WorldWideScience

Sample records for kansas rural institutions

  1. Prevalence of epilepsy in rural Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablah, Elizabeth; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Liu, Yi; Paschal, Angelia M; Hawley, Suzanne; Thurman, David; Hauser, W Allen

    2014-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of active epilepsy in two southeastern rural Kansas counties. Medical records were abstracted from the emergency rooms, out- and inpatient services and clinics of 9 hospitals, from 10 doctors' offices, and 1 nursing home in and surrounding the two counties. Letters were mailed from hospitals and doctors' offices to invite their potentially eligible patients to participate in an interview. Medical record information and the interview, when available, were used for the final determination of active epilepsy, seizure type, etiology, syndrome, age, and gender in consensus conferences. Prevalence of epilepsy was calculated, and capture-recapture methodology, which estimates prevalence based on what is known about the population, was employed to assess active epilepsy in the two counties. This study identified 404 individuals with active prevalent epilepsy who visited at least one of the 20 facilities during the observation period. The overall prevalence of active epilepsy was 7.2 per 1000. The seizure type for 71.3% of prevalent cases was unknown; among the 76 cases with known and classifiable seizure type, 55.3% had focal with secondary generalized seizures. Among the 222 cases with classifiable etiology, 53.1% were idiopathic/cryptogenic. About 75% (n=301) were captured at only one center, 72% (n=75) of the remaining 103 patients were captured at two centers, and 28 patients were identified at three or more centers. The capture-recapture assessment yielded an estimation of 982 prevalent patients. The overall estimated prevalence of epilepsy in the two Kansas counties using capture-recapture was 17 per 1000. The crude prevalence of epilepsy, using medical record survey methods, was similar to, but on the high end, of other total population prevalence studies in the United States. The capture-recapture assessment suggested that epilepsy prevalence might be considerably higher than the crude prevalence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  2. From Infancy to Adolescence: The Kansas University School of Medicine-Salina: A Rural Medical Campus Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathcart-Rake, William; Robinson, Michael; Paolo, Anthony

    2017-05-01

    The University of Kansas School of Medicine established a rural regional campus in Salina, Kansas, in 2011. The creation of a four-year medical campus of only 32 total students in a town of less than 50,000 inhabitants appeared to contradict all previous practices where medical schools have been situated in large metropolitan cities with student bodies frequently in the hundreds. The rationale to open the Salina campus was to attract medical students with a desire to train in a rural environment, hoping that many would eventually elect to practice primary care in rural Kansas. The authors evaluated the admission demographics, academic performance, campus satisfaction, and graduate medical education choices of students at Kansas University School of Medicine-Salina (KUSM-S) during its first four years of existence. To date, the Salina campus has succeeded in its mission to train students from rural communities in a rural environment to eventually become rural-based physicians. KUSM-S students have adjusted well to the rigors of medical school, have shown steady improvement in academic performance as measured by United States Medical Licensing Examination scores, and have been overwhelmingly positive about the Salina medical education program. The initial cohort of students has now successfully graduated and secured residency training positions, and most KUSM-S graduates are either continuing their training in primary care in Kansas or intend to return to Kansas to practice following residency training.

  3. From Infancy to Adolescence: The Kansas University School of Medicine–Salina: A Rural Medical Campus Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michael; Paolo, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    The University of Kansas School of Medicine established a rural regional campus in Salina, Kansas, in 2011. The creation of a four-year medical campus of only 32 total students in a town of less than 50,000 inhabitants appeared to contradict all previous practices where medical schools have been situated in large metropolitan cities with student bodies frequently in the hundreds. The rationale to open the Salina campus was to attract medical students with a desire to train in a rural environment, hoping that many would eventually elect to practice primary care in rural Kansas. The authors evaluated the admission demographics, academic performance, campus satisfaction, and graduate medical education choices of students at Kansas University School of Medicine–Salina (KUSM-S) during its first four years of existence. To date, the Salina campus has succeeded in its mission to train students from rural communities in a rural environment to eventually become rural-based physicians. KUSM-S students have adjusted well to the rigors of medical school, have shown steady improvement in academic performance as measured by United States Medical Licensing Examination scores, and have been overwhelmingly positive about the Salina medical education program. The initial cohort of students has now successfully graduated and secured residency training positions, and most KUSM-S graduates are either continuing their training in primary care in Kansas or intend to return to Kansas to practice following residency training. PMID:27805948

  4. Kansas Primary Care Weighs In: A Pilot Randomized Trial of a Chronic Care Model Program for Obesity in 3 Rural Kansas Primary Care Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Andrea C.; Banitt, Angela; Befort, Christie; Hou, Qing; Rhode, Paula C.; Grund, Chrysanne; Greiner, Allen; Jeffries, Shawn; Ellerbeck, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Context: Obesity is a chronic disease of epidemic proportions in the United States. Primary care providers are critical to timely diagnosis and treatment of obesity, and need better tools to deliver effective obesity care. Purpose: To conduct a pilot randomized trial of a chronic care model (CCM) program for obesity care in rural Kansas primary…

  5. Availability of emergency contraception in rural and urban pharmacies in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Fernand D; Loren, Rebecca; Downing, Nicki; Schroeppel, Sarah; Kelly, Patricia J; Ramaswamy, Megha

    2013-01-01

    Determine availability of emergency contraception (EC) at rural and urban pharmacies in Kansas. A sample of 201 Kansas pharmacies was selected using a random integer generator. We measured ability to dispense EC within 24 hours and whether it was in stock at the time of the survey call. We examined EC availability based on geographic differences and pharmacy type. Of the sample, 186 pharmacists agreed to be interviewed. Of these, 19% (n = 36) were unable to provide EC within 24 hours. There were essentially no differences in availability of EC between rural (75% could dispense in 24 hours) and urban pharmacies (85% could dispense in 24 hours) (P= .105). Corporate pharmacies were more likely to be able to provide EC within 24 hours compared to independent pharmacies (OR = 3.79, CI 1.71-8.43). Thirty-one percent (n = 57) of pharmacists did not carry EC at the time of the survey call. With this sample, urban pharmacies were more than twice as likely to report carrying EC compared to rural pharmacies (OR = 2.47, CI 1.31-4.68), and corporate pharmacies were also more likely to report carrying EC compared to independent pharmacies (OR = 7.77, CI 3.72-16.21). In a sample of Kansas pharmacies, there were no differences between rural and urban pharmacies in 24-hour EC availability; however, there were differences in those who stocked EC at the time of the survey call. Corporate pharmacies were more likely to dispense EC within 24 hours and have it in stock compared to independent pharmacies, suggesting differences in availability of EC. © 2012 National Rural Health Association.

  6. Empowering Promotores de Salud as partners in cancer education and research in rural southwest Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupertino, Ana Paula; Saint-Elin, Mercedes; de Los Rios, Johana Bravo; Engelman, Kimberly K; Greiner, K Allen; Ellerbeck, Edward F; Nápoles, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    To describe community-based participatory processes used to develop promotore training on cancer research, and to assess the feasibility of training promotores from rural communities to disseminate cancer research information. Prospective, cohort design. Rural communities in the state of Kansas. 34 Spanish-speaking promotores attended an information session; 27 enrolled and 22 completed training. With input from a community advisory board, the authors developed a leadership and cancer curriculum and trained Spanish-speaking promotores to disseminate information on cancer research. Promotores completed pretraining and post-training surveys in Spanish to assess demographic characteristics and changes in knowledge of cancer, cancer treatment and cancer research studies, and intent to participate in cancer research. Cancer knowledge, awareness of cancer clinical trials, interest in participating in cancer clinical research studies. Compared to pretraining, after training, promotores were more likely to correctly define cancer, identify biopsies, describe cancer stages, and report ever having heard of cancer research studies. Completion rates of the training and willingness to participate in cancer research were high, supporting the feasibility of training promotores to deliver community-based education to promote cancer research participation. Nursing professionals and researchers can collaborate with promotores to disseminate cancer education and research among underserved rural Latino communities in Kansas and elsewhere. Members of these communities appear willing and interested in improving their knowledge of cancer and cancer clinical trials.

  7. Smoking Behaviors Among Urban and Rural Pregnant Women Enrolled in the Kansas WIC Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Lisette T; Dong, Frank; Scheuermann, Taneisha S; Redmond, Michelle L; Collins, Tracie C

    2015-10-01

    Smoking during pregnancy is associated with poor birth outcomes. The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is a public nutritional assistance program for low-income pregnant women and their children up to age five. This study examined differences in smoking behavior among women enrolled in the Kansas WIC program. A secondary analysis was conducted using the Pregnancy Nutrition Surveillance System dataset of enrolled women between 2005 and 2011. Geographic residency status was obtained through application of the Census tract-based rural-urban commuting area codes. Chi square tests of association were used to assess differences. Multi-variable binary logistic regression was used to assess maternal characteristics and smoking 3 months prior to pregnancy. Total sample size averaged 21,650 women for years 2005 through 2011. Low-income, rural pregnant women smoked at significantly higher rates before, during, and after pregnancy. High smoking rates have remained unchanged since 2008. The following characteristics were associated with reduced odds of smoking 3 months prior to pregnancy: being 17 years old or younger, Hispanic, a high school graduate, urban location, normal body mass index, no live births prior to current pregnancy, and using multi-vitamins. Results from this study indicate that the WIC population in rural areas may have different needs regarding smoking cessation programming than the urban WIC population. Findings help inform WIC program administrators and assist in enhancing current smoking cessation services to the Kansas WIC population.

  8. Characteristics associated with breastfeeding behaviors among urban versus rural women enrolled in the Kansas WIC program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Lisette T; Twumasi-Ankrah, Philip; Redmond, Michelle L; Ablah, Elizabeth; Hines, Robert B; Johnston, Judy; Collins, Tracie C

    2015-04-01

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) is a public nutritional assistance program for low-income women and their children up to age five. This study provides insight into maternal characteristics associated with breastfeeding among urban versus rural women. A secondary analysis was conducted using the Pregnancy Nutrition Surveillance System dataset of women enrolled in the Kansas WIC program in 2011. Geographic residency status was obtained through application of the Census tract-based rural-urban commuting area codes. Descriptive variables included maternal demographics, health, and lifestyle behaviors. A multivariable binary logistic regression was used to obtain adjusted odds ratios with 95 % confidence intervals. The outcome variable was initiation of breastfeeding. A P value of ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. The total sample size was 17,067 women. Statistically significant differences regarding socio-demographics, program participation, and health behaviors for urban and rural WIC participants were observed. About 74 % of all WIC mothers initiated breastfeeding. Urban women who were Hispanic, aged 18-19, high school graduates, household income >$10,000/year, and started early prenatal care were more likely to breastfeed. Urban and rural women who were non-Hispanic black with some high school education were less likely to breastfeed. Increased breastfeeding initiation rates are the result of a collaborative effort between WIC and community organizations. Availability of prenatal services to rural women is critical in the success of breastfeeding promotion. Findings help inform WIC program administrators and assist in enhancing breastfeeding services to the Kansas WIC population.

  9. Institutional determiners of rural entrepreneurship development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Usyuk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The paper presents the research results that specify current institutional determinants in rural entrepreneurship development. The establishment of rural entrepreneurship is a key factor in rural economy revival, as well as, Ukrainian identity in particular. To reduce the impact of institutional barriers in business development, mandatory would be to consider the existing legal, economic, political, social canons, requirements and regulations. On the one hand, the components hereof will increase business efficiency, and on the other hand they will contribute to opportunistic behavior of economic agents when signing contracts or executing them. Therefore, coordination of external (formal institutions and internal (informal institutional elements will improve the conditions for entrepreneurship development and rise business economic efficiency in particular. The article is aimed at determining institutional impact on the development of rural entrepreneurship and justification of areas in order to overcome barriers of institutional character to form strategic goals of strengthening economic business performance. The results of the analysis. The paper highlights basic premise for creating institutional framework of rural entrepreneurship. It is proposed to consider institutional entrepreneurship environment in rural areas as a specific infrastructure designed to facilitate efficient operations, rapid product turnover, company positive image formation and innovation implementation in economic activity. The main problems of institutional environment in assessing rural entrepreneurship are associated with a limited amount of statistic information. The existing methods do not allow determining of entrepreneurship institutional determinants in rural areas or on that basis to justify innovative directions for each structure further operation. Therefore, the author proposes to use a method of constructing multicorrelation

  10. Rural Electrification in China: History and Institution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wuyuan Peng; Jiahua Pan

    2006-01-01

    China has been highly successful in electrifying rural areas in the past half century.Institutional structure and its reform are important for investment and, therefore,development of rural electrification. Over time, there have been three major institutional changes initiated by the central government; When the People's Republic was founded in 1949, it was short of capital, technology and management professionals to promote rural electrification, so rural electricity had a separate administrative system from the urban areas. From 1949 to 1977, China established a comprehensive vertical system of rural electricity administration under strict central planning. At the end of the 1970s, with the adoption of economic reform policy, the central government handed over the management of the local electricity system to local government. County levelhas proved the most effective implementation unit for both planning and project implementation of the rural electricity system. From 1998 to 2002, the central government has been separating local electricity supply from local governments to facilitate the commercial operation of the utility market.After 2002, the rural electricity system was merged with the urban system, forming an integrated national electricity administrative system in China.

  11. Coordinating rural-urban education and institution innovation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    In order to implement the spirit of the Sixteenth National People's Congress to accelerate development of rural education,deepen reform of rural education, guarantee a well-off society, and harmonize rural and urban development, coordinating ruralurban education is the key to China's development. At present, the rural-urban coordinating education is influenced by many factors,including rural-urban income difference, rural-urban educational resources difference, rural-urban background difference, and ruralurban institutional difference. In order to realize the coordinating development of rural-urban education, we need innovation in "Hukou" institution, land institution, financial institution and rural education institution. Institution innovation would be the guarantee to the coordinating rural-urban education.

  12. Brief Analysis on Institution of Rural Collective Construction Land Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    From the viewpoint of strengthening the government management and control of rural collective construction land transfer,this paper gives relevant definitions and puts forward institution and policy of construction land for township enterprises and rural housing land. It is expected to provide institutional guarantee for standardizing the market order of rural collective construction land use right transfer.

  13. "If the Lord's Willing and the Creek Don't Rise": Flood Control and the Displaced Rural Communities of Irving and Broughton, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    The author examines how the residents of two displaced rural Kansas towns, and their descendants, exhibit a sense of identity common to small farm communities throughout the Great Plains, and how tenacious these ties are even after the physical reminder of their communal bonds no longer exists. By examining the struggles to survive faced by these…

  14. The Rural Institutions in Colombia: Reflections for Analysis and Strengthening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Ropero Beltran

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The rural question is one of the great challenges for institutions in Colombia. The discussion regarding institutional efficiency and effectiveness for the rural sector should be brought forward based on circumstantial aspects that in turn mediate social the social, political, cultural, environmental, economic and productive in the Colombian agriculture, including trade agreements and post-conflict eventually included. The new rurality as an approach to rural development poses a different view about the subject, conceives the rural thing as a multisectorial and multidimensional space, which is the starting point from which arise the elements of analysis that allow advance an institutional debate broad and participatory facing the structural transformation of the rural reality.

  15. Kansas Non-State Road System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset is a single centerline road network representation of 120,000 miles of the Kansas non-state highway system with limited attribution. It includes rural...

  16. Case Study in the Power of Collaboration: Planning Process for the Kansas Educational Leadership Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devin, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the collaborative efforts undertaken for systematic statewide support for the recruitment, development, and retention of quality leaders in schools and school districts in Kansas, USA. The author presents the case of a strong sense of "collaboration" that made the difference and stimulated movement from vision…

  17. Case Study in the Power of Collaboration: Planning Process for the Kansas Educational Leadership Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devin, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the collaborative efforts undertaken for systematic statewide support for the recruitment, development, and retention of quality leaders in schools and school districts in Kansas, USA. The author presents the case of a strong sense of "collaboration" that made the difference and stimulated movement from vision…

  18. The Relative Cost Efficiencies of Commercial Banks, Rural Financial Institutions, and Microfinance Institutions in China

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ya; Escalante, Cesar L.; Gunter, Lewell F.

    2010-01-01

    This study employed data envelopment analysis (DEA) to evaluate the comparative efficiency performance of selected commercial banks, rural financial institutions and microfinance institutions in China. The first pairwise comparison indicated that commercial banks achieved higher level of overall technical efficiency, pure technical efficiency and scale efficiency than rural financial institutions (including RCCs) through the study period (2004-2007). Overall technical inefficiency seems to be...

  19. Drinking Among Rural Youth with Implications for Rural Institutional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassey, Marie; And Others

    During a 3-month period ending in January 1977, questionnaires were given to 889 eighth and twelfth grade students to determine the extent of drinking among rural teenagers in Idaho, and the sociological and psychological factors affecting their drinking habits. At least 16% of 8th graders and 34% of 12th graders drink frequently. A much higher…

  20. Science programs in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P.; Kramer, Ariele R.

    2017-05-08

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is a non-regulatory Earth science agency within the Department of the Interior that provides impartial scientific information to describe and understand the health of our ecosystems and environment; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life. The USGS cooperates with Federal, State, tribal, and local agencies in Kansas to deliver long-term data in real-time and interpretive reports describing what those data mean to the public and resource management agencies. USGS science programs in Kansas provide real-time groundwater monitoring at more than 30 locations; streamflow monitoring at more than 232 locations; water-quality and trends in the Little Arkansas and Kansas Rivers; inflows and outflows of sediment to/from reservoirs and in streams; harmful algal bloom research in the Kansas River, Milford Lake, and Cheney Reservoir; water-quantity and water-quality effects of artificial groundwater recharge for the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery project near Wichita, Kansas; compilation of Kansas municipal and irrigation water-use data statewide; the occurrence, effects, and movement of environmental pesticides, antibiotics, algal toxins, and taste-and-odor compounds; and funding to the Kansas Water Resources Research Institute to further research and education through Kansas universities.

  1. Promoting Rural Development through Chieftaincy Institutions and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose was to provide empirical data on the contribution ... institutions in local governance processes to ensure effective partnership for ..... rehabilitated several health facilities in the district to provide quality health care for the people.

  2. INVESTIGATION OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE IN RURAL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Augustyniak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of the investigation of organisational culture in rural schools. The pool was organized in fall 2004 among 1000 teachers working at primary schools in rural areas of south-eastern Poland and yielded 922 (92,2% correct answers. The questionnaire contained 13 items of various focus concerning the strenght of the organizational culture-related issues, however only 4 of them are analysed in this paper. The stastical analysis of the answers reveals high importance of organizational liaisons for the teaching staff that is expressed by the peode of the school achievement, orginality of educational approaches (75% and also by the knowledge of the history and fame of the institution (87%. Suprisingly, only 65% of responses indicated children as the most important in the school. The paper contains also details on gender, age and habitation of rural teachers.

  3. The Eco-Behavioral Approach to Surveys and Social Accounts for Rural Communities: Exploratory Analyses and Interpretations of Roger G. Barker's Microdata from the Behavior Setting Survey of Midwest, Kansas in 1963-64.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Karl A.

    The concept of behavior settings--the environments shaping individual behavior--was originated by Roger Barker in 1950 in connection with his community surveys in a small Kansas town, code-named Midwest. This book seeks to provide rural social scientists with an understanding of Barker's eco-behavioral approach and proposed adaptations of it to…

  4. Rural credit in Brazil: contrat's evolution at an institutional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Florêncio de Almeida

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines a New Institutional Economics’ approach of rural credit. The mainstream relies in the understanding that the rural credit contracts are hybrid forms in response to the agrichain´s complexity. The object of the research was operational credit contract for soybeans farms. The research consisted on qualitative researches in the extent that they sought to comprehend in a more profound level the rules of game for the rural financing contracting environment based on the economic agent’s perceptions. The results highlighted the agent’s perception that the judicial system is not strong enough to performance an efficient enforcement of the contracts. In response to this institutional challenge, the agents and the government manage adaptations in the contracts, which has been successful in the agent’s point of view. In the other hand, the informational system has showed weaknesses in protecting the creditor’s right. This scenario open breaches to opportunist actions and adverse selection. In order to mitigate these problems the agents govern interdependent transactions as a tool for risk sharing.

  5. Determinants of institutional delivery in rural Jhang, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carton Thomas W

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is expert consensus that delivery at a health facility substantially reduces the risk of maternal death. By increasing the use of antenatal (ANC, postnatal care (PNC and family planning, the risk of maternal death can be further reduced. There has been little investigation of factors associated with the use of these services in Pakistan. Methods A representative household survey was conducted in rural areas of Jhang district, Pakistan, to determine the effect of demographic, economic and program factors on the utilization of maternal health services. Married women who had children ages 12 months or younger were interviewed. Data was collected from 2,018 women on socio-demographic characteristics and the utilization of health services. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify the correlates of health services use. Marginal effects quantify the impact of various factors on service utilization. Results Parity and education had the largest impact on institutional delivery: women were substantially less likely to deliver at a health facility after their first birth; women with primary or higher education were much more likely to have an institutional delivery. Age, autonomy, household wealth, proximity to a health facility and exposure to mass media were also important drivers of institutional delivery. The use of family planning within a year of delivery was low, with parity, education and husband's approval being the strongest determinants of use. Conclusions The findings suggest that rural women are likely to respond to well-designed interventions that remove financial and physical barriers to accessing maternal health services and motivate women by emphasizing the benefits of these services. Interventions should specifically target women who have two or more living children, little formal education and are from the poorest households.

  6. Issues and Answers in the Rural and Small School Education Movement. Annual Rural Education Conference (2nd, Manhattan, Kansas, November 10-11, 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Gerald D., Comp.; Scott, Robert E., Comp.

    Conference papers are clustered into three major categories: background--the past and future; current issues in rural and small school education; and individual and group roles in rural and small school education. Papers in the first category provide an overview of the basic changes in rural education, project a picture of rural education in the…

  7. Development of New Rural Cooperative Economic Organizations from the Perspective of Institutional Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihua; BAI

    2015-01-01

    Appearance of new rural cooperative economic organizations is the result of institutional change and also important institutional arrangement and innovation promoting rural development of China. At present,development of rural cooperative economic organizations is faced with problems of unsmooth operation and management mechanism,lack of supervision mechanism,internal system defect and imperfect law,weak policy support,and imperfect financial system. In this situation,government should take due responsibility from improving legal system,strengthening policy support,deepening rural market reform,and improving rural financial system.

  8. The contribution of rural institutions to rural development: Study of smallholder farmer groups and NGOs in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results from a quantitative analysis of the contribution of nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) and smallholder farmer groups as sample rural institutions in addressing four main rural developmental objectives via improving health, education, agriculture and industry. The study involved 87 respondents from 40 organizations including19 NGOs and 21 smallholder farmer groups from central region of Uganda. Data from questionnaires, focus group discussions, interviews, key inf...

  9. Kansas Electric Transmission Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital representation of the EletcircTransmission lines for the State of Kansas as maintained by the Kansas Corporation Commission. Data is...

  10. Kansas Power Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Power Plants database depicts, as point features, the locations of the various types of power plant locations in Kansas. The locations of the power plants...

  11. Construction of Rural Grass-roots Water Conservancy Service System in the Context of Institutional Changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning WANG

    2015-01-01

    At present,it is urgent to solve problems of reforming and improving grass-roots water conservancy management mode in rural areas and improving rural water conservancy public service ability. Through analyzing institutional changes of grass-roots water conservancy management in rural areas,this paper discussed current situations and outstanding problems in grass-roots water conservancy services in rural areas of Kunming City. On the basis of current situations and problems,it came up with policy recommendations from reform of management institutions,reform of personnel system,construction of human resources,development of rural water use cooperation organizations,and improvement of fund input mechanism,to build rural grass-roots water conservancy service system.

  12. Kansas Playa Wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This digital dataset provides information about the distribution, areal extent, and morphometry of playa wetlands throughout western Kansas. Playa wetlands were...

  13. Facilitating bricolage through more organic institutional designs? The case of water users’ associations in rural Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho Haapala

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study scrutinizes the institutional realities of water project implementation in remote, rural Nepal. It demonstrates that both sound institutional design and local bricolage capabilities are required for sustainable operation and maintenance of local institutions in the challenging operational environment. Institutional bricolage processes are best facilitated through providing locally legitimate, inspiring spaces to local agencies for continued learning, adaptation, and innovation. However, the apparent institutional designs do not explicitly facilitate such bricolage processes. We therefore outline more organic institutional design that accounts for and addresses the interlaced institutional design and bricolage processes in development intervention contexts for advancing more sustainable natural resources management.

  14. An Appraisal of the Institutional Structure of Rural Tourism in Malaysia: A Conceptual Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo-Ee GAN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This conceptual paper seeks to examine the institutional obstacles that affect rural tourism in Malaysia. Identifying the government institutions involved in the planning and development of rural tourism is itself problematic. The jurisdictions of federal agencies and state agencies may overlap, thus resulting in haphazard planning and mismatched objectives. Studies on this area are limited and have become outmoded due to the shifting governmental landscape in the country. The jurisdictional boundaries of various institutions continue to change, thus causing a gap in the identification of responsible government agencies and their corresponding portfolios. An institutional appraisal of rural tourism in Malaysia is therefore necessary. In this regard, the effectiveness of governmental institutions should be evaluated in terms of (a the promotion of environmentally sustainable rural tourism; (b the protection of host community interests; and (c facilitating the effective enforcement of laws and regulations pertaining to rural tourism. The conceptual framework facilitates the development of a responsible rural tourism institutional framework at local, state and national levels.

  15. The Power Within: Institution-Based Leadership Development Programs in Rural Community Colleges in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbini, Jaleh T.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine institution-based leadership development programs in rural community colleges in Illinois, and the impact of these programs in supporting and preparing future community college leaders. The study also explored the efficacy of these programs and whether their implementation aligns with the institutions'…

  16. Education and Equity in Rural America: 1984 and Beyond. Proceedings of the Annual Rural and Small Schools Conference (6th, Manhattan, Kansas, October 29-30, 1984).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Jerry, Ed.; Davis, Patricia, Ed.

    The proceedings consist of the entire major addresses of Senator Nancy Landon Kassebaum, Steve Miller, and Walter Turner, and abbreviated versions of 29 other papers or presentations. The materials deal with a variety of rural-focused topics: women (Evelyn Hausmann); teacher career ladder plans (Paul Burden); inservice (Robert Norton, Myron…

  17. Rural local institutions and climate change adaptation in forest communities in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Carolyn Peach Brown

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Surveys and interviews were used to understand community resilience in forest-dependent communities facing climate change in Cameroon. Surveys of 232 individuals showed a diversity of formal and informal institutions that relate to most aspects of rural life. Although direct activities related to climate change adaptation were limited, the activities and density of membership in rural local institutions could increase the community's adaptive capacity. Twenty-six semistructured interviews were also conducted with representatives of diverse local institutions who had some responsibility for agriculture, forests, conservation, or development. Local governmental institutions had not received any information from the national level and were limited in their knowledge of how to help communities respond to climate change. Although limited in their direct action on climate change, local nongovernmental organizations and international institutions act as bridging institutions with rural communities and could facilitate sharing of knowledge and innovation, thereby fostering resilience. Planning for climate change adaptation in Cameroon needs to build the capacity of diverse local institutions and improve the relationships between local and national-level adaptation planning.

  18. Kansas Cartographic Database (KCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Cartographic Database (KCD) is an exact digital representation of selected features from the USGS 7.5 minute topographic map series. Features that are...

  19. Kansas LPC CRI Protocol

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Inventory and Monitoring: 2015-2019 Kansas Lesser Prairie-Chicken Cooperative Recovery Initiative. The Kansas Lesser prairie-chicken (LPC) Cooperative Recovery...

  20. Kansas TV facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This layer shows the location of all Kansas Title V sources (Clean Air Act major sources). Source information came from Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

  1. Kansas Rivers TMDL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set includes all the streams in the Kansas 2006 Water Register that have established TMDLs as of October 17, 2006. The impairments and implementation...

  2. Rural Governance, Community Empowerment and the New Institutionalism: A Case Study of the Isle of Wight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David; Southern, Rebekah; Beer, Julian

    2007-01-01

    This article compares two different institutional models--state-sponsored rural partnerships and community-based development trusts--for engaging and empowering local communities in area-based regeneration, using the Isle of Wight as a case study. Following a critical review of the literature on community governance, we evaluate the effectiveness…

  3. Institutional Innovation for Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Resources Management: Changing the rules of the game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santamaria Guerra, J.

    2003-01-01

    This study was carried out to critically examine the state of the art of institutional innovation and to identify the theories of action informing it in rural research and development (R&D) organisations.The study was carried out in three cases. The selected case studies are different in their organ

  4. Predictors of Bachelor's Degree Completion among Rural Students at Four-Year Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Soo-yong; Irvin, Matthew J.; Meece, Judith L.

    2012-01-01

    Using the National Education Longitudinal Study, this study explored various factors that predicted bachelor's degree attainment among rural youth attending a four-year institution. Results showed that Hispanic origin, family income, parental educational expectations, the rigor of the high school curriculum, timing and intensity of college…

  5. Rural Community College Initiative IV: Capacity for Leading Institutional and Community Change. AACC Project Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Ronald; Martinez, Ruben; Pace, Cynthia; Pavel, Michael; Barnett, Lynn

    This brief reports on the Ford Foundation's establishment of the Rural Community College Initiative (RCCI) for selected institutions in economically distressed areas of the Southeast, Deep South, Southwest, Appalachia, and western Indian reservations. This is the fourth report in a series by the RCCI Documentation Team. The RCCI program challenges…

  6. Institutional Innovation for Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Resources Management: Changing the rules of the game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santamaria Guerra, J.

    2003-01-01

    This study was carried out to critically examine the state of the art of institutional innovation and to identify the theories of action informing it in rural research and development (R&D) organisations.The study was carried out in three cases. The selected case studies are different in their

  7. Bridging political economy analysis and critical institutionalism: an approach to help analyse institutional change for rural water services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen David Jones

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that approaches to understanding local institutionsfor natural resource management based on “critical institutionalism” (Cleaver2012, which emphasises the importance of improvisation and adaptationacross different scales, can be placed within broader political economy analysisframeworks for assessing challenges in public services delivery from national tolocal levels. The paper uses such an extended political economy analysis approachto understand the role of the international NGO WaterAid and its partners in Mali inrelation to institutions for financing rural water services, drawing on collaborativeresearch undertaken in 2010 and 2011. The case study shows that WaterAid’sapproach can be understood through elements of both mainstream and criticalinstitutionalist thinking. At local government level, WaterAid primarily promotesformal institutional arrangements, which exhibit the challenge of “reforms assignals” (Andrews 2013, where institutional reforms appear to happen but lackthe intended function. However, the work of WaterAid’s partners at communitylevel supports processes of “institutional bricolage” through which they try togradually work with local actors to find ways of ‘best fit’ for financing rural waterservices which adapt existing local practices into new arrangements.

  8. Study on the Influence of Informal institution on Rural Legal Construction in Northwest Ethnic Minority Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junlin; DU

    2015-01-01

    The Informal institution in Northwest Ethnic Minority Region has dual effects on rural legal construction. In the process of rural legal construction,it can make up for the defects of formal institution to reduce the cost of legal construction,and increase benefit. It also has negative influence on social function,and can’t be conducive to the social stability,development and harmony. Civil law is to be more valued,thus avoiding and hampering the implementation of national laws and even covering the operation of national laws,so it is impossible to achieve rule of law. The coordinated development of Informal institution and socio-economic development in Northwest Ethnic Minority Region will contribute to stable and harmonious social development in Northwest Region.

  9. Medicaid managed care for mental health services: the survival of safety net institutions in rural settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willging, Cathleen E; Waitzkin, Howard; Nicdao, Ethel

    2008-09-01

    Few accounts document the rural context of mental health safety net institutions (SNIs), especially as they respond to changing public policies. Embedded in wider processes of welfare state restructuring, privatization has transformed state Medicaid systems nationwide. We carried out an ethnographic study in two rural, culturally distinct regions of New Mexico to assess the effects of Medicaid managed care (MMC) and the implications for future reform. After 160 interviews and participant observation at SNIs, we analyzed data through iterative coding procedures. SNIs responded to MMC by nonparticipation, partnering, downsizing, and tapping into alternative funding sources. Numerous barriers impaired access under MMC: service fragmentation, transportation, lack of cultural and linguistic competency, Medicaid enrollment, stigma, and immigration status. By privatizing Medicaid and contracting with for-profit managed care organizations, the state placed additional responsibilities on "disciplined" providers and clients. Managed care models might compromise the rural mental health safety net unless the serious gaps and limitations are addressed in existing services and funding.

  10. Cancer outcomes research in a rural area: a multi-institution partnership model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael; Almon, Lyn; Bayakly, Rana; Butler, Susan; Crosby, Carol; DiIorio, Colleen; Ekwueme, Donatus; Fletcher, Diane; Fowler, John; Gillespie, Theresa; Glanz, Karen; Hall, Ingrid; Lee, Judith; Liff, Jonathan; Lipscomb, Joseph; Pollack, Lori A; Richardson, Lisa C; Roberts, Phillip; Steenland, Kyle; Ward, Kevin

    2009-02-01

    Whereas, most cancer research data come from high-profile academic centers, little is known about the outcomes of cancer care in rural communities. We summarize the experience of building a multi-institution partnership to develop a cancer outcomes research infrastructure in Southwest Georgia (SWGA), a primarily rural 33-county area with over 700,000 residents. The partnership includes eight institutions: the Emory University in Atlanta, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Georgia Comprehensive Center Registry (the Registry), the Southwest Georgia Cancer Coalition (the Coalition), and the four community cancer centers located within the SWGA region. The practical application of the partnership model, its organizational structure, and lessons learned are presented using two specific examples: a study evaluating treatment decisions and quality of life among prostate cancer patients, and a study of treatment discontinuation among prostate, breast, lung, and colorectal cancer patients. Our partnership model allowed us to (1) use the Coalition as a link between Atlanta-based researchers and local community; (2) collaborate with the area cancer centers on day-to-day study activities; (3) involve the Registry personnel and resources to identify eligible cancer cases and to perform data collection; and (4) raise community awareness and sense of study ownership through media announcements organized by the Coalition. All of the above activities were performed in consultation with the funding institution (CDC) and its project directors who oversee several other studies addressing similar research questions throughout the country. Our partnership model may provide a useful framework for cancer outcomes research projects in rural communities.

  11. LOCAL RURAL DEVELOPMENT, INSTITUTIONAL INACTION AND THE TRAGEDY OF LOCAL PUBLIC GOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo CANNARELLA

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Empirical observation can confirm that not all rural communities enjoy an optimal level of local public goods: some public goods are provided more often and in a better quality than others. Given the vital importance of public goods for the welfare of local communities (among which the management of the local natural resource base for sustainable development plays a relevant role, the relation between existing local political institutions and their competences represents a critical issue for the concrete possibilities to properly produce, manage and provide local public goods. A better understanding of the nature of local public goods may increase the awareness of interdependence between local economic, environmental and social development not only in order to stop their continuing eroding but also to increase the possibility to produce local public goods and to design the institutional setting to overcome generic problems of public goods provision.

  12. Institutional delivery in rural India: the relative importance of accessibility and economic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesterton, Amy J; Cleland, John; Sloggett, Andy; Ronsmans, Carine

    2010-06-06

    Skilled attendance at delivery is an important indicator in monitoring progress towards Millennium Development Goal 5 to reduce the maternal mortality ratio by three quarters between 1990 and 2015. In addition to professional attention, it is important that mothers deliver their babies in an appropriate setting, where life saving equipment and hygienic conditions can also help reduce the risk of complications that may cause death or illness to mother and child. Over the past decade interest has grown in examining influences on care-seeking behavior and this study investigates the determinants of place of delivery in rural India, with a particular focus on assessing the relative importance of community access and economic status. A descriptive analysis of trends in place of delivery using data from two national representative sample surveys in 1992 and 1998 is followed by a two-level (child/mother and community) random-effects logistical regression model using the second survey to investigate the determinants. In this investigation of institutional care seeking for child birth in rural India, economic status emerges as a more crucial determinant than access. Economic status is also the strongest influence on the choice between a private-for-profit or public facility amongst institutional births. Greater availability of obstetric services will not alone solve the problem of low institutional delivery rates. This is particularly true for the use of private-for-profit institutions, in which the distance to services does not have a significant adjusted effect. In the light of these findings a focus on increasing demand for existing services seems the most rational action. In particular, financial constraints need to be addressed, and results support current trials of demand side financing in India.

  13. Public Sector Education Institution's Analysis: A Way Forward to Curtail Rural-Regional Education Accessibility Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Aftab Hussain Talpur

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The availability of accessible educational facilities is essential for the better rural education. However, because of the huge population, lack of resources and absence of proper policy plans; the distance between educational facilities and rural communities is mounting as time progresses. These sorts of problematic circumstances put damaging effects on education standards and become responsible for the declining literacy rate. Hence, the goal of this research is to investigate the lack of educational institutions with respect to indigenous standards. Therefore, in this study, the dearth of education institutions was determined for the one of the most deprived sub-regions of Pakistan, i.e. Badin. The data were collected through observations, questionnaire survey, and from secondary sources, like census report and other pertinent public sector documents. The outcome of this study can be taken as an input to develop policy plans, targeting the education accessibility issues of backward communities. This research could show a guiding-path to local planning agencies, as these can come-up with the policy plans to trounce the education accessibility issues from the bucolic sub-regions of developing countries

  14. HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION AS A SUBJECT OF ADAPTATION OF RURAL STUDENTS TO THE TERMS OF THE CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyona Aleksandrovna Antipova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the difficulties of adaptation of rural students to the various spheres of life of the modern city. These difficulties are considered as a field of activity of higher educational institution, acting as the subject of adaptation of students coming to study from rural areas to the terms of the city. The authors ' point of view on this issue is substantiated by the analysis of data of several sociological surveys conducted in various regions of theRussian Federation. Also the experience of assistance in adaptation of the Mordovia state University named after N. P. Ogarev of the city ofSaransk, which is the largest in the Republic of Mordovia University and which accommodates a large number of rural youth. The relevance and scientific novelty of research consists in allocation of areas of adaptation support of students from rural areas by the higher educational institution.

  15. Who wants to work in a rural health post? The role of intrinsic motivation, rural background and faith-based institutions in Ethiopia and Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serneels, Pieter; Montalvo, Jose G; Pettersson, Gunilla; Lievens, Tomas; Butera, Jean Damascene; Kidanu, Aklilu

    2010-05-01

    To understand the factors influencing health workers' choice to work in rural areas as a basis for designing policies to redress geographic imbalances in health worker distribution. A cohort survey of 412 nursing and medical students in Rwanda provided unique contingent valuation data. Using these data, we performed a regression analysis to examine the determinants of future health workers' willingness to work in rural areas as measured by rural reservation wages. These data were also combined with those from an identical survey in Ethiopia to enable a two-country analysis. Health workers with higher intrinsic motivation - measured as the importance attached to helping the poor - as well as those who had grown up in a rural area and Adventists who had participated in a local bonding scheme were all significantly more willing to work in a rural area. The main result for intrinsic motivation in Rwanda was strikingly similar to the result obtained for Ethiopia and Rwanda combined. Intrinsic motivation and rural origin play an important role in health workers' decisions to work in a rural area, in addition to economic incentives, while faith-based institutions can also influence the decision.

  16. Ecoregions of Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a...

  17. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, Kansas River Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Upper Kansas River Watershed Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period as part of a...

  18. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, Kansas River Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  19. Kansas Road Centerline Fle (KRCF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This version of the Kansas Road Centerline File (0801) represents the first effort to create a statewide roads layer from best available data sources. KGS integrated...

  20. Community Development as an Approach to Community Engagement in Rural-Based Higher Education Institutions in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netshandama, V. O.

    2010-01-01

    The premise of this article is that the "jury is still out" to describe what effective Community Engagement entails in South African higher education institutions. The current discussions about community engagement and service learning do not cover the primary objective of adding value to the community, particularly of the rural-based…

  1. 农村金融生态环境与新型农村金融机构脆弱性%The Fragility of Rural Financial Ecological Environment and New-type Rural Financial Institutions' Based on SEM Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何颖媛

    2013-01-01

    农村金融生态环境是新型农村金融机构生存和发展的环境基础.为了深入揭示农村金融生态环境对新型农村金融机构脆弱性的影响程度,在分析农村金融生态环境属性构成基础上,构建了农村金融生态环境与新型农村金融机构脆弱性的关系模型,并在问卷调查基础上运用结构方程模型进行实证检验,研究结果表明:除了农村法律环境的影响假设未得到支持外,农村经济环境、农村金融环境、农村政策环境和农村信用环境在降低新型农村金融机构脆弱性方面有显著正向影响.%Rural financial ecological environment provides the basis for the existence and development of new-type rural financial institutions. In order to reveal how much the rural financial ecological environment has influenced the fragility of new-type rural financial institutions this paper, based on an analysis of the components of rural financial ecological environment, constructs a relation model between the rural financial ecological environment and the new-type rural financial Institutions' fragility. SEM is used to analyze the questionnaires. The result proves that rural financial ecological environment consists of five parts: except rural legal environment, rural economic environment, rural financial environment, rural policy environment, rural legal environment and rural credit environment all have a significant positive effect on New-type rural financial Institutions' fragility.

  2. Contributing institutional factors of rural environmental pollution in the process of modernization in China——In the perspecpective of the efficiency of environmental management system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang SU; Ye QI; Zhouyan XIAO; Yu WEI

    2009-01-01

    With the development of rural pollution, its characteristic and institutional factor should be studied for pollution control through economics and sociology.Based on the data gathered from investigations by several government sectors, rural environmental pollution can be divided into two types by its sources: internal source type and external source type. The internal source type is the main component of rural pollution at present, which can be further divided into three types. Research shows that the contributing institutional factors of rural pollution issues and the effectiveness of environmental management system over rural pollution can be summarized as distinc-tiveness. In essence, the rural pollution issue results from the dualism of rural and urban areas' inadaptability to rural modernization. In detail, the contributing factors can be summed up on three institutional levels. There are obvious loopholes in rural environmental manage-ment system which, in the meantime, is incapable and inadaptable to rural pollution control. There exist similar questions in the related public service system, which are intensified by inappropriate reform which brought about incompatible incentive in the recent years. However, in the eleventh five-year plan period, there are advantageous trends in the three institutional levels.

  3. Forests of Kansas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.M. Meneguzzo; B.J. Butler

    2014-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on annual inventories conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station (NRS) of the U.S. Forest Service. The estimates presented in this update are based on field data collected in 2009-2013 with comparisons made to data collected from...

  4. Kansas' Forest Resources, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; M.H. Hansen; R.L. Atchison

    2008-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  5. Forests of Kansas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.M. Meneguzzo; S.J. Crocker

    2015-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on annual inventories conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station (NRS) of the U.S. Forest Service. The estimates presented in this update are based on field data collected in 2010-2014 with comparisons made to data collected from...

  6. Kansas' forest resources, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; P.D. Miles; R.A. Atchison

    2013-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  7. Kansas' forest resources, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; C.H. Barnett; C.M. Kurtz; R.A. Atchison

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  8. Kansas' forest resources, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; M.H. Hansen; C.H. Barnett; R.A. Atchison

    2010-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  9. Kansas' forest resources, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.K. Moser; D.E. Haugen; R.A. Atchison

    2012-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Kansas based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  10. Sexting in Kansas Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Dale R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an exploratory study about sexting, the sending of sexually explicit or illicit photos or video between cell phones, in Kansas public schools. An on-line survey asked superintendents to report if they have had an occurrence of sexting in their district. They were also asked if they felt sexting is currently a problem in their…

  11. Influence of Rural Land Institutional Reform on Urbanization During the 13th Five-Year Plan Period:A Case Study of Jiangsu Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen; Xiaohui; Qian; Fang

    2016-01-01

    The rural land institutions have confined the process of China’s urbanization for a long time. During the 13 th Five-Year Plan period, the Chinese government will push forward a new round of rural land institutional reform, so as to promote the restructuring of current rural land use pattern, change related elements concerning urbanization, and realize the transformation of the urbanization mode. Taking Jiangsu Province, a comprehensive pilot site of new urbanization at the provincial level in China, as an example, the paper summarizes the practical experience of rural land institutional reform in Jiangsu during recent years. Further, through analyzing the influence of rural land institutional reform on the urbanization process of Jiangsu Province during the 13 th Five-Year Plan period, the paper puts forward some policy measures, with the hope of providing a lasting impetus for the new urbanization in Jiangsu Province as well as a reference for other provinces in China.

  12. Collaboration Among Institutions to Bring Geospatial Technology to an Underserved Rural Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T.

    2012-12-01

    The University of Maine at Machias and Washington County Community College, the two smallest and most remote public institutions in Maine, provide important education and workforce development services in a rural and economically-challenged region. Through an innovative collaboration supported by the National Science Foundation, the two institutions have developed geospatial technology (GST) programs designed to meet the specific workforce needs of the region, affording students with the opportunity to pursue degrees, certificates and minors. Prior to this effort, neither school had the resources to maintain a GST laboratory or to offer courses consistently. The region had almost no GST capacity with which to manage critical environmental resources and grapple with economic, public safety, and public health challenges. Several statewide studies had shown a growing need for more GST technicians and training for incumbent workers. The new programs are designed to produce a small number of specialist technicians with associate's degrees and a large number of ancillary users with significant GST expertise from courses, certificates or minors. Course content is shaped by workforce research in Maine and elsewhere, and all courses are offered in either blended, online or short-term intensive formats to provide access to incumbent workers and extend the geographic reach of the programs. Through the university's Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Service Center, students from both institutions engage in real-world projects, and are linked with employers via internships. This has the added plus of providing low-cost and no-cost GIS services to area clients, generating demand. Many of these projects and internships lead to work for graduates, even through the economic downturn. By creating courses that serve multiple audiences, each contributing a small number to the total enrollment, the programs constitute a sustainable model that serves the growing needs of the region

  13. Prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablah, Elizabeth; Dong, Frank; Cupertino, Ana Paula; Konda, Kurt; Johnston, Judy A; Collins, Tracie

    2013-01-01

    The study objective was to determine the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes among rural and urban populations in Kansas. This study utilized 2009 BRFSS data and included 18,912 respondents. Participants were identified through a stratified random sample of adult Kansans, living in a non-institutionalized setting, and with access to a land-based telephone line. Analyses were conducted using SAS to provide descriptive statistics for groups based on diabetes status. A logistic regression was conducted to explore significant variables associated with the likelihood of diabetes. Diabetes prevalence was lower among urban (11.8%) populations than rural (12.7%) areas of Kansas, but the inverse was true for pre-diabetes (3.7% urban, 3.1% in rural). Lower income and lower levels of educational attainment were associated with increased rates of diabetes and pre-diabetes, with the highest prevalence levels overall found among rural Latinos (19.3%) and urban African Americans (22.9%). Multivariate regression suggests that age, income, ethnicity, education, sex, rural vs urban status, and race all served as significant predicators of diabetes, net of other factors. Rural residents were more likely than urban residents to report having diabetes, whereas urban residents were more likely than rural residents to report having pre-diabetes. Although rural vs urban status played a significant role in the model's predicative ability for diabetes and pre-diabetes diagnosis, increased age was by far the most significant factor in diabetes and pre-diabetes diagnosis.

  14. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenbacher, Don [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  15. Kansas forests 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Keith Moser; Mark H. Hansen; Robert L. Atchison; Gary J. Brand; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Mark D. Nelson; Charles H. Perry; William H. IV Reading; Barry T. Wilson; Christopher W. Woodall

    2008-01-01

    The first completed annual inventory of Kansas forests reports 2.1 million acres of forest land, roughly 4 percent of the total land area in the State. Softwood forests account for nearly 5 percent of the total timberland area. Oak/hickory forest types make up 56 percent of the total hardwood forest land area. Elm/ash/cottonwood accounts for more than 30 percent of the...

  16. Kansas' Forests 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Keith Moser; Mark H. Hansen; Robert L. Atchison; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Grant Domke; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Andrew Lister; Patrick D. Miles; Mark D. Nelson; Ronald J. Piva; Christopher W. Woodall

    2013-01-01

    The second completed annual inventory of Kansas' forests reports 2.4 million acres of forest land, roughly 5 percent of the total land area in the State. Softwood forests account for 4.4 percent of the total timberland area. Oak/hickory forest types make up 55 percent of the total hardwood forest land area. Elm/ash/cottonwood accounts for more than 32 percent of...

  17. Educational Equity and Institutional Safeguards: An Analysis of Compulsory Education for Chinese Rural Migrant Workers' Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xianzuo; Peng, Pai

    2008-01-01

    The educational inequity of rural workers' children is a unique social problem in the transition stage of China. Based on the specific survey in such provinces as Hubei, Henan, Anhui, and other provinces, a conclusion can be drawn that the reasons for the educational inequity of rural worker's children are very complicated, among which the system…

  18. KANSAS WIND POWERING AMERICAN STATE OUTREACH: KANSAS WIND WORKING GROUP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAMMARLUND, RAY

    2010-10-27

    The Kansas Wind Working Group (WWG) is a 33-member group announced by former Governor Kathleen Sebelius on Jan. 7, 2008. Formed through Executive Order 08-01, the WWG will educate stakeholder groups with the current information on wind energy markets, technologies, economics, policies, prospects and issues. Governor Mark Parkinson serves as chair of the Kansas Wind Working Group. The group has been instrumental in focusing on the elements of government and coordinating government and private sector efforts in wind energy development. Those efforts have moved Kansas from 364 MW of wind three years ago to over 1000 MW today. Further, the Wind Working Group was instrumental in fleshing out issues such as a state RES and net metering, fundamental parts of HB 2369 that was passed and is now law in Kansas. This represents the first mandatory RES and net metering in Kansas history.

  19. Archeological Investigations at the Cow-Killer Site, 140S347, Melvern Lake, Kansas, 1974-1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    Keith focus as an MTS unit on the basis of sites excavated in the Medicine Creek reservoir, Hitchcock county, Nebraska, and Phillips county, Kansas (1949a...Kansas. Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 189, River Basin Surveys Papers 38:319-370. Johnson, Alfred E. 1968 Archaeological...settlement system, in Hopewellian archaeology in the Lower Missouri river valley, ed. by Alfred E. Johnson. University of Kansas, Pub ications in Anthropology

  20. Comparative analysis of the expected demands for nursing care services among older people from urban, rural, and institutional environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borowiak E

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ewa Borowiak,1,2,* Joanna Kostka,3,* Tomasz Kostka1 1Department of Geriatrics, Medical University of Lodz, Poland; 2Institute of Nursing, Medical University of Lodz, Poland; 3Department of Physical Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Poland *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Demand for nursing and social services may vary depending on the socio-demographic variables, health status, receipt of formal and informal care provided, and place of residence. Objectives: To conduct a comparative analysis of the expectations of older people from urban, rural, and institutional environments concerning nursing care with respect to the care provided and elements of a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Material and methods: The study comprised 2,627 individuals above the age of 65 years living in urban (n=935 and rural (n=812 areas as well as nursing homes (n=880. Results: Family care was most often expected both in urban (56.6% and rural (54.7% environments, followed by care provided simultaneously by a family and nurse (urban – 18.8%; rural – 26.1% and realized only by a nurse (urban – 24.6%; rural – 19.2%. Not surprisingly, nursing home residents most commonly expected nursing care (57.5% but 33.1% preferred care provided by family or friends and neighbors. In the whole cohort of people living in the home environment (n=1,718, those living with family demonstrated willingness to use primarily care implemented by the family (62.0%, while respondents living alone more often expected nursing services (30.3%. In the logistic regression model, among the respondents living in the city, only the form of care already received determined the expectations for nursing care. Among the respondents living in the county, the presence of musculoskeletal disorders, better nutritional status, and current care provided by family decreased expectations for nursing care. Higher cognitive functioning, symptoms of depression, and living alone

  1. THE ROLE OF MICRO FINANCIAL INSTITUTION TO IMPROVE SOCIO-ECONOMIC OF THE RURAL COMMUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Aziz Arisudi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Micro f inancial inst itut ion had an important role to improve the socio-economicof the rural communit ies. However, in its effort , the result in improving the socio-economicof the rural communit ies, part icularly among the poor is st ill low. The access for the ruralcommunit ies for low interest credit was also limited. The object ives of this research were asfollows. First , to analyze the factors that drove the rural communit ies to borrow money f rommicro credit inst itut ions. Second, to analyze the role of micro credit inst itut ions and itsimpacts on the rural communit ies’ socio-economic, Third, to analyze the rural communit ies’coping st rategies, Fourth, to evaluate the rural communit ies’ percept ions on micro creditinterest rate. This research used both qualitat ive and quant itat ive methods. The results ofthis research were as follows. First , the factors causing rural communit ies to borrow moneyf rom micro credit inst itut ions were to cover their living cost , provision and addit ion of capital.The micro credit inst itut ion had considerably lower interest rate than rentener, and theprocedures were simple and fast . Second, the role of micro credit inst itut ions to improve therural communit ies socio-economic was st ill low. Third, the interest rate of the micro creditinst itut ions was comparably fair and lower than the unlicensed micro bank.

  2. The Development of the Institution of School Counselors in Rural Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurianova, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Two decades of experience with the use of school counselors in rural areas of Russia has demonstrated their necessity in supporting students, but their further development and increasing effectiveness requires a significant increase in resources provided to them.

  3. The Galatia, Kansas, chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schmus, W. R.; Keil, K.; Lange, D. E.; Conrad, G. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the Galatia meteorite found August 1971 approximately 7 km ENE of Galatia, Barton County, Kansas (98 deg 53 min W, 38 deg 39.5 min N). The single stone weighed 23.9 kg and is partially weathered. Olivine (Fa 24.9) and pyroxene (Fs 20.9) compositions indicate L-group classification, and textural observations indicate that the stone is of petrologic type 6. While Galatia is similar in many respects to the Otis L6 chondrite found 20 miles to the west, Galatia does not have the brecciated structure of Otis and is therefore not part of the same fall.

  4. Comparative analysis of the expected demands for nursing care services among older people from urban, rural, and institutional environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiak, Ewa; Kostka, Joanna; Kostka, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background Demand for nursing and social services may vary depending on the socio-demographic variables, health status, receipt of formal and informal care provided, and place of residence. Objectives To conduct a comparative analysis of the expectations of older people from urban, rural, and institutional environments concerning nursing care with respect to the care provided and elements of a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Material and methods The study comprised 2,627 individuals above the age of 65 years living in urban (n=935) and rural (n=812) areas as well as nursing homes (n=880). Results Family care was most often expected both in urban (56.6%) and rural (54.7%) environments, followed by care provided simultaneously by a family and nurse (urban – 18.8%; rural – 26.1%) and realized only by a nurse (urban – 24.6%; rural – 19.2%). Not surprisingly, nursing home residents most commonly expected nursing care (57.5%) but 33.1% preferred care provided by family or friends and neighbors. In the whole cohort of people living in the home environment (n=1,718), those living with family demonstrated willingness to use primarily care implemented by the family (62.0%), while respondents living alone more often expected nursing services (30.3%). In the logistic regression model, among the respondents living in the city, only the form of care already received determined the expectations for nursing care. Among the respondents living in the county, the presence of musculoskeletal disorders, better nutritional status, and current care provided by family decreased expectations for nursing care. Higher cognitive functioning, symptoms of depression, and living alone increased the willingness to obtain nursing care. Conclusion Older inhabitants of urban areas, rural areas, and those residing in institutions have different expectations for individual nursing care. Nearly 45% of seniors living in the community expect to obtain nursing care, while only 1.6% do not

  5. How infrastructure and financial institutions affect rural income and poverty: evidence from Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandker, Shahidur R; Koolwal, Gayatri B

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the poor benefit from economic growth remain a topic of debate in development literature. We address this issue in the context of rural Bangladesh, using a pooled dataset of three household panels between 1991-2001. Expansion of irrigation, paved roads, electricity, and access to formal and informal credit have (through different veins) led to higher rural farm and non-farm incomes, accounting for exogenous local agroclimatic endowments that explain a large part of the variation in the growth of infrastructure and credit programmes. However, this has not translated into substantial reductions in poverty for the poorest households.

  6. Leadership for Sustainable Regional Development in Rural Areas: Bridging Personal and Institutional Aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, L.G.; Padt, F.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid transformations offer new challenges for rural regions to invent new pathways for development. For many, an obvious choice is to set out on the path towards economic growth and to compete with other regions for global, mobile capital and labor. There is however an increasing awareness that in

  7. Families in Troubled Times: Adapting to Change in Rural America. Social Institutions and Social Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Rand D.; Elder, Glen H., Jr.

    In Iowa in the 1980s, dreams of prosperity were suddenly replaced by economic nightmares as plummeting land values generated economic decline and dislocation in rural communities and individual lives. This book examines the experience of over 400 Iowa families who lived through the Great Farm Crisis and now face an uncertain future. Interviewed as…

  8. Prospects for China's Rural Vocational Education and the Role of Higher Agricultural Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzi, Peng; Xianguang, Liu

    The 1980s saw significant development in China's rural vocational education and the continuation of some problems. Most Chinese secondary (92 percent) and postsecondary (82 percent) students are educated in the countryside. However, only 60 percent of vocational high school students are educated there. There is insufficient enrollment at many…

  9. Leadership for Sustainable Regional Development in Rural Areas: Bridging Personal and Institutional Aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, L.G.; Padt, F.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid transformations offer new challenges for rural regions to invent new pathways for development. For many, an obvious choice is to set out on the path towards economic growth and to compete with other regions for global, mobile capital and labor. There is however an increasing awareness that in

  10. Maternal and perinatal outcomes of rupture uterus at rural tertiary care institution: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Singh

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: Incidence of rupture is very high in our rural tertiary center. Mortality and complications due to rupture can be decreased by regular antenatal visits, early referral, taking timely and active interventions and blood transfusions. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(7.000: 2233-2238

  11. The Permian system in Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Rocks of Permian age in Kansas were first recognized in 1895, and by the early 21st century the internationally accepted boundary between the Permian and the...

  12. 2010 Kansas bobwhite status report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a brief description of bobwhite population trends in Kansas over the last 30+ years. At the time of this report most of the 2010 surveys...

  13. Integrated model of primary and secondary eye care for underserved rural areas: the L V Prasad Eye Institute experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gullapalli N; Khanna, Rohit C; Athota, Sashi Mohan; Rajshekar, Varda; Rani, Padmaja Kumari

    2012-01-01

    Blindness is a major global public health problem and recent estimates from World Health Organization (WHO) showed that in India there were 62 million visually impaired, of whom 8 million are blind. The Andhra Pradesh Eye Disease Study (APEDS) provided a comprehensive estimate for prevalence and causes of blindness for the state of Andhra Pradesh (AP). It also highlighted that uptake of services was also an issue, predominantly among lower socio-economic groups, women, and rural populations. On the basis of this analysis, L V Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI) developed a pyramidal model of eye care delivery. This article describes the LVPEI eye care delivery model. The article discusses infrastructure development, human resource development, and service delivery (including prevention and promotion) in the context of primary and secondary care service delivery in rural areas. The article also alludes to opportunities for research at these levels of service delivery and the amenability of the evidence generated at these levels of the LVPEI eye health pyramid for advocacy and policy planning. In addition, management issues related to the sustainability of service delivery in rural areas are discussed. The article highlights the key factors required for the success of the LVPEI rural service delivery model and discusses challenges that need to be overcome to replicate the model. The article concludes by noting the potential to convert these challenges into opportunities by integrating certain aspects of the existing healthcare system into the model. Examples include screening of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy in order to promote higher community participation. The results of such integration can serve as evidence for advocacy and policy.

  14. Integrated model of primary and secondary eye care for underserved rural areas: The L V Prasad Eye Institute experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gullapalli N Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Blindness is a major global public health problem and recent estimates from World Health Organization (WHO showed that in India there were 62 million visually impaired, of whom 8 million are blind. The Andhra Pradesh Eye Disease Study (APEDS provided a comprehensive estimate for prevalence and causes of blindness for the state of Andhra Pradesh (AP. It also highlighted that uptake of services was also an issue, predominantly among lower socio-economic groups, women, and rural populations. On the basis of this analysis, L V Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI developed a pyramidal model of eye care delivery. This article describes the LVPEI eye care delivery model. The article discusses infrastructure development, human resource development, and service delivery (including prevention and promotion in the context of primary and secondary care service delivery in rural areas. The article also alludes to opportunities for research at these levels of service delivery and the amenability of the evidence generated at these levels of the LVPEI eye health pyramid for advocacy and policy planning. In addition, management issues related to the sustainability of service delivery in rural areas are discussed. The article highlights the key factors required for the success of the LVPEI rural service delivery model and discusses challenges that need to be overcome to replicate the model. The article concludes by noting the potential to convert these challenges into opportunities by integrating certain aspects of the existing healthcare system into the model. Examples include screening of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy in order to promote higher community participation. The results of such integration can serve as evidence for advocacy and policy.

  15. Improving Access to Institutional Delivery through Janani Shishu Suraksha Karyakram: Evidence from Rural Haryana, North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salve, Harshal R; Charlette, Lena; Kankaria, Ankita; Rai, Sanjay K; Krishnan, Anand; Kant, Shashi

    2017-01-01

    In India, Janani Shishu Suraksha Karyakaram (JSSK) was launched in the year 2011 to assure cashless institutional delivery to pregnant women, including free transport and diet. To assess the impact of JSSK on institutional delivery. A record review was done at the primary health care facility in Faridabad district of Haryana from August 2010 to March 2013. Focus group discussion/ informal interviews were carried out to get an insight about various factors determining use / non-use of health facilities for delivery. Institutional delivery increased by almost 2.7 times (197 Vs 537) after launch of JSSK (p < 0.001). For institutional deliveries, the most important facilitator as well as barrier was identified as ambulance service under JSSK and pressure by elders in the family respectively. JSSK scheme had a positive impact on institutional deliveries. It should be supported with targeted intervention designed to facilitate appropriate decision-making at family level in order to address barriers to institutional delivery.

  16. Perspectives for rural electrification in the new economic and institutional scenario of the brazilian electric sector; Perspectivas para a eletrificacao rural no novo cenario economico-institucional do setor eletrico brasileiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luciana Correa de

    2001-03-15

    This thesis discusses the energy deficit in Brazilian rural areas, from the viewpoint of the ongoing reform, which is establishing a new economic and institutional model for the electric sector. The main objective of this inquiry is to reveal the perspectives for the solution of the rural energy problem, by means of a critical examination of the legal and executive initiatives related to the expansion of electric coverage, indicating the priority level of rural electrification within the reform. This analysis infers the need of an innovative reform approach, different from the solutions employed by developed countries, due to peculiar characteristics of the Brazilian case. (author)

  17. Roger Tory Peterson Institute Links Interdisciplinary Nature Studies to Increased Community Understanding. Rural Trust Featured Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Null, Elizabeth Higgins

    The Roger Tory Peterson Institute (Jamestown, New York) has been sparking a regional revival in K-12 nature studies and attracting attention from educators across America. Through summer training sessions and workshops, the Institute introduces multidisciplinary teams of teachers and community members to empirical research techniques for observing…

  18. The Biofuels Revolution: Understanding the Social, Cultural and Economic Impacts of Biofuels Development on Rural Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selfa, Theresa L; Goe, Richard; Kulcsar, Laszlo; Middendorf, Gerad; Bain, Carmen

    2013-02-11

    The aim of this research was an in-depth analysis of the impacts of biofuels industry and ethanol plants on six rural communities in the Midwestern states of Kansas and Iowa. The goal was to provide a better understanding of the social, cultural, and economic implications of biofuels development, and to contribute to more informed policy development regarding bioenergy.Specific project objectives were: 1. To understand how the growth of biofuel production has affected and will affect Midwestern farmers and rural communities in terms of economic, demographic, and socio-cultural impacts; 2. To determine how state agencies, groundwater management districts, local governments and policy makers evaluate or manage bioenergy development in relation to competing demands for economic growth, diminishing water resources, and social considerations; 3. To determine the factors that influence the water management practices of agricultural producers in Kansas and Iowa (e.g. geographic setting, water management institutions, competing water-use demands as well as producers attitudes, beliefs, and values) and how these influences relate to bioenergy feedstock production and biofuel processing; 4. To determine the relative importance of social-cultural, environmental and/or economic factors in the promotion of biofuels development and expansion in rural communities; The research objectives were met through the completion of six detailed case studies of rural communities that are current or planned locations for ethanol biorefineries. Of the six case studies, two will be conducted on rural communities in Iowa and four will be conducted on rural communities in Kansas. A multi-method or mixed method research methodology was employed for each case study.

  19. Institutional capacity for designing and implementing agricultural and rural development policies and strategies in Nigeria:

    OpenAIRE

    Adebayo, Kolawole; Babu, Suresh Chandra; Rhoe, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the capacity for designing and implementing agricultural and rural development policies, strategies, and programs in Nigeria. Data for this study were derived from initial consultations at the Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Water Resources (FMAWR), Federal Ministry of Women affairs and Social Development (FMWASD), and the Federal Ministry of Environment (FMEnv) early in 2008. Two consultation workshops were also held, one for relevant staff in the ministries, parastat...

  20. Libraries in Kansas: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/kansas.html Libraries in Kansas To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Fort Riley IRWIN ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL MEDICAL LIBRARY 650 Huebner Road FORT RILEY, KS 66442-5037 ...

  1. 1990 Kansas Land Cover Patterns Update

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — In 2008, an update of the 1990 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) database was undertaken. The 1990 KLCP database depicts 10 general land cover classes for the State...

  2. Kansas Water Quality Action Targeting System (KATS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This system is a revision of the original KATS system developed in 1990 as a tool to aid resource managers target Kansas valuable and vulnerable water resources for...

  3. Quality of Streams in Johnson County, Kansas, 2002-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.

    2008-01-01

    Water quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas was evaluated from October 2002 through December 2007 in a cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program. Water quality at 42 stream sites, representing urban and rural basins, was characterized by evaluating benthic macroinvertebrates, water (discrete and continuous data), and/or streambed sediment. Point and nonpoint sources and transport were described for water-quality constituents including suspended sediment, dissolved solids and major ions, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), indicator bacteria, pesticides, and organic wastewater and pharmaceutical compounds. The information obtained from this study is being used by city and county officials to develop effective management plans for protecting and improving stream quality. This fact sheet summarizes important results from three comprehensive reports published as part of the study and available on the World Wide Web at http://ks.water.usgs.gov/Kansas/studies/qw/joco/ .

  4. Excessive Competition and Exit of Small Rural Financial Institutions%过度竞争与农村小型金融机构退出

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂勇

    2011-01-01

    This article uses Salop's circular city model to make quantitative analysis on the market demand of small rural financial institutions.Research shows that excessive growth of small rural financial institutions may lead to excessive competition in the financial market,which can cause adverse selection or moral hazard and finally lead to the collapse of rural credit market.Therefore,strict scrutiny of market access should be carried out for small rural financial institutions,and an early warning should be made for problematic rural financial institutions.In addition,the market exit with market-based instruments should apply if rural financial institutions fail to effectively improve themselves within prescribed time limit.%文章采用萨乐普环行城市模型,定量分析了农村小型金融机构市场需求量。研究表明,超速增长的农村小型金融机构可能会导致农村金融市场的过度竞争现象,从而引起逆向选择或者是道德风险,最终导致农村信贷市场的崩溃。因此,对农村小型金融机构的市场准入要严格审查,对出现问题的农村金融机构要尽早预警,对在规定期限内仍不能实现有效改善的,要通过市场手段进行市场退出。

  5. Training Home Economists for Rural Development. Report of a Global Study on the Development of Criteria for Establishing Training Institutions for Home Economics Staff in Rural Development. FAO Economic and Social Development Paper 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.

    In 1973 a global study aimed toward the development of criteria for establishing institutions for training home economists for rural development programs was initiated by the Home Economics and Social Programmes Services of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the U.N. As a first step, a survey was developed on the variety of roles appropriate…

  6. Institutional options for rural energy access: Exploring the concept of the multifunctional platform in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    organisational set-ups and local fuel production have in fact had limited or even adverse effects on the outcome of the multifunctional platform programme, these virtues have proved essential in presenting the concept at the policy level. This analysis of the dilemma between mobilizing funding and implementing...... practical programmes provides an argument for building development aid on existing structures instead of inventing new complicated concepts and approaches.......The concept of the multifunctional platform for rural energy access has increasingly been supported by donors in five West African countries since 1994. While it is often referred to as a highly successful concept, recent reviews and interviews with local stakeholders in Mali and Burkina Faso...

  7. Out-Of-Pocket Expenditure on Institutional Delivery in Rural Lucknow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Shukla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Promotion of reproductive health through institutional delivery has been adopted by government as a strategy for reducing maternal mortality rate but still about half of the deliveries have been conducted at home. Cost barrier is one of the major cause for preferring home delivery instead of institutional delivery. Not only the direct costs responsible for low institutional delivery but also indirect costs too accountable for less number of institutional births in the country. Aims & Objectives: To estimate the out of pocket expenditure incurred by households during delivery and its determinants. Materials and methods: A community based cross sectional study was conducted during which a total 272 households having women who had recently delivered in government institutions were interviewed. Result: The mean out of pocket expenditure was found to be Rs. 1406.04 ± 103.27 including spending’s on drugs, travel, pathological tests and unofficial payments. Low socioeconomic class, residence outside the catchment area of delivery point, tertiary and secondary health care facilities as place of delivery and low literacy status of head of the family below high school  were found to be significantly associated with out of pocket expenditure bivariate analysis (p<0.05. On multivariate analysis low socioeconomic (OR 22.40; 95% CI 9.44-53.15; p = 0.01   and residence (OR 13.07; 95% CI (1.58-116.55; p = 0.03  outside the catchment area of delivery point were found to be independent predictors of catastrophic out of pocket expenditure during delivery. Conclusions: Although government has been running lot of schemes for availing free of cost health services but still one has to pay from their pocket as medical expenses. In order to bear these expenses, they have to borrow money, sell their assets and securities due to which households suffer a lot. In the present study, unofficial payment was found prevalent in public institutions

  8. Kansas: Early Head Start Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Kansas Early Head Start (KEHS) provides comprehensive services following federal Head Start Program Performance Standards for pregnant women and eligible families with children from birth to age 4. KEHS was implemented in 1998 using Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) quality set-aside dollars augmented by a transfer of federal…

  9. Kansas City Plots Next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Kansas City (Missouri) Public Schools is at a crossroads. The district has struggled for decades with poor academic achievement, dwindling enrollment and budget, and short-term superintendents--27 in the past 40 years. Most recently, after a two-year stint during which he helped the district get its financial house in order, closing nearly half of…

  10. Colectiv Property Land Institution Reform And Urban Rural Planning Response%集体建设用地制度改革与城乡规划应对

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈振华

    2014-01-01

    On the 18th thrid meeting, urban rural integrate construction land market, more economic right for farmers, col ective construction land institution reform is getting focused of urban rural integrate development reform. The paper reviews the ecolution of urban rural construction land institution, analyzes col ective construction land institution reform promlems and issues, and studies future content, method, and implementation of urban rural planning.%党的十八届三中全会提出要建立城乡统一的建设用地市场,赋予农民更多的财产权利,由此集体建设用地制度改革成为城乡统筹改革的焦点。研究回顾了城乡建设用地制度的演变历程,分析了集体建设用地制度改革面临的一系列问题与争论,对在集体建设用地制度改革背景下,城乡规划未来的内容拓展、方法创新与实施机制进行了探索。

  11. A Critical Review of Rural Poverty Literature: Is There Truly a Rural Effect? Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Paper No. 1309-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bruce; Jensen, Leif; Miller, Kathleen; Mosley, Jane; Fisher, Monica

    2005-01-01

    Poverty rates are highest in the most urban and most rural areas of the United States, and are higher in nonmetropolitan than metropolitan areas. Yet, perhaps because only one-fifth of the nation's 35 million poor people live in nonmetropolitan areas, rural poverty has received less attention than urban poverty from both policymakers and…

  12. KNOWLEDGE & ATTITUDE REGARDING PCPNDT ACT AMONG PHARMACY STUDENTS: A STUDY CONDUCTED IN RURAL TEACHING INSTITUTE, KASEGAON.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasundhara Vijay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available : AIMS & OBJECTIVES: (1 To assess the awareness regarding PCPNDT Act & sex ratio, among students. (2 To Sensitize the Pharmacy students regarding declining sex ratio & create awareness by education. MATERIAL & METHODS: A cross-sectional opinion study was carried out in Rajaram Bapu Pharmacy College Kasegaon on 21st July 2014. In total 168 respondents participated with good response. A pretested & predesigned proforma was used to collect information under supervision & analyzed & interpreted with the help of percentage & chi square test. The sensitization was done with lecture & question answer session. RESULTS: Majority i.e.85.11 % were found in age bracket of 20 to 22 years with more female respondents. Almost i.e., 91.48 % aware about adverse sex ratio & PCPNDT Act. Commonest source of information was awarded to mass media (82.73% more than half i.e. 58.92 % aware that sex determination is not permitted legally. Among them 27.97% exactly knew the punishment profile for violators. No girls to marry & rise in violence against women remained common future implication of female foeticide. Girls’ attitude towards not going for sex determination found statistically significant compared with boys’, X2 =23.92, df =2, HS. Common place of male/female discrimination for girls was outside home & institute, while for boys it was in institute. CONCLUSION: In our study though majority were aware about adverse sex ratio & PCPNDT Act, knowledge about exact punishment for violators seemed to be less. Most believed that, social & sexual crime & lack of brides will be the likely implications in future. Boys’ attitude towards not going for sex determination in future was less compared with girls’. It urge for proper guidance sessions for them.

  13. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period. The map is designed to be explicitly...

  14. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, State of Kansas (300m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period. The map is designed to be explicitly...

  15. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, State of Kansas (300m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  16. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  17. Between Sumak Kawsay and Institutional Good Living. The social discourses of Good Living in rural areas of Southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alaminos Chica

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The strategies of building alternative measures of development have been established from a disconnected approach of very significant elements such as the legitimation or the dynamics of change of capitalism. In this research we study a particular case for a proposal of measuring development from the concept of Sumak Kawsay. This concept brings together very special properties which, although characterized by the same criteria as its alternatives (multidimensionality, segmentation, balance and subjectivity, resort to the novel use of a myth, that legitimizes communitary ways of living that are different to the most widespread lifestyles. This paper presents a discourse analysis of the conceptions about Good Living that can be extracted from the texts of interviews and other group dynamics carried out in the peasant communities of Nabón, a rural canton of the South of Ecuador. The analysis results a relational structure in which the limits and contents of an adaptive or hybrid discourse are defined, which is the product of the interaction between two opposing discourses: Sumak Kawsay (community and traditional and goverment’s Institutional Good Living (societal and modern. This interaction allows to expose and to explain the set of contradictions detected; and the emergence of new categories that establish the limits of this adaptive discourse on Good Living: bad living, good dying or quality of life. In this way, the positions of the internal fractures of the populations are explained, as well as their strategies for subsistence and negotiation with government authorities.

  18. 78 FR 50409 - Kansas Municipal Energy Agency v. Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Mid-Kansas Electric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kansas Municipal Energy Agency v. Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Mid-Kansas Electric Company, LLC, Southwest Power Pool, Inc.; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on August... 206 of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206 (2013), Kansas...

  19. EVALUATION OF BREAST LUMPS BY ULTRASONOGRAPHY: A STUDY IN RURAL TEACHING INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To find the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of ultrasound in detection of palpable breast lumps and to correlate the findings of ultrasound with the findings of fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC, or histopathology. Ultrasonagraphic evaluation of 50 palpable breast lumps was done in our institute from January 2011 to February 2012. Diagnosis was made considering four features of the lumps i.e. shape, margins, width: AP ratio and echogenicity. Diagnosis was confirmed by fine needle aspiration cytology or histopathology. The sensitivity of ultrasound in detection of palpable breast lumps was 84%. The incidence of breast lumps was highest in the age group of 20-39 years (60%. Lump alone was the presentation in 88% of the cases. 64% of the lumps were present in outer upper quadrant of the breast. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of ultrasound in fibroadenoma of the breast was 88.88%, 94.7% and 91.2% respectively. The sensitivity for carcinoma of the breast was 84.61% and for cystic masses it was 100%. The ultrasound features that most reliably characterized breast masses as benign were round or oval shape (93.33% were benign, circumscribed margins (89.28% were benign and width: AP ratio >1.4 (87.09% were benign. Features that characterized masses as malignant were irregular shape (75% were malignant, non-circumscribed margins (57.14% were malignant and width: AP ratio ≤1.4 (63.63% were malignant.Ultrasound is a useful tool in differentiation of cystic from solid masses of the breast. It is useful in young females and pregnant women where mammography is not advisable. However its role in diagnosis of carcinoma of the breast needs further evaluation before it can be used for screening of carcinoma breast.

  20. Incorporating local institutions in irrigation experiments: evidence from rural communities in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneeque Javaid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many irrigation systems are special cases of common-pool resources (CPRs in which some users have preferential access to the resource, which in theory aggravates collective action challenges such as the under-provision of necessary infrastructure as a result of unequal appropriation of water resources. We present experimental evidence based on an irrigation game played in communities that are dependent on one of the largest contiguous irrigation network: the Indus basin irrigation system in Punjab, Pakistan. Furthermore, we simulate two institutional mechanisms that are neglected in experimental studies, despite their importance in many CPR governance systems: traditional authorities and legal pluralism. In our experiments, Punjabi farmers (N = 160 managed to provide the CPR at a level close to the social optimum, even without communication or enforcement opportunities. The equal investment in water infrastructure seems to be a strong social norm, even though those in disadvantageous positions (tail-users earn less than those who have preferential access (head-users. At the same time, head-users restrain themselves from maximum resource extraction, which could be interpreted either as a norm or a stationary bandit strategy. In contrast to one of the most consistent findings of previous experimental studies, the participants in our experiment increased their earnings over the experimental rounds by using the available resources in a more efficient manner. One explanation for this behavior could be the availability of social information in our game. Starting from a high level of cooperation during baseline rounds, the treatments did not change the group investment significantly. The introduction of external sanctions created additional coordination problems, which led to a decrease in the level of group welfare. More specifically, head-users reduced their water extraction in the face of possible external sanctions to a level that the remaining

  1. From "Migrant Workers Boom" to "Migrant Workers Scarcity"——Analysis of Institutional Bottleneck of Rural Surplus Labors Transfer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Through description of three-steps characteristic of dual economic theory and its practical significance to the process of industrialization and urbanization in China,and making comparative analysis between important criterion of "Lewis turning point" and current situation of rural surplus labors market in China,we can find that there exists a great deal of surplus labors in rural areas in our country,improvement of peasant income is the result of external interference of government,and demographic dividend in our country hasn’t finished.These phenomena go against the theory of "Lewis turning point".So it can prove that "Lewis turning point" in China hasn’t come yet.The paper points out the major factors of coexistence of "migrant workers scarcity" and labors redundancy in our country.The first one is structure contradiction of labors market;the second one is law of supply-demand of labors market;the third one is institutional barrier which hinders labors in free flow of census register and social guarantee.Therefore,if we want to realize successful transfer of rural surplus labors and the goal of industrialization and urbanization,we must promote upgrading of industrial structure,change the style of economic growth and realize harmonious development of regional economy in macrocosmic level;And in microcosmic level,we should eliminate institutional barrier which hinders transfer of rural surplus labors.

  2. 40 CFR 131.34 - Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Secondary Contact Recreation Indian Creek 10270102 20 Secondary Contact Recreation James Creek 10270102 87...: Lower Kansas Baldwin Creek 10270104 69 Secondary Contact Recreation Brush Creek 10270104 49...

  3. Using new Marketing Methods by Managers of Rural Cooperative Institutions, A Case Study – The Kohgilooye and Booyerah-mad Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Namdari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of an accessible market for buying and selling agricultural products by networks of rural and farming cooperatives in Iran has given rise to the need to devote considerable attention to marketing and the use of new marketing methods. In view of this fact, this research will attempt to provide insight and help understand why managers of these institutions use these methods rarely. To this end, we designed a questionnaire and distributed it to the statistical sample, comprised of managers of rural cooperative institutions in the Kohgilooyeh and Boyerahmad Province. The results of analysing their responses indicate that there is a considerable level of correlation between the application of new marketing managers of rural cooperatives and the level of education, knowledge, social and cultural factors of the geographical location of their environment. However, no significant correlation was found between the use of new marketing methods and the work experience of surveyed managers. Furthermore, the lack of facilities and infrastructure required for using new marketing methods cannot be the rationale for dismissing these methods by the managers of these institutions.

  4. Kansas Water Science Center bookmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2017-03-27

    The U.S. Geological Survey Kansas Water Science Center has collected and interpreted hydrologic information in Kansas since 1895. Data collected include streamflow and gage height, reservoir content, water quality and water quantity, suspended sediment, and groundwater levels. Interpretative hydrologic studies are completed on national, regional, statewide, and local levels and cooperatively funded through more than 40 partnerships with these agencies. The U.S. Geological Survey provides impartial scientific information to describe and understand the health of our ecosystems and environment; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life. These collected data are in the National Water Information System https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ks/nwis/rt, and all results are documented in reports that also are online at https://ks.water.usgs.gov/. Follow the USGS Kansas Water Science Center on Twitter for the most recent updates and other information: https://twitter.com/USGS_KS.

  5. Rural Households

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    dependency on state institutions under the Vietnamese transition to a market society. It discusses present poverty definitions and measures by comparing survey data with the formal economic categorization of rural households. Both the overall characteristics of rural society and qualitative data indicate...

  6. Building Institutional Capacity in Rural Northern Ireland: The Role of Partnership Governance in the LEADER II Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Throughout the 1990s, Europe's rural areas increasingly embraced local action and local development solutions to face the challenge of the continued re-structuring of the agricultural industry. In parallel, in both the EU and the UK, a policy discourse has emerged which envisages a fundamental shift in support policies for rural areas from a…

  7. The Local Beneath the National and Global - Institutional Education, Credentialed Natural Resource Management (NRM) and Rural Community (Un) Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Janice

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of strategies for national and global outcomes has in some instances left rural community resources and practices devalued and disturbed and rural people demoralised with the result that local community sustainability has been compromised. Formal education in Australia is about many things, but is rarely sympathetic towards…

  8. 77 FR 16314 - Kansas Disaster # KS-00062

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00062 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Kansas dated 03/12/2012... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  9. Kansas Energy Sources: A Geological Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merriam, Daniel F., E-mail: dmerriam@kgs.ku.edu [University of Kansas (United States); Brady, Lawrence L.; Newell, K. David [University of Kansas, Kansas Geological Survey (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Kansas produces both conventional energy (oil, gas, and coal) and nonconventional (coalbed gas, wind, hydropower, nuclear, geothermal, solar, and biofuels) and ranks the 22nd in state energy production in the U.S. Nonrenewable conventional petroleum is the most important energy source with nonrenewable, nonconventional coalbed methane gas becoming increasingly important. Many stratigraphic units produce oil and/or gas somewhere in the state with the exception of the Salina Basin in north-central Kansas. Coalbed methane is produced from shallow wells drilled into the thin coal units in southeastern Kansas. At present, only two surface coal mines are active in southeastern Kansas. Although Kansas has been a major exporter of energy in the past (it ranked first in oil production in 1916), now, it is an energy importer.

  10. Kansas DOE/EPSCoR planning and traineeship grants: Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    In 1991, Kansas became the 18th state eligible for EPSCoR support, and it responded quickly to calls for planning proposals from DOE, NSF, and EPA. Planning process was carried out to improve the quality of scientific and engineering R&D in Kansas. All programs attempt to strengthen the intra- and inter-institutional ties to develop a critical mass of researchers in several areas. The following areas of excellence were selected for DOE/EPSCoR traineeships: atomic processes, electric power production, petroleum, high-energy physics, and energy alternative and efficiency.

  11. Kansas legislators prioritize obesity but overlook nutrition and physical activity issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Katie M; Stephen, Mellina O; Vaughan, Katherine B; Kellogg, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    State-level policymakers play an important role in the fight against obesity because of their ability to create policies that influence opportunities for physical activity and nutrition. In 2011, we investigated how Kansas policymakers regarded obesity, nutrition, and physical activity in comparison to other issues. This study used a cross-sectional design. This study was conducted in Kansas, a predominately rural and Republican Midwestern state. All 181 state-level policymakers in Kansas were mailed a cover letter and survey. Policymakers were asked to identify and rate the importance of issues or problems in need of attention for Kansas. The 2011 state legislative report was content analyzed and coded to match the survey. Comparisons were made by political party. Of the 49 policymakers who completed a survey, 37 were Republicans and 43 were elected to their position. Although obesity-related issues were rated second highest after jobs, physical activity- and nutrition-related issues were not seen as important problems; moreover, little corresponding legislation was introduced. Other key issues identified by policymakers included budget/spending/taxes, education, jobs/economy, and drug abuse, with more legislation reflecting these problems. The Democrats ranked 11 issues as more significant problems than did the Republicans: quality of public education, poverty, access to health care, lack of affordable housing, ethics in government, lack of public health training, access to healthy groceries, lack of pedestrian walkways/crosswalks/sidewalks, pedestrian safety, air pollution, and global warming (P Kansas policymakers. Issues identified may be similar for other predominately rural and Republican states.

  12. 城乡统筹规划:政策支持与制度创新%Urban and Rural Integrated Planning: Policy Support and Institutional Innovation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵华勤; 张如林; 杨晓光; 周焱

    2013-01-01

    城乡统筹规划作为指导城乡发展建设的总纲,必须要有强有力的政策来支持以及较完善的制度体系作保障.通过对城乡统筹规划实践过程中存在的主要问题归纳分析,初步构建了城乡统筹规划的政策与制度设计基本框架,并结合各地城乡统筹规划的实践经验,重点对城乡统筹规划的政策支持与制度创新匹配性内容进行了探讨.%Integrated spatial planning as a guide for coordinated urban-rural development must have strong policy and institutional support.. Based on a summary and analysis of problems encountered in the practice of urban-rural integrated planning, the paper reconstructs the policy and institutional framework of spatial planning and discusses the compatibility of policies and institutional innovations.

  13. Final Monitoring Plan for Site Closure at Inman, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Inman, Kansas, is a rural town located in southwest McPherson County, in sections 8, 9, 16, and 17, Township 21 South, Range 4 West (Figure 1.1). There are 1,377 people in 513 households, as of the census of 2010. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the southern edge of the city of Inman, Kansas, from 1954 to 1965. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In 1997, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contamination level [MCL] of 5.0 μg/L) were detected in three private wells near the former grain storage facility at Inman, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. No public water supply wells were identified within 1 mi of the town by the KDHE in 1998. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with grain storage operations. To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Inman is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA agreed to conduct a multi-phase investigation at Inman. The investigation was performed by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the USDA.

  14. Irrigation water use in Kansas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.

    2016-03-22

    This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources, presents derivative statistics of 2013 irrigation water use in Kansas. The published regional and county-level statistics from the previous 4 years (2009–12) are shown with the 2013 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. An overall Kansas average and regional averages also are calculated and presented. Total reported irrigation water use in 2013 was 3.3 million acre-feet of water applied to 3.0 million irrigated acres.

  15. Annual Report of Monitoring at Barnes, Kansas, in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Barnes, Kansas, is a small rural community (population approximately 150) located in Washington County, in north-central Kansas (Figure 1.1). Barnes is located in Section 9, Township 4 South, Range 5 East, at approximate latitude 39°43'0'' north and longitude 96°52'25'' west (USGS 1968). The city lies in a transition zone between the Flint Hills and the glaciated region. The area’s topography consists of gently sloping hills of Pleistocene loess (< 20 ft) overlying a shale unit and interbedded shale, limestone, and siltstone of the Permian Chase Group. Groundwater for the public water supply is obtained from wells PWS2 and PWS3 at reported depths of 155 ft and 160 ft, respectively, located in the northwestern portion of the city. The water is produced from the bedrock aquifer of the Chase Group. Section 2 summarizes the hydrogeologic conceptual site model. This report summarizes findings for groundwater inspection in Barnes.

  16. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, State of Kansas (300m buffer) and Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period. The map is designed to be explicitly...

  17. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, State of Kansas (300m buffer) and Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  18. 我国新型农村金融机构存在的问题及对策分析%Problems and Countermeasures of the New Rural Financial Institutions Supporting Agriculture in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡洋萍

    2015-01-01

    The new type of rural ifnancial institutions in rural ifnancial markets, the role of "supporting agriculture is small", it is an important part of the construction of rural ifnancial system in rural areas. But in the actual development process, China's new rural ifnancial institutions in agriculture support small area distribution exists on the polarization, target deviation, service mode, personnel quality is low rigid. Recommended by ifscal and taxation, monetary policy optimization of Rural Finance on the regional layout, and vigorously develop the rural Internet banking, innovation, support for small service model, improve the quality of rural ifnancial institutions and other aspects of the promotion of new rural ifnancial institutions to support small and small target of real.%新型农村金融机构在农村金融市场上承担着“支农支小”的重要角色,是我国构建农村普惠金融体系当中的重要一环。但在实际发展过程中,我国新型农村金融机构在“支农支小”上存在地区分布两极化、目标跑偏、服务模式僵化、人员素质较低等问题。建议通过财税、货币政策优化新型农村金融就区域布局、大力发展农村互联网金融,创新“支农支小”服务模式、提高农村金融从业人员素质等方面促进新型农村金融机构“支农支小”目标的实现。

  19. The Influence of Rural Banking Structure on the Rural Economic Growth---Based on the Background of New Type of Rural Financial Institutions Innovation%农村银行业结构对农村经济增长的影响--基于新型农村金融机构创新的背景

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田杰; 刘勇; 陶建平

    2013-01-01

    基于新型农村金融机构创新所导致的农村银行业结构变化是否促进农村经济增长这一重要的研究背景,使用来自中国2006-2010年1769个县(市)的面板数据检验“最优金融结构理论”在农村地区的适用性。研究结果表明:农村银行业集中度的下降促进了农村经济的增长。%Based on an important research background about whether the changes of the rural banking structure which was caused by the new type of rural financial institutions innovation were to promote the rural economic growth? This paper used the panel data from the 1769 counties (cities)during 2006-2010 to check the applicability of "optimal financial structure theory" in rural areas. The results show that the declining of the rural banking loans concentration promoted the rural economic growth, and the robust test supports this conclusion.

  20. The effects of behavioral health reform on safety-net institutions: a mixed-method assessment in a rural state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willging, Cathleen E; Sommerfeld, David H; Aarons, Gregory A; Waitzkin, Howard

    2014-03-01

    In July 2005, New Mexico initiated a major reform of publicly-funded behavioral healthcare to reduce cost and bureaucracy. We used a mixed-method approach to examine how this reform impacted the workplaces and employees of service agencies that care for low-income adults in rural and urban areas. Information technology problems and cumbersome processes to enroll patients, procure authorizations, and submit claims led to payment delays that affected the financial status of the agencies, their ability to deliver care, and employee morale. Rural employees experienced lower levels of job satisfaction and organizational commitment and higher levels of turnover intentions under the reform when compared to their urban counterparts.

  1. Irrigation trends in Kansas, 1991–2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This fact sheet examines trends in total reported irrigation water use and acres irrigated as well as irrigation water use by crop type and system type in Kansas for...

  2. "Consumer Satisfaction" Response from Kansas State Alumni

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrew P. Barkley

    1993-01-01

    The determinants of the degree of alumni satisfaction with their investment in college education were identified using survey data from recent graduates of the College of Agriculture at Kansas State University...

  3. Major Kansas Perennial Streams : 1961 and 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Map of major perennial streams in Kansas for the years 1961 and 2009. The map shows a decrease in streams regarded as perennial in 1961, compared to stream regarded...

  4. Kansas State University DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program. Year 3, Third quarter report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hague, J.R.

    1994-05-01

    Formed on July 15, 1981, the goal of this program is to undertake applied research and development projects that may enhance reliability and minimize the cost of electric service in Kansas. The Kansas Electric Utilities Research Program (KEURP) is a contractual joint venture between six major electric utilities that serve the residents of the State of Kansas. The establishment of KEURP was made possible by the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC). The KCC allowed Kansas electric utilities to include research and development (R & D) costs in their operating expenses, including dues to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Kansas universities play a unique role in KEURP with representation on the executive, technical and advisory committees of the program. The universities receive significant direct and indirect support from KEURP through direct funded projects as well as KEURP/EPRI co-funded projects. KEURP is working with EPRI researchers on projects to develop or expand Kansans knowledge and expertise in the fields of high technology and economic development. KEURP is a major source of funding in the electric/hybrid vehicle demonstration program.

  5. The Tie That Binds: Leadership and Liberal Arts Institutions' Civic Engagement Commitment in Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Hunter Phillips

    2014-01-01

    Community boundary spanners create ties that bind the campus and its surrounding region for reciprocal relationships. Using community boundary spanning literature as a conceptual framework, this study went beyond existing research on public and 4-year comprehensive universities to examine how university leadership at rural, private liberal arts…

  6. 75 FR 103 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 17, Kansas City, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... been given in the Federal Register (74 FR 17953-17954, 4/20/2009) and the application has been... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Order No. 1655 Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 17, Kansas City, Kansas...

  7. Educational Retrenchment: A Model for Institutions of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishler, Richard E.

    1981-01-01

    Due to economic factors, many institutions of higher education may be forced to reduce faculty positions. The procedures used by Emporia State University (Kansas) can be used as a model for colleges needing to pursue various methods of retrenchment. (JN)

  8. Kansas Protects and Restores Wetlands, Streams and Riparian Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetland Program Development Grant (WPDG) in 2007 when the Kansas State Conservation Commission began identifying team members interested in developing a framework for a comprehensive Kansas Wetland and Aquatic Resources Conservation Plan.

  9. MODIS 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  10. Landsat TM and ETM+ Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2000-2001 consists of terrain-corrected, precision rectified spring, summer, and fall Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and...

  11. ASTER 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  12. Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID) 2004-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID) 2004-2005 consists of terrain-corrected, precision rectified spring, summer, and fall Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM)...

  13. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Kansas City Plant (KCP), conducted March 23 through April 3, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the KCP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations performed at the KCP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the KCP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the KCP Survey. 94 refs., 39 figs., 55 tabs.

  14. Alaskan Exemplary Program The Rural Alaska Honors Institute (RAHI) A Quarter Century of Success of Educating, Nurturing, and Retaining Alaska Native and Rural Students An International Polar Year Adventure in Barrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartes, D.; Owens, G.

    2007-12-01

    RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute, began in 1983 after a series of meetings between the Alaska Federation of Natives and the University of Alaska, to discuss the retention rates of Alaska Native and rural students. RAHI is a six-week college-preparatory summer bridge program on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. The student body is approximately 94 percent Alaska Native. RAHI students take classes that earn them seven to ten college credits, thus giving them a head start on college. Courses include: writing, study skills, desk top publishing, Alaska Native dance or swimming, and a choice of geoscience, biochemistry, math, business, rural development, or engineering. A program of rigorous academic activity combines with social, cultural, and recreational activities to make up the RAHI program of early preparation for college. Students are purposely stretched beyond their comfort levels academically and socially to prepare for the big step from home or village to a large culturally western urban campus. They are treated as honors students and are expected to meet all rigorous academic and social standards set by the program. All of this effort and activity support the principal goal of RAHI: promoting academic success for rural students in college. Over 25 years, 1,200 students have attended the program. Sixty percent of the RAHI alumni have entered four-year academic programs. Over 230 have earned a bachelors degree, twenty-nine have earned masters degrees, and seven have graduated with professional degrees (J.D., Ph.D., or M.D.), along with 110 associate degrees and certificates. In looking at the RAHI cohort, removing those students who have not been in college long enough to obtain a degree, 27.3 percent of RAHI alums have received a bachelors degree. An April 2006 report by the American Institutes for Research through the National Science Foundation found that: Rural Native students in the

  15. Water quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas, 2002-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    Water quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas was evaluated from October 2002 through December 2007 in a cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program. Water quality at 42 stream sites, representing urban and rural basins, was characterized by evaluating benthic macroinvertebrates, water (discrete and continuous data), and/or streambed sediment. Point and nonpoint sources and transport were described for water-quality constituents including suspended sediment, dissolved solids and major ions, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), indicator bacteria, pesticides, and organic wastewater and pharmaceutical compounds. The information obtained from this study is being used by city and county officials to develop effective management plans for protecting and improving stream quality. This fact sheet summarizes important results from three comprehensive reports published as part of the study and available on the World Wide Web at http://ks.water.usgs.gov/Kansas/studies/qw/joco/. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  16. Kansas Educational Achievement Report Card 2015. Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallman, Mark; Carter, Ted

    2015-01-01

    This report includes a high-level overview of student outcome data and how Kansas measures up to the other 49 states. It is meant to complement the other reporting that the Kansas Association of School Boards has released and will be releasing related to improving student outcomes for all Kansas public schools. The following are key findings…

  17. Low birth weight in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, V James; Lai, Sue Min; Suminski, R; Crawford, G

    2015-05-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) is associated with infant morbidity and mortality. This is the first study of LBW in Kansas using vital statistics to determine maternal and health care system factors associated with LBW. Low birth weight. Determine if prenatal care, maternal socio-demographic or medical factors, or insurance status were associated with LBW. Birth certificate data were merged with Medicaid eligibility data and subjected to logistic regression analysis. Of the 37,081 single vaginal births, LBW rates were 5.5% overall, 10.8% for African Americans, and 5% for White Americans. Lacking private insurance was associated with 34% more LBW infants (AOR 1.34; 95% CI 1.13-1.58), increased comorbidity, and late or less prenatal care. Low birth weight was associated with maternal medical comorbidity and with previous adverse birth outcomes. Insurance status, prenatal care, and maternal health during pregnancy are associated with LBW. Private insurance was consistently associated with more prenatal care and better outcomes. This study has important implications regarding health care reform.

  18. 农户小额信贷与农村金融机构可持续发展关系研究%Study on the Relationship Between Rural -Household Micro-credit and Sustainability of Rural Financial Institution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔哲礼; 李兴中

    2014-01-01

    在小额信贷实践中,可持续性逐渐成为衡量金融机构发展成败的重要标准。农村信用社、村镇银行等农村金融机构已成为我国小额信贷最重要的承办机构。首先,采用比较静态的分析方法,通过引入农户投入努力程度、农户未来收益预期等中间变量,研究农户小额信贷中的利率水平、违约风险等要素和农村金融机构可持续发展之间的关系;其次,以新疆植棉农户和县域农村金融机构为例,利用相关数据对三者之间的关系进行了实证分析。研究表明:农户小额贷款的利率不能高于合理水平,过高的利率水平将不利于农村金融机构的长期持续稳定经营;小额农户贷款的单户贷款规模要保持适度,“小额”是与我国当前农业综合生产力水平相适应的;必须采取多种措施切实提高农户收入水平,防止因农户“短视”而形成违约。%During the practice of rural -household micro-credit, sustainbility has became the key standard to evaluate the success or failure of micro-credit institutions.Rural Credit Cooperative(RCC) and rural bank are the most important rural financial institutions (RFI) which carry on micro-credit business in China.Following the method of comparative static analysis , this paper introducing the intermediate variable of effort in cultivating and expectation income , study on the relationship of loan interest rate and default risk of ru-ral-household and sustainability of RFI .Secondly , we conduct positive analysis on the relationship using the datas from Xinjiang ’ s county and cotton farmers.Finally, we get the following conclusion:the interest-rate can’t be higher than its reasonable level,which might be have negative effect on RFI ’ s sustainability;the amount of individual rural -household ’ s loan must be “small”, because the large amount of loan might be cause the default risk;RFI must focus on the improvement

  19. A New Type of Rural Financial Institutions in Our Country Development Present Situation Analysis%我国新型农村金融机构的发展现状分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓先骐; 殷蕾蕾

    2014-01-01

    Through the use of the China banking regulatory commission official figures released by the website, from the overall development trend of the new type of rural financial institutions, three kinds of new type of rural financial institutions and the development trend of new type of rural financial institutions in the Midwest, in the eastern part of distribution, etc., analyzes the development of new type of rural financial institutions and business conditions, the results of the study found that the new type of rural financial institutions in our country is developing rapidly in recent years, the village bank is growing rapidly;The central and western regions of the new type of rural financial institutions growth speed is faster than the eastern region;In addition, the new type of rural financial institutions have better profit space, and most of the money to the new type of rural financial institutions for agriculture, rural areas and farmers and small and medium-sized enterprises (smes), but since 2010, the new type of rural financial institutions for agriculture, rural areas and farmers and small and medium-sized enterprises of money into the declining trend.%本文通过使用中国银行业监督管理委员会网站上公布的官方数据,从新型农村金融机构的总体发展趋势、三类新型农村金融机构的发展趋势和新型农村金融机构在中西部、东部的分布状况等方面,分析了我国新型农村金融机构的发展状况和业务状况,研究结果发现我国新型农村金融机构近几年发展迅速,其中村镇银行增长较快;中西部地区新型农村金融机构的增长速度比东部地区快;另外,新型农村金融机构有较好的盈利空间,并且新型农村金融机构的大部分资金都投向了“三农”和中小企业,但自2010年以后,新型农村金融机构对“三农”和中小企业的资金投入呈不断下滑的趋势。

  20. Institutional Delivery Service Utilization among Women from Rural Districts of Wolaita and Dawro Zones, Southern Ethiopia; a Community Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihiretu Alemayehu Arba

    Full Text Available The highest number of maternal deaths occur during labour, delivery and the first day after delivery highlighting the critical need for good quality care during this period. Therefore, for the strategies of institutional delivery to be effective, it is essential to understand the factors that influence individual and household factors to utilize skilled birth attendance and institutions for delivery. This study was aimed to assess factors affecting the utilization of institutional delivery service of women in rural districts of Wolaita and Dawro Zones.A community based cross-sectional study was done among mothers who gave birth within the past one year preceding the survey in Wolaita and Dawro Zones, from February 01 -April 30, 2015 by using a three stage sampling technique. Initially, 6 districts were selected randomly from the total of 17 eligible districts. Then, 2 kebele from each district was selected randomly cumulating a total of 12 clusters. Finally, study participants were selected from each cluster by using systematic sampling technique. Accordingly, 957 mothers were included in the survey. Data was collected by using a pretested interviewer administered structured questionnaire. The questionnaire was prepared by including socio-demographic variables and variables of maternal health service utilization factors. Data was entered using Epi-data version 1.4.4.0 and exported to SPSS version 20 for analysis. Bivariate and multiple logistic regressions were applied to identify candidate and predictor variables respectively.Only 38% of study participants delivered the index child at health facility. Husband's educational status, wealth index, average distance from nearest health facility, wanted pregnancy, agreement to follow post-natal care, problem faced during delivery, birth order, preference of health professional for ante-natal care and maternity care were predictors of institutional delivery.The use of institutional delivery service is

  1. Chlordane exposure to interior least terns nesting along the Kansas River, Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The federally endangered interior least tern (Sterna antillarum) has been known to nest on sandbars along the Kansas River, KS since 1996. Documented concentrations...

  2. Quarry Creek - Excavation, Analysis and Prospect of a Kansas City Hopewell Site, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    1980 Culture Drift: A Case Study of the Kansas City Hopewell. Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation, Department of Antropology , University of Kansas...provides information on the horizontal and vertical extent of cultural deposits and the nature of them. The application and results of a proton...middens, below which six trash-filled pits were revealed. Cultural material at the site includes an abundance of ceramic and lithic artifacts and well

  3. Survey of Fossil Vertebrates from East-Central Kansas, Kansas River Bank Stabilization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    pages 15-19) Figure 1. Upper molar of adult mastodon, Mammut americanus (KUVP 5898), from Kansas River at Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas. Figure 2...fact, one of the earliest specimens to be added to that collection was a mandible of an American mastodon, Mammut americanum. It was found by then...Pleistocene assemblage including forms indicative of spruce forest such as the American mastodon, Mammut americanum, the woodland musk ox, 5.mbos cavifrons

  4. Environmental concern of university students in the federal education institute in rural Goiás, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélio Ferreira Borges

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research the adaptation and validation of the Environmental Concern Scale (ECS for Brazilian Portuguese and the environmental concerns of students were described. After being translated with the assistance of an expert teacher in Spanish language, the ECS was administered to two samples: one of university students (N=153 from Federal Institute of Education Goiano (IF GOIANO, Rio Verde campus, and another of public servants evaluators (N=13 from Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Rondônia (IFRO, Colorado do Oeste campus. Content validity, reliability and construct validity were evaluated. Statistical properties obtained proved the quality of the measurement instrument of Environmental Concern. The agreement style of evaluators with the ECS admitted values for average central tendency, median and mode close to 4.00, in a scale of values from 1.00 to 5.00. The environmental concern of students was low.

  5. Lead in drinking water: sampling in primary schools and preschools in south central Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Anne R; Steele, Janet E

    2012-03-01

    Studies in Philadelphia, New York City, Houston, Washington, DC, and Greenville, North Carolina, have revealed high lead levels in drinking water. Unlike urban areas, lead levels in drinking water in suburban and rural areas have not been adequately studied. In the study described in this article, drinking water in primary schools and preschools in five suburban and rural south central Kansas towns was sampled to determine if any exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) guidance level for schools and child care facilities of 20 parts per billion (ppb). The results showed a total of 32.1% of the samples had detectable lead levels and 3.6% exceeded the U.S. EPA guidance level for schools and child care providers of 20 ppb. These results indicate that about one-third of the drinking water consumed by children age six and under in the five suburban and rural south central Kansas towns studied has some lead contamination, exposing these children to both short-term and long-term health risks. The authors suggest a need for increased surveillance of children's drinking water in these facilities.

  6. 76 FR 61775 - Kansas Disaster #KS-00059

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00059 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  7. 76 FR 47637 - Kansas Disaster #KS-00055

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00055 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street,...

  8. 1977 Kansas Field Crop Insect Control Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Leroy; Gates, Dell E.

    This publication is prepared to aid producers in selecting methods of insect population management that have proved effective under Kansas conditions. Topics covered include insect control on alfalfa, soil insects attacking corn, insects attacking above-ground parts of corn, and sorghum, wheat, and soybean insect control. The insecticides…

  9. JAZZ E CRIME ORGANIZADO EM KANSAS CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder Kôei Itikawa Tanaka

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This essay aims at analyzing the problematic relationship between jazz and gangsterism in Robert Altman’s Kansas City (1996. Through an analysis of the film’s final sequence, we will bring up a historical background about the theme and investigate how the connection between musical production and organized crime is established through the formal construction of the movie.

  10. 77 FR 32708 - Kansas Disaster #KS-00064

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Kansas Disaster KS-00064 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This...: 02/25/2013. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  11. A longitudinal study on health expenditure in a rural community attached to Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sewagram, Maharashtra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Tapas; Sadhukhan, Sanjoy Kumar; Premendran, John S

    2012-01-01

    Community based study on health expenditure is a rarity in India. A Rural Community based longitudinal study was undertaken in Jaulgaon village of Maharashtra, with objectives of finding out the health expenditure contributed by direct treatment, related travel and relevant loss of wages with certain pertinent associated factors. 50% of the village population was studied (N = 256) by pre-designed, pre-tested schedule following WHO guidelines. A monthly house to house interview was conducted over 12 months. During study period, 78% study subjects suffered some illness with mean illness episode 1.74/person and 6.37/family without any sex difference. The annual health expenditure of the community was Rs 1,576/family, 4,31/person and 2,42/episode, which was about 4.3% of their income. The major part of the expenditure (82%) was for direct treatment cost, followed by loss of wages (12%) and travel related cost (6%). Expenditure was seen to be significantly associated with family income (P = 0.000) and education (P = 0.006).

  12. Streamflow alteration at selected sites in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.; Eng, Ken

    2017-06-26

    An understanding of streamflow alteration in response to various disturbances is necessary for the effective management of stream habitat for a variety of species in Kansas. Streamflow alteration can have negative ecological effects. Using a modeling approach, streamflow alteration was assessed for 129 selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in the State for which requisite streamflow and basin-characteristic information was available. The assessment involved a comparison of the observed condition from 1980 to 2015 with the predicted expected (least-disturbed) condition for 29 streamflow metrics. The metrics represent various characteristics of streamflow including average flow (annual, monthly) and low and high flow (frequency, duration, magnitude).Streamflow alteration in Kansas was indicated locally, regionally, and statewide. Given the absence of a pronounced trend in annual precipitation in Kansas, a precipitation-related explanation for streamflow alteration was not supported. Thus, the likely explanation for streamflow alteration was human activity. Locally, a flashier flow regime (typified by shorter lag times and more frequent and higher peak discharges) was indicated for three streamgages with urbanized basins that had higher percentages of impervious surfaces than other basins in the State. The combination of localized reservoir effects and regional groundwater pumping from the High Plains aquifer likely was responsible, in part, for diminished conditions indicated for multiple streamflow metrics in western and central Kansas. Statewide, the implementation of agricultural land-management practices to reduce runoff may have been responsible, in part, for a diminished duration and magnitude of high flows. In central and eastern Kansas, implemented agricultural land-management practices may have been partly responsible for an inflated magnitude of low flows at several sites.

  13. Evaluation of Rural Financial Institutions Competitiveness Mode:Shandong Case%农村金融机构竞争实力模型评价研究:以山东省为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭强; 董良泉

    2012-01-01

    文章构建了农村金融机构竞争实力综合评价指标体系,运用熵值法、灰色关联分析法对硬实力进行评价,运用层次分析法(AHP)对软实力进行测评,同时结合Kendall协同系数检验,对硬实力和软实力测评结果进行一致性检验,最终得出三类机构的竞争实力综合测评结果。通过全面评价农村金融机构的综合竞争实力,为决策者合理制定竞争力策略提供了参考依据。%The paper establishes the rural financial institutions competitiveness evaluation index system in Shandong Province.Through the Entropy Method,Gray Relational,this paper evaluates the hard power of rural financial institutions,using AHP method to evaluate soft power,and using Kendall test to measure consistency of hard power and soft power.The paper gives the two indexes 40% and 60% weight respectively.The results objectively reflect the trend of rural financial institutions development in Shandong Province,and the evaluation of the rural financial institutions' competitiveness,can be used as reference to decision makers.

  14. Institutional provisions for administration of rural development programmes: experience from Fadama 111 development programme in Taraba state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.U. Dimelu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study examined institutional provisions in the implementation of Fadama 111 Development Project in Taraba State, Nigeria during 2008-2013. All the staff of the project (57 from eight out of 16 local government areas participated in the programme was used in the study. Data were collected with questionnaire and analysed using descriptive statistics. The results showed strong linkages of the state Fadama coordinating office with government parastaltals and organizations at different levels of the project implementation. There were strong adherence to rules and regulations guiding staff recruitment, financial management, preparation of local development plan, environmental compliance and friendliness, and group formation. The project was constrained by several institutional factors namely delay in the payment of counterpart fund by the government (M=3.39, lack of transport and other logistic supports (M=3.06, lack of payment of counterpart fund by the government (M=3.04 and others. The study recommends that policy makers and development planner should ensure functional mechanisms that could foster and enhance linkages, and support adherence to rules and regulations prescribed for implementation of development programmes.

  15. Completeness of Institutional Ethics Application Forms Submitted to the Ethics Committee in A Rural Tertiary Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Dattatraye Jadhav

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim and objective: To evaluate the completeness of ethics application forms submitted for review to institutional ethics committee. Materials and methods: Application forms of year 2011-2013 submitted to our institutional ethics committee were studied. Results: The total numbers of application forms submitted to ethics committee were 100. Of these 67 were dissertation and 33 were research project. The type of studies consists of observational prospective studies (88%, procedure related studies (8% and interventional studies consist of clinical trial (4%. Title of study was incomplete in 15 forms and place of the study was not mentioned in 11 forms. Time period required was mentioned in 76 forms. Only 37 forms have attached the consent form. Involvement of risk to participating subjects mention in 7 forms, none of form filled information related to compensation, financial burden will be met and conflict of interest and data maintence and storage of application forms. Conclusion: The present study highlights the importance of knowledge and awareness about the filling of the application forms of ethics committee. A uniform well prepared application form of ethics committee required for evaluation and understanding of research project. [Natl J Med Res 2015; 5(4.000: 286-289

  16. Diversion or Democratization: Do Rural, Hispanic, Community College Students Show Signs of Academic Undermatch?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Eric

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between academic undermatch theory and the college-going decisions, experiences, and aspirations of first-generation, rural Hispanic community college students in the new destination meatpacking town of Winstead, Kansas. Ethnographic data from rural high school guidance counselors, community college faculty,…

  17. Rural Health Care Information Access and the Use of the Internet: Opportunity for University Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Biswa R.; Leatherman, John C.; Bressers, Bonnie M.

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has potential for improving health information delivery and strengthening connections between rural populations and local health service providers. An exploratory case study six rural health care markets in Kansas showed that about 70% of adults use the Internet, with substantial use for accessing health information. While there are…

  18. The Fragility Analysis of New Rural Financial Institutions Based on the Game Theory%基于博弈理论的新型农村金融机构脆弱性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何颖媛

    2014-01-01

    新型农村金融机构的发展为“三农”建设提供了强大的金融支持,然而新型农村金融机构的脆弱性却较少引起学者关注。基于脆弱性的功能视角,分别研究了新型农村金融机构与借款农户间的、普通商业银行与贷款者间的博弈过程与博弈记过。研究表明:金融机构的脆弱性源于信贷的外部性;新型农村金融机构比普通商业银行具备更强的脆弱性;其产生的根源在于农户的还款能力与意识的缺乏、担保抵押资产的低质和信用制约的缺失。%The development of the new rural financial institutions provides a powerful financial support to the construction of"three agriculture". However, the fragility of the new rural financial institutions has aroused little concern of scholars. Based on the fragile functional perspective, this article studies the game process and game results between the new rural financial institutions and the borrowing farmers as well as the ordinary commercial banks and the creditor respectively. According to the results, we can draw the following conclusions. First, the fragility of the financial institutions originates from the externality of the credit. Second, the new rural financial institutions are much more fragile than the ordinary commercial banks. Third, it comes from the absence of the repayment ability and awareness of the farmers, the inferiority of the mortgage assets and the lack of credit restricts.

  19. Public-health education at Kansas State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Jennifer; Payne, Patricia; Ann Holcomb, Carol; Rush, Bonnie; Renter, David; Moro, Manuel H; Freeman, Lisa C

    2008-01-01

    What are veterinary medical and public-health professionals doing to remedy the immediate and impending shortages of veterinarians in population health and public practice? This question was addressed at the joint symposium of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges and the Association of Schools of Public Health, held in April 2007. Thinking locally, faculty and students at Kansas State University (KSU) asked similar questions after attending the symposium: What are we doing within the College of Veterinary Medicine to tackle this problem? What can we do better with new collaborators? Both the professional veterinary curriculum and the Master of Public Health (MPH) at KSU provide exceptional opportunities to address these questions. Students are exposed to public health as a possible career choice early in veterinary school, and this exposure is repeated several times in different venues throughout their professional education. Students also have opportunities to pursue interests in population medicine and public health through certificate programs, summer research programs, study abroad, and collaborations with contributing organizations unique to KSU, such as its Food Science Institute, National Agricultural Biosecurity Center, and Biosecurity Research Institute. Moreover, students may take advantage of the interdisciplinary nature of public-health education at KSU, where collaborations with several different colleges and departments within the university have been established. We are pleased to be able to offer these opportunities to our students and hope that our experience may be instructive for the development of similar programs at other institutions, to the eventual benefit of the profession at large.

  20. Public-supply water use in Kansas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.; Eslick, Patrick J.

    2015-10-27

    This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Agriculture’s Division of Water Resources, presents derivative statistics of water used by Kansas public-supply systems in 2013. The published statistics from the previous 4 years (2009–12) are also shown with the 2013 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. An overall Kansas average and regional averages also are calculated and presented.

  1. Performance of Microfinance Institutions in The Economic Empowerment of Women in Rural Are: Comparative Study in The Fisher, Agriculture, and Industrial Community in Tangerang, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhaer Pakkana

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to discover the performance of the financial independence, the members’ welfare, and accessibility of microfinance institutions to the rural areas in the Tangerang District. To measure the financial dependence is using financial ratios. Measuring levels of performance of the members’ welfare and accessibility using Chi-Square. The results found that, first, the level of welfare of members. The coastal areas have a higher loan value than other regions. Expenditure and income of members, industrial areas have high levels of spending and revenues higher than other regions. The performance of a range to members based on a group basis. Second, the performance of financial independence, categorized as "Healthy". The coastal area is 86.40, the area around the industrial area is 85.71 and agricultural area is 83,73. Third, the level of non-performing loans, the coastal area is 0.03, the industrial area is 0,26, and the agricultural area is 0.19.DOI:  10.15408/sjie.v6i1.4637 

  2. Psychosocial generalised resistance resources and clinical indicators of patients suffering from Osteoarthritis at the Institute of Rural Health in Lublin, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wioletta Tuszyńska-Bogucka

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the study was investigation of the correlations between medical indicators of the course of illness and psychological factors, treated as generalised resistance resources, according to the Salutogenic Model by A.Antonovsky. The salutogenic orientation is one of the more viable paradigms for health promotion research and practice, and is offered as a useful theory for taking a salutogenic approach to health research. Materials and methods. Data was used of 67 patients at Institute of Rural Health in Lublin, Poland, suffering from Osteoarthritis. Using psychological test methods: SOC-29, CISS, AIS, IZZ, KNS, GSES, BDI and The Index of Severity for Osteoarthritis of the Hip or the Knee and The Low Back Pain Rating Scale as medical indicators of the course of the illness. Results. Analysis showed significance correlations between some psychosocial (sense of coherence, stress coping strategies, acceptance of illness, health behaviour, hope for success, self-efficacy and depression and medical variables (intensity of the degenerative disease and low back spine. Conclusions. Results of analysis showed that psychological factors within the meaning of psychosocial resources may be potential pathways for improving or disturbing the treatment effects in the course of hip and knee osteoarthritis treatment, and/or the patient’s condition.

  3. 我国农村金融机构效率研究的现状与趋势%Present Situation and Trend of Study on the Efficiency of Chinese Rural Financial Institutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚凤阁; 王天航

    2014-01-01

    Taking the progress and current trends of rural financial institutions efficiency as the starting point , and taking high level of literature as the main research object , this paper tried to summarize and explore the forward viewpoint from the new theory .The research literatures were all derived from the Chinese Journal Net Database .Through the network professional search , the paper classified and summarized the related literatures in CNKI between 2001 and 2013 by using different methods , and analyzed the literature content with the current rural financial environment and background .Since 2002 , scholars have been concerning and studying related issues to the efficiency of rural financial institutions , among which , finance , macro economic management and sustainable development , investment the three disciplines are the lead-ing subjects for the study on the efficiency of rural financial institutions .Further study found: insufficient agricultural capital investment , low capital operation efficiency and the lack of financial organizations were the main reasons for low efficiency of rural financial institutions in China;legal system and rural credit system affecting rural financial ecological environment influenced the efficiency ascension of the whole rural financial institutions , showing we need to take further measures to standardize and improve the rural financial organization system , so as to effectively improve the efficiency of Chinese rural financial institutions .%本文以探究农村金融机构效率问题的研究进展和前沿动态为出发点,运用不同方法对CNKI在2001-2013年之间收录的相关文献进行分类总结,并结合当前农村金融环境和背景对文献内容进行深入剖析。从2002年起,有学者开始对农村金融机构效率的相关问题进行关注与研究,其中金融学、宏观经济管理与可持续发展、投资学这三门学科是对农村金融机构效率问题研究的

  4. 农村金融市场开放度测度与演化--基于新型农村金融机构省际数据的实证分析%Measurement and Evolution of Rural Financial Market Openness-An Empirical Analysis Based on Provincial Data of New Types of Rural Financial Institutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武晓明; 罗剑朝

    2015-01-01

    Based on the perspective of structural changes in rural financial market by the entry of new types of rural financial institutions, The paper, by employing Gini coefficient and Location Quotient, builds absolute and relative indexex of rural fi⁃nancial market openness from three dimensions:the coverage of new types of rural financial institutions, their service capacity and the formal degree of informal financial institutions, and measures the rural financial market openness of thirty provinces, municipalities and autonomous regions, eastern, central and western areas, and eight economic regions respectively. The study shows that:The overall level of China’s rural financial market openness is very low and is still at its early stage. The rural fi⁃nancial market openness in all provinces is lower and the gaps among provinces are widening. The rural financial market open⁃ness in three areas presents U-type shape, with the highest level in the west, middle in the east and the lowest in the central. The differences of rural financial market openness in eight economic regions are significant. Finally, the paper puts forward some policy implications to accelerate the rural financial market openness, narrow regional disparities of rural financial open⁃ness, continue to deepen reform of rural financial system, improve institutional foundation of the virtuous operation of rural fi⁃nancial market and innovate new rural financial products and services.%基于新型农村金融机构引起农村金融市场结构变化的视角,文章从新型农村金融机构的覆盖面、服务能力和非正规金融机构正规化程度等三个维度,运用基尼系数和区位熵方法构建了农村金融市场开放度绝对指数和相对指数,分别测度了2008-2013年30个省、东中西部三大区域、八大经济区域的农村金融市场开放度。研究发现:我国农村金融市场开放总体程度水平非常低,处于开放的初期阶段;

  5. Regional interpretation of Kansas aeromagnetic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarger, H.L.

    1982-01-01

    The aeromagnetic mapping techniques used in a regional aeromagnetic survey of the state are documented and a qualitative regional interpretation of the magnetic basement is presented. Geothermal gradients measured and data from oil well records indicate that geothermal resources in Kansas are of a low-grade nature. However, considerable variation in the gradient is noted statewide within the upper 500 meters of the sedimentary section; this suggests the feasibility of using groundwater for space heating by means of heat pumps.

  6. Investigating the Problems with New Rural Financial Institutions in Chinaˊs Socialist New Countryside Construction:A Case Study of Yicheng CDB Rural Banks%新农村建设中新型农村金融机构问题探析--以宜城国开村镇银行为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亮

    2015-01-01

    Rural banks are a new type of rural financial institutions in the socialist new countryside construction, playing a positive role that encourages the development of China's rural areas, alleviates financial repression, and promotes the"Three Rural"development. By this stage, against the background that the CPC Central Committee encourages the expansion of new pilot rural financial institutions, it is of practical significance to increase policy support for rural banks and improve the level of hardware and software and quality of fi-nancial services so as to meet the growing demand for financial services in rural areas.%村镇银行作为我国社会主义新农村建设中茁壮发展的新型农村金融机构,对缓解我国农村地区金融抑制、促进“三农”发展发挥了积极的作用。现阶段在党中央鼓励扩大新型农村金融机构试点的政策背景下,加大对村镇银行的政策扶持力度,提升村镇银行自身软硬件水平和金融服务质量,以满足农村地区日益增长的金融服务需求,具有重要的现实意义。

  7. Current Situation and Countermeasures of New Rural Financial Institutions in Hebei Province%河北省新型农村金融机构发展的现状与对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李延春; 杨海芬; 赵邦宏

    2013-01-01

    Under the background of rapid development of the new types of rural financial institutions,the new types of rural financial institutions in Hebei province,with the rural banks as leading type,relieved the difficulty in loan and promoted the development of county economy.However,there were still some difficult problems to be solved,such as a low level of social awareness,small scale,capital insufficiency,high risk and difficult supervision.Several countermeasures and suggestions for government and institutions based on current development of the new types rural financial institutions in the province were put forward.%在中国新型农村金融机构快速发展的背景下,河北省以村镇银行为主导的新型农村金融机构在一定程度上缓解了农村“贷款难”的矛盾,促进了县域经济的发展.但在发展过程中还存在着社会认知度低、机构规模小、资金不足、风险问题突出、监管难度大等诸多问题亟待解决.结合目前河北省新型农村金融机构的发展情况,对政府和机构提出了几点促进其发展的对策与建议.

  8. "Ruralizing" Presidential Job Advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leist, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Rural community college presidential job advertisements that focus on geography, politics, and culture can improve the likelihood of a good fit between the senior leader and the institution. (Contains 2 figures.)

  9. "Ruralizing" Presidential Job Advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leist, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Rural community college presidential job advertisements that focus on geography, politics, and culture can improve the likelihood of a good fit between the senior leader and the institution. (Contains 2 figures.)

  10. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-03-31

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative

  11. History and Future of Professional Development Schools in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Debbie; Myers, Scott

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a history of the Professional Development School (PDS) movement in Kansas, as well as the major influences and challenges ahead as partnerships continue to grow and adapt. Mercer and Myers highlight the Kansas State Department of Education's (KSDE's) engagement in dialogue about the professional learning continuum of licensed…

  12. State of Kansas: K-12 Enrollment Projection Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ted

    2015-01-01

    This document contains headcount enrollment projections for the State of Kansas for the 2015-16 school year through the 2019-20 school year. These projections are based on resident live births in Kansas and the headcount enrollment data for previous school years. Based on the available data related to resident live births by county and previous…

  13. Kansas's forests, 2005: statistics, methods, and quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick D. Miles; W. Keith Moser; Charles J. Barnett

    2011-01-01

    The first full annual inventory of Kansas's forests was completed in 2005 after 8,868 plots were selected and 468 forested plots were visited and measured. This report includes detailed information on forest inventory methods and data quality estimates. Important resource statistics are included in the tables. A detailed analysis of Kansas inventory is presented...

  14. Lead and cadmium exposure study, Galena, Kansas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhara, R.J.; Stallings, F.L.; Feese, D.

    1996-01-01

    A total of 167 residents from Galena, Kansas, and 283 residents from the southern portions of Neosho and Goodman, Missouri, participated in the study. Residents from the southern portions of Neosho and Goodman, Missouri, area served as the comparison population. Biological, environmental, and questionnaire information collected from residents of the Galena, Kansas, was compared with similar information collected from residents of the comparison area.

  15. 76 FR 40624 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas AGENCY... Plan (SIP) submittal from the State of Kansas addressing the requirements of Clean Air Act (CAA or Act... Division, 901 North 5th Street, Kansas City, Kansas 66101. EPA requests that, if at all possible, you...

  16. The Impact of Agribusiness on Rural Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Paul

    The dramatic growth of multinational agribusiness corporations has led to all types of rural decline--social, demographic, institutional, and environmental. Historically, rural inhabitants and rural land have been abused and neglected in the name of progress. Rural development efforts often attract small assembly or light manufacturing plants that…

  17. 我国农村合作金融机构的转型模式--社区银行%The Optimal Transformation Mode of Financially Cooperative Institutions in China’s Rural Area-Community Bank

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晶

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of rural financial cooperative institutions solved such problems as need for providing financial services in China's villages to a certain degree, which made a huge contribution to improve the financial service system of our country. However, with skyrocketing development of regional economy especially of the rural economy, it begins to encounter the dual crisis, namely it has developed in a difficult period which is bottlenecked both internally and externally. In this paper, a bundle of consensuses are reached by comparing the bank asset size, scope of services and credit model between the rural cooperative financial institutions and community bank. Personally speaking, with such similarities, community banks are the preferred mode of transforming financially cooperative institutions in rural area. Several rational suggestions of how to improve community bank with Chinese characteristics are also put forward, in combination with national conditions at this critical time when the rural financial institution is taking form.%农村合作金融机构的设立在一定程度上解决了我国农村金融服务空白的问题,对完善我国金融服务体系做出了巨大贡献,但是随着区域经济尤其是农村经济的快速崛起,其开始面临内部和外部的双重危机,发展进入瓶颈期。本文通过将农村合作金融机构与社区银行的资产规模、服务范围以及信贷模式相对比,发现诸多共同之处;作者认为社区银行是农村合作金融机构转型的首选模式,并对农村合作金融机构在转型中如何结合我国国情发展,为特色社区银行提出合理化建议。

  18. Research on vertical integration characteristics and problems of rural three-level medical institutions%农村三级医疗机构纵向整合特征与问题研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏来

    2015-01-01

    [目的]了解农村医疗服务网络纵向整合现状和存在的问题,为深化医疗服务纵向整合提供参考依据。[方法]采用实地调查法和半结构访谈法,收取黔江区农村医疗机构纵向合作资料和数据,并进行统计分析。[结果]农村医疗机构纵向整合模式多样化,以行政推动为主,近年来合作步伐加快,合作内容逐渐丰富,合作效果正在显现,但组织整合关系不够紧密,业务技术合作仍停留在较低层次,机构间利益没有交汇。[结论]应该转变思路,从组织联合转向技术业务协作,改革支付方式,促进纵向机构间的利益关联,同时加强基层能力建设,开发临床路径和服务规范,优化纵向服务流程,真正建立起农村纵向整合的医疗服务网络。%Objective To understand the situation and problems of rural medical care vertical integration, so as to provide reference for deepening vertical integration. Methods Collected and statistically analyzed rural medical institutions vertical cooperation information and data by field survey and semi-structured interview method in Qianjiang district. Results The medical institutions vertical integration mode was diversification in rural area. Administrative pushing was main power. The pace of institutions cooperation was speeding up in recent years, cooperation content gradually got rich, cooperation effect was emerging. But the organization integration relationship was not quite close, business and technical cooperation was still at a lower level, the cooperation mechanism between institutions had little common interest intersection.Conclusions Government should change ideas, turn to technical cooperation from organization cooperation. Reform payment mode. Promote the interests linkage between vertical institutions, and reinforce the construction of grassroots institutions’ ability at the same time. Develop clinical pathway and service specification

  19. Research on the Management and Development of Small-scale Rural Financial Institutions%农村小型金融机构管理和发展研究——以东海村镇银行为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴薇

    2011-01-01

    With the banks in Donghai County for example, the management and development of small-scale rural financial institutions were studied, based on the field survey and the three management principles of rural banks, their development status and factors were analyzed and some political suggestions were proposed.%以东海村镇银行为例,研究农村小型金融机构的管理和发展,基于实地调研的基础上,从村镇银行经营的“三性”原则角度,分析了村镇银行的发展状况及影响其发展的因素,并提出了相应的政策建议.

  20. Estadio de Kansas City (EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy, C. F.

    1978-05-01

    Full Text Available The Crosby Kemper stadium, located in the center of an industrial district of Kansas City, was designed for various uses which include activities ranging from music and sports competitions to equestrian sports. It has a capacity for approximately 16 to 18,000 people and parking for 4,000 cars. The outstanding feature of its architectonic conception is the solution adopted for building the roof, by means of enormous metal tubular beams, of triangular section and a height of 8.25 meters with pipe diameters reaching 120 cm.

    El estadio Crosby Kemper, situado en el centro de un distrito industrial de Kansas, fue concebido para un funcionamiento diverso que comprende actividades que van desde la música y competiciones deportivas hasta pruebas hípicas. Tiene capacidad para unas 16.000 ó 18.000 personas, y plazas de aparcamiento para 4.000 coches. En su concepción arquitectónica sobresale la solución adoptada para la realización de la cubierta, mediante enormes vigas tubulares metálicas, de sección triangular y altura de 8,25 m, con diámetros de tubo que alcanzan los 120 cm.

  1. The Marketing Performance of Illinois and Kansas Wheat Farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Sarah N.; Nicole M. Aulerich; Irwin,Scott H.; Good, Darrel L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the marketing performance of wheat farmers in Illinois and Kansas over 1982-2004. The results show that farmer benchmark prices for wheat in Illinois and Kansas fall in the middle-third of the price range about half to three-quarters of the time. Consistent with previous studies, this refutes the contention that Illinois and Kansas wheat farmers routinely market the bulk of their wheat crop in the bottom portion of the price range. Tests of the aver...

  2. The Marketing Performance of Illinois and Kansas Wheat Farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Sarah N.; Aulerich, Nicole M.; Irwin, Scott H.; Good, Darrel L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the marketing performance of wheat farmers in Illinois and Kansas over 1982-2004. The results show that farmer benchmark prices for wheat in Illinois and Kansas fall in the middle-third of the price range about half to three-quarters of the time. Consistent with previous studies, this refutes the contention that Illinois and Kansas wheat farmers routinely market the bulk of their wheat crop in the bottom portion of the price range. Tests of the aver...

  3. Rural Development in Central America : Markets, Livelihoods and Local Governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruben, R.; Bastiaensen, J.

    1999-01-01

    Rural development is now considered almost synonymous with involvement in market exchange. When market and institutional failures prevail, however, rural communities increasingly rely on local institutional or contractual arrangements to guarantee their livelihoods. This book offers a comprehensive

  4. Quality of streams in Johnson County, Kansas, 2002--10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Stone, Mandy S.; Poulton, Barry C.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Stream quality in Johnson County, northeastern Kansas, was assessed on the basis of land use, hydrology, stream-water and streambed-sediment chemistry, riparian and in-stream habitat, and periphyton and macroinvertebrate community data collected from 22 sites during 2002 through 2010. Stream conditions at the end of the study period are evaluated and compared to previous years, stream biological communities and physical and chemical conditions are characterized, streams are described relative to Kansas Department of Health and Environment impairment categories and water-quality standards, and environmental factors that most strongly correlate with biological stream quality are evaluated. The information is useful for improving water-quality management programs, documenting changing conditions with time, and evaluating compliance with water-quality standards, total maximum daily loads (TMDLs), National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit conditions, and other established guidelines and goals. Constituent concentrations in water during base flow varied across the study area and 2010 conditions were not markedly different from those measured in 2003, 2004, and 2007. Generally the highest specific conductance and concentrations of dissolved solids and major ions in water occurred at urban sites except the upstream Cedar Creek site, which is rural and has a large area of commercial and industrial land less than 1 mile upstream on both sides of the creek. The highest base-flow nutrient concentrations in water occurred downstream from wastewater treatment facilities. Water chemistry data represent base-flow conditions only, and do not show the variability in concentrations that occurs during stormwater runoff. Constituent concentrations in streambed sediment also varied across the study area and some notable changes occurred from previously collected data. High organic carbon and nutrient concentrations at the rural Big Bull Creek site in 2003 decreased

  5. Alienation in Rural Women: A Longitudinal Cross-Lagged Analysis of its Association with Community and Family Involvement, Socioeconomic Status, and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poresky, Robert H.; Atilano, Raymond B.

    1982-01-01

    58 rural Kansas women were interviewed when their children were three, six, or nine years old, and again two years later. Maternal alienation appeared to be primarily affected by socioeconomic status, community involvement, and maternal education. The validity of anomia as a social measure of rural women was also examined. (Author/SK)

  6. Climate and weather atlas of Kansas : An introduction

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Because Kansas lies in the center of the continental United States, it is subject to varying weather patterns as air masses move across the state. Much of the severe...

  7. The ecology of a boggy marsh in Stafford County, Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The fluctuating water level of lakes and ponds is one of the most critical factors in the establishment of aquatic vegetation in Kansas. This study utilizes an...

  8. Pesticide evaluation for Flint Hills National Wildlife Refuge in Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Flint Hills National Wildlife Refuge is an overlay on the Corps of Engineers John Redmond Reservoir in east-central Kansas. The Refuge is managed to provide spring...

  9. Ramona, Kansas, Corrective Action Monitoring Report for 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This report describes groundwater monitoring in 2014 for the property at Ramona, Kansas, on which a grain storage facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The monitoring was implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory and was conducted as specified in the Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2012) approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2012).

  10. Ramona, Kansas, Corrective Action Monitoring Report for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This Monitoring Report describes groundwater monitoring for the property at Ramona, Kansas, on which a grain storage facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The monitoring was implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory. Monitoring was conducted as specified in the Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2012) approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2012).

  11. Summary of hydrologic conditions in Kansas, 2013 water year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Arin J.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Kansas Water Science Center (KSWSC), in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring gages in the State of Kansas. These include 195 real-time streamflow-gaging stations (herein gages) and 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations. These data and associated analysis, accumulated for many years, provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve our understanding of our water resources.

  12. Ramona, Kansas, Corrective Action Monitoring Report for 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This report describes groundwater monitoring in 2015 for the property at Ramona, Kansas, on which a grain storage facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The monitoring was implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory and was conducted as specified in the Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2012) approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2012).

  13. US hydropower resource assessment for Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Kansas.

  14. Physician Practices Regarding SIDS in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill-Scott, Fannette; Dong, Frank; Redmond, Michelle; Ablah, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death among infants aged 1 to 12 months. The purpose of this study was to assess prenatal and postnatal physicians' knowledge about SIDS in a county with high rates of SIDS deaths. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of pediatricians, family practitioners, and obstetricians in Sedgwick County, Kansas. Most physicians reported correctly that there were effective measures to reduce SIDS. Most respondents agreed it was important to discuss SIDS with parents. Pediatricians were more likely than family practitioners and obstetricians to recognize that pacifier use is important for infants in their first year to reduce SIDS and 2 to 4 months is the age range for peak incidence of SIDS. Pediatricians, family practitioners, and obstetricians are knowledgeable about SIDS and SIDS risk reduction. However, they are not allocating adequate time for discussing SIDS and SIDS reduction efforts with patients.

  15. Radar research at the University of Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Shannon D.; Allen, Christopher; Arnold, Emily; Hale, Richard; Hui, Rongqing; Keshmiri, Shahriar; Leuschen, Carlton; Li, Jilu; Paden, John; Rodriguez-Morales, Fernando; Salandrino, Alessandro; Stiles, James

    2017-05-01

    Radar research has been synonymous with the University of Kansas (KU) for over half a century. As part of this special session organized to highlight significant radar programs in academia, this paper surveys recent and ongoing work at KU. This work encompasses a wide breadth of sensing applications including the remote sensing of ice sheets, autonomous navigation methods for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), novel laser radar capabilities, detection of highenergy cosmic rays using bistatic radar, different forms of waveform diversity such as MIMO radar and pulse agility, and various radar-embedded communication methods. The results of these efforts impact our understanding of the changing nature of the environment, address the proliferation of unmanned systems in the US airspace, realize new sensing modalities enabled by the joint consideration of electromagnetics and signal processing, and greater facilitate radar operation in an increasingly congested and contested spectrum.

  16. Public-supply water use in Kansas, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning-Rush, Jennifer; Restrepo-Osorio, Diana

    2017-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Data Release provides derivative statistics of water used by Kansas public-supply systems in 2015. Gallons per capita per day is calculated using self-reported information in the “Part B: Monthly Water Use Summary” and “Part C: Population, Service Connections, and Water Rates” sections of the Kansas Department of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources' (DWR) annual municipal water use report (see appendixes at http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/ds964 for an example of a municipal water use report form.) Percent unaccounted for water is calculated using self-reported information in “Part B: Monthly Water Use Summary” of the DWR’s municipal water-use report. The published statistics from the previous 4 years (2011–2014) are also shown with the 2015 statistics and are used to calculate a 5-year average. Derivative statistics of 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, and 5-year averages for gallons per capita per day (gpcd) are also provided by the Kansas Water Authority's 14 regional planning areas, and the DWR regions used for analysis of per capita water use in Kansas. An overall Kansas average (yearly and 5-year average) is also calculated. Kansas state average per capita municipal water use in 2015 was 105 gpcd.

  17. A CLINICAL STUDY ON INCIDENCE, PATHOLOGICAL PATTERN AND MANAGEMENT OF GASTRIC CARCINOMA IN RURAL SETUP (ADICHUNCHANAGIRI INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL SCIENCES, MANDYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abinash

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Stomach cancer or gastric cancer is when cancer develops from the lining of stomach. Early symptoms may include heartburn, upper abdominal pain, nausea and loss of appetite. Later symptoms may include weight loss, yellow skin, vomiting, difficulty swallowing and blood in the stool among others. The cancer may spread from the stomach to other parts of the body, particularly the liver, lungs, bones, lining of the abdomen and lymph nodes. The most common cause is infection by the bacteria Helicobacter pylori, which accounts for more than 60% of cases. About 10% of cases run in families and between 1% and 3% of cases are due to genetic syndromes inherited from a person’s parents such as hereditary diffuse gastric cancer. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 1 To study the prevalence of carcinoma stomach as occurring in Adichunchanagiri Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Mandya. 2 To study the clinical presentation including the anatomic site of occurrence and histological type. 3 To study the association of risk factors. 4 To study the surgical modalities of treatment. METHODS The tissue for diagnosis was obtained by endoscopy or following surgical resection. Patients presenting to Adichunchanagiri Hospital, Mandya, during the study period and those found eligible were included in the study. Sample Size Minimum of 50 cases meeting criteria of the present study. RESULTS Gastric carcinoma is more common in males with 56% of the cases being males in this study. The prevalence is more among the low socio-economic group, which is 80% of the population. Smoked foods is a risk factor in 15 (30% of the patients and 40 (80% in high spicy diet in everyday food. Tobacco smoking (44%, alcohol consumption (44% are also risk factors. Blood Group A is associated with gastric cancer, 23 (46% patients. Anorexia was the most common symptoms reported in 42 (84% of the patients. Anaemia was the most common sign in 35 (70% of the cases. The most common

  18. LA MULTIFUNCIONALIDAD DE LAS INSTITUCIONES JURÍDICAS ASOCIATIVAS AGRARIAS EN LAS POLÍTICAS DE DESARROLLO RURAL Y REGIONAL/THE MULTIFUNCTIONALITY OF THE JURIDICAL ASSOCIATIVE AGRARIAN INSTITUTIONS IN POLITICS FOR RURAL AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis ARGUDO PÉRIZ

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available La nueva Política Agrícola Común (PAC establece un eje muy importante en el desarrollo rural, y en ese ámbito pueden moverse muchas cooperativas ya instaladas en el territorio. Las cooperativas constituyen un tipo de empresa muy asentado en el medio rural, y es la forma empresarial más adecuada para liderar el desarrollo de cualquier forma de actividad económica que en él se lleve a cabo, colaborando en el mantenimiento de la población, y logrando una mayor integración y cohesión social. A ello contribuye también su flexibilidad y capacidad de adaptación para implementar las nuevas políticas de desarrollo rural. Sin las cooperativas en estos territorios, sería más difícil y complejo el surgimiento de iniciativas viables por faltarles el soporte de una organización o red empresarial, que facilitan la realización de actividades de carácter complementario que suponen una fuente adicional de ingresos y empleo. Para ello se analizan en este trabajo los instrumentos legales existentes de cooperación y colaboración económica, tomando como marco referencial la legislación cooperativa estatal, especialmente en aquellos aspectos que permiten una mayor amplitud que la propia integración intracooperativa, y una mayor flexibilidad en las fórmulas colaborativas, con intervención y protagonismo de otros agentes, personas y entidades, presentes en el mundo rural, y se finaliza con algunas posibilidades de cooperación entre el sector privado y público./In this paper, the author seeks to locate the role of agricultural cooperatives as an instrument for implementing rural development, understood as one of the two pillars of current European CAP. Cooperatives are a type of business organisation widespread in rural areas that has proved to be specially suited to promoting any kind of economic activity, avoiding depopulation and enhancing social cohesion in those areas. Cooperatives are versatile legal entities that may easily adapt to the

  19. Rural Develoment Policies and Rural Governability: the Andalusian case

    OpenAIRE

    López Moreno, Ignacio; Aguilar Criado, Encarnación; Lozano Cabedo, Carmen; Pérez Chueca, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 90s, the EU Rural Development Policy (RDP) embodied on different programmes and initiatives -such as Leader- has been changing the institutional way to approach rural communities among State Members. This new policy has been introducing new ideas such as multi-level governance or bottom-up decision making process, which have unfolded a new model of rural governance in Europe. Therefore, the hypothesis of this p...

  20. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Kansas. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Kansas.

  1. Landsat TM and ETM+ 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  2. October 2008 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-26

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2008a). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events in November 2007 (Argonne 2008b), March 2008 (Argonne 2008c), and July 2008 (Argonne 2008d) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigations indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). The former agriculture building owned by the local school district, located immediately east of well PWS3, is also a potential source of the contamination. This current report presents the results of the

  3. LAS ENTIDADES FINANCIERAS DE ECONOMÍA SOCIAL ANTE LA CRISIS FINANCIERA: UN ANÁLISIS DE LAS CAJAS RURALES / THE SOCIAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS IN A FRAME OF CRISIS: AN ANALYISIS OF SPANISH RURAL CO-OPERATIVE BANKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco SOLER TORMO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Las cajas rurales, en su condición de entidades de crédito, al igual que los bancos y las cajas de ahorros, están experimentando las consecuencias derivadas de la actual crisis financiera internacional. Sin embargo, lejos de suponer un lastre para estas entidades, la actual situación ha de ser aprovechada como una oportunidad, lo que significa redefinir su modelo de negocio apostando por una mayor eficiencia. El objetivo del presente trabajo es analizar cuáles son los efectos que la crisis financiera está provocando en las cajas rurales españolas, partiendo de las características propias de las cajas rurales y teniendo en cuenta los trabajos más recientes publicados sobre la crisis financiera actual. El entorno de crisis financiera global requiere una caracterización comparativa del sector con la banca y las cajas de ahorros mediante el análisis de las tasas de morosidad, de cobertura de insolvencias y los ratings otorgados. / The small farm loan banks, as their credit organizations, like the banks and the savings banks, are undergoing the derived consequences of the present international financial crisis. Nevertheless, far from supposing a ballast for these organizations, the present situation has to be taken advantage of like an opportunity, which means to redefine its model of business betting by a greater efficiency. The objective of the present work is to analyze which are the effects that the financial crisis is causing in the Spanish small farm loan banks, starting off of the own characteristics of the small farm loan banks and considering the published most recent works on the present financial crisis. The surroundings of global financial crisis require a comparative characterization of the sector with the bank and the savings banks by means of the analysis of the rates of dilatoriness, cover of insolvencies and the granted ratings.

  4. Efficient mitigation strategies for epidemics in rural regions

    CERN Document Server

    Scoglio, Caterina; Schumm, Phillip; Easton, Todd; Chowdhury, Sohini Roy; Sydney, Ali; Youssef, Mina

    2010-01-01

    Containing an epidemic at its origin is the most desirable mitigation. Epidemics have often originated in rural areas, with rural communities among the first affected. Disease dynamics in rural regions have received limited attention, and results of general studies cannot be directly applied since population densities and human mobility factors are very different in rural regions from those in cities. We create a network model of a rural community in Kansas, USA, by collecting data on the contact patterns and computing rates of contact among a sampled population. We model the impact of different mitigation strategies detecting closely connected groups of people and frequently visited locations. Within those groups and locations, we compare the effectiveness of random and targeted vaccinations using a Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Recovered compartmental model on the contact network. Our simulations show that the targeted vaccinations of only 10% of the sampled population reduced the size of the epidemic by 34....

  5. Effectiveness of demand and supply side interventions in promoting institutional deliveries--a quasi-experimental trial from rural north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amudhan, Senthil; Mani, Kalaivani; Rai, Sanjay K; Pandav, Chandrakant S; Krishnan, Anand

    2013-06-01

    We assessed the differential and sequential effects of a Government of India conditional cash transfer scheme for the socio-economically disadvantaged (Janani Suraksha Yojana; JSY) and the strengthening of the primary health centre (PHC) network to provide 24/7 obstetric care in promoting institutional deliveries. This study used 7796 births from the Ballabgarh Health and Demographic Surveillance Site between April 2006 and March 2010 when both schemes were implemented in a staggered manner. The multiple baseline design took advantage of interventions separated by time and geographical zone to compute difference in differences in the rate of institutional deliveries. Logistic regression was used to estimate increases in the odds of institutional deliveries after adjustment for caste and maternal education. Compared with villages with poor access, institutional deliveries nearly doubled among villages with access to 24/7 delivery services; odds ratio (OR) 1.9 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3, 2.6]. Introduction of JSY in villages with poor access resulted in a 1.4-fold (95% CI: 1.1, 1.8) increase in institutional deliveries and a 1.1-fold (95% CI: 0.9, 1.4) increase in villages served by PHCs 24/7. However, the introduction of PHC 24/7 care to villages served by JSY doubled the rate of institutional deliveries; OR 2.1 (95% CI: 1.5, 2.8). Among the disadvantaged, institutional deliveries increased by 34.4%, compared with 24.8% among the non-disadvantaged. Introduction of PHC 24/7 care in this group increased institutional deliveries 4-fold; OR 4.2 (95% CI: 1.9, 9.0) compared with 3-fold for JSY alone; OR 3.2 (95% CI: 1.8, 5.6). Both demand and supply side strategies are effective and promote equity. Improving service delivery in a population previously primed by demand side intervention appears to be the most useful.

  6. Hydrologic Conditions in Kansas, water year 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Madison R.

    2016-03-31

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring sites in Kansas. In 2015, the network included about 200 real-time streamgages (hereafter referred to as “gages”), 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations, and 30 groundwater-level monitoring wells. These data and associated analyses provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve the understanding of Kansas’s water resources.Real-time data are verified by the USGS throughout the year with regular measurements of streamflow, lake levels, and groundwater levels. These data are used in protecting life and property; and managing water resources for agricultural, industrial, public supply, ecological, and recreational purposes. Yearly hydrologic conditions are characterized by comparing statistical analyses of current and historical water year (WY) data for the period of record. A WY is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the year in which it ends.

  7. On the Institutional Alienation of Rural Credit Cooperatives: "the Prisoner's Dilemma"%农村信用社制度异化:“囚犯的困境”——一个经济史的视角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖冬华

    2011-01-01

    The institutional alienation of rural credit cooperatives means the phenomenon in contrast to the original goals appears because of various factors. The institutional alienation of rural credit cooperatives took place during national government period. Firstly, the goal was to save "rural bankruptcy", but the result was still rural economy decline. Secondly, the goal was to help farmers, but the result was that farmers got little benefit. Thirdly, the goal was to make the voluntary cooperation of farmers, but the result was completely opposite to the original goal. Fourthly, the goal was to curb the traditional usury, but the result was forming the new usury. The institutional alienation of rural credit cooperatives during national government period was due to "the Prisoner's Dilemma". The institutional alienation of rural credit cooperatives during national government period provides an important enlightenment for us to promote the sustainable development of rural credit cooperatives.%国民政府时期农村信用社制度曾发生异化现象,主要表现为:欲挽救“农村破产”,农村经济却愈加衰落;欲使农民得利,农民却几乎是“被得利”;欲使农民自愿参与合作,农民却是“被合作”;欲遏制旧式高利贷,却产生了“集团高利贷”。国民政府时期农村信用社制度异化是由于其陷入“囚犯困境”的漩涡所致,这对于当前如何促进农村信用社的健康可持续发展提供了重要启示。

  8. Routine environment audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri. During this audit the activities the audit team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted October 24-November 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} establishes the mission of EH-24, which is to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  9. Kyoto protocol and cogeneration in rural areas: institutional and organizational configuration and perspectives; Protocolo de Kyoto e co-geracao no meio rural: configuracao institucional e organizacional e perspectivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Zilmar Jose de; Azevedo, Paulo Furquim de [Fundacao Getulio Vargas (EESP/FGV), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola de Economia de Sao Paulo], e-mails: zilmar.souza@energiasdobrasil.com.br, pfa@fgvsp.br

    2006-07-01

    This article presents a brief historical record concerning the Brazilian institutional arrangement given to the Kyoto Protocol and, based on the Brazilian emissions profile, discusses general perspectives to the use of the CDM, mainly in projects involving co-generation in the agricultural sector. It is observed high uncertainty about the liquidity and development of the carbon credit market, above all, with reference to the definition of the second period of the Kyoto Protocol commitments. Even so, with the consolidation of the institutional environment, the carbon credit market must become favorable to the projects of co-generation in agricultural sector, especially in countries as Brazil. (author)

  10. Getting to no: how Kansas advocates derailed the Anthem steamroller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A battle royale has taken shape in Kansas about the future of its Blue Cross and Blue Shield plan. This past February, Kansas Insurance Commissioner Kathleen Sebelius rocked the corporate health care establishment by refusing to allow Anthem Insurance Company to buy the state's independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield plan. Then in June, a state judge overturned her decision. Now the case is headed to appeals court, where Sebelius will seek to have her decision reinstated. At the heart of the legal wrangling is the unprecedented manner in which advocates have asserted consumer interests, raising issues that will persist long after the courts hand down a final ruling. States of Health looks at how consumer advocates have responded to the proposed Blues transaction, a process that has strengthened the health consumer voice in Kansas--and offers important lessons for advocates in other states as well.

  11. Fine Needle Aspiration of Thyroid Nodules Using the Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology: An Institutional Experience in a Rural Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminoh, Yuuki; Forward, Terra; Schwartz, Frank L.; Jenkinson, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Background. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) remains the first-line diagnostic in management of thyroid nodules and reduces unnecessary surgeries. However, it is still challenging since cytological results are not always straightforward. This study aimed to examine the results of thyroid FNA using the Bethesda system for reporting thyroid cytopathology (TBSRTC) to establish the level of accuracy of FNA procedures in a rural practice setting. Method. A retrospective chart review was conducted on existing thyroid FNA performed in a referral endocrine center between December 2011 and November 2015. Results. A total of 159 patients (18–88 years old) and 236 nodule aspirations were performed and submitted for evaluation. 79% were benign, 3% atypia/follicular lesion of unknown significance (AUS/FLUS), 5% follicular neoplasm/suspicious for follicular neoplasm (FN/SFN), 4% suspicious for malignancy (one case was indeed an atypical parathyroid neoplasm by surgical pathology), 2% malignant, and 7% nondiagnostic. Two cases also had advanced molecular analysis on FNA specimens before thyroidectomy. Conclusion. The diagnostic yield of FNA cytology from our practice in a rural setting suggests that accuracy and specificity are comparable to results from larger centers. PMID:28280507

  12. Imbalance and Correction of the Rural Credit Cooperatives and Rural Economic Relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    This article expounds the manifestations of imbalance between the rural credit cooperatives and rural economic relations: the rural credit cooperatives fail to effectively promote economic development in rural areas; the rural economy is also incapable of effectively promoting the development of the rural credit cooperatives. It analyses the reasons for imbalance between the rural credit cooperatives and rural economic relations,including the direct reason (loss of function of the rural credit cooperatives) ,the fundamental reason (restricted economic development of agriculture and countryside and relative pauperization of farmers) ,and the deep-seated reason (sluggish rural economic development) . Corresponding countermeasures and proposals are put forward for promoting balanced development of the rural credit cooperatives and rural economy as follows: first, deepen reform of the rural credit cooperatives,strengthen the function of the rural credit cooperatives in serving the needs of agriculture; second, speed up economic development in rural areas,eliminate the economic constraints for the development of the rural credit cooperatives; third,transform the development pattern and the development strategies,foster the macro-institutional environment for balanced development of rural credit cooperatives and rural economy.

  13. Occurrence of organic wastewater compounds in effluent-dominated streams in Northeastern Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.J.; Rasmussen, T.J.

    2006-01-01

    Fifty-nine stream-water samples and 14 municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) discharge samples in Johnson County, northeastern Kansas, were analyzed for 55 compounds collectively described as organic wastewater compounds (OWCs). Stream-water samples were collected upstream, in, and downstream from WWTF discharges in urban and rural areas during base-flow conditions. The effect of secondary treatment processes on OWC occurrence was evaluated by collecting eight samples from WWTF discharges using activated sludge and six from WWTFs samples using trickling filter treatment processes. Samples collected directly from WWTF discharges contained the largest concentrations of most OWCs in this study. Samples from trickling filter discharges had significantly larger concentrations of many OWCs (p-value < 0.05) compared to samples collected from activated sludge discharges. OWC concentrations decreased significantly in samples from WWTF discharges compared to stream-water samples collected from sites greater than 2000??m downstream. Upstream from WWTF discharges, base-flow samples collected in streams draining predominantly urban watersheds had significantly larger concentrations of cumulative OWCs (p-value = 0.03), caffeine (p-value = 0.01), and tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (p-value < 0.01) than those collected downstream from more rural watersheds.

  14. Annual Report of Groundwater Monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Periodic sampling is performed at Centralia, Kansas, on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) by Argonne National Laboratory. The sampling is currently (2009-2012) conducted in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2009). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater sitewide (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a), as well as the response to the interim measure (IM) pilot test that is in progress (Argonne 2007b). This report provides a summary of the findings for groundwater inspection in Centralia.

  15. Rural Lending Reform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FIONAWANG

    2005-01-01

    Impended by the lack of a rural financial service network, farmers in China are prone to encounter many difficulties when attempting to secure loans. According to statistics, agriculture accounted for 14.8 percent of China's gross domestic product (GDP) in 2003, but it only used no more than 6 percent of outstanding loans released by all China's financial institutions.

  16. Rural hospitals under PPS: a five-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R G; Zeddies, T C; Zimmerman, M K; McLean, R A

    1990-07-01

    This research examines the impact of prospective payment (PPS) on the financial performance of Kansas hospitals, which are predominantly rural. Financial ratios are presented and regressed on bed size and year. The data suggest that bed size has the strongest effect on financial viability. There are indications of a delayed effect of PPS on the rural, smallest hospitals (fewer than 25 beds), suggesting that non-operating sources of revenue (local property tax mill levies) are being used to subsidize them in the short term. Small hospitals appear to be delaying all capital and long-term costs to survive. The research suggests that the effect of PPS may be long term.

  17. October 2008 monitoring results for Morrill, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-03-10

    In September 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) initiated periodic sampling of groundwater in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Morrill, Kansas. The sampling at Morrill is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2005), to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at this site (Argonne 2004, 2005a). This report provides results for the most recent monitoring event, in October 2008. Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), groundwater was initially sampled twice yearly for a period of two years (in fall 2005, in spring and fall 2006, and in spring and fall 2007). The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as for selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. During the two-year period, the originally approved scope of the monitoring was expanded to include vegetation sampling (initiated in October 2006) and surface water and stream bed sediment sampling (initiated in March 2007, after a visual reconnaissance along Terrapin Creek [Argonne 2007a]). The analytical results for groundwater sampling events at Morrill in September 2005, March and September 2006, March and October 2007, and April 2008 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007b, 2008a,c). Those results consistently demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (5.0 {micro}g/L) for this compound, in a groundwater plume extending generally south-southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, toward Terrapin Creek at the south edge of the town. Low levels ({le} 1.3 {micro}g/L) of carbon

  18. Sitewide monitoring at Agra, Kansas, June 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-01-14

    In 1985, carbon tetrachloride was discovered in the groundwater at Agra, Kansas, during routine sampling of public water supply wells. Two of Agra's four public water supply wells contained low but detectable levels of carbon tetrachloride; the concentrations in wells PWS-3 and PWS-4 exceeded the maximum contaminant level. These wells were removed from service in 1986, although they remain available for uses other than drinking water. Other public wells, outside the area of contamination, supply drinking water for the city of Agra. In 1987-2005, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) and the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) conducted investigations to delineate the contaminant plume and to identify source areas for the contamination - which results from the past use of grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride. Source areas were identified on the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility property and on the Producers Agricultural Marketing Association, Inc., property located to the south (Argonne 2006). The contaminant plume extends to the southeast, toward well PWS-3, from the identified source areas. Both the CCC/USDA and Pro-Ag Marketing are currently implementing KDHE-approved interim measures (IMs). To address the contamination identified on its former property, the CCC/USDA is implementing a source control IM consisting of large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) coupled with soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparging (AS). Pro-Ag Marketing plans to use groundwater extraction to address the downgradient plume. The CCC/USDA and Pro-Ag completed installation of the two interim measures in May 2009 and August 2009, respectively. The performance and assessments of the effectiveness of the IMs are being reported separately by the responsible entities. As part of the IM process, the KDHE (2008) requested the development of a joint sitewide groundwater monitoring plan to allow periodic assessment of the

  19. 新时期民族地区农村反贫困面临的挑战与扶贫开发机制创新——以贵州省为例%Challenges of Rural Anti-poverty and Institutional Innovation of Rural Poverty Alleviation in Minority Regions in New Period——A Case of Guizhou Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永平; 周丕东; 黄海燕; 刘希磊

    2012-01-01

    新时期民族地区农村反贫困成效如何,直接关系到2020年我国全面小康社会战略目标能否实现.本文以贵州省为例,在分析新时期农村反贫困面临的挑战的基础上,提出了针对不同对象实施有针对性的扶贫措施、扶业与扶人并举、区域瞄准与人口瞄准相结合的扶贫开发总体思路,并从“两项制度”衔接、推进区域连片开发、完善“大扶贫”联动机制和扶贫资金投入与监管机制、健全贫困动态监测与绩效考评机制等方面,提出了推动新时期农村扶贫开发体制机制创新的对策措施.%The effectiveness of the rural anti-poverty in minority regions in the new period directly concerns the realization of the two strategic goals of basically eliminating absolute poverty phenomena and completely building overall well-off society by 2020 in China. Based on the analysis of the rural poverty problems and challenges of rural anti-poverty in Guizhou Province, this paper puts forward the general idea of poverty alleviation, which is adopting pertinent poverty alleviation measures for different poor populations, supporting the development of both rural industry and poor populations, and targeting both poor region and poor populations. Meanwhile, the paper suggests specific countermeasures for promoting institutional innovation of the rural poverty alleviation in terms of linking "two systems", promoting regional development, perfecting linkage mechanisms of anti-poverty and the mechanisms of poverty alleviation fund investing and controlling, and improving the dynamic monitoring and evaluation mechanisms, etc.

  20. 土地制度变迁与农村经济增长--理论逻辑与实证评价%Land Institutional Change and Rural Economic Growth--Theoretical logic and empirical evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔占峰; 李宇飞

    2013-01-01

      实证研究是现代经济学常用的方法。计量学派的实证研究通过将“制度”这一变量嫁接到技术、资本或劳动上,形成了制度变迁与经济增长关系实证研究的两种思路。土地制度与农村经济增长之间关系的实证研究是上述思路的具体运用。尽管不同研究者设置的制度维度存在差异,但却得到了制度变迁对增长具有正向作用的一致结论。结论的一致性排除了制度失灵理论上的可能性,却增加了陷入福格尔反事实度量法陷阱的危险。土地制度变迁的动态性增加了比较研究的重要性,而将制度对于经济增长贡献的度量拓展到对更为复杂的经济发展的度量将具有更现实的意义。%Empirical research is a commonly used method of modern economics. An empirical study of the measurement school formed two approaches of institutional change and empirical studies of economic growth by grafting the variable “Institution”on technology, capital or labor. An empirical study of the relationship between the land institution and rural economic growth is a specific application of the above ideas. Although different researchers set different dimensions of the institution,it drew the consistent conclusions that institutional change has a positive effect on growth. The consistency of the conclusions excluded the possibility of Theory Of System Malfunction,but increased the danger of falling into the trap of Fogel Counterfactural Measurment.The dynamic nature of land institutional change increased the importance of comparative studies,and the expansion of institution for the measure of contribution of economic growth to More complex measure of economic development will have more realistic significance.

  1. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  2. Local resource based approach to maintaining and preserving rural local access roads assets: Siyatentela institutional framework and governance case study discourses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chakwizira, J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available certain surface tolerances, and compacting material (World Bank, 2006). Local Resource Based Approaches & Institutional Responses Since the mid 80s, many developing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America have begun implementing important road... by globalization, the growth of urbanization and the democratization processes that emerged post the 1970s era (World Bank, 2006). In Africa, Asia and Latin America, decentralization is considered as a key element in order 4th SARF / IRF Regional Conference...

  3. Serologic incidence of some diseases in Kansas wild turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, J K; Applegate, R D; Osborne, S J

    1998-01-01

    Wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo, n = 1164) were tested for Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma meleagridis, Mycoplasma synoviae, and Salmonella pullorum from 1990 to 1997. Although 3.3% of the turkeys were suspect for one or more diseases, only 0.9% were serologically positive for M. gallisepticum. These 11 positives were all from one country in south-central Kansas.

  4. Teaching Kansas History: The State of the State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isern, Thomas D.

    1990-01-01

    Provides a history of debate concerning issue of teaching Kansas state history in public schools as mandated by law. Studies show the failure to comply was a result of nonavailability of textbooks and lack of teacher preparation. Contends that State Department of Education did not support the law because state history is not taught in many Kansas…

  5. Southeast Kansas Demonstration Child Development Center. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman, Joan I.

    The development of 10 preschool children who attended the Southeast Kansas Demonstration Child Development Center was compared with the development of 10 preschool children who did not attend a child care center to ascertain the value of the center's program. Both groups were tested with the Denver Developmental Screening Test at the beginning and…

  6. The Best Little Teacher Education Program in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demski, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Many undergraduate teacher education programs still treat technology as an elective, instead of an integral and inseparable part of the curriculum. So when "T.H.E. Journal" set out to find the best program for training tomorrow's teachers, it found one at a K-12 school district in Kansas. The Blue Valley School District in Overland Park,…

  7. Why Kansas Is Developing Standards for Its Adult Education Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharakis, Jeff; Glass, Dianne S.

    2010-01-01

    In Kansas, local and state adult education leaders realized that leadership standards cannot be ignored if adult education is to be perceived as a professional discipline within the state's larger educational community. The perfect opportunity to study and develop leadership standards for adult education directors and coordinators presented itself…

  8. Final work plan for targeted sampling at Webber, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-05-01

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for targeted sampling at Webber, Kansas (Figure 1.1). This activity is being conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). Data obtained in this sampling event will be used to (1) evaluate the current status of previously detected contamination at Webber and (2) determine whether the site requires further action. This work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Argonne has issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan, approved by the KDHE, contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. This document should be consulted for complete details of the technical activities proposed at the former CCC/USDA facility in Webber.

  9. Kansas Citizens Plan Comprehensive Mental Retardation Services. Summary and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas State Dept. of Social Welfare, Topeka. Div. of Institutional Management.

    Summarized are the recommendations and findings of 1 1/2-year project to prepare a plan to combat mental retardation in Kansas. The study is said to have been based on the principle that needs rather than diagnostic labels should determine services provided. Outlined are mental retardation planning activities at the federal level and preplanning…

  10. Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, S.

    2010-05-01

    This report provides an overview of a technical report on an assessment NREL conducted in Greensburg, Kansas, to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region. See NREL/TP-7A2-45843 for the Executive Summary of this report.

  11. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This secondary horticulture curriculum guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in thirteen sections: (1) Orientation and Careers, (2) Leadership and Future Farmers of America, (3) Supervised Occupational Experience Program, (4) Plant…

  12. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This second horticulture guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in eight sections: (1) Leadership, (2) Supervised Occupational Experience, (3) Plant Propagation, (4) Soil and Plant Growth Media, (5) Fertilizers, (6) Greenhouse, (7) Plant…

  13. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This secondary horticulture curriculum guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in eight sections: (1) Human Relations, (2) Business Operations, (3) Greenhouse, (4) Retail Flowershop Operation, (5) Landscape Nursery, (6) Lawn Maintenance, (7)…

  14. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-04-01

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  15. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Egan

    2010-04-14

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  16. Sediment oxygen demand in eastern Kansas streams, 2014 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Guy M.; King, Lindsey R.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2016-08-29

    Dissolved oxygen concentrations in streams are affected by physical, chemical, and biological factors in the water column and streambed, and are an important factor for the survival of aquatic organisms. Sediment oxygen demand (SOD) rates in Kansas streams are not well understood. During 2014 and 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, measured SOD at eight stream sites in eastern Kansas to quantify SOD rates and variability with respect to season, land use, and bottom-sediment characteristics. Sediment oxygen demand rates (SODT) ranged from 0.01 to 3.15 grams per square meter per day at the ambient temperature of the measurements. The summer mean SOD rate was 3.0-times larger than the late fall mean rate, likely because of increased biological activity at warm water temperatures. Given the substantial amount of variability in SOD rates possible within sites, heterogeneity of substrate type is an important consideration when designing SOD studies and interpreting the results. Sediment oxygen demand in eastern Kansas streams was correlated with land use and streambed-sediment characteristics, though the strength of relations varied seasonally. The small number of study sites precluded a more detailed analysis. The effect of basin land use and streambed sediment characteristics on SOD is currently (2016) not well understood, and there may be many contributing factors including basin influences on water quality that affect biogeochemical cycles and the biological communities supported by the stream.

  17. Collection Development Policy for the University of Kansas Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Ted, Ed.; And Others

    This policy reflects developmental patterns governing the evolution of collections in the University of Kansas Libraries. Policy statements, written by bibliographers, are provided for 54 subject areas: African studies; anthropology; applied English; architecture and urban design; art; astronomy and physics; biological sciences; business…

  18. 建立存款保险制度对地方性金融机构的影响研究——以延边州农村金融机构为例%Study on the influence on local financial institution by the establishment of deposit insurance system:Take Yianbian rural financial institution example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李占伟

    2012-01-01

    建立存款保险制度是成熟市场经济国家的通行做法,我国存款保险立法的步伐也正在加紧。建立存款保险制度对地方性金融机构到底有何影响,本文以延边州农村金融机构为例,通过定性定量分析,提出若干建议,以期既能保证存款保险制度的适时推出,又尽可能减少政策对地方性金融机构的震动。%It is the common practice for mature market economy country, and the steps of deposit insurance legislation in china is also being speeded up. In order to find out how much influence of the establishment of deposit insurance system to the local financial institution, some suggestions, based on the example of Yanbian rural financial institution, are put forward in this paper by using qualitative and quantitative methods, so as to make sure the timely launch of deposit insurance system and reduce the influence of the establishment of deposit insurance system on local financial institution.

  19. The Evolution of Groundwater Management Paradigms in Kansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophocleous, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to trace the evolution of key water-related laws and management practices in Kansas, from the enactment of the Kansas Water Resources Appropriation Act of 1945 to the present, in order to highlight the state's efforts to create a more sustainable water future and in hopes that others will benefit from Kansas' experience. The 1945 Act provides the basic framework of water law (prior appropriation) in Kansas. Progression of groundwater management in the state encompasses local ground-water management districts (GMDs) and their water-management programs, minimum-streamflow and TMDL standards, water-use reporting and water metering programs, use of modified safe-yield policies in some GMDs, the subbasin water-resources-management program, the integrated resource planning/Aquifer Storage and Recovery project of the City of Wichita, the Central Kansas Water Bank, enhanced aquifer subunits management, and various water conservation programs. While these have all contributed to the slowing down of declines in groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer and in associated ecosystems, they have not yet succeeded in halting those declines. Based on the assumption that the different management approaches have to operate easily within the prevailing water rights and law framework to succeed, a number of steps are suggested here that may help further halt the declines of the High Plains aquifer. These include eliminating the "use it or lose it" maxim in the prior-appropriation framework, broadening the definition of "beneficial use," regulating domestic and other "exempt" wells, encouraging voluntary "sharing the shortage" agreements, and determining to what extent water rights may be regulated in the public interest without a compensable "taking." Further necessary measures include determining to what extent water-rights holders might be subjected to reasonable dictates without having the security of their rights altered.

  20. Prevalence of depression and associated risk factors among the elderly in urban and rural field practice areas of a tertiary care institution in Ludhiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramita Sengupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression, the most common psychiatric disorder among the elderly, is not yet perceived as an important health problem in India, where few population-based studies have addressed this problem. Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of depression and identify the associated risk factors in the elderly population. Materials and Methods: 3038 consenting elderly (>60 years old rural and urban residents of both sexes from the field practice areas were interviewed and examined in a cross-sectional study. Physical impairment in the subjects was assessed with the Everyday Abilities Scale for India (EASI, depression by the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15, and cognitive impairment by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE. Data were analyzed using Epi Info version-6 software. Statistical analysis included proportions, χ[2] -test, odds ratio, and its 95% confidence interval. Multiple logistic regression was done using SPSS version 21. Results: The prevalence of depression in the study population was 8.9%. It was significantly higher in urban residents, females, older elderly, nuclear families, in those living alone, those not working, illiterates, poor, functionally impaired, and cognitively impaired. In the multivariate analysis, unmarried/widowed status, unemployment, and illiteracy did not emerge as risk factors. Conclusions: Urban residence, female gender, higher age, nuclear family, poverty, and functional and cognitive impairment were found to be associated with depression even after controlling for other factors.

  1. Rural Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rural Health Topics & States Topics View more Rural Aging The nation's population is aging, and with that change comes increased healthcare needs. ... Disease Control and Prevention report, The State of Aging and Health in America 2013 , the population 65 ...

  2. Evolution of the Hydro-Kansas Research Program to Test Two Integrative Scaling Hypotheses in the Whitewater Basin, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, V. K.

    2005-12-01

    The Hydro-Kansas (H-K) research program represents an illustrative example of the Water, Earth, Biota (WEB) report to develop an integrated hydrologic science involving new theories and observations (http://cires.colorado.edu/hydrology). The main objective of the H-K research program is to test two integrative scaling hypotheses in the 1100 sq. km. Whitewater Basin, KS: Fundamental statistical scale invariant relationships exist for floods and riparian vegetation evapotranspiration (ET) with respect to complete Horton-Strahler order streams. The biophysical origins of scaling can be tested from biophysical processes that couple water, energy, terrain and vegetation on time scales of individual rainfall-runoff events. The long-term goal is to extend these hypotheses to seasonal, annual and inter-annual time scales. The H-K research program requires developing new analytical theories and numerical models, and taking new integrated core observations in the Whitewater basin. Several academic institutions and federal agencies are cooperating and supporting the H-K program, which has been developing in several phases since 2001. The first phase (2001-present) has developed a digital watershed environment for numerical modeling and for data archiving. The first set of results to test the physical basis of statistical scaling flood hypothesis on two Agriculture Research Service (ARS) basins will be presented in a companion talk in this session. We developed and tested a new steam gauging methodology on the Whitewater basin during the second phase of the project (2003-2004). Initial results are very promising and are comparable to or better than the well-established, USGS stream-gauging methodology. The third phase (2005-06) consists of a pilot project to install 12 stream flow gauges at the end of complete Horton-Strahler streams. In addition, 14 rainfall-gauging sites are being installed and will be used in tandem with NEXRAD at Wichita for estimating space-time variable

  3. Hydrologic and water-quality conditions in the Kansas River, northeast Kansas, November 2001-August 2002, and simulation of ammonia assimilative capacity and bacteria transport during low flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Christensen, Victoria G.

    2005-01-01

    Large concentrations of ammonia and densities of bacteria have been detected in reaches of the Kansas River in northeast Kansas during low streamflow conditions, prompting the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) to list these reaches as water-quality limited with respect to ammonia and fecal coliform bacteria. Sources for ammonia and bacteria in the watershed consist of wastewater-treatment facilities (WWTFs) and agricultural and urban runoff. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with KDHE, conducted an investigation of the Kansas River to characterize hydrologic and water-quality conditions and to simulate ammonia assimilative capacity and bacteria transport during low streamflow. This report characterizes the water-quality conditions, documents the calibration of a two-dimensional water-quality model, and presents results of hypothetical simulations of existing and future WWTFs discharging to the Kansas River during low streamflow.

  4. Investigation of contaminant sources at Navarre, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-05

    The results of the 2006 investigation of contaminant sources at Navarre, Kansas, clearly demonstrate the following: {sm_bullet} Sources of carbon tetrachloride contamination were found on the Navarre Co-op property. These sources are the locations of the highest concentrations of carbon tetrachloride found in soil and groundwater at Navarre. The ongoing groundwater contamination at Navarre originates from these sources. {sm_bullet} The sources on the Co-op property are in locations where the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) never conducted grain storage operations. {sm_bullet} No definitive sources of carbon tetrachloride were identified on the portion of the current Co-op property formerly used by the CCC/USDA. {sm_bullet} The source areas on the Co-op property are consistent with the locations of the most intense Co-op operations, both historically and at present. The Co-op historically stored carbon tetrachloride for retail sale and used it as a grain fumigant in these locations. {sm_bullet} The distribution patterns of other contaminants (tetrachloroethene and nitrate) originating from sources on the Co-op property mimic the carbon tetrachloride plume. These other contaminants are not associated with CCC/USDA operations. {sm_bullet} The distribution of carbon tetrachloride at the Co-op source areas, particularly the absence of contamination in soils at depths less than 20 ft below ground level, is consistent with vertical migration into the subsurface through a conduit (well Co-op 2), with subsequent lateral migration through the subsurface. {sm_bullet} The groundwater flow direction, which is toward the west-northwest, is not consistent with migration of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater from the former CCC/USDA property to the source areas on the Co-op property. {sm_bullet} The absence of soil and groundwater contamination along surface drainage pathways on the former CCC/USDA property is not consistent with

  5. Organizing Rural Health Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    The liberalization of health care in the course of three decades of ‘reform and opening up’ has given people in rural China access to a diverse range of treatment options, but the health care system has also been marred by accusations of price hikes, fake pharmaceuticals, and medical malpractice....... This chapter offers an ethnographic description of health as an issue in a Hebei township and it focuses on a popular and a statist response to the perceived inadequacy of the rural health care system. The revival of religious practices in rural China is obviously motivated by many factors, but in the township...... in question, various forms of healing play a significant role in religious movements and the rising cost of medical services as well as a general distrust of formal medical institutions seem to be part of the reason why people choose to follow spirit mediums and religious movements that offer alternative...

  6. ANALYSIS OF DISINFECTION OF RURAL MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS IN PINGLUO COUNTY FROM 2007 TO 2009%平罗县2007~2009年乡村医疗机构消毒效果调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵建军; 王晓东; 杨永才

    2011-01-01

    [ Objectivel To understand the sterilization situation of Pingluo County Hospital, find out disinfection and management problems, so as to provide science basis for stenriization in rural medical institutions, and provide information for prevent and control infection. [Methods ] We monitored the sterilization of rural medical institutions from 2007 to 2009 according to the methods and requirement of Ministry of health in the disinfection methods, the health standard for medical sterilization and disinfection and sterilization methods and criteria. [ Results] We monitored 1979 copies, including medical personnel of the hand, ultraviolet, surface and sterilization. A total of 1581 copies were qualified with the average rate of 79.9%. From 2007 to 2009, we respectively monitored 650, 648 and 681 copies, with the rates of 72.8% , 79. 5%and 87.1%, respectively.There was signivant difference in the three groupe (P < 0.01). The average qualified rate of county and village medical centers were 89.1% and 76.5%, respectively (P < 0.01). The qualified rate of sterilization instruments and hands of medical staff was high, but the pass rate of objective' s surface and ultraviolet lamp showed to be low. Especially for UV in rural medical units was low, and was only 69.9%. [Conclusion ] The sterilization work was slightly changed through three years' supervision and management, disinfection and supervision work is yet to be further strengthened.%[目的]了解平罗县乡村医序机构消毒效果情况,找出消毒管理工作存在的问题,为科学指导基层医疗机构消毒工作、预防和控制感染提供科学依据.[方法]按卫生部、和的方法和要求,我所于2007-2009年对乡村两级医疗卫生单位消毒效果进行了监测.[结果]共监测医务人员的手、紫外线灯、物体表面、灭菌物品等各类样品共计1979份,合格1581份,平均合格率79.9%.2007-2009年3年间监测各类样品数分别为650、648和681

  7. Management Enviroment in the Designated Medical Institution of the New Rural Cooperative Medical%新农合定点医疗机构管理环境分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊光辉; 王方; 雷坤; 王琳

    2011-01-01

    With the deepening development of medical system reform, Chinas new rural cooperative medi-cal system security role is shown with each passing day. In the implementation process, there are some drawbacks in management controls. The author analyzed the internal and external environment of designated medical institu-tions and put forward some improving measures, which included establishing the contactor system, strengthening business triage, perfecting feedback mechanism, executing couplet, etc.%随着我国医疗体制改革的进一步深化,新型农村合作医疗保障制度的作用日渐显现.新型农村合作医疗制度在执行过程中,出现一些管理控制不到位的现象,分析定点医疗机构的内部和外部环境因素,通过制度监管、建立联系人制度、加强业务分流完善反馈机制、实行联网工作等措施加强新农合定点医疗机构的管理.

  8. Summary of hydrologic conditions in Kansas, water year 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louen, Justin M.

    2017-04-06

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring sites in Kansas. Real-time data are collected at 216 streamgage sites and are verified throughout the year with regular measurements of streamflow made by USGS personnel. Annual assessments of hydrologic conditions are made by comparing statistical analyses of current and historical water year (WY) data for the period of record. A WY is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the calendar year in which the period ends. Long-term monitoring of hydrologic conditions in Kansas provides critical information for water-supply management, flood forecasting, reservoir operations, irrigation scheduling, bridge and culvert design, ecological monitoring, and many other uses.

  9. CLIMATE CHANGE AND ITS IMPACT ON WHEAT PRODUCTION IN KANSAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C. Howard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effect of climate change on wheat production in Kansas using annual time series data from 1949 to 2014. For the study, an error correction model is developed in which the price of wheat, the price of oats (substitute good, average annual temperature and average annual precipitation are used as explanatory variables with total output of wheat being the dependent variable. Time series properties of the data series are diagnosed using unit root and cointegration tests. The estimated results suggest that Kansas farmers are supply responsive to both wheat as well as its substitute (oat prices in the short run as well as in the long run. Climate variables; temperature has a positive effect on wheat output in the short run but an insignificant effect in the long run. Precipitation has a positive effect in the short run but a negative effect in the long run.

  10. College-industry alliances improving science education in Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.; Moore, J.; Palubicki, S. [Kansas Newman College, Wichita, KS (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Kansas Newman College`s investigate laboratory approach and its partnership with local industries has been motivating precollege students into science since 1990. The Vulcan Chemical Company in Wichita supported our Investigative Summer Science Program for high school juniors where we make science fun and exciting through exploration and testing of ideas, broaden their scientific interests, foster independent scholarship, and with active involvement of community scientists, make them aware of career opportunities and challenges in sciences. Upon completion, 80% to 94% of the participants became interested in pursuing science in college. Our second approach has been to encourage pre-college faculty to have their students present science projects at the annual meeting of Kansas Junior Academy of Science. The Metropolitan Life Foundation has been underwriting all the expenses for promoting participation and hosting of the annual meeting since 1987. The number of science projects/papers has increased from 11 in 1987 to 43 in 1993.

  11. Bendix Kansas City Division technological spinoff through 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, H.T.

    1979-02-01

    The results of work of Bendix Kansas City Division are made available in the form of technical reports that are processed through the DOE Technical Information Center in Oak Ridge. The present report lists the documents released by the Division, along with author and subject indexes. Drawing sets released are also listed. Locations of report collections in the U.S., other countries, and international agencies are provided. (RWR)

  12. High throughput screening operations at the University of Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anuradha

    2014-05-01

    The High Throughput Screening Laboratory at University of Kansas plays a critical role in advancing academic interest in the identification of chemical probes as tools to better understand the biological and biochemical basis of new therapeutic targets. The HTS laboratory has an open service policy and collaborates with internal and external academia as well as for-profit organizations to execute projects requiring HTS-compatible assay development and screening of chemical libraries for target validation, probe selection, hit identification and lead optimization.

  13. Assessing urban forest effects and values: Douglas County, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Allison R. Bodine; Robert E. Hoehn; Alexis Ellis; Kim Bomberger; Daniel E. Crane; Theodore A. Endreny; Thomas Taggert; Emily. Stephan

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of trees in Douglas County, Kansas, reveals that this area has about 14,164,000 trees with tree and shrub canopy that covers 25.2 percent of the county. The most common tree species are American elm, northern hackberry, eastern redcedar, Osage-orange, and honeylocust. Trees in Douglas County currently store about 1.7 million tons of carbon (6.4 million tons...

  14. Monitoring the Increase in Seismicity in South-Central Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, K.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Watney, W. L.

    2016-12-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in seismicity in the Midcontinent over the last five years, which appears to be linked to the injection of large volumes of wastewater from oilfield operations. Injection of fluids into deeper formations causes an increase in pore pressure, which can facilitate slip on existing faults oriented optimally to subsurface stress fields. Very little is known about the stresses within the shallow basement in Southern Kansas which has seen an increase in seismicity. The historical average of 21 M>3 earthquakes a year has increased to 188 M>3 reported earthquakes observed in 2011, in the US midcontinent. Earthquake focal mechanisms were analyzed for western Sumner County, south-central Kansas, from May of 2015 to July of 2016. The Kansas Geological Society (KGS) seismometer array in the Wellington Oil Field and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) portable array in southern Kansas were used to locate the earthquakes. These arrays generated a catalog of events from Mw .4 to Mw 3.5. Analyses of focal mechanisms for nearly 200 earthquakes larger than approximately Mw 2.0 were included in the inversion. Earthquakes of this magnitude were recorded on nearly all stations. The larger magnitude events tend to cluster in Northeast-Southwest and Northwest-Southeast lineations. These local, larger earthquakes provide a better understanding of the stresses that are causing the increased seismicity. The stress tensor was calculated for the region to the west of the city of Wellington, KS, in Sumner County. The primary horizontal stress direction is nearly east. This observation is in agreement with well data that estimates the maximum horizontal stress at approximately 75 degrees.

  15. Final work plan : groundwater monitoring at Morrill, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-01-27

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for a program of twice yearly groundwater monitoring at Morrill, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The purposes of this monitoring program are to follow changes in plume dynamics and to collect data necessary to evaluate the suitability of monitored natural attenuation as a remedial option, under the requirements of Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy No.BER-RS-042. This monitoring program is planned for a minimum of 2 yr. The planned monitoring activity is part of an investigation at Morrill being performed on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Details and background for this Work Plan were presented previously (Argonne 2004, 2005). Argonne has also issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan (approved by the KDHE) contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. These documents must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Morrill.

  16. Final work plan : groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2005-08-31

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for a program of twice yearly groundwater monitoring at the site of a former grain storage facility at Centralia, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The purposes of this monitoring program are to follow changes in plume dynamics and to collect data necessary to evaluate the suitability of monitored natural attenuation as a remedial option, under the requirements of Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy No.BER-RS-042. This monitoring program is planned for a minimum of 2 yr. The planned monitoring activity is part of an investigation at Centralia being performed on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Details and background for this Work Plan were presented previously (Argonne 2004, 2005). Argonne has also issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan (approved by the KDHE) contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. These documents must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Centralia.

  17. Revising the Dust Bowl: High Above the Kansas Grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, Kenneth M; Rupley, Eric S A

    2012-07-01

    This article reconstructs land cover patterns in Depressionera Kansas from historical aerial photos and compares the locations of crop fields to areas of submarginal land identified in modern digital soil survey maps. The analysis argues that New Deal land retirement programs overestimated the degree of bad land use because they lacked the basic science to make comprehensive assessments. The findings demonstrate that the misuse of land unfit for cultivation was relatively rare across the central plains but especially in the Dust Bowl region.

  18. Archaeological Survey and Testing at Perry Lake, Jefferson County, Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    underneath it was a representation of the nation’s capitol dome built entirely of Kansas apples with tall jars of grain and seed for the pillars . Visitors...one spark plug, a %piece of iron wire, one metal fastener, a copper coin (penny) and one piece of brick. Although the whiteware dates between 1860 and...pre-1900 date of manufacture, while the electroplated spoon handle has a small floral pattern and probablN dates to the early twentieth century. The

  19. Rurality study of restricted areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rivaroli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Two main perspectives of investigation emerge from the study of a territory’s rurality: a geographical approach and a sociological approach. The research examines the sub-regional study case of ‘Nuovo circondario imolese’. The analysis shows that the combination of traditional institutional criteria with detailed informations about the territory, generates more accurate results which determine a better comprehension of the characteristics of restricted areas’ rurality. Over the period 1991-2001, the study highlights an increase in rural areas. This result could be interpreted as an effect of urban sprawl’s intensification, that increases the competition between non-farm residences and agricultural activities.

  20. Cigarette Consumption and Cigarette Smoking Prevalence Among Adults in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, John S; Lai, Sue Min

    2015-06-11

    Recent tobacco prevention and cessation activities have focused on nonsmoking ordinances and behavioral changes, and in Kansas, the overall prevalence of cigarette smoking among adults has decreased. The objective of this study was to determine whether overall cigarette consumption (mean annual number of cigarettes smoked) in Kansas also decreased. Data on cigarette smoking prevalence for 91,465 adult Kansans were obtained from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey for 1999 through 2010. Data on annual cigarette consumption were obtained from the 2002 and 2006 Kansas Adult Tobacco Survey and analyzed by totals, by sex, and by smoking some days or smoking every day. Linear regression was used to evaluate rate changes over time. Among men, but not women, cigarette smoking prevalence decreased significantly over time. The prevalence of smoking every day decreased significantly among both men and women, whereas the prevalence of smoking on some days increased significantly for women but not men. For current smokers, the mean annual number of cigarettes consumed remained the same. The decline in overall smoking prevalence coupled with the lack of change in mean annual cigarette consumption may have resulted in a more intense exposure to cigarettes for the smoking population. The significant increase in some day use among women indicates a need for additional prevention and education activities; the impact on future lung cancer incidence rates needs further investigation.

  1. Risk assessment Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (DOE/KCP) PCB discharge to Blue River Sewage Treatment Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidambariah, Venkatesh; Garrett, J.K.; King, K.H.; Yambert, M.W.; Travis, C.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-09-29

    The Environmental Protection Department of the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (DOE/KCP) requested that a risk assessment be performed on the potential health effects of discharges of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the DOE/KCP to the Blue River Sewage Treatment Plant, Kansas City's largest publicly owned treatment works facility (Kansas City POTW). The major objectives of this risk assessment are (1) to determine the potential health impacts of DOE/KCP's current discharges of PCBs to the Kansas City POTW via all reasonable exposure pathways and (2) to determine a health-based, safe'' discharge level for PCBs to the Kansas City POTW. The present risk assessment considers both occupational and public impacts of PCB discharges from the DOE/KCP. Two occupational exposure scenarios assessed are (1) risk to Kansas City POTW sewer line maintenance workers and (2) risk to Kansas City POTW workers during routine operations of the facility. Both types of workers may be dermally exposed to PCBs in sewage. Public risks considered include risk to populations living within 50 km of the Kansas City POTW via inhalation of PCBs from sludge incinerated at the facility. Additionally, risk to the general public associated with PCB releases from the Kansas City POTW to the Missouri River is assessed. These pathways include ingestion of PCBs in drinking water supplied by the Missouri River, dermal adsorption and accidental ingestion of PCBs while swimming in the Missouri River, and ingestion of PCBs through consumption of fish taken from the Missouri River. Risk to breastfed infants from ingestion of PCBs through mothers' milk is also assessed. 108 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Rural Supremacy

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Meera

    2011-01-01

    The success of any brand depends on it acceptance by the consumers. This project highlights the rural buying behaviour. The rural consumers tend to show a closed mind towards branded goods and services. Though the current scenario is improved than the past but still large amount of rural market is untapped. The marketers now understand the potential at the bottom of the pyramid but there are doubts regarding the way this market can be reached and converted into customers. Many factors like in...

  3. Rural Supremacy

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Meera

    2011-01-01

    The success of any brand depends on it acceptance by the consumers. This project highlights the rural buying behaviour. The rural consumers tend to show a closed mind towards branded goods and services. Though the current scenario is improved than the past but still large amount of rural market is untapped. The marketers now understand the potential at the bottom of the pyramid but there are doubts regarding the way this market can be reached and converted into customers. Many factors like in...

  4. Integrated rural development programs: a skeptical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttan, V W

    1975-11-01

    In examining integrated rural development programs the question that arises is why is it possible to identify several relatively successful small-scale or pilot rural development projects yet so difficult to find examples of successful rural development programs. 3 bodies of literature offer some insight into the morphology of rural development projects, programs, and processes: the urban-industrial impact hypothesis; the theory of induced technical change; and the new models of institutional change that deal with institution building and the economics of bureaucratic behavior. The urban-industrial impact hypothesis helps in the clarification of the relationships between the development of rural areas and the development of the total society of which rural areas are a part. It is useful in understanding the spatial dimensions of rural development where rural development efforts are likely to be most successful. Formulation of the hypothesis generated a series of empirical studies designed to test its validity. The effect of these studies has been the development of a rural development model in which the rural community is linked to the urban-industrial economy through a series of market relationships. Both the urban economy's rate of growth and the efficiency of the intersector product and factor markets place significant constraints on the possibilities of rural area development. It is not possible to isolate development processes in the contemporary rural community in a developing society from development processes in the larger society. The induced technical change theory provides a guide as to what must be done to gain access to efficient sources of economic growth, the new resources and incomes that are necessary to sustain rural development. Design of a successful rural development strategy involves a combination of technical and institutional change. The ability of rural areas to respond to the opportunities for economic growth generated by local urban

  5. Trends in peak flows of selected streams in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, T.J.; Perry, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of a systematic change in flood potential led to an investigation of trends in the magnitude of annual peak flows in Kansas. Efficient design of highway bridges and other flood-plain structures depends on accurate understanding of flood characteristics. The Kendall's tau test was used to identify trends at 40 stream-gaging stations during the 40-year period 1958-97. Records from 13 (32 percent) of the stations showed significant trends at the 95-percent confidence level. Only three of the records (8 percent) analyzed had increasing trends, whereas 10 records (25 percent) had decreasing trends, all of which were for stations located in the western one-half of the State. An analysis of flow volume using mean annual discharge at 29 stations in Kansas resulted in 6 stations (21 percent) with significant trends in flow volumes. All six trends were decreasing and occurred in the western one-half of the State. The Kendall's tau test also was used to identify peak-flow trends over the entire period of record for 54 stream-gaging stations in Kansas. Of the 23 records (43 percent) showing significant trends, 16 (30 percent) were decreasing, and 7 (13 percent) were increasing. The trend test then was applied to 30-year periods moving in 5-year increments to identify time periods within each station record when trends were occurring. Systematic changes in precipitation patterns and long-term declines in ground-water levels in some stream basins may be contributing to peak-flow trends. To help explain the cause of the streamflow trends, the Kendall's tau test was applied to total annual precipitation and ground-water levels in Kansas. In western Kansas, the lack of precipitation and presence of decreasing trends in ground-water levels indicated that declining water tables are contributing to decreasing trends in peak streamflow. Declining water tables are caused by ground-water withdrawals and other factors such as construction of ponds and terraces. Peak

  6. Countermeasures of Institutional Reform to Accelerate Development of Small Towns in the Western Chinese Rural Area%西部农村小城镇体制改革的对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟顺昌

    2013-01-01

    To develop small towns and to promote rural urbanization is the important way of implementing urbaniza -tion strategy in our country .There are many factors restricting the rapid development of small towns of which institu-tion constraints are the important part .Compared with the system reform of the developed eastern region ,the reform in the western rural small towns is relatively slow and lag ,which mainly reflects in finance ,investment and finan-cing,administration,planning,land circulation etc.On one hand,we should study and draw lessons from revelations of system reform in small towns in developed eastern areas ,at the same time ,by combining the own characteristics of western small towns ,we should get down to find a suitable way for their own development .%制度设计影响着经济绩效的发挥。发展小城镇,促进农村城镇化进程是我国实施城镇化战略必不可少的重要途径。影响小城镇快速发展的制约因素很多,而体制约束是其重要的一方面。相对于东部发达地区的“扩权强镇”和“强镇扩权”改革,西部农村小城镇的体制改革还相对缓慢和滞后,突出体现在财政、行政、规划、土地流转和投融资等方面。一方面,我们应该研究和借鉴东部发达地区在小城镇体制改革方面的经验和启示,同时,要结合西部地区小城镇内部自身特点,探索出一条适合自身发展需要的改革之路。

  7. Rural Social Work - Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Ken

    Because life styles, values, social institutions, and "survival activities" differ in undeveloped rural areas from those in industrial societies, the techniques and approaches used by rural social workers must be adjusted to meet the needs of the population being dealt with. In forager and agricultural societies, social workers and other…

  8. Biotech Tradeoffs in the Rural Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttel, Frederick H.

    1987-01-01

    Synthesizes findings with personal estimates of likely impacts of biotechnology on nonmetropolitan economy, farming, public research institutions. Indicates biotechnology's benefit to rural America may come in expanded demand for raw materials although drawbacks may include declining farm numbers and displacement of rural workers in…

  9. Contingency interim measure for the public water supply at Barnes, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-07-09

    This document presents a conceptual design for a contingency interim measure (IM) for treatment of the public water supply system at Barnes, Kansas, should this become necessary. The aquifer that serves the public water supply system at Barnes has been affected by trace to low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride and its degradation product, chloroform. Investigations conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne 2008a) have demonstrated that groundwater at the Barnes site is contaminated with carbon tetrachloride at concentrations exceeding the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) formerly operated a grain storage facility in Barnes, approximately 800 ft east-southeast of the public water supply wells. Carbon tetrachloride was used in the treatment of grain. Another potential source identified in an investigation conducted for the KDHE (PRC 1996) is the site of a former agriculture building owned by the local school district (USD 223). This building is located immediately east of well PWS3. The potential contingency IM options evaluated in this report include the treatment of groundwater at the public water supply wellheads and the provision of an alternate water supply via Washington County Rural Water District No.2 (RWD 2). This document was developed in accordance with KDHE Bureau of Environmental Remediation (BER) Policy No.BER-RS-029 (Revised) (KDHE 2006a), supplemented by guidance from the KDHE project manager. Upon the approval of this contingency IM conceptual design by the KDHE, the CCC/USDA will prepare a treatment system design document that will contain the following elements: (1) Description of the approved contingency IM treatment method; (2) Drawings and/or schematics provided by the contractor and/or manufacturer of the approved technology; (3) A

  10. Characteristics of Child Abuse Homicides in the State of Kansas from 1994 to 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajese, Tanyaradzwa M.; Nguyen, Linh T.; Pham, Giao Q.; Pham, Van K.; Melhorn, Katherine; Kallail, K. James

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study described the epidemiology of child abuse homicides in the state of Kansas from 1994 to 2007. It focused on obtaining significant details on all recorded child abuse homicides in Kansas during this time frame to provide critical information that can be used for future preventive measures. Methods: A retrospective case review…

  11. Federal-State Cooperative Program in Kansas, seminar proceedings, July 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntzinger, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    During the past few years, water-resource management in Kansas has undergone reorientation with the creation of the Kansas Water Authority and the Kansas Water office. New thrusts toward long-term goals based on the Kansas State Water plan demand strong communication and coordination between all water-related agencies within the State. The seminar discussed in this report was an initial step by the Kansas Water Office to assure the continued presence of a technical-coordination process and to provide an opportunity for the U.S. Geological Survey to summarize their technical-informational activities in Kansas for the benefit of State and Federal water agencies with the State. The seminar was held on July 8 and 9, 1985, in Lawrence, Kansas. The agenda included a summary of the data-collection activities and short synopses of projects completed within the past year and those currently underway. The data program discussions described the information obtained at the surface water, groundwater, water quality, and sediment sites in Kansas. Interpretive projects summarized included studies in groundwater modeling, areal hydrologic analysis, regional analysis of floods , low-flow, high-flow, and flow-volume characteristics, water quality of groundwater and lakes, and traveltime and transit-loss analysis. (USGS)

  12. Characteristics of Child Abuse Homicides in the State of Kansas from 1994 to 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajese, Tanyaradzwa M.; Nguyen, Linh T.; Pham, Giao Q.; Pham, Van K.; Melhorn, Katherine; Kallail, K. James

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study described the epidemiology of child abuse homicides in the state of Kansas from 1994 to 2007. It focused on obtaining significant details on all recorded child abuse homicides in Kansas during this time frame to provide critical information that can be used for future preventive measures. Methods: A retrospective case review…

  13. Kansas School District Leaders' Handbook for Maximizing Nontraditional Donations and Grant Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekarek, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to research, develop, and validate a handbook of effective strategies that Kansas school district leaders can use to increase their ability to maximize their school districts' nontraditional funding. Kansas School District Leaders' Handbook for Maximizing Nontraditional Donations and Grant Funding was developed using…

  14. Geospatial economics of the woody biomass supply in Kansas -- A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olga Khaliukova; Darci Paull; Sarah L. Lewis-Gonzales; Nicolas Andre; Larry E. Biles; Timothy M. Young; James H. Perdue

    2017-01-01

    This research assessed the geospatial supply of cellulosic feedstocks for potential mill sites in Kansas (KS), with procurement zones extending to Arkansas (AR), Iowa(IA), Missouri(MO), Oklahoma (OK), and Nebraska (NE). A web-based modeling system, the Kansas Biomass Supply Assessment Tool, was developed to identify least-cost sourcing areas for logging residues and...

  15. Western Kansas Migrant Health Project: 11th Annual Progress Report, 1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas State Dept. of Health, Topeka.

    Information about the Western Kansas Migrant Health Project for 1974 is presented in this annual progress report. The Project provides: (1) migrant education programs; (2) health education; (3) nursing services; (4) medical and dental services; (5) hospital services; and (6) supplemental food programs. Since August 1974, the western Kansas VISTA…

  16. Archaeological Investigation in the Perry Lake Project Area, Northeastern Kansas National Register Evaluation of 17 Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    University of Kansas ( lithic analysis ), Ms. Michelle Dunlap, Museum of Anthropology, University of Kansas (ceramic analysis; historic assemblages). I...address relevant research goals of the Perry Lake Project. In the past, lithic analysis primarily consisted of classification schemes. From these...the methods of lithic analysis employed here will follow procedures established for the recent Clinton Lake Archaeological Project by Ritterbush

  17. Going Rural

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Foreign banks are beginning to invest in China's rural financial system, helping to meet a strong need for capital As Chinese commercial banks retreat from the rural market, foreign banks appear ready to jump into a sector with a strong thirst for capital. In July, Rabobank Group, the International Finance Corp. and the United

  18. Rural Agrobusiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treillon, Roland; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This publication describes the formation and evolution of rural agribusiness (RA) in the southern hemisphere as a precondition for improving the lives of families in rural communities, and focuses on RA endeavors created by development projects in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa. After a short introduction, the first section of this study…

  19. The Reliance on and Demand for Adjunct Faculty Members in America's Rural, Suburban, and Urban Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Hara D.; Williams, Mitchell R.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on a survey of chief academic officers at 347 community colleges nationwide, this study examined the impact of institutional type (rural, suburban, urban) on reliance on and demand for adjunct faculty members. Findings indicated that rural institutions rely less on adjuncts, whereas both rural and urban institutions report high levels of…

  20. 新型农村金融机构发展研究--以吉林省东丰县吉银村镇银行为例%Research on the Development of New Rural Financial Institutions--Take Dongfeng as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海波; 张文波

    2015-01-01

    作为金融体制创新,村镇银行这类新型农村金融机构的出现,激活了农村金融市场,打破了过去单一垄断局面,形成了有效竞争,促进了农村金融服务质量的提升,标志着农村金融市场体系多元化、竞争化这样一个阶段的到来。吉银村镇银行作为首批试点的村镇银行之一,通过扶持农户和小微企业发展壮大实现自身的长远发展。但不可否认随着市场化的加剧,村镇银行在未来的竞争中,面临更加严峻的考验。%As the innovation of financial system, rural banks this kind of new-type rural financial institutions, the activation of the rural ifnancial market, breaking the past single monopoly, to form an effective competition, to enhance the quality of rural ifnancial services, marking system of rural ifnancial market diversiifcation, the competition of such a stage of arrival. As one of the ifrst batch of pilot villages and towns bank, the bank is one of the ifrst batch of villages and towns, and the development of small and micro enterprises is to achieve their long-term development by supporting the development of small and micro enterprises. But it can not be denied that with the intensiifcation of the market, rural banks in the future of the competition, facing a more severe test.

  1. Effects of Regulation on Induced Seismicity in Southern Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, J. L.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Dougherty, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    The appearance of seismicity concurrent with the expansion of oil and gas activities in southern Kansas since September 2012 suggests that industrial operations are inducing earthquakes there. Much of the seismicity can be related to high-rate injection wells within 5 km of the earthquakes. There is significant complexity to the situation, though. Some of the seismicity, including the 2014 M4.8 Milan earthquake, the largest earthquake to occur in the area, lies at least 10km from high-rate injection wells. Additionally, the presence of high-rate wells does not guarantee that there will be nearby seismicity. Many of the highest-rate injection wells are located to the southwest of our study area, where there is minimal seismicity. We have also seen changes in earthquake rates shortly following the March 2015 enactment of new limits on the rate of wastewater disposal in five areas in southern Kansas. Overall, the earthquake rate has decreased significantly since these rules went into place. In more detail, however, earthquake rates within the five areas decreased, but the rate outside the five zones increased. It is likely that fluid-pressure diffusion is responsible for the migration of seismicity outside the areas of reduced injection because there is little injection in the areas unaffected by the new injection rules. This increase is also a reminder that seismicity can persist long after the reduction or cessation of injection. In addition to the effect of the new injection rules, it is possible that the reduction in injection may be partially caused by economic factors that have resulted in a decrease in the production of oil and gas. We have yet to disentangle the effects of the new injection rules and the low prices of oil and gas on the induced seismicity in southern Kansas.

  2. Mechanical ventilation in rural ICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieselmann; Bock; Hendryx; Wakefield; Helms; Bentler

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, rural hospitals have expanded their scope of specialized services, which has led to the development and staffing of rural intensive care units (ICUs). There is little information about the breadth, quality or outcomes of these services. This is particularly true for specialized ICU services such as mechanical ventilation, where little, if any, information exists specifically for rural hospitals. The long-term objectives of this project were to evaluate the quality of medical care provided to mechanically ventilated patients in rural ICUs and to improve patient care through an educational intervention. This paper reports baseline data on patient and hospital characteristics for both rural and rural referral hospitals. RESULTS: Twenty Iowa hospitals were evaluated. Data collected on 224 patients demonstrated a mean age of 70 years and a mean ICU admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score of 22, with an associated 36% mortality. Mean length of ICU stay was 10 days, with 7.7 ventilated days. Significant differences were found in both institutional and patient variables between rural referral hospitals and rural hospitals with more limited resources. A subgroup of patients with diagnoses associated with complex ventilation had higher mortality rates than patients without these conditions. Patients who developed nosocomial events had longer mean ventilator and ICU days than patients without nosocomial events. This study also found ICU practices that frequently fell outside the guidelines recommended by a task force describing minimum standards of care for critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure on mechanical ventilation. CONCLUSIONS: Despite distinct differences in the available resources between rural referral and rural hospitals, overall mortality rates of ventilated patients are similar. Considering the higher mortality rates observed in patients with complicated medical conditions requiring

  3. Annual Report of Monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the public water supply wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha (Figure 1.1). The population of Morrill as of the 2010 Census was approximately 230 (down from 277 in 2000). All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. This document reports the findings concerning the groundwater in Morrill.

  4. Wastewater Disposal, Hydraulic Fracturing, and Seismicity in Southern Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, J. L.; Terra, F. M.; Ellsworth, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    The concurrent appearance of seismicity with the expansion of oil and gas activities in southern Kansas since September 2012 suggests that industrial operations are inducing earthquakes. These earthquakes occur in a portion of the Mississippian Lime Play, an oil and gas field stretching from central Oklahoma to northwestern Kansas. As has been seen in other areas of high-rate wastewater injection, the seismicity appears to be driven by the disposal of produced water by injection into deep sedimentary formations. We focus on an 1800 km^2 region in Harper and Sumner counties where a temporary, 14-station seismic network deployed by the USGS monitors ongoing seismicity. Regional and national networks supplement the temporary network. Earthquake locations and magnitudes are reported on a daily basis and M≥1.5 earthquakes are included in the USGS Comprehensive Catalog (ComCat) with a magnitude of completeness of ~M2.0. The clusters of earthquakes are principally in the crystalline basement, some forming lineations extending up to 10 km. Focal mechanisms indicate normal faulting, consistent with the local tectonic stress field. While some of the clusters of seismicity are located close to high-rate injection wells, others are at least 10km from large injection wells. Additionally, high-rate wells do not always appear to be associated with seismicity. In response to the increased seismicity, on March 29, 2015 the Kansas Corporation Commission placed new limits on the rate of wastewater disposal in 5 areas in southern Kansas. Since this regulation has been in place, earthquake activity has decreased by 40-50%. In the 87 days between January 1, 2015 and March 29, when the order was enacted, there were on average three M≥2 earthquakes and 0.3 M≥3 earthquakes per day in the study area. The earthquake rate in the 87 days following the change in regulations dropped to 1.8 M≥2 and 0.2 M≥3 earthquakes per day in the same region over the same amount of time. The two

  5. Investigation on screening status of high risk factors of obstetric hemorrhage in rural midwifery institutions%农村地区助产机构产科出血相关高危因素筛查现状调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高群; 宋波; 熊玮仪; 罗晓敏

    2015-01-01

    Objective To understand the screening status of high risk factors of obstetric hemorrhage and problems in screening in rural midwifery institutions. Methods In 2013 cross-sectional survey was used to collect relevant screening information on high risk factors of obstetric hemorrhage among 124 midwifery institutions in 6 counties of 3 provinces, including the situation of screening work, provided services for high risk screening and the detection rate of high risk factors. Results Of 124 midwifery institutions, 74. 19% had conducted high risk factors screening and 55. 65% had set high-risk clinics. The percentages of the use of blood coagulation check, pregnancy map drawing and application of partogram were 50. 81%, 49. 19% and 65. 32% respectively. More county leveled hospitals had conducted all these three services than township leveled ones, and the differences were significant (χ2 value was 11. 201, 4. 119 and 11. 472, respectively, all P<0. 05). The detection rate of high risk factors of obstetric hemorrhage was 25. 17%. That of government hospitals (27. 48%) was higher than private ones (14. 91%) and that of county leveled hospitals (30. 20%) was higher than township leveled ones (15. 99%) with significant differences (χ2 value was 162. 217 and 165. 442, respectively, both P =0. 000). The top three high risk factors were anemia (9. 49%), scarred uterus (9. 05%) and macrosomia (2. 31%). Conclusion The screening of high risk factors of obstetric hemorrhage in rural midwifery institutions is inadequate. It is urgent to complete the setting of high-risk clinics, enhance the management of private and township leveled hospitals, standardize high risk screening and management, and reduce the incidence of obstetric hemorrhage.%目的:了解农村地区助产机构产科出血相关高危因素筛查状况及存在的问题。方法采用横断面的调查方法,收集3个省6个县124所助产机构2013年产科出血相关高危因素

  6. The Attraction of Adjunct Faculty to Rural Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Hara Dracon

    2010-01-01

    As rural community colleges face mounting fiscal pressure, the ability to attract adjunct faculty members to support the institutional mission becomes increasingly important. Although the professional literature documents differences between rural, suburban, and urban community colleges, the effect of this institutional diversity on the role and…

  7. Institutional Capacity Building for Rural Women's Empowerment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, de S.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Basically, women¿s empowerment is the process (and its outcomes) in which women ¿ individually and collectively- become active, knowledgeable and goal-oriented actors who take and/ or support initiatives to overcoming gender inequalities. Hence, women¿s empowerment refers to a strategy to achieve ge

  8. Conflict and the evolution of institutions: Unbundling institutions at the local level in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, Maarten J.; Bulte, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    The impact of armed conflict may persist long after the end of war, and may include a lasting institutional legacy. We use a novel dataset from rural Burundi to examine the impact of local exposure to conflict on institutional quality, and try to ‘unbundle’ institutions by distinguishing between

  9. Rural Priority

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    As the Chinese economy soars ahead in the wake of the international financial crisis, more attention is being given to the country’s indus-trial, financial, investment and trade figures. But the Central Rural Work

  10. Rural nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Rhonda L.; Usher, Kim

    2015-01-01

    with descriptive techniques. In-depth interviews were conducted and the transcribed data were analysed using thematic techniques. Results: The results of this study demonstrate that in general rural people are willing to seek mental health care, and that rural nurses are well suited to provide initial care...... to young people. Conclusions: Non-traditional venues such as community, school and justice settings are ideal places where more convenient first conversations about mental health with young people and their families, and rural nurses should be deployed to these settings. Relevance to Clinical Practice......: Rural nurses are able to contribute important initial engagement interventions that enhance the early mental health care for young people when it is needed....

  11. Profiles of adult survivors of severe sexual, physical and emotional institutional abuse in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, Mark; Carr, Alan; Dooley, Barbara A.; Flanagan-Howard, Roisín; Flanagan, Edel; Tierney, Kevin; White, Megan; Daly, Margaret; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Adult survivors of institutional abuse were interviewed with a comprehensive assessment protocol which included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, the Institutional Child Abuse Processes and Coping Inventory, the Structured Clinical Interviews for Disorders of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV axis I disorders and personality disorders, the Trauma Symptoms Inventory, a Life Problems Checklist, the Experiences in Close Relationships Inventory and the Kansas Marital ...

  12. Distribution and Sources of Nitrate-Nitrogen in Kansas Groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A. Townsend

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Kansas is primarily an agricultural state. Irrigation water and fertilizer use data show long- term increasing trends. Similarly, nitrate-N concentrations in groundwater show long-term increases and exceed the drinking-water standard of 10 mg/l in many areas. A statistical analysis of nitrate-N data collected for local and regional studies in Kansas from 1990 to 1998 (747 samples found significant relationships between nitrate-N concentration with depth, age, and geographic location of wells. Sources of nitrate-N have been identified for 297 water samples by using nitrogen stable isotopes. Of these samples, 48% showed fertilizer sources (+2 to +8 and 34% showed either animal waste sources (+10 to +15 with nitrate-N greater than 10 mg/l or indication that enrichment processes had occurred (+10 or above with variable nitrate-N or both. Ultimate sources for nitrate include nonpoint sources associated with past farming and fertilization practices, and point sources such as animal feed lots, septic systems, and commercial fertilizer storage units. Detection of nitrate from various sources in aquifers of different depths in geographically varied areas of the state indicates that nonpoint and point sources currently impact and will continue to impact groundwater under current land uses.

  13. Streamflow characteristics and trends along Soldier Creek, Northeast Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2017-08-16

    Historical data for six selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgages along Soldier Creek in northeast Kansas were used in an assessment of streamflow characteristics and trends. This information is required by the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation for the effective management of tribal water resources, including drought contingency planning. Streamflow data for the period of record at each streamgage were used to assess annual mean streamflow, annual mean base flow, mean monthly flow, annual peak flow, and annual minimum flow.Annual mean streamflows along Soldier Creek were characterized by substantial year-to-year variability with no pronounced long-term trends. On average, annual mean base flow accounted for about 20 percent of annual mean streamflow. Mean monthly flows followed a general seasonal pattern that included peak values in spring and low values in winter. Annual peak flows, which were characterized by considerable year-to-year variability, were most likely to occur in May and June and least likely to occur during November through February. With the exception of a weak yet statistically significant increasing trend at the Soldier Creek near Topeka, Kansas, streamgage, there were no pronounced long-term trends in annual peak flows. Annual 1-day, 30-day, and 90-day mean minimum flows were characterized by considerable year-to-year variability with no pronounced long-term trend. During an extreme drought, as was the case in the mid-1950s, there may be zero flow in Soldier Creek continuously for a period of one to several months.

  14. Modeling impact of small Kansas landfills on underlying aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophocleous, M.; Stadnyk, N.G.; Stotts, M.

    1996-01-01

    Small landfills are exempt from compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle D standards for liner and leachate collection. We investigate the ramifications of this exemption under western Kansas semiarid environments and explore the conditions under which naturally occurring geologic settings provide sufficient protection against ground-water contamination. The methodology we employed was to run water budget simulations using the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model, and fate and transport simulations using the Multimedia Exposure Assessment Model (MULTIMED) for several western Kansas small landfill scenarios in combination with extensive sensitivity analyses. We demonstrate that requiring landfill cover, leachate collection system (LCS), and compacted soil liner will reduce leachate production by 56%, whereas requiring only a cover without LCS and liner will reduce leachate by half as much. The most vulnerable small landfills are shown to be the ones with no vegetative cover underlain by both a relatively thin vadose zone and aquifer and which overlie an aquifer characterized by cool temperatures and low hydraulic gradients. The aquifer-related physical and chemical parameters proved to be more important than vadose zone and biodegradation parameters in controlling leachate concentrations at the point of compliance. ??ASCE.

  15. Indoor smoking ordinances in workplaces and public places in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, John S; Davis, Ken; Nazir, Niaman; Dunton, Nancy; Winn, Kimberly; Jacquot, Sandy; Moler, Don

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the preferences of elected city officials regarding the need for a statewide clean indoor air law and to analyze the content of local smoking ordinances. A survey of elected officials in 57 larger Kansas cities obtained information on the perceived need for statewide legislation, venues to be covered, and motivating factors. Clean indoor air ordinances from all Kansas cities were analyzed by venue. The survey response rate was 190 out of 377 (50.4%) for elected officials. Over 70% of the respondents favored or strongly favored greater restrictions on indoor smoking. Sixty percent favored statewide legislation. Among these, over 80% favored restrictions in health care facilities, theaters, indoor sports arenas (including bowling alleys), restaurants, shopping malls, lobbies, enclosed spaces in outdoor arenas, and hotel/motel rooms. Officials who had never smoked favored a more restrictive approach. Employee and public health concerns were cited as influential by 76%-79% of respondents. Thirty-eight ordinances, covering over half of the state's population, were examined. They varied considerably in their exemptions. Official's attitudes toward smoking regulations were associated with their smoking status. The examination of existing ordinances revealed a piecemeal approach to smoking regulations.

  16. Efficient mitigation strategies for epidemics in rural regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoglio, Caterina; Schumm, Walter; Schumm, Phillip; Easton, Todd; Roy Chowdhury, Sohini; Sydney, Ali; Youssef, Mina

    2010-07-13

    Containing an epidemic at its origin is the most desirable mitigation. Epidemics have often originated in rural areas, with rural communities among the first affected. Disease dynamics in rural regions have received limited attention, and results of general studies cannot be directly applied since population densities and human mobility factors are very different in rural regions from those in cities. We create a network model of a rural community in Kansas, USA, by collecting data on the contact patterns and computing rates of contact among a sampled population. We model the impact of different mitigation strategies detecting closely connected groups of people and frequently visited locations. Within those groups and locations, we compare the effectiveness of random and targeted vaccinations using a Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Recovered compartmental model on the contact network. Our simulations show that the targeted vaccinations of only 10% of the sampled population reduced the size of the epidemic by 34.5%. Additionally, if 10% of the population visiting one of the most popular locations is randomly vaccinated, the epidemic size is reduced by 19%. Our results suggest a new implementation of a highly effective strategy for targeted vaccinations through the use of popular locations in rural communities.

  17. Engaging a Rural Community with Science through a Science Café

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P. E.

    2012-12-01

    Public awareness about science and science issues is often lacking in the general community; in a rural community there are even fewer options for an interested person to engage with others on science topics. One approach to address this issue is through the use of the Science Café model of citizen science at the local level. The Science Café concept, for the United States, originated in Boston (http://www.sciencecafes.org/). Science Café events are held in informal settings, such as restaurants, pubs, or coffee houses with presentations being provided by experts on the subject. The format is designed to promote discussion and questions. Fort Hays State University Science and Mathematics Institute (SMEI), located in Hays, KS, is now in its fifth year of hosting a science café in a community of 20,000 people. The program in Hays started as a grassroots effort from an area high school teacher asking SMEI to organize and support the program. Attendance at the Science Café has range from 14 to 75 people (fire code capacity!), with an average attendance of 30 people. The audience for our Science Café has been citizens, college students, high school students, and university faculty. The presenters at the Hays Science Café have ranged from scientists to engineers, high school students to hobbyists. Our topics have ranged from searching for life in the universe, wind energy, paleo-life in Kansas, climate change, honey bees, and planetary science. The program has developed a strong following in the community and has led to the formation of additional Science Café programs in Kansas. Selection of topics is based on community interest and timeliness. Publicity occurs through posters, e-mail, and social media outlets. Participants have found the sessions to be of interest and a place to learn more about the world and become informed about issues in the news. The Science Café in Hays has had a positive impact on the community.

  18. What Is Rural?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of mind. For others, rural is an objective quantitative measure. The USDA , Economic Research Service, provides insight to rural definitions with an article, Defining the "Rural" in Rural America: The use ...

  19. Hypothesis and Testing on the Regulation Strategy of Certified Medical Institution of New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme%新型农村合作医疗定点医疗机构监管策略的假设与检验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张乐; 徐凌忠

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the optimal regulation strategy of certified medical institution of New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme. Methods: Testing a hypothetical proposition based on the game analysis method. Results: In the condition of information asymmetry, increasing the punishment of regulatory bodies is the most optimal strategy, rewarding the regulatory behavior is the second best strategy, and increasing the violation cost of certified medical institutions is inferior strategy. Conclusion: The regulation strategy of certified medical institution of New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme has defects, and needs to be further optimized.%目的:探讨对新型农村合作医疗定点医疗机构监管的最优策略.方法:采用博弈分析的方法,对一个假设命题进行检验.结果:在信息不对称的情况下,加大对监管机构的惩罚是最优策略,对监管行为奖励是次优策略,而加大定点医疗机构的违规成本是劣等策略.结论:对定点医疗机构采取的监管策略存在缺陷,有待进一步优化.

  20. Evaluation of Training Programs for Rural Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indira, A.

    2008-01-01

    An Evaluation of the "Impact Assessment of the Training Programs" of a National Level Training Institution in India was conducted using the Kirkpatrick Method (KP Method). The studied Institution takes up research, provides training, offers consultancy and initiates action in the rural sector of India. The evaluation study used a…

  1. Sediment Transport from Urban, Urbanizing, and Rural Areas in Johnson County, Kansas, 2006-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Casey J.

    2013-01-01

    1. Studies have commonly illustrated that erosion and sediment transport from construction sites is extensive, typically 10-100X that of background levels. 2. However, to our knowledge, the affects of construction and urbanization have rarely been assessed (1) since erosion and sediment controls have been required at construction sites, and (2) at watershed (5-65 mi2) scales. This is primarily because of difficulty characterizing sediment loads in small basins. Studies (such as that illustrated from Timble, 1999) illustrated how large changes in surface erosion may not result in substantive changes in downstream sediment loads (b/c of sediment deposition on land-surfaces, floodplains, and in stream channels). 3. Improved technology (in-situ turbidity) sensors provide a good application b/c they provide an independent surrogate of sediment concentration that is more accurate at estimating sediment concentrations and loads that instantaneous streamflow.

  2. Leadership development for rural health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Size, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Leadership is the capacity to help transform a vision of the future into reality. Individuals who can and will exercise leadership are like a river's current--a part past where we now stand, a part yet to come. We have an ongoing need to remember and to look toward the next "generation." A key responsibility of those here now, is to mentor and to create structures for mentoring, in order to maximize the flow and effectiveness of tomorrow's leaders. When recruiting organizational leaders, the recruitment and interview process must seek individuals who in addition to technical competence, also have demonstrated leadership in their prior work and activities. To exercise effective leadership, we must work to know who we are, how we relate to others, and the environment around us. "Servant leadership" is a perspective held by many throughout the rural health community and offers a key set attributes of leadership useful to rural health. To implement the Institute of Medicine's recommendations in Through Collaboration: the Future of Rural Health, we must develop leaders skilled in collaboration, both internal to their organization and across organizations. The National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services had it right when they said to the Secretary and to the rest of us, "the best way to honor Jim is to consciously work to help develop the next generation of rural health leaders." There are, of course, a multitude of leadership institutes, programs, and courses throughout America; this is not a call for yet another separate entity. But it is a call to each of us in rural health to assure that we are deliberate in how we identify "emerging leaders from and for rural communities and provide them with the training and resources to play a lead role in ensuring access to quality healthcare in their states and communities." Let's get started.

  3. Sources, transport, and management of salt contamination in the groundwater of south-central Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the outcomes of studies by the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) during the last decade with regard to mineral intrusion into the aquifers of...

  4. 78 FR 22827 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas; Infrastructure SIP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... implement the Kansas Air Quality Act and to employ the professional, technical and other staff to effectuate... potentially resulted in apartment complexes, strip malls, small farms, restaurants, etc. triggering GHG PSD...

  5. Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term, Class II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Timothy R.; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul

    2001-10-30

    The focus of this project was development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent.

  6. [Kansas plat map : T22S R10W : Quivira National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map is of township no. 22 south, range no. 10 west of 6th principal meridian, Kansas. This map serves as a historical reference to townships in relation to...

  7. [Kansas plat map : T21S R10W : Quivira National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map is of township no. 21 south, range no. 10 west of 6th principal meridian, Kansas. This map serves as a historical reference to townships in relation to...

  8. [Kansas plat map : T21S R11W : Quivira National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map is of township no. 21 south, range no. 11 west of 6th principal meridian, Kansas. This map serves as a historical reference to townships in relation to...

  9. Contaminants in Interior Least Tern Eggs from Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, Kansas, in 1990 and 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Flooded or abandoned eggs of interior least terns (Sterna antillarum) nesting at Quivira National Wildlife Refuge in central Kansas were collected in 1990 and 1991....

  10. A new species of Myrmedonota Cameron from eastern Kansas (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Aleocharinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Eldredge

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Myrmedonota heliantha sp. n. is described from eastern Kansas (USA. All specimens were collected from dung. A modified new key to the species of Myrmedonota of America north of Mexico is provided.

  11. Background Contaminants Evaluation of the Republican River Drainage- Colorado, Kansas, and Nebraska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Republican River Basin is a very large watershed in west-central Kansas, eastern Colorado, Wyoming and southern Nebraska. This study was conducted to determine...

  12. Trace elements and organic compounds in the Spring River Basin of southeastern Kansas in 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We sampled sediments and aquatic biota at five locations in the Spring River drainage in southeastern Kansas. The samples were analyzed for metals, organochlorine...

  13. Government Should Adopt Policies Favouring Rural Migrants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩长赋

    2007-01-01

    Based on a systematic analysis of the development trends of Chinese rural migrant workers, this article has designed a model representing the flow of migrant workers from rural to urban areas, and the patterns of urban settlement. The significant factors contributing to the problems of migrant workers are assessed and suggestions for improvement put forward. This article concludes that the rural migrant worker problem is attributable to institutional set-up and strategy and will continue for the entire process of China’s modernization. It is estimated that modernization will be realized in about 2050, at which time the rural-urban migration process will also be completed. To solve the problems of migrant workers, a comprehensive strategy of balanced development between urban and rural areas should be carried out, featuring industry’s support of agriculture and urban support of rural areas. Furthermore, the urban-rural dual structure should be gradually eliminated through institutional reform and policy innovation. The principles of equality, humanity and fair treatment for both urban and rural populations should be sought.

  14. Development of Rural Banks in Yellow River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The status quo of new-type rural financial institutions in the Yellow River delta is summarized.It is pointed out that these financial institutions have improved the development of economy concerning agriculture,rural areas and peasants,but due to the shortage of capital,deficit and many other reasons,the outlets is fewer,which can not serve the agriculture,rural areas and peasants well.The necessity of developing rural banks in the Yellow River delta is introduced:firstly,rural banks can serve the agriculture,rural areas and peasants well with flexible system and management methods.Secondly,rural banks can serve and support the vulnerable groups of the three rural issues concerning agriculture,countryside and famers well.Thirdly,rural banks provide strong support for the all around development of rural business concerning the agriculture,rural areas and peasants.Fourthly,rural banks have significant advantages in serving the agriculture,rural areas and peasants.The probability of developing rural banks in the Yellow River delta is analyzed from the three advantages of policy,environment and economy.The challenges faced by the development of rural banks are studied as follows:firstly,the short-term profits are hard to take effect.Secondly,the capital quantity of rural banks is large.Thirdly,the pressure of competition and operation is great.Thus the countermeasures of developing rural banks in the Yellow River delta are put forward:for instance,clarifying the service object in a certain area;using the minority to bring along the majority;reducing the risk of asymmetric information by information technology.

  15. Intoxication of nontarget wildlife with rodenticides in northwestern Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruder, Mark G; Poppenga, Robert H; Bryan, John A; Bain, Matt; Pitman, Jim; Keel, M Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The perception of prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) both as a nuisance species and a keystone species presents a significant challenge to land, livestock, and wildlife managers. Anticoagulant and nonanticoagulant rodenticides are commonly employed to control prairie dog populations throughout their range. Chlorophacinone, and to a lesser extent zinc phosphide, are widely used in northwestern Kansas for controlling black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) populations. Although zinc phosphide poisoning of gallinaceous birds is not uncommon, there are few published accounts of nontarget chlorophacinone poisoning of wildlife. We report three mortality events involving nontarget rodenticide poisoning in several species, including wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo), a raccoon (Procyon lotor), and an American badger (Taxidea taxus). This includes the first documentation of chlorophacinone intoxication in wild turkeys and an American badger in the literature. The extent of nontarget poisoning in this area is currently unknown and warrants further investigation.

  16. Economics show CO2 EOR potential in central Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, M.K.; Byrnes, A.P.; Pancake, R.E.; Willhite, G.P.; Schoeling, L.G.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) enhanced oil recovery (EOR) may be the key to recovering hundreds of millions of bbl of trapped oil from the mature fields in central Kansas. Preliminary economic analysis indicates that CO2 EOR should provide an internal rate of return (IRR) greater than 20%, before income tax, assuming oil sells for $20/bbl, CO2 costs $1/Mcf, and gross utilization is 10 Mcf of CO2/bbl of oil recovered. If the CO2 cost is reduced to $0.75/Mcf, an oil price of $17/bbl yields an IRR of 20%. Reservoir and economic modeling indicates that IRR is most sensitive to oil price and CO2 cost. A project requires a minimum recovery of 1,500 net bbl/acre (about 1 million net bbl/1-mile section) under a best-case scenario. Less important variables to the economics are capital costs and non-CO2 related lease operating expenses.

  17. Based on the Institutional Economics of China's Rural Financial Demand Analysis%基于制度经济学的我国农村金融需求分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巴红静

    2012-01-01

      Farmers and rural enterprises deposit, loan financial demand of multi level difference , high cost and high risk, seasonal and time and demand diversification characteristics ect. in four aspects. From the financial supply level, it accelerates the development of rural insurance market and informal financial market from three aspects of improving the rural financial services.%  农户和农村企业的存、贷款金融需求具有多层次差异性、高成本与高风险、季节性和时间性及需求多元化等四个方面的特征。应从金融供给层次化,加快发展农村保险市场和非正规金融市场等三方面改善农村金融服务。

  18. Final report : Phase III targeted investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated grain storage facilities at two different locations at Everest, Kansas (Figure 1.1). One facility (referred to in this report as the Everest facility) was at the western edge of the city. The second facility (referred to in this report as Everest East) was about 0.5 mi northeast of the town. The CCC/USDA operated these facilities from the early 1950s until the early 1970s, at a time when commercial fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the CCC/USDA and private industry for the preservation of grain in storage. In 1997 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled several domestic drinking water and non-drinking water wells in the Everest area as part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program. All of the sampled wells were outside the Everest city limits. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was identified at a single domestic drinking water well (the Nigh well, DW06; Figure 1.1) approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Subsequent KDHE investigations suggested that the contamination in DW06 could be linked to the former use of grain fumigants at the CCC/USDA facility. For this reason, the CCC/USDA is conducting a phased environmental study to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at Everest and to identify potential remedial options. The studies are being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Two phases of investigation were completed previously; this report presents the findings of the targeted Phase III investigation at Everest.

  19. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Inman, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-05

    In 1997, low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contaminant level [MCL] of 5 {micro}g/L) were detected in groundwater at Inman, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1997 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Inman from 1954 to 1965. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Inman is located in southwest McPherson County, approximately 10 mi southwest of the city of McPherson (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Inman is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation at Inman, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the USDA. For this work plan, Argonne compiled historical data related to the previous investigations and grain storage operations at Inman. Through a review of documents acquired from all available sources, other potential contaminant source areas (in addition to the former CCC/USDA facility) have been identified as (1) the commercial grain storage structures northwest of Inman, along the railroad right-of-way, and (2) small former private grain storage facilities west of Main Street and near the former CCC/USDA facility at the southern edge of Inman (Figure 1.2). Previous investigations and the potential source areas are discussed in Section 2.

  20. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first

  1. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first i

  2. Confucius Institute

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Confucius Institute(simplified Chinese:孔子学院;traditional Chinese:孔子學院;pinyin:kǒngzǐ xuéyuàn)is a non-profit public institute which aims at promoting Chinese language and culture and supporting local Chinese teaching internationally through affiliated Confucius Institutes.

  3. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first i

  4. Analyzing Public Sector Education Facilities: A Step Further towards Accessible Basic Education Institutions in Destitute Subregions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpur, Mir Aftab Hussain; Napiah, Madzlan; Chandio, Imtiaz Ahmed; Memon, Irfan Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Rural subregions of the developing countries are suffering from many physical and socioeconomic problems, including scarcity of basic education institutions. The shortage of education institutions extended distance between rural localities and education institutions. Hence, to curb this problem, this research is aimed to deal with the basic…

  5. Educational equity and institutional safeguards——an analysis of compulsory education for Chinese rural migrant workers'children%教育公平与制度保障——中国进城务工子女接受义务教育的现状分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范先佐; 彭湃

    2008-01-01

    进城务工人员子女义务教育公平问题是中国社会转型期一个独特的社会问题. 基于对中国湖北、河南、安徽等省市进城务工人员子女上学问题的专门调查,并结合全国其他省市的调查研究,可以发现,产生这一问题的原因相当复杂,但制度是其中最重要的因素.因此,要保证进城务工人员子女能公平地接受义务教育,必须为其提供制度保障.%The educational inequity of rural workers' children is a unique social problem in the transition stage of China. Based on the specific survey in such provinces as Hubei, Henan, Anhui, and other provinces, a conclusion can be drawn that the reasons for the educational inequity of rural worker's children are very complicated, among which the system is the most essential factor. Therefore, institutional safeguards should be provided to realize the education equity of rural worker's children.

  6. Expanding Local Cancer Clinical Trial Options: Analysis of the Economic Impact of the Midwest Cancer Alliance in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafford, J Atlee; Gurley-Calvez, Tami; Krebill, Hope; Lai, Sue Min; Christiadi; Doolittle, Gary C

    2017-09-01

    Patients benefit from receiving cancer treatment closer to home when possible and at high-volume regional centers when specialized care is required. The purpose of this analysis was to estimate the economic impact of retaining more patients in-state for cancer clinical trials and care, which might offset some of the costs of establishing broader cancer trial and treatment networks. Kansas Cancer Registry data were used to estimate the number of patients retained in-state for cancer care following the expansion of local cancer clinical trial options through the Midwest Cancer Alliance based at the University of Kansas Medical Center. The 2014 economic impact of this enhanced local clinical trial network was estimated in four parts: Medical spending was estimated on the basis of National Cancer Institute cost-of-care estimates. Household travel cost savings were estimated as the difference between in-state and out-of-state travel costs. Trial-related grant income was calculated from administrative records. Indirect and induced economic benefits to the state were estimated using an economic impact model. The authors estimated that the enhanced local cancer clinical trial network resulted in approximately $6.9 million in additional economic activity in the state in 2014, or $362,000 per patient retained in-state. This estimate includes $3.6 million in direct spending and $3.3 million in indirect economic activity. The enhanced trial network also resulted in 45 additional jobs. Retaining patients in-state for cancer care and clinical trial participation allows patients to remain closer to home for care and enhances the state economy.

  7. 利率市场化对农村中小金融机构的影响及对策研究%The Research on the Influence of the Interest Rate Marketization on Rural Small and Medium-sized Financial Institutions and Countermeasures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张数民

    2014-01-01

    The interest rate marketization plays an important regulatory role in realizing the internal and external equilibrium, en-suring the optimal allocation of financial resources, promoting economic growth, while at the same time, it will intensify the market competition among financial institutions, and test financial institutions’ pricing ability, management ability and risk control ability. Setting rural credit cooperatives in Xianyang as samples, the paper briefly analyzes their development situation and the impact of the interest rate marketization on them, and puts forward related suggestions on promoting the interest rate marketization of rural small and medium-sized financial institutions.%利率市场化在实现内外均衡、保证金融资源优化配置、促进经济增长等方面起着重要调节作用的同时,会加剧金融机构间的市场竞争、更加考验金融机构的定价能力、经营管理能力、风险管控能力。本文以辖区农村信用社为样本简要分析了其发展现状以及利率市场化对其造成的影响,并就推进农村中小金融机构利率市场化提出相关建议。

  8. Technical justification for a request to reclassify the former CCC/USDA facility at Canada, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-12-21

    Contamination in groundwater at Canada, Kansas, was discovered in 1997, during limited private well sampling near former grain storage facilities of the Commodity Credit Corporation, U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). Subsequent investigations by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) confirmed carbon tetrachloride and nitrate concentrations in groundwater above the respective maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) of 5.0 {micro}g/L and 10.0 mg/L. The KDHE investigations identified both the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility and a private grain storage facility as likely sources for the carbon tetrachloride contamination. The CCC/USDA funded extension of a rural water district line to provide a permanent alternate water supply, and the KDHE has conducted long-term monitoring under the State Water Plan. This document presents an analysis of the available information for the Canada site, acquired in previous investigations and the long-term KDHE monitoring. This analysis forms the technical justification for a request to reclassify the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility at Canada as a site requiring no further action under the Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) between the KDHE and the USDA's Farm Service Agency. The KDHE's long-term water level monitoring results indicate a consistent groundwater flow direction to the east-southeast. Consequently, the wells with the highest overall concentrations of carbon tetrachloride are downgradient from the private grain storage facility but not downgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. The KDHE criterion for reclassification of a site is that contamination there should not pose an unacceptable risk, on the basis of analytical results for four consecutive, equally timed, sequenced sampling episodes over a period of no less than two years. In seven KDHE sampling events over a period of six years (2001-2007), the concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in the monitoring well on the former

  9. 农村公众风险认知偏差的非正式制度因素研究%Informal Institutional Factors of Rural Public risk Perception Bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙云; 李彬

    2015-01-01

    In the sudden rural public events, the public risk perception bias is an important factor to the public psychological panic. so the research of public risk perception bias and its influence factors is an important part of the research work. On the basis of defining the deviation of the rural emergency and public risk, the influence mechanism of the traditional culture and customs of rural society is analyzed, and the relevant countermeasures are put forward to improve the education level of rural residents, to promote the effective transfer of rural information, and to strengthen the communication between government and people.%农村突发事件中公众风险认知偏差是公众心理恐慌产生的重要影响因素,因此公众风险认知偏差及其影响因子的研究是突发事件管控研究工作中的重要一环。在界定农村突发事件和公众风险认知偏差的基础上,分析农村社会的传统文化习惯习俗等非正式制度对公众风险认知偏差的影响机理,提出相关对策如下:提高农村居民的教育水平;促进农村信息的有效传递;加强政府与民众之间的沟通。

  10. Assessment of macroinvertebrate communities in adjacent urban stream basins, Kansas City, Missouri, metropolitan area, 2007 through 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Eric D.; Krempa, Heather M.

    2013-01-01

    Macroinvertebrates were collected as part of two separate urban water-quality studies from adjacent basins, the Blue River Basin (Kansas City, Missouri), the Little Blue River and Rock Creek Basins (Independence, Missouri), and their tributaries. Consistent collection and processing procedures between the studies allowed for statistical comparisons. Seven Blue River Basin sites, nine Little Blue River Basin sites, including Rock Creek, and two rural sites representative of Missouri ecological drainage units and the area’s ecoregions were used in the analysis. Different factors or levels of urban intensity may affect the basins and macroinvertebrate community metrics differently, even though both basins are substantially developed above their downstream streamgages (Blue River, 65 percent; Little Blue River, 52 percent). The Blue River has no flood control reservoirs and receives wastewater effluent and stormflow from a combined sewer system. The Little Blue River has flood control reservoirs, receives no wastewater effluent, and has a separate stormwater sewer system. Analysis of macroinvertebrate community structure with pollution-tolerance metrics and water-quality parameters indicated differences between the Blue River Basin and the Little Blue River Basin.

  11. Rural Health Information Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... issues that impact rural health in RHIhub’s Topic Guides. Recently updated: Social Determinants of Health for Rural People Browse all 50+ topics Community Health Gateway Find rural project examples in Rural Health Models and Innovations and proven strategies for strong rural programs with ...

  12. Final work plan : environmental site investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2012-07-15

    In 1998, carbon tetrachloride was found above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L in groundwater from one private livestock well at Sylvan Grove, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1998 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Sylvan Grove from 1954 to1966. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Sylvan Grove is located in western Lincoln County, approximately 60 mi west of Salina (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. This Work Plan presents historical data related to previous investigations, grain storage operations, local private wells and public water supply (PWS) wells, and local geologic and hydrogeologic conditions at Sylvan Grove. The findings from a review of all available documents are discussed in Section 2. On the basis of the analyses of historical data, the following specific technical objectives are proposed for the site investigation at Sylvan Grove: (1) Evaluate the potential source of carbon tetrachloride at the former CCC/USDA facility; (2) Determine the relationship of potential contamination (if present) at the former CCC/USDA facility to contamination identified in 1998 in groundwater samples from one private well to the west; and (3) Delineate the extent of potential contamination associated with the former CCC/USDA facility. The detailed scope of work is outlined in Section 3. The results of the proposed work will provide the basis for determining

  13. Analysis of energy use at US institutional buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, E.; Trimble, J.; Goelitz, R.

    1981-11-01

    The Federal Institutional Conservation Program includes collection of energy use and energy related data from individual institutional buildings. Data were obtained from ten states (Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, New Jersey, Florida, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Texas, Kansas, and Oregon) on almost fifteen thousand schools, hospitals, local government buildings, and public care institutions. After the data were carefully examined, organized, and validated (i.e., outliers that might be errors were deleted), regression equations were developed for each of the four institutional building types. Because so many of the data elements were either missing or outliers, techniques were applied that allow incorporation of observations with missing data in the regression analysis. These equations explain annual energy use as functions of average energy price, floor area, year of construction, occupancy, air conditioning, primary heating fuel, owner, location, and building function.

  14. Estimation of constituent concentrations, densities, loads, and yields in lower Kansas River, northeast Kansas, using regression models and continuous water-quality monitoring, January 2000 through December 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Ziegler, Andrew C.; Rasmussen, Patrick P.

    2005-01-01

    The lower Kansas River is an important source of drinking water for hundreds of thousands of people in northeast Kansas. Constituents of concern identified by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) for streams in the lower Kansas River Basin include sulfate, chloride, nutrients, atrazine, bacteria, and sediment. Real-time continuous water-quality monitors were operated at three locations along the lower Kansas River from July 1999 through September 2004 to provide in-stream measurements of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen and to estimate concentrations for constituents of concern. Estimates of concentration and densities were combined with streamflow to calculate constituent loads and yields from January 2000 through December 2003. The Wamego monitoring site is located 44 river miles upstream from the Topeka monitoring site, which is 65 river miles upstream from the DeSoto monitoring site, which is 18 river miles upstream from where the Kansas River flows into the Missouri River. Land use in the Kansas River Basin is dominated by grassland and cropland, and streamflow is affected substantially by reservoirs. Water quality at the three monitoring sites varied with hydrologic conditions, season, and proximity to constituent sources. Nutrient and sediment concentrations and bacteria densities were substantially larger during periods of increased streamflow, indicating important contributions from nonpoint sources in the drainage basin. During the study period, pH remained well above the KDHE lower criterion of 6.5 standard units at all sites in all years, but exceeded the upper criterion of 8.5 standard units annually between 2 percent of the time (Wamego in 2001) and 65 percent of the time (DeSoto in 2003). The dissolved oxygen concentration was less than the minimum aquatic-life-support criterion of 5.0 milligrams per liter less than 1 percent of the time at all sites. Dissolved solids, a measure of the

  15. Excerpts from Dr. P. Kotaiah's paper: Policies on Institutional Credit to Generate Employment and Marketing Skills among the Rural Youth in Asia and the Pacific region -- the Indian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaiah, P

    1998-03-01

    This article summarizes a seminar presented at a CIRDAP regional workshop in February 1998, on gender equity, poverty, rights, and participation. This seminar discussed India's experience with banks and financial policies. The recent East Asian crisis has shown that poverty eradication and sustainable development are not possible without an effective and transparent state that can play a catalytic, facilitating role and can increase and complement the activities of private businesses and individuals. The economy grows faster with a well diversified, efficient financial sector for promoting investment. Well developed, market oriented financial systems contribute to greater economic growth than weak and stringently regulated ones. Formal banks play a key role in meeting the growing needs of the economy and pursuing a social agenda. India, in 1991, reformed its banks which became more competitive and responsive to emerging challenges of a fast growing economy. India has an anti-poverty agenda that for the last 50 years promoted economic growth, offered wage assurance and self employment schemes, and provided a safety net for the poor. These schemes have met with varying success. For example, some operational constraints to credit in rural non-farm schemes were: the bank's perception that rural businesses were high risk and less profitable; poor infrastructure; and a slow process of credit delivery changes and skill upgrades for visible results. The author touches on other issues, such as the changing labor market, collateral substitutes, self-help concepts, venture capital, and integration of rural development programs within banking systems.

  16. Flood-inundation maps for Indian Creek and Tomahawk Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Arin J.; Studley, Seth E.

    2016-01-25

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.4-mile upper reach of Indian Creek from College Boulevard to the confluence with Tomahawk Creek, a 3.9-mile reach of Tomahawk Creek from 127th Street to the confluence with Indian Creek, and a 1.9-mile lower reach of Indian Creek from the confluence with Tomahawk Creek to just beyond the Kansas/Missouri border at State Line Road in Johnson County, Kansas, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Overland Park, Kansas. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgages on Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas. Near real time stages at these streamgages may be obtained on the Web from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at these sites.Flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated for each reach by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the streamgages. The hydraulic models were then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; 17 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and 14 water-surface profiles for Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas, for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the next interval above the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flood level (500-year recurrence interval). The

  17. Institutional ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rebecca; Tienari, Janne

    2016-01-01

    . In institutional ethnography the notion of objectification is applied to describe research processes like those that have been found to dominate in scholarly work on M&As. In this chapter, we offer an outline of Smiths critique of objectification, elucidate how institutional ethnography seeks to address it...

  18. Colonial Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAtackney, Laura; Palmer, Russell

    2016-01-01

    and the USA which reveal that the study of colonial institutions should not be limited to the functional life of these institutions—or solely those that take the form of monumental architecture—but should include the long shadow of “imperial debris” (Stoler 2008) and immaterial institutions....

  19. 制度约束下的乡村人居环境建设模式研究——以湖南省衡南县工联村为例%Construction Pattern of Rural Human Settlement under Institution Constraints——A Case Study of Gonglian Village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伯华; 刘沛林; 窦银娣

    2012-01-01

    优化乡村人居环境,改善农户生活质量,统筹城乡发展是社会主义新农村建设的一项重要内容.以实地调研为基础资料,以湖南省新农村示范点——工联村为例,探索制度约束下乡村人居环境建设的特征、困境与优化路径.在集体合作经营体制下,工联村人居环境建设在筹集资金、约束农户人居行为、改善基础设施、推进社会事业等方面具有一定的制度优势,但也存在诸多困境.从4个方面提出了优化路径,即鼓励制度创新,完善人居环境建设模式;优化村庄布局,规范农户居住行为;加快村庄整治,引导农户生活行为;整体营销村庄,扩大人居环境示范效应.%Optimizing rural human settlement to improve households' life quality and balancing urban and rural development are important parts of new rural communities' construction. Based on field investigation in Gonglian village, this article discussed how to improve human settlement environment construction under the institution constraints. Under the collective co-operating system, Gonglian village has advantages in financing, restraining behaviors of fanners, improving infrastructure and promoting social undertakings. But there were also many difficulties. This article introduced 4 optimum paths. Firstly, encouraging institutional innovation and improving human settlement construction pattern. Secondly, optimizing Village layout and regularizing dwelling behavior. Thirdly, carrying out village renovation and leading living behaviors of fanners. Forth, total marketing to improve rural human settlement.

  20. Institutional actorhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Uhrenholdt

    In this paper I describe the changing role of intra-organizational experts in the face of institutional complexity of their field. I do this through a qualitative investigation of the institutional and organizational roles of actors in Danish organizations who are responsible for the efforts to c...... to comply with the Danish work environment regulation. And by doing so I also describe how institutional complexity and organizational responses to this complexity are particular important for the changing modes of governance that characterizes contemporary welfare states.......In this paper I describe the changing role of intra-organizational experts in the face of institutional complexity of their field. I do this through a qualitative investigation of the institutional and organizational roles of actors in Danish organizations who are responsible for the efforts...

  1. Institutional upbringing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulløv, Eva

    2008-01-01

    In the chapter, I discuss the role day care institutions play in the construction of the idea of proper childhood in Denmark. Drawing on findings from research on ethnic minority children in two Danish day care institutions, I begin with a discussion of how childcare institutions act as civilising...... agents, empowered with the legitimate right to define and control normality and proper ways of behaving oneself. I aim to show how institutions come to define the normal child and proper childhood in accordance with current efforts toward reinventing national culture, exemplified by legislation requiring...... current testing of Danish language fluency levels among pre-school minority children. Testing language skills marks and defines distinctions that reinforce images of deviance that, in turn, legitimize initiatives to enrol children, specifically minority children, in child care institutions....

  2. Fate and transport of cyanobacteria and associated toxins and taste-and-odor compounds from upstream reservoir releases in the Kansas River, Kansas, September and October 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Ziegler, Andrew C.; Loving, Brian L.; Loftin, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria cause a multitude of water-quality concerns, including the potential to produce toxins and taste-and-odor compounds. Toxins and taste-and-odor compounds may cause substantial economic and public health concerns and are of particular interest in lakes, reservoirs, and rivers that are used for drinking-water supply, recreation, or aquaculture. The Kansas River is a primary source of drinking water for about 800,000 people in northeastern Kansas. Water released from Milford Lake to the Kansas River during a toxic cyanobacterial bloom in late August 2011 prompted concerns about cyanobacteria and associated toxins and taste-and-odor compounds in downstream drinking-water supplies. During September and October 2011 water-quality samples were collected to characterize the transport of cyanobacteria and associated compounds from upstream reservoirs to the Kansas River. This study is one of the first to quantitatively document the transport of cyanobacteria and associated compounds during reservoir releases and improves understanding of the fate and transport of cyanotoxins and taste-and-odor compounds downstream from reservoirs. Milford Lake was the only reservoir in the study area with an ongoing cyanobacterial bloom during reservoir releases. Concentrations of cyanobacteria and associated toxins and taste-and-odor compounds in Milford Lake (upstream from the dam) were not necessarily indicative of outflow conditions (below the dam). Total microcystin concentrations, one of the most commonly occurring cyanobacterial toxins, in Milford Lake were 650 to 7,500 times higher than the Kansas Department of Health and Environment guidance level for a public health warning (20 micrograms per liter) for most of September 2011. By comparison, total microcystin concentrations in the Milford Lake outflow generally were less than 10 percent of the concentrations in surface accumulations, and never exceeded 20 micrograms per liter. The Republican River, downstream from

  3. Low Impact Development Intensive Rural Construction Planning in Xu Fu Village Ningbo, China: Planning Review through Rural Resilience Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roosmayri Lovina Hermaputi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Xu Fu Village Ningbo LID Intensive Rural Construction Planning is a cooperation project between Zhejiang University and Ningbo Institute of Technology which named "12th Five-Year National Science and Technology support program-the comprehensive demonstration of the key technology of the beautiful rural construction in the rapid urbanization area of the Yangtze River Delta". This plan focuses on intensive rural construction as part of rural development and construction project that applies the principles of low impact development. Xu Fu Village located in the Yangtze River Delta Region. Currently, the rural growth brings the high impact of development, as a result of rapid urbanization growth arising several issues, such as low land use efficiency, dispersed rural residence, homestead occupies more, rural roads covering over, etc. Meanwhile, Xu Fu village wishes to develop its tourism potential. Thus, the intensive rural construction should be done to avoid the severe effect. The project result hopefully can improve the quality and level of rural residential planning, design, and construction; improve their living environment; save construction land and water use; and improve energy efficiency. The aim of this study is to review the Low Impact Development (LID Intensive Rural Construction in Xu Fu Village, Ningbo City through the rural resilience perspective. This paper will describe the project plan first, then review it through rural resilience perspective. This paper will elaborate the rural resilience theory and then review the rural resiliency through two parts; the first part is identifying rural resilience in rural infrastructure development based on the criteria created by Ayyob S. and Yoshiki Y. (2014, about urban resiliency criteria, and then the second part is reviewing Xu Fu Village resilience through Arup Resilience Qualities (2012, considering three rural resilience domain (economy, ecology, and cultural.

  4. Informal Institutions and Intergenerational Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, David Dreyer; Lilleør, Helene Bie

    , that informal institutions of social control, rooted in tribal affiliations, determine both the household's investment in schooling and the probability that it receives remittances from migrants. This is consistent with a framework in which households' expected returns in the form of remittances, which...... is determined partly by the prospects of social control over migrants, influence current investments in schooling.......This paper carries out a theoretical and empirical investigation of the role of informal institutions in facilitating intergenerational contracts governing investments in schooling and payments of pensions in the form of remittances. We show, using detailed household level data from rural Tanzania...

  5. Informal Institutions and Intergenerational Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, David Dreyer; Lilleør, Helene Bie

    This paper carries out a theoretical and empirical investigation of the role of informal institutions in facilitating intergenerational contracts governing investments in schooling and payments of pensions in the form of remittances. We show, using detailed household level data from rural Tanzania......, that informal institutions of social control, rooted in tribal affiliations, determine both the household's investment in schooling and the probability that it receives remittances from migrants. This is consistent with a framework in which households' expected returns in the form of remittances, which...... is determined partly by the prospects of social control over migrants, influence current investments in schooling....

  6. 78 FR 11751 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Kansas; Idle Reduction of Heavy-Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... Development Branch, 11201 Renner Boulevard, Lenexa, Kansas 66219. The Regional Office's official hours of... subject to the rules may allow or permit NO X to be emitted in excess of specified emission limits. The... the Kansas City Board of Public Utilities (BPU) power generating facilities located in Wyandotte...

  7. Advancing Postsecondary Opportunity, Completion, and Productivity: Essential Performance Indicators for Kansas and Selected Peer States. 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midwestern Higher Education Compact, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This report portrays various performance indicators that are intended to facilitate an assessment of the postsecondary education system in Kansas. Descriptive statistics are presented for Kansas and five other comparison states as well as the nation. Comparison states were selected according to the degree of similarity of population…

  8. Structural load inventory database for the Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, P.S.; Johnson, M.W.; Nakaki, D.K. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Wilson, J.J.; Lynch, D.T.; Drury, M.A. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Kansas City, MO (United States). Kansas City Div.

    1993-10-01

    This report discusses a structural load inventory database (LID) which has been developed to support configuration management at the DOE Kansas City Plant (KCP). The objective of the LID is to record loads supported by the plant structures and to provide rapid assessments of the impact of future facility modifications on structural adequacy. Development of the LID was initiated for the KCP`s Main Manufacturing Building. Field walkdowns were performed to determine all significant loads supported by the structure, including the weight of piping, service equipment, etc. These loads were compiled in the LID. Structural analyses for natural phenomena hazards were performed in accordance with UCRL-15910. Software to calculate demands on the structural members due to gravity loads, total demands including both gravity and seismic loads, and structural member demand-to-capacity ratios were also developed and integrated into the LID. Operation of the LID is menu-driven. The LID user has options to review and print existing loads and corresponding demand-to-capacity ratios, and to update the supported loads and demand-to-capacity ratios for any future facility modifications.

  9. Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Royer, Michael P.; Hadjian, M.; Kauffman, Rick

    2013-06-10

    Nine different streetlighting products were installed on various streets in Kansas City, Missouri during February, 2011, to evaluate their performance relative to the incumbent high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting. The applications investigated included 100 W, 150 W, 250 W, and 400 W HPS installations. Initial measurements and comparisons included power, illuminance, and luminance; sample illuminance readings have continued at each of the nine locations at roughly 1,000-hour operating intervals since then. All of the LED products consumed less power than their HPS counterparts—with a mean difference of 39% and a range of 31% to 51%—but they also emitted 31% fewer lumens, on average. The net result is just a 15% increase in mean efficacy. Applying the city’s stringent light loss factors to the initial measured data meant that five of the LED products (and two of the HPS luminaires) were predicted to eventually fail to meet the specified mean illuminance over their lifetimes; however, the specified light loss levels are not expected to be reached by the LED products until some distant future date (between 12 and 30 years after installation according to manufacturer specification sheet estimates). The practical value of designing streetlighting systems to meet illumination requirements more than 15 years in the future is questioned. Numerous sources of variation in field measurements are noted throughout the report, particularly seasonal influences such as ambient temperature and foliage that are evident in the time-series illuminance data.

  10. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-08-28

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of a targeted investigation to update the status of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater associated with grain storage operations at Hilton, Kansas. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton during the 1950s and 1960s. At the time of the CCC/USDA operation in Hilton, grain storage facilities (CCC/USDA and private) were located along the both sides of the former Union Pacific railroad tracks (Figure 1.1). The main grain storage structures were on or near the railroad right-of-way. The proposed targeted investigation, to be conducted by Argonne National Laboratory on the behalf of CCC/USDA, will supplement Argonne's Phase I and Phase II investigations in 1996-1997. The earlier investigations erroneously focused on an area east of the railroad property where the CCC/USDA did not operate, specifically on a private grain storage facility. In addition, the investigation was limited in scope, because access to railroad property was denied (Argonne 1997a,b). The hydrogeologic system at Hilton is potentially complex.

  11. COLLABORATIVE ELEARNING: AN ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE BETWEEN THE UNIVERSITY OF COSTA RICA AND THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS (COLABORACION EN LINEA: UNA EXPERIENCIA ACADEMICA ENTRE LA UNIVERSIDAD DE COSTA RICA Y LA UNIVERSIDAD DE KANSAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quesada Pacheco Allen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:The continuing improvements in the worldwide access to the Internet are rapidly improving the ability for international collaborative eLearning. The University of Kansas (KU and University of Costa Rica (UCR are developing eLearning strategies designed to establish meaningful and sustained relationships. We are investigating: 1 how to use technology and pedagogy to enrich social interaction and learning, 2 strategies and technologies for engaging students in collaborating on issues of mutual interest, 3 understanding how the quality of relationships can improve learning, 4 institutional issues and barriers related to implementing coursework, certifications and academic programs across international institutions. Our analysis indicates that student collaborate more when they can meet in live teleconferencing as opposed to relying solely of asynchronous email or threaded discussions for collaborative project. Participants reported that strategies that scaffold activities by beginning with clearly stated problems and achievable common goals, such as locating and ranking relevant web resources, contribute to richer collaborations.Abstract: El crecimiento continuo del acceso a la Internet, a nivel mundial, está mejorando rápidamente el aprendizaje internacional colaborativo en línea. La Universidad de Kansas (KU y la Universidad de Costa Rica (UCR están desarrollando estrategias de aprendizaje en línea para establecer relaciones significativas. El equipo está investigando: (1 la integración de la tecnología y la pedagogía de enseñanza para enriquecer la interacción social y el aprendizaje, (2 la integración de estrategias y tecnologías para incorporar a los estudiantes en actividades de colaboración acerca de temas de interés común, (3 entender cómo la calidad de la relaciones sociales pueden mejorar el aprendizaje, y (4 los eventos y barreras internacionales relacionadas con la implementación de los cursos acad

  12. Experiences with micro finance in improving rural livelihoods: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    micro-finance institutions that address needs of different levels of recipients. ... micro-finance management and provides proposals for its out-scaling among smallholder farmers and the rural poor in .... borrowers should manage risk effectively!

  13. Peru: The Social Welfare and Rural Development Programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figallo, Flavio

    1994-01-01

    In Peru, the Social Compensation Fund uses various strategies for fighting rural poverty: linking social investment to other development strategies, considering poverty indicators in determining project priorities, developing a productive infrastructure, and involving local institutions in solutions. (SK)

  14. Improving the effectiveness of rural development policy in Chile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter Leal, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    In Chile, agriculture remains a key economic factor for rural development. Accordingly, the Chilean government, through the Agricultural Development Institute (INDAP), provides financial support for fostering entrepreneurship among small farmers to enable them to become more competitive in global ma

  15. Transparent Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fombona

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project is to create sets of media-based imagery that illustrate the internal workings of public institutions to the common citizen. This is an important need in countries that are seeking to open up their public and private institutions and bring them closer to their users. Method: There is a clear need to carry out proposals that tackle organizational lack of transparency; to this end, through an interdisciplinary approach, we propose the creation of a freeaccess Web-based portal that shows the interior of the institutions at hand, learning institutions to start with, this scope will be broadened later to institutions of health and public safety. The project chooses and shows a core selection of features capable of becoming international models for each kind of institutions, elementary schools in this phase. These features are shown in short videos, depicting every core element found: installations, governing bodies, documentation, samples of learning and teaching methodologies in use, etc. Results: the propossed project succeeds in getting institutions closer to their users. It has been developed in Spain, and translated to other Latin-American countries and the United States.

  16. Transparent Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fombona

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project is to create sets of media-based imagery that illustrate the internal workings of public institutions to the common citizen. This is an important need in countries that are seeking to open up their public and private institutions and bring them closer to their users. Method: There is a clear need to carry out proposals that tackle organizational lack of transparency; to this end, through an interdisciplinary approach, we propose the creation of a freeaccess Web-based portal that shows the interior of the institutions at hand, learning institutions to start with, this scope will be broadened later to institutions of health and public safety. The project chooses and shows a core selection of features capable of becoming international models for each kind of institutions, elementary schools in this phase. These features are shown in short videos, depicting every core element found: installations, governing bodies, documentation, samples of learning and teaching methodologies in use, etc. Results: the propossed project succeeds in getting institutions closer to their users. It has been developed in Spain, and translated to other Latin-American countries and the United States.

  17. The Availability, Prospects, and Fiscal Potential of On-Campus Housing at Rural Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeck, Pat G.; Katsinas, Stephen G.; Hardy, David E.; Bush, V. Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Many rural community colleges have long provided on-campus housing. This article profiles the availability of housing at rural community colleges in 2001-2002 and 2005-2006, examines the factors that will continue to make on-campus housing an important service at rural institutions, and draws on 2005-2006 data from the Institutional…

  18. The contribution of town functions to the development of rural areas: empirical analyses for Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tadesse Woeldesenbet, T.

    2012-01-01

    Rural areas in many developing countries often lack infrastructure and institutions. However, rural towns and towns possess some of the major services that rural and town households can use to advance their economic activities. The study of the contribution that towns and their functions make to dif

  19. Working Together to Make a Difference in Rural America: North Central Regional Center for Rural Development, 2010 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Central Regional Center for Rural Development, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The North Central Regional Center for Rural Development (NCRCRD) is one of four regional centers in the United States that have worked to improve the quality of life in rural communities for nearly 40 years. With funding from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture and the land-grant universities in our 12-state region, the NCRCRD…

  20. Effects of urbanization on water quality in the Kansas River, Shunganunga Creek Basin, and Soldier Creek, Topeka, Kansas, October 1993 through September 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, L.M.; Putnam, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    A study of urban-related water-qulity effects in the Kansas River, Shunganunga Creek Basin, and Soldier Creek in Topeka, Kansas, was conducted from October 1993 through September 1995. The purpose of this report is to assess the effects of urbanization on instream concentrations of selected physical and chemical constituents within the city of Topeka. A network of seven sampling sites was established in the study area. Samples principally were collected at monthly intervals from the Kansas River and from the Shunganunga Creek Basin, and at quarterly intervals from Soldier Creek. The effects of urbanization werestatistically evaluated from differences in constituent concentrations between sites on the same stream. No significant differences in median concentrations of dissolved solids, nutrients, or metals and trace elements, or median densities offecal bacteria were documented between sampling sites upstream and downstream from the major urbanized length of the Kansas River in Topeka.Discharge from the city's primary wastewater- treatment plant is the largest potential source of contamination to the Kansas River. This discharge increased concentrations of dissolved ammonia, totalphosphorus, and densities of fecal bacteria.Calculated dissolved ammonia as nitrogen concentrations in water from the Kansas River ranged from 0.03 to 1.1 milligrams per liter after receiving treatment-plant discharge. However, most of the calculated concentrations wereconsiderably less than 50 percent of Kansas Department of Health and Environment water- quality criteria, with a median value of 20 percent.Generally, treatment-plant discharge increased calculated total phosphorus concentrations in water from the Kansas River by 0.01 to 0.04 milligrams per liter, with a median percentage increase of 7.6 percent. The calculated median densities of fecal coliform and fecal Streptococci bacteria in water from the Kansas River increased from 120 and 150colonies per 100 milliliters of water

  1. Fall may be imminent for Kansas Cherokee basin coalbed gas output

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Newell K.

    2010-01-01

    Natural gas production in the Kansas portion of the Cherokee basin, Southeastern Kansas, for 2008 was 49.1 bcf. The great majority of Cherokee basin gas production is now coal-bed methane (CBM). The major producers are Quest Energy LLC, Dart Cherokee Basin Operating Co. LLC, and Layne Energy Operating LLC. Most CBM in Southeastern Kansas is from Middle and Upper Pennsylvanian high-volatile B and A rank bituminous coals at 800 to 1,200 ft depth. Rates of decline for the CBM wells generally decrease the longer a well produces. A gentler collective decline of 13.8% is calculated by averaging the number of new producing wells in a given year with that of the previous year. By the calculations using the gentler overall 13.8% decline rate, if more than 918 successful CBM wells are drilled in 2009, then gas production will increase from 2008 to 2009.

  2. Milking the Plains: movement of large dairy operations into southwestern Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Lisa M B; Lu, Max; Kromm, David E

    2010-01-01

    Western Kansas has an historical identification with cattle, with a focus on cattle ranching and more specifically since the 1950s, beef-cattle feedlots. Since the mid-1990s large dairy operations have moved into southwestern Kansas. Today more than twenty large dairies house more than 70,000 milk cows. These operate as confined feeding operations similar to beef-cattle feedlots. Regional advantages for the dairy industry include affordable land with wide-open space, local residents' cattle- and dairy-friendly attitudes, and other factors. Regional promoters have actively recruited dairies, and a dairy-business support system has emerged. The prospects for continued expansion of dairies in southwestern Kansas are unclear; despite the locational advantages and the possibility that the industry may continue to relocate here, as did the cattle-feeding industry several decades ago, further moves into the area may depend on continued resources availability and additional infrastructure development.

  3. 我国农村宅基地使用制度创新研究∗--“宅基地指标化”改革思路与方案设计%Research on Institutional Innovation for Chinese Rural Residential Site Exploitation-Reform Idea and Plan Design of “Residential Site Normalization”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李勇坚; 袁锦秀; 李蕊

    2014-01-01

    我国现行农村宅基地制度立法思想落后、权利框架模糊,宅基地因权利被限制而无法实现收益权能,导致宅基地浪费严重、使用效率低下。党的“十八届三中全会”提出了“改革完善农村宅基地制度”的战略构想。宅基地制度创新应体现城乡公平、区域公平和时际公平,并实现节约集约利用土地的目标。而现有的“限制自由流转、扩大权能”和“自由流转”两个改革思路,都局限于宅基地问题的表层,没有在城乡统筹、新型城镇化背景下对宅基地制度进行重构,存在着天然的缺陷。“宅基地指标化”模式,以权利替代实物,引进市场化的交易机制,实现宅基地指标在全国范围内的流转,有利于节约集约利用土地,能在更大程度上体现社会公平,是解决我国宅基地问题的一种较为理想的方案。%The backward legislation ideas and fuzzy right framework of Chinese current rural residential site institution can not realize gain right because of the residential right restriction, which causes its serious waste and low exploitation efficiency. The Third Plenary Session of the Eighteenth Central Committee of CPC proposed a strategic concept of “reforming and improving the system of rural residential sites”. Therefore, the institutional innovation of rural residential sites should embody urban⁃rural fairness, regional fairness and practical fairness and attain the goal of intensive land⁃use. However, current two reform ideas such as“limiting free transfer and enlarging exploitation rights” and “free transfer” have natural shortcomings because the two ideas only concern about the surface of the sites and do not reconstruct the residential site institution under the background of overall urban and rural development and new⁃style urbanization. “The Residential Site Normalization” Model is helpful to intensively use the land, can embody

  4. Burn Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Now Help keep local seniors safe from fire! Burn Survivor Support If you are reading this, chances ... year – a burn injury. Learn more Fire and Burn Prevention Each year, the Burn Institute provides fire ...

  5. CSCAPES Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alex Pothen

    2008-10-26

    We report on the progress made by researchers of the CSCAPES Institute at Old Dominion University for the years 2007 and 2008 in the areas of research, software creation, education and training, and outreach activities.

  6. Institutional Controls

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of institutional control data from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different...

  7. Kansas physician assistants' attitudes and beliefs regarding spirituality and religiosity in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Gina M; Crowe, Robin E; Budke, Ginny; Norman, Jennifer; Swick, Valerie; Nyberg, Sue; Lee, Felecia

    2013-09-01

    Research indicates patients want to discuss spirituality/religious (S/R) beliefs with their healthcare provider. This was a cross-sectional study of Kansas physician assistants (PA) regarding S/R in patient care. Surveys included questions about personal S/R beliefs and attitudes about S/R in patient care. Self-reported religious respondents agreed (92%) they should be aware of patient S/R; 82% agreed they should address it. Agreement with incorporating S/R increased significantly based on patient acuity. This research indicates Kansas PAs' personal S/R beliefs influence their attitudes toward awareness and addressing patient S/R.

  8. The giant resin bee making its way west: First record in Kansas (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Hinojosa-Díaz

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The invasive giant resin bee (Megachile sculpturalis Smith was first discovered in North America in 1994. A 2005 study provided the first predictive ecological niche model for any bee species and concluded that M. sculpturalis, then confined to the eastern United States, would eventually spread as far south as southern Florida, as far north as southern Ontario and Nova Scotia, and as far west as South Dakota, western Kansas, and northwestern Texas. Herein I provide the first record of M. sculpturalis from northeastern Kansas, documenting that the species has indeed continued its westward expansion in North America and the new available records entirely correspond to the earlier predictions.

  9. Final Corrective Action Study for the Former CCC/USDA Facility in Hanover, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater and vapor intrusion into a limited number of residences (attributable to the contaminant concentrations in groundwater) have been identified in Hanover, Kansas, at and near a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). At the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2009h), the CCC/USDA has prepared this Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address the contamination in groundwater and soil vapor.

  10. Equitable Opportunities for Higher Education Under the Urban-rural Dual Structure__Institutional Barriers and Reform Path%城乡二元结构下的高等教育机会公平:体制性障碍及改革路径探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方丽丽

    2015-01-01

    The institutional barriers of higher education opportunities are analyzed under the dual structure of urban-rural in this paper.We want to find the reason of education unfair causes, and give some corresponding suggestions.It will have great sig-nificance on improving higher education theory and promoting the realization of higher education equity.%通过城乡二元结构体制下高等教育机会公平的体制性障碍分析,挖掘城乡体制性教育不公平的原因,并针对性地给出对策建议,对促进高等教育机会公平的实现,完善高等教育公平理论具有重大意义。

  11. The Rural Development Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Louis E.

    1991-01-01

    Progress toward rural development has been hampered by flawed views of rural America; serious limitations to existing social and economic data on sparsely populated areas; treatment of rural America as a geographical entity unconnected to the larger U.S. economy and society; perceived lack of feasible political solution to rural problems; and…

  12. Rural-Urban Connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Daniel F.; LaGreca, Anthony J.; Mullis, Ronald L.

    This publication combines three papers on rural and urban youth issues. "Key Issues Facing Rural Youth" (Daniel F. Perkins) notes that rural adolescents share the same concerns and exhibit the same problem behaviors as their urban counterparts. But in addition, geographic isolation presents problems unique to rural areas. A framework is proposed…

  13. Funding of a medical research institute in a small country: 15 years of Instituto de Patologia e Imunologia Molecular da Universidade do Porto (IPATIMUP)--interview conducted by Ivan Damjanov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel

    2005-06-01

    This is an interview with Prof Manuel Sobrinho-Simoes, the Director of the Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology of the University of Porto (IPATIMUP), Porto, Portugal. The interview was prepared for this Pathology thematic issue, by Prof Ivan Damjanov, from the University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, Kansas, USA. The interview deals with the funding and the growth of IPATIMUP, which became, within 15 years from its inception, one of the leading biomedical research institutions of Portugal. The interview touches upon the logistical, political, financial, and personnel-related problems they encountered during these 15 years. It illustrates some of the dilemmas and questions faced by scientists in Porto, which are also relevant to scientists in other small countries.

  14. Recommendations for new monitoring wells at Everest, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2007-05-03

    On February 15, 2007, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) submitted Recommendations for Remedial Action at Everest, Kansas. Those Recommendations were accepted by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in a letter to the CCC/USDA dated March 5, 2007. The approved Recommendations document outlines a plan for systematic groundwater sampling and monitoring at Everest to provide data necessary for the critical evaluation of remedial options - including a phytoremediation alternative - for restoration of the groundwater and protection of the surface waters of the intermittent creek at this site. Phase I of the KDHE-approved monitoring plan includes the following activities: (1) Groundwater sampling at existing monitoring wells, with analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and selected biodegradation parameters; (2) Sampling of surface waters along the intermittent creek for VOCs analyses; and (3) Periodic manual measurement and automated recording of groundwater and surface water levels in the vicinity of the intermittent creek. The locations selected for groundwater and surface water sampling and analyses under the approved monitoring program were determined in consultation with the KDHE. As a result of subsequent discussions among representatives of the KDHE, the CCC/USDA, and Argonne regarding the technical program at Everest, the CCC/USDA seeks KDHE approval for the installation of up to four new permanent monitoring wells along the upper reach of the intermittent creek west of the Nigh property, as shown in Figure 1. The proposed new well locations lie progressively downgradient in the anticipated direction of future groundwater and contaminant movement; all of the recommended points lie at least 2,000 ft upgradient, however, of the confirmed area of groundwater discharge to the creek identified near Highway 73. The proposed new wells will supplement the existing network of groundwater and surface

  15. Interim measure work plan/design for Agra, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-18

    This Interim Measure Work Plan/Design (IMWP/D) is supplemental to the Argonne document Interim Measure Conceptual Design for Remediation of Source Area Contamination at Agra, Kansas. The IMWP/D includes information required by Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy BER-RS-029, Policy and Scope of Work for Interim Measures. Specific to Policy BER-RS-029 is the requirement for several documents that will ensure that an adequate amount and type of data are collected for implementation of the IMWP/D and that data quality and safe conditions are prevailed. Such information is included in the IMWP/D as follows: Appendix A: Data Acquisition Plan--Design Testing Requirements; Appendix B: Basis of Design; Appendix C: Permits; Appendix D: Quality Assurance Project Plan; Appendix E: Health and Safety Plan; and Appendix F: Operations, Maintenance, and Monitoring Schedule. The proposed remedial technology for this project is the installation of five large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) in a source area that has been identified on the property formerly used for grain storage by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The goal of the LDB technology is the remediation of the source area by removal of mass quantities of contaminated soil from the vadose zone and treatment of any remaining contaminated soils that are adjacent to the source area to achieve a carbon tetrachloride concentration below 200 {micro}g/kg. Secondary to the soil remediation is the remediation of groundwater at and adjacent to the source areas. The LDB technology serves the following purposes: (1) The physical removal of contaminated soil from the identified source area. (2) Replacement of less permeable native materials (silty clay, clayey silt, and silty sand) with more permeable materials to facilitate the capture of volatilized contaminants in the vertical borehole. (3) Removal of contaminants volatilized by air sparging (AS) and extracted from the

  16. Annual report of monitoring at Barnes, Kansas, in 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-05-25

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, in 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). The results of that investigation indicated that carbon tetrachloride contamination is present in groundwater at low to moderate levels in the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigation also indicated that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). The former agriculture building owned by the local school district, located immediately east of well PWS3, is also a potential source of the contamination. In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began periodic groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, under the direction of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. Through 2010, sampling was conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events (Argonne 2008a-d, 2009a,b, 2010) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Long

  17. Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Everest, Kansas, in 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-21

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) began its environmental investigations at Everest, Kansas, in 2000. The work at Everest is implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, under the oversight of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The results of the environmental investigations have been reported in detail (Argonne 2001, 2003, 2006a,b). The lateral extent of the carbon tetrachloride in groundwater over the years of investigation has been interpreted as shown in Figure 1.1 (2001-2002 data), Figure 1.2 (2006 data), Figure 1.3 (2008 data), and Figure 1.4 (2009 data). The pattern of groundwater flow and inferred contaminant migration has consistently been to the north-northwest from the former CCC/USDA facility toward the Nigh property, and then west-southwest from the Nigh property (e.g., Figure 1.5 [2008 data] and Figure 1.6 [2009 data]). Both the monitoring data for carbon tetrachloride and the low groundwater flow rates estimated for the Everest aquifer unit (Argonne 2003, 2006a,b, 2008) indicate slow contaminant migration. On the basis of the accumulated findings, in March 2009 the CCC/USDA developed a plan for annual monitoring of the groundwater and surface water. This current monitoring plan (Appendix A in the report of monitoring in 2009 [Argonne 2010]) was approved by the KDHE (2009a). Under this plan, the monitoring wells are sampled by the low-flow procedure, and sample preservation, shipping, and analysis activities are consistent with previous work at Everest. The annual sampling will continue until identified conditions at the site indicate a technical justification for a change. The first annual sampling event under the new monitoring plan took place in April 2009. The results of analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and water level measurements were consistent with previous observations (Figures 1.1-1.4). No carbon tetrachloride was detected in surface

  18. Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2010-10-19

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater was sampled twice yearly from September 2005 until September 2007 for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The results from the two-year sampling program demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound in a localized groundwater plume that has shown little movement. The relative concentrations of chloroform, the primary degradation product of carbon tetrachloride, suggested that some degree of reductive dechlorination or natural biodegradation was taking place in situ at the former CCC/USDA facility on a localized scale. The CCC/USDA subsequently developed an Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007b), proposing a pilot test of the Adventus EHC technology for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR). The proposed interim measure (IM) was approved by the KDHE in November 2007 (KDHE 2007). Implementation of the pilot test occurred in November-December 2007. The objective was to create highly reducing conditions that would enhance both chemical and biological reductive dechlorination

  19. Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-16

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater was sampled twice yearly from September 2005 until September 2007 for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation processes (reductive dechlorination) in the subsurface environment (Argonne 2006, 2007a, 2008a). The results from the two-year sampling program demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a localized groundwater plume that has shown little movement. The relative concentrations of chloroform, the primary degradation product of carbon tetrachloride, suggested that some degree of reductive dechlorination or natural biodegradation was talking place in situ at the former CCC/USDA facility on a localized scale. The CCC/USDA subsequently developed an Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007b), proposing a pilot test of the Adventus EHC technology for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR). The proposed interim measure (IM) was approved by the KDHE in November 2007 (KDHE 2007). Implementation of the pilot test occurred in November-December 2007. The objective was to create highly reducing conditions that would enhance both chemical and biological

  20. Microbial Community Responses to Glycine Addition in Kansas Prairie Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottos, E.; Roy Chowdhury, T.; White, R. A., III; Brislawn, C.; Fansler, S.; Kim, Y. M.; Metz, T. O.; McCue, L. A.; Jansson, J.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies are rapidly expanding our abilities to unravel aspects of microbial community structure and function in complex systems like soil; however, characterizing the highly diverse communities is problematic, due primarily to challenges in data analysis. To tackle this problem, we aimed to constrain the microbial diversity in a soil by enriching for particular functional groups within a community through addition of "trigger substrates". Such trigger substrates, characterized by low molecular weight, readily soluble and diffusible in soil solution, representative of soil organic matter derivatives, would also be rapidly degradable. A relatively small energy investment to maintain the cell in a state of metabolic alertness for such substrates would be a better evolutionary strategy and presumably select for a cohort of microorganisms with the energetics and cellular machinery for utilization and growth. We chose glycine, a free amino acid (AA) known to have short turnover times (in the range of hours) in soil. As such, AAs are a good source of nitrogen and easily degradable, and can serve as building blocks for microbial proteins and other biomass components. We hypothesized that the addition of glycine as a trigger substrate will decrease microbial diversity and evenness, as taxa capable of metabolizing it are enriched in relation to those that are not. We tested this hypothesis by incubating three Kansas native prairie soils with glycine for 24 hours at 21 degree Celsius, and measured community level responses by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, metagenomics, and metatranscriptomics. Preliminary evaluation of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed minor changes in bacterial community composition in response to glycine addition. We will also present data on functional gene abundance and expression. The results of these analyses will be useful in designing sequencing strategies aimed at dissecting and deciphering complex microbial communities.

  1. Implementation of deep soil mixing at the Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, F.G.; Korte, N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Strong-Gunderson, J.; Siegrist, R.L.; West, O.R.; Cline, S.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Baker, J. [AlliedSignal, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1998-11-01

    In July 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Kansas City Plant (KCP), AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), conducted field-scale tests of in situ soil mixing and treatment technologies within the Northeast Area (NEA) of the KCP at the Former Ponds site. This demonstration, testing, and evaluation effort was conducted as part of the implementation of a deep soil mixing (DSM) innovative remedial technology demonstration project designed to test DSM in the low-permeability clay soils at the KCP. The clay soils and groundwater beneath this area are contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE). The demonstration project was originally designed to evaluate TCE and 1,2-DCE removal efficiency using soil mixing coupled with vapor stripping. Treatability study results, however, indicated that mixed region vapor stripping (MRVS) coupled with calcium oxide (dry lime powder) injection would improve TCE and 1,2-DCE removal efficiency in saturated soils. The scope of the KCP DSM demonstration evolved to implement DSM with the following in situ treatment methodologies for contaminant source reduction in soil and groundwater: DSM/MRVS coupled with calcium oxide injection; DSM/bioaugmentation; and DSM/chemical oxidation using potassium permanganate. Laboratory treatability studies were started in 1995 following collection of undisturbed soil cores from the KCP. These studies were conducted at ORNL, and the results provided information on optimum reagent concentrations and mixing ratios for the three in situ treatment agents to be implemented in the field demonstration.

  2. The Kansas Anthropologist Reminlscence Project for Senior Plains Anthropologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlin F. Hawley

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Remember the days of old, consider the years of many generations, ask thy father and he will show thee, thy elders, and they will tell thee. Deuteronomy 32: 7. For the past six years, 'The Kansas Anthropologist' has published an ongoing series of reminiscences or retrospective articles by senior Great Plains archaeologists. The aim of the project is to collect reminiscences from senior anthro­pologists regarding their experiences in pre-and post-World War II Plains archaeology, biological anthropology, and ethnology. The historian John Lukacs (1966:x once offered an elegant and concise comment on the value of history, one that I offer here: "I believe that history, as a form of thought, is one of the most precious and perhaps unique rational posssessions of Western civilizations. The character of a person may appear best from the reconstruc­tion of the history of his life; the same is true of the character of nations. The very history of a prob­lem may reveal its essential diagnosis. There is no human endeavor that may not be approached and studied profitably through its history." Fortunately, there hardly needs to be a justification anymore for such a project, as is attested by the recent prolifera­tion of research into the history of archaeology and anthropology on virtually a global scale.The intention of these retrospective articles is not to explore or diagnose any particular problem but rather to create a mosaic of first person narrratives informed by personal experience and illustrated with photos and anecdotes to illuminate the development of Plains anthropology in the 20th Century.

  3. Quality of Streams in Johnson County, Kansas, and Relations to Environmental Variables, 2003-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Poulton, Barry C.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    The quality of streams and relations to environmental variables in Johnson County, northeastern Kansas, were evaluated using water, streambed sediment, land use, streamflow, habitat, algal periphyton (benthic algae), and benthic macroinvertebrate data. Water, streambed sediment, and macroinvertebrate samples were collected in March 2007 during base flow at 20 stream sites that represent 11 different watersheds in the county. In addition, algal periphyton samples were collected twice (spring and summer 2007) at one-half of the sites. Environmental data including water and streambed-sediment chemistry data (primarily nutrients, fecal-indicator bacteria, and organic wastewater compounds), land use, streamflow, and habitat data were used in statistical analyses to evaluate relations between biological conditions and variables that may affect them. This report includes an evaluation of water and streambed-sediment chemistry, assessment of habitat conditions, comparison of biological community attributes (such as composition, diversity, and abundance) among sampling sites, placement of sampling sites into impairment categories, evaluation of biological data relative to environmental variables, and evaluation of changes in biological communities and effects of urbanization. This evaluation is useful for understanding factors that affect stream quality, for improving water-quality management programs, and for documenting changing conditions over time. The information will become increasingly important for protecting streams in the future as urbanization continues. Results of this study indicate that the biological quality at nearly all biological sampling sites in Johnson County has some level of impairment. Periphyton taxa generally were indicative of somewhat degraded conditions with small to moderate amounts of organic enrichment. Camp Branch in the Blue River watershed was the only site that met State criteria for full support of aquatic life in 2007. Since 2003

  4. The value of cooperatives in rural electrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadoo, Annabel; Cruickshank, Heather [Centre for Sustainable Development, Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    The electricity sectors of many developing countries underwent substantial reforms during the 1980s and 1990s, driven by global agendas of privatization and liberalization. However, rural electrification offered little by way of market incentives for profit-seeking private companies and was often neglected. As a consequence, delivery models for rural electrification need to change. This paper will review the experiences of various rural electrification delivery models that have been established in developing countries, including concessionary models, dealership approaches and the strengthening of small and medium-sized energy businesses. It will use examples from the USA, Bangladesh and Nepal, together with a detailed case study of a Nepali rural electric cooperative, to explore the role that local cooperatives can play in extending electricity access. It is shown that although there is no magic bullet solution to deliver rural electrification, if offered appropriate financial and institutional support, socially orientated cooperative businesses can be a willing, efficient and effective means of extending and managing rural electricity services. It is expected that this paper will be of particular value to policy-makers, donors, project planners and implementers currently working in the field of rural electrification. (author)

  5. Obesity, Body Fat Distribution, and Physical Activity in School-age Children: an Urban and Rural Comparison in Valparaíso, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizana, Pablo A; Paula, Cisternas-Vallejos; Araya, Leonel; Aguilera, Francisco; Mora, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    This study analyze the relation between body composition, physical activity (PA), and sex in Chilean children from rural and urban public educational institutions. The prevalence of obesity (according to BMI) was 30.88% in urban children and 28.93% in rural children. Central obesity presented mainly in the rural girls. Approximately 90% of the participants reported child urban-rural population.

  6. Rural Land Institutions and Labor Relations of Migrant Workers in China%中国农村土地制度与农民工劳资关系状况研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯风云; 潘芸红

    2016-01-01

    中国农村集体土地产权制度对农民工劳资关系状况的影响是很明显的,尤其是对农民工工资水平的影响。研究表明,中国农村集体土地产权制度对中国农民、外出务工人员以及改革开放后的中国经济发展有积极影响,稳定的农村土地制度为外出务工农民提供了一个基本的保障和劳资谈判底线,在某种程度上起到了对农民工权益的保护作用。实行土地私有制的印度难以确保土地权的稳定,大量农民失去土地,流落城市贫民窟,忍受低工资盘剥。因此,城镇化是一个自然过程,城镇化过程一定要充分考虑农民工进城的生存能力,任何行政命令式的推进都会事与愿违,带来严重后果。%This paper examines the impact of collective land ownership in rural China on labor relations of migrant workers ,especially on migrants’ wages .The results indicate that the collective land ownership in rural China has a positive impact on Chinese farmers ,migrant workers and China’ s economic development since the reform and opening up . T he stability of land tenure provides a basic protection and bottom line of labor negotiations for migrant workers ,which serves as some kind of unemployment insurance mechanism to protect their labor rights .By comparison ,the private land ow nership in India fails to ensure the stability of land tenure ,and many Indian farmers have lost their land and have to live in urban slums enduring low wages and poor living conditions .The policy implication is that urbanization is a natural process ,w hich must take into full account the ability of rural migrant workers to survive in cities ,and any administration intervention by the government to push the urbanization forward is likely to be counterproductive with serious consequences .

  7. Unimagined Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangenberg, Mikkel Bruun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper it is argued that war contains inherent and thus necessary aesthetic traits (ranging from sensory data to narrative features), but that existing research institutions throughout the West have failed to address this issue adequately, in terms of research policy, recruitment and metho......In this paper it is argued that war contains inherent and thus necessary aesthetic traits (ranging from sensory data to narrative features), but that existing research institutions throughout the West have failed to address this issue adequately, in terms of research policy, recruitment...... and methodology. Accordingly, it is suggested that scholars from the humanities in particular aggressively seek to develop new types of research institutions and methods in order to deal with the manifold forms of overlap between warfare and aesthetics. In empirical terms, focus is limited to the current...

  8. Rural health care in Mexico?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañedo, L

    1974-09-27

    A very large percentage of Mexico's population living in rural areas lacks resources for health care. Any new effort to provide such care must emphasize the health of the infant population because of the high percentage of infants in the country. Plans made at the national level have not been correlated with the conditions that exist in rural areas. For example, the majority of university programs are oriented toward urban medical practice, and the construction of more schools of medicine to solve the problem of doctors in rural areas is based on a mistaken premise. This problem has not been solved even in developed countries such as the United States where, as in Mexico, graduates in medicine migrate to the cities where optimal conditions are met for practicing the type of medicine for which they have been trained. Furthermore, it is both expensive and illogical to maintain urban doctors in rural areas where they cannot practice their profession for lack of resources; to do so is to deny the purpose of their education (27). Conventional schools of medicine, for reasons of investment and of structure, should teach only very selected groups of students who, on finishing their training, are fully capacitated to practice specialized medicine. A different system is required if we are to provide adequate health care in the rural communities. A system such as that described herein, adapted to the real need of rural communities, would avoid the necessity to create dysfunctional bureaucracies and would not destroy those institutions which have proved useful in the past. This study should be considered as one of the many pilot programs that should be initiated in order to determine the type of program that would best solve the problem of health care in rural Mexico. Other programs already being considered at the National Autonomous University of Mexico include the A36 plan of the Faculty of Medicine, now in operation; the work of C. Biro carried out in Netzahualcoyotl City

  9. Institutional Awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlvik, Carina; Boxenbaum, Eva

    Drawing on dual-process theory and mindfulness research this article sets out to shed light on the conditions that need to be met to create “a reflexive shift in consciousness” argued to be a key foundational mechanism for agency in institutional theory. Although past research has identified diff...... in consciousness to emerge and argue for how the varying levels of mindfulness in the form of internal and external awareness may manifest as distinct responses to the institutional environment the actor is embedded in....

  10. Bonanza Club: 35 Years of Maximum Crop Production and Extension Education in Southwestern Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes the success of a county extension crops program, the Bonanza Club, in providing timely and useful information regarding new and successful agronomic practices. The program is cited for its beneficial influence on changing crop-production practices in southwestern Kansas. (MCO)

  11. The Edgerton Structure: A Possible Meteorite Impact Feature in Eastern Kansas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Merriam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognized meteorite impact features are relatively rare in the U.S. Midcontinent region, but recently with increased interest and research, the number has increased dramatically. We add another possibility to the growing list, the Edgerton structure in northwestern Miami County, Kansas. The feature is elliptical (∼5.5 × 6.5 km, slightly elongated east-west with radial surface drainage. The feature was first observed on hillshade maps of digitized topography of 7.5 minute quadrangles. Subsequent magnetic profiles show a higher magnetic value in the center of the ellipse with higher values around the edges; this shape is characteristic of an impact feature. Depth to the anomalous body is estimated to be about 1 km, which puts it in the Precambrian crystalline basement under a cover of Paleozoic sediments. There are no deep boreholes in the vicinity and no seismic profiles are available. If it is an impact structure, it will be the second such feature documented in Kansas, the first being the Brenham meteorite crater at Haviland in Kiowa County in southwestern Kansas. It would be older than the other impact structures identified in the Midcontinent—Manson in Iowa, Ames in Oklahoma, Haswell Hole in Colorado, and possibly Belton in Missouri and Merna in Nebraska. There are at least two other prospective impact features in Kansas: the Goddard ring west of Wichita and Garden City ellipse north-west of Garden City.

  12. Migrant Programs in the Southwestern States -- Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Migrant Information Clearinghouse, Austin, TX. Juarez-Lincoln Center.

    Part of the "Comprehensive National Survey of Migrant Programs" series, this directory was prepared for use by agencies working with migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the Southwestern states of Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. The directory lists programs, services, and resources available to migrants in these states.…

  13. Schools in Kansas with Tornado Protection. Shawnee Mission Public Schools--District No. 512.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Delbert B.

    Kansas and nearby Missouri are among the half-dozen states in America having the greatest frequency of tornadoes of any region in the world. This booklet describes a districtwide approach of designing and constructing tornado-resistant shelters as integrated parts of the school facilities. The design criteria for tornado protection also resulted…

  14. First Kansas Colored Volunteers: Contributions of Black Union Soldiers in the Trans-Mississippi West

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-17

    public service.”8 Such approval, however, never materialized and President Lincoln immediately annulled Hunter’s emancipation proclamation. Lacking...dispelled the myth believed by many Confederate soldiers that black men were inferior soldiers. For the citizens of Mound City, Kansas, the victory at

  15. Pheromone trapping to determine Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) activity in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), has been a historically significant pest of wheat throughout the Great Plains, including Kansas. However, it has been many decades since the flies’ activity has been monitored throughout the year in the field. This paper presents research on the activity ...

  16. Kansas Plan: For Program Planning and Development in Education for the Mentally Retarded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsell, Marguerite; And Others

    The manual of administrative guidelines outlining program organization for the education of the mentally retarded in Kansas presents standards of program organization and operation and plans for implementing specified services for the various levels of mental retardation. Part 1 of the manual, detailing program organization, covers program…

  17. Employer Manpower Needs and Job Entry Requirements for Paralegals within Johnson County, Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatham, Elaine L.

    In order to determine whether a paralegal program could be successfully implemented at Johnson County Community College, surveys were sent to 262 local attorneys (with a 24% response rate) and to 41 members of the Kansas City Association of Legal Assistants (71% response). Emphasis was placed on determining area employment needs and the…

  18. 75 FR 70657 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Kansas: Prevention of Significant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... Kansas's SIP revision. A. What are GHGs and their sources? A detailed explanation of GHGs, climate change... amount of GHGs in the atmosphere, which is changing the climate in a way that endangers human health... or local air pollution control agency that has its own authority to issue PSD permits under a permit...

  19. Kansas timber industry: an assessment of timber product output and use, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Haugen

    2013-01-01

    Presents recent Kansas forest industry trends; production and receipts of industrial roundwood; and production of saw logs and other products in 2009. Logging residue generated from timber harvest operations is reported, as well as wood and bark residue generated at primary wood-using mills and disposition of mill residues.

  20. Update on Kansas City Middle Blue River Green Infrastructure Pilot Project - seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2010, Kansas City, MO (KCMO) signed a consent degree with EPA on combined sewer overflows. The City decided to use adaptive management in order to extensively utilize green infrastructure (GI) in lieu of, and in addition to, structural controls. KCMO installed 130 GI storm con...

  1. Western Kansas Migrant Health Project: 10th Annual Progress Report, 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas State Dept. of Health, Topeka.

    Basic services provided by the Western Kansas Migrant Health Project for migrant families include: (1) remedial schools and migrant education programs; (2) health education; (3) housing and sanitation; (4) nursing services; (5) medical and dental services; (6) hospital services; and (7) supplemental food programs. Among the Project's services…

  2. Western Kansas Migrant Health Project: 7th Annual Progress Report, 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas State Dept. of Health, Topeka.

    Basic services which the Western Kansas Migrant Health Project provides migrant families include: (1) remedial schools and day care centers; (2) health education; (3) housing and sanitation; (4) nursing services; (5) medical and dental services; (6) hospital services; (7) supplemental food programs; and (8) driver education. During 1970, the…

  3. Western Kansas Migrant Health Project: 9th Annual Progress Report, 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas State Dept. of Health, Topeka.

    Services provided by the Western Kansas Migrant Health Project include: (1) remedial schools and day care centers; (2) health education; (3) housing and sanitation; (4) nursing services; (5) medical and dental services; (6) hospital services; and (7) supplemental food programs. In September 1971, the Project's sponsoring of VISTA Volunteers in…

  4. The Attitudes of Negro High School Students in Kansas City, Missouri: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiddmont, Norman; Levine, Daniel U.

    This report evaluates a questionnaire submitted to 529 economically disadvantaged black high school students in Kansas City, Missouri. The questionnaire was designed to assess attitudes in the following areas: value placed on education and its importance for one's future; interracial relationships, the Black Power movement, and violence; interest…

  5. Migration Trends in the Kansas Ogallala Region and the Internal Colonial Dependency Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    Examines population change in the High Plains of western Kansas in terms of an internal colonialism-dependency model. Identifies a wide range of colonial dependent characteristics, including long-term population decline, high median age, highly channelized migration flows, and continuing outmigration of the region's most educated inhabitants.…

  6. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - Near-term, Class I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Reynolds, Rodney R.; McCune, A. Dwayne; Michnick, Michael J.; Walton, Anthony W.; Watney, W. Lynn

    2000-06-08

    This project involved two demonstration projects, one in a Marrow reservoir located in the southwestern part of the state and the second in the Cherokee Group in eastern Kansas. Morrow reservoirs of western Kansas are still actively being explored and constitute an important resource in Kansas. Cumulative oil production from the Morrow in Kansas is over 400,000,000 bbls. Much of the production from the Morrow is still in the primary stage and has not reached the mature declining state of that in the Cherokee. The Cherokee Group has produced about 1 billion bbls of oil since the first commercial production began over a century ago. It is a billion-barrel plus resource that is distributed over a large number of fields and small production units. Many of the reservoirs are operated close to the economic limit, although the small units and low production per well are offset by low costs associated with the shallow nature of the reservoirs (less than 1000 ft. deep).

  7. 30 CFR 916.15 - Approval of Kansas regulatory program amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MLCRA 49-403, 49-405c, 49-406, 49-420; § 10 of House Bill 2182; K.A.R. 47-2-21, 47-8-10, 47-8-11. March..., 2007 November 28, 2008 Revegetation Success Guidelines; Normal Husbandry Practices; Kansas...

  8. Career Development Event Participation and Professional Development Needs of Kansas Agricultural Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Clark R.

    2008-01-01

    Past studies have shown that agricultural education teachers perceive a need for professional development in Career Development Events (CDEs) preparation, but they did not identify the individual CDEs where training was needed. This study examined the CDEs that Kansas schools were participating in at the district and state levels and the CDEs…

  9. The Effect of an Electromagnetic Pulse Strike on the Transportation Infrastructure of Kansas City

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    resource. SCADA systems are used globally, and are found at supermarkets , refineries, water treatment plants, and even in the common household...25 Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition systems ..................................................... 28 Kansas City... System CIKR Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources DCS Digital Control Systems DOD Department of Defense ECM Electronic Control Module EFI

  10. Potential economic impacts of water-use changes in southwest Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research considers three policy scenarios aimed at reducing groundwater consumption in three high priority subareas of southwest Kansas. The three policy scenarios include: (1) a Status Quo scenario where there is no change in water-use policy, (2) an Immediate Conversion to Dryland scenario wh...

  11. Evaluating the impact of future climate change on irrigated maize production in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States southern and central High Plains including western Kansas are experiencing declining ground water supplies from the Ogallala as a result of withdrawals for irrigation exceeding annual recharge, this situation will be exacerbated by future climate change. The purpose of this simulat...

  12. Kansas timber industry--an assessment of timber product output and use, 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H., IV Reading; David L. Bruton

    2007-01-01

    Discusses recent forest industry trends in Kansas; reports production and receipts of industrial roundwood by product, species, and county in 2003. Also reports on logging residue, on wood and bark residue generated at primary wood-using mills, and on disposition of mill residues.

  13. Archaeological Inventory and Evaluation at Milford, Melvern and Pomona Lakes, Eastern Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Creek Knives. A second site (De Shazer Creek) with similar artifacts has been located in Marshall County, Kansas. Dates at this site range from 4215...180 to 5320±790 years B.P. (Schmits 1981). The Archaic cultural sequence succeeding Unit III at Coffey and De Shazer Creek has been identified largely

  14. Update on Kansas City Middle Blue River Green Infrastructure Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2010, Kansas City, MO (KCMO) signed a consent degree with EPA on combined sewer overflows. The City decided to use adaptive management in order to extensively utilize green infrastructure (GI) in lieu of, and in addition to, gray structural controls. KCMO installed 130 GI sto...

  15. Update on Kansas City Middle Blue River Green Infrastructure Pilot Project - seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2010, Kansas City, MO (KCMO) signed a consent degree with EPA on combined sewer overflows. The City decided to use adaptive management in order to extensively utilize green infrastructure (GI) in lieu of, and in addition to, structural controls. KCMO installed 130 GI storm con...

  16. Taeniopterid lamina on Phasmatocycas megasporophylls (Cycadales) from the Lower Permian of Kansas, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, W.H.; Pfefferkorn, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    New specimens of Phasmatocycas and Taeniopteris from the original Lower Permian locality in Kansas demonstrate organic attachment of the two and corroborate Mamay's hypothesis that Phasmatocycas and Taeniopteris were parts of the same plant. These forms also suggest that cycads evolved from taxa with entire leaves; i.e. Taeniopteris, rather than from pteridosperms with compound leaves. ?? 1986.

  17. Progress Developing the Kansas Early Childhood Special Education Accountability System: Initial Findings Using ECO and COSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Charles R.; Walker, Dale; Hornbeck, Marguerite; Hebbeler, Kathleen; Spiker, Donna

    2007-01-01

    Policy decision makers, early educators, and early interventionists face numerous challenges as they develop and implement statewide accountability systems to evaluate and improve children's early intervention and early childhood special education outcomes. Kansas was an early adopter of the Child Outcomes Summary Form (COSF) developed by the…

  18. European Institutions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meacham, Darian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to sketch a phenomenological theory of political institutions and to apply it to some objections and questions raised by Pierre Manent about the project of the European Union and more specifically the question of “European Construction”, i.e. what is the aim of the Europea

  19. Institution Morphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Joseph; Rosu, Grigore; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Institutions formalize the intuitive notion of logical system, including both syntax and semantics. A surprising number of different notions of morphisim have been suggested for forming categories with institutions as objects, and a surprising variety of names have been proposed for them. One goal of this paper is to suggest a terminology that is both uniform and informative to replace the current rather chaotic nomenclature. Another goal is to investigate the properties and interrelations of these notions. Following brief expositions of indexed categories, twisted relations, and Kan extensions, we demonstrate and then exploit the duality between institution morphisms in the original sense of Goguen and Burstall, and the 'plain maps' of Meseguer, obtaining simple uniform proofs of completeness and cocompleteness for both resulting categories; because of this duality, we prefer the name 'comorphism' over 'plain map.' We next consider 'theoroidal' morphisms and comorphisims, which generalize signatures to theories, finding that the 'maps' of Meseguer are theoroidal comorphisms, while theoroidal morphisms are a new concept. We then introduce 'forward' and 'semi-natural' morphisms, and appendices discuss institutions for hidden algebra, universal algebra, partial equational logic, and a variant of order sorted algebra supporting partiality.

  20. Institutional Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmolinsky, Adam

    1975-01-01

    Institutional paralysis of higher education is the result of the disjunction between faculty and administration; the disjunction between substantive planning and bugetary decision-making; the disjunction between departmental structures and functional areas of university concern; and the disjunction between the theory of direct democracy and its…

  1. Agricultural Education for Sustainable Rural Development in Developing Countries – Challenges and Policy Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhansi Seetharam Chittoor

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Governments all over the world have focused upon sustainable rural development in an organized way. Rural locations, in particular, need more economic development in order to match urban centric development. Poverty in rural areas has remained by and large, the main focal point of governments and development agencies. Sustainable rural development is the most effective way to eliminate this curse. Environment friendly growth stimulators have been provided to rural populations. This paper aims to: (a give an insight into the linkages between the agricultural education and sustainable rural development, and (b present strategies for sustainable rural development. Challenges in sustainable rural development for developing countries in the 21st century have also been looked into. The paper concludes that agricultural education institutions in developing countries will need to address not only immediate production needs, but also long-term food security, sustainable agriculture and rural development needs.

  2. Influence of Outflow of Rural Funds on Financial Support for Agriculture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinqian; DENG; Wenkai; LUO

    2013-01-01

    Since the reform and opening-up,rural finance has made enormous contribution to rural economic development.However,with commercialization reform of financial institutions,the conflict between outflow of large funds and shortage of funds for rural economic development becomes prominent,leading to serious degradation of agricultural support function of rural finance.From the perspective of outflow of rural funds,this paper analyzes the problem of"deviation from agriculture"of rural financial business,and derives the conclusion that it is necessary and urgent to restore agricultural support function of rural finance.Then,it discusses restoration path for agricultural support function of rural finance.Finally,it comes up with some effective paths in accordance with existing problems in agricultural support function of rural finance.

  3. Rural Entrepreneurship or Entrepreneurship in the Rural

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Steffen; Müller, Sabine; Tanvig, Hanne Wittorff

    2015-01-01

    ” and “space” from human geography are applied to develop a nuanced understanding of rural entrepreneurship as a spatial phenomenon. Space consists of processes of movement and mobility, while places consist of localized material, social and economic relations. Findings: Two ideal types are developed, namely......Purpose: This article investigates how rural entrepreneurship engages with place and space. It explores the concept of “rural” in rural enterprise, and illustrates the importance of distinguishing between types of rural entrepreneurship. Design/methodology/approach: The constructs of “place...... (i) entrepreneurship in the rural and (ii) rural entrepreneurship. The former represents entrepreneurial activities that have limited embeddedness and enact a profit-oriented and mobile logic of space. The latter represents entrepreneurial activities that leverage local resources to re-connect place...

  4. Research on the Sustainable Development of Rural Microfinance Institutions Under the“New Normal”%新常态下农村小额信贷机构的可持续发展研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张路通; 何华

    2016-01-01

    回顾我国小额信贷机构的三十年发展历程,厘清我国小额信贷的发展路径,得出我国小额信贷机构整体上发展基本合理的结论。刻画出我国小贷市场近五年内出现的井喷式增长,探析增长背后的深层次原因,并为我国小额信贷机构的未来可持续发展提出建议。%Review the thirty years development of China's microfinance institutions ,clarify the development path of China's microfinance , and draw the conclusion that the development of China 's microfinance institutions as a whole,depict the growth of small loan market in the past five years ,and give suggestions for the future sustainable development of microfinance institutions .

  5. The evolution of groundwater management paradigms in Kansas and possible new steps towards water sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophocleous, Marios

    2012-01-01

    SummaryThe purpose of this paper is to trace the evolution of key water-related laws and management practices in Kansas, from the enactment of the Kansas Water Resources Appropriation Act of 1945 to the present, in order to highlight the state's efforts to create a more sustainable water future and in hopes that others will benefit from Kansas' experience. The 1945 Act provides the basic framework of water law (prior appropriation) in Kansas. Progression of groundwater management in the state encompasses local Groundwater Management Districts (GMDs) and their water-management programs, minimum-streamflow and TMDL standards, water-use reporting and water metering programs, use of modified safe-yield policies in some GMDs, the subbasin water-resources-management program, the integrated resource planning/aquifer storage and recovery project of the city of Wichita, the Central Kansas Water Bank, enhanced aquifer subunits management, and various water conservation programs. While these have all contributed to the slowing down of declines in groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer and in associated ecosystems, they have not yet succeeded in halting those declines. Based on the assumption that the different management approaches have to operate easily within the prevailing water rights and law framework to succeed, a number of steps are suggested here that may help further diminish or reverse the declines of the High Plains aquifer. These include eliminating the "use it or lose it" maxim in the prior-appropriation framework, broadening the definition of "beneficial use," regulating domestic and other "exempt" wells, encouraging voluntary "sharing the shortage" agreements, and determining to what extent water rights may be regulated in the public interest without a compensable "taking". Further measures include establishing artificial recharge and/or aquifer storage and recovery projects wherever feasible and determining to what extent water-rights holders might be

  6. ­Is the Recent Increase in Seismicity in Southern Kansas Natural?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, J. L.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Llenos, A. L.; Walter, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes in southern Kansas were nearly unheard of until September 2013, when two M2 earthquakes occurred. Since then, the earthquake rate has risen dramatically. Between December 2013 and July 28, 2014, 14 M≥3 earthquakes were recorded in Harper and Sumner counties, the largest being a M3.8 earthquake in December 2013. Residents of the towns of Caldwell and Anthony have reported feeling even more earthquakes. In response to the surge in earthquakes, the USGS deployed a 10-station seismic network to monitor earthquakes in southeastern Harper and southwestern Sumner counties. We have identified over 200 earthquakes that occurred from mid-June to late-July, 2014. The locations of these earthquakes cluster within or near the seismic array, ranging in magnitude from 0.5 to 3.5. The earthquakes we identified are occurring within the Mississippian Lime Play, an area of rapidly expanding oil and gas development stretching from central Oklahoma to northwestern Kansas. In Kansas, new development of the play is largely in the adjoining areas of Harper and Sumner counties. Even with the new development, production in Sumner County has largely remained constant. However, in Harper County, where production was fairly stable from 1995-2010, it began increasing rapidly in 2011. In 2013 the highest yearly production volumes to date were approximately five times larger than those in 2010. The spatial and temporal correlation of the oil and gas development and seismicity in southern Kansas suggests a potential relationship between the two; some of the earthquake clusters lie within 1-2 kilometers of recent development. We examine the possibility that the earthquakes in southern Kansas are induced by wastewater injection and/or hydraulic fracturing. This involves using a refined earthquake catalog built upon cross-correlation detections and high-precision earthquake relocation techniques. We also compute first-motion focal mechanisms and compare them to the regional stress field.

  7. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Law Enforcement Officers on Rabies and Animal Control Issues in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straily, A; Trevino-Garrison, I

    2017-03-01

    Rabies is a deadly zoonoses endemic in the United States, including Kansas. Animal control programmes that emphasize vaccination of dogs and cats, removal of stray animals and enforcement of licensure programmes have historically been essential in reducing the risk of rabies exposures to humans (Beran, 1991). Kansas does not mandate the use of animal control officers [ACOs] and in areas where there is no designated animal control officer, law enforcement officers [LEOs] are required to fill that role. Little is known about LEOs' knowledge of rabies, their current practices in responding to animal-related calls or if they receive any specialized training to perform the duties of an ACO. A web-based, voluntary and anonymous survey was sent to law enforcement officers in Kansas in January 2014. The survey included questions about animal control practices and a self-assessment of rabies knowledge. The response rate was 16.2%. All respondents indicated LEOs will respond to animal-related calls, even if there was an ACO available in their department or jurisdiction. A majority of respondents indicated they had not received training on safe animal handling (62.9%, 61/97) or zoonoses prevention (85.6%, 83/97), even though a strong majority considered such training important (89.7% and 79.4%, respectively). Most respondents (>80%) were able to correctly identify animals capable of transmitting rabies but were less aware of how rabies was transmitted or the severity of rabies in humans. Our results demonstrate that Kansas LEOs perform animal control duties, many without the proper training, even though most consider such training to be important to be able to perform their duties safely. Training on safe animal handling and zoonoses prevention should be provided to all LEOs in Kansas to enable them to safely execute their duties and provide timely and accurate information to citizens regarding rabies prevention. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Office of Rural Health Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Hub Rural Health Research Gateway Rural Community Health Gateway White House Rural Council  Eligibility Analyzer Contact Us Subscribe to FORHP weekly announcement for rural health grantees and stakeholders by e-mail Subscribe to ...

  9. Rural Logistics System Based on Rural Informatization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Current status of rural informatization construction in China,including the relatively weak rural informatization,asymmetric market information,low level of information sharing,dispersedly allocated resources and no cross point among each other are analyzed.The importance of informatization in rural logistic system is introduced:firstly,decision making of logistics system plan is based on information.Secondly,improvement of the overall efficiency of logistics system is based on information.Thirdly,logistics transmission takes the Internet as the carrier.Necessity of rural logistics system is discussed from five aspects of increasing the employment of farmers,enhancing the income of farmers,reducing the blindness of agricultural production and circulation,sharing the risks of agricultural management,and promoting the rural economic restructuring.According to the above five steps,five countermeasures are posed in order to improve the rural logistics system.The countermeasures cover the aspects of deepening the information awareness of government,establishing a rural informatization system suited to the national condition of China,strengthening the information infrastructure in rural areas,promoting the integration of rural information resources and establishing the training system for agricultural information talents.

  10. Results of groundwater monitoring at Everest, Kansas, in April 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-05

    On September 7, 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented a Scoping Memo (Argonne 2005) for preliminary consideration by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), suggesting possible remedial options for the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Everest, Kansas. The suggested approaches were discussed by representatives of the KDHE, the CCC/USDA, and Argonne at the KDHE office in Topeka on September 8-9, 2005, along with other technical and logistic issues related to the Everest site. In response to these discussions, the KDHE recommended (KDHE 2005) evaluation of several remedial processes, either alone or in combination, as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for Everest. The primary remedial processes suggested by the KDHE were the following: Hydraulic control by groundwater extraction with aboveground treatment; Air sparging (AS) coupled with soil vapor extraction (SVE) in large-diameter boreholes (LDBs); and Phytoremediation. As a further outcome of the 2005 meeting and as a precursor to development of a possible CAS, the CCC/USDA completed the following supplemental investigations at Everest to address several specific technical concerns discussed with the KDHE: (1) Construction of interpretive cross sections at strategic locations selected by the KDHE along the main plume migration pathway, to depict the hydrogeologic characteristics affecting groundwater flow and contaminant movement (Argonne 2006a). (2) A field investigation in early 2006 (Argonne 2006b), as follows: (a) Installation and testing of a production well and associated observation points, at locations approved by the KDHE, to determine the response of the Everest aquifer to groundwater extraction near the Nigh property. (b) Groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the installation of additional permanent monitoring points at locations selected by the KDHE, to further

  11. Annual report of monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2009 .

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-05

    In September 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) initiated periodic sampling of groundwater in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Morrill, Kansas. The sampling at Morrill is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2005), to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at this site (Argonne 2004, 2005a). This report provides results for monitoring events in April and September 2009. Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), groundwater was initially sampled twice yearly for a period of two years (in fall 2005, in spring and fall 2006, and in spring and fall 2007). The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as for selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The analytical results for groundwater sampling events at Morrill from September 2005 to October 2008 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007, 2008a,b, 2009). Those results consistently demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a groundwater plume extending generally south-southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, toward Terrapin Creek at the south edge of the town. Low levels ({le} 1.3 {micro}g/L) of carbon tetrachloride were persistently detected at monitoring well MW8S, on the bank of an intermittent tributary to Terrapin Creek. This observation suggested a possible risk of contamination of the surface waters of the creek. That concern is the regulatory driver for ongoing monitoring. In light of the early findings, in 2006 the CCC

  12. Annual report of monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-06-27

    Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha. The population of Morrill as of the 2000 census was approximately 277. All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. Starting in 1922, eight different public wells formerly served the Morrill municipal system at some time. Because of poor water quality, including high nitrate levels attributed to numerous animal feeding operations in the vicinity and application of fertilizer on agricultural lands, use of the local groundwater from any public well for municipal supply purposes was terminated in 1991 in favor of obtaining water from the Sabetha municipal water system. Investigations of the carbon tetrachloride and nitrate contamination by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in 1989, 1994, and 1996 (KDHE 1989; GeoCore 1994a-e, 1996) identified a localized plume of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater extending downgradient from a grain storage facility located in the northwestern section of Morrill. The facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), from 1950 to 1971. Since termination of the CCC/USDA grain storage operations in 1971, the property and existing grain bins have been used for private grain storage up to the present time. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants were commonly used by the CCC/USDA, as well as private and commercial grain storage operations, to preserve grain. Because the identified carbon tetrachloride contamination could in part be linked to historical use of carbon tetrachloride

  13. Vistazos Intimos De Puebla; Una Compilacion De Informes Individuales Preparados Por Los Participantes Del Instituto De Verano (NDEA) (Close-ups on Puebla; A Compilation of Individual Reports Prepared by the Participants of the NDEA Summer Institute).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichita State Univ., KS.

    The individual and committee reports on the sociology of Puebla, Mexico, which are collected here, were written by participants in an NDEA Summer Institute program of the University of Wichita, Kansas. The underlying motives of the program, described in the preface, were to provide participants with real language experience and a chance to…

  14. Simulation of canal and control-pond operation at the Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, south-central Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Efficient water management of the Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, located in the Rattlesnake Creek Basin of south-central Kansas, is a complicated task. In a...

  15. Ground-water quality in quaternary deposits of the central high plains aquifer, south-central Kansas, 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Water samples from 20 randomly selected domestic water-supply wells completed in the Quaternary deposits of south-central Kansas were collected as part of the High...

  16. National Rural Health Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... History of Rural Health Globalization Urban Bias Dependency Theory Political Economy History of Rural Health IV: '60s ... Data Grassroots Action Center Policy Documents Legislative and Regulatory Agenda Medicaid News Response to 2013 OIG CAH ...

  17. Rural Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and International Patterns , the authors found that rural American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth have a higher mortality rate than their urban counterparts. Additionally, the rate of substance abuse admissions was higher for rural AI/AN ...

  18. El sector rural y el plan de desarrollo The rural sector in the Development Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado C. Absalón

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available El diagnostico del Plan de desarrollo sobre los problemas rurales desconoce los avances logrados por la Mision Rural durante 1996-1997 en la precision de la problematica rural y el las propuestas para resolverla. El diagnostico es muy parcial y de corte economicista y sus propuestas son imprecisas e insuficientes. No profundiza el analisis de las causa de la crisis y se limita a aceptar los hechos. Menciona diversos temas como -financiacion del sector rural, reforma agraria, pobreza y desarrollo rural, investigacion y transferencia de tecnologia, problematica social y de desarrollo institucional- pero no los desarrolla y no aclara a los actores cual sera el horizonte en deben actuar, de modo que sus expectativas sobre el futuro y sus desiciones de inversion estaran llenos de incertidumbre.The diagnosis of rural problems in the Development Plan ignores the advanees achieved by the Rural Mission in 1996-1997 in the specification of the rural problematic and in the proposals to resolve it. The diagnosis is very partial and economistic and its proposals are imprecise and insufficient. It does not analyze in depth the causes of the crisis and is limited to accepting the facts. It mentions diverse topics -financing of the rural sector, agrarian reform, poverty and rural development, research and technology transfer, social problems and institutional development- but it does not develop them and does not clarify for the actors involved in what horizon they must act, and therefore their expectations about the future and their investment decisions will be full of uncertainty.

  19. Water-quality variability and constituent transport and processes in streams of Johnson County, Kansas, using continuous monitoring and regression models, 2003-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Teresa; Gatotho, Jackline

    2014-01-01

    The population of Johnson County, Kansas increased by about 24 percent between 2000 and 2012, making it one of the most rapidly developing areas of Kansas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program, began a comprehensive study of Johnson County streams in 2002 to evaluate and monitor changes in stream quality. The purpose of this report is to describe water-quality variability and constituent transport for streams representing the five largest watersheds in Johnson County, Kansas during 2003 through 2011. The watersheds ranged in urban development from 98.3 percent urban (Indian Creek) to 16.7 percent urban (Kill Creek). Water-quality conditions are quantified among the watersheds of similar size (50.1 square miles to 65.7 square miles) using continuous, in-stream measurements, and using regression models developed from continuous and discrete data. These data are used to quantify variability in concentrations and loads during changing streamflow and seasonal conditions, describe differences among sites, and assess water quality relative to water-quality standards and stream management goals. Water quality varied relative to streamflow conditions, urbanization in the upstream watershed, and contributions from wastewater treatment facilities and storm runoff. Generally, as percent impervious surface (a measure of urbanization) increased, streamflow yield increased. Water temperature of Indian Creek, the most urban site which is also downstream from wastewater facility discharges, was higher than the other sites about 50 percent of the time, particularly during winter months. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were less than the Kansas Department of Health and Environment minimum criterion of 5 milligrams per liter about 15 percent of the time at the Indian Creek site. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were less than the criterion about 10 percent of the time at the rural Blue River and Kill Creek sites, and less than

  20. Rural Education Issues: Rural Administrators Speak Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julia; Nierengarten, Gerry

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the issues that most affect Minnesota's rural public school administrators as they attempt to fulfill the mandates required from state legislation and communities. A second purpose was to identify exemplary practices valued by individual Minnesota rural schools and districts. Electronic surveys were sent…

  1. Do Rural Students Really Perform Worse than Urban Students Do? Empirical Evidence from a University Entrance Program in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-An; Chang, Hung-Hao; Wang, Jiun-Hao; Horng, Tai-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    Despite a major expansion in the number of students in higher education, students from rural areas continue to be underrepresented at selective universities. To reduce the urban-rural imbalance of entry to selective universities, institutions in many countries of the world have implemented admission policies favoring rural students. Previous…

  2. Medicare and Rural Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1.9 million rural beneficiaries participated in Medicare Advantage (MA) and other prepaid plans, accounting for 13.4% of MA enrollees. While rural participation is not proportionate to urban participation, strong rural enrollment in ... Medicare Advantage – The ACA reduces the payments to companies providing ...

  3. 小农水治理对农村社会管理制度的嵌入性--以人民公社制度和“乡政村治”制度为例%The embeddedness of the governance of small irrigation facilities in the rural social management institution:A case study of the People’s Commune and the“Township governing with villagers’ autonomy”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜威漩

    2016-01-01

    小农水治理对农村社会管理制度的嵌入性是指小农水治理嵌入农村社会管理制度之中,即小农水治理与农村社会管理制度相联系并受农村社会管理制度影响。人民公社制度下,人民公社及村级基层组织拥有的强大农村社会动员及农村公共事务管理功能有效提升了小农水治理绩效;但人民公社制度本身的缺陷使小农水治理中诸如集体行动困境等问题并未完全解决。“乡政村治”制度下,乡镇政府及村级基层组织农村社会动员及农村公共事务管理功能的弱化导致了小农水“建”“管”“用”陷入困境,但随着“乡政村治”制度的不断完善,其对小农水治理的积极影响必将充分展现。只有重构农村社会管理制度环境:构建财政支持小农水治理的长效投入机制、长效激励机制及有效监督机制以强化小农水治理中的国家力量,实现乡镇政府、村级基层组织治水功能的制度创新以强化小农水治理中的乡村基层组织力量,构建农民参与的市场引导机制、组织引领机制和精神激励机制以强化小农水治理中的农民力量;才能实现新时代背景下的小农水善治。%The embeddedness of governance of small irrigation water facilities in the rural social management institution is that the governance of small irrigation water facilities is embedded in the rural social management institution, namely the governance of small-scale irrigation water facilities is associated with and affected by the rural social management institution. The strong function of rural social mobilization and the rural public affairs management which People’s communes and village-level organizations had under the institution of People’s commune effectively improved the governance performance of small-scale irrigation water facilities;but the problem such as collective action dilemma in the governance of small

  4. EARLY CHILDHOOD MENTAL HEALTH CONSULTATION: AN EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVENESS IN A RURAL COMMUNITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuyk, M Alexandra; Sprague-Jones, Jessica; Reed, Christie

    2016-01-01

    Little research has been done to evaluate the effectiveness of early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) in rural, applied settings. In this mixed-methods study, we evaluated an approach to ECMHC used in rural Southwest Kansas with individualized services for childcare providers. Twenty-nine home-based and center-based childcare providers completed measures on provider growth, perceptions of child outcomes, and satisfaction with sessions. In total, 162 data points were collected and analyzed using multilevel growth models. In addition, 16 providers participated in qualitative interviews. Both home-based and center-based providers reported very high satisfaction with consultation sessions which increased with time, although home-based providers showed significantly higher satisfaction than did center-based providers. Provider growth, encompassing personal well-being, scheduling and transitions, connections with parents, and positive discipline strategies increased significantly over time. Child outcomes, encompassing prosocial behavior, resilience, and overall well-being also improved significantly in providers' perception. ECMHC as conducted in Southwest Kansas appears to have a positive effect on childcare providers and the children in their care. © 2015 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  5. Institutional Awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlvik, Carina; Boxenbaum, Eva

    Drawing on dual-process theory and mindfulness research this article sets out to shed light on the conditions that need to be met to create “a reflexive shift in consciousness” argued to be a key foundational mechanism for agency in institutional theory. Although past research has identified...... different exogenous triggers to evoke shifts in consciousness, such as conflicting logics or socio-economic shocks, we argue that a reflexive shift in consciousness can also be cultivated by developing mindfulness. We develop a typology to depict conditions that need to be met to enable a reflexive shift...

  6. Institutional Investors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkmose, Hanne Søndergaard; Strand, Therese

    Research Question/Issue: Institutional investors are facing increased pressure and threats of legislation from the European Union to abandon passive ownership strategies. This study investigates the prerequisites for – and potential dissimilarities in the practice of, active ownership among......, as such a setup transfers power from the board to the owners. Presumably, this reduces the impact of free rider and collective action problems, and increases the shareholders’ inclination to make proposals, which is also what we find. Theoretical/Academic Implications: We contribute to literature by investigating...

  7. Annual report of monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2011.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2012-07-03

    Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha (Figure 1.1). The population of Morrill as of the 2010 Census was approximately 230 (down from 277 in 2000). All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. The findings of the April 2011 and October 2011 monitoring events at Morrill support the following conclusions: (1) Groundwater flow during the 2011 review period (as in prior years) was predominantly to the south, from the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility toward Terrapin Creek. Automatic water level monitoring data suggest that spring precipitation and recharge represent the predominant factors affecting the local groundwater level patterns. (2) No significant changes were observed in the concentration or distribution of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater during the spring and fall 2011 monitoring events versus the spring and fall 2010 monitoring events. In October 2011, a maximum carbon tetrachloride concentration of 49 {micro}g/L was identified in groundwater at well MW3S on the former CCC/USDA facility, with concentrations decreasing downgradient toward Terrapin Creek. (3) Since 2004, the accumulated results of 15 sampling events have demonstrated a significant decline in the maximum detected concentration of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater. In 1995, the contaminant was detected at the former CCC/USDA facility at 390 {micro}g/L, while the current maximum levels are < 50 {micro}g/L. The residual contaminant plume extending from the former CCC/USDA facility southward toward Terrapin Creek is well-defined and slowly declining in concentration naturally

  8. Rupture process of the Milan, Kansas Earthquake of November 12, 2014 (M4.9) and Its Relationship to Fluid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, G. L.; Rubinstein, J. L.; Yeck, W.; McNamara, D. E.; Mueller, C. S.; Boyd, O. S.

    2016-12-01

    From 1974-2012, Kansas had experienced only 15 earthquakes of M>3.0, a rate of less than one earthquake every two years. In 2014 and 2015 the number of earthquakes (M≥3.0) was 108. These events were located almost exclusively in Harper and Sumner counties, a region in southern Kansas where wastewater injection from oil and gas extraction operations had dramatically increased starting about 2010. The largest recorded earthquake in Kansas (Mw 4.9) occurred northeast of Milan on November 12, 2014 in a region previously devoid of such large events. Applying multi-station processing to data from a local seismic network, we are able to detail the rupture process, rupture geometry and stress drop ( 1.7 MPa) of the main shock. The first-month aftershocks define a well-delineated zone which aligns with the NS nodal plane of the USGS/COMCAT focal mechanism. The causative fault plane is inferred to be an extension of the Nemaha fault zone. The first-year aftershocks expand well beyond the original rupture zone. Characteristics of this earthquake that are shared by other earthquakes induced by fluid injection into permeable formations overlying crystalline basement include: (1) the unprecedented occurrence of earthquakes in a previously near-aseismic region; (2) wastewater injection wells in the vicinity (about 10-20 km) of the main-shock epicenter; (3) seismicity following episodes of increased fluid injection; and (4) a geological structure that could be activated by changes in pore pressure and hydraulic connectivity. Pockets of seismicity at the extremities of the rupture zone suggest stress may have been transferred to the ends of the fault implying some seismic hazard remains. In assessing seismic hazard, an empirical formula from the Electric Power Institute (EPRI) that uses felt area to estimate moment magnitude is often applied to historical earthquakes. This earthquake provides an opportunity to test the efficacy of that formula. The earthquake had been felt as far

  9. Estimates of Median Flows for Streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    The Kansas State Legislature, by enacting Kansas Statute KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., mandated the criteria for determining which Kansas stream segments would be subject to classification by the State. One criterion for the selection as a classified stream segment is based on the statistic of median flow being equal to or greater than 1 cubic foot per second. As specified by KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., median flows were determined from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging-station data by using the most-recent 10 years of gaged data (KSA) for each streamflow-gaging station. Median flows also were determined by using gaged data from the entire period of record (all-available hydrology, AAH). Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating median flows for uncontrolled stream segments. The drainage area of the gaging stations on uncontrolled stream segments used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. A logarithmic transformation of the data was needed to develop the best linear relation for computing median flows. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. Tobit analyses of KSA data yielded a model standard error of prediction of 0.285 logarithmic units, and the best equations using Tobit analyses of AAH data had a model standard error of prediction of 0.250 logarithmic units. These regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute median flows for the uncontrolled stream segments on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Measured median flows from gaging stations were incorporated into the regression-estimated median flows along the stream segments where available. The segments that were uncontrolled were interpolated using gaged data weighted according to the drainage area and the bias between the

  10. Final corrective action study for the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-04-20

    Past operations at a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Ramona, Kansas, resulted in low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater that slightly exceed the regulatory standard in only one location. As requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the CCC/USDA has prepared a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address groundwater impacted by the former CCC/USDA facility but not releases caused by other potential groundwater contamination sources in Ramona. Four remedial alternatives were considered in the CAS. The recommended remedial alternative in the CAS consists of Environmental Use Control to prevent the inadvertent use of groundwater as a water supply source, coupled with groundwater monitoring to verify the continued natural improvement in groundwater quality. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) has directed Argonne National Laboratory to prepare a Corrective Action Study (CAS), consistent with guidance from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2001a), for the CCC/USDA grain storage facility formerly located in Ramona, Kansas. This effort is pursuant to a KDHE (2007a) request. Although carbon tetrachloride levels at the Ramona site are low, they remain above the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L (Kansas 2003, 2004). In its request for the CAS, the KDHE (2007a) stated that, because of these levels, risk is associated with potential future exposure to contaminated groundwater. The KDHE therefore determined that additional measures are warranted to limit future use of the property and/or exposure to contaminated media as part of site closure. The KDHE further requested comparison of at least two corrective

  11. Tourism participation of rural communities at the heritage sites in the perspective of institutional embeddedness: A comparative study of Yaotang village and Duanshi village in the Danxia Mountain%遗产地农村社区参与旅游发展的制度嵌入性——丹霞山瑶塘村与断石村比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王华; 郑艳芬

    2016-01-01

    in the case studies of two typical tourism communities in the Danxia Mountain,the only World Natural Heritage Site in Guangdong province.The two communities,which are located within the scenic spot and are adjacent to each other,have manifested different modes of decisionmaking in tourism participation while sharing a similar development background in the past three decades.The result shows that the decision-making behaviors of community subjects are rational choices embedded into multilayer institutions,which,generally speaking,include formal institutions like policies and legislation made by the government departments and the concrete destination management institutions,and informal institutions such as the clan culture,community group decision rules,folk rules,perception of fair value and many other traditional views and concepts.Particularly,the paper reveals that the difference of informal institutions existing in the two communities is the main reason for the different modes of decision making in tourism participation process,which significantly affects the benefits the local residents could receive from tourism.It is notable that the effective embeddedness of external formal institutions plays a key role in coordinating the relationship between heritage site development and community development when the internal informal institutions of the local community turn out disembedding.Finally,the paper indicates that the theory of institutional embeddedness facilitates an in-depth analysis of the different modes of tourism participation of rural communities,which provides a significant insight for both the government departments and the industrial sectors to institution design for engaging community participation in tourism development.

  12. Afifi Mohammad, Chih Rachida, Marino Brigitte, Michel Nicolas et Tamdogan Isik (ed., Sociétés rurales ottomanes, Ottoman Rural Societies, Institut français d’archéologie orientale, 2005, Le Caire, Cahier des Annales islamologiques 25-2005.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette Establet

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Dans l’introduction, Nicolas Michel part d’une constatation : dans la seconde moitié du xxe siècle, l’éloignement des problématiques marxistes (stade féodal, mode de production asiatique a entraîné un reflux sensible des études rurales dans le domaine ottoman.  Cette évolution est propre à l’histoire ottomane : depuis quelques années, en effet, des historiens britanniques, français, allemands, se sont penchés sur l’étude des campagnes en tant que telles, non pas pour en intégrer l’histoire d...

  13. Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  14. Preliminary survey of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitizing wild turkeys (Aves: Phasianidae) in eastern Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, D E; Applegate, R D; Fox, L B

    2001-01-01

    During the spring and fall turkey hunting seasons of 1999, hunters and Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks field personnel examined wild turkeys, Meleagris gallopavo L., for ticks and submitted them to us for identification. From springtime hunting, we received 113 ticks from 12 turkeys killed in nine counties, all in the eastern one-third of Kansas. Collectors reported examining three additional wild turkeys on which no ticks were found. All ticks were nymphal lone star ticks, Amblyomma americanum (L.). Of 11 wild turkeys examined in seven counties during October, one was parasitized by 30 A. americanum larvae. Data from this study and accounts from the published literature suggest that parasitism of wild turkeys by immature lone star ticks is commonplace wherever this host and ectoparasite are sympatric. Our study suggests that M. gallopavo may be an important host that supports lone star tick populations.

  15. Bothriocephalus acheilognathi and other intestinal helminths of Cyprinella lutrensis in Deep Creek, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, Rebecca R.; Bouska, Wesley W.; Campbell, Scott W.; Paukert, Craig P.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the intestinal parasites of a wild fish population in a Kansas stream to determine the prevalence and abundance of potentially harmful parasites. In total, 180 red shiners (Cyprinella lutrensis) were collected from 6 sites in October-November 2007. Fifteen Asian tapeworms (Bothriocephalus acheilognathi) were recovered from 13 fish (prevalence of 7.2%). Prevalence did not differ among sites; however, B. acheilognathi abundance was greatest at the site of a public fishing area. A total of 39 roundworms (Rhabdochona canadensis) were recovered from 28 fish (prevalence of 15.6%). Prevalence did not differ among sites, nor did abundance. However, mean abundance tended to be about 50% greater at the site of a public fishing area compared to all other sites. This paper documents the presence of both B. acheilognathi and R. canadensis in Kansas and offers a compilation of the known potential impacts these parasites may have on the native, federally endangered Topeka shiner (Notropis topeka).

  16. 1972 preliminary safety analysis report based on a conceptual design of a proposed repository in Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomeke, J.O.

    1977-08-01

    This preliminary safety analysis report is based on a proposed Federal Repository at Lyons, Kansas, for receiving, handling, and depositing radioactive solid wastes in bedded salt during the remainder of this century. The safety analysis applies to a hypothetical site in central Kansas identical to the Lyons site, except that it is free of nearby salt solution-mining operations and bore holes that cannot be plugged to Repository specifications. This PSAR contains much information that also appears in the conceptual design report. Much of the geological-hydrological information was gathered in the Lyons area. This report is organized in 16 sections: considerations leading to the proposed Repository, design requirements and criteria, a description of the Lyons site and its environs, land improvements, support facilities, utilities, different impacts of Repository operations, safety analysis, design confirmation program, operational management, requirements for eventually decommissioning the facility, design criteria for protection from severe natural events, and the proposed program of experimental investigations. (DLC)

  17. Streamflow characteristics and trends at selected streamgages in southwest and south-central Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2016-01-11

    Historical data for nine selected streamgages in southwest and south-central Kansas were used in an assessment of streamflow characteristics and trends. This information is required by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism to assist with the effective management of Etheostoma cragini (Arkansas darter) habitats and populations in the State. Changing streamflow conditions, such as a reduction or elimination of streamflow, may adversely affect the Arkansas darter. Priority basins for the Arkansas darter represented by the selected streamgages include the Cimarron River, Rattlesnake Creek, the North Fork Ninnescah River, the South Fork Ninnescah River, the Medicine Lodge River, and the Chikaskia River.

  18. Streamflow characteristics and trends at selected streamgages in southwest and south-central Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2016-01-11

    Historical data for nine selected streamgages in southwest and south-central Kansas were used in an assessment of streamflow characteristics and trends. This information is required by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism to assist with the effective management of Etheostoma cragini (Arkansas darter) habitats and populations in the State. Changing streamflow conditions, such as a reduction or elimination of streamflow, may adversely affect the Arkansas darter. Priority basins for the Arkansas darter represented by the selected streamgages include the Cimarron River, Rattlesnake Creek, the North Fork Ninnescah River, the South Fork Ninnescah River, the Medicine Lodge River, and the Chikaskia River.

  19. Hydrology of Prairie Dog Creek Valley, Norton Dam to state line, north-central Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stullken, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    Development of water resources has been a major factor in the economy of Prairie Dog Creek Valley in north-central Kansas. Releases from Norton Reservoir to the Almena Irrigation District averaged 6,900 acre-feet per year during 1967-76. The number of irrigation wells increased from 4 to 147 during 1947-78. Ground water in the valley is derived mostly from the alluvial aquifer. The effects of irrigation on the aquifer are indicated by water-level changes. The water in storage increased from 130,000 to 136,000 acre-feet during 1947-78 due to recharge from surface-water irrigation. A steady-state model of the aquifer prior to irrigation (1947) indicated that most recharge was from precipitation (88 percent) and most discharge was to streams (54 percent) and reparian transpiration (26 percent). Although aquifer storage increased in this area, storage generally decreased in other areas of western Kansas. (USGS)

  20. Managing Diversity In The Midst Of Homogeneity: Lessons Learned In Rural Service Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Holton

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Rural areas are known for their homogeneity. Although cultures in different rural areas are often distinct and even unique, the culture within a given rural area is often easily characterized by one skin color, one language, one set of morays, and one mindset toward governmental institutions. Service Learning combines real academic learning in a community service setting. Are some diversity issues pandemic across rural areas?  How do these issues impact Service Learning programs in rural areas and how can even remote places like Alaska benefit from the lessons learned?

  1. Rural Land Capitalization and Peasants’ Income Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Ye

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Up to present, China is still represented by a typical dual society separated by both urban and rural concepts, and the income gap between the two is tending to enlarge. The low agricultural productivity and peasants’ insufficient labor skills result in slender incomes in their business, wage and transfer activities, with improvement though, which does not help to narrow the gap. Therefore, it is essential for peasants to acquire property income by means of rural land capitalization. In recent years, China has increased efforts to protect the property rights of rural land. However, there still exist multiple institutional barriers that prevent land from enforcing its capitalization feature, and shall be broken through at the shortest delay, so as to awaken the “Sleeping Capital”.

  2. Rural territorial dynamics in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Chiriboga

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article draws from the preliminary findings of an ongoing appliedresearch program on rural territorial dynamics carried out by the Latin American Center for Rural Development (RIMISP. The article provides some initial findings on 4 territories, of the 11 territories that are part of the overall study. The case studies include the island of Chiloé in southern Chile, the province of Tungurahua in Ecuador, a dairy farm region of Santo Tomás Nicaragua and Cuatro Lagunas near Cuzco Perú. Rural areas in Latin America are characterized by their dual nature with agro-exporting enclaves linked to global value chains alongside impoverished peasant economies, leading to differentiated policy recommendations. The research attempts to find relationships between reduced poverty and inequality in winning regions, measured by three variables, with issues of access to resources, human capital, political empowerment, markets and institutions, with particular attention to innovative social coalitions.

  3. Logistic and linear regression model documentation for statistical relations between continuous real-time and discrete water-quality constituents in the Kansas River, Kansas, July 2012 through June 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Guy M.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2016-04-06

    The Kansas River is a primary source of drinking water for about 800,000 people in northeastern Kansas. Source-water supplies are treated by a combination of chemical and physical processes to remove contaminants before distribution. Advanced notification of changing water-quality conditions and cyanobacteria and associated toxin and taste-and-odor compounds provides drinking-water treatment facilities time to develop and implement adequate treatment strategies. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Kansas Water Office (funded in part through the Kansas State Water Plan Fund), and the City of Lawrence, the City of Topeka, the City of Olathe, and Johnson County Water One, began a study in July 2012 to develop statistical models at two Kansas River sites located upstream from drinking-water intakes. Continuous water-quality monitors have been operated and discrete-water quality samples have been collected on the Kansas River at Wamego (USGS site number 06887500) and De Soto (USGS site number 06892350) since July 2012. Continuous and discrete water-quality data collected during July 2012 through June 2015 were used to develop statistical models for constituents of interest at the Wamego and De Soto sites. Logistic models to continuously estimate the probability of occurrence above selected thresholds were developed for cyanobacteria, microcystin, and geosmin. Linear regression models to continuously estimate constituent concentrations were developed for major ions, dissolved solids, alkalinity, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus species), suspended sediment, indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, fecal coliform, and enterococci), and actinomycetes bacteria. These models will be used to provide real-time estimates of the probability that cyanobacteria and associated compounds exceed thresholds and of the concentrations of other water-quality constituents in the Kansas River. The models documented in this report are useful for characterizing changes

  4. A model technology transfer program for independent operators: Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program. The original Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) activities, upon which the KTTM is based, were developed and tested for Kansas and have proved to be effective in assisting independent operators in utilizing technology. Through joint activities of TORP and the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), the KTTM was developed and documented for application in other oil-producing regions. During the course of developing this model, twelve documents describing the implementation of the KTTM were developed as deliverables to DOE. These include: (1) a problem identification (PI) manual describing the format and results of six PI workshops conducted in different areas of Kansas, (2) three technology workshop participant manuals on advanced waterflooding, reservoir description, and personal computer applications, (3) three technology workshop instructor manuals which provides instructor material for all three workshops, (4) three technologies were documented as demonstration projects which included reservoir management, permeability modification, and utilization of a liquid-level acoustic measuring device, (5) a bibliography of all literature utilized in the documents, and (6) a document which describes the KTTM.

  5. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY IN MISSISSIPPIAN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS OF KANSAS--NEAR TERM--CLASS 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy R. Carr; Don W. Green; G. Paul Willhite

    1999-06-01

    This annual report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  6. Quality of diabetes care for adults with physical disabilities in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Amanda; Stolzle, Hayley; Sella, Ana Carolina; Shireman, Theresa I

    2012-01-01

    Similar to health disparities found among racial and ethnic minority groups, individuals with physical disabilities experience a greater risk for diabetes than those without disabilities. The purpose of this works was to assess Kansas Medicaid data to determine the quality of diabetic care and the level to which individuals with physical disabilities' prevention and diabetes management needs are being met. We selected a continuously eligible cohort of adults (ages 18 and older) with physical disabilities who had diabetes and received medical benefits through Kansas Medicaid. We examined their quality of care measures (screening for HbA1c/glucose, cholesterol, and eye exams; and, primary care visits) in the succeeding year. Using unconditional logistic regression, we assessed the measures for quality of care as they related to demographic variables and comorbid hypertension. Thirty-nine percent of the 9,532 adults with physical disabilities had diabetes. They had the following testing rates: HbA1c, 82.7%; cholesterol, 51.5%; and eye examinations, 86.8%. Females, those with dual eligibility, and those with comorbid hypertension had higher rates for all types of screenings and primary care visits. Those living in MUAs had a higher screening rate for cholesterol. Adults with physical disabilities supported by Kansas Medicaid received diabetes quality indicator screenings have better diabetes quality of care rates for 3 out of 4 measures than nationally published figures for Medicaid. These findings point to a strong quality of care programs in Kansas for this population; however an imperative next step is to determine how effectively this population is managing their blood sugar levels day-to-day. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Kansas environmental and resource study: A Great Plains model, tasks 1-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralick, R. M.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Morain, S. A.; Yarger, H. L. (Principal Investigator); Ulaby, F. T.; Shanmugam, K. S.; Williams, D. L.; Mccauley, J. R.; Mcnaughton, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    There are no author identified significant results in this report. Environmental and resources investigations in Kansas utilizing ERTS-1 imagery are summarized for the following areas: (1) use of feature extraction techniqued for texture context information in ERTS imagery; (2) interpretation and automatic image enhancement; (3) water use, production, and disease detection and predictions for wheat; (4) ERTS-1 agricultural statistics; (5) monitoring fresh water resources; and (6) ground pattern analysis in the Great Plains.

  8. Separate process wastewaters, part A: Contaminated flow collection and treatment system for the Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) to assist the agency in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 as it applies to modification of ongoing groundwater treatment at DOE`s Kansas City Plant (KCP), located about 19 km (12 miles) south of the central business district of Kansas City, Missouri. The KCP is currently owned by DOE and is operated by the Kansas City Division of AlliedSignal Inc. The plant manufactures nonnuclear components for nuclear weapons. The purpose of and need for the DOE action is to treat identified toxic organic contaminated groundwater at the KCP to ensure that human health and the environment are protected and to comply with groundwater treatment requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) 3008(h) Administrative Order on Consent and the discharge requirements of the Kansas City, Missouri, ordinances for the city sewer system. Four source streams of toxic organic contaminated groundwater have been identified that require treatment prior to discharge to the city sewer system. The toxic organic contaminants of concern consist of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in the groundwater and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) predominantly associated with some soils near the Main Manufacturing Building. The no-action alternative is to continue with the current combination of treatment and nontreatment and to continue operation of the KCP groundwater treatment system in its current configuration at Building 97 (B97). The DOE proposed action is to collect and treat all identified toxic organic contaminated groundwater prior to discharge to the city sewer system. The proposed action includes constructing an Organics Collection System and Organics Treatment Building, moving and expanding the existing groundwater treatment system, and operating the new groundwater treatment facility.

  9. West Nile Virus Antibodies in Permanent Resident and Overwintering Migrant Birds in South-Central Kansas

    OpenAIRE

    Shelite, Thomas R.; Rogers, Christopher M.; Litzner, Brandon R.; Johnson, R. Roy; Schneegurt, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted serological studies, using epitope-blocking ELISAs directed at West Nile virus (WNV) and flavivirus antibodies, of wild birds in south-central Kansas, the first for this state, in the winters of 2003–04 through 2005–06. Overwintering migratory species (primarily the American tree sparrow and dark-eyed junco) consistently showed significantly lower seropositivity than permanent residents (primarily the northern cardinal). The cardinal showed annual variation in seropositivity betw...

  10. Stormwater Runoff: What it is and Why it is Important in Johnson County, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Schmidt, Heather C.

    2009-01-01

    Stormwater runoff is a leading contributor to pollution in streams, rivers, and lakes in Johnson County, Kansas, and nationwide. Because stormwater runoff contains pollutants from many different sources, decreasing pollution from stormwater runoff is a challenging task. It requires cooperation from residents, businesses, and municipalities. An important step in protecting streams from stormwater pollution is understanding watershed processes, stormwater characteristics, and their combined effects on streams and water quality.

  11. Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-Term -- Class 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Timothy R.; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-07-08

    This report describes progress during the third year of the project entitled ''Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas''. This project funded under the Department of Energy's Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and mid-continent. The project introduced a number of potentially useful technologies, and demonstrated these technologies in actual oil field operations. Advanced technology was tailored specifically to the scale appropriate to the operations of Kansas producers. An extensive technology transfer effort is ongoing. Traditional technology transfer methods (e.g., publications and workshops) are supplemented with a public domain relational database and an online package of project results that is available through the Internet. The goal is to provide the independent complete access to project data, project results and project technology on their desktop. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). The value of cost-effective techniques for reservoir characterization and simulation at Schaben Field were demonstrated to independent operators. All major operators at Schaben have used results of the reservoir management strategy to locate and drill additional infill locations. At the Schaben Demonstration Site, the additional locations resulted in incremental production increases of 200 BOPD from a smaller number of wells.

  12. Flexible DCP interface. [signal conditioning system for use with Kansas environmental sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemasu, E. T. (Principal Investigator); Schimmelpfenning, H.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A user of an ERTS data collection system must supply the sensors and signal conditioning interface. The electronic interface must be compatible with the NASA-furnished data collection platform (DCP). A universal signal conditioning system for use with a wide range of environmental sensors is described. The interface is environmentally and electronically compatible with the DCP and has operated satisfactorily for a complete winter wheat growing season in Kansas.

  13. 2003 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-04

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Kansas City Plant. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  14. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-01-27

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work that will be conducted to investigate the subsurface contaminant conditions at the property formerly leased by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) in Ramona, Kansas (Figure 1.1). Data obtained during this event will be used to (1) evaluate potential source areas on the property, (2) determine the vertical and horizontal extent of potential contamination, and (3) provide recommendations for future actions, with the ultimate goal of assigning this site No Further Action status. The planned investigation includes groundwater monitoring requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. Under the Intergovernmental Agreement, Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne has issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. The Master Work Plan was approved by the KDHE. It contains materials common to investigations at locations in Kansas and should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Ramona.

  15. Lapin koulutushistoria - Kirkollinen alkuopetus, kansa-, perus- ja oppikoulut, osa 1

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this research is to examine the history of elementary schools held by the Church as well as the history of primary schools, comprehensive schools and secondary schools in various municipalities in Lapland up to the end of school year 1998-99. This is a basic research. The examination proceeds from the founding of the first educational institution of each school type. The first itinerant catechists of Finland began teaching in Utsjoki in 1751. The first primary scho...

  16. Lapin koulutushistoria - Kirkollinen alkuopetus, kansa-, perus- ja oppikoulut, osa 2

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this research is to examine the history of elementary schools held by the Church as well as the history of primary schools, comprehensive schools and secondary schools in various municipalities in Lapland up to the end of school year 1998-99. This is a basic research. The examination proceeds from the founding of the first educational institution of each school type. The first itinerant catechists of Finland began teaching in Utsjoki in 1751. The first primary scho...

  17. Rural Entrepreneurship or Entrepreneurship in the Rural

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Steffen; Müller, Sabine; Tanvig, Hanne Wittorff

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article investigates how rural entrepreneurship engages with place and space. It explores the concept of “rural” in rural enterprise, and illustrates the importance of distinguishing between types of rural entrepreneurship. Design/methodology/approach: The constructs of “place” and ...... these processes are enabled and constrained by the immediate context or “place”. The paper weaves space and place in order to show the importance of context for entrepreneurship, which responds to the recent calls for contextualizing entrepreneurship research and theories....

  18. [Bases for the development of teaching, research and maternal and infant care in the rural area. The Temascalcingo plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso Yáñez, G; Ortega Espinosa, R; Hevia Rivas, P; García Romero, H

    1975-01-01

    The Instituto de Ensenanza e Investigaciones Rurales (Institute for Rural Training and Research) has been established in Solís, Municipality of Temascalcingo, State of Mexico. The institute is part of the Institucion Mexicana de Asistencia a la Ninez, IMAN (Mexican Institution for the Assistance of Childhood). The institute will study a system of healthy delivery in its (rural) zone of activity, based principally in programes with a strong content in the preventive and promotional aspects. For this purpose it will use in a preferential way, auxiliary and technical personnel which is being trained by the institute and that is original from the community where it will serve. At the professional level, the institute will mainly employ pediatricians, nurses and social workers that are completing their residency at the Hospital del Nino IMAN in Mexico City. These professional will obtain important supplementary training through their participation in the rural community health programes that the institute will develop.

  19. Pest status and distribution of the stem borer, Dectes texanus, in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschman, Lawrent L; Sloderbeck, Phillip E

    2010-01-01

    The Dectes stem borer, Dectes texanus LeConte (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is currently receiving increased attention as a pest of soybeans in the Great Plains of North America. Field surveys were conducted in 1999 and in 2008 to record the distribution of this pest in Kansas. These surveys documented an increase in the abundance of the pest and an expansion in the range of this insect westward and eastward. The percentage of fields with more than 50% of plants infested also increased from 4% in 1999 to 11% in 2008. The far eastern counties still had surprisingly few infested fields even though much of the Kansas soybean acreage is located in these counties. It is not clear if D. texanus simply haven't expanded into eastern Kansas yet or if there is an ecological barrier that keeps them from doing so. Field crop entomologists from across eastern North America were sent an email questionnaire and their responses indicate that this pest is now well established as a pest of soybeans in at least 14 states across eastern North America.

  20. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Leavenworth, Kansas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, R. M.

    1980-06-01

    The solar heating and cooling system installed at the headquarters of Citizens Mutual Savings Association in Leavenworth, Kansas, is described in detail. The project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's solar demonstration program and became operational in March, 1979. The designer was TEC, Inc. Consulting Engineers, Kansas City, Missouri and contractor was Norris Brothers, Inc., Lawrence, Kansas. The solar system is expected to furnish 90 percent of the overall heating load, 70 percent of the cooling load and 100 percent of the domestic hot water load. The building has two floors with a total of 12,000 square feet gross area. The system has 120 flat-plate liquid solar panels with a net area of 2200 square feet. Five, 3-ton Arkla solar assisted absorption units provide the cooling, in conjunction with a 3000 gallon chilled water storage tank. Two, 3000 gallon storage tanks are provided with one designated for summer use, whereas both tanks are utilized during winter.