive dechlorination product, 14C-ethene. In contrast, microbial degradation of [1,2-14C] cis-DCE by reductive dechlorination or mineralization was not significant in the absence of detectable oxygen. The potential for [1,2-14C] VC biodegradation also was significant in sediments from the deeper hyporheic zones under oxic conditions and in the absence of detectable oxygen. In this study, microbial degradation of [1,2-14C] cis-DCE was not significant in hyporheic sediment treatments under either oxygen condition. Taken together, the results indicate that microbial mineralization processes in

  20. An evaluation of the use of an advanced oxidation process to remove chlorinated hydrocarbons from groundwater at the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garland, S.B. II; Peyton, G.R.

    1990-10-01

    The Allied-Signal Aerospace Company currently operates a production facility in Kansas City, Missouri, under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Over the years the operation of the DOE Kansas City Plant has resulted in the contamination of groundwater with chlorinated hydrocarbons, including trichloroethene (TCE). One of the plumes of contaminated groundwater, the underground tank farm (UTF) plume, was selected for remediation with an advanced oxidation process (AOP) consisting of simultaneous treatment by ozone (O{sub 3}), ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Since the use of AOPs is relatively new for the removal of organics from groundwater, information on design criteria, costs, performance, and operating experience is not well documented in the literature. Therefore, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was requested to evaluate the treatment process. This report documents the work performed through FY 1989. The results of the initial year of the evaluations, FY 1988, have been published previously, and the evaluation will continue at least through FY 1990. This report first briefly describes the treatment plant and the mechanisms of the treatment process. Next, the methodology and the results from the evaluation are discussed. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are presented. 8 refs., 14 figs., 16 tabs.

  1. The Permian system in Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Rocks of Permian age in Kansas were first recognized in 1895, and by the early 21st century the internationally accepted boundary between the Permian and the...

  2. 2010 Kansas bobwhite status report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a brief description of bobwhite population trends in Kansas over the last 30+ years. At the time of this report most of the 2010 surveys...

  3. Public-supply water use in Kansas, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer; Restrepo-Osorio, Diana

    2017-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Data Release provides derivative statistics of water used by Kansas public-supply systems in 2015. Gallons per capita per day is calculated using self-reported information in the “Part B: Monthly Water Use Summary” and “Part C: Population, Service Connections, and Water Rates” sections of the Kansas Department of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources' (DWR) annual municipal water use report (see appendixes at http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/ds964 for an example of a municipal water use report form.) Percent unaccounted for water is calculated using self-reported information in “Part B: Monthly Water Use Summary” of the DWR’s municipal water-use report. The published statistics from the previous 4 years (2011–2014) are also shown with the 2015 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. Derivative statistics of 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, and 5-year averages for gallons per capita per day (gpcd) are also provided by the Kansas Water Authority's 14 regional planning areas, and the DWR regions used for analysis of per capita water use in Kansas. An overall Kansas average (yearly and 5-year average) is also calculated. Kansas state average per capita municipal water use in 2015 was 105 gpcd.

  4. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of Kansas and Oklahoma. Volume 5, Project on Advanced Oil Recovery and the States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of the IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the states of Kansas, Illinois and Oklahoma for five other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. The analysis presented in this report is based on the databases and models available in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to Kansas` known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technology, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could have even greater benefits to the state and the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, and energy security will benefit both the state of Kansas, Illinois and Oklahoma and the nation as a whole.

  5. Geodatabase of the datasets used to represent the High Plains aquifer, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase includes spatial datasets that represent the High Plains aquifer in the States of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota,...

  6. Geodatabase of the datasets used to represent the 4 subareas of the Lower Cretaceous aquifer, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase includes spatial datasets which represent the Lower Cretaceous aquifer system in the States of Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North...

  7. HCUP State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) - Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) contain the universe of emergency department visits in participating States. Restricted access data files are...

  8. Kansas Power Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Power Plants database depicts, as point features, the locations of the various types of power plant locations in Kansas. The locations of the power plants...

  9. 78 FR 11751 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas; Idle Reduction of Heavy-Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... Development Branch, 11201 Renner Boulevard, Lenexa, Kansas 66219. The Regional Office's official hours of... subject to the rules may allow or permit NO X to be emitted in excess of specified emission limits. The... the Kansas City Board of Public Utilities (BPU) power generating facilities located in Wyandotte...

  10. Kansas Playa Wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This digital dataset provides information about the distribution, areal extent, and morphometry of playa wetlands throughout western Kansas. Playa wetlands were...

  11. Kansas Protects and Restores Wetlands, Streams and Riparian Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetland Program Development Grant (WPDG) in 2007 when the Kansas State Conservation Commission began identifying team members interested in developing a framework for a comprehensive Kansas Wetland and Aquatic Resources Conservation Plan.

  12. Kansas forests 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Keith Moser; Mark H. Hansen; Robert L. Atchison; Gary J. Brand; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Mark D. Nelson; Charles H. Perry; William H. IV Reading; Barry T. Wilson; Christopher W. Woodall

    2008-01-01

    The first completed annual inventory of Kansas forests reports 2.1 million acres of forest land, roughly 4 percent of the total land area in the State. Softwood forests account for nearly 5 percent of the total timberland area. Oak/hickory forest types make up 56 percent of the total hardwood forest land area. Elm/ash/cottonwood accounts for more than 30 percent of the...

  13. Kansas' Forests 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Keith Moser; Mark H. Hansen; Robert L. Atchison; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Grant Domke; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Andrew Lister; Patrick D. Miles; Mark D. Nelson; Ronald J. Piva; Christopher W. Woodall

    2013-01-01

    The second completed annual inventory of Kansas' forests reports 2.4 million acres of forest land, roughly 5 percent of the total land area in the State. Softwood forests account for 4.4 percent of the total timberland area. Oak/hickory forest types make up 55 percent of the total hardwood forest land area. Elm/ash/cottonwood accounts for more than 32 percent of...

  14. 48 CFR 606.370 - Department of State standardization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... standardization program. 606.370 Section 606.370 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE... Department of State standardization program. (a) It is the Department's policy to promote full and open... standardization when only specified makes and models of equipment will satisfy the Department's needs and only...

  15. United States Department of Energy: A History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    This pamphlet traces the origins of the Department of Energy and outlines the history of the Department as reflected in the energy policies of Presidents Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan. It attempts to place recent energy policy into historical perspective by describing the evolution of the federal Government's role in energy research, development, and regulation.

  16. United States Department of Energy: a history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holl, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    This pamphlet traces the origins of the Department of Energy and outlines the history of the Department as reflected in the energy policies of Presidents Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan. It attempts to place recent energy policy into historical perspective by describing the evolution of the federal Government's role in energy research, development, and regulation.

  17. Kansas Educational Achievement Report Card 2015. Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallman, Mark; Carter, Ted

    2015-01-01

    This report includes a high-level overview of student outcome data and how Kansas measures up to the other 49 states. It is meant to complement the other reporting that the Kansas Association of School Boards has released and will be releasing related to improving student outcomes for all Kansas public schools. The following are key findings…

  18. 77 FR 16314 - Kansas Disaster # KS-00062

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00062 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Kansas dated 03/12/2012... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  19. Irrigation trends in Kansas, 1991–2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This fact sheet examines trends in total reported irrigation water use and acres irrigated as well as irrigation water use by crop type and system type in Kansas for...

  20. Major Kansas Perennial Streams : 1961 and 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Map of major perennial streams in Kansas for the years 1961 and 2009. The map shows a decrease in streams regarded as perennial in 1961, compared to stream regarded...

  1. 75 FR 103 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 17, Kansas City, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... been given in the Federal Register (74 FR 17953-17954, 4/20/2009) and the application has been... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Order No. 1655 Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 17, Kansas City, Kansas...

  2. Biomedical learning experiences for middle school girls sponsored by the Kansas State University Student Chapter of the IEEE EMBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Lucinda; Griffith, Connor; Young, Ethan; Sullivan, Adriann; Schuler, Jeff; Arnold-Christian, Susan; Warren, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Learning experiences for middle school girls are an effective means to steer young women toward secondary engineering curricula that they might not have otherwise considered. Sponsorship of such experiences by a collegiate student group is worthwhile, as it gives the group common purpose and places college students in a position to mentor these young women. This paper addresses learning experiences in different areas of bio-medical engineering offered to middle school girls in November 2008 via a day-long workshop entitled "Engineering The Body." The Kansas State University (KSU) Student Chapter of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) worked with the KSU Women in Engineering and Science Program (WESP) to design and sponsor these experiences, which addressed the areas of joint mechanics, electrocardiograms, membrane transport, computer mouse design, and audio filters for cochlear implants. Fifty five middle-school girls participated in this event, affirming the notion that biomedical engineering appeals to young women and that early education and recruitment efforts have the potential to expand the biomedical engineering talent pool.

  3. Dog and cat exposures to hazardous substances reported to the Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory: 2009-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Ali; Van der Merwe, Deon

    2013-06-01

    Pet dogs and cats in the USA are commonly exposed to potentially hazardous substances found in domestic environments. Requests for assistance and advice received by the Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory regarding exposures in dogs and cats to substances perceived by their caretakers to be potentially harmful included 1,616 phone calls, over a 3-year period covering 2009-2012. Enquiries occurred more often during summer. Dogs were involved in 84.7 % of calls and cats in 15.3 %. Oral exposures were reported in 95.5 % of calls, dermal exposures in 3.7 % of calls, inhalation exposures in 0.6 % of calls, and parenteral exposures in 0.2 % of calls. Therapeutic drugs were the most frequently reported substances, accounting for 35.4 % of calls, followed by household chemicals (15.5 %); foods (14.8 %); pesticides (13.9 %); plants (12 %), industrial chemicals and fertilizers (3.6 %); cosmetics and personal care products (2.8 %); and animal, insect, and microorganism toxins (2.1 %). Although requests for information or assistance are not a measure of poisoning incidence, it can provide insight regarding relative exposure rates, help to identify changing exposure trends and emerging exposures, and reflect the public concern regarding actual or apparent harmful exposures in pets.

  4. Kansas Energy Sources: A Geological Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merriam, Daniel F., E-mail: dmerriam@kgs.ku.edu [University of Kansas (United States); Brady, Lawrence L.; Newell, K. David [University of Kansas, Kansas Geological Survey (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Kansas produces both conventional energy (oil, gas, and coal) and nonconventional (coalbed gas, wind, hydropower, nuclear, geothermal, solar, and biofuels) and ranks the 22nd in state energy production in the U.S. Nonrenewable conventional petroleum is the most important energy source with nonrenewable, nonconventional coalbed methane gas becoming increasingly important. Many stratigraphic units produce oil and/or gas somewhere in the state with the exception of the Salina Basin in north-central Kansas. Coalbed methane is produced from shallow wells drilled into the thin coal units in southeastern Kansas. At present, only two surface coal mines are active in southeastern Kansas. Although Kansas has been a major exporter of energy in the past (it ranked first in oil production in 1916), now, it is an energy importer.

  5. Irrigation water use in Kansas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.

    2016-03-22

    This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources, presents derivative statistics of 2013 irrigation water use in Kansas. The published regional and county-level statistics from the previous 4 years (2009–12) are shown with the 2013 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. An overall Kansas average and regional averages also are calculated and presented. Total reported irrigation water use in 2013 was 3.3 million acre-feet of water applied to 3.0 million irrigated acres.

  6. Kansas Cartographic Database (KCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Cartographic Database (KCD) is an exact digital representation of selected features from the USGS 7.5 minute topographic map series. Features that are...

  7. Kansas Rivers TMDL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set includes all the streams in the Kansas 2006 Water Register that have established TMDLs as of October 17, 2006. The impairments and implementation...

  8. Department

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2017-05-25

    May 25, 2017 ... Department of Animal production Federal University of Technology Minna – Niger state,. Nigeria ... principles by poultry farmers in Kwara State, Nigeria. The ma .... usually incur by broiler and layer farmers ... A multi-stage sampling technique .... their birds under intensive care, which is ... husbandry system.

  9. Chlordane exposure to interior least terns nesting along the Kansas River, Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The federally endangered interior least tern (Sterna antillarum) has been known to nest on sandbars along the Kansas River, KS since 1996. Documented concentrations...

  10. Routine environment audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri. During this audit the activities the audit team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted October 24-November 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} establishes the mission of EH-24, which is to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  11. 76 FR 80754 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas: Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... Energy Information Agency's databases for emissions data on cyclone boilers equipped with SCR technology..., Westar Energy, and the National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA). We have summarized the comments... comments on our proposed action. Comment #2: The State and Westar Energy noted some transcription errors...

  12. Public-supply water use in Kansas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.; Eslick, Patrick J.

    2015-10-27

    This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Agriculture’s Division of Water Resources, presents derivative statistics of water used by Kansas public-supply systems in 2013. The published statistics from the previous 4 years (2009–12) are also shown with the 2013 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. An overall Kansas average and regional averages also are calculated and presented.

  13. US hydropower resource assessment for Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Kansas.

  14. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Kansas City Plant (KCP), conducted March 23 through April 3, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the KCP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations performed at the KCP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the KCP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the KCP Survey. 94 refs., 39 figs., 55 tabs.

  15. STATE_SYSTEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset is a single centerline highway network representation of the 10,000 miles Kansas State Highway System (Interstate, U.S., and Kansas routes). The state...

  16. Texas State Department of Health Migrant Project. Annual Report 1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Dept. of Health Resources, Austin.

    The Texas Migrant Health Project under the State Department of Health aims to: (1) promote and improve medical, dental, and public health services for the domestic agricultural worker and his dependents and (2) encourage and support migrant efforts to participate in and be responsible for personal and family health. During 1969-70, the state was…

  17. Quarry Creek - Excavation, Analysis and Prospect of a Kansas City Hopewell Site, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    1980 Culture Drift: A Case Study of the Kansas City Hopewell. Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation, Department of Antropology , University of Kansas...provides information on the horizontal and vertical extent of cultural deposits and the nature of them. The application and results of a proton...middens, below which six trash-filled pits were revealed. Cultural material at the site includes an abundance of ceramic and lithic artifacts and well

  18. DOE/SOUTF/KEURP Kansas State University, Pushing technology to satisfy real world applications. First quarter report, July 1--September 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hague, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    K-State has concluded the first quarter of the third year, demonstrating and evaluating electric vehicle technology. The G-Van has failed to operate during this period. Although plans are being made to install new batteries in the G-Van, the vehicle has little to prove or demonstrate in the way of advanced technologies. As such, there was an agreement by the Site Operator Users Task Force that no additional federal funding would be spent to maintain or operate the G-Vans. The DSEP van, received from DOE during the latter part of January remains idle. The DSEP vehicle may never be refurbished and used in the Site Operator Program as an operational vehicle. It may be used as a lab vehicle or in a special projects capacity. The cost of operating or maintaining this one-of-a-kind vehicle is high and the value of the vehicle to the program is questionable. Kansas State University is using and pleased with its first Soleq`s EVcort. The vehicle has been used on a routine basis around campus, at the Nebraska State Fair, the Kansas State Fair, and other specific functions. The vehicle continues to operate in an efficient manner, is well received by the public, and clearly demonstrates what is possible in EV technology. Professor Hague continued to serve as the Chairman of the Site Operator Users Task Force. As such, K-State is involved at all levels in promoting electric vehicle legislation and technology. The electric vehicle technology continues to be debated and discussed at all levels of government. The next year should bring incremental improvements for funding. The SOUTF has established an effort to ``push`` the EV technology forward with the development of a common specification to be used in the purchase of electric vehicles during the next year.

  19. PULSAR: A High-Repetition-Rate, High-Power, CE Phase-Locked Laser for the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Itzhak, Itzik (Itzhak) [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Carnes, Kevin D. [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Cocke, C. Lew [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Fehrenbach, Charles W. [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Kumarappan, Vinod [PULSAR: A High-Repetition-Rate, High-Power, CE Phase-Locked Laser for the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University; Rudenko, Artem [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University; Trallero, Carlos [J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University

    2014-05-09

    This instrumentation grant funded the development and installation of a state-of-the-art laser system to be used for the DOE funded research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. Specifically, we purchased a laser based on the KMLABs Red-Dragon design, which has a high repetition rate of 10-20 kHz crucial for multi-parameter coincidence measurements conducted in our lab. This laser system is carrier-envelope phase (CEP) locked and provides pulses as short as 21 fs directly from the amplifier (see details below). In addition, we have developed a pulse compression setup that provides sub 5 fs pulses and a CEP tagging capability that allows for long measurements of CEP dependent processes.

  20. Functions of environmental epidemiology and surveillance in state health departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanbury, Martha; Anderson, Henry; Blackmore, Carina; Fagliano, Jerald; Heumann, Michael; Kass, Daniel; McGeehin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Public health surveillance and epidemiology are the foundations for disease prevention because they provide the factual basis from which agencies can set priorities, plan programs, and take actions to protect the public's health. Surveillance for noninfectious diseases associated with exposure to agents in the environment like lead and pesticides has been a function of state health departments for more than 3 decades, but many state programs do not have adequate funding or staff for this function. Following the efforts to identify core public health epidemiology functions in chronic diseases, injury, and occupational health and safety, a workgroup of public health environmental epidemiologists operating within the organizational structure of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists has defined the essential core functions of noninfectious disease environmental epidemiology that should be present in every state health department and additional functions of a comprehensive program. These functions are described in terms of the "10 Essential Environmental Public Health Services" and their associated performance standards. Application of these consensus core and expanded functions should help state and large metropolitan health departments allocate resources and prioritize activities of their environmental epidemiologists, thus improving the delivery of environmental health services to the public.

  1. The ecology of a boggy marsh in Stafford County, Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The fluctuating water level of lakes and ponds is one of the most critical factors in the establishment of aquatic vegetation in Kansas. This study utilizes an...

  2. Pesticide evaluation for Flint Hills National Wildlife Refuge in Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Flint Hills National Wildlife Refuge is an overlay on the Corps of Engineers John Redmond Reservoir in east-central Kansas. The Refuge is managed to provide spring...

  3. Department

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-09-20

    Sep 20, 2016 ... Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Kibabii University. 2. Department .... be seen that average rainfall exhibited a cyclic pattern with a reducing trend under both scenarios .... Department of Meteorology, University.

  4. Ramona, Kansas, Corrective Action Monitoring Report for 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This report describes groundwater monitoring in 2014 for the property at Ramona, Kansas, on which a grain storage facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The monitoring was implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory and was conducted as specified in the Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2012) approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2012).

  5. Ramona, Kansas, Corrective Action Monitoring Report for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This Monitoring Report describes groundwater monitoring for the property at Ramona, Kansas, on which a grain storage facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The monitoring was implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory. Monitoring was conducted as specified in the Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2012) approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2012).

  6. Ramona, Kansas, Corrective Action Monitoring Report for 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This report describes groundwater monitoring in 2015 for the property at Ramona, Kansas, on which a grain storage facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The monitoring was implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory and was conducted as specified in the Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2012) approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2012).

  7. Ecoregions of Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a...

  8. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, Kansas River Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Upper Kansas River Watershed Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period as part of a...

  9. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, Kansas River Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  10. Kansas Road Centerline Fle (KRCF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This version of the Kansas Road Centerline File (0801) represents the first effort to create a statewide roads layer from best available data sources. KGS integrated...

  11. 22 CFR 9b.8 - Term and renewal of Department of State press building passes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Term and renewal of Department of State press... DEPARTMENT OF STATE PRESS BUILDING PASSES § 9b.8 Term and renewal of Department of State press building passes. (a) Department of State press building passes for U.S. citizens are issued with three...

  12. Emergency department transfers and transfer relationships in United States hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindermann, Dana R; Mutter, Ryan L; Houchens, Robert L; Barrett, Marguerite L; Pines, Jesse M

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to describe transfers out of hospital-based emergency departments (EDs) in the United States and to identify different characteristics of sending and receiving hospitals, travel distance during transfer, disposition on arrival to the second hospital, and median number of transfer partners among sending hospitals. Emergency department records were linked at transferring hospitals to ED and inpatient records at receiving hospitals in nine U.S. states using the 2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Emergency Department Databases and State Inpatient Databases, the American Hospital Association Annual Survey, and the Trauma Information Exchange Program. Using the Clinical Classification Software (CCS) to categorize conditions, the 50 disease categories with the highest transfer rates were studied, and these were then placed into nine clinical groups. Records were included where both sending and receiving records were available; these data were tabulated to describe ED transfer patterns, hospital-to-hospital distances, final patient disposition, and number of transfer partners. A total of 97,021 ED transfer encounters were included in the analysis from the 50 highest transfer rate disease categories. Among these, transfer rates ranged from 1% to 13%. Circulatory conditions made up about half of all transfers. Receiving hospitals were more likely to be nonprofit, teaching, trauma, and urban and have more beds with greater specialty coverage and more advanced diagnostic and therapeutic resources. The median transfer distance was 23 miles, with 25% traveling more than 40 to 50 miles. About 8% of transferred encounters were discharged from the second ED, but that varied from 0.6% to 53% across the 50 conditions. Sending hospitals had a median of seven transfer partners across all conditions and between one and four per clinical group. Among high-transfer conditions in U.S. EDs, patients are often transferred great distances, more

  13. Final corrective action study for the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-04-20

    Past operations at a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Ramona, Kansas, resulted in low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater that slightly exceed the regulatory standard in only one location. As requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the CCC/USDA has prepared a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address groundwater impacted by the former CCC/USDA facility but not releases caused by other potential groundwater contamination sources in Ramona. Four remedial alternatives were considered in the CAS. The recommended remedial alternative in the CAS consists of Environmental Use Control to prevent the inadvertent use of groundwater as a water supply source, coupled with groundwater monitoring to verify the continued natural improvement in groundwater quality. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) has directed Argonne National Laboratory to prepare a Corrective Action Study (CAS), consistent with guidance from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2001a), for the CCC/USDA grain storage facility formerly located in Ramona, Kansas. This effort is pursuant to a KDHE (2007a) request. Although carbon tetrachloride levels at the Ramona site are low, they remain above the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L (Kansas 2003, 2004). In its request for the CAS, the KDHE (2007a) stated that, because of these levels, risk is associated with potential future exposure to contaminated groundwater. The KDHE therefore determined that additional measures are warranted to limit future use of the property and/or exposure to contaminated media as part of site closure. The KDHE further requested comparison of at least two corrective

  14. Adverse health effects in Canada geese (Branta canadensis) associated with waste from zinc and lead mines in the Tri-State Mining District (Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri, USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Deon; Carpenter, James W; Nietfeld, Jerome C; Miesner, John F

    2011-07-01

    Lead and zinc poisoning have been recorded in a variety of bird species, including migrating waterfowl such as Canada Geese (Branta canadensis), at sites contaminated with mine waste from lead and zinc mines in the Tri-State Mining District, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri, USA. The adverse health impacts from mine waste on these birds may, however, be more extensive than is apparent from incidental reports of clinical disease. To characterize health impacts from mine waste on Canada Geese that do not have observable signs of poisoning, four to eight apparently healthy birds per site were collected from four contaminated sites and an uncontaminated reference site, and examined for physical and physiologic evidence of metals poisoning. Tissue concentrations of silver, aluminum, arsenic, barium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, selenium, thallium, vanadium, and zinc were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Adverse health effects due to lead were characterized by assessing blood δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) enzyme activity. Adverse effects associated with zinc poisoning were determined from histologic examination of pancreas tissues. Elevated tissue lead concentrations and inhibited blood ALAD enzyme activities were consistently found in birds at all contaminated sites. Histopathologic signs of zinc poisoning, including fibrosis and vacuolization, were associated with elevated pancreatic zinc concentrations at one of the study sites. Adverse health effects associated with other analyzed elements, or tissue concentrations indicating potentially toxic exposure levels to these elements, were not observed.

  15. Depart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2017-01-26

    Jan 26, 2017 ... Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, ... informal automobile workshops in virtually every open space in Nigerian cities that ..... plantation to encourage a green society and.

  16. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Law Enforcement Officers on Rabies and Animal Control Issues in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straily, A; Trevino-Garrison, I

    2017-03-01

    Rabies is a deadly zoonoses endemic in the United States, including Kansas. Animal control programmes that emphasize vaccination of dogs and cats, removal of stray animals and enforcement of licensure programmes have historically been essential in reducing the risk of rabies exposures to humans (Beran, 1991). Kansas does not mandate the use of animal control officers [ACOs] and in areas where there is no designated animal control officer, law enforcement officers [LEOs] are required to fill that role. Little is known about LEOs' knowledge of rabies, their current practices in responding to animal-related calls or if they receive any specialized training to perform the duties of an ACO. A web-based, voluntary and anonymous survey was sent to law enforcement officers in Kansas in January 2014. The survey included questions about animal control practices and a self-assessment of rabies knowledge. The response rate was 16.2%. All respondents indicated LEOs will respond to animal-related calls, even if there was an ACO available in their department or jurisdiction. A majority of respondents indicated they had not received training on safe animal handling (62.9%, 61/97) or zoonoses prevention (85.6%, 83/97), even though a strong majority considered such training important (89.7% and 79.4%, respectively). Most respondents (>80%) were able to correctly identify animals capable of transmitting rabies but were less aware of how rabies was transmitted or the severity of rabies in humans. Our results demonstrate that Kansas LEOs perform animal control duties, many without the proper training, even though most consider such training to be important to be able to perform their duties safely. Training on safe animal handling and zoonoses prevention should be provided to all LEOs in Kansas to enable them to safely execute their duties and provide timely and accurate information to citizens regarding rabies prevention. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Summary of hydrologic conditions in Kansas, 2013 water year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Arin J.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Kansas Water Science Center (KSWSC), in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring gages in the State of Kansas. These include 195 real-time streamflow-gaging stations (herein gages) and 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations. These data and associated analysis, accumulated for many years, provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve our understanding of our water resources.

  18. Study of Correlation of Logging Parameters Obtained from the Wells Drilled on Two Nearby Areas with the Same Geological Structure. An Example of Counties Russell and Ellis, Kansas State, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Shiryaev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the data shared by Kansas geological survey, the analysis of logging parameters from the wells located in nearby Counties Russell and Ellis located in the Kansas State, USA was performed. These counties have the similar geological structure. Data obtained in Kansas geological survey were processed to delete the gaps and other inconsistent readings. Then the correlation matrixes were calculated showing correlation between shallow, medium and deep logging in each well. Correlation matrixes demonstrated significant correlation between medium and deep logging, and medium and shallow logging because of similar geological structure. Ellis County is located at higher elevation than Russell County hence well top in Ellis County is at the higher elevation than well top in Russell County. We determined the depth shift, for which the maximum correlation between logging parameters in both wells (in Russell and Ellis Counties was observed. In addition, the correlation coefficients for the same logging parameters in two wells were received. The strongest correlation coefficient of up to 0.425 was obtained between medium logging in two wells. The results of study show that if the geological structures are similar the logging parameters obtained from the wells in these areas are also similar.

  19. Streamflow characteristics and trends at selected streamgages in southwest and south-central Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2016-01-11

    Historical data for nine selected streamgages in southwest and south-central Kansas were used in an assessment of streamflow characteristics and trends. This information is required by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism to assist with the effective management of Etheostoma cragini (Arkansas darter) habitats and populations in the State. Changing streamflow conditions, such as a reduction or elimination of streamflow, may adversely affect the Arkansas darter. Priority basins for the Arkansas darter represented by the selected streamgages include the Cimarron River, Rattlesnake Creek, the North Fork Ninnescah River, the South Fork Ninnescah River, the Medicine Lodge River, and the Chikaskia River.

  20. Streamflow characteristics and trends at selected streamgages in southwest and south-central Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2016-01-11

    Historical data for nine selected streamgages in southwest and south-central Kansas were used in an assessment of streamflow characteristics and trends. This information is required by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism to assist with the effective management of Etheostoma cragini (Arkansas darter) habitats and populations in the State. Changing streamflow conditions, such as a reduction or elimination of streamflow, may adversely affect the Arkansas darter. Priority basins for the Arkansas darter represented by the selected streamgages include the Cimarron River, Rattlesnake Creek, the North Fork Ninnescah River, the South Fork Ninnescah River, the Medicine Lodge River, and the Chikaskia River.

  1. Forests of Kansas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.M. Meneguzzo; B.J. Butler

    2014-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on annual inventories conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station (NRS) of the U.S. Forest Service. The estimates presented in this update are based on field data collected in 2009-2013 with comparisons made to data collected from...

  2. Kansas' Forest Resources, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; M.H. Hansen; R.L. Atchison

    2008-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  3. Forests of Kansas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.M. Meneguzzo; S.J. Crocker

    2015-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on annual inventories conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station (NRS) of the U.S. Forest Service. The estimates presented in this update are based on field data collected in 2010-2014 with comparisons made to data collected from...

  4. Kansas' forest resources, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; P.D. Miles; R.A. Atchison

    2013-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  5. Kansas' forest resources, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; C.H. Barnett; C.M. Kurtz; R.A. Atchison

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  6. Kansas' forest resources, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; M.H. Hansen; C.H. Barnett; R.A. Atchison

    2010-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  7. Kansas' forest resources, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; D.E. Haugen; R.A. Atchison

    2012-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  8. Sexting in Kansas Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Dale R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an exploratory study about sexting, the sending of sexually explicit or illicit photos or video between cell phones, in Kansas public schools. An on-line survey asked superintendents to report if they have had an occurrence of sexting in their district. They were also asked if they felt sexting is currently a problem in their…

  9. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-01-27

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work that will be conducted to investigate the subsurface contaminant conditions at the property formerly leased by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) in Ramona, Kansas (Figure 1.1). Data obtained during this event will be used to (1) evaluate potential source areas on the property, (2) determine the vertical and horizontal extent of potential contamination, and (3) provide recommendations for future actions, with the ultimate goal of assigning this site No Further Action status. The planned investigation includes groundwater monitoring requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. Under the Intergovernmental Agreement, Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne has issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. The Master Work Plan was approved by the KDHE. It contains materials common to investigations at locations in Kansas and should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Ramona.

  10. Fabrication and testing of a 4-node micro-pocket fission detector array for the Kansas State University TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenberger, Michael A.; Nichols, Daniel M.; Stevenson, Sarah R.; Swope, Tanner M.; Hilger, Caden W.; Unruh, Troy C.; McGregor, Douglas S.; Roberts, Jeremy A.

    2017-08-01

    Advancements in nuclear reactor core modeling and computational capability have encouraged further development of in-core neutron sensors. Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs) have been fabricated and tested previously, but successful testing of these prior detectors was limited to single-node operation with specialized designs. Described in this work is a modular, four-node MPFD array fabricated and tested at Kansas State University (KSU). The four sensor nodes were equally spaced to span the length of the fuel-region of the KSU TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor core. The encapsulated array was filled with argon gas, serving as an ionization medium in the small cavities of the MPFDs. The unified design improved device ruggedness and simplified construction over previous designs. A 0.315-in. (8-mm) penetration in the upper grid plate of the KSU TRIGA Mk. II research nuclear reactor was used to deploy the array between fuel elements in the core. The MPFD array was coupled to an electronic support system which has been developed to support pulse-mode operation. Neutron-induced pulses were observed on all four sensor channels. Stable device operation was confirmed by testing under steady-state reactor conditions. Each of the four sensors in the array responded to changes in reactor power between 10 kWth and full power (750 kWth). Reactor power transients were observed in real-time including positive transients with periods of 5, 15, and 30 s. Finally, manual reactor power oscillations were observed in real-time.

  11. Streamflow alteration at selected sites in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.; Eng, Ken

    2017-06-26

    An understanding of streamflow alteration in response to various disturbances is necessary for the effective management of stream habitat for a variety of species in Kansas. Streamflow alteration can have negative ecological effects. Using a modeling approach, streamflow alteration was assessed for 129 selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in the State for which requisite streamflow and basin-characteristic information was available. The assessment involved a comparison of the observed condition from 1980 to 2015 with the predicted expected (least-disturbed) condition for 29 streamflow metrics. The metrics represent various characteristics of streamflow including average flow (annual, monthly) and low and high flow (frequency, duration, magnitude).Streamflow alteration in Kansas was indicated locally, regionally, and statewide. Given the absence of a pronounced trend in annual precipitation in Kansas, a precipitation-related explanation for streamflow alteration was not supported. Thus, the likely explanation for streamflow alteration was human activity. Locally, a flashier flow regime (typified by shorter lag times and more frequent and higher peak discharges) was indicated for three streamgages with urbanized basins that had higher percentages of impervious surfaces than other basins in the State. The combination of localized reservoir effects and regional groundwater pumping from the High Plains aquifer likely was responsible, in part, for diminished conditions indicated for multiple streamflow metrics in western and central Kansas. Statewide, the implementation of agricultural land-management practices to reduce runoff may have been responsible, in part, for a diminished duration and magnitude of high flows. In central and eastern Kansas, implemented agricultural land-management practices may have been partly responsible for an inflated magnitude of low flows at several sites.

  12. 22 CFR 9b.1 - Press access to the Department of State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., concessionaries, barber shop, dry cleaners and the Foreign Affairs Recreation Association offices for the purposes... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Press access to the Department of State. 9b.1 Section 9b.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEPARTMENT OF STATE PRESS...

  13. 38 CFR 1.506 - Disclosure of records to Federal Government departments, State unemployment compensation agencies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Federal Government departments, State unemployment compensation agencies, and the Office of Servicemembers....506 Disclosure of records to Federal Government departments, State unemployment compensation agencies... official purposes by any department or other agency of the U.S. Government or any state unemployment...

  14. 78 FR 24784 - State Department Advisory Committee on Private International Law; Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE State Department Advisory Committee on Private International Law; Closed Meeting In accordance with section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App Sec. 10(a), the Department of State announces a meeting of the full Advisory Committee...

  15. 78 FR 22020 - State Department Advisory Committee on Private International Law; Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE State Department Advisory Committee on Private International Law; Closed Meeting In accordance with section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App Sec. 10(a), the Department of State announces a meeting of the full Advisory Committee...

  16. 76 FR 9051 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State Department of Natural Resources... inventory of human remains in the control of the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Olympia... control of the Washington State Department of Natural Resources at the time of removal, and as such...

  17. 22 CFR 23.1 - Remittances made payable to the Department of State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remittances made payable to the Department of State. 23.1 Section 23.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE FEES AND FUNDS FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING § 23.1 Remittances made payable to the Department of State. Except as otherwise specified in this...

  18. 22 CFR 23.5 - Claims for settlement by Department of State or General Accounting Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... General Accounting Office. 23.5 Section 23.5 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE FEES AND FUNDS FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING § 23.5 Claims for settlement by Department of State or General Accounting Office. Claims for settlement by the Department of State or by the General Accounting Office shall be...

  19. 48 CFR 652.219-70 - Department of State Subcontracting Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Subcontracting Goals. 652.219-70 Section 652.219-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE... Department of State Subcontracting Goals. As prescribed in 619.708-70, insert a provision substantially the same as follows: Department of State Subcontracting Goals (APR 2004) (a) The offeror shall provide...

  20. Terrorism and emergency preparedness in state and territorial public health departments--United States, 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-13

    After the events of September 11, 2001, federal funding for state public health preparedness programs increased from $67 million in fiscal year (FY) 2001 to approximately $1 billion in FY 2002. These funds were intended to support preparedness for and response to terrorism, infectious disease outbreaks, and other public health threats and emergencies. The Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) assessed the impact of funding on epidemiologic capacity, including terrorism preparedness and response, in state health departments in November 2001 and again in May 2004, after distribution of an additional $1 billion in FY 2003. This report describes the results of those assessments, which indicated that increased funding for terrorism preparedness and emergency response has rapidly increased the number of epidemiologists and increased capacity for preparedness at the state level. However, despite the increase in epidemiologists, state public health officials estimate that 192 additional epidemiologists, an increase of 45.3%, are needed nationwide to fully staff terrorism preparedness programs.

  1. Terrorism preparedness in state health departments--United States, 2001-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-31

    The anthrax attacks in fall 2001 highlighted the role of infectious disease (ID) epidemiologists in terrorism preparedness and response. Beginning in 2002, state health departments (SHDs) received approximately 1 billion dollars in new federal funding to prepare for and respond to terrorism, infectious disease outbreaks, and other public health threats and emergencies. This funding is being used in part to improve epidemiologic and surveillance capabilities. To determine how states have used a portion of their new funding to increase ID epidemiology capacity, the Iowa Department of Public Health's Center for Acute Disease Epidemiology and the Iowa State University Department of Microbiology conducted two surveys of U.S. state epidemiologists during September 2000-August 2001 and October 2002-June 2003. This report summarizes the results of these surveys, which determined that although the number of SHD epidemiology workers assigned to ID and terrorism preparedness increased by 132%, concerns remained regarding the ability of SHDs to hire qualified personnel. These findings underscore the need to develop additional and more diverse training venues for current and future ID epidemiologists.

  2. Annual Report of Groundwater Monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Periodic sampling is performed at Centralia, Kansas, on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) by Argonne National Laboratory. The sampling is currently (2009-2012) conducted in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2009). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater sitewide (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a), as well as the response to the interim measure (IM) pilot test that is in progress (Argonne 2007b). This report provides a summary of the findings for groundwater inspection in Centralia.

  3. United States Department of Energy Budget Highlights FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Leary, H.R.

    1993-04-01

    The President`s Fiscal Year 1994 budget request for the Department of Energy reflects the Administration`s goal of redressing the balance between the Nation`s energy and economic requirements and protection of the environment. The Department plans to undertake a careful restructuring of its national defense responsibilities, in line with post Cold War exigencies; contribute to the Administration`s deficit reduction objectives; and fulfill the President`s commitment to invest in science and technology development and transfer.

  4. The Accountability Illusion: Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  5. 22 CFR 9b.5 - Temporary Department of State press building passes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary Department of State press building... OF STATE PRESS BUILDING PASSES § 9b.5 Temporary Department of State press building passes. A media... of State may make arrangements with the Office of Press Relations for the issuance of a...

  6. Hydrologic and water-quality conditions in the Kansas River, northeast Kansas, November 2001-August 2002, and simulation of ammonia assimilative capacity and bacteria transport during low flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Christensen, Victoria G.

    2005-01-01

    Large concentrations of ammonia and densities of bacteria have been detected in reaches of the Kansas River in northeast Kansas during low streamflow conditions, prompting the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) to list these reaches as water-quality limited with respect to ammonia and fecal coliform bacteria. Sources for ammonia and bacteria in the watershed consist of wastewater-treatment facilities (WWTFs) and agricultural and urban runoff. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with KDHE, conducted an investigation of the Kansas River to characterize hydrologic and water-quality conditions and to simulate ammonia assimilative capacity and bacteria transport during low streamflow. This report characterizes the water-quality conditions, documents the calibration of a two-dimensional water-quality model, and presents results of hypothetical simulations of existing and future WWTFs discharging to the Kansas River during low streamflow.

  7. Regional interpretation of Kansas aeromagnetic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarger, H.L.

    1982-01-01

    The aeromagnetic mapping techniques used in a regional aeromagnetic survey of the state are documented and a qualitative regional interpretation of the magnetic basement is presented. Geothermal gradients measured and data from oil well records indicate that geothermal resources in Kansas are of a low-grade nature. However, considerable variation in the gradient is noted statewide within the upper 500 meters of the sedimentary section; this suggests the feasibility of using groundwater for space heating by means of heat pumps.

  8. 22 CFR 9b.4 - Department of State building press pass for technical crews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Department of State building press pass for technical crews. 9b.4 Section 9b.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL REGULATIONS GOVERNING... provide technical support on a daily basis for media correspondents assigned to the Department of...

  9. 5 CFR 870.1009 - Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE PROGRAM Benefits... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibilities of the U.S. Department....1009 Responsibilities of the U.S. Department of State. (a) The U.S. Department of State functions...

  10. 76 FR 43714 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology... Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... affiliated with the human remains may contact the Oregon State University Department of...

  11. 76 FR 43716 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology... Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... affiliated with the human remains may contact ] the Oregon State University Department of...

  12. United States Department of Energy Budget Highlights FY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Leary, H.R.

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy is entrusted to contribute to the welfare of the Nation by providing the scientific and educational foundation or the technology, policy, and institutional leadership necessary to achieve efficiency in energy use, diversity in energy sources, and access to technical information required for a more productive and competitive economy, improved environmental quality, and a secure national defense.

  13. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. October - December 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Hall et al14 compared the success rate of endotracheal intubation among paramedic students trained on a human patient simulator group or on human...Kang J, Hall CA. Human patient simulation is effective for teaching paramedic students endotracheal intubation . Acad Emerg Med. 2005;12(9):850-855...published in The Army Medical Department Journal are listed and indexed in MEDLINE, the National Library of Medicine’s premier bibliographic database of life

  14. Energy Objectives for the United States Department of Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Service, Library of Congress Schwartz, M., Blakely, K., & O’Rourke, R ., for the Congressional Research Service (CRS) 2012 14 More capable warfighting...Report FT602T1) Crowley, T. D., Corrie, T. D., Diamond, D. B., Funk, S. D., Hansen , W. A., Stenhoff, A. D., & Swift, D. C., for Logistics Management...Memorandum] Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition 2011 28 Department of the Navy ( DON ) objectives for FY 2012 and

  15. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. October - December 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 October – December 2012 The Army Medical Department Center...health benefits increase as you spend more time being active. Children and adolescents : get 60 minutes or more a day. Adults: get 2 hours and 30...AFB, Delaware ; and Fort Sam Houston, Texas.7 In addition, the Joint Pa- thology Center, the federal govern- ment’s pathology resource center, was

  16. Department of Defense Expenditure Impact on State Economic Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    R. Whppl , man, Department of Admini s a e Sciences James M FregActing Deah of Informaton i~- ,, an o cy Sci ce 2% ABSTRACT Utilizing pooled cross...was compounded by decisions of military members to stay in the region where they are stationed when leaving the armed forces. Also, military retirees...data. There is no ability to predict the future outcome based on 66 S 5 the model results. This is compounded by significant statistical problems in

  17. The Galatia, Kansas, chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schmus, W. R.; Keil, K.; Lange, D. E.; Conrad, G. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the Galatia meteorite found August 1971 approximately 7 km ENE of Galatia, Barton County, Kansas (98 deg 53 min W, 38 deg 39.5 min N). The single stone weighed 23.9 kg and is partially weathered. Olivine (Fa 24.9) and pyroxene (Fs 20.9) compositions indicate L-group classification, and textural observations indicate that the stone is of petrologic type 6. While Galatia is similar in many respects to the Otis L6 chondrite found 20 miles to the west, Galatia does not have the brecciated structure of Otis and is therefore not part of the same fall.

  18. Getting to no: how Kansas advocates derailed the Anthem steamroller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A battle royale has taken shape in Kansas about the future of its Blue Cross and Blue Shield plan. This past February, Kansas Insurance Commissioner Kathleen Sebelius rocked the corporate health care establishment by refusing to allow Anthem Insurance Company to buy the state's independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield plan. Then in June, a state judge overturned her decision. Now the case is headed to appeals court, where Sebelius will seek to have her decision reinstated. At the heart of the legal wrangling is the unprecedented manner in which advocates have asserted consumer interests, raising issues that will persist long after the courts hand down a final ruling. States of Health looks at how consumer advocates have responded to the proposed Blues transaction, a process that has strengthened the health consumer voice in Kansas--and offers important lessons for advocates in other states as well.

  19. 78 FR 45490 - Department of State Acquisition Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ..., distributive impacts and equity). E.O. 13563 emphasized the importance of quantifying both costs and benefits... Office of Finance via email at RM-FPRAPROP@state.gov . List of Subjects in 48 CFR Parts 645 and 652...

  20. Sources, transport, and management of salt contamination in the groundwater of south-central Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the outcomes of studies by the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) during the last decade with regard to mineral intrusion into the aquifers of...

  1. [Kansas plat map : T22S R10W : Quivira National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map is of township no. 22 south, range no. 10 west of 6th principal meridian, Kansas. This map serves as a historical reference to townships in relation to...

  2. [Kansas plat map : T21S R10W : Quivira National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map is of township no. 21 south, range no. 10 west of 6th principal meridian, Kansas. This map serves as a historical reference to townships in relation to...

  3. [Kansas plat map : T21S R11W : Quivira National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map is of township no. 21 south, range no. 11 west of 6th principal meridian, Kansas. This map serves as a historical reference to townships in relation to...

  4. Contaminants in Interior Least Tern Eggs from Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, Kansas, in 1990 and 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Flooded or abandoned eggs of interior least terns (Sterna antillarum) nesting at Quivira National Wildlife Refuge in central Kansas were collected in 1990 and 1991....

  5. Background Contaminants Evaluation of the Republican River Drainage- Colorado, Kansas, and Nebraska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Republican River Basin is a very large watershed in west-central Kansas, eastern Colorado, Wyoming and southern Nebraska. This study was conducted to determine...

  6. Trace elements and organic compounds in the Spring River Basin of southeastern Kansas in 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We sampled sediments and aquatic biota at five locations in the Spring River drainage in southeastern Kansas. The samples were analyzed for metals, organochlorine...

  7. The Implementation Analysis of Intellectual Capital to Department Performance in Padang State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulastri sulastri

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to observe the effect of the age of the organization department in Padang State University on performance through human capital, structural capital and relational capital. The sample is all of department in Padang State University, which is 33 departments. The data were collected through questionnaires and analyzed using partial least squares (PLS. The results showed that the age of the department is not direct and significant impact on the department performance. While the age departments significantly affect the department's human capital, structural capital and relational capital. Furthermore, the human capital, structural capital and relational capital significantly positive affect the department performance. This research failed to prove the existence of variable human capital, structural capital and relational capital as a mediating variable but serves as an intervening variable. Its means that age of department performance cannot determine performance without increasing the human capital, structural capital and relational capital.

  8. United States Army Medical Department Journal, January-March 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    kidney dialysis treatment, and artificial nutrition and hydration. The term does not include the administration of pain management medication or the...person the right to refuse lifesaving hydration and nutrition . The Court noted that "most state courts have based a right to refuse treatment on...and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) defines substantial evidence as ...evidence consisting of adequate and well-controlled investigations, including clinical

  9. 27 CFR 447.55 - Departments of State and Defense consulted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Departments of State and Defense consulted. 447.55 Section 447.55 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL..., AMMUNITION AND IMPLEMENTS OF WAR Miscellaneous Provisions § 447.55 Departments of State and Defense consulted...

  10. 76 FR 81554 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Department of State Acquisition Regulation (DOSAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... Collection: Department of State Acquisition Regulation (DOSAR). OMB Control Number: 1405-0050. Type of... of the Procurement Executive (A/OPE). Form Number: N/A. Respondents: Any business, other for-profit, individual, not-for-profit, or household organizations wishing to receive Department of State...

  11. 76 FR 67099 - Forwarding of Asylum Applications to the Department of State

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... Forwarding of Asylum Applications to the Department of State AGENCY: Executive Office for Immigration Review... regulations to alter the process by which the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) forwards asylum applications for consideration by the Department of State (DOS). Currently, EOIR forwards to DOS all...

  12. The Total Quality Management Model Department of Personnel State of Colorado,

    Science.gov (United States)

    A panel of three members will present the Total Quality Management model recently designed for the Department of Personnel, State of Colorado. This model was selected to increase work quality and productivity of the Department and to exemplify Governor Romer’s commitment to quality work within state government.

  13. 31 CFR 595.705 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to United States Department of Justice. 595.705 Section 595.705 Money and Finance: Treasury... TREASURY TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Penalties § 595.705 Administrative collection; referral to United... United States Department of Justice for appropriate action to recover the penalty in a civil suit in a...

  14. The Role of the State Department of Public Instruction in the Del Mod System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiher, John F.

    This is one of a series of monographs providing information about the Delaware Model: A Systems Approach to Science Education (Del Mod System). The State Department of Public Instruction is the agency that represents the public schools of Delaware. The two branches of the state department with which Del Mod interacts are the Instructional Services…

  15. 77 FR 29531 - 150th Anniversary of the United States Department of Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... of May 14, 2012 150th Anniversary of the United States Department of Agriculture By the President of... legislation to establish the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and codified a commitment to the... vision of service by applying sound public policy and science to an evolving food and agriculture system...

  16. 44 CFR 351.26 - The United States Department of Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The United States Department of Agriculture. 351.26 Section 351.26 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY... PREPAREDNESS Interagency Assignments § 351.26 The United States Department of Agriculture. (a) Assist FEMA in...

  17. Relationship between Organizational Climate, Job Stress and Job Performance Officer at State Education Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suandi, Turiman; Ismail, Ismi Arif; Othman, Zulfadli

    2014-01-01

    This research aims at finding out the relationship between Organizational Climate, job stress and job performance among State Education Department (JPN) officers . The focus of the research is to determine the job performance of state education department officers, level of job stress among the officers, level of connection between organizational…

  18. 76 FR 48177 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State Department of Natural Resources... Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Washington State Department of Natural Resources and the... Natural Resources. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary object to the Indian...

  19. Why Kansas Is Developing Standards for Its Adult Education Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharakis, Jeff; Glass, Dianne S.

    2010-01-01

    In Kansas, local and state adult education leaders realized that leadership standards cannot be ignored if adult education is to be perceived as a professional discipline within the state's larger educational community. The perfect opportunity to study and develop leadership standards for adult education directors and coordinators presented itself…

  20. Final work plan for targeted sampling at Webber, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-05-01

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for targeted sampling at Webber, Kansas (Figure 1.1). This activity is being conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). Data obtained in this sampling event will be used to (1) evaluate the current status of previously detected contamination at Webber and (2) determine whether the site requires further action. This work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Argonne has issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan, approved by the KDHE, contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. This document should be consulted for complete details of the technical activities proposed at the former CCC/USDA facility in Webber.

  1. 22 CFR 9b.7 - Procedures for denial, revocation, or non-renewal of Department of State press building passes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-renewal of Department of State press building passes. 9b.7 Section 9b.7 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEPARTMENT OF STATE PRESS BUILDING PASSES § 9b.7 Procedures for denial, revocation, or non-renewal of Department of State press building passes. (a) If the Director...

  2. 22 CFR 9b.6 - Grounds for denial, revocation, or non-renewal of Department of State press building passes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of Department of State press building passes. 9b.6 Section 9b.6 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL REGULATIONS GOVERNING DEPARTMENT OF STATE PRESS BUILDING PASSES § 9b.6 Grounds for denial, revocation, or non-renewal of Department of State press building passes. In consultation with the Bureau...

  3. State Agency Administrative Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This database comprises 28 State agency boundaries and point of contact. The Kansas Geological Survey collected legal descriptions of the boundaries for various...

  4. Libraries in Kansas: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/kansas.html Libraries in Kansas To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Fort Riley IRWIN ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY 650 Huebner Road FORT RILEY, KS 66442-5037 ...

  5. Kansas Water Quality Action Targeting System (KATS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This system is a revision of the original KATS system developed in 1990 as a tool to aid resource managers target Kansas valuable and vulnerable water resources for...

  6. 32 CFR 700.835 - Work, facilities, supplies, or services for other Government departments, State or local...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... other Government departments, State or local governments, foreign governments, private parties and....835 Work, facilities, supplies, or services for other Government departments, State or local... Federal and State governments, local governments, foreign governments, private parties, and...

  7. Occurrence, distribution, and volume of metals-contaminated sediment of selected streams draining the Tri-State Mining District, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Kansas, 2011–12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. Charlie

    2016-12-14

    Lead and zinc were mined in the Tri-State Mining District (TSMD) of southwest Missouri, northeast Oklahoma, and southeast Kansas for more than 100 years. The effects of mining on the landscape are still evident, nearly 50 years after the last mine ceased operation. The legacies of mining are the mine waste and discharge of groundwater from underground mines. The mine-waste piles and underground mines are continuous sources of trace metals (primarily lead, zinc, and cadmium) to the streams that drain the TSMD. Many previous studies characterized the horizontal extent of mine-waste contamination in streams but little information exists on the depth of mine-waste contamination in these streams. Characterizing the vertical extent of contamination is difficult because of the large amount of coarse-grained material, ranging from coarse gravel to boulders, within channel sediment. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with U.S. Fish and Wildlife service, collected channel-sediment samples at depth for subsequent analyses that would allow attainment of the following goals: (1) determination of the relation between concentration and depth for lead, zinc and cadmium in channel sediments and flood-plain sediments, and (2) determination of the volume of gravel-bar sediment from the surface to the maximum depth with concentrations of these metals that exceeded sediment-quality guidelines. For the purpose of this report, volume of gravel-bar sediment is considered to be distributed in two forms, gravel bars and the wetted channel, and this study focused on gravel bars. Concentrations of lead, zinc, and cadmium in samples were compared to the consensus probable effects concentration (CPEC) and Tri-State Mining District specific probable effects concentration (TPEC) sediment-quality guidelines.During the study, more than 700 sediment samples were collected from borings at multiple sites, including gravel bars and flood plains, along Center Creek, Turkey Creek, Shoal Creek

  8. 7 CFR 1945.18 - United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Agriculture Council (FAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Agriculture Council (FAC). 1945.18 Section 1945.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE...

  9. What happens in a merger? Experiences of the State Department for Water Resources in Khorezm, Uzbekistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegerich, K.

    2005-01-01

    The paper focuses on the organisational problems of the state Department of Water Resources at the district level in the Khorezm Province, Uzbekistan. The study opens the organisational `black box¿ and looks inside the organisational structure of the Department of Water Resources. The analysis goes

  10. 77 FR 59969 - Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University, Department of Anthropology, San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Anthropology, San Francisco, CA; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; correction... Department of Anthropology). The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Marin County... San Francisco State University Department of Anthropology records. In the Federal Register (73...

  11. 75 FR 65460 - Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committee; United States Military Academy Board...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Renewal of Federal advisory... Department of Defense gives notice that it is renewing the charter for the United States Military Academy... Academy, including the following: morale and discipline, curriculum, instruction, physical equipment...

  12. What happens in a merger? Experiences of the State Department for Water Resources in Khorezm, Uzbekistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegerich, K.

    2005-01-01

    The paper focuses on the organisational problems of the state Department of Water Resources at the district level in the Khorezm Province, Uzbekistan. The study opens the organisational `black box¿ and looks inside the organisational structure of the Department of Water Resources. The analysis goes

  13. Fifty Ninth Annual Report: United States Department of Labor. Fiscal Year 1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Labor, Washington, DC.

    This fifty-ninth annual report of the United States Department of Labor for the fiscal year 1971 contains a 6-page report by the Secretary of Labor, 11 separate Federal Department reports, and a variety of appended tables covering such areas as enrollments and funding for various government programs. Detailing the initiation or improvement of a…

  14. Women in the Department of State: Their Role in American Foreign Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkin, Homer L.

    A history of the employment of women in the Department of State and the Foreign Service is presented. Thirteen chapters consider the status of American women from 1776 to the present; women in the Department and at international conferences, 1800-1940; applicants and employees for overseas employment, 1851-1943; the Foreign Service examinations;…

  15. 2007 Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Silver Falls State Park Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset represents the Lidar elevations for Silver Falls State Park in Marion County, Oregon. The LiDAR data was collected during March 2007. This was a leaf-off...

  16. 2007 Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Silver Falls State Park Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset represents the Lidar elevations for Silver Falls State Park in Marion County, Oregon. The LiDAR data was collected during March 2007. This was a leaf-off...

  17. United States of America Department of Energy Environmental Management Advisory Committee Public Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    This reports contains documentation of presentations given at the United States of America Department of Energy Environmental Management Advisory Committee Public Meeting held December 14--15, 1993 in Alexandria, Virginia.

  18. Linking public relations processes and organizational effectiveness at a state health department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored a state health department's relationships with strategic constituencies from a public relations perspective. The relationships were explored within the theoretical framework of the Excellence Theory, the dominant paradigm in public research. Findings indicate application of the Excellence Theory has the potential to increase organizational effectiveness at public health entities. With respect to the case investigated, findings indicate that the state health department could increase its organizational effectiveness through the adoption of recommendations based on the Excellence Theory.

  19. From Patchwork to Package: Implementing Foundational Capabilities for State and Local Health Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrucci, Brian C.; Dilley, Abby; Leider, Jonathon P.; Juliano, Chrissie; Nelson, Rachel; Kaiman, Sherry; Sprague, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Daily public health responses are threatened by the inadequate capacity of public health agencies. A 2012 Institute of Medicine report defined a package of foundational capabilities that support all programs and services within a health department. Standardizing foundational capabilities may help address the increasing disparity in health department performance nationally. During the Fall of 2013, we collected information on how much state and local health departments knew about foundational capabilities. To our knowledge, this was the first study to assess current health department infrastructure as it relates to foundational capabilities. PMID:25521887

  20. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-03-31

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative

  1. Sediment oxygen demand in eastern Kansas streams, 2014 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Guy M.; King, Lindsey R.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2016-08-29

    Dissolved oxygen concentrations in streams are affected by physical, chemical, and biological factors in the water column and streambed, and are an important factor for the survival of aquatic organisms. Sediment oxygen demand (SOD) rates in Kansas streams are not well understood. During 2014 and 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, measured SOD at eight stream sites in eastern Kansas to quantify SOD rates and variability with respect to season, land use, and bottom-sediment characteristics. Sediment oxygen demand rates (SODT) ranged from 0.01 to 3.15 grams per square meter per day at the ambient temperature of the measurements. The summer mean SOD rate was 3.0-times larger than the late fall mean rate, likely because of increased biological activity at warm water temperatures. Given the substantial amount of variability in SOD rates possible within sites, heterogeneity of substrate type is an important consideration when designing SOD studies and interpreting the results. Sediment oxygen demand in eastern Kansas streams was correlated with land use and streambed-sediment characteristics, though the strength of relations varied seasonally. The small number of study sites precluded a more detailed analysis. The effect of basin land use and streambed sediment characteristics on SOD is currently (2016) not well understood, and there may be many contributing factors including basin influences on water quality that affect biogeochemical cycles and the biological communities supported by the stream.

  2. Measuring the performance of multi-agency programmatic permits for Washington State Department of Transportation activities

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, the Washington State Legislature established the Transportation Permit Efficiency and Accountability Committee (TPEAC) to identify measures to streamline permit procedures for transportation activities and improve environmental outcomes. A programmatic subcommittee was created to develop a multi-agency approach for developing programmatic permits that would cover 60 to 70 percent of Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) activities (mostly maintenance and preservation ...

  3. Piezoelectric motor development at AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pressly, R.B.; Mentesana, C.P.

    1994-11-01

    The Kansas City Division of AlliedSignal Inc. has been investigating the fabrication and use of piezoelectric motors in mechanisms for United States Department of Energy (DOE) weapons applications for about four years. These motors exhibit advantages over solenoids and other electromagnetic actuators. Prototype processes have been developed for complete fabrication of motors from stock materials, including abrasive machining of piezoelectric ceramics and more traditional machining of other motor components, electrode plating and sputtering, electric poling, cleaning, bonding and assembly. Drive circuits have been fabricated and motor controls are being developed. Laboratory facilities have been established for electrical/mechanical testing and evaluation of piezo materials and completed motors. Recent project efforts have focused on the potential of piezoelectric devices for commercial and industrial use. A broad range of various motor types and application areas has been identified, primarily in Japan. The Japanese have been developing piezo motors for many years and have more recently begun commercialization. Piezoelectric motor and actuator technology is emerging in the United States and quickly gaining in commercial interest. The Kansas City Division is continuing development of piezoelectric motors and actuators for defense applications while supporting and participating in the commercialization of piezoelectric devices with private industry through various technology transfer and cooperative development initiatives.

  4. United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service stored-grain areawide integrated pest management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, Paul W; Hagstrum, David W; Reed, Carl; Phillips, Tom W

    2003-01-01

    The USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) funded a demonstration project (1998-2002) for areawide IPM for stored wheat in Kansas and Oklahoma. This project was a collaboration of researchers at the ARS Grain Marketing and Production Research Center in Manhattan, Kansas, Kansas State University, and Oklahoma State University. The project utilized two elevator networks, one in each state, for a total of 28 grain elevators. These elevators stored approximately 31 million bushels of wheat, which is approximately 1.2% of the annual national production. Stored wheat was followed as it moved from farm to the country elevator and finally to the terminal elevator. During this study, thousands of grain samples were taken in concrete elevator silos. Wheat stored at elevators was frequently infested by several insect species, which sometimes reached high numbers and damaged the grain. Fumigation using aluminum phosphide pellets was the main method for managing these insect pests in elevators in the USA. Fumigation decisions tended to be based on past experience with controlling stored-grain insects, or were calendar based. Integrated pest management (IPM) requires sampling and risk benefit analysis. We found that the best sampling method for estimating insect density, without turning the grain from one bin to another, was the vacuum probe sampler. Decision support software, Stored Grain Advisor Pro (SGA Pro) was developed that interprets insect sampling data, and provides grain managers with a risk analysis report detailing which bins are at low, moderate or high risk for insect-caused economic losses. Insect density was predicted up to three months in the future based on current insect density, grain temperature and moisture. Because sampling costs money, there is a trade-off between frequency of sampling and the cost of fumigation. The insect growth model in SGA Pro reduces the need to sample as often, thereby making the program more cost-effective. SGA Pro was validated

  5. Simulation of canal and control-pond operation at the Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, south-central Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Efficient water management of the Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, located in the Rattlesnake Creek Basin of south-central Kansas, is a complicated task. In a...

  6. Ground-water quality in quaternary deposits of the central high plains aquifer, south-central Kansas, 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Water samples from 20 randomly selected domestic water-supply wells completed in the Quaternary deposits of south-central Kansas were collected as part of the High...

  7. Kansas: Early Head Start Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Kansas Early Head Start (KEHS) provides comprehensive services following federal Head Start Program Performance Standards for pregnant women and eligible families with children from birth to age 4. KEHS was implemented in 1998 using Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) quality set-aside dollars augmented by a transfer of federal…

  8. Kansas City Plots Next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Kansas City (Missouri) Public Schools is at a crossroads. The district has struggled for decades with poor academic achievement, dwindling enrollment and budget, and short-term superintendents--27 in the past 40 years. Most recently, after a two-year stint during which he helped the district get its financial house in order, closing nearly half of…

  9. Miscellaneous agreements between the U.S. Department of Energy and Federal, State, and local agencies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meincke, Carol L.

    2010-08-01

    This document identifies and provides access to source documentation for the Site- Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. Specifically, it lists agreements between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), DOE/NNSA/Sandia Site Office (SSO), Sandia Corporation, and local and state government agencies, Department of Defense, Kirtland Air Force Base, and other federal agencies.

  10. 77 FR 530 - Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law: Notice of Renewal of Charter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law: Notice of Renewal of Charter The Charter of the Department of State's Advisory Committee on Private International Law has been renewed, effective for a two-year period. Pursuant to...

  11. 77 FR 75695 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Notice of Public Meeting of the Study Group on the Hague Judgments Project The Office of the Assistant Legal Adviser for Private International Law, Department of State,...

  12. 78 FR 55772 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law: Notice of Annual Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law: Notice of Annual Meeting The Department of State's Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL) will hold its annual meeting on Monday, October 21 and Tuesday, October...

  13. 77 FR 75696 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting of the Study Group on Family Law The Office of the Assistant Legal Adviser for Private International Law, Department of State, hereby gives notice of a...

  14. 77 FR 52784 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law: Notice of Annual Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law: Notice of Annual Meeting The Department of State's Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL) will hold its annual meeting on developments in private international law...

  15. 76 FR 51119 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law: Notice of Annual Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law: Notice of Annual Meeting The Department of State's Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL) will hold its annual meeting on developments in private international law...

  16. 76 FR 9072 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting on Jurisdiction and the Recognition and Enforcement of Judgments The Department of State, Office of Legal Adviser, Office of Private International Law would...

  17. 78 FR 36816 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting of the Study Group on Family Law The Office of the Assistant Legal Adviser for Private International Law, Department of State, hereby gives notice of a...

  18. Immunization information systems--progress on integration of school nurses: a multi-state roundtable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galemore, Cynthia A

    2011-03-01

    The following is an article and roundtable discussion on school nurse integration into immunization information systems. The discussion participants were April Bailey, Deputy Director, Immunization Division, Indiana State Department of Health; Thomas Maerz, Manager, Wisconsin Immunization Registry; Erin Seward, Immunization Program Manager, Nevada State Health Division; and Debra Warren, Project Manager, KSWebIZ, Kansas Immunization Program.

  19. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period. The map is designed to be explicitly...

  20. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  1. State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch State-wide Water Quality Sampling Dataset 1999-2006 (NODC Accession 0013723)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Monitoring Section of the State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch collects water quality data at over 300 coastal locations state-wide using...

  2. State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch State-wide Water Quality Sampling Dataset 1973-1998 (NODC Accession 0013724)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Monitoring Section of the State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch collects water quality data at over 300 coastal locations state-wide using...

  3. The Evolution of Groundwater Management Paradigms in Kansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophocleous, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to trace the evolution of key water-related laws and management practices in Kansas, from the enactment of the Kansas Water Resources Appropriation Act of 1945 to the present, in order to highlight the state's efforts to create a more sustainable water future and in hopes that others will benefit from Kansas' experience. The 1945 Act provides the basic framework of water law (prior appropriation) in Kansas. Progression of groundwater management in the state encompasses local ground-water management districts (GMDs) and their water-management programs, minimum-streamflow and TMDL standards, water-use reporting and water metering programs, use of modified safe-yield policies in some GMDs, the subbasin water-resources-management program, the integrated resource planning/Aquifer Storage and Recovery project of the City of Wichita, the Central Kansas Water Bank, enhanced aquifer subunits management, and various water conservation programs. While these have all contributed to the slowing down of declines in groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer and in associated ecosystems, they have not yet succeeded in halting those declines. Based on the assumption that the different management approaches have to operate easily within the prevailing water rights and law framework to succeed, a number of steps are suggested here that may help further halt the declines of the High Plains aquifer. These include eliminating the "use it or lose it" maxim in the prior-appropriation framework, broadening the definition of "beneficial use," regulating domestic and other "exempt" wells, encouraging voluntary "sharing the shortage" agreements, and determining to what extent water rights may be regulated in the public interest without a compensable "taking." Further necessary measures include determining to what extent water-rights holders might be subjected to reasonable dictates without having the security of their rights altered.

  4. Kansas Nightjar Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Common nighthawk (CONI) and common poorwill (COPO) are two priority species identified in the Flint Hills Surrogate Species Report for which we do not have adequate...

  5. Final work plan : groundwater monitoring at Morrill, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-01-27

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for a program of twice yearly groundwater monitoring at Morrill, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The purposes of this monitoring program are to follow changes in plume dynamics and to collect data necessary to evaluate the suitability of monitored natural attenuation as a remedial option, under the requirements of Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy No.BER-RS-042. This monitoring program is planned for a minimum of 2 yr. The planned monitoring activity is part of an investigation at Morrill being performed on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Details and background for this Work Plan were presented previously (Argonne 2004, 2005). Argonne has also issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan (approved by the KDHE) contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. These documents must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Morrill.

  6. Final work plan : groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2005-08-31

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for a program of twice yearly groundwater monitoring at the site of a former grain storage facility at Centralia, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The purposes of this monitoring program are to follow changes in plume dynamics and to collect data necessary to evaluate the suitability of monitored natural attenuation as a remedial option, under the requirements of Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy No.BER-RS-042. This monitoring program is planned for a minimum of 2 yr. The planned monitoring activity is part of an investigation at Centralia being performed on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Details and background for this Work Plan were presented previously (Argonne 2004, 2005). Argonne has also issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan (approved by the KDHE) contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. These documents must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Centralia.

  7. 78 FR 50409 - Kansas Municipal Energy Agency v. Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Mid-Kansas Electric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kansas Municipal Energy Agency v. Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Mid-Kansas Electric Company, LLC, Southwest Power Pool, Inc.; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on August... 206 of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206 (2013), Kansas...

  8. Status of science education in state departments of education: An initial report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Kenneth W.; Yager, Robert E.

    The past five years have been characterized as times of assessment in science education. One aspect of the profession where little information has been reported is the service and leadership provided by the various Departments of Education that exist as a part of the 50 state governments. Information was collected from the 50 states concerning the professional preparation of state science consultants, the nature of the positions, number of workers employed in such units, changes in support staff, facilities, and budget for each five year interval between 1960-1980. Science consultants are 46 years of age, have completed more than 10 years of classroom teaching, have been supervisors at the last level, have been in state positions for one-eight years, and have a Master's degree (half have the Ph.D.). Science consultants in the state department of education work in local schools, write proposals, assist with other administrative duties, work as members of evaluation teams. They spend two-thirds of their time in science education per se. The duties have become more general with less time spent exclusively on science education duties. The positions have become more involved with regulations, evaluations; the consultants enjoying less flexibility in their jobs. There has been a decline in terms of numbers of consultants, budget for science education; and general support for science education projects in state departments of education during the 20-year period surveyed.

  9. 75 FR 28200 - Safety Zone; Washington State Department of Transportation Ferries Division Marine Rescue...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... safety of the participating ferries, rescue vessels, and the maritime public during the exercise by... response organization specific to ferries in the Puget Sound area. This temporary safety zone will mitigate... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Washington State Department of...

  10. [Florida State Department of Education] Division of Vocational Education Dissemination and Diffusion Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This dissemination and diffusion handbook for the Florida State Department Division of Vocational Education is divided into ten chapters. Chapter 1 describes the functions of the dissemination and diffusion (D&D) section of the division of vocational education. Identifying the procedures and processes to be followed, chapter 2 focuses on the…

  11. 32 CFR 728.57 - Department of State and associated agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... restrictions of this section, care may be rendered at the expense of the Department of State or one of the... illness or injury which results in hospitalization or equal treatment. Outpatient care is only authorized as an adjunct to hospitalization. (2) Overseas. (i) When, in the opinion of the principal or...

  12. 75 FR 60159 - Determination Concerning the Bolivian Military and Police Under the Department of State, Foreign...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE... hereby determine that the Government of Bolivia is investigating, prosecuting, and punishing military and.... This Determination shall be transmitted to the Congress and published in the Federal Register....

  13. 8 CFR 208.11 - Comments from the Department of State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., the Department of State may provide, at its discretion, to USCIS: (1) Detailed country conditions... the applicant's assertions about conditions in his or her country of nationality or habitual residence... to the applicant are persecuted or tortured in the applicant's country of nationality or...

  14. 31 CFR 547.704 - Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative collection; referral to United States Department of Justice. 547.704 Section 547.704 Money and Finance: Treasury... TREASURY DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Penalties § 547.704 Administrative...

  15. 40 CFR 131.34 - Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Secondary Contact Recreation Indian Creek 10270102 20 Secondary Contact Recreation James Creek 10270102 87...: Lower Kansas Baldwin Creek 10270104 69 Secondary Contact Recreation Brush Creek 10270104 49...

  16. Building Stronger State Energy Partnerships with the U.S. Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Kate

    2011-09-30

    This final technical report details the results of total work efforts and progress made from October 2007 – September 2011 under the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) cooperative agreement DE-FC26-07NT43264, Building Stronger State Energy Partnerships with the U.S. Department of Energy. Major topical project areas in this final report include work efforts in the following areas: Energy Assurance and Critical Infrastructure, State and Regional Technical Assistance, Regional Initiative, Regional Coordination and Technical Assistance, and International Activities in China. All required deliverables have been provided to the National Energy Technology Laboratory and DOE program officials.

  17. Kansas Water Science Center bookmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2017-03-27

    The U.S. Geological Survey Kansas Water Science Center has collected and interpreted hydrologic information in Kansas since 1895. Data collected include streamflow and gage height, reservoir content, water quality and water quantity, suspended sediment, and groundwater levels. Interpretative hydrologic studies are completed on national, regional, statewide, and local levels and cooperatively funded through more than 40 partnerships with these agencies. The U.S. Geological Survey provides impartial scientific information to describe and understand the health of our ecosystems and environment; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life. These collected data are in the National Water Information System https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ks/nwis/rt, and all results are documented in reports that also are online at https://ks.water.usgs.gov/. Follow the USGS Kansas Water Science Center on Twitter for the most recent updates and other information: https://twitter.com/USGS_KS.

  18. The network of web 2.0 connections among state health departments: new pathways for dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jenine K

    2013-01-01

    Most state health departments (SHDs) have adopted and are using Facebook and/or Twitter. Among the friends and followers of SHD Facebook and Twitter pages are other SHDs. These connections form networks with the potential to facilitate dissemination of evidence around effective public health practice among health departments nationwide. To better understand the composition and structure of these networks, Facebook and Twitter connections between SHDs were collected and examined. More SHDs were connected to each other on Twitter (n = 37) than on Facebook (n = 24). The Twitter network was denser (dTwitter = 0.06; dFacebook = 0.01) with more clustering (CTwitter = 0.06; CFacebook = 0.01). Larger health departments were more central in the Facebook network, whereas health departments with a longer social media presence were central on Twitter. Health departments on Twitter were also more likely to be following other health departments in the same geographic region, whereas the same was not true on Facebook. California and Florida were central in the Facebook network, whereas Minnesota, Missouri, Louisiana, and Rhode Island were central on Twitter. Overall, the Twitter network demonstrated greater potential to disseminate information quickly to a larger group of SHDs. More information is needed on the feasibility and effectiveness of using Web 2.0 for dissemination and other public health activities.

  19. U.S. State Department urged to beef up science component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    The U.S. State Department often comes under pressure to respond to a variety of international emergencies one after another, from the U.S. embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania to Hurricane Mitch in Central America to the crisis in Kosovo.Many of the department's priorities include significant science, technology, and health (STH) components: nuclear nonproliferation, global climate change, protecting scientific databases, and international food and water supply safety, including arsenic in drinking water wells in Bangladesh, among other varied issues.

  20. Final Corrective Action Study for the Former CCC/USDA Facility in Hanover, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater and vapor intrusion into a limited number of residences (attributable to the contaminant concentrations in groundwater) have been identified in Hanover, Kansas, at and near a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). At the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2009h), the CCC/USDA has prepared this Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address the contamination in groundwater and soil vapor.

  1. The United States and World Energy: A Discussion Paper, Department of State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ralph Stuart

    This publication is a summary of the world energy situation and its impact on the United States. A brief review of some interrelated diplomatic, commercial, and technical aspects of the energy crisis and their implications for the U.S. and its foreign policy is presented first. Next, discussions of world supplies, uses and problems with different…

  2. Latino College Completion: Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  3. State procurement law: facilitating the collaboration between health department and school of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, George A; Barron, Gerald M; Duchak, Linda S; Raniowski, Martin; Alsahlani, Hazem S; Potter, Margaret A

    2014-01-01

    The mark of an "academic health department" includes shared activity by academic and practice partners sustained over time. Despite a long history of productive interactivity, the Pennsylvania Department of Health and the University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School of Public Health often faced administrative hurdles in contracting for projects of mutual interest. Seeking to overcome these hurdles, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School of Public Health negotiated a Master Agreement on the basis of statutes designating both as "public procurement units." This provided a template for project specifications, standard financial terms, and a contracting process. Since taking effect, the Master Agreement has supported projects in policy development, capacity building, workforce development, program evaluation, data analysis, and program planning. This experience suggests an approach potentially useful for other states and localities seeking to solidify academic health department partnerships either envisioned for the future or already in place.

  4. Adaptations to the "Whole of Government" Approach by the United States Department of State

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    Handbook of qualitative research. California: Sage Publications, Inc., 1994. Food and Agriculture Organization ( FAO ). 2008. Undernourishment around...the world. The State of Food Insecurity in the World. Galvan, Jr., James J. 2009. America’s army: A model for interagency effectiveness. Military...billion. There is no reason for this when globally food production yields more than enough to feed everyone. The problem stems from poverty as many

  5. Adoption of anesthesia information management systems by academic departments in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger Halbeis, Christoph B; Epstein, Richard H; Macario, Alex; Pearl, Ronald G; Grunwald, Zvi

    2008-10-01

    Information technology has been promoted as a way to improve patient care and outcomes. Whereas information technology systems for ancillary hospital services (e.g., radiology, pharmacy) are deployed commonly, it has been estimated that anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) are only installed in a small fraction of United States (US) operating rooms. In this study, we assessed the adoption of AIMS at academic anesthesia departments and explored the motivations for and resistance to AIMS adoption. Members of the Society of Academic Anesthesiology Chairs and the Association of Anesthesiology Program Directors were solicited by e-mail to participate in an online survey of AIMS adoption. Two months after closing the survey, another e-mail was sent with a single question asking for an update to their AIMS implementation status. Surveys were fully completed by 48 (34%) of the 140 Society of Academic Anesthesiology Chairs and Association of Anesthesiology Program Directors departments surveyed, with 72 (51%) providing AIMS status information. Twenty of these 72 departments have an AIMS installed, 12 are currently implementing, 11 have selected but not yet installed, and 18 are planning to purchase an AIMS in 2008 or 2009. Therefore, at least 61 (44%) of all 140 US academic anesthesia departments have committed to AIMS. This estimated adoption rate is conservative because the numerator equals the affirmative responses, whereas the denominator equals the total population of academic departments. Among adopters, the top ranked anticipated benefits from installing an AIMS included improved clinical documentation, improved data collection for clinical research, enhancement of quality improvement programs, and compliance with requirements of regulatory authorities. The hospital provided funding in almost all facilities (90%), with co-funding by the anesthesia group in 35%. At least 61 or 44% of the 140 US academic departments surveyed in this study have already

  6. Relationship Between Organizational Climate, Job Stress And Job Performance Officer At State Education Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turiman Suandi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims at finding out the relationship between Organizational Climate, job stress and job performance among State Education Department (JPN officers . The focus of the research is to determeane the job performance of state education department officers, level of job stress among the officers, level of connection between organizational climate with job stress of State Education Department officers, looking at the difference in level of performance according to demographic factors and looking at the influence of organizational climate and job stress towards job performance . Research findings pertaining level of job performance showed that 75.8% of the respondents are at a high level, 23.7% respondents are at a moderate level while 0.5% respondents are at a low level. For organizational climate, findings show that 79.0% respondents are in the moderate level, 1.6 % respondents are at a highlevel and 19.4% respondents are at a low level. Findings on overall level of job stress found that as many as 92.5% respondents are at a normal job stress. Only about 7.5% respondents are at a moderate level of job stress. There is not even one respondent who are facing a high level of job stress.  In terms of the relationship between independent variables (organizational climate, job stress and dependent variable (job performance, the research findings show that there is a moderate level of positive relationship which is quite significant between organizational climate and job performance of the State Education Department officers at α = 0.01 (p < 0.01; r = 0.396.

  7. Washington State Department of Transportation Bridge Maintenance and Inspection Guidance for Protected Terrestrial Species

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Marion

    2007-01-01

    Protected wildlife species that utilize the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) bridges and structures may be susceptible to impacts from routine maintenance and inspection activities. In response to community-driven concerns related to the conservation of protected terrestrial species and due to the lack of existing guidance for bridge related activities, WSDOT expanded their Highway Maintenance Environmental Compliance Guidance for Protected Terrestrial Species to include ...

  8. United States Department of Defense Research in Robotic Unmanned Systems for Combat Casualty Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    first responder combat casualty care, and patient evacuation under hostile fire have compounded combat losses throughout history. Force protection of military first responders is complicated by current international and coalition troop deployments for peacekeeping operations, counter terrorism, and humanitarian assistance missions that involve highly visible, politically sensitive low intensity combat in urban terrain. The United States Department of Defense (DoD) has significantly invested in autonomous vehicles, and other robots to support its Future Force. By leveraging

  9. Higher Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) Values Measured in Homes of Asthmatic Children in Boston, Kansas City, and San Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesper, Stephen; Barnes, Charles; Ciaccio, Christina E.; Johanns, Alan; Kennedy, Kevin; Murphy, Johnna S.; Nunez-Alvarez, Arcela; Sandel, Megan T.; Cox, David; Dewalt, Gary; Ashley, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mold in water-damaged homes has been linked to asthma. Our objective was to test a new metric to quantify mold exposures in asthmatic children’s homes in three widely dispersed cities in the United States. Methods The Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) metric was created by the US Environmental Protection Agency, with assistance by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), to quantify mold contamination in US homes. The ERMI values in homes of asthmatic children were determined for the three widely dispersed cities of Boston, Kansas City, and San Diego. Results Asthmatic children in Boston (n = 76), Kansas City (n = 60), and San Diego (n = 93) were found to be living in homes with significantly higher ERMI values than were found in homes randomly selected during the 2006 HUD American Healthy Homes Survey (AHHS) from the same geographic areas (n = 34, 22, and 28, respectively). Taken together, the average ERMI value in the homes with an asthmatic child was 8.73 compared to 3.87 for the AHHS homes. In addition, Kansas City homes of children with “Mild, Moderate, or Severe Persistent Asthma” had average ERMI value of 12.4 compared to 7.9 for homes of children with only “Mild Intermittent Asthma.” Aspergillus niger was the only mold of the 36 tested which was measured in significantly greater concentration in the homes of asthmatic children in all three cities. Conclusion High ERMI values were associated with homes of asthmatic children in three widely dispersed cities in the United States. PMID:23137280

  10. Prevalence of epilepsy in rural Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablah, Elizabeth; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Liu, Yi; Paschal, Angelia M; Hawley, Suzanne; Thurman, David; Hauser, W Allen

    2014-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of active epilepsy in two southeastern rural Kansas counties. Medical records were abstracted from the emergency rooms, out- and inpatient services and clinics of 9 hospitals, from 10 doctors' offices, and 1 nursing home in and surrounding the two counties. Letters were mailed from hospitals and doctors' offices to invite their potentially eligible patients to participate in an interview. Medical record information and the interview, when available, were used for the final determination of active epilepsy, seizure type, etiology, syndrome, age, and gender in consensus conferences. Prevalence of epilepsy was calculated, and capture-recapture methodology, which estimates prevalence based on what is known about the population, was employed to assess active epilepsy in the two counties. This study identified 404 individuals with active prevalent epilepsy who visited at least one of the 20 facilities during the observation period. The overall prevalence of active epilepsy was 7.2 per 1000. The seizure type for 71.3% of prevalent cases was unknown; among the 76 cases with known and classifiable seizure type, 55.3% had focal with secondary generalized seizures. Among the 222 cases with classifiable etiology, 53.1% were idiopathic/cryptogenic. About 75% (n=301) were captured at only one center, 72% (n=75) of the remaining 103 patients were captured at two centers, and 28 patients were identified at three or more centers. The capture-recapture assessment yielded an estimation of 982 prevalent patients. The overall estimated prevalence of epilepsy in the two Kansas counties using capture-recapture was 17 per 1000. The crude prevalence of epilepsy, using medical record survey methods, was similar to, but on the high end, of other total population prevalence studies in the United States. The capture-recapture assessment suggested that epilepsy prevalence might be considerably higher than the crude prevalence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  11. Summary of hydrologic conditions in Kansas, water year 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louen, Justin M.

    2017-04-06

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring sites in Kansas. Real-time data are collected at 216 streamgage sites and are verified throughout the year with regular measurements of streamflow made by USGS personnel. Annual assessments of hydrologic conditions are made by comparing statistical analyses of current and historical water year (WY) data for the period of record. A WY is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the calendar year in which the period ends. Long-term monitoring of hydrologic conditions in Kansas provides critical information for water-supply management, flood forecasting, reservoir operations, irrigation scheduling, bridge and culvert design, ecological monitoring, and many other uses.

  12. 2011 Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Lidar: Northeast (Clyde Holliday, Cove Palisades, Lake Owyhee, and White River Falls State Parks)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set provides the lidar elevations for four Oregon State Parks. The four state parks are Clyde Holliday (766 square acres) in Grant County, Cove Palisades...

  13. 34 CFR 79.7 - How does the Secretary communicate with State and local officials concerning the Department's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the Secretary communicate with State and local officials concerning the Department's programs and activities? 79.7 Section 79.7 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION PROGRAMS...

  14. Putting chronic disease on the map: building GIS capacity in state and local health departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Casper, Michele; Tootoo, Joshua; Schieb, Linda

    2013-06-20

    Techniques based on geographic information systems (GIS) have been widely adopted and applied in the fields of infectious disease and environmental epidemiology; their use in chronic disease programs is relatively new. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention is collaborating with the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors and the University of Michigan to provide health departments with capacity to integrate GIS into daily operations, which support priorities for surveillance and prevention of chronic diseases. So far, 19 state and 7 local health departments participated in this project. On the basis of these participants' experiences, we describe our training strategy and identify high-impact GIS skills that can be mastered and applied over a short time in support of chronic disease surveillance. We also describe the web-based resources in the Chronic Disease GIS Exchange that were produced on the basis of this training and are available to anyone interested in GIS and chronic disease (www.cdc.gov/DHDSP/maps/GISX). GIS offers diverse sets of tools that promise increased productivity for chronic disease staff of state and local health departments.

  15. October 2008 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-26

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2008a). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events in November 2007 (Argonne 2008b), March 2008 (Argonne 2008c), and July 2008 (Argonne 2008d) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigations indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). The former agriculture building owned by the local school district, located immediately east of well PWS3, is also a potential source of the contamination. This current report presents the results of the

  16. Use of the emergency department for dermatologic care in the United States by ethnic group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abokwidir, Manal; Davis, Scott A; Fleischer, Alan B; Pichardo-Geisinger, Rita O

    2015-01-01

    The emergency department (ED) is not the ideal setting for dermatologic care, but may be widely used, especially among disadvantaged ethnic minorities. This study was performed to characterize the role of the ED in providing dermatologic care for each racial and ethnic group in the United States. We analyzed visits from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 1993 to 2010. Settings (office-based, outpatient department or ED), diagnoses and race/ethnicity were assessed to compare usage of the ED across groups. Usage of the ED for dermatologic conditions increased over time (p dermatologic care of black (18.3%) and Hispanic (10.5%) patients than for white patients (5.9%) and were used most in rural or small metropolitan areas. Providing better insurance, more dermatologists in rural areas and better dermatologic training for family physicians may help improve care for underserved populations and reduce inappropriate use of the ED.

  17. Characterization of surface-water quality based on real-time monitoring and regression analysis, Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, south-central Kansas, December 1998 through June 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Because of the considerable wildlife benefits offered by the Quivira National Wildlife Refuge in south-central Kansas, there is a desire to ensure suitable water...

  18. 76 FR 48902 - Solicitation of Nominations for the United States Department of Labor's Iqbal Masih Award for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... of Child Labor The United States Department of Labor's Iqbal Masih Award for the Elimination of Child... Elimination of Child Labor. 2. Purpose: To outline the eligibility criteria, the nomination process and the... Child Labor, and to solicit nominations for the United States Department of Labor's Iqbal Masih Award...

  19. 75 FR 38835 - Solicitation of Nominations for the United States Department of Labor's Iqbal Masih Award for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... Nominations for the United States Department of Labor's Iqbal Masih Award for the Elimination of Child Labor The United States Department of Labor's Iqbal Masih Award for the Elimination of Child Labor presented... of Child Labor. 2. Purpose: To outline the eligibility criteria, the nomination process and the...

  20. 75 FR 66420 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Online Dispute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    ..._trabajo_gt_proteccion_consumidor_anexo_A__Borrador_Ley_Marco_Cooperativo_Modelo_Solucion_Electro.pdf... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Online Dispute Resolution (ODR...

  1. 75 FR 55846 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law: Public Meeting on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law: Public Meeting on the Work of the UNCITRAL Working Group on Procurement The United Nations Commission on International Trade Law...

  2. 28 CFR 1100.29 - The roles and responsibilities of federal law enforcement, immigration, and Department of State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The roles and responsibilities of federal law enforcement, immigration, and Department of State officials under the Trafficking Victims... and responsibilities of federal law enforcement, immigration, and Department of State officials...

  3. 78 FR 50480 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    .... Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting on Arbitration The Office of the Assistant Legal Adviser for Private International Law, Department of State, gives... arbitration that will be considered by the Secretariat of the United Nations Commission on International Trade...

  4. 75 FR 58465 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law: Notice of Annual Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ...; international arbitration; investment securities, market stability and treaty law; international family law.... Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law: Notice of Annual Meeting The Department of State's Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL) will hold its annual meeting on...

  5. 75 FR 65461 - Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committee; United States Naval Academy Board of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Renewal of Federal advisory... Department of Defense gives notice that it is renewing the charter for the United States Naval Academy Board... methods and other matters relating to the United States Naval Academy that the Board decides to consider...

  6. 76 FR 26333 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL); Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL); Notice of Public Meeting of Its Study Group on the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements The Office of the Assistant Legal Adviser for Private International...

  7. 77 FR 12353 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Notice of Public Meeting on (1) Jurisdiction and the Recognition and Enforcement of Judgments, and (2) Choice of Law in International Commercial Contracts The Office of...

  8. 77 FR 58606 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Notice of Public Meeting of the Study Group on Choice of Law in International Commercial Contracts The Office of the Assistant Legal Adviser for Private International...

  9. 77 FR 5292 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Notice of Public Meeting of Its Study Group on the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements The Office of the Assistant Legal Adviser for Private International...

  10. 77 FR 72904 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Notice of Public Meeting of the Study Group on the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements The Office of the Assistant Legal Adviser for Private International...

  11. 22 CFR 40.82 - Alien who departed the United States to avoid service in the armed forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alien who departed the United States to avoid service in the armed forces. 40.82 Section 40.82 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH NONIMMIGRANTS AND IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Ineligible for Citizenship. § 40.82...

  12. 76 FR 77584 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... (international electronic commerce) of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) met.... Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting on Electronic Commerce The Department of State, Office of Legal Adviser, Office of Private International Law would...

  13. The Effect of an Electromagnetic Pulse Strike on the Transportation Infrastructure of Kansas City

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    resource. SCADA systems are used globally, and are found at supermarkets , refineries, water treatment plants, and even in the common household...25 Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition systems ..................................................... 28 Kansas City... System CIKR Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources DCS Digital Control Systems DOD Department of Defense ECM Electronic Control Module EFI

  14. State's Labor Department working to increase Hawai'i's primary care workforce 20% by 2020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Jillian B; Caldwell, Ruth R; Powell, Anna S

    2012-04-01

    Hawai'i lacks the number of skilled professionals needed to meet current and future healthcare demands. In order to meet the growing needs of Hawai'i's residents, the Workforce Development Council, a state agency attached to the State Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, is looking to expand the primary care workforce 20% by the year 2020. Using funds from a Healthcare Workforce Planning grant, the state formed several Healthcare Industry Skill Panels, a workforce development best practice from the State of Washington, to address the gap in healthcare services and healthcare workforce opportunities for Hawai'i residents. Over 150 stakeholders--from employers, education, the public workforce system, economic development and labor--contributed their time and expertise to identify current workforce issues and develop action-oriented strategies to close industry skill gaps. So far these Skill Panels have developed a Critical Care Nursing Course Curriculum, a Workforce Readiness Curriculum and Certification pilot project, and a group to address specific barriers that are impeding Certified Nurse Aides (CNA). Upcoming initiatives include the distribution of a comprehensive statewide healthcare workforce development plan entitled Hawai'i's Healthcare Workforce 20/20 Plan & Report: Addendum to the Comprehensive State Plan for Workforce Development 2009-2014, and the creation of HawaiiHealthCareers.org, a website to both recruit and support individuals interested in pursuing careers in the healthcare industry.

  15. Monitoring the Increase in Seismicity in South-Central Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, K.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Watney, W. L.

    2016-12-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in seismicity in the Midcontinent over the last five years, which appears to be linked to the injection of large volumes of wastewater from oilfield operations. Injection of fluids into deeper formations causes an increase in pore pressure, which can facilitate slip on existing faults oriented optimally to subsurface stress fields. Very little is known about the stresses within the shallow basement in Southern Kansas which has seen an increase in seismicity. The historical average of 21 M>3 earthquakes a year has increased to 188 M>3 reported earthquakes observed in 2011, in the US midcontinent. Earthquake focal mechanisms were analyzed for western Sumner County, south-central Kansas, from May of 2015 to July of 2016. The Kansas Geological Society (KGS) seismometer array in the Wellington Oil Field and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) portable array in southern Kansas were used to locate the earthquakes. These arrays generated a catalog of events from Mw .4 to Mw 3.5. Analyses of focal mechanisms for nearly 200 earthquakes larger than approximately Mw 2.0 were included in the inversion. Earthquakes of this magnitude were recorded on nearly all stations. The larger magnitude events tend to cluster in Northeast-Southwest and Northwest-Southeast lineations. These local, larger earthquakes provide a better understanding of the stresses that are causing the increased seismicity. The stress tensor was calculated for the region to the west of the city of Wellington, KS, in Sumner County. The primary horizontal stress direction is nearly east. This observation is in agreement with well data that estimates the maximum horizontal stress at approximately 75 degrees.

  16. Self Inflicted Injuries among Children in United States - estimates from a nationwide emergency department sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseem Sulyman

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objectives of the current study are to provide nationally representative estimates of hospital based emergency department visits (ED attributed to self inflicted injuries and attempted suicides among children in United States; and to identify potential methods of such intentional self inflicted injuries and attempted suicides. METHODS: The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (year 2007 was used. All ED visits occurring among children (aged ≤18 years with an External Cause of Injury for any of self inflicted injuries were selected. Outcomes examined include hospital ED charges and hospitalization charges. All estimates were projected to national levels. RESULTS: 77,420 visits to hospital based emergency departments were attributed to self inflicted injuries among children (26,045 males and 51,370 females. The average age of the ED visits was 15.7 years. 134 patients died in ED's (106 males and 28 females and 93 died in hospitals following in-patient admission (75 males and 18 females. A greater proportion of male ED visits were discharged routinely as opposed to female ED visits (51.1% versus 44%. A greater proportion of male ED visits also died in the emergency departments compared to female visits (0.4% versus 0.05%. 17,965 ED visits necessitated admission into same hospital. The mean charge for each ED visit was $1,874. Self inflicted injuries by poisoning were the most frequently reported sources accounting for close to 70% of all ED visits. CONCLUSIONS: Females comprise a greater proportion of ED visits attributed to self inflicted injuries. 227 children died either in the ED's or in hospitals. The current study results highlight the burden associated with such injuries among children.

  17. Kansas Primary Care Weighs In: A Pilot Randomized Trial of a Chronic Care Model Program for Obesity in 3 Rural Kansas Primary Care Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Andrea C.; Banitt, Angela; Befort, Christie; Hou, Qing; Rhode, Paula C.; Grund, Chrysanne; Greiner, Allen; Jeffries, Shawn; Ellerbeck, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Context: Obesity is a chronic disease of epidemic proportions in the United States. Primary care providers are critical to timely diagnosis and treatment of obesity, and need better tools to deliver effective obesity care. Purpose: To conduct a pilot randomized trial of a chronic care model (CCM) program for obesity care in rural Kansas primary…

  18. Cooperative Agreement Between the United States Department of the Interior and the State of Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Division of Forestry

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An agreement for assistance with forest fire detection, suppression and presuppression services on wildlife refuge lands by the Florida Division of Forestry. The...

  19. Flood-inundation maps for Indian Creek and Tomahawk Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Arin J.; Studley, Seth E.

    2016-01-25

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.4-mile upper reach of Indian Creek from College Boulevard to the confluence with Tomahawk Creek, a 3.9-mile reach of Tomahawk Creek from 127th Street to the confluence with Indian Creek, and a 1.9-mile lower reach of Indian Creek from the confluence with Tomahawk Creek to just beyond the Kansas/Missouri border at State Line Road in Johnson County, Kansas, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Overland Park, Kansas. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgages on Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas. Near real time stages at these streamgages may be obtained on the Web from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at these sites.Flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated for each reach by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the streamgages. The hydraulic models were then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; 17 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and 14 water-surface profiles for Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas, for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the next interval above the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flood level (500-year recurrence interval). The

  20. BUILDING STRONGER STATE ENERGY PARTNERSHIPS WITH THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kate Burke

    2003-09-01

    This technical progress report includes an update of the progress during the third year of cooperative agreement DE-FC26-00NT40802, Building Stronger State Energy Partnerships with the U.S. Department of Energy. The report also describes the barriers in conduct of the effort, and our assessment of future progress and activities. The approach of the project included three tasks during year three. First, NASEO and its Buildings Committee were to focus on raising awareness and coordination of Rebuild activities. Through education, one-on-one communications, and presentations at NASEO meetings and other events, staff and the committee will assist Rebuild officials in stimulating interest in the program and building greater support among State Energy Office Directors. The most recent subtasks added to the project, though not directly related to Rebuild America, fall under this initial task, and support: (a) state plans to implement integrated energy and environmental initiatives, including distributed generation technologies, and (b) initiation of a state collaborative on advanced turbines and hybrid systems. The advanced turbine piece was completed during this year. During the year, a new workplan was accepted by Rebuild America's Dan Sze to supplement the work in this task. This workplan is outlined below. Second, NASEO would work to improve the efficiency of America's schools by assisting states and DOE in promoting projects that result in more energy efficient and clean energy schools and a better learning environment. This task was fully completed during this year. The third task involves energy security issues which NASEO addressed by way of a Summer Fuels Outlook Conference held Tuesday, April 8, 2003. The purpose of this educational event was to inform state, federal, local, and other energy officials about the most recent transportation fuels data and trends. The public benefits part of this task was not funded for Year 3, thus no activity occurred.

  1. Trends in peak flows of selected streams in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, T.J.; Perry, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of a systematic change in flood potential led to an investigation of trends in the magnitude of annual peak flows in Kansas. Efficient design of highway bridges and other flood-plain structures depends on accurate understanding of flood characteristics. The Kendall's tau test was used to identify trends at 40 stream-gaging stations during the 40-year period 1958-97. Records from 13 (32 percent) of the stations showed significant trends at the 95-percent confidence level. Only three of the records (8 percent) analyzed had increasing trends, whereas 10 records (25 percent) had decreasing trends, all of which were for stations located in the western one-half of the State. An analysis of flow volume using mean annual discharge at 29 stations in Kansas resulted in 6 stations (21 percent) with significant trends in flow volumes. All six trends were decreasing and occurred in the western one-half of the State. The Kendall's tau test also was used to identify peak-flow trends over the entire period of record for 54 stream-gaging stations in Kansas. Of the 23 records (43 percent) showing significant trends, 16 (30 percent) were decreasing, and 7 (13 percent) were increasing. The trend test then was applied to 30-year periods moving in 5-year increments to identify time periods within each station record when trends were occurring. Systematic changes in precipitation patterns and long-term declines in ground-water levels in some stream basins may be contributing to peak-flow trends. To help explain the cause of the streamflow trends, the Kendall's tau test was applied to total annual precipitation and ground-water levels in Kansas. In western Kansas, the lack of precipitation and presence of decreasing trends in ground-water levels indicated that declining water tables are contributing to decreasing trends in peak streamflow. Declining water tables are caused by ground-water withdrawals and other factors such as construction of ponds and terraces. Peak

  2. Final Monitoring Plan for Site Closure at Inman, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Inman, Kansas, is a rural town located in southwest McPherson County, in sections 8, 9, 16, and 17, Township 21 South, Range 4 West (Figure 1.1). There are 1,377 people in 513 households, as of the census of 2010. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the southern edge of the city of Inman, Kansas, from 1954 to 1965. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In 1997, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contamination level [MCL] of 5.0 μg/L) were detected in three private wells near the former grain storage facility at Inman, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. No public water supply wells were identified within 1 mi of the town by the KDHE in 1998. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with grain storage operations. To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Inman is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA agreed to conduct a multi-phase investigation at Inman. The investigation was performed by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the USDA.

  3. Security, Violent Events, and Anticipated Surge Capabilities of Emergency Departments in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyand, Jonathan S; Junck, Emily; Kang, Christopher S; Heiner, Jason D

    2017-04-01

    Over the past 15 years, violent threats and acts against hospital patients, staff, and providers have increased and escalated. The leading area for violence is the emergency department (ED) given its 24/7 operations, role in patient care, admissions gateway, and center for influxes during acute surge events. This investigation had three objectives: to assess the current security of Washington State EDs; to estimate the prevalence of and response to threats and violence in Washington State EDs; and to appraise the Washington State ED security capability to respond to acute influxes of patients, bystanders, and media during acute surge events. A voluntary, blinded, 28-question Web-based survey developed by emergency physicians was electronically delivered to all 87 Washington State ED directors in January 2013. We evaluated responses by descriptive statistical analyses. Analyses occurred after 90% (78/87) of ED directors responded. Annual censuses of the EDs ranged from security was inadequate, based on the general consensus of their ED staff. Nearly two-thirds (63%) of EDs had 24-hour security personnel coverage, while 28% reported no assigned security personnel. Security personnel training was provided by 45% of hospitals or healthcare systems. Sixty-nine of 78 (88%) respondents witnessed or heard about violent threats or acts occurring in their ED. Of these, 93% were directed towards nursing staff, 90% towards physicians, 74% towards security personnel, and 51% towards administrative personnel. Nearly half (48%) noted incidents directed towards another patient, and 50% towards a patient's family or friend. These events were variably reported to the hospital administration. After an acute surge event, 35% believed the initial additional security response would not be adequate, with 26% reporting no additional security would be available within 15 minutes. Our study reveals the variability of ED security staffing and a heterogeneity of capabilities throughout

  4. Influence of the Kansas Collaborative Research Network on teacher beliefs, instructional practices and technology integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Gary G.

    Student-centered inquiry has been advocated for a lengthy period of time, through various waves of reform, and in 1996 was included in the vision of the National Science Education Standards. In 1997, the United States Department of Education awarded Kansas City, Kansas Public Schools a Technology Innovation Challenge Grant to support the Kansas Collaborative Research Network (KanCRN), which was an attempt to fulfill this vision by engaging teachers and students in scientific inquiry. KanCRN supported inquiry by providing teachers of various disciplines with project-based professional development, on-line curriculum and research tools, mentors, materials and equipment. This study examines the influences of KanCRN interventions on teachers' beliefs, classroom practices, technology skill-efficacies, and the integration of technology into classroom practices. Background characteristics of teachers and the influence of contemporary school-based professional development also were included in the research in order to evaluate and compare their impact on participation in KanCRN and the teacher outcome variables. Survey data collected on participation in professional development, beliefs and teaching practices were analyzed using a process that included: (a) factor analysis to assure reliability of constructs, (b) generation of theoretical models, and (c) analysis of those models using structural equation analysis. Longitudinal data concerning teacher beliefs and practices also were examined with a paired-comparison t-test. Analysis of the structural models revealed that KanCRN had significant and positive influences on teachers': (a) beliefs about student inquiry abilities, (b) beliefs about authentic and engaging work, (c) self-efficacy in support of inquiry, (d) self-reported content expertise, (e) frequency of use of authentic/engaging classwork, (f) frequency of use of the research process, (g) frequency of use of project/problem-based learning, (h) technology self

  5. Classroom Interaction in the English Department Speaking Class at State University of Malang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Kasim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study involved the teacher and students who were taking Speaking II class at the English Department of State University of Malang. The data was collected by conducting a non-participant observation, recording, and interview. Based on the analysis, the present study reveals that classroom interaction (CI is the realization of a lesson plan which is organized in patterns of CI. There are five patterns of CI identified. The most dominant pattern is student-student (S-S CI. Nine interactional strategies are used by the teacher and ten by the students. Speaking II class can be facilitated by implementing certain classroom procedures. The students communicative ability is described in terms of the frequency of use of the interactional strategies throughout the semester.

  6. State and use of monitoring and evaluation systems in national and provincial departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futhi Umlaw

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Since 2009, South Africa has seen a major shift in emphasis concerning monitoring and evaluation (M&E systems. This shift was partially stimulated by the South African government being faced with a number of pressures, key amongst which were persistent poverty and inequality and widespread service delivery protests. These pressures resulted ina greater willingness by government to address the poor quality of public services, and other governance problems that needed a greater focus on M&E to address these challenges. This led to the establishment of the Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME in early 2010. A comprehensive survey on the state and use of M&E systems in national and provincial government was conducted by the DPME as an attempt to understand the M&E landscape since 1994. The results were used to make informed policy and programme decisions. This paper outlines the findings of the survey.

  7. 78 FR 19062 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... commerce), the UNCITRAL Secretariat has prepared draft provisions on electronic transferable records, which.... Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting on Electronic Commerce The Office of the Assistant Legal Adviser for Private International Law, Department of...

  8. 78 FR 69172 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... response to a request from UNCITRAL's Working Group IV (electronic commerce), the UNCITRAL Secretariat has.... Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting on Electronic Commerce The Office of the Assistant Legal Adviser for Private International Law, Department of...

  9. Mississippi State University’s Geoscience Education and Geocognition Research Program in the Department of Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, K.; Clary, R. M.; Sherman-Morris, K.; Kirkland, B.; Gillham, D.; Moe-Hoffman, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Department of Geosciences at Mississippi State University offers both a MS in Geosciences and a PhD in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, with the possibility of a concentration in geoscience education. The department offers broad research opportunities in the geoscience sub-disciplines of Geology, Meteorology, GIS, and Geography. Geoscience education research is one of the research themes emphasized in the department and focuses on geoscience learning in traditional, online, field-based, and informal educational environments. Approximately 20% of the faculty are actively conducting research in geoscience education and incorporate both qualitative and quantitative research approaches in areas including: the investigation of effective teaching strategies, the implementation and evaluation of geoscience teacher professional development programs and diversity enhancement programs, the study of the history and philosophy of science in geoscience teaching, the exploration of student cognition and understanding of complex and dynamic earth systems, and the investigation of using visualizations to enhance learning in the geosciences. The inception and continued support of an active geoscience education research program is derived from a variety of factors including: (1) the development of the on-line Teachers in Geosciences (TIG) Masters Degree Program which is the primary teaching appointment for the majority of the faculty conducting geoscience education research, (2) the securing of federal funds to support geoscience education research, (3) the publication of high-quality peer-reviewed research papers in both geoscience education and traditional research domains, (4) the active contribution of the geoscience education faculty in their traditional research domains, (5) a faculty that greatly values teaching and recognizes the research area of geoscience education as a sub-domain of the broader geoscience disciplines, (6) the involvement of university faculty, outside

  10. Evaluation of Syndromic Surveillance Systems in 6 US State and Local Health Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mathew J; Yoon, Paula W; Collins, James M; Davidson, Arthur J; Mac Kenzie, William R

    2017-09-28

    Evaluating public health surveillance systems is critical to ensuring that conditions of public health importance are appropriately monitored. Our objectives were to qualitatively evaluate 6 state and local health departments that were early adopters of syndromic surveillance in order to (1) understand the characteristics and current uses, (2) identify the most and least useful syndromes to monitor, (3) gauge the utility for early warning and outbreak detection, and (4) assess how syndromic surveillance impacted their daily decision making. We adapted evaluation guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and gathered input from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention subject matter experts in public health surveillance to develop a questionnaire. We interviewed staff members from a convenience sample of 6 local and state health departments with syndromic surveillance programs that had been in operation for more than 10 years. Three of the 6 interviewees provided an example of using syndromic surveillance to identify an outbreak (ie, cluster of foodborne illness in 1 jurisdiction) or detect a surge in cases for seasonal conditions (eg, influenza in 2 jurisdictions) prior to traditional, disease-specific systems. Although all interviewees noted that syndromic surveillance has not been routinely useful or efficient for early outbreak detection or case finding in their jurisdictions, all agreed that the information can be used to improve their understanding of dynamic disease control environments and conditions (eg, situational awareness) in their communities. In the jurisdictions studied, syndromic surveillance may be useful for monitoring the spread and intensity of large outbreaks of disease, especially influenza; enhancing public health awareness of mass gatherings and natural disasters; and assessing new, otherwise unmonitored conditions when real-time alternatives are unavailable. Future studies should explore opportunities to

  11. Hydrologic Conditions in Kansas, water year 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Madison R.

    2016-03-31

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring sites in Kansas. In 2015, the network included about 200 real-time streamgages (hereafter referred to as “gages”), 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations, and 30 groundwater-level monitoring wells. These data and associated analyses provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve the understanding of Kansas’s water resources.Real-time data are verified by the USGS throughout the year with regular measurements of streamflow, lake levels, and groundwater levels. These data are used in protecting life and property; and managing water resources for agricultural, industrial, public supply, ecological, and recreational purposes. Yearly hydrologic conditions are characterized by comparing statistical analyses of current and historical water year (WY) data for the period of record. A WY is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the year in which it ends.

  12. MODIS 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  13. Landsat TM and ETM+ Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2000-2001 consists of terrain-corrected, precision rectified spring, summer, and fall Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and...

  14. ASTER 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  15. Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID) 2004-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID) 2004-2005 consists of terrain-corrected, precision rectified spring, summer, and fall Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM)...

  16. Final report : results of the 2007 investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility in Powhattan, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-15

    The 2007 investigation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination at Powhattan, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2006a). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The primary purposes of the investigation were to evaluate potential contaminant source areas on the former CCC/USDA property, determine the horizontal and vertical extent of potential contamination, conduct groundwater monitoring, and provide recommendations for future action.

  17. Kansas DOE/EPSCoR planning and traineeship grants: Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    In 1991, Kansas became the 18th state eligible for EPSCoR support, and it responded quickly to calls for planning proposals from DOE, NSF, and EPA. Planning process was carried out to improve the quality of scientific and engineering R&D in Kansas. All programs attempt to strengthen the intra- and inter-institutional ties to develop a critical mass of researchers in several areas. The following areas of excellence were selected for DOE/EPSCoR traineeships: atomic processes, electric power production, petroleum, high-energy physics, and energy alternative and efficiency.

  18. The giant resin bee making its way west: First record in Kansas (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Hinojosa-Díaz

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The invasive giant resin bee (Megachile sculpturalis Smith was first discovered in North America in 1994. A 2005 study provided the first predictive ecological niche model for any bee species and concluded that M. sculpturalis, then confined to the eastern United States, would eventually spread as far south as southern Florida, as far north as southern Ontario and Nova Scotia, and as far west as South Dakota, western Kansas, and northwestern Texas. Herein I provide the first record of M. sculpturalis from northeastern Kansas, documenting that the species has indeed continued its westward expansion in North America and the new available records entirely correspond to the earlier predictions.

  19. The economic impact of the Department of Energy on the State of New Mexico Fiscal Year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansford, R.R. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). New Mexico Agricultural Experiment Station; Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Office of Energy, Science and Technology; Ben-David, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Economics

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides a major source of economic benefits in New Mexico, second only to the activities of the U.S. Department of Defense. The agency`s far-reaching economic influence within the state is the focus of this report. Economic benefits arising from the various activities and functions of both the Department and its contractors have accrued to the state continuously for over 45 years. For several years, DOE/Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained inter-industry, input-output modeling capabilities to assess DOE`s impacts on the state of New Mexico and the other substate regions most directly impacted by DOE activities. One of the major uses of input-output techniques is to assess the effects of developments initiated outside the economy such as federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy.

  20. Heat Stress Illness Emergency Department Visits in National Environmental Public Health Tracking States, 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter-Leggett, Ethan D; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Choudhary, Ekta

    2016-02-01

    Variability of heat stress illness (HSI) by urbanicity and climate region has rarely been considered in previous HSI studies. We investigated temporal and geographic trends in HSI emergency department (ED) visits in CDC Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking) states for 2005-2010. We obtained county-level HSI ED visit data for 14 Tracking states. We used the National Center for Health Statistics Urban-Rural Classification Scheme to categorize counties by urbanicity as (1) large central metropolitan (LCM), (2) large fringe metropolitan, (3) small-medium metropolitan, or (4) nonmetropolitan (NM). We also assigned counties to one of six US climate regions. Negative binomial regression was used to examine trends in HSI ED visits over time across all counties and by urbanicity for each climate region, adjusting for pertinent variables. During 2005-2010, there were 98,462 HSI ED visits in the 14 states. ED visits for HSI decreased 3.0% (p < 0.01) per year. Age-adjusted incidence rates of HSI ED visits increased from most urban to most rural. Overall, ED visits were significantly higher for NM areas (IRR = 1.41, p < 0.01) than for LCM areas. The same pattern was observed in all six climate regions; compared with LCM, NM areas had from 14 to 90% more ED visits for HSI. These findings of significantly increased HSI ED visit rates in more rural settings suggest a need to consider HSI ED visit variability by county urbanicity and climate region when designing and implementing local HSI preventive measures and interventions.

  1. Heat Stress Illness Emergency Department Visits in National Environmental Public Health Tracking States, 2005–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter-Leggett, Ethan D.; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Choudhary, Ekta

    2015-01-01

    Variability of heat stress illness (HSI) by urbanicity and climate region has rarely been considered in previous HSI studies. We investigated temporal and geographic trends in HSI emergency department (ED) visits in CDC Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking) states for 2005–2010. We obtained county-level HSI ED visit data for 14 Tracking states. We used the National Center for Health Statistics Urban-Rural Classification Scheme to categorize counties by urbanicity as 1) large central metropolitan (LCM), 2) large fringe metropolitan (LFM), 3) small–medium metropolitan (SMM), or 4) nonmetropolitan (NM). We also assigned counties to one of six US climate regions. Negative binomial regression was used to examine trends in HSI ED visits over time across all counties and by urbanicity for each climate region, adjusting for pertinent variables. During 2005–2010, there were 98,462 HSI ED visits in the 14 states. ED visits for HSI decreased 3.0 % (p < 0.01) per year. Age-adjusted incidence rates of HSI ED visits increased from most urban to most rural. Overall, ED visits were significantly higher for NM areas (IRR = 1.41, p < 0.01) than for LCM areas. The same pattern was observed in all six climate regions; compared with LCM, NM areas had from 14 % to 90 % more ED visits for HSI. These findings of significantly increased HSI ED visit rates in more rural settings suggest a need to consider HSI ED visit variability by county urbanicity and climate region when designing and implementing local HSI preventive measures and interventions. PMID:26205070

  2. Annual Report of Monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the public water supply wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha (Figure 1.1). The population of Morrill as of the 2010 Census was approximately 230 (down from 277 in 2000). All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. This document reports the findings concerning the groundwater in Morrill.

  3. Department of Defense, Atlas/Data Abstract for the United States and Selected Areas, Fiscal Year 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    FOR13ES FIELD* SHAWNEE / SUNFLOWER LAWRENCE ARMY AMMO PLANT OLATHE HUTCHINSON WICHITA KANSAS ARMY 0 AMMO PLANT 9McCONNELL AFB A LIBERAL * PARSONS 0...COMPANY 7,817 Other Miscellaneous Buildings 5,660 4. TALCOTT PROPERTIES 3,003 Maint/Troop Housing Facilities 1,928 5. MONTANA POWER COMPANY INC 2,752

  4. The University of Kansas High-Throughput Screening Laboratory. Part II: enabling collaborative drug-discovery partnerships through cutting-edge screening technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Peter R; Roy, Anuradha; Chaguturu, Rathnam

    2011-07-01

    The University of Kansas High-Throughput Screening (KU HTS) core is a state-of-the-art drug-discovery facility with an entrepreneurial open-service policy, which provides centralized resources supporting public- and private-sector research initiatives. The KU HTS core was established in 2002 at the University of Kansas with support from an NIH grant and the state of Kansas. It collaborates with investigators from national and international academic, nonprofit and pharmaceutical organizations in executing HTS-ready assay development and screening of chemical libraries for target validation, probe selection, hit identification and lead optimization. This is part two of a contribution from the KU HTS laboratory.

  5. Variation in Emergency Department vs Internal Medicine Excess Charges in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tim; Park, Angela; Bai, Ge; Joo, Sarah; Hutfless, Susan M; Mehta, Ambar; Anderson, Gerard F; Makary, Martin A

    2017-08-01

    Uninsured and insured but out-of-network emergency department (ED) patients are often billed hospital chargemaster prices, which exceed amounts typically paid by insurers. To examine the variation in excess charges for services provided by emergency medicine and internal medicine physicians. Retrospective analysis was conducted of professional fee payment claims made by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services for all services provided to Medicare Part B fee-for-service beneficiaries in calendar year 2013. Data analysis was conducted from January 1 to July 31, 2016. Markup ratios for ED and internal medicine professional services, defined as the charges submitted by the hospital divided by the Medicare allowable amount. Our analysis included 12 337 emergency medicine physicians from 2707 hospitals and 57 607 internal medicine physicians from 3669 hospitals in all 50 states. Services provided by emergency medicine physicians had an overall markup ratio of 4.4 (340% excess charges), which was greater than the markup ratio of 2.1 (110% excess charges) for all services performed by internal medicine physicians. Markup ratios for all ED services ranged by hospital from 1.0 to 12.6 (median, 4.2; interquartile range [IQR], 3.3-5.8); markup ratios for all internal medicine services ranged by hospital from 1.0 to 14.1 (median, 2.0; IQR, 1.7-2.5). The median markup ratio by hospital for ED evaluation and management procedure codes varied between 4.0 and 5.0. Among the most common ED services, laceration repair had the highest median markup ratio (7.0); emergency medicine physician review of a head computed tomographic scan had the greatest interhospital variation (range, 1.6-27.7). Across hospitals, markups in the ED were often substantially higher than those in the internal medicine department for the same services. Higher ED markup ratios were associated with hospital for-profit ownership (median, 5.7; IQR, 4.0-7.1), a greater percentage of uninsured patients seen

  6. October 2008 monitoring results for Morrill, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-03-10

    In September 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) initiated periodic sampling of groundwater in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Morrill, Kansas. The sampling at Morrill is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2005), to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at this site (Argonne 2004, 2005a). This report provides results for the most recent monitoring event, in October 2008. Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), groundwater was initially sampled twice yearly for a period of two years (in fall 2005, in spring and fall 2006, and in spring and fall 2007). The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as for selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. During the two-year period, the originally approved scope of the monitoring was expanded to include vegetation sampling (initiated in October 2006) and surface water and stream bed sediment sampling (initiated in March 2007, after a visual reconnaissance along Terrapin Creek [Argonne 2007a]). The analytical results for groundwater sampling events at Morrill in September 2005, March and September 2006, March and October 2007, and April 2008 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007b, 2008a,c). Those results consistently demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (5.0 {micro}g/L) for this compound, in a groundwater plume extending generally south-southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, toward Terrapin Creek at the south edge of the town. Low levels ({le} 1.3 {micro}g/L) of carbon

  7. Sitewide monitoring at Agra, Kansas, June 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-01-14

    In 1985, carbon tetrachloride was discovered in the groundwater at Agra, Kansas, during routine sampling of public water supply wells. Two of Agra's four public water supply wells contained low but detectable levels of carbon tetrachloride; the concentrations in wells PWS-3 and PWS-4 exceeded the maximum contaminant level. These wells were removed from service in 1986, although they remain available for uses other than drinking water. Other public wells, outside the area of contamination, supply drinking water for the city of Agra. In 1987-2005, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) and the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) conducted investigations to delineate the contaminant plume and to identify source areas for the contamination - which results from the past use of grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride. Source areas were identified on the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility property and on the Producers Agricultural Marketing Association, Inc., property located to the south (Argonne 2006). The contaminant plume extends to the southeast, toward well PWS-3, from the identified source areas. Both the CCC/USDA and Pro-Ag Marketing are currently implementing KDHE-approved interim measures (IMs). To address the contamination identified on its former property, the CCC/USDA is implementing a source control IM consisting of large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) coupled with soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparging (AS). Pro-Ag Marketing plans to use groundwater extraction to address the downgradient plume. The CCC/USDA and Pro-Ag completed installation of the two interim measures in May 2009 and August 2009, respectively. The performance and assessments of the effectiveness of the IMs are being reported separately by the responsible entities. As part of the IM process, the KDHE (2008) requested the development of a joint sitewide groundwater monitoring plan to allow periodic assessment of the

  8. Revised National Estimates of Emergency Department Visits for Sepsis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry E; Jones, Allison R; Donnelly, John P

    2017-09-01

    The emergency department is an important venue for initial sepsis recognition and care. We sought to determine contemporary estimates of the epidemiology of U.S. emergency department visits for sepsis. Analysis of data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. U.S. emergency department visits, 2009-2011. Adult (age, ≥ 18 yr) emergency department sepsis patients. We defined serious infection as an emergency department diagnosis of a serious infection or a triage temperature greater than 38°C or less than 36°C. We defined three emergency department sepsis classifications: 1) original emergency department sepsis-serious infection plus emergency department diagnosis of organ dysfunction, endotracheal intubation, or systolic blood pressure less than or equal to 90 mm Hg or explicit sepsis emergency department diagnoses; 2) quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment emergency department sepsis-serious infection plus presence of at least two "quick" Sequential Organ Failure Assessment criteria (Glasgow Coma Scale ≤ 14, respiratory rate ≥ 22 breaths/min, or systolic blood pressure ≤ 100 mm Hg); and 3) revised emergency department sepsis-original or quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment emergency department sepsis. None. We used survey design and weighting variables to produce national estimates of annual adult emergency department visits using updated sepsis classifications. Over 2009-2011, there were 103,257,516 annual adult emergency department visits. The estimated number of emergency department sepsis visits were as follows: 1) original emergency department sepsis 665,319 (0.64%; 95% CI, 0.57-0.73); 2) quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment emergency department sepsis 318,832 (0.31%; 95% CI, 0.26-0.37); and 3) revised emergency department sepsis 847,868 (0.82%; 95% CI, 0.74-0.91). Sepsis continues to present a major burden to U.S. emergency departments, affecting up to nearly 850,000 emergency department visits annually. Updated

  9. Schools in Kansas with Tornado Protection. Shawnee Mission Public Schools--District No. 512.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Delbert B.

    Kansas and nearby Missouri are among the half-dozen states in America having the greatest frequency of tornadoes of any region in the world. This booklet describes a districtwide approach of designing and constructing tornado-resistant shelters as integrated parts of the school facilities. The design criteria for tornado protection also resulted…

  10. Career Development Event Participation and Professional Development Needs of Kansas Agricultural Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Clark R.

    2008-01-01

    Past studies have shown that agricultural education teachers perceive a need for professional development in Career Development Events (CDEs) preparation, but they did not identify the individual CDEs where training was needed. This study examined the CDEs that Kansas schools were participating in at the district and state levels and the CDEs…

  11. Evaluating the impact of future climate change on irrigated maize production in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States southern and central High Plains including western Kansas are experiencing declining ground water supplies from the Ogallala as a result of withdrawals for irrigation exceeding annual recharge, this situation will be exacerbated by future climate change. The purpose of this simulat...

  12. Seed storage and testing procedures used at Saratoga Tree Nursery, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Lee

    2008-01-01

    The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Saratoga Tree Nursery maintains over 120 ha (300 ac) of seed orchard and seed production areas.With the help of New York State Corrections crews, cones and fruits of desired species are collected when ripe. Cones and fruits are transported back to the nursery, assigned a seedlot number according to species,...

  13. 75 FR 504 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law: Organization of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    .... Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law: Organization of American States (OAS) Specialized Conference on Private International Law (CIDIP) Study Group The OAS CIDIP Study Group will hold... Conference on Private International Law (CIDIP-VII), the Committee on Juridical and Political Affairs...

  14. Low birth weight in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, V James; Lai, Sue Min; Suminski, R; Crawford, G

    2015-05-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) is associated with infant morbidity and mortality. This is the first study of LBW in Kansas using vital statistics to determine maternal and health care system factors associated with LBW. Low birth weight. Determine if prenatal care, maternal socio-demographic or medical factors, or insurance status were associated with LBW. Birth certificate data were merged with Medicaid eligibility data and subjected to logistic regression analysis. Of the 37,081 single vaginal births, LBW rates were 5.5% overall, 10.8% for African Americans, and 5% for White Americans. Lacking private insurance was associated with 34% more LBW infants (AOR 1.34; 95% CI 1.13-1.58), increased comorbidity, and late or less prenatal care. Low birth weight was associated with maternal medical comorbidity and with previous adverse birth outcomes. Insurance status, prenatal care, and maternal health during pregnancy are associated with LBW. Private insurance was consistently associated with more prenatal care and better outcomes. This study has important implications regarding health care reform.

  15. Funding priorities in animal reproduction at the United States Department of Agriculture's Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirando, Mark A; Hamernik, Debora L

    2006-03-01

    The National Research Initiative (NRI) Competitive Grants Program is the U.S. Department of Agriculture's major competitive grants program and is administered by the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES). Since its inception in 1991, the NRI has funded competitive grants in the discipline of animal reproduction. Previously, this program provided funding for a broad range of projects encompassing almost every subdiscipline in reproductive biology of farm animals, including aquatic species important to the aquaculture industry. During fiscal year 2004, the NRI Animal Reproduction Program narrowed the focus of funding priorities to the topics of infertility, basic mechanisms regulating fertility, cryopreservation of gametes, reducing the postpartum interval to conception, and sterilization methods or development of monosex populations. In response to a directive to further narrow the focus of funding priorities for fiscal year 2005 and beyond, CSREES conducted a Stakeholder Workshop on Funding Priorities in Animal Reproduction at the 37th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Reproduction in Vancouver, Canada. More than 75 stakeholder scientists from a cross section of federal, public, and private institutions from across the United States participated in the workshop and provided recommendations to CSREES for future NRI-funding priorities in Animal Reproduction. The recommendations provided by stakeholders included continuing efforts to focus funding priorities into fewer high-impact areas relevant to animal agriculture and aquaculture. Recommendations also included movement back toward subdisciplines of animal reproduction that cut across all applicable species. The three funding priorities that consistently emerged as recommendations from the workshop participants were 1) gonadal function and production of gametes, 2) pituitary-hypothalamic function, and 3) embryo and conceptus development, including interaction between the

  16. From Infancy to Adolescence: The Kansas University School of Medicine-Salina: A Rural Medical Campus Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathcart-Rake, William; Robinson, Michael; Paolo, Anthony

    2017-05-01

    The University of Kansas School of Medicine established a rural regional campus in Salina, Kansas, in 2011. The creation of a four-year medical campus of only 32 total students in a town of less than 50,000 inhabitants appeared to contradict all previous practices where medical schools have been situated in large metropolitan cities with student bodies frequently in the hundreds. The rationale to open the Salina campus was to attract medical students with a desire to train in a rural environment, hoping that many would eventually elect to practice primary care in rural Kansas. The authors evaluated the admission demographics, academic performance, campus satisfaction, and graduate medical education choices of students at Kansas University School of Medicine-Salina (KUSM-S) during its first four years of existence. To date, the Salina campus has succeeded in its mission to train students from rural communities in a rural environment to eventually become rural-based physicians. KUSM-S students have adjusted well to the rigors of medical school, have shown steady improvement in academic performance as measured by United States Medical Licensing Examination scores, and have been overwhelmingly positive about the Salina medical education program. The initial cohort of students has now successfully graduated and secured residency training positions, and most KUSM-S graduates are either continuing their training in primary care in Kansas or intend to return to Kansas to practice following residency training.

  17. From Infancy to Adolescence: The Kansas University School of Medicine–Salina: A Rural Medical Campus Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michael; Paolo, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    The University of Kansas School of Medicine established a rural regional campus in Salina, Kansas, in 2011. The creation of a four-year medical campus of only 32 total students in a town of less than 50,000 inhabitants appeared to contradict all previous practices where medical schools have been situated in large metropolitan cities with student bodies frequently in the hundreds. The rationale to open the Salina campus was to attract medical students with a desire to train in a rural environment, hoping that many would eventually elect to practice primary care in rural Kansas. The authors evaluated the admission demographics, academic performance, campus satisfaction, and graduate medical education choices of students at Kansas University School of Medicine–Salina (KUSM-S) during its first four years of existence. To date, the Salina campus has succeeded in its mission to train students from rural communities in a rural environment to eventually become rural-based physicians. KUSM-S students have adjusted well to the rigors of medical school, have shown steady improvement in academic performance as measured by United States Medical Licensing Examination scores, and have been overwhelmingly positive about the Salina medical education program. The initial cohort of students has now successfully graduated and secured residency training positions, and most KUSM-S graduates are either continuing their training in primary care in Kansas or intend to return to Kansas to practice following residency training. PMID:27805948

  18. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, S.

    2010-10-22

    The mission of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is to clean up the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons research and production during the Cold War. That mission includes cleaning up nuclear waste, contaminated groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and contaminated facilities covering two million acres of land in thirty-five states. EM's principal program goals include timely completion of tank waste treatment facilities, reduction of the life-cycle costs and acceleration of the cleanup of the Cold War legacy, and reduction of the EM footprint. The mission of the EM Technology Innovation and Development program is to transform science and innovation into practical solutions to achieve the EM mission. During fiscal year 2010 (October 2009-September 2010), EM focused upon accelerating environmental cleanup by expeditiously filling identified gaps in available knowledge and technology in the EM program areas. This report describes some of the approaches and transformational technologies in tank waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, nuclear materials disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning developed during fiscal year 2010 that will enable EM to meet its most pressing program goals.

  19. Resilience skills as emergent phenomena: A study of emergency departments in Brazil and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachs, Priscila; Saurin, Tarcisio Abreu; Righi, Angela Weber; Wears, Robert Lewis

    2016-09-01

    Although the use of resilience skills (RSs) by emergency department (ED) front-line staff is ubiquitous, the nature and origin of these skills tend to be taken for granted. This study investigates the research question "where do RSs come from"? Case studies in two EDs were undertaken in order to answer the research question: one in Brazil and the other in the United States. The case studies adopted the same data collection and analysis procedures, involving interviews, questionnaires, observations, and analysis of documents. A model for describing RSs as emergent phenomena is proposed. The model indicates that RSs arise from interactions between: work constraints, hidden curriculum, gaps in standardized operating procedures, organizational support for resilience, and RSs themselves. An instantiation of the model is illustrated by a critical event identified from the American ED. The model allows the identification of leverage points for influencing the development of RSs, instead of leaving their evolution purely to chance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Water sample data set from the State of Hawaii, Department of Health, 1999-2006 in Hawaiian waters (NODC Accession 0013723)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water quality data from were collected by the Monitoring Section of the State of Hawaii, Department of Health. Data were obtained from 373 state-wide coastal...

  1. Water sample data set from the State of Hawaii, Department of Health, 1973-1998 in Hawaiian waters (NODC Accession 0013724)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water quality data from were collected by the Monitoring Section of the State of Hawaii, Department of Health. Data were obtained from 373 state-wide coastal...

  2. Identifying potentially preventable emergency department visits by nursing home residents in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Robert E.; Rooks, Sean P.; Levy, Cari; Schwartz, Robert; Ginde, Adit A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify and describe potentially preventable emergency department (ED) visits by nursing home (NH) residents in the United States. These visits are important because they are common, frequently lead to hospitalization, and can be associated with significant cost to the patient and the health care system. Design Retrospective analysis of the 2005-2010 National Hospital Ambulatory Care Survey (NHAMCS), comparing ED visits by nursing home residents that did not lead to hospital admission (potentially preventable) to those that led to admission (less likely preventable). Setting Nationally representative sample of United States EDs; Federal hospitals and hospitals with less than six beds were excluded. Participants Older (age ≥65 years) nursing home residents with an ED visit during this time period. Measurements Patient demographics, ED visit information including testing performed, interventions (both procedures and medications) provided, and diagnoses treated. Results Older NH residents accounted for 3,857 of 208,956 ED visits during the time period of interest (1.8%). When weighted to be nationally representative, these represent 13.97 million ED visits, equivalent to 1.8 ED visits annually per NH resident in the United States. More than half of visits (53.5%) did not lead to hospital admission; of those discharged from the ED, 62.8% had normal vital signs on presentation and 18.9% did not have any diagnostic testing prior to ED discharge. Injuries were 1.78 times more likely to be discharged than admitted (44.8% versus 25.3%, respectively, p<0.001), while infections were 2.06 times as likely to be admitted as discharged (22.9% versus 11.1%, respectively). CT scans were performed in 25.4% and 30.1% of older NH residents who were discharged from the ED and admitted to the hospital, respectively, and more than 70% of these were CTs of the head. NH residents received centrally acting, sedating medications prior to ED discharge in 9.4% of visits

  3. Estimation of constituent concentrations, densities, loads, and yields in lower Kansas River, northeast Kansas, using regression models and continuous water-quality monitoring, January 2000 through December 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Ziegler, Andrew C.; Rasmussen, Patrick P.

    2005-01-01

    The lower Kansas River is an important source of drinking water for hundreds of thousands of people in northeast Kansas. Constituents of concern identified by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) for streams in the lower Kansas River Basin include sulfate, chloride, nutrients, atrazine, bacteria, and sediment. Real-time continuous water-quality monitors were operated at three locations along the lower Kansas River from July 1999 through September 2004 to provide in-stream measurements of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen and to estimate concentrations for constituents of concern. Estimates of concentration and densities were combined with streamflow to calculate constituent loads and yields from January 2000 through December 2003. The Wamego monitoring site is located 44 river miles upstream from the Topeka monitoring site, which is 65 river miles upstream from the DeSoto monitoring site, which is 18 river miles upstream from where the Kansas River flows into the Missouri River. Land use in the Kansas River Basin is dominated by grassland and cropland, and streamflow is affected substantially by reservoirs. Water quality at the three monitoring sites varied with hydrologic conditions, season, and proximity to constituent sources. Nutrient and sediment concentrations and bacteria densities were substantially larger during periods of increased streamflow, indicating important contributions from nonpoint sources in the drainage basin. During the study period, pH remained well above the KDHE lower criterion of 6.5 standard units at all sites in all years, but exceeded the upper criterion of 8.5 standard units annually between 2 percent of the time (Wamego in 2001) and 65 percent of the time (DeSoto in 2003). The dissolved oxygen concentration was less than the minimum aquatic-life-support criterion of 5.0 milligrams per liter less than 1 percent of the time at all sites. Dissolved solids, a measure of the

  4. The digital divide in public e-health: barriers to accessibility and privacy in state health department websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Darrell M; Miller, Edward Alan

    2006-08-01

    State health departments have placed a tremendous amount of information, data, and services online in recent years. With the significant increase in online resources at official health sites, though, have come questions concerning equity of access and the confidentiality of electronic medical materials. This paper reports on an examination of public health department websites maintained by the 50 state governments. Using a content analysis of health department sites undertaken each year from 2000 to 2005, we investigate several dimensions of accessibility and privacy: readability levels, disability access, non-English accessibility, and the presence of privacy and security statements. We argue that although progress has been made at improving the accessibility and confidentiality of health department electronic resources, there remains much work to be done to ensure quality access for all Americans in the area of public e-health.

  5. Kansas legislators prioritize obesity but overlook nutrition and physical activity issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Katie M; Stephen, Mellina O; Vaughan, Katherine B; Kellogg, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    State-level policymakers play an important role in the fight against obesity because of their ability to create policies that influence opportunities for physical activity and nutrition. In 2011, we investigated how Kansas policymakers regarded obesity, nutrition, and physical activity in comparison to other issues. This study used a cross-sectional design. This study was conducted in Kansas, a predominately rural and Republican Midwestern state. All 181 state-level policymakers in Kansas were mailed a cover letter and survey. Policymakers were asked to identify and rate the importance of issues or problems in need of attention for Kansas. The 2011 state legislative report was content analyzed and coded to match the survey. Comparisons were made by political party. Of the 49 policymakers who completed a survey, 37 were Republicans and 43 were elected to their position. Although obesity-related issues were rated second highest after jobs, physical activity- and nutrition-related issues were not seen as important problems; moreover, little corresponding legislation was introduced. Other key issues identified by policymakers included budget/spending/taxes, education, jobs/economy, and drug abuse, with more legislation reflecting these problems. The Democrats ranked 11 issues as more significant problems than did the Republicans: quality of public education, poverty, access to health care, lack of affordable housing, ethics in government, lack of public health training, access to healthy groceries, lack of pedestrian walkways/crosswalks/sidewalks, pedestrian safety, air pollution, and global warming (P Kansas policymakers. Issues identified may be similar for other predominately rural and Republican states.

  6. The United States Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program Validation Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litynski, John T; Plasynski, Sean; McIlvried, Howard G; Mahoney, Christopher; Srivastava, Rameshwar D

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the Validation Phase (Phase II) of the Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships initiative. In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) to help determine and implement the technology, infrastructure, and regulations most appropriate to promote carbon sequestration in different regions of the nation. The objectives of the Characterization Phase (Phase I) were to characterize the geologic and terrestrial opportunities for carbon sequestration; to identify CO(2) point sources within the territories of the individual partnerships; to assess the transportation infrastructure needed for future deployment; to evaluate CO(2) capture technologies for existing and future power plants; and to identify the most promising sequestration opportunities that would need to be validated through a series of field projects. The Characterization Phase was highly successful, with the following achievements: established a national network of companies and professionals working to support sequestration deployment; created regional and national carbon sequestration atlases for the United States and portions of Canada; evaluated available and developing technologies for the capture of CO(2) from point sources; developed an improved understanding of the permitting requirements that future sequestration activities will need to address as well as defined the gap in permitting requirements for large scale deployment of these technologies; created a raised awareness of, and support for, carbon sequestration as a greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation option, both within industry and among the general public; identified the most promising carbon sequestration opportunities for future field tests; and established protocols for project implementation, accounting, and management. Economic evaluation was started and is continuing and will be a factor in project selection. During the

  7. Distribution and Sources of Nitrate-Nitrogen in Kansas Groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A. Townsend

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Kansas is primarily an agricultural state. Irrigation water and fertilizer use data show long- term increasing trends. Similarly, nitrate-N concentrations in groundwater show long-term increases and exceed the drinking-water standard of 10 mg/l in many areas. A statistical analysis of nitrate-N data collected for local and regional studies in Kansas from 1990 to 1998 (747 samples found significant relationships between nitrate-N concentration with depth, age, and geographic location of wells. Sources of nitrate-N have been identified for 297 water samples by using nitrogen stable isotopes. Of these samples, 48% showed fertilizer sources (+2 to +8 and 34% showed either animal waste sources (+10 to +15 with nitrate-N greater than 10 mg/l or indication that enrichment processes had occurred (+10 or above with variable nitrate-N or both. Ultimate sources for nitrate include nonpoint sources associated with past farming and fertilization practices, and point sources such as animal feed lots, septic systems, and commercial fertilizer storage units. Detection of nitrate from various sources in aquifers of different depths in geographically varied areas of the state indicates that nonpoint and point sources currently impact and will continue to impact groundwater under current land uses.

  8. Pediatric martial arts injuries presenting to Emergency Departments, United States 1990-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yard, Ellen E; Knox, Christy L; Smith, Gary A; Comstock, R Dawn

    2007-08-01

    Although an estimated 6.5 million United States (US) children aged 6-17 practiced a martial art in 2004, there have been no nationally representative studies comparing pediatric injuries among the three most popular disciplines, karate, taekwondo, and judo. Describe pediatric martial arts injuries presenting to a representative sample of US Emergency Departments (EDs) from 1990 to 2003. We reviewed all martial arts injuries captured by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC), National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). An estimated 128,400 children martial arts-related injuries from 1990 to 2003. Injured tended to be male (73.0%) and had a mean age of 12.1 years. Most injuries were attributed to karate (79.5%). The most common mechanism of injury was being kicked (25.6%), followed by falling (20.6%) and kicking (18.0%). The majority of injuries occurred to the lower leg/foot/ankle (30.1%) and hand/wrist (24.5%). The most common injury diagnoses were sprains/strains (29.3%), contusions/abrasions (27.8%), and fractures (24.6%). Participants in judo sustained significantly higher proportions of shoulder/upper arm injuries than karate (IPR=4.31, 95% CI: 2.84-6.55) or taekwondo (IPR=9.75, 95% CI: 3.53-26.91) participants. There were also higher proportions of neck injuries sustained by judo participants compared to karate (IPR=4.73, 95% CI: 1.91-11.70) or taekwondo (IPR=4.17, 95% CI: 1.02-17.06) participants. Pediatric martial arts injuries differ by discipline. Understanding these injury patterns can assist with the development of discipline-specific preventive interventions.

  9. Interpersonal influence among public health leaders in the United States Department of Health and Human Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenine K. Harris

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. In public health, interpersonal influence has been identified as an important factor in the spread of health information, and in understanding and changing health behaviors. However, little is known about influence in public health leadership. Influence is important in leadership settings, where public health professionals contribute to national policy and practice agendas. Drawing on social theory and recent advances in statistical network modeling, we examined influence in a network of tobacco control leaders at the United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS. Design and Methods. Fifty-four tobacco control leaders across all 11 agencies in the DHHS were identified; 49 (91% responded to a web-based survey. Participants were asked about communication with other tobacco control leaders, who influenced their work, and general job characteristics. Exponential random graph modeling was used to develop a network model of influence accounting for characteristics of individuals, their relationships, and global network structures. Results. Higher job ranks, more experience in tobacco control, and more time devoted to tobacco control each week increased the likelihood of influence nomination, as did more frequent communication between network members. Being in the same agency and working the same number of hours per week were positively associated with mutual influence nominations. Controlling for these characteristics, the network also exhibited patterns associated with influential clusters of network members. Conclusions. Findings from this unique study provide a perspective on influence within a government agency that both helps to understand decision-making and also can serve to inform organizational efforts that allow for more effective structuring of leadership.

  10. Survey of Fossil Vertebrates from East-Central Kansas, Kansas River Bank Stabilization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    pages 15-19) Figure 1. Upper molar of adult mastodon, Mammut americanus (KUVP 5898), from Kansas River at Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas. Figure 2...fact, one of the earliest specimens to be added to that collection was a mandible of an American mastodon, Mammut americanum. It was found by then...Pleistocene assemblage including forms indicative of spruce forest such as the American mastodon, Mammut americanum, the woodland musk ox, 5.mbos cavifrons

  11. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - Near-term, Class I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Reynolds, Rodney R.; McCune, A. Dwayne; Michnick, Michael J.; Walton, Anthony W.; Watney, W. Lynn

    2000-06-08

    This project involved two demonstration projects, one in a Marrow reservoir located in the southwestern part of the state and the second in the Cherokee Group in eastern Kansas. Morrow reservoirs of western Kansas are still actively being explored and constitute an important resource in Kansas. Cumulative oil production from the Morrow in Kansas is over 400,000,000 bbls. Much of the production from the Morrow is still in the primary stage and has not reached the mature declining state of that in the Cherokee. The Cherokee Group has produced about 1 billion bbls of oil since the first commercial production began over a century ago. It is a billion-barrel plus resource that is distributed over a large number of fields and small production units. Many of the reservoirs are operated close to the economic limit, although the small units and low production per well are offset by low costs associated with the shallow nature of the reservoirs (less than 1000 ft. deep).

  12. 76 FR 61775 - Kansas Disaster #KS-00059

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00059 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  13. 76 FR 47637 - Kansas Disaster #KS-00055

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00055 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street,...

  14. 1977 Kansas Field Crop Insect Control Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Leroy; Gates, Dell E.

    This publication is prepared to aid producers in selecting methods of insect population management that have proved effective under Kansas conditions. Topics covered include insect control on alfalfa, soil insects attacking corn, insects attacking above-ground parts of corn, and sorghum, wheat, and soybean insect control. The insecticides…

  15. JAZZ E CRIME ORGANIZADO EM KANSAS CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder Kôei Itikawa Tanaka

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This essay aims at analyzing the problematic relationship between jazz and gangsterism in Robert Altman’s Kansas City (1996. Through an analysis of the film’s final sequence, we will bring up a historical background about the theme and investigate how the connection between musical production and organized crime is established through the formal construction of the movie.

  16. 77 FR 32708 - Kansas Disaster #KS-00064

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00064 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This...: 02/25/2013. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  17. Fate and transport of cyanobacteria and associated toxins and taste-and-odor compounds from upstream reservoir releases in the Kansas River, Kansas, September and October 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Ziegler, Andrew C.; Loving, Brian L.; Loftin, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria cause a multitude of water-quality concerns, including the potential to produce toxins and taste-and-odor compounds. Toxins and taste-and-odor compounds may cause substantial economic and public health concerns and are of particular interest in lakes, reservoirs, and rivers that are used for drinking-water supply, recreation, or aquaculture. The Kansas River is a primary source of drinking water for about 800,000 people in northeastern Kansas. Water released from Milford Lake to the Kansas River during a toxic cyanobacterial bloom in late August 2011 prompted concerns about cyanobacteria and associated toxins and taste-and-odor compounds in downstream drinking-water supplies. During September and October 2011 water-quality samples were collected to characterize the transport of cyanobacteria and associated compounds from upstream reservoirs to the Kansas River. This study is one of the first to quantitatively document the transport of cyanobacteria and associated compounds during reservoir releases and improves understanding of the fate and transport of cyanotoxins and taste-and-odor compounds downstream from reservoirs. Milford Lake was the only reservoir in the study area with an ongoing cyanobacterial bloom during reservoir releases. Concentrations of cyanobacteria and associated toxins and taste-and-odor compounds in Milford Lake (upstream from the dam) were not necessarily indicative of outflow conditions (below the dam). Total microcystin concentrations, one of the most commonly occurring cyanobacterial toxins, in Milford Lake were 650 to 7,500 times higher than the Kansas Department of Health and Environment guidance level for a public health warning (20 micrograms per liter) for most of September 2011. By comparison, total microcystin concentrations in the Milford Lake outflow generally were less than 10 percent of the concentrations in surface accumulations, and never exceeded 20 micrograms per liter. The Republican River, downstream from

  18. 78 FR 14631 - 100th Anniversary of the United States Department of Labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... responsibilities, you can get ahead. It is forging new ladders of opportunity so a generation of workers can get... the job. On this centennial, we recognize the dedicated public servants at the Department of Labor who...

  19. 2003 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-04

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Kansas City Plant. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  20. INFORMATION: Management Alert on the Department's Monitoring of the Weatherization Assistance Program in the State of Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-12-01

    Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program received $5 billion to improve the energy efficiency of homes owned or occupied by low income persons, reduce their total residential expenditures, and improve their health and safety. Since the Recovery Act was enacted in February 2009, the Department has awarded weatherization grants to every state, the District of Columbia and five territories. Because of the unprecedented level of funding and the risks associated with spending vast amounts of money in a relatively short period of time, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) initiated a series of audits designed to evaluate the Program's internal control structures at both the Federal and state levels. As part of our work, we are in the process of reviewing Weatherization Program internal controls for the State of Illinois. We are also currently performing identical audits in the States of North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Virginia. Under the Recovery Act and the Department's Program, the State of Illinois received $242 million to weatherize 26,933 homes. The State of Illinois awarded these funds to 35 local agencies responsible for determining recipients' eligibility, contracting for the installation of the weatherization work, and conducting final inspections to ensure that work on homes was done in accordance with requirements. Inspectors working for the local agencies are required to evaluate the quality of mechanical and architectural improvements, such as furnace installations and window caulking, and certify that the work performed meets established standards. Under a Department approved plan in place at the time of our review, state officials were required to evaluate the sufficiency of local agency monitoring controls and to inspect the work performed on at least five percent of the units weatherized with Department funds during the program year for each

  1. A perspective on the states` role in the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management budget process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J.P.; Hinman, P. [Carter, Brock & Hinman, Boise, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Responding in 1994 to proposed budget reductions and predicted funding shortfalls, the Office of Environmental Management at the Department of Energy began working closely with its regulators and stakeholders to prioritize activities. In a series of national and site specific meetings held with representatives of states, the Environmental Protection Agency, Indian tribes and the public, the Department of Energy brought regulators and other stakeholders into its budget development process in a {open_quotes}bottoms up{close_quotes} approach to the prioritization of activities at each of its sites. This paper presents an overview of this process which began last year and will highlight its unique cooperative nature. This paper will assess ways of institutionalizing this process. It also identifies issues to be addressed in resolving matters related to future budgets. Areas of concern to the Department of Energy`s host states and their regulators will be identified as they relate to waste management, cleanup and facility transition activities.

  2. ALLEN COUNTY, KANSAS, USA, REDELINEATION, Allen County, KANSAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  3. 22 CFR 92.2 - Description of overseas notarial functions of the Department of State, record of acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Description of overseas notarial functions of... AND RELATED SERVICES NOTARIAL AND RELATED SERVICES Introduction § 92.2 Description of overseas notarial functions of the Department of State, record of acts. The overseas notarial function of...

  4. 48 CFR 619.202-70 - The Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Definitions. The definitions of small business (SB), HUBZone small business concern (HUBZone), small...; (iii) Overall business management/planning; (iv) Business development; and, (v) Technical assistance... OF STATE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 619.202-70 The Department of...

  5. 77 FR 49851 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    .... Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Notice of Public Meeting of the Study Group on International Arbitration and Conciliation The Office of the Assistant Legal Adviser for... on International Arbitration and Conciliation. A Working Group of the United Nations Commission on...

  6. 78 FR 52601 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    .... Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting on Arbitration... Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL) Public Meeting on Arbitration, to take place on... Legal Adviser, Private International Law, Officer of the Legal Adviser. BILLING CODE 4710-08-P ...

  7. Choreographing Partnerships within an Organizational Structure of Accountability: Maryland State Department of Education's Shift from Compliance Monitor to Breakthrough Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickling, Laura Rutter; Doneker, Karen Lee

    2014-01-01

    Drawing upon data from twenty-five interviews, this paper examines how the Maryland State Department of Education's Cross-functional Team navigates its changing role from compliance monitor to breakthrough partner in terms of discourse, time, and flexibility, as it carries out the work of the Breakthrough Center. It also examines how the role of…

  8. 77 FR 40790 - Republic of Tunisia Loan Guarantees Issued Under the Department of State, Foreign Operations, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... DEVELOPMENT 22 CFR Part 232 Republic of Tunisia Loan Guarantees Issued Under the Department of State, Foreign... conditions applicable to loan guarantees issued for the benefit of the Republic of Tunisia pursuant to the..., acting on behalf of the Republic of Tunisia (the ``Borrower''). The loan guarantees shall insure...

  9. Joint-Service Integration: An Organizational Culture Study of the United States Department of Defense Voluntary Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Martin K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the descriptive case study with a multiple case framework was to (a) describe the organizational cultures of education programs and leaders in the United States (U.S.) Department of Defense (DoD) voluntary education system on Oahu, Hawaii; (b) determine if an overlapping common organizational culture exists; and (c) assess the…

  10. A Relational Model of the Financial Data Collected from Local Education Agencies by a State Department of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Richard P.

    The educational community is recognizing that it has had little direct control over or knowledge of educational data collection. The objective of this paper is to present a description of presently collected financial data collected by a state education department. An entity set model is used to create a relational view of the data to facilitate…

  11. 76 FR 56865 - U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... electronic commerce) of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL). Working Group IV... and, in so doing, may address related aspects of electronic commerce. The report of the Forty-fourth.... Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law (ACPIL): Public Meeting on...

  12. Work Plan for a Limited CCC/USDA Investigation of the Current Carbon Tetrachloride Contamination in Groundwater at Navarre, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-05-01

    During private well testing in 1990-1991, carbon tetrachloride was identified in the groundwater at several locations in the town of Navarre, Kansas, at levels exceeding the Kansas Tier 2 level and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5.0 μg/L. Several subsequent investigations through 2006 evaluated the concentrations and distribution of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater. This work included the identification of the contaminant sources (Argonne 2007). The history of activities to address the contamination in soil and groundwater is summarized in Table 1.1. The most recent studies, conducted by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), include a brownfields investigation initiated in 2013 (Phase I) and continuing in early 2014 (Phase II), as well as private well testing.

  13. Indoor smoking ordinances in workplaces and public places in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, John S; Davis, Ken; Nazir, Niaman; Dunton, Nancy; Winn, Kimberly; Jacquot, Sandy; Moler, Don

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the preferences of elected city officials regarding the need for a statewide clean indoor air law and to analyze the content of local smoking ordinances. A survey of elected officials in 57 larger Kansas cities obtained information on the perceived need for statewide legislation, venues to be covered, and motivating factors. Clean indoor air ordinances from all Kansas cities were analyzed by venue. The survey response rate was 190 out of 377 (50.4%) for elected officials. Over 70% of the respondents favored or strongly favored greater restrictions on indoor smoking. Sixty percent favored statewide legislation. Among these, over 80% favored restrictions in health care facilities, theaters, indoor sports arenas (including bowling alleys), restaurants, shopping malls, lobbies, enclosed spaces in outdoor arenas, and hotel/motel rooms. Officials who had never smoked favored a more restrictive approach. Employee and public health concerns were cited as influential by 76%-79% of respondents. Thirty-eight ordinances, covering over half of the state's population, were examined. They varied considerably in their exemptions. Official's attitudes toward smoking regulations were associated with their smoking status. The examination of existing ordinances revealed a piecemeal approach to smoking regulations.

  14. Effects of urbanization on water quality in the Kansas River, Shunganunga Creek Basin, and Soldier Creek, Topeka, Kansas, October 1993 through September 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, L.M.; Putnam, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    A study of urban-related water-qulity effects in the Kansas River, Shunganunga Creek Basin, and Soldier Creek in Topeka, Kansas, was conducted from October 1993 through September 1995. The purpose of this report is to assess the effects of urbanization on instream concentrations of selected physical and chemical constituents within the city of Topeka. A network of seven sampling sites was established in the study area. Samples principally were collected at monthly intervals from the Kansas River and from the Shunganunga Creek Basin, and at quarterly intervals from Soldier Creek. The effects of urbanization werestatistically evaluated from differences in constituent concentrations between sites on the same stream. No significant differences in median concentrations of dissolved solids, nutrients, or metals and trace elements, or median densities offecal bacteria were documented between sampling sites upstream and downstream from the major urbanized length of the Kansas River in Topeka.Discharge from the city's primary wastewater- treatment plant is the largest potential source of contamination to the Kansas River. This discharge increased concentrations of dissolved ammonia, totalphosphorus, and densities of fecal bacteria.Calculated dissolved ammonia as nitrogen concentrations in water from the Kansas River ranged from 0.03 to 1.1 milligrams per liter after receiving treatment-plant discharge. However, most of the calculated concentrations wereconsiderably less than 50 percent of Kansas Department of Health and Environment water- quality criteria, with a median value of 20 percent.Generally, treatment-plant discharge increased calculated total phosphorus concentrations in water from the Kansas River by 0.01 to 0.04 milligrams per liter, with a median percentage increase of 7.6 percent. The calculated median densities of fecal coliform and fecal Streptococci bacteria in water from the Kansas River increased from 120 and 150colonies per 100 milliliters of water

  15. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former USDA facility in Powhattan, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-02-02

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work to be conducted to investigate the subsurface contaminant conditions at the property formerly leased by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) in Powhattan, Kansas (Figure 1.1). Data obtained during this event will be used to (1) evaluate potential contaminant source areas on the property; (2) determine the vertical and horizontal extent of potential contamination; and (3) provide recommendations for future action, with the ultimate goal of assigning this site No Further Action status. The planned investigation includes groundwater monitoring requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. A nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy, Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that has been approved by the KDHE. The Master Work Plan describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. It should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Powhattan.

  16. Annual report of monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-06-27

    Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha. The population of Morrill as of the 2000 census was approximately 277. All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. Starting in 1922, eight different public wells formerly served the Morrill municipal system at some time. Because of poor water quality, including high nitrate levels attributed to numerous animal feeding operations in the vicinity and application of fertilizer on agricultural lands, use of the local groundwater from any public well for municipal supply purposes was terminated in 1991 in favor of obtaining water from the Sabetha municipal water system. Investigations of the carbon tetrachloride and nitrate contamination by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in 1989, 1994, and 1996 (KDHE 1989; GeoCore 1994a-e, 1996) identified a localized plume of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater extending downgradient from a grain storage facility located in the northwestern section of Morrill. The facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), from 1950 to 1971. Since termination of the CCC/USDA grain storage operations in 1971, the property and existing grain bins have been used for private grain storage up to the present time. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants were commonly used by the CCC/USDA, as well as private and commercial grain storage operations, to preserve grain. Because the identified carbon tetrachloride contamination could in part be linked to historical use of carbon tetrachloride

  17. Logistic and linear regression model documentation for statistical relations between continuous real-time and discrete water-quality constituents in the Kansas River, Kansas, July 2012 through June 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Guy M.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2016-04-06

    The Kansas River is a primary source of drinking water for about 800,000 people in northeastern Kansas. Source-water supplies are treated by a combination of chemical and physical processes to remove contaminants before distribution. Advanced notification of changing water-quality conditions and cyanobacteria and associated toxin and taste-and-odor compounds provides drinking-water treatment facilities time to develop and implement adequate treatment strategies. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Kansas Water Office (funded in part through the Kansas State Water Plan Fund), and the City of Lawrence, the City of Topeka, the City of Olathe, and Johnson County Water One, began a study in July 2012 to develop statistical models at two Kansas River sites located upstream from drinking-water intakes. Continuous water-quality monitors have been operated and discrete-water quality samples have been collected on the Kansas River at Wamego (USGS site number 06887500) and De Soto (USGS site number 06892350) since July 2012. Continuous and discrete water-quality data collected during July 2012 through June 2015 were used to develop statistical models for constituents of interest at the Wamego and De Soto sites. Logistic models to continuously estimate the probability of occurrence above selected thresholds were developed for cyanobacteria, microcystin, and geosmin. Linear regression models to continuously estimate constituent concentrations were developed for major ions, dissolved solids, alkalinity, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus species), suspended sediment, indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, fecal coliform, and enterococci), and actinomycetes bacteria. These models will be used to provide real-time estimates of the probability that cyanobacteria and associated compounds exceed thresholds and of the concentrations of other water-quality constituents in the Kansas River. The models documented in this report are useful for characterizing changes

  18. Final report : Phase III targeted investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated grain storage facilities at two different locations at Everest, Kansas (Figure 1.1). One facility (referred to in this report as the Everest facility) was at the western edge of the city. The second facility (referred to in this report as Everest East) was about 0.5 mi northeast of the town. The CCC/USDA operated these facilities from the early 1950s until the early 1970s, at a time when commercial fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the CCC/USDA and private industry for the preservation of grain in storage. In 1997 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled several domestic drinking water and non-drinking water wells in the Everest area as part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program. All of the sampled wells were outside the Everest city limits. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was identified at a single domestic drinking water well (the Nigh well, DW06; Figure 1.1) approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Subsequent KDHE investigations suggested that the contamination in DW06 could be linked to the former use of grain fumigants at the CCC/USDA facility. For this reason, the CCC/USDA is conducting a phased environmental study to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at Everest and to identify potential remedial options. The studies are being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Two phases of investigation were completed previously; this report presents the findings of the targeted Phase III investigation at Everest.

  19. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Inman, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-05

    In 1997, low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contaminant level [MCL] of 5 {micro}g/L) were detected in groundwater at Inman, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1997 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Inman from 1954 to 1965. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Inman is located in southwest McPherson County, approximately 10 mi southwest of the city of McPherson (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Inman is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation at Inman, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the USDA. For this work plan, Argonne compiled historical data related to the previous investigations and grain storage operations at Inman. Through a review of documents acquired from all available sources, other potential contaminant source areas (in addition to the former CCC/USDA facility) have been identified as (1) the commercial grain storage structures northwest of Inman, along the railroad right-of-way, and (2) small former private grain storage facilities west of Main Street and near the former CCC/USDA facility at the southern edge of Inman (Figure 1.2). Previous investigations and the potential source areas are discussed in Section 2.

  20. Participation in the United States Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1992-05-01

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility is an integral part of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics (to become the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering on July 1, 1992). As such, it is effectively used to support educational programs in engineering and science at the University of Virginia as well as those at other area colleges and universities. The expansion of support to educational programs in the mid-east region is a major objective. To assist in meeting this objective, the University of Virginia has been supported under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Sharing Program since 1978. Due to the success of the program, this proposal requests continued DOE support through August 1993.

  1. The evolution of groundwater management paradigms in Kansas and possible new steps towards water sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophocleous, Marios

    2012-01-01

    SummaryThe purpose of this paper is to trace the evolution of key water-related laws and management practices in Kansas, from the enactment of the Kansas Water Resources Appropriation Act of 1945 to the present, in order to highlight the state's efforts to create a more sustainable water future and in hopes that others will benefit from Kansas' experience. The 1945 Act provides the basic framework of water law (prior appropriation) in Kansas. Progression of groundwater management in the state encompasses local Groundwater Management Districts (GMDs) and their water-management programs, minimum-streamflow and TMDL standards, water-use reporting and water metering programs, use of modified safe-yield policies in some GMDs, the subbasin water-resources-management program, the integrated resource planning/aquifer storage and recovery project of the city of Wichita, the Central Kansas Water Bank, enhanced aquifer subunits management, and various water conservation programs. While these have all contributed to the slowing down of declines in groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer and in associated ecosystems, they have not yet succeeded in halting those declines. Based on the assumption that the different management approaches have to operate easily within the prevailing water rights and law framework to succeed, a number of steps are suggested here that may help further diminish or reverse the declines of the High Plains aquifer. These include eliminating the "use it or lose it" maxim in the prior-appropriation framework, broadening the definition of "beneficial use," regulating domestic and other "exempt" wells, encouraging voluntary "sharing the shortage" agreements, and determining to what extent water rights may be regulated in the public interest without a compensable "taking". Further measures include establishing artificial recharge and/or aquifer storage and recovery projects wherever feasible and determining to what extent water-rights holders might be

  2. Governance typology: a consensus classification of state-local health department relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meit, Michael; Sellers, Katie; Kronstadt, Jessica; Lawhorn, Nikki; Brown, Alexa; Liss-Levinson, Rivka; Pearsol, Jim; Jarris, Paul E

    2012-11-01

    Public health practitioners and researchers often refer to state public health systems as being centralized, decentralized, shared, or mixed. These categories refer to governance of the local public health units within the state and whether they operate under the authority of the state government, local government, shared state and local governance, or a mix of governance structures within the state. This article describes the development of an objective method of classifying states as centralized, decentralized, shared, or mixed. We also discuss some initial analyses that have been conducted to identify how public health resources and activities vary across states with different classifications. Cross-sectional study. State health agencies. Survey respondents were organizational leaders from all 50 state health agencies. Total full-time equivalent employees, total health agency expenditures, expenditures on clinical services, and provision of clinical services. Centralized state health agencies employ more full-time equivalent employees, have higher total expenditures, and provide more clinical services than decentralized state health agencies. Although higher expenditures on clinical services were observed, these differences were not statistically significant. It is important to take governance classification into account when investigating variation in services, resources, or performance of governmental public health systems. As public health systems and services researchers seek to identify best practices in the organization of public health systems, consistent definition of different types of organization is critical. This system provides an objective and reliable system for classifying governance relationships that allows for comparisons that are meaningful to both practitioners and researchers.

  3. TERRAIN, Sedgwick COUNTY, Kansas USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. FLOODPLAIN, RILEY COUNTY, KANSAS, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  5. FLOODPLAIN, HARVEY COUNTY, KANSAS PMR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  6. FLOODPLAIN, DOUGLAS COUNTY, KANSAS USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  7. FLOODPLAIN, POTTAWATOMIE COUNTY, KANSAS, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  8. FLOODPLAIN, SEDGWICK COUNTY, KANSAS, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  9. 75 FR 17418 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration, United States Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug... Administration (FDA) is providing notice of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the Food and Drug...

  10. 75 FR 17423 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration, United States Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug... Drug Administration (FDA) is providing notice of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the FDA, U...

  11. 78 FR 19077 - Forwarding of Asylum Applications to the Department of State

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Immigration Review 8 CFR Parts 1208 and 1240 RIN 1125-AA65 Forwarding of Asylum Applications to the Department... the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) forwards asylum applications for consideration by... to DOS all asylum applications that are submitted initially in removal proceedings before an...

  12. Sustainability in Teaching, Research, and Community Practice: The FCS Department at California State University, Northridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontikis, Kyriakos; Martin, Allen; Cai, Yi; Kim, Jongeun; Cao, Wei; Giordano, Angie; Torabian-Riasati, Setareh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how a large comprehensive family and consumer sciences unit has incorporated sustainability into its curriculum and research agenda. It summarizes how each area within the department (Interior Design, Apparel Design and Merchandising, Consumer Affairs, Family Studies, Nutrition, Dietetics, and Food…

  13. State-of-the-Art Evaluation of Emergency Department Patients Presenting With Potential Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Judd E; Than, Martin; Mueller, Christian

    2016-08-16

    It is well established that clinicians cannot use clinical judgment alone to determine whether an individual patient who presents to the emergency department has an acute coronary syndrome. The history and physical examination do not distinguish sufficiently between the many conditions that can cause acute chest pain syndromes. Cardiac risk factors do not have sufficient discriminatory ability in symptomatic patients presenting to the emergency department. Most patients with non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction do not present with electrocardiographic evidence of active ischemia. The improvement in cardiac troponin assays, especially in conjunction with well-validated clinical decision algorithms, now enables the clinician to rapidly exclude myocardial infarction. In patients in whom unstable angina remains a concern or there is a desire to evaluate for underlying coronary artery disease, coronary computed tomography angiography can be used in the emergency department. Once a process that took ≥24 hours, computed tomography angiography now can rapidly exclude myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease in patients in the emergency department. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. The Status of Environmental Studies in United States and Canadian Geography Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Gary A.

    1982-01-01

    A 30-item questionnaire was mailed to 325 geography departments (206 returned) to determine status of environmental studies curricula-courses. Areas addressed and discussed include nature of institutions, enrollment trends, environmental courses within geography curricula, academics/career objectives of courses, job placement records, other…

  15. United States Department of Defense: Agency Financial Report Fiscal Year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    relationships between the USMC and partner nations. Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Patrick Dionne U.S. Department of Defense Agency...the year, and the relationship between the budgetary resources and the outlays made against them. In accordance with Federal statutes and...102 Note 23 Funds from Dedicated Collections ............................................................. 103 Note 24 Fiduciary

  16. [Pages from the history of the Department of Forensic Medicine, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonova, E N; Romanenko, G Kh; Sidorovich, Iu V

    2012-01-01

    The history of the Department of Forensic Medicine of I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University is highlighted based on the results of the studies of the relevant literature data and archival materials. The authors lay special emphasis on the organization of the teaching process and research at different stages of the development of the Department, scientific and forensic medical activities of its leading specialists, materials obtained in the course of research, and the contribution to the development of forensic medicine made by outstanding scientists.

  17. Naturally occurring arsenic in the groundwater at the Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes an investigation concerning the presence of arsenic in concentrations exceeding 0.4 mg/L in the groundwater under the Department of Energy's Kansas City Plant (KCP). The study consisted of four distinct phases: a thorough review of the technical literature, a historical survey of arsenic use at the facility, a laboratory study of existing techniques for determining arsenic speciation, and a field program including water, soil, and sediment sampling. The historical survey and literature review demonstrated that plant activities had not released significant quantities of arsenic to the environment but that similar occurrences of arsenic in alluvial groundwater are widespread in the midwestern United States. Laboratory studies showed that a chromatographic separation technique was necessary to accurately determine arsenic speciation for the KCP groundwater samples. Field studies revealed that naturally occurring reducing conditions prevalent in the subsurface are responsible for dissolving arsenic previously sorbed by iron oxides. Indeed, the data demonstrated that the bulk arsenic concentration of site subsoils and sediments is {approximately}7 mg/kg, whereas the arsenic content of iron oxide subsamples is as high as 84 mg/kg. Literature showed that similar concentrations of arsenic in sediments occur naturally and are capable of producing the levels of arsenic found in groundwater monitoring wells at the KCP. The study concludes, therefore, that the arsenic present in the KCP groundwater is the result of natural phenomena. 44 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

  18. Climate change and local public health in the United States: preparedness, programs and perceptions of local public health department directors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward W Maibach

    Full Text Available While climate change is inherently a global problem, its public health impacts will be experienced most acutely at the local and regional level, with some jurisdictions likely to be more burdened than others. The public health infrastructure in the U.S. is organized largely as an interlocking set of public agencies at the federal, state and local level, with lead responsibility for each city or county often residing at the local level. To understand how directors of local public health departments view and are responding to climate change as a public health issue, we conducted a telephone survey with 133 randomly selected local health department directors, representing a 61% response rate. A majority of respondents perceived climate change to be a problem in their jurisdiction, a problem they viewed as likely to become more common or severe over the next 20 years. Only a small minority of respondents, however, had yet made climate change adaptation or prevention a top priority for their health department. This discrepancy between problem recognition and programmatic responses may be due, in part, to several factors: most respondents felt personnel in their health department--and other key stakeholders in their community--had a lack of knowledge about climate change; relatively few respondents felt their own health department, their state health department, or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had the necessary expertise to help them create an effective mitigation or adaptation plan for their jurisdiction; and most respondents felt that their health department needed additional funding, staff and staff training to respond effectively to climate change. These data make clear that climate change adaptation and prevention are not currently major activities at most health departments, and that most, if not all, local health departments will require assistance in making this transition. We conclude by making the case that, through their

  19. Climate change and local public health in the United States: preparedness, programs and perceptions of local public health department directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, Edward W; Chadwick, Amy; McBride, Dennis; Chuk, Michelle; Ebi, Kristie L; Balbus, John

    2008-07-30

    While climate change is inherently a global problem, its public health impacts will be experienced most acutely at the local and regional level, with some jurisdictions likely to be more burdened than others. The public health infrastructure in the U.S. is organized largely as an interlocking set of public agencies at the federal, state and local level, with lead responsibility for each city or county often residing at the local level. To understand how directors of local public health departments view and are responding to climate change as a public health issue, we conducted a telephone survey with 133 randomly selected local health department directors, representing a 61% response rate. A majority of respondents perceived climate change to be a problem in their jurisdiction, a problem they viewed as likely to become more common or severe over the next 20 years. Only a small minority of respondents, however, had yet made climate change adaptation or prevention a top priority for their health department. This discrepancy between problem recognition and programmatic responses may be due, in part, to several factors: most respondents felt personnel in their health department--and other key stakeholders in their community--had a lack of knowledge about climate change; relatively few respondents felt their own health department, their state health department, or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had the necessary expertise to help them create an effective mitigation or adaptation plan for their jurisdiction; and most respondents felt that their health department needed additional funding, staff and staff training to respond effectively to climate change. These data make clear that climate change adaptation and prevention are not currently major activities at most health departments, and that most, if not all, local health departments will require assistance in making this transition. We conclude by making the case that, through their words and actions

  20. State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch Special Surveys for Bellow Beach, Oahu, Hawaii 1992-1999 (NODC Accession 0014264)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Monitoring Section of the State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch collected water quality samples at six sites near the mouth of streams and...

  1. State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch Hanalei, Kauai Water Quality Sampling Dataset October 2005 - November 2006 (NODC Accession 0020391)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Monitoring Section of the State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch collected water quality data at 8 sites centered on Hanalei Bay on the north...

  2. Water quality data from the State of Hawaii, Department of Health, from the Coastal Waters of Hawaii from 05 November 2005 to 15 November 2006 (NODC Accession 0020391)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Monitoring Section of the State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch collected water quality data at 8 sites centered on Hanalei Bay on the north...

  3. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 197 - Procedures for the Department of State (DoS) Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS) Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS) Series C Appendix C to Part 197 National Defense Department... RESEARCH IN THE FILES OF THE OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (OSD) Pt. 197, App. C Appendix C to Part... such non-DoD Agency classified information expected to be interfiled with the requested OSD records....

  4. Tree seed handling, processing, testing, and storage at Hayward State Nursery, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Christians

    2008-01-01

    The Hayward State Nursery, Wisconsin grows more than 40 species from seeds. Up to 6000 bushels of raw unprocessed tree and shrub seeds are collected each year, and all seeds are collected in Wisconsin or adjacent states. All white spruce (Picea glauca) and some white pine seeds (Pinus strobus) are collected from orchards containing...

  5. Annual progress report of the Department of Solid State Physics 1 January -31 December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, M.; Bechgaard, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Feidenhans`l, R.; Johannsen, I.

    1997-01-01

    Research in the department is concerned with `Materials with Distinct Physical and Chemical Properties`. The principal activities of the department in the period from 1 January to 31 December, 1996, are presented in this Progress Report. Neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques are used to study a wide variety of problems in condensed matter physics and include: two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering, heavy fermions, high T{sub c} superconductivity, phase transitions in model systems, precipitation phenomena, and nano-scale structures in various materials. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Related to these problems there is work going on in theory, Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au) 6 tabs., 144 ills., 197 refs.

  6. Annual progress report of the Department of Solid State Physics 1 January - 31 December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, M.; Bechgaard, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Feidenhans`l, R.; Johannsen, I. [eds.

    1996-01-01

    Research in the department is concerned with `Materials with Distinct Physical and Chemical Properties`. The principal activities of the department in the period from 1 January to 31 December, 1995, are presented in this Progress Report. Neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques are used to study a wide variety of problems in condensed matter physics and include: two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering, heavy fermions, high T{sub c} superconductivity, phase transitions in model systems, precipitation phenomena, and nano-scale structures in various materials. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Related to these problems there is work going on in theory, Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au) 5 tabs., 135 ills., 163 refs.

  7. [Construction of Research-Oriented State Key Clinical Department by Highlighting the Characteris- tics and Advantages of Chinese Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shi-yu; Guo, Li-heng; Han, Yun; Li, Jian; Zhang, Min-zhou

    2016-04-01

    As the largest research-oriented specialty department in national traditional Chinese medicine hospitals, the Department of Critical Care Medicine in Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine insists on the development mode combined with clinical medicine and scientific research. By taking clinical and basic researches for integrative medicine preventing and treating acute myocardial in-farction and sepsis as a breakthrough, authors explored key problems of Chinese medicine in improving the prognosis related diseases and patients' quality of life. In recent 3 years our department has successively become the principal unit of the national key specialties cooperative group of critical care medicine (awarded by State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine), the key clinical specialties (awarded by National Health and Family Planning Commission), and Guangzhou key laboratory construction unit, and achieved overall lap in clinical medical treatment, personnel training, scientific research, and social service.

  8. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. July-September 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    virus antigens were detected in hair follicles of nuchal skin biopsy specimens by direct immunofl uorescence, and rabies viral RNA was found in...be reprinted if credit is given to the author(s). OFFICIAL DISTRIBUTION: This publication is targeted to US Army Medical Department units and...Louis, MO: Saunders/Elsevier; 2006:676- 681. Godfrey MER. Non- target and secondary poison-24. ing hazards of “second generation” anticoagulants

  9. United States Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Environmental Compliance Handbook. Third edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The Environment, Safety & Health Division (ESHD) of the Nevada Operations Office has prepared this Environmental Compliance Handbook for all users of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) facilities. The Handbook gives an overview of the important environmental laws and regulations that apply to the activities conducted by the Nevada Operations Office and other users of DOE/NV facilities in Nevada.

  10. United States Department of Defense Agency Financial Report for Fiscal Year 2013. Financial Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    information to assist users in understanding the relationship between the net cost of operations and the budgetary resources obligated by the entity during...collections are then applied to reduce accounts payable and receivable accordingly. 1.X. Fiduciary Activities Fiduciary cash and other assets are not...assets of the Department and are not recognized on the Balance Sheet. Fiduciary activities are reported on the financial statement note schedules. 1.Y

  11. Summary of property damage control programs of the United States Department of Energy CY 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dix, George P.; Maybee, Walter W.

    1980-10-01

    Calendar year 1979 was the second full year of operation of the Department of Energy. This report summarizes the loss experience in overall terms and itemizes facility and program achievements in property protection. Planned projects for CY 1980 are included and several subjects of interest to loss-control specialists are discussed in detail. Property damage from all causes was $2.5 million, of which $0.65 million was due to fire, the major cause of losses in both the Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies. Combined losses for the 2 full years of Department of Energy experience total over $20 million, of which over $13 million is due to fire. The fire loss ratio for 1979 was 0.13 cents for each $100 of property values at risk, more than an order-of-magnitude less than that expeienced by the better class of insured private property. Final decontamination and cleanup costs necessitated by a product spill at a solvent-refined coal pilot plant at the end of 1979 may exceed $2 million. Even including this estimate, the total loss from all causes (fire, explosion, mechanical or electrical damage, acts of nature, radioactive and non-radioactive contamination/cleanup costs, and a variety of miscellaneous causes), would yield a loss ratio of about 1 cent for each $100 of property. This indicated the overall property protection program is exemplary.

  12. Preliminary survey of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitizing wild turkeys (Aves: Phasianidae) in eastern Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, D E; Applegate, R D; Fox, L B

    2001-01-01

    During the spring and fall turkey hunting seasons of 1999, hunters and Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks field personnel examined wild turkeys, Meleagris gallopavo L., for ticks and submitted them to us for identification. From springtime hunting, we received 113 ticks from 12 turkeys killed in nine counties, all in the eastern one-third of Kansas. Collectors reported examining three additional wild turkeys on which no ticks were found. All ticks were nymphal lone star ticks, Amblyomma americanum (L.). Of 11 wild turkeys examined in seven counties during October, one was parasitized by 30 A. americanum larvae. Data from this study and accounts from the published literature suggest that parasitism of wild turkeys by immature lone star ticks is commonplace wherever this host and ectoparasite are sympatric. Our study suggests that M. gallopavo may be an important host that supports lone star tick populations.

  13. Keeping strategic thinking in strategic planning: macro-environmental analysis in a state department of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginter, P M; Duncan, W J; Capper, S A

    1992-07-01

    This paper examined the tendency of strategic decision makers in public health to allow their strategic planning process to degenerate into short-term, operational management. The temptation is great in light of pressing current problems. However, the danger of not thinking strategically about the future and of failing to attempt to position the organization in such a way as to take advantage of its strengths and minimize the adverse consequences of its weaknesses can be catastrophic. An attempt is made to illustrate how one state department of public health attempted to ensure that strategic thinking remained a part of its strategic planning process. The process was built around the energizing of the expertise present in the department and the mobilization of resources under the direction of the State Health Officer. The process is ongoing and is constantly fine tuned. However, the procedure utilized can be adapted easily to the unique circumstances facing most public health organizations.

  14. 75 FR 23274 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security United States Immigration Customs and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... use in the enforcement Federal firearms laws (e.g., Brady Act). BB. To Federal, State, local, tribal... facility. HH. To the news media and the public, with the approval of the Chief Privacy Officer in...

  15. Transition report, United States Department of Energy: A report to the President-Elect. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This report is a description of the Department of Energy transition issues. The topics of the report include: Congressional, Intergovernmental and Public Affairs; Conservation and Renewable Energy; Defense Programs; New Production Reactors; Economic Regulatory Administration; Energy Information Administration; energy research; environment, safety and health; fossil energy; General Counsel; hearings and appeals, Inspector General, international affairs and energy emergencies; management and administration, minority economic impact; nuclear energy; policy, planning and analysis, radioactive waste management; and power marketing administrations: Bonneville Power Administration, Western Area Power Administration, Alaska Power Administration, Southeastern Power Administration, and Southwestern Power Administration.

  16. Final report : results of the 2006-2007 investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility in Barnes, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-28

    The 2006-2007 investigation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination at Barnes, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The overall goal of the investigation was to establish criteria for monitoring leading to potential site reclassification. The investigation objectives were to (1) determine the hydraulic gradient near the former CCC/USDA facility, (2) delineate the downgradient carbon tetrachloride plume, and (3) design and implement an expanded monitoring network at Barnes (Argonne 2006a).

  17. Temporal Trends in Emergency Department Visits for Bronchiolitis in the United States, 2006-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Tsugawa, Yusuke; Brown, David F.M.; Mansbach, Jonathan M.; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Background To examine temporal trends in emergency departments (ED) visits for bronchiolitis among US children between 2006 and 2010. Methods Serial, cross-sectional analysis of the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample, a nationally-representative sample of ED patients. We used ICD-9-CM code 466.1 to identify children bronchiolitis. Primary outcome measures were rate of bronchiolitis ED visits, hospital admission rate, and ED charges. Results Between 2006 and 2010, weighted national discharge data included 1,435,110 ED visits with bronchiolitis. There was a modest increase in the rate of bronchiolitis ED visits, from 35.6 to 36.3 per 1000 person-years (2% increase; Ptrend=0.008), due to increases in the ED visit rate among children from 12 months to 23 months (24% increase; Ptrendbronchiolitis increased from $337 million to $389 million (16% increase; Ptrendbronchiolitis ED visits by age group. Despite a significant increase in associated ED charges, ED-associated hospital admission rates for bronchiolitis significantly decreased over this same period. PMID:23934206

  18. The economic impact of the Department of Energy on the State of New Mexico Fiscal Year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansford, Robert R.; Adcock, Larry D.; Gentry, Lucille M.; Ben-David, Shaul; Temple, John

    1999-08-05

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides a major source of economic benefits in New Mexico, second only to the activities of the U.S. Department of Defense. The agency's far-reaching economic influence within the state is the focus of this report. Economic benefits arising from the various activities and functions of both the Department and its contractors have accrued to the state continuously for over 50 years. For several years, DOE/Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained inter-industry, input-output modeling capabilities to assess DOE's impacts on the state of New Mexico and the other substate regions most directly impacted by DOE activities. One of the major uses of input-output techniques is to assess the effects of developments initiated outside the economy such as Federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy. The information on which the models are based is updated periodically to ensure the most accurate depiction possible of the economy for the period of reference. For this report, the reference periods are Fiscal Year (FY) 1997 (October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997), and FY 1998 (October 1, 1997, through September 30, 1998). Total impact represents both direct and indirect impacts (resending by business), including induced (resending by households) effects. The standard multipliers used in determining impacts result from the inter-industry, input-output models uniquely developed for New Mexico. This report includes seven main sections: (1) Introduction; (2) Profile of DOE Activities in New Mexico; (3) DOE Expenditure Patterns; (4) Measuring DOE/New Mexico's Economic Impact: (5) Technology Transfer within the Federal Labs funded by DOE/New Mexico; (6) Glossary of Terms; and (7) Technical Appendix containing a description of the model.

  19. Foreign Military Sales: A Growing Concern. Departments of State and Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-01

    tipoing the United States by 12 perc0nt~ In lY74 this margin was increased to L 50 percent. Soviet arms wore directed at a few ~ountries with Syria...er the sales market . It is also evident that ~any na~ions want ~ot only the eauipment but also the follow-on support and assistance which, when...restraint in * * * the overall level of u.s. arms sales, the percentage of each national defense market the United States enjoys, the

  20. 78 FR 14629 - 10th Anniversary of the United States Department of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ..., BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the... accomplishments and pay tribute to the people who have made them possible. Alongside its partners in government.... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-05395 Filed 3-5-13; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F3...

  1. Palestinian-Israeli Conflict: Department of Defense Role in a Two-State Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    establish a more robust, permanent presence in the form of an Office of Military Cooperation ( OMC ). An OMC for a Palestine state need not be as large as...the 800-man U.S. Military Training Mission Saudi Arabia or an OMC in 23 Kuwait.85 Nonetheless, DoD must be prepared to maintain a sizeable

  2. Ovrseas Real Property: State Department Needs to Improve Guidance and Records Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-25

    Ciudad Juarez, Mexico , a new consulate was built; however, State retained property to accommodate and expand their mission. Officials at the posts we... Mexico , Brazil, and India, policy changes with the diplomatic mission have led to retaining property previously marked as unneeded. For example, in

  3. Diplomats in the Foxhole: The Evolution of the State Department During Irregular Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    Institute of Peace Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training Interview #63, interviewed by Mehmet Ali , September 21, 2008. 57United States Institute...and Patrick Cronin , 19-38. Washington, DC: The National Defense University, December, 2008. Lawrence, T.E. “The 27 Articles of T.E. Lawrence.” Arab

  4. Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-10

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan`s purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner.

  5. United States Department of Energy projects related to reactor pressure vessel annealing optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosinski, S.T.; Nakos, J.T.

    1993-09-01

    Light water reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material properties reduced by long-term exposure to neutron irradiation can be recovered through a thermal annealing treatment. This technique to extend RPV life, discussed in this report, provides a complementary approach to analytical methodologies to evaluate RPV integrity. RPV annealing has been successfully demonstrated in the former Soviet Union and on a limited basis by the US (military applications only). The process of demonstrating the technical feasibility of annealing commercial US RPVs is being pursued through a cooperative effort between the nuclear industry and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) Plant Lifetime Improvement (PLIM) Program. Presently, two projects are under way through the USDOE PLIM Program to demonstrate the technical feasibility of annealing commercial US RPVS, (1) annealing re-embrittlement data base development and (2) heat transfer boundary condition experiments.

  6. United States Department of Energy large commercial absorption chiller development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garland, P.W.; DeVault, R.C.; Zaltash, A.

    1998-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is working with partners from the gas cooling industry to improve energy efficiency and US competitiveness by using advanced absorption technologies that eliminate the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), refrigerants that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. Absorption cooling uses natural gas as the heat source, which produces much lower NO{sub x} emissions than oil- or coal-generated electricity. Gas-fired chillers also have the advantage of helping reduce peak electrical usage during summer months. To assist industry in developing advanced absorption cooling technologies, DOE sponsors the Large Commercial Chiller Development Program. The goal of the program is to improve chiller cooling efficiency by 30--50% compared with the best currently available absorption systems.

  7. Transition report, United States Department of Energy: A report to the President-Elect. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This report is a description of the Department of Energy organization and projects. The topics of the report include: (1) DOE organization and overview; (2) Headquarters Offices: Congressional, Intergovernmental and Public Affairs; Conservation and Renewable Energy; Contract Appeals; Defense Programs; Economic Regulatory Administration; Energy Information Administration; Energy Research; Environment, Safety and Health; Fossil Energy; General Counsel; Hearings and Appeals; Inspector General; International Affairs and Energy Emergencies; Management and Administration; Minority Economic Impact; New Production Reactors; Nuclear Energy; Policy, Planning and Analysis; Radioactive Waste Management; (3) Operations Offices: Albuquerque Operations Office; Chicago Operations Office; Idaho Operations Office; Nevada Operations Office; Oak Ridge Operations Office; Richland Operations Office; San Francisco Operations Office; Savannah River Operations Office; Laboratories; and (4) Power Administrations: Bonneville Power Administration; Western Area Power Administration.

  8. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, S.

    2009-11-05

    The Office of Waste Processing identifies and reduces engineering and technical risks and uncertainties of the waste processing programs and projects of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management (EM) mission through the timely development of solutions to technical issues. The risks, and actions taken to mitigate those risks, are determined through technology readiness assessments, program reviews, technology information exchanges, external technical reviews, technical assistance, and targeted technology development and deployment. The Office of Waste Processing works with other DOE Headquarters offices and project and field organizations to proactively evaluate technical needs, identify multi-site solutions, and improve the technology and engineering associated with project and contract management. Participants in this program are empowered with the authority, resources, and training to implement their defined priorities, roles, and responsibilities. The Office of Waste Processing Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Environmental Management Engineering and Technology Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstration that will lead to a reduction of technical risks and uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The MYPP summarizes the program areas and the scope of activities within each program area proposed for the next five years to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. Waste Processing Program activities within the Roadmap and the MYPP are described in these seven program areas: (1) Improved Waste Storage Technology; (2) Reliable and Efficient Waste Retrieval Technologies; (3) Enhanced Tank Closure Processes; (4) Next-Generation Pretreatment Solutions; (5

  9. West Nile Virus Antibodies in Permanent Resident and Overwintering Migrant Birds in South-Central Kansas

    OpenAIRE

    Shelite, Thomas R.; Rogers, Christopher M.; Litzner, Brandon R.; Johnson, R. Roy; Schneegurt, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted serological studies, using epitope-blocking ELISAs directed at West Nile virus (WNV) and flavivirus antibodies, of wild birds in south-central Kansas, the first for this state, in the winters of 2003–04 through 2005–06. Overwintering migratory species (primarily the American tree sparrow and dark-eyed junco) consistently showed significantly lower seropositivity than permanent residents (primarily the northern cardinal). The cardinal showed annual variation in seropositivity betw...

  10. Level IV Ecoregions of Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  11. Level III Ecoregions of Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  12. Options for Educating Students Attending Department of Defense Schools in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    special education, English- language learner Fort Bragg Cumberland County Schools Low income, special education Camp Lejeune Onslow County Schools Low...with or without facilities considered earlier. 3. contract with LEA: Contract with an LEA to operate on-base schools, identical to the contracting...option considered earlier. 4. coterminous district: Establish a new LEA under state law covering the full installa- tion area, identical to the

  13. Full Impact of Department of Defense Program to Restart State-Owned Enterprises Difficult to Estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-30

    Baiji Fertilizer $6,600,000 Caustic soda flakes, cement, motors, and spare parts Basrah Chemical $250,000 Seals, gaskets, and valves for boilers...State Company for Dairy Products would be impacted when a milk plant under construction is completed in March 2009. However, during our November...2008 visit to the construction site, the engineer estimated that about 600 people would be employed once the milk plant is completed. The Task Force

  14. Reconciling the Multiple Objectives of Prison Diversion Programs for Drug Offenders: Evidence from Kansas' Senate Bill 123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemen, Don; Rengifo, Andres F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In recent years, several states have created mandatory prison-diversion programs for felony drug possessors. These programs have both individual-level goals of reducing recidivism rates and system-level goals of reducing prison populations. Objective: This study examines the individual level and system level impact of Kansas' Senate…

  15. Kansas's forests, 2005: statistics, methods, and quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick D. Miles; W. Keith Moser; Charles J. Barnett

    2011-01-01

    The first full annual inventory of Kansas's forests was completed in 2005 after 8,868 plots were selected and 468 forested plots were visited and measured. This report includes detailed information on forest inventory methods and data quality estimates. Important resource statistics are included in the tables. A detailed analysis of Kansas inventory is presented...

  16. Lead and cadmium exposure study, Galena, Kansas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhara, R.J.; Stallings, F.L.; Feese, D.

    1996-01-01

    A total of 167 residents from Galena, Kansas, and 283 residents from the southern portions of Neosho and Goodman, Missouri, participated in the study. Residents from the southern portions of Neosho and Goodman, Missouri, area served as the comparison population. Biological, environmental, and questionnaire information collected from residents of the Galena, Kansas, was compared with similar information collected from residents of the comparison area.

  17. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, S

    2008-08-12

    The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) Roadmap, U.S. Department of Energy--Office of Environmental Management Engineering & Technology Roadmap (Roadmap), defines the Department's intent to reduce the technical risk and uncertainty in its cleanup programs. The unique nature of many of the remaining facilities will require a strong and responsive engineering and technology program to improve worker and public safety, and reduce costs and environmental impacts while completing the cleanup program. The technical risks and uncertainties associated with cleanup program were identified through: (1) project risk assessments, (2) programmatic external technical reviews and technology readiness assessments, and (3) direct site input. In order to address these needs, the technical risks and uncertainties were compiled and divided into the program areas of: Waste Processing, Groundwater and Soil Remediation, and Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D). Strategic initiatives were then developed within each program area to address the technical risks and uncertainties in that program area. These strategic initiatives were subsequently incorporated into the Roadmap, where they form the strategic framework of the EM Engineering & Technology Program. The EM-21 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstrations that will lead to a reduction of technical uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The current MYPP summarizes the strategic initiatives and the scope of the activities within each initiative that are proposed for the next five years (FY2008-2012) to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. As a result of the importance of reducing technical risk and uncertainty in the EM Waste

  18. Technology diffusion of anesthesia information management systems into academic anesthesia departments in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stol, Ilana S; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Epstein, Richard H

    2014-03-01

    Anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) are electronic health records that automatically import vital signs from patient monitors and allow for computer-assisted creation of the anesthesia record. When most recently surveyed in 2007, it was estimated that at least 16% of U.S. academic hospitals (i.e., with an anesthesia residency program) had installed an AIMS. At least an additional 28% reported that they were in the process of implementing, or searching for an AIMS. In this study, we updated the adoption figures as of May 2013 and examined the historical trend of AIMS deployment in U.S. anesthesia residency programs from the perspective of the theory of diffusion of technologic innovations. Questionnaires were sent by e-mail to program directors or their identified contact individuals at the 130 U.S. anesthesiology residency programs accredited as of June 30, 2012 by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The questionnaires asked whether the department had an AIMS, the year of installation, and, if not present, whether there were plans to install an AIMS within the next 12 months. Follow-up e-mails and phone calls were made until responses were obtained from all programs. Results were collected between February and May 2013. Implementation percentages were determined using the number of accredited anesthesia residency programs at the start of each academic year between 1987 and 2013 and were fit to a logistic regression curve using data through 2012. Responses were received from all 130 programs. Eighty-seven (67%) reported that they currently are using an AIMS. Ten programs without a current AIMS responded that they would be installing an AIMS within 12 months of the survey. The rate of AIMS adoption by year was well fit by a logistic regression curve (P = 0.90). By the end of 2014, approximately 75% of U.S. academic anesthesiology departments will be using an AIMS, with 84% adoption expected between 2018 and 2020. Historical adoption

  19. [Department of Physiology of Industrial Microorganisms: the history and present state].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidhors'kyĭ, V S

    2008-01-01

    The paper is devoted to investigations carried out in the recent years at the Department of Physiology of industrial Microorganisms. The basic trends and results of investigation are presented concerning the systematic position and biological activity of industrially important strains of lactic acid and bifido-bacteria, search and selection of yeast--producers of biologically active substances, effect of ionizing electromagnetic radiation of radio-frequency range on yeast viability, their sorptional activity. Surface biopolymers ofcorinebacteria cells, their ability to destruct mineral motor oils have been studied; preparations based on actinobacteria for bioremediation of oil pollutions have been developed; interaction of microorganisms with inorganic xenobiotics--oxygen-containing anions and heavy metals have been investigated. The author also presents data on the study of action mechanism of extracellular sialospecific lectins of saprophytic bacilli, their antiviral activity on the models of influenza, herpes, hepatitis C, and HIV-infection, as well the processes of shaping regulation in a number of micromycetes. Data are available concerning the maintenance of the collection cultures of yeast, lactic acid and corinebacteria, microorganisms which have been preserved in the depositary.

  20. Overview of United States Department of Energy activities to support life extension of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, D.L. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of LWR Safety and Technology; Rosinski, S.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Today, 109 nuclear power plants provide over 20 percent of the electrical energy generated in the US The operating license of the first of these plants will expire in the year 2000; one-third of the operating licenses will expire by 2010 and the remaining plant licenses are scheduled to expire by 2033. The National Energy Strategy assumes that 70 percent of these plants will continue to operate beyond their current license expiration to assist in ensuring an adequate, diverse, and environmentally acceptable energy supply for economic growth. In order to preserve this energy resource in the US three major tasks must be successfully completed: establishment of regulations, technical standards, and procedures for the preparation and review of a license renewal application; development, verification, and validation of technical criteria and bases for monitoring, refurbishing, and/or replacing plant equipment; and demonstration of the regulatory process. Since 1985, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear industry and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish and demonstrate the option to extend the life of nuclear power plants through the renewal of operating licenses. This paper focuses primarily on DOE`s Plant Lifetime Improvement (PLIM) Program efforts to develop the technical criteria and bases for effective aging management and lifetime improvement for continued operation of nuclear power plants. This paper describes current projects to resolve generic technical issues in the principal areas of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity, fatigue, and environmental qualification (EQ).

  1. Nursery Product-Related Injuries Treated in United States Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaw, Christopher E; Chounthirath, Thiphalak; Smith, Gary A

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the epidemiology of injuries associated with nursery products among young children treated in US emergency departments. Data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System were retrospectively analyzed for patients aged injuries among children aged injuries per 10 000 children. The annual injury rate decreased significantly by 33.9% from 1991 to 2003, followed by a significant increase of 23.7% from 2003 to 2011. The decrease was driven by a significant decline in baby walker/jumper/exerciser-related injuries; the increase was driven by a significant increase in concussions and closed head injuries. Nursery product-related injuries were most commonly associated with baby carriers (19.5%), cribs/mattresses (18.6%), strollers/carriages (16.5%), or baby walkers/jumpers/exercisers (16.2%). The most common mechanism of injury was a self-precipitated fall (80.0%), and the most frequently injured body region was the head or neck (47.1%). Although successful injury prevention efforts with baby walkers led to a decline in nursery product-related injuries from 1991 to 2003, the number and rate of these injuries have been increasing since 2003. Greater efforts are warranted to prevent injuries associated with other nursery products, especially baby carriers, cribs, and strollers. Prevention of falls and concussions/closed head injuries associated with nursery products also deserves special attention. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. United States Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, completion report Operation KLAXON, Fiscal Year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Completion Report provides a summary of activities conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) between October 1, 1992, and September 30, 1993, associated with Operation KLAXON. (In the past, each annual Completion Report dealt with a series of underground nuclear detonations; however, because no nuclear tests were conducted during FY 1993, this Report summarizes continuing nonnuclear and nuclear test readiness activities at the NTS sponsored by DOE/NV.) The report serves as a reference for those involved with the planning and execution of Operation KLAXON and also serves as a planning guide for future operations. Information in the report covers the logistics and management of activities. Scientific information and data associated with NTS activities are presented in technical documents published by participating agencies. In September 1992, Congress legislated a nine-month moratorium on the testing of nuclear weapons. The bill also provided for a resumption of testing (with no more than five tests per year, or a total of 15 during the next three years) in July 1993, and mandated an end to nuclear testing, entirely, by 1996. President Bush signed the bill into law in October 1992.

  3. A child in a state of shock in emercency department: classification, mechanisms and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Равіч Maрцін

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric shock is a life-threatening condition that can often be difficult to recognize in the emergency department, especially in early stages. Once recognized, the emphasis of therapy is to correct cellular metabolism and gas exchange by increasing oxygen and other substrate delivery to tissue beds. This review discusses various mechanisms and aetiology of shock are discussed, among them hypoxia in infancy, hypovolaemia, impaired distribution, obstruction of the cardiac outflow and sepsis.In septic shock providing oxygen, improving tissue perfusion through restoration in the intravascular volume, augmentation of cardiac output, preservation of kidney function, and administering antibiotics in a timely manner have all been shown to significantly improve outcomes in children. Simple  algorithms for first aid in emergency room are given, emphasizes the importance of effective surveillance and timely recognition of this disease process, to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. The review indicates how to identify specific markers of septic shock, lays out the essential components of goal-directed therapy, and ways to avoid the devastating consequences of shock in paediatric patients

  4. Estimates of Median Flows for Streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    The Kansas State Legislature, by enacting Kansas Statute KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., mandated the criteria for determining which Kansas stream segments would be subject to classification by the State. One criterion for the selection as a classified stream segment is based on the statistic of median flow being equal to or greater than 1 cubic foot per second. As specified by KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., median flows were determined from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging-station data by using the most-recent 10 years of gaged data (KSA) for each streamflow-gaging station. Median flows also were determined by using gaged data from the entire period of record (all-available hydrology, AAH). Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating median flows for uncontrolled stream segments. The drainage area of the gaging stations on uncontrolled stream segments used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. A logarithmic transformation of the data was needed to develop the best linear relation for computing median flows. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. Tobit analyses of KSA data yielded a model standard error of prediction of 0.285 logarithmic units, and the best equations using Tobit analyses of AAH data had a model standard error of prediction of 0.250 logarithmic units. These regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute median flows for the uncontrolled stream segments on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Measured median flows from gaging stations were incorporated into the regression-estimated median flows along the stream segments where available. The segments that were uncontrolled were interpolated using gaged data weighted according to the drainage area and the bias between the

  5. Use of Video Directly Observed Therapy for Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection - Johnson County, Kansas, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzschuh, Elizabeth Lawlor; Province, Stacie; Johnson, Krystle; Walls, Caitlin; Shemwell, Cathy; Martin, Gary; Showalter, Amy; Dunlay, Jennifer; Conyers, Andrew; Griffin, Phil; Tausz, Nancy

    2017-04-14

    Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is spread from person to person through the air. TB can be spread in congregate settings, such as school environments, to varying degrees, based on factors including duration of contact and air ventilation (1); therefore, evaluating potential contacts and exposures can be challenging. In February 2015, a student at a Kansas high school received a diagnosis of active pulmonary TB disease. Screening of 385 (91%) school contacts, four (100%) household contacts, and 19 (90%) social contacts resulted in the identification of 50 persons with latent TB infection. Johnson County Department of Health and Environment (JCDHE) Public Health Emergency Preparedness personnel used their experience with points of distribution logistics to optimize testing clinic layouts and implement the incident command structure. Open communication with students, school staff members, the public, and the media about the investigation from the outset was imperative to reduce rumors and unease that can accompany a large communicable disease investigation. The large number of persons needing treatment for latent TB overwhelmed JCDHE's two TB nurses. As a result, JCDHE developed a policy and procedure to allow persons who met eligibility requirements to complete 12 weekly doses of isoniazid and rifapentine treatment using video directly observed therapy (VDOT) rather than traditional in-person directly observed therapy (DOT). This procedure facilitated treatment compliance and completion; among the eligible 15 persons who chose the 12-week VDOT option, 14 (93%) completed treatment. State and local health departments might consider use of VDOT to monitor treatment of persons with latent TB infection.

  6. Investigation of contaminant sources at Navarre, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-05

    The results of the 2006 investigation of contaminant sources at Navarre, Kansas, clearly demonstrate the following: {sm_bullet} Sources of carbon tetrachloride contamination were found on the Navarre Co-op property. These sources are the locations of the highest concentrations of carbon tetrachloride found in soil and groundwater at Navarre. The ongoing groundwater contamination at Navarre originates from these sources. {sm_bullet} The sources on the Co-op property are in locations where the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) never conducted grain storage operations. {sm_bullet} No definitive sources of carbon tetrachloride were identified on the portion of the current Co-op property formerly used by the CCC/USDA. {sm_bullet} The source areas on the Co-op property are consistent with the locations of the most intense Co-op operations, both historically and at present. The Co-op historically stored carbon tetrachloride for retail sale and used it as a grain fumigant in these locations. {sm_bullet} The distribution patterns of other contaminants (tetrachloroethene and nitrate) originating from sources on the Co-op property mimic the carbon tetrachloride plume. These other contaminants are not associated with CCC/USDA operations. {sm_bullet} The distribution of carbon tetrachloride at the Co-op source areas, particularly the absence of contamination in soils at depths less than 20 ft below ground level, is consistent with vertical migration into the subsurface through a conduit (well Co-op 2), with subsequent lateral migration through the subsurface. {sm_bullet} The groundwater flow direction, which is toward the west-northwest, is not consistent with migration of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater from the former CCC/USDA property to the source areas on the Co-op property. {sm_bullet} The absence of soil and groundwater contamination along surface drainage pathways on the former CCC/USDA property is not consistent with

  7. 48 CFR 653.219-71 - DOS form DS-4053, Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false DOS form DS-4053... Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 653.219-71 DOS form DS-4053, Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application. As prescribed in 619.102-70(i), DS-4053...

  8. An overview of the United States Department of Energy plant lifetime improvement program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosinski, S.T.; Clauss, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harrison, D.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Today, 109 nuclear power plants provide over 20 percent of the electrical energy generated in the US. The operating license of the first of these plants will expire in the year 2000; one third of the operating licenses will expire by 2010 and the remaining plant licenses are scheduled to expire by 2033. The National Energy Strategy assumes that 70 percent of these plants will continue to operate beyond their current license expiration to assist in ensuring an adequate, diverse, and environmentally acceptable energy supply for economic growth. In order to preserve this energy resource in the US three major tasks must be successfully completed: (1) establishment of the regulations, technical standards, and procedures for the preparation and review of a license renewal application; (2) development, verification, and validation of the various technical criteria and bases for needed monitoring, refurbishment, or replacement of plant equipment; and (3) demonstration of the regulatory process. Since 1985, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear industry and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish and demonstrate the option to extend the life of nuclear power plants through the renewal of operating licenses. This paper focuses primarily on DOE`s Plant Lifetime Improvement (PLIM) Program efforts to develop the technical criteria and bases for effective aging management and lifetime improvement for continued operation of nuclear power plants. This paper describes current projects to resolve generic technical issues, including degradation of long-lived components, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) embrittlement management approaches, and analytical methodologies to characterize RPV integrity.

  9. The United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology`s Technology Benefits Recording System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, K.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1994-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technology`s (OIT`s) Technology Benefits Recording System (TBRS) was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The TBRS is used to organize and maintain records of the benefits accrued from the use of technologies developed with the assistance of OIT. OIT has had a sustained emphasis on technology deployment. While individual program managers have specific technology deployment goals for each of their ongoing programs, the Office has also established a separate Technology Deployment Division whose mission is to assist program managers and research and development partners commercialize technologies. As part of this effort, the Technology Deployment Division developed an energy-tracking task which has been performed by PNL since 1977. The goal of the energy-tracking task is to accurately assess the energy savings impact of OIT-developed technologies. In previous years, information on OIT-sponsored technologies existed in a variety of forms--first as a hardcopy, then electronically in several spreadsheet formats that existed in multiple software programs. The TBRS was created in 1993 for OIT and was based on information collected in all previous years from numerous industrial contacts, vendors, and plants that have installed OIT-sponsored technologies. The TBRS contains information on technologies commercialized between 1977 and the present, as well as information on emerging technologies in the late development/early commercialization stage of the technology life cycle. For each technology, details on the number of units sold and the energy saved are available on a year-by-year basis. Information regarding environmental benefits, productivity and competitiveness benefits, or impact that the technology may have had on employment is also available.

  10. Technical assistance from state health departments for communities engaged in policy, systems, and environmental change: the ACHIEVE Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefelfinger, Jenny; Patty, Alice; Ussery, Ann; Young, Walter

    2013-10-24

    This study assessed the value of technical assistance provided by state health department expert advisors and by the staff of the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors (NACDD) to community groups that participated in the Action Communities for Health, Innovation, and Environmental Change (ACHIEVE) Program, a CDC-funded health promotion program. We analyzed quantitative and qualitative data reported by community project coordinators to assess the nature and value of technical assistance provided by expert advisors and NACDD staff and the usefulness of ACHIEVE resources in the development and implementation of community action plans. A grounded theory approach was used to analyze and categorize phrases in text data provided by community coordinators. Open coding placed conceptual labels on text phrases. Frequency distributions of the quantitative data are described and discussed. The most valuable technical assistance and program support resources were those determined to be in the interpersonal domain (ie, interactions with state expert advisors, NACDD staff, and peer-to-peer support). The most valuable technical assistance events were action institutes, coaches' meetings, webinars, and technical assistance conference calls. This analysis suggests that ACHIEVE communities valued the management and training assistance provided by expert advisors and NACDD staff. State health department expert advisors provided technical guidance and support, including such skills or knowledge-based services as best-practice strategies, review and discussion of community assessment data, sustainability planning, and identification of possible funding opportunities. NACDD staff led development and implementation of technical assistance events.

  11. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Leavenworth, Kansas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, R. M.

    1980-06-01

    The solar heating and cooling system installed at the headquarters of Citizens Mutual Savings Association in Leavenworth, Kansas, is described in detail. The project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's solar demonstration program and became operational in March, 1979. The designer was TEC, Inc. Consulting Engineers, Kansas City, Missouri and contractor was Norris Brothers, Inc., Lawrence, Kansas. The solar system is expected to furnish 90 percent of the overall heating load, 70 percent of the cooling load and 100 percent of the domestic hot water load. The building has two floors with a total of 12,000 square feet gross area. The system has 120 flat-plate liquid solar panels with a net area of 2200 square feet. Five, 3-ton Arkla solar assisted absorption units provide the cooling, in conjunction with a 3000 gallon chilled water storage tank. Two, 3000 gallon storage tanks are provided with one designated for summer use, whereas both tanks are utilized during winter.

  12. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY IN MISSISSIPPIAN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS OF KANSAS--NEAR TERM--CLASS 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy R. Carr; Don W. Green; G. Paul Willhite

    1999-06-01

    This annual report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  13. Separate process wastewaters, part A: Contaminated flow collection and treatment system for the Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) to assist the agency in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 as it applies to modification of ongoing groundwater treatment at DOE`s Kansas City Plant (KCP), located about 19 km (12 miles) south of the central business district of Kansas City, Missouri. The KCP is currently owned by DOE and is operated by the Kansas City Division of AlliedSignal Inc. The plant manufactures nonnuclear components for nuclear weapons. The purpose of and need for the DOE action is to treat identified toxic organic contaminated groundwater at the KCP to ensure that human health and the environment are protected and to comply with groundwater treatment requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) 3008(h) Administrative Order on Consent and the discharge requirements of the Kansas City, Missouri, ordinances for the city sewer system. Four source streams of toxic organic contaminated groundwater have been identified that require treatment prior to discharge to the city sewer system. The toxic organic contaminants of concern consist of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in the groundwater and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) predominantly associated with some soils near the Main Manufacturing Building. The no-action alternative is to continue with the current combination of treatment and nontreatment and to continue operation of the KCP groundwater treatment system in its current configuration at Building 97 (B97). The DOE proposed action is to collect and treat all identified toxic organic contaminated groundwater prior to discharge to the city sewer system. The proposed action includes constructing an Organics Collection System and Organics Treatment Building, moving and expanding the existing groundwater treatment system, and operating the new groundwater treatment facility.

  14. Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-Term -- Class 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Timothy R.; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-07-08

    This report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  15. Final work plan : environmental site investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2012-07-15

    In 1998, carbon tetrachloride was found above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L in groundwater from one private livestock well at Sylvan Grove, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1998 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Sylvan Grove from 1954 to1966. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Sylvan Grove is located in western Lincoln County, approximately 60 mi west of Salina (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. This Work Plan presents historical data related to previous investigations, grain storage operations, local private wells and public water supply (PWS) wells, and local geologic and hydrogeologic conditions at Sylvan Grove. The findings from a review of all available documents are discussed in Section 2. On the basis of the analyses of historical data, the following specific technical objectives are proposed for the site investigation at Sylvan Grove: (1) Evaluate the potential source of carbon tetrachloride at the former CCC/USDA facility; (2) Determine the relationship of potential contamination (if present) at the former CCC/USDA facility to contamination identified in 1998 in groundwater samples from one private well to the west; and (3) Delineate the extent of potential contamination associated with the former CCC/USDA facility. The detailed scope of work is outlined in Section 3. The results of the proposed work will provide the basis for determining

  16. Development by design: mitigating wind development's impacts on wildlife in Kansas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Obermeyer

    Full Text Available Wind energy, if improperly sited, can impact wildlife through direct mortality and habitat loss and fragmentation, in contrast to its environmental benefits in the areas of greenhouse gas, air quality, and water quality. Fortunately, risks to wildlife from wind energy may be alleviated through proper siting and mitigation offsets. Here we identify areas in Kansas where wind development is incompatible with conservation, areas where wind development may proceed but with compensatory mitigation for impacts, and areas where development could proceed without the need for compensatory mitigation. We demonstrate that approximately 10.3 million ha in Kansas (48 percent of the state has the potential to provide 478 GW of installed capacity while still meeting conservation goals. Of this total, approximately 2.7 million ha would require no compensatory mitigation and could produce up to 125 GW of installed capacity. This is 1,648 percent higher than the level of wind development needed in Kansas by 2030 if the United States is to get 20 percent of its electricity from wind. Projects that avoid and offset impacts consistent with this analysis could be awarded "Green Certification." Certification may help to expand and sustain the wind industry by facilitating the completion of individual projects sited to avoid sensitive areas and protecting the industry's reputation as an ecologically friendly source of electricity.

  17. Pediatric Emergency Department Utilization and Reliance by Insurance Coverage in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Lauren E; Rogers, Michelle L; Gjelsvik, Annie; Linakis, James G; Vivier, Patrick M

    2017-08-18

    For many children, the Emergency Department (ED) serves as the main destination for health care, whether it be for emergent or non-urgent reasons. Through examination of repeat utilization and ED reliance, in addition to overall ED utilization, we can identify subpopulations dependent on the ED as their primary source of health care. Nationally representative data from the 2010-2014 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) were used to examine the annual ED utilization of children age 0-17 years by insurance coverage. Overall utilization, repeat utilization (≥2 ED visits), and ED reliance (percentage of all health care visits that occur in the ED) were examined using multivariate models, accounting for weighting and the complex survey design. High ED reliance was defined as having >33% of outpatient visits in a year being ED visits. A total of 47,926 children were included in the study. Approximately 12% of children visited an ED within a one-year period. A greater number of children with public insurance (15.2%) visited an ED at least once, compared to privately insured (10.1%) and uninsured (6.4%) children. Controlling for covariates, children with public insurance were more likely to visit the ED (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.40-1.73) than children with private insurance, whereas uninsured children were less likely (aOR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.51-0.81). Children age three and under were significantly more likely to visit the ED than children age 15-17, whereas female children and Hispanic and non-Hispanic other race children were significantly less likely to visit the ED than male children and non-Hispanic white children. Among children with ED visits, 21% had two or more visits to the ED in a one-year period. Children with public insurance were more likely to have two or more visits to the ED (aOR: 1.53; 95% CI: 1.19-1.98) than children with private insurance whereas there was no significant difference in repeat ED utilization for

  18. Where Do Freestanding Emergency Departments Choose to Locate? A National Inventory and Geographic Analysis in Three States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuur, Jeremiah D; Baker, Olesya; Freshman, Jaclyn; Wilson, Michael; Cutler, David M

    2017-04-01

    We determine the number and location of freestanding emergency departments (EDs) across the United States and determine the population characteristics of areas where freestanding EDs are located. We conducted a systematic inventory of US freestanding EDs. For the 3 states with the highest number of freestanding EDs, we linked demographic, insurance, and health services data, using the 5-digit ZIP code corresponding to the freestanding ED's location. To create a comparison nonfreestanding ED group, we matched 187 freestanding EDs to 1,048 nonfreestanding ED ZIP codes on land and population within state. We compared differences in demographic, insurance, and health services factors between matched ZIP codes with and without freestanding EDs, using univariate regressions with weights. We identified 360 freestanding EDs located in 30 states; 54.2% of freestanding EDs were hospital satellites, 36.6% were independent, and 9.2% were not classifiable. The 3 states with the highest number of freestanding EDs accounted for 66% of all freestanding EDs: Texas (181), Ohio (34), and Colorado (24). Across all 3 states, freestanding EDs were located in ZIP codes that had higher incomes and a lower proportion of the population with Medicaid. In Texas and Ohio, freestanding EDs were located in ZIP codes with a higher proportion of the population with private insurance. In Texas, freestanding EDs were located in ZIP codes that had fewer Hispanics, had a greater number of hospital-based EDs and physician offices, and had more physician visits and medical spending per year than ZIP codes without a freestanding ED. In Ohio, freestanding EDs were located in ZIP codes with fewer hospital-based EDs. In Texas, Ohio, and Colorado, freestanding EDs were located in areas with a better payer mix. The location of freestanding EDs in relation to other health care facilities and use and spending on health care varied between states. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians

  19. Estadio de Kansas City (EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy, C. F.

    1978-05-01

    Full Text Available The Crosby Kemper stadium, located in the center of an industrial district of Kansas City, was designed for various uses which include activities ranging from music and sports competitions to equestrian sports. It has a capacity for approximately 16 to 18,000 people and parking for 4,000 cars. The outstanding feature of its architectonic conception is the solution adopted for building the roof, by means of enormous metal tubular beams, of triangular section and a height of 8.25 meters with pipe diameters reaching 120 cm.

    El estadio Crosby Kemper, situado en el centro de un distrito industrial de Kansas, fue concebido para un funcionamiento diverso que comprende actividades que van desde la música y competiciones deportivas hasta pruebas hípicas. Tiene capacidad para unas 16.000 ó 18.000 personas, y plazas de aparcamiento para 4.000 coches. En su concepción arquitectónica sobresale la solución adoptada para la realización de la cubierta, mediante enormes vigas tubulares metálicas, de sección triangular y altura de 8,25 m, con diámetros de tubo que alcanzan los 120 cm.

  20. 8 June 2010 - South Dakota Governor M. Rounds signing the guest book with External Relations Office Adviser R. Voss, visiting the LHC superconducting Magnet test hall with Technology Department L. Bottura, in the CERN Control Centre with Beams Department Head P. Collier, ATLAS visitor Centre with Deputy Collaboration Spokesperson A. Lankford and visiting CMS Control Centre with Deputy Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela. LHC Communications and FNAL member K. Yurkewicz accompanies throughout (see complete delegation list below).

    CERN Multimedia

    Teams (M. Brice/J.C. Gadmer)

    2010-01-01

    CERN-HI-1006100 24: from left to right: Permanent Mission Representative A. Shybut; External Relations Office Adviser R. Voss; LHC Communications and FNAL K. Yurkewicz, Washington CSG Director for internationl programmes S. Sutcliffe-Stephenson; Technology Department Representative L. Bottura; South Dakota State Patrol D. Svendsen; CSG Executive Director and Former State Senator from Kansas D. Atkins;Office of the First Lady L. Svendsen; Office of the Governor K. Mueller; First Lady J. Rounds; South Dakota Governor M. Rounds; Washington State Senator T. Eide;Judge M. Eide; Assemblyman J. Oceguera and G. Oceguera (with son Jackson Oceguera, 5 months).

  1. An exploratory study to examine intentions to adopt an evidence-based HIV linkage-to-care intervention among state health department AIDS directors in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norton Wynne E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widespread dissemination and implementation of evidence-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV linkage-to-care (LTC interventions is essential for improving HIV-positive patients' health outcomes and reducing transmission to uninfected others. To date, however, little work has focused on identifying factors associated with intentions to adopt LTC interventions among policy makers, including city, state, and territory health department AIDS directors who play a critical role in deciding whether an intervention is endorsed, distributed, and/or funded throughout their region. Methods Between December 2010 and February 2011, we administered an online questionnaire with state, territory, and city health department AIDS directors throughout the United States to identify factors associated with intentions to adopt an LTC intervention. Guided by pertinent theoretical frameworks, including the Diffusion of Innovations and the "push-pull" capacity model, we assessed participants' attitudes towards the intervention, perceived organizational and contextual demand and support for the intervention, likelihood of adoption given endorsement from stakeholder groups (e.g., academic researchers, federal agencies, activist organizations, and likelihood of enabling future dissemination efforts by recommending the intervention to other health departments and community-based organizations. Results Forty-four participants (67% of the eligible sample completed the online questionnaire. Approximately one-third (34.9% reported that they intended to adopt the LTC intervention for use in their city, state, or territory in the future. Consistent with prior, related work, these participants were classified as LTC intervention "adopters" and were compared to "nonadopters" for data analysis. Overall, adopters reported more positive attitudes and greater perceived demand and support for the intervention than did nonadopters. Further, participants varied with

  2. The Marketing Performance of Illinois and Kansas Wheat Farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Sarah N.; Nicole M. Aulerich; Irwin,Scott H.; Good, Darrel L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the marketing performance of wheat farmers in Illinois and Kansas over 1982-2004. The results show that farmer benchmark prices for wheat in Illinois and Kansas fall in the middle-third of the price range about half to three-quarters of the time. Consistent with previous studies, this refutes the contention that Illinois and Kansas wheat farmers routinely market the bulk of their wheat crop in the bottom portion of the price range. Tests of the aver...

  3. The Marketing Performance of Illinois and Kansas Wheat Farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Sarah N.; Aulerich, Nicole M.; Irwin, Scott H.; Good, Darrel L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the marketing performance of wheat farmers in Illinois and Kansas over 1982-2004. The results show that farmer benchmark prices for wheat in Illinois and Kansas fall in the middle-third of the price range about half to three-quarters of the time. Consistent with previous studies, this refutes the contention that Illinois and Kansas wheat farmers routinely market the bulk of their wheat crop in the bottom portion of the price range. Tests of the aver...

  4. Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -- Florida State Energy Program"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) provides grants to states, territories, and the District of Columbia to support their energy priorities through the State Energy Program (SEP). The SEP provides Federal financial assistance to carry out energy efficiency and renewable energy projects that meet each state's unique energy needs while also addressing national goals such as energy security. Federal funding is based on a grant formula that takes into account population and energy consumption. The SEP emphasizes the state's role as the decision maker and administrator for the program. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) expanded the SEP, authorizing $3.1 billion in grants. Based on existing grant formulas and after reviewing state-level plans, EERE made awards to states. The State of Florida's Energy Office (Florida) was allocated $126 million - a 90-fold increase over Florida's average annual SEP grant of $1.4 million. Per the Recovery Act, this funding must be obligated by September 30, 2010, and spent by April 30, 2012. As of March 10, 2010, Florida had expended $13.2 million of the SEP Recovery Act funds. Florida planned to use its grant funds to undertake activities that would preserve and create jobs; save energy; increase renewable energy sources; and, reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To accomplish Recovery Act objectives, states could either fund new or expand existing projects. As a condition of the awards, EERE required states to develop and implement sound internal controls over the use of Recovery Act funds. Based on the significant increase in funding from the Recovery Act, we initiated this review to determine whether Florida had internal controls in place to provide assurance that the goals of the SEP and Recovery Act will be met and accomplished efficiently and effectively. We identified weaknesses in the implementation of SEP Recovery Act projects that

  5. Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -- Florida State Energy Program"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) provides grants to states, territories, and the District of Columbia to support their energy priorities through the State Energy Program (SEP). The SEP provides Federal financial assistance to carry out energy efficiency and renewable energy projects that meet each state's unique energy needs while also addressing national goals such as energy security. Federal funding is based on a grant formula that takes into account population and energy consumption. The SEP emphasizes the state's role as the decision maker and administrator for the program. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) expanded the SEP, authorizing $3.1 billion in grants. Based on existing grant formulas and after reviewing state-level plans, EERE made awards to states. The State of Florida's Energy Office (Florida) was allocated $126 million - a 90-fold increase over Florida's average annual SEP grant of $1.4 million. Per the Recovery Act, this funding must be obligated by September 30, 2010, and spent by April 30, 2012. As of March 10, 2010, Florida had expended $13.2 million of the SEP Recovery Act funds. Florida planned to use its grant funds to undertake activities that would preserve and create jobs; save energy; increase renewable energy sources; and, reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To accomplish Recovery Act objectives, states could either fund new or expand existing projects. As a condition of the awards, EERE required states to develop and implement sound internal controls over the use of Recovery Act funds. Based on the significant increase in funding from the Recovery Act, we initiated this review to determine whether Florida had internal controls in place to provide assurance that the goals of the SEP and Recovery Act will be met and accomplished efficiently and effectively. We identified weaknesses in the implementation of SEP Recovery Act projects that

  6. Pest status and distribution of the stem borer, Dectes texanus, in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschman, Lawrent L; Sloderbeck, Phillip E

    2010-01-01

    The Dectes stem borer, Dectes texanus LeConte (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is currently receiving increased attention as a pest of soybeans in the Great Plains of North America. Field surveys were conducted in 1999 and in 2008 to record the distribution of this pest in Kansas. These surveys documented an increase in the abundance of the pest and an expansion in the range of this insect westward and eastward. The percentage of fields with more than 50% of plants infested also increased from 4% in 1999 to 11% in 2008. The far eastern counties still had surprisingly few infested fields even though much of the Kansas soybean acreage is located in these counties. It is not clear if D. texanus simply haven't expanded into eastern Kansas yet or if there is an ecological barrier that keeps them from doing so. Field crop entomologists from across eastern North America were sent an email questionnaire and their responses indicate that this pest is now well established as a pest of soybeans in at least 14 states across eastern North America.

  7. Geophysically inferred structural and lithologic map of the precambrian basement in the Joplin 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Kansas and Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCafferty, Anne E.; Cordell, Lindrith E.

    1992-01-01

    This report is an analysis of regional gravity and aeromagnetic data that was carried out as part of a Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program (CUSMAP) study of the Joplin 1° X 2° quadrangle, Kansas and Missouri. It is one in a series of reports representing a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey, Kansas Geological Survey, and Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Land Survey. The work presented here is part of a larger project whose goal is to assess the mineral resource potential of the Paleozoic sedimentary section and crystalline basement within the quadrangle. Reports discussing geochemical, geological, and various other aspects of the study area are included in this Miscellaneous Field Studies Map series as MF-2125-A through MF-2125-E. Geophysical interpretation of Precambrian crystalline basement lithology and structure is the focus of this report. The study of the crystalline basement is complicated by the lack of exposures due to the presence of a thick sequence of Phanerozoic sedimentary cover. In areas where there are no outcrops, the geologist must turn to other indirect methods to assist in an understanding of the basement. Previous investigations of the buried basement in this region used available drill hole data, isotope age information, and regional geophysical data (Sims, 1990; Denison and others, 1984; Bickford and others, 1986). These studies were regional in scope and were presented at state and multistate scales. The work documented here used recently collected detailed gravity and aeromagnetic data to enhance the regional geologic knowledge of the area. Terrace-density and terrace-magnetization maps were calculated from the gravity and aeromagnetic data, leading directly to inferred physical-property (density and magnetization) maps. Once these maps were produced, the known geology and drill-hole data were reconciled with the physical-property maps to form a refined structural and

  8. The economic impact of the Department of Energy on the state of New Mexico fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansford, R.R.; Nielsen, T.G.; Schultz, J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Albuquerque Operations Office; Ben-David, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Economics; Temple, J. [Temple (John), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-05-29

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) provides a major source of economic benefits in New Mexico. The agency`s far-reaching economic influence within the state is the focus of this report. Economic benefits arising from the various activities and functions of both DOE and its contractors have accrued to the state continuously for over 50 years. For several years, DOE/Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained inter-industry, input-output modeling capabilities to assess DOE`s impacts on the state of New Mexico and the other substate regions most directly impacted by DOE activities. One of the major uses of input-output techniques is to assess the effects of developments initiated outside the economy such as federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy. The information on which the models are based is updated periodically to ensure the most accurate depiction possible of the economy for the period of reference. For this report, the reference periods are Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 and FY 1997. Total impacts represents both direct and indirect impacts (respending by business), including induced (respending by households) effects. The standard multipliers used in determining impacts result from the inter-industry, input-output models uniquely developed for New Mexico. This report includes seven main sections: (1) introduction; (2) profile of DOE activities in New Mexico; (3) DOE expenditure patterns; (4) measuring DOE/New Mexico`s economic impact; (5) technology transfer within the federal labs funded by DOE/New Mexico; (6) glossary of terms; and (7) technical appendix containing a description of the model. 9 figs., 19 tabs.

  9. Examine the Gaps between Current and Ideal State of Knowledge Management in the Department of Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Hasani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In today's competitive world, knowledge has become the strategic resource in many organizations. Nonaka believes that in today's volatile situation, the only viable source of sustainable competitive advantage is knowledge. Thus, the knowledge management has become a major task for organizations that are looking to take advantage of this valuable asset. In this case the goal of this study is to examine the gaps between current and ideal state of knowledge management in the Department of Physical Education in Iran. Research's method was descriptive-menstruation. Study sample consisted of all employees of the Department of Physical Education of Kurdistan that were 320 members and it was selected by using Morgan table that were 175 members. The reliability of the questionnaire was measured and verified based on Cronbach's Alpha for the knowledge management dimension equals 0/89. Also a questionnaire to be standardized and be normalized in internal research, ensure validity of test. Used statistical methods in current study is use SPSS software and descriptive statistics to describe sex, age, education level and staff's job precedence variables and Kolmogorov – Smirnov test (K-S to verify data to be normal and to verify or reject hypothesis, Paired t-test is been used. Research results showed, there are meaningful differences among knowledge management Dimensions, including Technology infrastructure, organizational culture and organizational structure from the perspective of the Kurdistan's physical education staff in current situation with the ideal situation.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Regional Resource Centers Report: State of the Wind Industry in the Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranowski, Ruth [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United St; Oteri, Frank [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United St; Baring-Gould, Ian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United St; Tegen, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United St

    2016-03-01

    The wind industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are addressing technical challenges to increasing wind energy's contribution to the national grid (such as reducing turbine costs and increasing energy production and reliability), and they recognize that public acceptance issues can be challenges for wind energy deployment. Wind project development decisions are best made using unbiased information about the benefits and impacts of wind energy. In 2014, DOE established six wind Regional Resource Centers (RRCs) to provide information about wind energy, focusing on regional qualities. This document summarizes the status and drivers for U.S. wind energy development on regional and state levels. It is intended to be a companion to DOE's 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report, 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report, and 2014 Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis that provide assessments of the national wind markets for each of these technologies.

  11. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-08-28

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of a targeted investigation to update the status of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater associated with grain storage operations at Hilton, Kansas. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton during the 1950s and 1960s. At the time of the CCC/USDA operation in Hilton, grain storage facilities (CCC/USDA and private) were located along the both sides of the former Union Pacific railroad tracks (Figure 1.1). The main grain storage structures were on or near the railroad right-of-way. The proposed targeted investigation, to be conducted by Argonne National Laboratory on the behalf of CCC/USDA, will supplement Argonne's Phase I and Phase II investigations in 1996-1997. The earlier investigations erroneously focused on an area east of the railroad property where the CCC/USDA did not operate, specifically on a private grain storage facility. In addition, the investigation was limited in scope, because access to railroad property was denied (Argonne 1997a,b). The hydrogeologic system at Hilton is potentially complex.

  12. Agriculture, Crops - CULTIVATED_AREAS_USDA_IN: Cultivated Areas in Indiana in 2004 (United States Department of Agriculture, 1:100,000, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) area sampling frame is a delineation of all parcels of land for...

  13. Data from monitoring of shellfish for Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) and Domoic Acid Poisoning (DAP) by the Washington State Department of Health, 1989-1999 (NCEI Accession 0000580)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The state of Washington routinely experiences seasonal restrictions on commercial and recreational shellfish harvest due to two toxic phytoplankton syndromes,...

  14. Physician Practices Regarding SIDS in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill-Scott, Fannette; Dong, Frank; Redmond, Michelle; Ablah, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death among infants aged 1 to 12 months. The purpose of this study was to assess prenatal and postnatal physicians' knowledge about SIDS in a county with high rates of SIDS deaths. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of pediatricians, family practitioners, and obstetricians in Sedgwick County, Kansas. Most physicians reported correctly that there were effective measures to reduce SIDS. Most respondents agreed it was important to discuss SIDS with parents. Pediatricians were more likely than family practitioners and obstetricians to recognize that pacifier use is important for infants in their first year to reduce SIDS and 2 to 4 months is the age range for peak incidence of SIDS. Pediatricians, family practitioners, and obstetricians are knowledgeable about SIDS and SIDS risk reduction. However, they are not allocating adequate time for discussing SIDS and SIDS reduction efforts with patients.

  15. Radar research at the University of Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Shannon D.; Allen, Christopher; Arnold, Emily; Hale, Richard; Hui, Rongqing; Keshmiri, Shahriar; Leuschen, Carlton; Li, Jilu; Paden, John; Rodriguez-Morales, Fernando; Salandrino, Alessandro; Stiles, James

    2017-05-01

    Radar research has been synonymous with the University of Kansas (KU) for over half a century. As part of this special session organized to highlight significant radar programs in academia, this paper surveys recent and ongoing work at KU. This work encompasses a wide breadth of sensing applications including the remote sensing of ice sheets, autonomous navigation methods for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), novel laser radar capabilities, detection of highenergy cosmic rays using bistatic radar, different forms of waveform diversity such as MIMO radar and pulse agility, and various radar-embedded communication methods. The results of these efforts impact our understanding of the changing nature of the environment, address the proliferation of unmanned systems in the US airspace, realize new sensing modalities enabled by the joint consideration of electromagnetics and signal processing, and greater facilitate radar operation in an increasingly congested and contested spectrum.

  16. The Writer's Hotline: Outreach and the Urban English Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Robert F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a "writer's hotline" telephone program operated at the University of Missouri, Kansas City, in which English faculty address community members' writing problems. Benefits have included increased publicity for the department, improved relationships with the community, and gains in expertise in handling questions of English usage. (DF)

  17. Final work plan : targeted groundwater sampling and monitoring well installation for potential site reclassification at Barnes, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-07-11

    This ''Work Plan'' outlines the scope of work for a targeted groundwater sampling investigation and monitoring well installation at Barnes, Kansas. This activity is being conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with the intergovernmental agreement between the KDHE and the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Data resulting from the proposed work will be used to determine the hydraulic gradient near the former CCC/USDA facility, delineate the downgradient carbon tetrachloride plume, and determine additional monitoring requirements at Barnes. The overall goal is to establish criteria for monitoring leading to potential site reclassification. The proposed work will be performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Farm Service Agency of the USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a ''Master Work Plan'' (Argonne 2002) to provide general guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The ''Master Work Plan'', approved by the KDHE, contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. This document must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Barnes.

  18. Influence of atmospheric states in semi-arid areas on hospital admission in cardio-surgical department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yackerson, Naomy S.; Zilberman, Arkadi; Aizenberg, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    The influence of the changes in atmospheric state, typical for areas close to big deserts, on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was analyzed. Under test was the group of 3256 patients (77 % males, 23 % females), hospitalized in the Cardio-Surgical Department of Soroka Medical Center at Ben-Gurion University (BGU, Israel) during 2000-2008. To explore the relationship between atmospheric parameters and AMI, multivariate regression analysis has been performed. AMI was most frequent in winter to spring and least in summer. The highest number of cases was recorded in December and the lowest in September. Hospital admissions showed a higher prevalence in men than in women; the ratio is 3.3/1.0. About 60 % of males were aged between 45 and 65 years old with maximum ˜55 (21 %), whereas 60 % of women hospital admissions were aged between 65 and 80 years old with maximum ˜72 (24 %). The result suggested that the monthly mean relative humidity at daytime and its overall daily differences, wind speed, and respirable fraction of particulate concentration are associated with the admission for AMI. The results of the study confirm the importance of atmospheric state variability for cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Influence of atmospheric states in semi-arid areas on hospital admission in cardio-surgical department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yackerson, Naomy S.; Zilberman, Arkadi; Aizenberg, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    The influence of the changes in atmospheric state, typical for areas close to big deserts, on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was analyzed. Under test was the group of 3256 patients (77 % males, 23 % females), hospitalized in the Cardio-Surgical Department of Soroka Medical Center at Ben-Gurion University (BGU, Israel) during 2000-2008. To explore the relationship between atmospheric parameters and AMI, multivariate regression analysis has been performed. AMI was most frequent in winter to spring and least in summer. The highest number of cases was recorded in December and the lowest in September. Hospital admissions showed a higher prevalence in men than in women; the ratio is 3.3/1.0. About 60 % of males were aged between 45 and 65 years old with maximum ˜55 (21 %), whereas 60 % of women hospital admissions were aged between 65 and 80 years old with maximum ˜72 (24 %). The result suggested that the monthly mean relative humidity at daytime and its overall daily differences, wind speed, and respirable fraction of particulate concentration are associated with the admission for AMI. The results of the study confirm the importance of atmospheric state variability for cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Annual Burden of Occupationally-Acquired Influenza Infections in Hospitals and Emergency Departments in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachael M; Xia, Yulin

    2017-07-11

    Infections among health-care personnel (HCP) occur as a result of providing care to patients with infectious diseases, but surveillance is limited to a few diseases. The objective of this study is to determine the annual number of influenza infections acquired by HCP as a result of occupational exposures to influenza patients in hospitals and emergency departments (EDs) in the United States. A risk analysis approach was taken. A compartmental model was used to estimate the influenza dose received in a single exposure, and a dose-response function applied to calculate the probability of infection. A three-step algorithm tabulated the total number of influenza infections based on: the total number of occupational exposures (tabulated in previous work), the total number of HCP with occupational exposures, and the probability of infection in an occupational exposure. Estimated influenza infections were highly dependent upon the dose-response function. Given current compliance with infection control precautions, we estimated 151,300 and 34,150 influenza infections annually with two dose-response functions (annual incidence proportions of 9.3% and 2.1%, respectively). Greater reductions in infectious were achieved by full compliance with vaccination and IC precautions than with patient isolation. The burden of occupationally-acquired influenza among HCP in hospitals and EDs in the United States is not trivial, and can be reduced through improved compliance with vaccination and preventive measures, including engineering and administrative controls. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  1. When bioterrorism strikes: communication issues for the local health department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riederer-Trainor, Christine; Wilkinson, Tiffany; Snook, William D; Hoff, Gerald L; Griffin, Ron; Archer, Rex

    2005-10-01

    Public health preparedness is a multifaceted planning process that becomes grounded in a response plan and in effective communications, internal and external. This article describes an incident when the presence of anthrax spores was detected in a postal facility within Kansas City, Missouri, and discusses the communications issues faced by the Kansas City Health Department (KCHD). This incident provided the KCHD the first opportunity to operationalize its Incident Management System-based response plan. However, accompanying its implementation were unforeseen issues related to both internal and external communications. These issues and the lessons learned are discussed.

  2. THE TOMSK SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL OF NEUROLOGISTS. TO THE 120TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY AND NEUROSURGERY OF SIBERIAN STATE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Alifirova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of the development of the Tomsk Scientific School Neurologists and the past and current events in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Siberian State Medical University are described. The Department of Neurology was established in 1881–1882. At a different times the department was headed by many great Russian physicians such as Michail G. Kurlov, Leonid I. Omorokov, Nikolay V. Schubin, Nikolay I. Komandenko. In addition to the academic work the department leads research in many fields of neurology, including movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, demyelinating and paroxysmal diseases. 

  3. [The department of occupational medicine of the State School of Occupational Medicine at the National Institute of Occupational Medicine in Warsaw in 1926-1939].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braczkowska, B; Jabłoński, L

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Occupational Hygiene, State School of Hygiene at the National Institute of Hygiene was established in 1926/27. Prof. Brunon Nowakowski was its founder and the first Director. Teaching and providing of highly qualified personnel for occupational medicine institutions was the main area of the Department's activity. The Department also carried out scientific research focusing on organisation of labour hygiene in Poland, and occupational diseases, lead poisoning in particular. The results of studies carried out by the Department provided the basis for the elaboration of numerous legal regulations in the area of occupational medicine.

  4. Technical justification for a request to reclassify the former CCC/USDA facility at Canada, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-12-21

    Contamination in groundwater at Canada, Kansas, was discovered in 1997, during limited private well sampling near former grain storage facilities of the Commodity Credit Corporation, U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). Subsequent investigations by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) confirmed carbon tetrachloride and nitrate concentrations in groundwater above the respective maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) of 5.0 {micro}g/L and 10.0 mg/L. The KDHE investigations identified both the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility and a private grain storage facility as likely sources for the carbon tetrachloride contamination. The CCC/USDA funded extension of a rural water district line to provide a permanent alternate water supply, and the KDHE has conducted long-term monitoring under the State Water Plan. This document presents an analysis of the available information for the Canada site, acquired in previous investigations and the long-term KDHE monitoring. This analysis forms the technical justification for a request to reclassify the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility at Canada as a site requiring no further action under the Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) between the KDHE and the USDA's Farm Service Agency. The KDHE's long-term water level monitoring results indicate a consistent groundwater flow direction to the east-southeast. Consequently, the wells with the highest overall concentrations of carbon tetrachloride are downgradient from the private grain storage facility but not downgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. The KDHE criterion for reclassification of a site is that contamination there should not pose an unacceptable risk, on the basis of analytical results for four consecutive, equally timed, sequenced sampling episodes over a period of no less than two years. In seven KDHE sampling events over a period of six years (2001-2007), the concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in the monitoring well on the former

  5. Investigating the role of state and local health departments in addressing public health concerns related to industrial food animal production sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian P Fry

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Evidence of community health concerns stemming from industrial food animal production (IFAP facilities continues to accumulate. This study examined the role of local and state health departments in responding to and preventing community-driven concerns associated with IFAP. METHODS: We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with state and county health department staff and community members in eight states with high densities or rapid growth of IFAP operations. We investigated the extent to which health concerns associated with IFAP sites are reported to health departments, the nature of health departments' responses, and barriers to involvement. RESULTS: Health departments' roles in these matters are limited by political barriers, lack of jurisdiction, and finite resources, expertise, and staff. Community members reported difficulties in engaging health departments on these issues. CONCLUSIONS: Our investigation suggests that health departments frequently lack resources or jurisdiction to respond to health concerns related to IFAP sites, resulting in limited engagement. Since agencies with jurisdiction over IFAP frequently lack a health focus, increased health department engagement may better protect public health.

  6. Rates of TBI-related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths — United States, 2001–2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In general, total combined rates for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and deaths have increased over the past...

  7. Final report : results of aquifer pumping and groundwater sampling at Everest, Kansas, in January-March 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-09-30

    On September 8-9, 2005, representatives of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA), and Argonne National Laboratory met at the KDHE's offices in Topeka to review the status of the CCC/USDA's environmental activities in Kansas. As a result of this meeting, the KDHE recommended several additional activities to augment the CCC/USDA's investigations at Everest, Kansas, and assist in the selection of remedial approaches to be evaluated as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for this site. The requested actions included the following: (1) Construction of several additional interpretive cross sections illustrating the hydrogeologic setting along the apparent main plume migration pathway to the north-northwest of the former CCC/USDA facility, as well as in the vicinity of the Nigh property. (2) Installation of additional permanent monitoring wells, to better constrain the apparent western, northern, and northwestern margins of the existing groundwater plume. (3) Development of technical recommendations for a phased pumping study of the Everest aquifer unit in the area near and to the north of the Nigh property.

  8. California Community Colleges: The Chancellor's Office Inadequately Controlled Its Economic Development Program and, along with the Department of Education, Circumvented State Contracting Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Office of the Auditor General, Sacramento.

    This January 1996 audit report reviews the management of the Economic Development Program by the Chancellor's Office of the California Community Colleges and reviews the funding procedures of the Chancellor's Office and the Department of Education relating to the State Plan for Vocational Education. The state auditor found that the Chancellor's…

  9. Final report : results of the 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-08-24

    The 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE; Gotto 2004). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The investigation was designed to (1) update the conceptual site model and (2) investigate sources of previously identified carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater. Six technical objectives were proposed in the ''Work Plan'' (Argonne 2005). The ''Work Plan'' was approved by the KDHE on March 28, 2005 (KDHE 2005). The six objectives were as follows: (1) Determine the current configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume in the investigation area. (2) Delineate contamination detected in 1998-1999 at the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) Investigate the Pro-Ag Co-op property for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride. (4) Investigate the area adjacent to the site of the former retail store for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride to the subsurface. (5) Collect data to support the analysis of potential remedial alternatives. (6) Update the inventory of private wells to identify potential downgradient receptors. This report details and interprets the data collected during the 2005 investigation at Agra. The investigation met the objectives defined in the ''Work Plan''.

  10. Final report : results of the 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-08-24

    The 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE; Gotto 2004). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The investigation was designed to (1) update the conceptual site model and (2) investigate sources of previously identified carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater. Six technical objectives were proposed in the ''Work Plan'' (Argonne 2005). The ''Work Plan'' was approved by the KDHE on March 28, 2005 (KDHE 2005). The six objectives were as follows: (1) Determine the current configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume in the investigation area. (2) Delineate contamination detected in 1998-1999 at the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) Investigate the Pro-Ag Co-op property for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride. (4) Investigate the area adjacent to the site of the former retail store for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride to the subsurface. (5) Collect data to support the analysis of potential remedial alternatives. (6) Update the inventory of private wells to identify potential downgradient receptors. This report details and interprets the data collected during the 2005 investigation at Agra. The investigation met the objectives defined in the ''Work Plan''.

  11. Schaben field, Kansas: Improving performance in a Mississippian shallow-shelf carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, S.L.; Franseen, E.K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Gerlach, P.; Byrnes, A.; Guy, W.; Carr, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Schaben field (Kansas), located along the northeastern shelf of the Hugoton embayment, produces from Mississippian carbonates in erosional highs immediately beneath a regional unconformity. Production comes from depths of around 4400 ft (1342 m) in partially dolomitized shelf deposits. A detailed reservoir characterization/simulation study, recently performed as part of a Department of Energy Reservoir Class Oil Field Demonstration Project, has led to important revision in explanations for observed patterns of production. Cores recovered from three new data wells identify three main facies: Spicule-rich wackestone-packstone, echinoderm wackestone/packstone/grainstone, and dolomitic mudstone-wackestone. Reservoir quality is highest in spicule-rich wackestone/packstones but is subject to a very high degree of vertical heterogeneity due to facies interbedding, silification, and variable natural fracturing. The oil reservoir is underlain by an active aquifer, which helps maintain reservoir pressure but supports significant water production. Reservoir simulation, using public-domain, PC-based software, suggests that infill drilling is an efficient approach to enhanced recovery. Recent drilling directed by simulation results has shown considerable success in improving field production rates. Results from the Schaben field demonstration project are likely to have wide application for independent oil and exploration companies in western Kansas.Schaben field (Kansas), located along the northeastern shelf of the Hugoton embayment, produces from Mississippian carbonates in erosional highs immediately beneath a regional unconformity. Production comes from depths of around 4400 ft (1342 m) in partially dolomitized shelf deposits. A detailed reservoir characterization/simulation study, recently performed as part of a Department of Energy Reservoir Class Oil Field Demonstration Project, has led to important revision in explanations for observed patterns of production. Cores

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Kansas. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Kansas.

  13. Landsat TM and ETM+ 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  14. Updating United States Advanced Battery Consortium and Department of Energy battery technology targets for battery electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jeremy; Pesaran, Ahmad; Bae, Chulheung; Elder, Ron; Cunningham, Brian

    2014-12-01

    Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) offer significant potential to reduce the nation's consumption of petroleum based products and the production of greenhouse gases however, their widespread adoption is limited largely by the cost and performance limitations of modern batteries. With recent growth in efforts to accelerate BEV adoption (e.g. the Department of Energy's (DOE) EV Everywhere Grand Challenge) and the age of existing BEV battery technology targets, there is sufficient motivation to re-evaluate the industry's technology targets for battery performance and cost. Herein we document the analysis process that supported the selection of the United States Advanced Battery Consortium's (USABC) updated BEV battery technology targets. Our technology agnostic approach identifies the necessary battery performance characteristics that will enable the vehicle level performance required for a commercially successful, mass market full BEV, as guided by the workgroup's OEM members. The result is an aggressive target, implying that batteries need to advance considerably before BEVs can be both cost and performance competitive with existing petroleum powered vehicles.

  15. The Use of Social Media by State Health Departments in the US: Analyzing Health Communication Through Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ayan; Lin, Leesa; Savoia, Elena

    2016-02-01

    The use of social media as a powerful health communication tool is an area of current research interest. Our objective was to describe use of Facebook by State Health Departments (SHDs) in US, and their relationship with CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data. Facebook pages of 34 SHDs were studied over a 200 day period, coding 2597 posts into 19 broad health communication categories. Mean number of Facebook posts per SHD was 76.4 (range 34-133); most frequent topic areas included healthy living (12%), communicable diseases (9%), vaccines and immunization (7%), emergency preparedness and response (7%), infant and child health (5%), smoking and tobacco use (5%), and miscellaneous (32%). Through web-based interactive graphics (Google motion charts), we contrasted Facebook posts with CDC's BRFSS data on adult nutrition and physical activity, vaccination, smoking, adolescent health and road traffic accidents. Our research finds an apparent disconnect between content provided on Facebook by SHDs and the health conditions that affect their populations. Acknowledging the severe limitations in funding and human resources faced by the SHDs, our research attempts to present the factual situation in embracing a vastly popular social media platform for health communication. We believe there is a need for research exploring methods to balance the demands and resources.

  16. The Epidemiology of Emergency Department-Treated Burn Injuries Associated with Portable Heaters in the United States, 2003-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Raina D; McGwin, Gerald

    The purpose of this study is to examine the epidemiology of portable space heater-related burn injuries among an emergency department nationally representative population of the United States. The data analyzed in this study were collected from the Consumer Products Safety Commission's 2003-2013 National Electronic Injury Surveillance System. There were approximately 53,636 space heater-related thermal burn injuries attributed to portable space heaters from 2003 to 2013. The rate of injuries was relatively constant during the 10-year span. The number of burn injuries was highest during winter months. Young children, older adults, males, and Blacks had the highest rates of injury. The body part most commonly injured was the hand, which accounted for 33.3% of all burn injuries. It is important to understand the characteristics of persons who have an increased risk of portable space heater burn and trip/fall injuries, so that preventative methods and awareness strategies can be used to help reduce the number of annual portable space heater injuries.

  17. Environmental Assessment for US Department of Energy support of an Iowa State University Linear Accelerator Facility at Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-05-01

    The proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action is financial and technical support of construction and initial operation of an agricultural commodity irradiator (principally for meat), employing a dual mode electron beam generator capable of producing x-rays, at the Iowa State University Linear Accelerator located at Ames, Iowa. The planned pilot commercial-scale facility would be used for the following activities: conducting irradiation research on agricultural commodities, principally meats; in the future, after the pilot phase, as schedules permit, possibly conducting research on other, non-edible materials; evaluating effects of irradiation on nutritional and sensory quality of agricultural products; demonstrating the efficiency of the process to control or eliminate pathogens, and/or to prolong the commodities' post-harvest shelf-life via control or elimination of bacteria, fungi, and/or insects; providing information to the public on the benefits, safety and risks of irradiated agricultural commodities; determining consumer acceptability of the irradiated products; providing data for use by regulatory agencies in developing protocols for various treatments of Iowa agricultural commodities; and training operators, maintenance and quality control technicians, scientists, engineers, and staff of regulatory agencies in agricultural commodity irradiation technology. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  18. PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF ALCOHOL SCREENING TESTS IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT IN ARGENTINA, MEXICO AND THE UNITED STATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Rubén Daniel; Cherpitel, Cheryl J.; Borges, Guilherme

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article is to report psychometric characteristics of the AUDIT, CAGE, RAPS4, and TWEAK and to compare them across three countries: Argentina, Mexico, and the United States which used a similar protocol and methodology. Probability samples of patients 18 years and older were drawn from emergency departments in Mar del Plata, Argentina (n=780), Pachuca, Mexico (n=1624) and Santa Clara, U.S. (n=1220). Concurrent validity was assessed by comparing their performance against a diagnosis of alcohol dependence (DSM-IV) obtained through the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, and for the briefer measures, also by their correlation with the AUDIT. The internal consistency of the CAGE, RAPS4, and TWEAK scores was estimated by the KR-20 formula and by Cronbach’s Alpha for the AUDIT. Corrected item-total correlation and D-values were used as item discrimination measures. In Argentina and Mexico the AUDIT and the RAPS4 showed the highest validity. Reliability of all instruments was higher in the US than in Argentina or Mexico. In all three countries, reliability of the TWEAK was lowest, while the AUDIT was highest. With a few exceptions, all items showed good discrimination powers. PMID:20472341

  19. Non-parametric trend analysis of water quality data of rivers in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y.-S.; Zou, S.; Whittemore, D.

    1993-01-01

    Surface water quality data for 15 sampling stations in the Arkansas, Verdigris, Neosho, and Walnut river basins inside the state of Kansas were analyzed to detect trends (or lack of trends) in 17 major constituents by using four different non-parametric methods. The results show that concentrations of specific conductance, total dissolved solids, calcium, total hardness, sodium, potassium, alkalinity, sulfate, chloride, total phosphorus, ammonia plus organic nitrogen, and suspended sediment generally have downward trends. Some of the downward trends are related to increases in discharge, while others could be caused by decreases in pollution sources. Homogeneity tests show that both station-wide trends and basinwide trends are non-homogeneous. ?? 1993.

  20. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY IN MISSISSIPPIAN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS OF KANSAS - NEAR TERM - CLASS 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy R. Carr; Don W. Green; G. Paul Willhite

    2000-04-30

    This annual report describes progress during the final year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of the project was development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. As part of the project, tools and techniques for reservoir description and management were developed, modified and demonstrated, including PfEFFER spreadsheet log analysis software. The world-wide-web was used to provide rapid and flexible dissemination of the project results through the Internet. A summary of demonstration phase at the Schaben and Ness City North sites demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed reservoir management strategies and technologies. At the Schaben Field, a total of 22 additional locations were evaluated based on the reservoir characterization and simulation studies and resulted in a significant incremental production increase. At Ness City North Field, a horizontal infill well (Mull Ummel No.4H) was planned and drilled based on the results of reservoir characterization and simulation studies to optimize the location and length. The well produced excellent and predicted oil rates for the first two months. Unexpected presence of vertical shale intervals in the lateral resulted in loss of the hole. While the horizontal well was not economically successful, the technology was demonstrated to have potential to recover significant additional reserves in Kansas and the Midcontinent. Several low-cost approaches were developed to evaluate candidate reservoirs for potential horizontal well applications at the field scale, lease level, and well level, and enable the small

  1. Gymnastics-related injuries to children treated in emergency departments in the United States, 1990-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shubha; Smith, Gary A; Fields, Sarah K; McKenzie, Lara B

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of gymnastics-related injuries among children in the United States. A retrospective analysis was conducted of data for children 6 through 17 years of age from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission for 1990 through 2005. Sample weights provided by the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System were used to calculate national estimates of gymnastics-related injuries. Injury rates were calculated for the most frequently occurring types of injury using gymnastics participation data. An estimated 425,900 children 6 through 17 years of age were treated in US hospital emergency departments for gymnastics-related injuries during the 16-year period of 1990-2005. The number of injuries averaged 26,600 annually. The number of injuries sustained per 1000 gymnastics participants per year for the pediatric population was 4.8. The number of injuries sustained per 1000 participants per year was greater for the ages 12 to 17 years (7.4) than for the ages 6 to 11 years (3.6). The place where an injury occurred include school (40.0%), a place of recreation or sports (39.7%), home (14.5%), or on other public property (5.8%). The body parts injured were upper extremity (42.3%), lower extremity (33.8%), head/neck (12.9%), trunk (10.4%), and other (0.6%). Injury diagnoses were strain/sprain (44.5%), fracture/dislocation (30.4%), abrasion/contusion (15.6%), laceration/avulsion (3.7%), concussion/closed head injury (1.7%), and other (4.2%). The majority (97.1%) of patients with gymnastics-related injuries were treated and released from the emergency department. Gymnastics has one of the highest injury rates of all girls' sports. Establishment of a national database for gymnastics-related injuries, including exposure data for direct calculation of injury rates, would permit better identification and monitoring of risk factors for gymnastics-related injuries and aid in

  2. Environmental Impact Research Program: Stabilization of Dakota Sandstone Surface of the Faris Cave Petroglyphs Kanopolis Lake Project, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    varying forms of vandalism , but as a whole, the most destructive force acting on all rock art is natural weather- ing. Rock art sites are gradually...amounts of graffiti . Few remain in pristine condition with respect to graf- fiti. The highest density of known rock art sites occurs in central Kansas...OISTRtRUTION IAVAIIAW)TY STATE MNI iab. OISTW~UION CODE Approved for public release: distribution is unlimited. Native american rock art sites are affected by

  3. The Impact Of Local Option Sales Taxes On Retail Sales, Employment, Payrolls, And Establishments: The Case For Kansas

    OpenAIRE

    John D. Wong

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the impact of local option sales tax differentials in the State of Kansas on retail sales, retail employment, retail payrolls, and the number of retail establishments. It was found that (I) the county tax rate is inversely and significantly related to retail sales per capita, retail sales per vendor, and retail employment per vendor; (2) the city tax rate is inversely and significantly related to the number of retail establishment per capita only; (3) there is a significan...

  4. Recommendations for new monitoring wells at Everest, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2007-05-03

    On February 15, 2007, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) submitted Recommendations for Remedial Action at Everest, Kansas. Those Recommendations were accepted by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in a letter to the CCC/USDA dated March 5, 2007. The approved Recommendations document outlines a plan for systematic groundwater sampling and monitoring at Everest to provide data necessary for the critical evaluation of remedial options - including a phytoremediation alternative - for restoration of the groundwater and protection of the surface waters of the intermittent creek at this site. Phase I of the KDHE-approved monitoring plan includes the following activities: (1) Groundwater sampling at existing monitoring wells, with analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and selected biodegradation parameters; (2) Sampling of surface waters along the intermittent creek for VOCs analyses; and (3) Periodic manual measurement and automated recording of groundwater and surface water levels in the vicinity of the intermittent creek. The locations selected for groundwater and surface water sampling and analyses under the approved monitoring program were determined in consultation with the KDHE. As a result of subsequent discussions among representatives of the KDHE, the CCC/USDA, and Argonne regarding the technical program at Everest, the CCC/USDA seeks KDHE approval for the installation of up to four new permanent monitoring wells along the upper reach of the intermittent creek west of the Nigh property, as shown in Figure 1. The proposed new well locations lie progressively downgradient in the anticipated direction of future groundwater and contaminant movement; all of the recommended points lie at least 2,000 ft upgradient, however, of the confirmed area of groundwater discharge to the creek identified near Highway 73. The proposed new wells will supplement the existing network of groundwater and surface

  5. Interim measure work plan/design for Agra, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-18

    This Interim Measure Work Plan/Design (IMWP/D) is supplemental to the Argonne document Interim Measure Conceptual Design for Remediation of Source Area Contamination at Agra, Kansas. The IMWP/D includes information required by Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy BER-RS-029, Policy and Scope of Work for Interim Measures. Specific to Policy BER-RS-029 is the requirement for several documents that will ensure that an adequate amount and type of data are collected for implementation of the IMWP/D and that data quality and safe conditions are prevailed. Such information is included in the IMWP/D as follows: Appendix A: Data Acquisition Plan--Design Testing Requirements; Appendix B: Basis of Design; Appendix C: Permits; Appendix D: Quality Assurance Project Plan; Appendix E: Health and Safety Plan; and Appendix F: Operations, Maintenance, and Monitoring Schedule. The proposed remedial technology for this project is the installation of five large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) in a source area that has been identified on the property formerly used for grain storage by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The goal of the LDB technology is the remediation of the source area by removal of mass quantities of contaminated soil from the vadose zone and treatment of any remaining contaminated soils that are adjacent to the source area to achieve a carbon tetrachloride concentration below 200 {micro}g/kg. Secondary to the soil remediation is the remediation of groundwater at and adjacent to the source areas. The LDB technology serves the following purposes: (1) The physical removal of contaminated soil from the identified source area. (2) Replacement of less permeable native materials (silty clay, clayey silt, and silty sand) with more permeable materials to facilitate the capture of volatilized contaminants in the vertical borehole. (3) Removal of contaminants volatilized by air sparging (AS) and extracted from the

  6. Annual report of monitoring at Barnes, Kansas, in 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-05-25

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, in 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). The results of that investigation indicated that carbon tetrachloride contamination is present in groundwater at low to moderate levels in the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigation also indicated that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). The former agriculture building owned by the local school district, located immediately east of well PWS3, is also a potential source of the contamination. In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began periodic groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, under the direction of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. Through 2010, sampling was conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events (Argonne 2008a-d, 2009a,b, 2010) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Long

  7. Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Everest, Kansas, in 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-21

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) began its environmental investigations at Everest, Kansas, in 2000. The work at Everest is implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, under the oversight of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The results of the environmental investigations have been reported in detail (Argonne 2001, 2003, 2006a,b). The lateral extent of the carbon tetrachloride in groundwater over the years of investigation has been interpreted as shown in Figure 1.1 (2001-2002 data), Figure 1.2 (2006 data), Figure 1.3 (2008 data), and Figure 1.4 (2009 data). The pattern of groundwater flow and inferred contaminant migration has consistently been to the north-northwest from the former CCC/USDA facility toward the Nigh property, and then west-southwest from the Nigh property (e.g., Figure 1.5 [2008 data] and Figure 1.6 [2009 data]). Both the monitoring data for carbon tetrachloride and the low groundwater flow rates estimated for the Everest aquifer unit (Argonne 2003, 2006a,b, 2008) indicate slow contaminant migration. On the basis of the accumulated findings, in March 2009 the CCC/USDA developed a plan for annual monitoring of the groundwater and surface water. This current monitoring plan (Appendix A in the report of monitoring in 2009 [Argonne 2010]) was approved by the KDHE (2009a). Under this plan, the monitoring wells are sampled by the low-flow procedure, and sample preservation, shipping, and analysis activities are consistent with previous work at Everest. The annual sampling will continue until identified conditions at the site indicate a technical justification for a change. The first annual sampling event under the new monitoring plan took place in April 2009. The results of analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and water level measurements were consistent with previous observations (Figures 1.1-1.4). No carbon tetrachloride was detected in surface

  8. Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2010-10-19

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater was sampled twice yearly from September 2005 until September 2007 for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The results from the two-year sampling program demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound in a localized groundwater plume that has shown little movement. The relative concentrations of chloroform, the primary degradation product of carbon tetrachloride, suggested that some degree of reductive dechlorination or natural biodegradation was taking place in situ at the former CCC/USDA facility on a localized scale. The CCC/USDA subsequently developed an Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007b), proposing a pilot test of the Adventus EHC technology for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR). The proposed interim measure (IM) was approved by the KDHE in November 2007 (KDHE 2007). Implementation of the pilot test occurred in November-December 2007. The objective was to create highly reducing conditions that would enhance both chemical and biological reductive dechlorination

  9. Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-16

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater was sampled twice yearly from September 2005 until September 2007 for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation processes (reductive dechlorination) in the subsurface environment (Argonne 2006, 2007a, 2008a). The results from the two-year sampling program demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a localized groundwater plume that has shown little movement. The relative concentrations of chloroform, the primary degradation product of carbon tetrachloride, suggested that some degree of reductive dechlorination or natural biodegradation was talking place in situ at the former CCC/USDA facility on a localized scale. The CCC/USDA subsequently developed an Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007b), proposing a pilot test of the Adventus EHC technology for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR). The proposed interim measure (IM) was approved by the KDHE in November 2007 (KDHE 2007). Implementation of the pilot test occurred in November-December 2007. The objective was to create highly reducing conditions that would enhance both chemical and biological

  10. Federal Grant "Seed Money"--Sprouted, Growing and Blooming in the Kansas Sandhills: Interdisciplinary Studies--Their "Place in the Sun."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Donna

    The Outdoor Research Project of Hutchinson Senior High School in Hutchinson, Kansas, was funded in 1977 to conduct a scientific baseline study of an outdoor education center and a state park. Gifted students used initial limnology tests, fish population studies, and groundcover analyses to produce management recommendations and a computer…

  11. Brick and Click Libraries: How Do We Support Both? Proceedings of a Regional Academic Library Symposium (Iowa, Kansas, Missouri & Nebraska) (1st, Maryville, Missouri, October 26, 2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrem, Joyce A., Ed.; Johnson, Carolyn, Ed.

    This document presents the proceedings of a Regional Academic Library Symposium, "Brick and Click Libraries." Contributors are professionals from colleges and universities in the states of Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska. Papers include: "Library Web Site Redesign and Usability Testing" (Michelle Beattie and Susan Sykes Berry); "The…

  12. High prevalence of "Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae" and apparent exclusion of Rickettsia parkeri in adult Amblyomma maculatum (Acari: Ixodidae) from Kansas and Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Christopher D; Denison, Amy M; Dryden, Michael W; Noden, Bruce H; Lash, R Ryan; Abdelghani, Sarah S; Evans, Anna E; Kelly, Aubree R; Hecht, Joy A; Karpathy, Sandor E; Ganta, Roman R; Little, Susan E

    2015-04-01

    Amblyomma maculatum (the Gulf Coast tick), an aggressive, human-biting, Nearctic and Neotropical tick, is the principal vector of Rickettsia parkeri in the United States. This pathogenic spotted fever group Rickettsia species has been identified in 8-52% of questing adult Gulf Coast ticks in the southeastern United States. To our knowledge, R. parkeri has not been reported previously from adult specimens of A. maculatum collected in Kansas or Oklahoma. A total of 216 adult A. maculatum ticks were collected from 18 counties in Kansas and Oklahoma during 2011-2014 and evaluated by molecular methods for evidence of infection with R. parkeri. No infections with this agent were identified; however, 47% of 94 ticks collected from Kansas and 73% of 122 ticks from Oklahoma were infected with "Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae" a spotted fever group Rickettsia species of undetermined pathogenicity. These preliminary data suggest that "Ca. R. andeanae" is well-adapted to survival in populations of A. maculatum in Kansas and Oklahoma, and that its ubiquity in Gulf Coast ticks in these states may effectively exclude R. parkeri from their shared arthropod host, which could diminish markedly or preclude entirely the occurrence of R. parkeri rickettsiosis in this region of the United States.

  13. Full-length coding sequence for 12 bovine viral diarrhea virus isolates from persistently infected cattle in a feedyard in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report here the full-length coding sequence of 12 bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolates from persistently infected cattle from a feedyard in southwest Kansas, USA. These 12 genomes represent the three major genotypes (BVDV 1a, 1b, and 2a) of BVDV currently circulating in the United States....

  14. Uncertainties in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Advanced Biomass Feedstock Logistics Supply Chains in Kansas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Nguyen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To meet Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA cellulosic biofuel mandates, the United States will require an annual domestic supply of about 242 million Mg of biomass by 2022. To improve the feedstock logistics of lignocellulosic biofuels in order to access available biomass resources from areas with varying yields, commodity systems have been proposed and designed to deliver quality-controlled biomass feedstocks at preprocessing “depots”. Preprocessing depots densify and stabilize the biomass prior to long-distance transport and delivery to centralized biorefineries. The logistics of biomass commodity supply chains could introduce spatially variable environmental impacts into the biofuel life cycle due to needing to harvest, move, and preprocess biomass from multiple distances that have variable spatial density. This study examines the uncertainty in greenhouse gas (GHG emissions of corn stover logistics within a bio-ethanol supply chain in the state of Kansas, where sustainable biomass supply varies spatially. Two scenarios were evaluated each having a different number of depots of varying capacity and location within Kansas relative to a central commodity-receiving biorefinery to test GHG emissions uncertainty. The first scenario sited four preprocessing depots evenly across the state of Kansas but within the vicinity of counties having high biomass supply density. The second scenario located five depots based on the shortest depot-to-biorefinery rail distance and biomass availability. The logistics supply chain consists of corn stover harvest, collection and storage, feedstock transport from field to biomass preprocessing depot, preprocessing depot operations, and commodity transport from the biomass preprocessing depot to the biorefinery. Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the spatial uncertainty in the feedstock logistics gate-to-gate sequence. Within the logistics supply chain GHG emissions are most sensitive to the

  15. Overview of the United States department of energy's used fuel disposition research and development campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nutt, Mark [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Swift, Peter; MacKinnon, Robert; McMahon, Kevin; Sorenson, Ken [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Boyle, William; Gunter, Timothy; Larson, Ned [U.S. Department of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) is conducting research and development (R and D) activities within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to support storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. R and D activities are ongoing at nine national laboratories, and are divided into two major topical areas: (1) storage and transportation research, and (2) disposal research. Storage R and D focuses on closing technical gaps related to extended storage of UNF. For example, uncertainties remain regarding high-burnup nuclear fuel cladding performance following possible hydride reorientation and creep deformation, and also regarding long-term canister integrity. Transportation R and D focuses on ensuring transportability of UNF following extended storage, addressing data gaps regarding nuclear fuel integrity, retrievability, and demonstration of subcriticality. Disposal R and D focuses on identifying multiple viable geologic disposal options and addressing technical challenges for generic disposal concepts in various host media (e.g., mined repositories in salt, clay/shale, and granitic rocks, and deep borehole disposal in crystalline rock). R and D will transition to site-specific challenges as national policy advances. R and D goals at this stage are to increase confidence in the robustness of generic disposal concepts, to reduce generic sources of uncertainty that may impact the viability of disposal concepts, and to develop science and engineering tools that will support the selection, characterization, and ultimately licensing of a repository. The US DOE has also initiated activities that can be conducted within the constraints of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to facilitate the development of an interim storage facility and supporting transportation infrastructure. (authors)

  16. Description and utilization of the United States department of defense serum repository: a review of published studies, 1985-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Perdue

    Full Text Available Specimens in the United States Department of Defense (DoD Serum Repository have accumulated in frozen storage since 1985 when the DoD began universal screening for human immunodeficiency virus. Use of the stored serum for health research has been carefully controlled, but the resulting publications have never been systematically identified or described. The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center (AFHSC information systems and open (online sites were used as data sources. Through 2012, the repository contained 54,542,658 serum specimens, of which 228,610 (0.42% have been accessed for any purpose. Between 2001 (the first year that comprehensive, digital records were available and 2012, 65.2% of all approved requests for serum were for healthcare or public health investigations, but greater than 99% of all shipped samples were for research. Using two different methods - a structure search of PubMed and an exhaustive online search based on records from AFHSC - we identified 76 articles published between October 1988 and March 2013 that covered a multitude of infectious diseases, injuries, environmental exposures and mental health conditions through analysis of antibodies, biological metabolic, signaling and regulatory substances, Vitamin D, organochlorines, dioxin, omega-3-fatty acid, and portions of human deoxyribonucleic acid. Despite its operational and scientific value, it appears that the DoD Serum Repository has been underutilized. Changes to policy and increased capacity for specimen processing could increase use of the repository without risking privacy or the availability of specimens for the healthcare of individual service members in the future.

  17. Description and Utilization of the United States Department of Defense Serum Repository: A Review of Published Studies, 1985-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdue, Christopher L.; Cost, Angelia A. Eick; Rubertone, Mark V.; Lindler, Luther E.; Ludwig, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Specimens in the United States Department of Defense (DoD) Serum Repository have accumulated in frozen storage since 1985 when the DoD began universal screening for human immunodeficiency virus. Use of the stored serum for health research has been carefully controlled, but the resulting publications have never been systematically identified or described. The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center (AFHSC) information systems and open (online) sites were used as data sources. Through 2012, the repository contained 54,542,658 serum specimens, of which 228,610 (0.42%) have been accessed for any purpose. Between 2001 (the first year that comprehensive, digital records were available) and 2012, 65.2% of all approved requests for serum were for healthcare or public health investigations, but greater than 99% of all shipped samples were for research. Using two different methods – a structure search of PubMed and an exhaustive online search based on records from AFHSC – we identified 76 articles published between October 1988 and March 2013 that covered a multitude of infectious diseases, injuries, environmental exposures and mental health conditions through analysis of antibodies, biological metabolic, signaling and regulatory substances, Vitamin D, organochlorines, dioxin, omega-3-fatty acid, and portions of human deoxyribonucleic acid. Despite its operational and scientific value, it appears that the DoD Serum Repository has been underutilized. Changes to policy and increased capacity for specimen processing could increase use of the repository without risking privacy or the availability of specimens for the healthcare of individual service members in the future. PMID:25723497

  18. State health department perceived utility of and satisfaction with ArboNET, the U.S. National Arboviral Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Nicole P; Brown, Jennifer A; Kightlinger, Lon; Rosenberg, Lauren; Fischer, Marc

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the perceived utility of data collected through ArboNET, the national arboviral surveillance system, and evaluated state health department user satisfaction with system function. We used an online assessment tool to collect information about types of arboviral surveillance conducted, user satisfaction with ArboNET's performance, and use of data collected by the system. Representatives of all 53 reporting jurisdictions were asked to complete the assessment during spring 2009. Representatives of 48 (91%) jurisdictions completed the assessment. Two-thirds of respondents were satisfied with ArboNET's overall performance. Most concerns were related to data transmission, particularly the lack of compatibility with the National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS). Users found mosquito (85%), human disease (80%), viremic blood donor (79%), and veterinary disease (75%) surveillance data to be useful. While there was disagreement about the usefulness of avian mortality and sentinel animal surveillance, only 15% of users supported eliminating these categories. Respondents found weekly maps and tables posted on the U.S. Geological Survey (92%) and CDC (88%) websites to be the most useful reports generated from ArboNET data. Although many jurisdictions were willing to report additional clinical or laboratory data, time and resource constraints were considerations. Most respondents (71%) supported review and possible revision of the national case definition for human arboviral disease. As a result of this assessment, CDC and partner organizations have made ArboNET NEDSS-compatible and revised national case definitions for arboviral disease. Alternative data-sharing and reporting options are also being considered. Continued evaluation of ArboNET will help ensure that it continues to be a useful tool for national arboviral disease surveillance.

  19. Implementation of deep soil mixing at the Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, F.G.; Korte, N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Strong-Gunderson, J.; Siegrist, R.L.; West, O.R.; Cline, S.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Baker, J. [AlliedSignal, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1998-11-01

    In July 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Kansas City Plant (KCP), AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), conducted field-scale tests of in situ soil mixing and treatment technologies within the Northeast Area (NEA) of the KCP at the Former Ponds site. This demonstration, testing, and evaluation effort was conducted as part of the implementation of a deep soil mixing (DSM) innovative remedial technology demonstration project designed to test DSM in the low-permeability clay soils at the KCP. The clay soils and groundwater beneath this area are contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE). The demonstration project was originally designed to evaluate TCE and 1,2-DCE removal efficiency using soil mixing coupled with vapor stripping. Treatability study results, however, indicated that mixed region vapor stripping (MRVS) coupled with calcium oxide (dry lime powder) injection would improve TCE and 1,2-DCE removal efficiency in saturated soils. The scope of the KCP DSM demonstration evolved to implement DSM with the following in situ treatment methodologies for contaminant source reduction in soil and groundwater: DSM/MRVS coupled with calcium oxide injection; DSM/bioaugmentation; and DSM/chemical oxidation using potassium permanganate. Laboratory treatability studies were started in 1995 following collection of undisturbed soil cores from the KCP. These studies were conducted at ORNL, and the results provided information on optimum reagent concentrations and mixing ratios for the three in situ treatment agents to be implemented in the field demonstration.

  20. United States of America Department of Health and Human Services support for advancing influenza vaccine manufacturing in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdue, Michael L; Bright, Rick A

    2011-07-01

    Since 2005, the Government of the United States of America has provided more than US$ 50 million to advance influenza vaccine development in low-resourced countries. This programme has provided a unique opportunity for the US Government to develop a comprehensive view of, and to understand better the challenges and future needs for influenza vaccines in the developing world. The funding for this programme has been primarily through a cooperative agreement with the World Health Organization (WHO) to support directly its capacity-building grants to government-owned or -supported vaccine manufacturers in developing countries. A second cooperative agreement with the Program for Appropriate Technologies in Health (PATH) was initiated to accelerate the completion of a current Good Manufacturing Practice cGMP production facility, along with supporting facilities to obtain a reliable source of eggs, and to conduct clinical trials of influenza vaccine manufactured in Vietnam. This mechanism of utilizing cooperative agreements to support capacity-building for vaccine development in low-resourced settings has been novel and unique and has yielded fruitful returns on minimal investment. The information derived from this programme helps to clarify not only the development challenges for influenza vaccines and how the United States may assist in meeting those challenges, but also other vaccine development issues common to manufacturers in developing countries. While building the initial capacity to produce influenza vaccines can be a straightforward exercise, the sustainability of the enterprise and expansion of subsequent markets will be the key to future usefulness. There is hope for expansion of the global influenza vaccine market. Ongoing burden of disease studies are elucidating the impact of influenza infections, particularly in children, and more countries will take note and respond accordingly, since respiratory diseases are now the number one killer of children under

  1. Methods for estimating annual exceedance-probability streamflows for streams in Kansas based on data through water year 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Colin C.; Heimann, David C.; Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.

    2017-08-14

    A study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Transportation and the Federal Emergency Management Agency to develop regression models to estimate peak streamflows of annual exceedance probabilities of 50, 20, 10, 4, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.2 percent at ungaged locations in Kansas. Peak streamflow frequency statistics from selected streamgages were related to contributing drainage area and average precipitation using generalized least-squares regression analysis. The peak streamflow statistics were derived from 151 streamgages with at least 25 years of streamflow data through 2015. The developed equations can be used to predict peak streamflow magnitude and frequency within two hydrologic regions that were defined based on the effects of irrigation. The equations developed in this report are applicable to streams in Kansas that are not substantially affected by regulation, surface-water diversions, or urbanization. The equations are intended for use for streams with contributing drainage areas ranging from 0.17 to 14,901 square miles in the nonirrigation effects region and, 1.02 to 3,555 square miles in the irrigation-affected region, corresponding to the range of drainage areas of the streamgages used in the development of the regional equations.

  2. Spatial variability of harmful algal blooms in Milford Lake, Kansas, July and August 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Guy M.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Stiles, Tom C.; Boyer, Marvin G.; King, Lindsey R.; Loftin, Keith A.

    2017-01-09

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CyanoHABs) tend to be spatially variable vertically in the water column and horizontally across the lake surface because of in-lake and weather-driven processes and can vary by orders of magnitude in concentration across relatively short distances (meters or less). Extreme spatial variability in cyanobacteria and associated compounds poses unique challenges to collecting representative samples for scientific study and public-health protection. The objective of this study was to assess the spatial variability of cyanobacteria and microcystin in Milford Lake, Kansas, using data collected on July 27 and August 31, 2015. Spatially dense near-surface data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, nearshore data were collected by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, and open-water data were collected by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. CyanoHABs are known to be spatially variable, but that variability is rarely quantified. A better understanding of the spatial variability of cyanobacteria and microcystin will inform sampling and management strategies for Milford Lake and for other lakes with CyanoHAB issues throughout the Nation.The CyanoHABs in Milford Lake during July and August 2015 displayed the extreme spatial variability characteristic of cyanobacterial blooms. The phytoplankton community was almost exclusively cyanobacteria (greater than 90 percent) during July and August. Cyanobacteria (measured directly by cell counts and indirectly by regression-estimated chlorophyll) and microcystin (measured directly by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] and indirectly by regression estimates) concentrations varied by orders of magnitude throughout the lake. During July and August 2015, cyanobacteria and microcystin concentrations decreased in the downlake (towards the outlet) direction.Nearshore and open-water surface grabs were collected and analyzed for microcystin as part of this study. Samples were collected in the

  3. Results of the 2014 Kansas waterfowl hunter survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Individual states can select season dates for migratory game birds within the given frameworks derived by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS). The manner in...

  4. Rates of TBI-related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths by Sex — United States, 2001–2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Overall rates of TBI climbed slowly from 2001 through 2007, then spiked sharply in 2008 and continued to climb through 2010. The increase in TBI rates in 2008 was...

  5. Nevada Department of Water Resources State Crop Inventories for Newark, Little Smoky, and Steptoe Valleys 2000, 2002, and 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This layer is geographically based on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. General Land Office Geographic Coordinate Data Base (GCDB) 1:24,000-scale Land survey...

  6. Water-quality variability and constituent transport and processes in streams of Johnson County, Kansas, using continuous monitoring and regression models, 2003-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Teresa; Gatotho, Jackline

    2014-01-01

    The population of Johnson County, Kansas increased by about 24 percent between 2000 and 2012, making it one of the most rapidly developing areas of Kansas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program, began a comprehensive study of Johnson County streams in 2002 to evaluate and monitor changes in stream quality. The purpose of this report is to describe water-quality variability and constituent transport for streams representing the five largest watersheds in Johnson County, Kansas during 2003 through 2011. The watersheds ranged in urban development from 98.3 percent urban (Indian Creek) to 16.7 percent urban (Kill Creek). Water-quality conditions are quantified among the watersheds of similar size (50.1 square miles to 65.7 square miles) using continuous, in-stream measurements, and using regression models developed from continuous and discrete data. These data are used to quantify variability in concentrations and loads during changing streamflow and seasonal conditions, describe differences among sites, and assess water quality relative to water-quality standards and stream management goals. Water quality varied relative to streamflow conditions, urbanization in the upstream watershed, and contributions from wastewater treatment facilities and storm runoff. Generally, as percent impervious surface (a measure of urbanization) increased, streamflow yield increased. Water temperature of Indian Creek, the most urban site which is also downstream from wastewater facility discharges, was higher than the other sites about 50 percent of the time, particularly during winter months. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were less than the Kansas Department of Health and Environment minimum criterion of 5 milligrams per liter about 15 percent of the time at the Indian Creek site. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were less than the criterion about 10 percent of the time at the rural Blue River and Kill Creek sites, and less than

  7. Quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas, 2002--10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Stone, Mandy S.; Poulton, Barry C.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Stream quality in Johnson County, northeastern Kansas, was assessed on the basis of land use, hydrology, stream-water and streambed-sediment chemistry, riparian and in-stream habitat, and periphyton and macroinvertebrate community data collected from 22 sites during 2002 through 2010. Stream conditions at the end of the study period are evaluated and compared to previous years, stream biological communities and physical and chemical conditions are characterized, streams are described relative to Kansas Department of Health and Environment impairment categories and water-quality standards, and environmental factors that most strongly correlate with biological stream quality are evaluated. The information is useful for improving water-quality management programs, documenting changing conditions with time, and evaluating compliance with water-quality standards, total maximum daily loads (TMDLs), National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit conditions, and other established guidelines and goals. Constituent concentrations in water during base flow varied across the study area and 2010 conditions were not markedly different from those measured in 2003, 2004, and 2007. Generally the highest specific conductance and concentrations of dissolved solids and major ions in water occurred at urban sites except the upstream Cedar Creek site, which is rural and has a large area of commercial and industrial land less than 1 mile upstream on both sides of the creek. The highest base-flow nutrient concentrations in water occurred downstream from wastewater treatment facilities. Water chemistry data represent base-flow conditions only, and do not show the variability in concentrations that occurs during stormwater runoff. Constituent concentrations in streambed sediment also varied across the study area and some notable changes occurred from previously collected data. High organic carbon and nutrient concentrations at the rural Big Bull Creek site in 2003 decreased

  8. 22 CFR Appendix D to Part 62 - Annual Report-Exchange Visitor Program Services (GC/V), Department of State, Washington, DC 20547...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Pt. 62, App. D... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Annual Report-Exchange Visitor Program Services... ____ (b) PROGRAM EVALUATION On a separate sheet, please provide a brief narrative report on...

  9. A Citation Analysis of Master's Level English Theses Submitted to the Department of English-Kent State University, 1985-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutz, Mark J.

    This paper is a citation analysis of 16 Master's theses which were submitted to the Department of English-Kent State University from 1985 to 1995. Each citation from the 16 theses was analyzed along the following criteria: gender of citation author; format of citation (book, article within book, journal article, thesis, dissertation); nature of…

  10. The Lived Experiences of Single Hispanic Mothers Raising Gang-Affiliated Male Youth Released from Texas Juvenile Justice Department State Facilities: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Almendarez, Ruby

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The purpose of this transcendental phenomenological study (Moustakas, 1994) was to describe the experiences that single Hispanic mothers of gang-affiliated male juveniles face during their sons' reentry process after being released from a Texas Juvenile Justice Department state facility. Methods: After an extensive…

  11. The Lived Experiences of Single Hispanic Mothers Raising Gang-Affiliated Male Youth Released from Texas Juvenile Justice Department State Facilities: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Almendarez, Ruby

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The purpose of this transcendental phenomenological study (Moustakas, 1994) was to describe the experiences that single Hispanic mothers of gang-affiliated male juveniles face during their sons' reentry process after being released from a Texas Juvenile Justice Department state facility. Methods: After an extensive review of…

  12. Sexual Abuse: Therapeutic & Systems Considerations for the Child and Family. [Report of] Colorado State Department of Social Services Conference (Denver, Colorado, July 7-8, 1982).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Claudia A., Ed.; Gottlieb, Bruce, Ed.

    This publication presents papers from a 1982 child sexual abuse conference sponsored by the Colorado State Department of Social Services, designed to identify major issues and trends and to stimulate the exchange of perspectives and practices among persons concerned about preventing and treating child sexual abuse. The first section of the…

  13. Microbial Community Responses to Glycine Addition in Kansas Prairie Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottos, E.; Roy Chowdhury, T.; White, R. A., III; Brislawn, C.; Fansler, S.; Kim, Y. M.; Metz, T. O.; McCue, L. A.; Jansson, J.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies are rapidly expanding our abilities to unravel aspects of microbial community structure and function in complex systems like soil; however, characterizing the highly diverse communities is problematic, due primarily to challenges in data analysis. To tackle this problem, we aimed to constrain the microbial diversity in a soil by enriching for particular functional groups within a community through addition of "trigger substrates". Such trigger substrates, characterized by low molecular weight, readily soluble and diffusible in soil solution, representative of soil organic matter derivatives, would also be rapidly degradable. A relatively small energy investment to maintain the cell in a state of metabolic alertness for such substrates would be a better evolutionary strategy and presumably select for a cohort of microorganisms with the energetics and cellular machinery for utilization and growth. We chose glycine, a free amino acid (AA) known to have short turnover times (in the range of hours) in soil. As such, AAs are a good source of nitrogen and easily degradable, and can serve as building blocks for microbial proteins and other biomass components. We hypothesized that the addition of glycine as a trigger substrate will decrease microbial diversity and evenness, as taxa capable of metabolizing it are enriched in relation to those that are not. We tested this hypothesis by incubating three Kansas native prairie soils with glycine for 24 hours at 21 degree Celsius, and measured community level responses by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, metagenomics, and metatranscriptomics. Preliminary evaluation of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed minor changes in bacterial community composition in response to glycine addition. We will also present data on functional gene abundance and expression. The results of these analyses will be useful in designing sequencing strategies aimed at dissecting and deciphering complex microbial communities.

  14. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  15. Revenue Sharing: Its Use by and Impact on State Governments. Department of the Treasury. Report to the Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    The results of the G.A.O.'s State-by-State investigation of the status of the $1.7 billion distributed to 50 State governments and the District of Columbia for 1972 are reported in this pamphlet. The investigation attempted to assess the actual impact of revenue sharing in such areas as tax reduction, changes in budget priorities, and increased…

  16. 75 FR 51619 - Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security/United States...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... required by section 642(c) of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (Pub. L. 104.../United States Citizenship and Immigration Services-- 009 Compliance Tracking and Management System of.../United States Citizenship and Immigration system of records entitled the ``United States Citizenship...

  17. Combating Terrorism: Strategy to Counter Iran in the Western Hemisphere Has Gaps That State Department Should Address

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    includes a reference to some citizen security initiatives. The act stated that the strategy should include a plan, but State did not provide the... citizen security initiatives’ documents or a summary of its plan in the strategy. 7. Our report states that the language in the act requested “a plan to

  18. Participation in the United States Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Annual report, August 31, 1991--August 29, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1992-05-01

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility is an integral part of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics (to become the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering on July 1, 1992). As such, it is effectively used to support educational programs in engineering and science at the University of Virginia as well as those at other area colleges and universities. The expansion of support to educational programs in the mid-east region is a major objective. To assist in meeting this objective, the University of Virginia has been supported under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Sharing Program since 1978. Due to the success of the program, this proposal requests continued DOE support through August 1993.

  19. 40 CFR 147.850 - State-administered program-Class I, III, IV and V wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS Kansas § 147.850 State-administered program—Class I, III, IV and V wells. The UIC program for Class I, III, IV and V wells in the State of Kansas, except those on Indian lands as described in § 147... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program-Class...

  20. Estimates of Flow Duration, Mean Flow, and Peak-Discharge Frequency Values for Kansas Stream Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    Streamflow statistics of flow duration and peak-discharge frequency were estimated for 4,771 individual locations on streams listed on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. These statistics included the flow-duration values of 90, 75, 50, 25, and 10 percent, as well as the mean flow value. Peak-discharge frequency values were estimated for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods. Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating flow-duration values of 90, 75, 50, 25, and 10 percent and the mean flow for uncontrolled flow stream locations. The contributing-drainage areas of 149 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Kansas and parts of surrounding States that had flow uncontrolled by Federal reservoirs and used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. Logarithmic transformations of climatic and basin data were performed to yield the best linear relation for developing equations to compute flow durations and mean flow. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were contributing-drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. The analyses yielded a model standard error of prediction range of 0.43 logarithmic units for the 90-percent duration analysis to 0.15 logarithmic units for the 10-percent duration analysis. The model standard error of prediction was 0.14 logarithmic units for the mean flow. Regression equations used to estimate peak-discharge frequency values were obtained from a previous report, and estimates for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods were determined for this report. The regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute flow durations, mean flow, and estimates of peak-discharge frequency for locations along uncontrolled flow streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Flow durations, mean